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Sample records for chemokine c-c motif

  1. Andrographolide attenuates LPS-stimulated up-regulation of C-C and C-X-C motif chemokines in rodent cortex and primary astrocytes.

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    Wong, Siew Ying; Tan, Michelle G K; Banks, William A; Wong, W S Fred; Wong, Peter T-H; Lai, Mitchell K P

    2016-02-09

    Andrographolide is the major bioactive compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, a native South Asian herb used medicinally for its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we aimed to assess andrographolide's potential utility as an anti-neuroinflammatory therapeutic. The effects of andrographolide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chemokine up-regulation both in mouse cortex and in cultured primary astrocytes were measured, including cytokine profiling, gene expression, and, in cultured astrocytes, activation of putative signaling regulators. Orally administered andrographolide significantly attenuated mouse cortical chemokine levels from the C-C and C-X-C subfamilies. Similarly, andrographolide abrogated a range of LPS-induced chemokines as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in astrocytes. In astrocytes, the inhibitory actions of andrographolide on chemokine and TNF-α up-regulation appeared to be mediated by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. These results suggest that andrographolide may be useful as a therapeutic for neuroinflammatory diseases, especially those characterized by chemokine dysregulation.

  2. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 influences the development of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleens of myelofibrosis patients.

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    Wang, Xiaoli; Cho, Sool Yeon; Hu, Cing Siang; Chen, Daniel; Roboz, John; Hoffman, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by the constitutive mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal HSC/HPC trafficking pattern remain poorly understood. We demonstrated that both splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34(+) cells equally share a defective ability to home to the marrow, but not to the spleens, of NOD/LtSz-Prkdc(scid) mice. This trafficking pattern could not be attributed to discordant expression of integrins or chemokine receptors other than the downregulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 by both PB and splenic MF CD34(+) cells. The number of both splenic MF CD34(+) cells and HPCs that migrated toward splenic MF plasma was, however, significantly greater than the number that migrated toward PB MF plasma. The concentration of the intact HSC/HPC chemoattractant C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) was greater in splenic MF plasma than PB MF plasma, as quantified using mass spectrometry. Functionally inactive truncated products of CXCL12, which are the product of proteolytic degradation by serine proteases, were detected at similar levels in both splenic and PB MF plasma. Treatment with an anti-CXCL12 neutralizing antibody resulted in a reduction in the degree of migration of splenic MF CD34(+) cells toward both PB and splenic MF plasma, validating the role of CXCL12 as a functional chemoattractant. Our data indicate that the MF splenic microenvironment is characterized by increased levels of intact, functional CXCL12, which contributes to the localization of MF CD34(+) cells to the spleen and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2015 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) as an example of translation of cancer molecular biology to the clinic.

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    Zhang, Jian; Patel, Lalit; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are a family of small and secreted proteins that play pleiotropic roles in inflammation-related pathological diseases, including cancer. Among the identified 50 human chemokines, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) is of particular importance in cancer development since it serves as one of the key mediators of interactions between tumor and host cells. CCL2 is produced by cancer cells and multiple different host cells within the tumor microenvironment. CCL2 mediates tumorigenesis in many different cancer types. For example, CCL2 has been reported to promote prostate cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival, via binding to its functional receptor CCR2. Furthermore, CCL2 induces the recruitment of macrophages and induces angiogenesis and matrix remodeling. Targeting CCL2 has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic approach in preclinical prostate cancer models, and currently, neutralizing monoclonal antibody against CCL2 has entered into clinical trials in prostate cancer. In this chapter, targeting CCL2 in prostate cancer will be used as an example to show translation of laboratory findings from cancer molecular biology to the clinic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5-using envelopes predominate in dual/mixed-tropic HIV from the plasma of drug-naive individuals.

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    Irlbeck, David M; Amrine-Madsen, Heather; Kitrinos, Kathryn M; Labranche, Celia C; Demarest, James F

    2008-07-31

    HIV-1 utilizes CD4 and either chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) or chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) to gain entry into host cells. Small molecule CCR5 antagonists are currently being developed for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Because HIV-1 may also use CXCR4 for entry, the use of CCR5 entry inhibitors is controversial for patients harboring CCR5-using and CXCR4-using (dual/mixed-tropic) viruses. The goal of the present study was to determine the proportion of CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses in dual/mixed-tropic virus isolates from drug-naïve patients and the phenotypic and genotypic relationships of viruses that use CCR5 or CXCR4 or both. Fourteen antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients were identified as having population coreceptor tropism readout of dual/mixed-tropic viruses. Intrapatient comparisons of coreceptor tropism and genotype of env clones were conducted on plasma virus from each patient. Population HIV-1 envelope tropism and susceptibility to the CCR5 entry inhibitor, aplaviroc, were performed using the Monogram Biosciences Trofile Assay. Twelve env clones from each patient were analyzed for coreceptor tropism, aplaviroc sensitivity, genotype, and intrapatient phylogenetic relationships. Viral populations from antiretroviral-naive patients with dual/mixed-tropic virus are composed primarily of CCR5-tropic env clones mixed with those that use both coreceptors (R5X4-tropic) and, occasionally, CXCR4-tropic env clones. Interestingly, the efficiency of CXCR4 use by R5X4-tropic env clones varied with their genetic relationships to CCR5-tropic env clones from the same patient. These data show that the majority of viruses in these dual/mixed-tropic populations use CCR5 and suggest that antiretroviral-naive patients may benefit from combination therapy that includes CCR5 entry inhibitors.

  5. Skeletal muscle cell contraction reduces a novel myokine, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10): potential roles in exercise-regulated angiogenesis.

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    Ishiuchi, Yuri; Sato, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi; Nedachi, Taku

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that skeletal muscle secrets proteins referred to as myokines and that exercise contributes to their regulation. In this study, we propose that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) functions as a novel myokine. Initially, we stimulated differentiated C2C12 myotubes with or without electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to identify novel myokines. Cytokine array analysis revealed that CXCL10 secretion was significantly reduced by EPS, which was further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Treadmill experiments in mice identified significant reduction of Cxcl10 gene expression in the soleus muscle. Additionally, contraction-dependent p38 MAPK activation appeared to be involved in this reduction. Furthermore, C2C12 conditioned medium obtained after applying EPS could induce survival of MSS31, a vascular endothelial cell model, which was partially attenuated by the addition of recombinant CXCL10. Overall, our findings suggest CXCL10 as a novel exercise-reducible myokine, to control endothelial cell viability.

  6. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20, a potential biomarker for Graves' disease, is regulated by osteopontin.

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    Xiaoli Li

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD is a common autoimmune disease involving the thyroid gland. The altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GD. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20 is important for interleukin-17 (IL-17 signal activation and a potent chemoattractant for Th17 cells. Meanwhile, Osteopontin (OPN, a broadly expressed pleiotropic cytokine, has been implicated in GD through inducing Th1-involved response to enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but little is known about the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 and IL-17 signaling. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to explore the possibility of CCL20 level as a biomarker for GD, as well as investigate the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 production. METHODS: Fifty untreated GD patients, fifteen euthyroid GD patients, twelve TRAb-negative GD patients and thirty-five healthy control donors were recruited. OPN, CCL20 and other clinical GD diagnosis parameters were measured. CD4+T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using antibody-coated magnetic beads. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to determine CCL20 expression level. RESULTS: We found that the plasma CCL20 level was enhanced in GD patients and decreased in euthyroid and TRAb-negative GD patients. In addition, CCL20 level correlated with GD clinical diagnostic parameters and plasma OPN level. Moreover, we demonstrated that recombinant OPN and plasma from untreated GD patients increased the expression of CCL20 in CD4+T cells, which could be blocked by OPN antibody. Furthermore, we found that the effect of OPN on CCL20 expression was mediated by β3 integrin receptor, IL-17, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrated that CCL20 might serve as a biomarker for GD and suggested the possible role of OPN in induction of CCL20 expression.

  7. The Effect of C-X-C Motif Chemokine 13 on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associates with Wnt Signaling

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    Chunyan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objects. To investigate the effect of CXCL13 (C-X-C motif chemokine 13 on hepatocellular carcinoma and clarify the potential mechanisms. Methods. 32 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 healthy controls were recruited for analyzing the expression of CXCL13 by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. ELISA (enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay was used to test the concentration of serum CXCL13. The interaction between CXCL13 and Wnt signaling was analyzed by western blot. In vitro PBMCs cultured with HepG2 supernatant, the levels of IL-12, IL4, IL-6, and IL-17, and four IgG subclasses were detected by ELISA. Results. The rate of high expression CXCL13 was 63.4% in advanced HCC patients, and the serum CXCL13 was also at a high level in stage IV HCC patients. Meanwhile CXCL13 level was positively correlated with serum ALT (Alanine Transaminase and AST (Aspartate Aminotransferase. CXCL13 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling shared a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, CXCL13 could obviously promote the expressions of IL-12 and IL-17, and induce IgG4 secreted by B cells. Conclusions. The effect of CXCL13 on promoting liver cancer is related to the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the facilitation of IL-12, IL-17 and IgG4. CXCL13 plays an important role in the progression of HCC, and it may act as a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of HCC.

  8. Effects of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 on microglial function

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    Akimoto, Nozomi; Ifuku, Masataka; Mori, Yuki; Noda, Mami

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CCR8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia. •Expression of CCR-8 in microglia was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. •CCL-1 increased motility, proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. •CCL-1promoted BDNF and IL-6 mRNA, and the release of NO from microglia. •CCL-1 activates microglia and may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. -- Abstract: Microglia, which constitute the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), are generally considered as the primary immune cells in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial cells respond to various factors which are produced following nerve injury of multiple aetiologies and contribute to the development of neuronal disease. Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and is also produced in various cell types in the CNS, especially in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the role of CCL-1 in the CNS and the effects on microglia remains unclear. Here we showed the multiple effects of CCL-1 on microglia. We first showed that CCR-8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia, as well as on astrocytes and neurons, and was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. CCL-1 at concentration of 1 ng/ml induced chemotaxis, increased motility at a higher concentration (100 ng/ml), and increased proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. CCL-1 also activated microglia morphologically, promoted mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6, and increased the release of nitrite from microglia. These indicate that CCL-1 has a role as a mediator in neuron-glia interaction, which may contribute to the development of neurological diseases, especially in neuropathic pain

  9. Effects of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 on microglial function

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    Akimoto, Nozomi [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ifuku, Masataka [Laboratory of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Yuki [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Noda, Mami, E-mail: noda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •CCR8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia. •Expression of CCR-8 in microglia was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. •CCL-1 increased motility, proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. •CCL-1promoted BDNF and IL-6 mRNA, and the release of NO from microglia. •CCL-1 activates microglia and may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. -- Abstract: Microglia, which constitute the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), are generally considered as the primary immune cells in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial cells respond to various factors which are produced following nerve injury of multiple aetiologies and contribute to the development of neuronal disease. Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and is also produced in various cell types in the CNS, especially in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the role of CCL-1 in the CNS and the effects on microglia remains unclear. Here we showed the multiple effects of CCL-1 on microglia. We first showed that CCR-8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia, as well as on astrocytes and neurons, and was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. CCL-1 at concentration of 1 ng/ml induced chemotaxis, increased motility at a higher concentration (100 ng/ml), and increased proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. CCL-1 also activated microglia morphologically, promoted mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6, and increased the release of nitrite from microglia. These indicate that CCL-1 has a role as a mediator in neuron-glia interaction, which may contribute to the development of neurological diseases, especially in neuropathic pain.

  10. Serum C-X-C motif chemokine 13 is elevated in early and established rheumatoid arthritis and correlates with rheumatoid factor levels.

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    Jones, Jonathan D; Hamilton, B JoNell; Challener, Gregory J; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur J; Cossette, Pierre; Liang, Patrick; Masetto, Ariel; Ménard, Henri A; Carrier, Nathalie; Boyle, David L; Rosengren, Sanna; Boire, Gilles; Rigby, William F C

    2014-04-25

    We hypothesized that serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13), a B-cell chemokine, would delineate a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients characterized by increased humoral immunity. Serum from patients with established RA (the Dartmouth RA Cohort) was analyzed for CXCL13, rheumatoid factor (RF) levels, anticitrullinated peptide/protein antibody (ACPA) and total immunoglobulin G (IgG); other parameters were obtained by chart review. A confirmatory analysis was performed using samples from the Sherbrooke Early Undifferentiated PolyArthritis (EUPA) Cohort. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test, a t-test and Spearman's correlation analysis were utilized to determine relationships between variables. In both the Dartmouth and Sherbrooke cohorts, CXCL13 levels were selectively increased in seropositive relative to seronegative RA patients (P = 0.0002 and P < 0.0001 for the respective cohorts), with a strong correlation to both immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA RF levels (P < 0.0001). There was a weaker relationship to ACPA titers (P = 0.03 and P = 0.006, respectively) and total IgG (P = 0.02 and P = 0.14, respectively). No relationship was seen with regard to age, sex, shared epitope status or inclusion high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in either cohort or regarding the presence of baseline erosions in the Sherbrooke Cohort, whereas a modest relationship with Disease Activity Score in 28 joints CRP (DAS28-CRP) was seen in the Dartmouth cohort but not the Sherbrooke cohort. Using both established and early RA cohorts, marked elevations of serum CXCL13 levels resided nearly completely within the seropositive population. CXCL13 levels exhibited a strong relationship with RF, whereas the association with clinical parameters (age, sex, DAS28-CRP and erosions) or other serologic markers (ACPA and IgG) was either much weaker or absent. Elevated serum CXCL13 levels may identify a subset of seropositive RA patients whose disease is shaped by or responsive to RF

  11. High Levels of Chemokine C-C Motif Ligand 20 in Human Milk and Its Production by Oral Keratinocytes.

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    Lourenço, Alan G; Komesu, Marilena C; Duarte, Geraldo; Del Ciampo, Luiz A; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y

    2017-03-01

    Chemokine C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20) is implicated in the formation and function of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Although CCL20 is secreted by many normal human tissues, no studies have evaluated the presence of CCL20 in human milk or its production by oral keratinocytes stimulated by human milk. To evaluate the presence of CCL20 in breast milk and verify CCL20 secretion in vitro by oral keratinocytes stimulated with human and bovine milk, as well as its possible association with breast milk lactoferrin levels. The levels of CCL20 and lactoferrin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in human milk at three different stages of maturation from 74 healthy breastfeeding mothers. In vitro, oral keratinocytes were stimulated with human and bovine milk, and CCL20 was measured in their supernatant. High concentrations of CCL20 were detected in the human breast milk samples obtained during the first week (1,777.07 pg/mL) and second week postpartum (1,523.44 pg/mL), with a significantly low concentration in samples at 3-6 weeks postpartum (238.42 pg/mL; p stimulated higher CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes compared with bovine milk (p stimulation had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration. CCl20 is present at high levels in human milk, predominantly in the first and second week postpartum, but at significantly lower levels at 3-6 weeks postpartum. Human milk is capable of stimulating CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes, and this induction had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration.

  12. Molecular and functional roles of 6C CC chemokine 19 in defense system of striped murrel Channa striatus.

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    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Bhatt, Prasanth; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have reported the molecular information of chemokine-19 (Chem19) from striped murrel Channa striatus (Cs). CsCC-Chem19 cDNA sequence was 555 base pair (bp) in length which is 68bp 5' untranslated region (UTR), 339bp translated region and 149bp 3' UTR. The translated region is encoded for a polypeptide of 112 amino acids. CsCC-Chem19 peptide contains a signal sequence between 1 and 26 and an interleukin (IL) 8 like domain between 24 and 89. The multiple sequence alignment showed a 'DCCL' motif, an indispensable motif present in all CC chemokines which was conserved throughout the evolution. Phylogenetic tree showed that CsCC-Chem19 formed a cluster with chemokine 19 from fishes. Secondary structure of CsCC-Chem19 revealed that the peptide contains maximum amount of coils (61.6%) compared to α-helices (25.9%%) and β-sheet (12.5%). Further, 3D analysis indicated that the cysteine residues at 33, 34, 59 and 75 making the disulfide bridges as 33 = 59 and 34 = 75. Significantly (P coding region of CsCC-Chem19, recombinant CsCC-Chem19 protein was produced. The recombinant CsCC-Chem19 protein induced the cellular proliferation and respiratory burst activity of C. striatus peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the chemotactic activity showed that the recombinant CsCC-Chem19 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the movement of PBL of C. striatus. Conclusively, CsCC-Chem19 is a 6C CC chemokine having an ability to perform both inflammatory and homeostatic functions. However, further research is necessary to understand the potential of 6C CC chemokine 19 of C. striatus, particularly their regulatory ability on different cellular components in the defense system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identity and functions of CxxC-derived motifs.

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    Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2003-09-30

    Two cysteines separated by two other residues (the CxxC motif) are employed by many redox proteins for formation, isomerization, and reduction of disulfide bonds and for other redox functions. The place of the C-terminal cysteine in this motif may be occupied by serine (the CxxS motif), modifying the functional repertoire of redox proteins. Here we found that the CxxC motif may also give rise to a motif, in which the C-terminal cysteine is replaced with threonine (the CxxT motif). Moreover, in contrast to a view that the N-terminal cysteine in the CxxC motif always serves as a nucleophilic attacking group, this residue could also be replaced with threonine (the TxxC motif), serine (the SxxC motif), or other residues. In each of these CxxC-derived motifs, the presence of a downstream alpha-helix was strongly favored. A search for conserved CxxC-derived motif/helix patterns in four complete genomes representing bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes identified known redox proteins and suggested possible redox functions for several additional proteins. Catalytic sites in peroxiredoxins were major representatives of the TxxC motif, whereas those in glutathione peroxidases represented the CxxT motif. Structural assessments indicated that threonines in these enzymes could stabilize catalytic thiolates, suggesting revisions to previously proposed catalytic triads. Each of the CxxC-derived motifs was also observed in natural selenium-containing proteins, in which selenocysteine was present in place of a catalytic cysteine.

  14. Capillary arterialization requires the bone-marrow-derived cell (BMC)-specific expression of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-2, but BMCs do not transdifferentiate into microvascular smooth muscle.

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    Nickerson, Meghan M; Burke, Caitlin W; Meisner, Joshua K; Shuptrine, Casey W; Song, Ji; Price, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor-2 (CCR2) regulates arteriogenesis and angiogenesis, facilitating the MCP-1-dependent recruitment of growth factor-secreting bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the BMC-specific expression of CCR2 is also required for new arteriole formation via capillary arterialization. Following non-ischemic saphenous artery occlusion, we measured the following in gracilis muscles: monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6J mice by ELISA, and capillary arterialization in WT-WT and CCR2(-/-)-WT (donor-host) bone marrow chimeric mice, as well as BMC transdifferentiation in EGFP(+)-WT mice, by smooth muscle (SM) alpha-actin immunochemistry. MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated 1 day after occlusion in WT mice. In WT-WT mice at day 7, compared to sham controls, arterial occlusion induced a 34% increase in arteriole length density, a 46% increase in SM alpha-actin(+) vessels, and a 45% increase in the fraction of vessels coated with SM alpha-actin, indicating significant capillary arterialization. However, in CCR2(-/-)-WT mice, no differences were observed between arterial occlusion and sham surgery. In EGFP(+)-WT mice, EGFP and SM alpha-actin never colocalized. We conclude that BMC-specific CCR2 expression is required for skeletal muscle capillary arterialization following arterial occlusion; however, BMCs do not transdifferentiate into smooth muscle.

  15. Chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1 (CXCL1) protein expression is increased in aggressive bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Goodison, Steve; Urquidi, Virginia; Gomes-Giacoia, Evan; Zhang, Ge; Ross, Shanti; Kim, Jeongsoon; Rosser, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), may regulate tumor epithelial-stromal interactions that facilitate tumor growth and invasion. Studies have linked CXCL1 expression to gastric, colon and skin cancers, but limited studies to date have described CXCL1 protein expression in human bladder cancer (BCa). CXCL1 protein expression was examined in 152 bladder tissue specimens (142 BCa) by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of CXCL1 was scored by assigning a combined score based on the proportion of cells staining and intensity of staining. CXCL1 expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological features and follow-up data. CXCL1 protein expression was present in cancerous tissues, but was entirely absent in benign tissue. CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was significantly higher in high-grade tumors relative to low-grade tumors (p = 0.012). Similarly, CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was higher in high stage tumors (T2-T4) than in low stage tumors (Ta-T1) (p < 0.0001). An increase in the combined immunostaining score of CXCL1 was also associated with reduced disease-specific survival. To date, this is the largest study describing increased CXCL1 protein expression in more aggressive phenotypes in human BCa. Further studies are warranted to define the role CXCL1 plays in bladder carcinogenesis and progression

  16. C-C motif ligand 5 promotes migration of prostate cancer cells in the prostate cancer bone metastasis microenvironment.

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    Urata, Satoko; Izumi, Kouji; Hiratsuka, Kaoru; Maolake, Aerken; Natsagdorj, Ariunbold; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iwamoto, Hiroaki; Kadomoto, Suguru; Makino, Tomoyuki; Naito, Renato; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Wufuer, Guzailinuer; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Mizokami, Atsushi

    2018-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors have key roles in cancer progression. The present study investigated chemokine activity in the prostate cancer bone metastasis microenvironment. Growth and migration of human prostate cancer cells were assayed in cocultures with bone stromal cells. The migration of LNCaP cells significantly increased when co-cultured with bone stromal cells isolated from prostate cancer bone metastases. Cytokine array analysis of conditioned medium from bone stromal cell cultures identified CCL5 as a concentration-dependent promoter of LNCaP cell migration. The migration of LNCaP cells was suppressed when C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5) neutralizing antibody was added to cocultures with bone stromal cells. Knockdown of androgen receptor with small interfering RNA increased the migration of LNCaP cells compared with control cells, and CCL5 did not promote the migration of androgen receptor knockdown LNCaP. Elevated CCL5 secretion in bone stromal cells from metastatic lesions induced prostate cancer cell migration by a mechanism consistent with CCL5 activity upstream of androgen receptor signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Genetic polymorphism rs3760396 of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 gene (CCL2) associated with the susceptibility of lung cancer in a pathological subtype-specific manner in Han-ancestry Chinese: a case control study

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    Li, Xu; Lin, Fangcai; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are well known inflammatory factors critical for tumor development in diverse tissues, including lung cancer. Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 (CCL2) was one of such chemokines important for both primary tumor development and metastasis of various cancers. Polymorphism at rs3760396 of CCL2 genes is associated with the prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The goal of our study was to examine the relationship of genetic polymorphisms rs3760396 with the susceptibility of lung cancer and its pathological subtypes in Han-ancestry Chinese population. rs3760396 G/C polymorphism of CCL2 was genotyped using PCR in 394 patients with lung cancer and 545 cancer-free controls from the same Northeast region of China. After controlling for gender, age and smoking status, no significant association was observed between rs3760396 polymorphism and overall lung cancer. However, minor allele G of rs3760396 polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of adenosquamous lung carcinoma with either allelic genetic model (OR = 5.29, P < 0.001), or dominant genetic model (OR = 9.88, P < 0.001), or genotypic model (GC genotype vs. CC genotype, OR = 10.73, P < 0.001). Although rs3760396 polymorphism was not significantly associated with increased risk of adenocarcinoma subtype, it was nominally associated with the pooled outcome of either adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma under allelic genetic model (OR = 1.54, P = 0.023) or dominant genetic model (OR = 1.57, P = 0.031). Our study suggested rs3760396 polymorphism of CCL2 is associated not only with prognosis of NSCLC, but also with risk of lung cancer in a subtype-specific manner. Our results further supported previous evidence of the important role of CCL2 in lung cancer development

  18. HIV-1 Nef down-modulates C-C and C-X-C chemokine receptors via ubiquitin and ubiquitin-independent mechanism.

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    Prabha Chandrasekaran

    Full Text Available Human and Simian Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV encode an accessory protein, Nef, which is a pathogenesis and virulence factor. Nef is a multivalent adapter that dysregulates the trafficking of many immune cell receptors, including chemokine receptors (CKRs. Physiological endocytic itinerary of agonist occupied CXCR4 involves ubiquitinylation of the phosphorylated receptor at three critical lysine residues and dynamin-dependent trafficking through the ESCRT pathway into lysosomes for degradation. Likewise, Nef induced CXCR4 degradation was critically dependent on the three lysines in the C-terminal -SSLKILSKGK- motif. Nef directly recruits the HECT domain E3 ligases AIP4 or NEDD4 to CXCR4 in the resting state. This mechanism was confirmed by ternary interactions of Nef, CXCR4 and AIP4 or NEDD4; by reversal of Nef effect by expression of catalytically inactive AIP4-C830A mutant; and siRNA knockdown of AIP4, NEDD4 or some ESCRT-0 adapters. However, ubiquitinylation dependent lysosomal degradation was not the only mechanism by which Nef downregulated CKRs. Agonist and Nef mediated CXCR2 (and CXCR1 degradation was ubiquitinylation independent. Nef also profoundly downregulated the naturally truncated CXCR4 associated with WHIM syndrome and engineered variants of CXCR4 that resist CXCL12 induced internalization via an ubiquitinylation independent mechanism.

  19. Hybrid DNA i-motif: Aminoethylprolyl-PNA (pC5) enhance the stability of DNA (dC5) i-motif structure.

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    Gade, Chandrasekhar Reddy; Sharma, Nagendra K

    2017-12-15

    This report describes the synthesis of C-rich sequence, cytosine pentamer, of aep-PNA and its biophysical studies for the formation of hybrid DNA:aep-PNAi-motif structure with DNA cytosine pentamer (dC 5 ) under acidic pH conditions. Herein, the CD/UV/NMR/ESI-Mass studies strongly support the formation of stable hybrid DNA i-motif structure with aep-PNA even near acidic conditions. Hence aep-PNA C-rich sequence cytosine could be considered as potential DNA i-motif stabilizing agents in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysregulation of C-X-C motif ligand 10 during aging and association with cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradburn, Steven; McPhee, Jamie; Bagley, Liam; Carroll, Michael; Slevin, Mark; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Barnouin, Yoann; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Pääsuke, Mati; Gapeyeva, Helena; Maier, Andrea; Sipilä, Sarianna; Narici, Marco; Robinson, Andrew; Mann, David; Payton, Antony; Pendleton, Neil; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Murgatroyd, Chris

    2018-03-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation during aging (inflammaging) is associated with cognitive decline and neurodegeneration; however, the mechanisms underlying inflammaging are unclear. We studied a population (n = 361) of healthy young and old adults from the MyoAge cohort. Peripheral levels of C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) was found to be higher in older adults, compared with young, and negatively associated with working memory performance. This coincided with an age-related reduction in blood DNA methylation at specific CpGs within the CXCL10 gene promoter. In vitro analysis supported the role of DNA methylation in regulating CXCL10 transcription. A polymorphism (rs56061981) that altered methylation at one of these CpG sites further associated with working memory performance in 2 independent aging cohorts. Studying prefrontal cortex samples, we found higher CXCL10 protein levels in those with Alzheimer's disease, compared with aged controls. These findings support the association of peripheral inflammation, as demonstrated by CXCL10, in aging and cognitive decline. We reveal age-related epigenetic and genetic factors which contribute to the dysregulation of CXCL10. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of CXCL10 in pathogenesis of hepatitis C and antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Mi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Eradicating HCV can finally delay or prevent the progression of HCV infection to end-stage liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 is a chemokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family, and it exerts its function through binding to chemokine (C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3, playing a critical role in eradication of HCV. This article reviews the relationship of CXCL10 with the pathogenesis of HCV and the effectiveness of antiviral treatment, as well as the CXCL10 measurements. Meanwhile, this article introduces the clinical value of CXCL10 in assessing the risk of liver fibrosis and liver cancer. Further studies are needed to investigate the association between CXCL10 and liver diseases, and CXCL10 may provide a new therapeutic strategy for HCV infection.

  2. Immunomodulating activities of acidic sulphated polysaccharides obtained from the seaweed Ulva rigida C. Agardh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro, José M; Castro, Rosario; Arranz, Jon A; Lamas, Jesús

    2007-07-01

    Water-soluble acidic polysaccharides from the cell walls of Ulva rigida are mainly composed of disaccharides that contain glucuronic acid and sulphated rhamnose. The structure of disaccharides resembles that of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) as they both contain glucuronic acid and sulphated sugars. Glycosaminoglycans occur in the extracellular matrix of animal connective tissues but can also be produced by leucocytes at inflammatory sites. Certain types of GAGs can even activate macrophages and therefore the acidic polysaccharides from U. rigida probably modulate macrophage activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of U. rigida polysaccharides on several RAW264.7 murine macrophage activities, including expression of inflammatory cytokines and receptors, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression. U. rigida acidic polysaccharides induced a more than two-fold increase in the expression of several chemokines (chemokine (C motif) ligand 1, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 22 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (Cxcl14)) and in the expression of IL6 signal transducer and IL12 receptor beta 1. Incubation of macrophages with U. rigida polysaccharides also induced an increase in nitrite production, although this effect decreased considerably after desulphation of polysaccharides, suggesting that the sulphate group is important for the stimulatory capacity of these molecules. U. rigida polysaccharides also stimulated macrophage secretion of PGE(2) and induced an increase in COX-2 and NOS-2 expression. The results indicate that U. rigida acid polysaccharide can be used as an experimental immunostimulant for analysing inflammatory responses related to macrophage functions. In addition, these polysaccharides may also be of clinical interest for modifying certain macrophage activities in diseases where macrophage function is impaired or needs

  3. Synergistic enhancement of chemokine generation and lung injury by C5a or the membrane attack complex of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    demonstrated synergistic production of C-X-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant) and C-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and monocyte chemoattractant-1) chemokines. In the absence of the costimulus, C5a or MAC did not induce chemokine generation....... In in vivo studies, C5a and MAC alone caused limited or no intrapulmonary generation of chemokines, but in the presence of a costimulus (IgG immune complexes) C5a and MAC caused synergistic intrapulmonary generation of C-X-C and C-C chemokines but not of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Under these conditions...... increased neutrophil accumulation occurred, as did lung injury. These observations suggest that C5a and MAC function synergistically with a costimulus to enhance chemokine generation and the intensity of the lung inflammatory response....

  4. Roles for C-X-C chemokines and C5a in lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Warner, R L; Padgaonkar, V A

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the roles of the C-X-C chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) as well as the complement activation product C5a in development of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. During reperfusion, CD11b...... and CD18, but not CD11a, were upregulated on neutrophils [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood] and lung macrophages. BAL levels of CINC and MIP-2 were increased during the ischemic and reperfusion periods. Treatment with either anti-CINC or anti-MIP-2 IgG significantly reduced lung vascular......, 58, and 23%, respectively (P MIP-2 as well as the complement activation product C5a are required for lung neutrophil recruitment and full induction of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats....

  5. Correlations between polymorphisms in the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A and C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 genes and infection with the hepatitis B virus in three ethnic groups in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chan; He, Yan; Shan, Ke-Ren; Tan, Kui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Chan-Juan; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A ( UGT1A) and the C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 ( CCR5) genes are associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Yi, Yao and Han ethnic groups in the Guizhou Province of China. Methods The study enrolled subjects with and without HBV infection. Whole blood was used for DNA genotyping using standard techniques. The study determined the frequencies of several polymorphic alleles ( UGT1A6 [rs2070959], UGT1A1 [rs8175347], CCR5-59029 [rs1799987] and CCR5Δ32 [rs333]) and then characterized their relationship with HBV infection. Results A total of 404 subjects were enrolled in the study: 138 from the Yao group, 101 from the Yi group and 165 from the Han group. There was a significant difference in the frequency of UGT1A1 rs8175347 polymorphisms among the three groups. The rates of 7TA carriers of UGT1A1 rs8175347 in all three groups were significantly higher than the other genotypes. Individuals with genotype AA of UGT1A6 rs2070959 in the Yi group had a higher risk for HBV infection than in the Yao and Han groups. The frequency of genotype GG in CCR5-59029 in the Yao group was significantly higher than in the Yi group. The genotypes of CCR5Δ32 were not associated with HBV infection. Conclusion These findings provide genetic and epidemiological evidence for an association of UGT1A and CCR5-59029 polymorphisms with HBV infection in Chinese Yi and Yao populations.

  6. Preparation of C-terminally modified chemokines by expressed protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Lars; Steinhagen, Max; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-01-01

    In order to link structural features on a molecular level to the function of chemokines, site-specific modification strategies are strongly required. These can be used to incorporate fluorescent dyes and/or physical probes to allow investigations in a wide range of biological and physical techniques, e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Only a limited number of functional groups within the 20 canonical amino acids allow ligation strategies that can be helpful to introduce novel functionalities, which in turn expand the scope of chemoselective and orthogonal reactivity of (semi)synthetic chemokines. In the present chapter we mainly focus on the fabulous history of native chemical ligation (NCL) and provide a general protocol for the preparation of C-terminally modified SDF-1α including tips and tricks for practical work. We believe that this protocol can be easily adapted to other chemokines and many proteins in general.

  7. The Rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme binds cells via an Arg-Gly-Asp motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Höltje, Markus; Adolf, Andrej; Oms, Elisabeth; Hagemann, Sandra; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Just, Ingo

    2017-10-27

    The Rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme (C3bot) is a bacterial protein toxin devoid of a cell-binding or -translocation domain. Nevertheless, C3 can efficiently enter intact cells, including neurons, but the mechanism of C3 binding and uptake is not yet understood. Previously, we identified the intermediate filament vimentin as an extracellular membranous interaction partner of C3. However, uptake of C3 into cells still occurs (although reduced) in the absence of vimentin, indicating involvement of an additional host cell receptor. C3 harbors an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, which is the major integrin-binding site, present in a variety of integrin ligands. To check whether the RGD motif of C3 is involved in binding to cells, we performed a competition assay with C3 and RGD peptide or with a monoclonal antibody binding to β1-integrin subunit and binding assays in different cell lines, primary neurons, and synaptosomes with C3-RGD mutants. Here, we report that preincubation of cells with the GRGDNP peptide strongly reduced C3 binding to cells. Moreover, mutation of the RGD motif reduced C3 binding to intact cells and also to recombinant vimentin. Anti-integrin antibodies also lowered the C3 binding to cells. Our results indicate that the RGD motif of C3 is at least one essential C3 motif for binding to host cells and that integrin is an additional receptor for C3 besides vimentin. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Promoter motifs required for c-mpl gene expression induced by thrombopoietin in CMK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, Masataka; Sato, Iwao; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2017-11-30

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor, c-Mpl, are the central regulators of megakaryocyte development and platelet production and are also crucial to regulate megakaryocytopoiesis. TPO remarkably elevated c-mpl promoter activity, while the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203, H7 and Calphostin C, clearly reduced the steady level of its promoter activity.  In the present study, motifs crucial for c-mpl promoter activity induced by TPO treatment have been analyzed using a human megakaryoblastic cell line, CMK. Destruction of the -107Sp1 and the -57Sp1 sites in the c-mpl promoter enhancer region resulted in decrease of the promoter activity by 53.1% and 64.4%, respectively, and destruction of -69Ets and -28Ets elements dramatically decreased the promoter activity by 96.4% and 87.8%, respectively, while mutation of -77GATA moderately reduced the activity by 31.4%. The result was in agreement with our previous report that showed the crucial motifs in the c-mpl promoter for the promoter activity induced by PMA-treatment. This indicates that TPO-induced activation of the c-mpl promoter activity is fully modulated by transcription through a PKC-dependent pathway and the two Sp1 and two Ets motifs are crucial for the activation of the c-mpl promoter activity rather than a GATA motif in the c-mpl promoter of CMK cells.

  9. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme: in vitro and in vivo processing of CXCL10 generates a C-terminally truncated chemokine retaining full activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A; Dijkman, Remco; van der Schors, Roel C; van der Raaij-Helmer, Elizabeth M H; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Leurs, Rob; Deelder, André M; Smit, Martine J; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2004-04-02

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the total spectrum of chemokine variants. We have recently shown that the native chemokine CXCL10 is processed at the C terminus, thereby shedding the last four amino acids. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanism in vivo and in vitro and to study the biological activity of this novel isoform of CXCL10. Using a combination of protein purification and mass spectrometric techniques, we show that the production of C-terminally truncated CXCL10 by primary keratinocytes is inhibited in vivo by a specific inhibitor of pro-protein convertases (e.g. furin) but not by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases. Moreover, CXCL10 is processed by furin in vitro, which is abrogated by a mutation in the furin recognition site. Using GTPgammaS binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, and chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that the C-terminally truncated CXCL10 variant is a potent ligand for CXCR3. Moreover, the inverse agonist activity on the virally encoded receptor ORF74 and the direct antibacterial activity of CXCL10 are fully retained. Hence, we have identified furin as a novel chemokine-modifying enzyme in vitro and most probably also in vivo, generating a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, which fully retains its (inverse) agonistic properties.

  10. Interaction of Cu(+) with cytosine and formation of i-motif-like C-M(+)-C complexes: alkali versus coinage metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Rodgers, M T; Oomens, Jos

    2016-03-14

    The Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time. However, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or the presence of cations. Pairing of cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton (C-H(+)-C) may give rise to the so-called i-motif, which occurs primarily in expanded trinucleotide repeats and the telomeric region of DNA, particularly at low pH. At physiological pH, silver cations were recently found to stabilize C dimers in a C-Ag(+)-C structure analogous to the hemiprotonated C-dimer. Here we use infrared ion spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G+(2df,2p) level to show that copper in the 1+ oxidation state induces an analogous formation of C-Cu(+)-C structures. In contrast to protons and these transition metal ions, alkali metal ions induce a different dimer structure, where each ligand coordinates the alkali metal ion in a bidentate fashion in which the N3 and O2 atoms of both cytosine ligands coordinate to the metal ion, sacrificing hydrogen-bonding interactions between the ligands for improved chelation of the metal cation.

  11. Structural Diversity in Conserved Regions Like the DRY-Motif among Viral 7TM Receptors-A Consequence of Evolutionary Pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Davis-Poynter, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Several herpes- and poxviruses have captured chemokine receptors from their hosts and modified these to their own benefit. The human and viral chemokine receptors belong to class A 7 transmembrane (TM) receptors which are characterized by several structural motifs like the DRY-motif in TM3...... and the C-terminal tail. In the DRY-motif, the arginine residue serves important purposes by being directly involved in G protein coupling. Interestingly, among the viral receptors there is a greater diversity in the DRY-motif compared to their endogenous receptor homologous. The C-terminal receptor tail...... constitutes another regulatory region that through a number of phosphorylation sites is involved in signaling, desensitization, and internalization. Also this region is more variable among virus-encoded 7TM receptors compared to human class A receptors. In this review we will focus on these two structural...

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Frascerra, Silvia; Corrado, Alda; Pupilli, Cinzia; Bernini, Giampaolo; Benvenga, Salvatore; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2011-01-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPARα and PPARγ activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN)γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. IFNγ stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNFα alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFNγ and TNFα had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPARα activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFNγ and TNFα) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPARγ agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFNγ and TNFα in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPARα activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPARα may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  13. C-terminal motif prediction in eukaryotic proteomes using comparative genomics and statistical over-representation across protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutler Sean R

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carboxy termini of proteins are a frequent site of activity for a variety of biologically important functions, ranging from post-translational modification to protein targeting. Several short peptide motifs involved in protein sorting roles and dependent upon their proximity to the C-terminus for proper function have already been characterized. As a limited number of such motifs have been identified, the potential exists for genome-wide statistical analysis and comparative genomics to reveal novel peptide signatures functioning in a C-terminal dependent manner. We have applied a novel methodology to the prediction of C-terminal-anchored peptide motifs involving a simple z-statistic and several techniques for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Results We examined the statistical over-representation of position-specific C-terminal tripeptides in 7 eukaryotic proteomes. Sequence randomization models and simple-sequence masking were applied to the successful reduction of background noise. Similarly, as C-terminal homology among members of large protein families may artificially inflate tripeptide counts in an irrelevant and obfuscating manner, gene-family clustering was performed prior to the analysis in order to assess tripeptide over-representation across protein families as opposed to across all proteins. Finally, comparative genomics was used to identify tripeptides significantly occurring in multiple species. This approach has been able to predict, to our knowledge, all C-terminally anchored targeting motifs present in the literature. These include the PTS1 peroxisomal targeting signal (SKL*, the ER-retention signal (K/HDEL*, the ER-retrieval signal for membrane bound proteins (KKxx*, the prenylation signal (CC* and the CaaX box prenylation motif. In addition to a high statistical over-representation of these known motifs, a collection of significant tripeptides with a high propensity for biological function exists

  14. Autoimmune and Neoplastic Thyroid Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with “HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia” (MC + HCV, a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th1 (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients.

  15. A study of chemokines, chemokine receptors and interleukin-6 in patients with panic disorder, personality disorders and their co-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna M; Just, Marek J; Szromek, Adam R; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Stress may induce inflammatory changes in the immune system and activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors by activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. 460 hospitalized patients with panic disorders (PD) and/or personality disorders (P) were studied. The study group comprised subjects with PD, avoidant personality disorder (APD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), and concomitant (PD+APD; PD+BPD; PD+OCPD). Each study group consisted of 60 subjects (30 females and 30 males). The control group included 20 females and 20 males without any history of mental disorder. ELISA was used to assess the levels of chemokines: CCL-5/RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), CXCL-12/SDF-1 (stromal derived factor), their receptors CXCR-5 (C-C chemokine receptor type-5), CXCR-4 (chemokine C-X-C motif receptor-4), and IL-6. Statistically significant differences in the levels of CCL-5 and CCR-5 were revealed between all study groups. The greatest differences were found between the groups with PD+OCPD and PD+APD. Moreover, concomitance of PD with P significantly increased the level of chemokines and their receptors in all study groups versus the subjects with P alone. The results of the study show differences between the groups. To be specific, inflammatory markers were more elevated in the study groups than the controls. Therefore, chemokines and chemokine receptors may be used as inflammatory markers in patients with PD co-existent with P to indicate disease severity. PD was found to be a factor in maintaining inflammatory activity in the immune system in patients with P. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient farnesylation of an extended C-terminal C(x)3X sequence motif expands the scope of the prenylated proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanden, Melanie J; Suazo, Kiall F; Hildebrandt, Emily R; Hardgrove, Daniel S; Patel, Meet; Saunders, William P; Distefano, Mark D; Schmidt, Walter K; Hougland, James L

    2018-02-23

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that has been most commonly associated with enabling protein trafficking to and interaction with cellular membranes. In this process, an isoprenoid group is attached to a cysteine near the C terminus of a substrate protein by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) or protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I or II (GGTase-I and GGTase-II). FTase and GGTase-I have long been proposed to specifically recognize a four-amino acid C AAX C-terminal sequence within their substrates. Surprisingly, genetic screening reveals that yeast FTase can modify sequences longer than the canonical C AAX sequence, specifically C( x ) 3 X sequences with four amino acids downstream of the cysteine. Biochemical and cell-based studies using both peptide and protein substrates reveal that mammalian FTase orthologs can also prenylate C( x ) 3 X sequences. As the search to identify physiologically relevant C( x ) 3 X proteins begins, this new prenylation motif nearly doubles the number of proteins within the yeast and human proteomes that can be explored as potential FTase substrates. This work expands our understanding of prenylation's impact within the proteome, establishes the biologically relevant reactivity possible with this new motif, and opens new frontiers in determining the impact of non-canonically prenylated proteins on cell function. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Alanine substitutions in the GXXXG motif alter C99 cleavage by γ-secretase but not its dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashide, Hidekazu; Ishihara, Seiko; Nobuhara, Mika; Ihara, Yasuo; Funamoto, Satoru

    2017-03-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) protein is a major component of senile plaques, one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases leads to production of Aβ. APP contains tandem triple repeats of the GXXXG motif in its extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane regions. It is reported that the GXXXG motif is related to protein-protein interactions, but it remains controversial whether the GXXXG motif in APP is involved in substrate dimerization and whether dimerization affects γ-secretase-dependent cleavage. Therefore, the relationship between the GXXXG motifs, substrate dimerization, and γ-secretase-dependent cleavage sites remains unclear. Here, we applied blue native poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis to examine the effect of alanine substitutions within the GXXXG motifs of APP carboxyl terminal fragment (C99) on its dimerization and Aβ production. Surprisingly, alanine substitutions in the motif failed to alter C99 dimerization in detergent soluble state. Cell-based and solubilized γ-secretase assays demonstrated that increasing alanine substitutions in the motif tended to decrease long Aβ species such as Aβ42 and Aβ43 and to increase in short Aβ species concomitantly. Our data suggest that the GXXXG motif is crucial for Aβ production, but not for C99 dimerization. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} agonists modulate Th1 and Th2 chemokine secretion in normal thyrocytes and Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro, E-mail: a.antonelli@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Silvia Martina, E-mail: sm.ferrari@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Frascerra, Silvia, E-mail: lafrasce@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Corrado, Alda, E-mail: dala_res@hotmail.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Pupilli, Cinzia, E-mail: c.pupilli@dfc.unifi.it [Endocrinology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Careggi and University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 85, I-50134, Florence (Italy); Bernini, Giampaolo, E-mail: g.bernini@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Benvenga, Salvatore, E-mail: s.benvenga@me.nettuno.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University of Messina, Piazza Pugliatti 1, I-98122, Messina (Italy); Ferrannini, Ele, E-mail: eferrannini@med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy); Fallahi, Poupak, E-mail: poupak@int.med.unipi.it [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa-School of Medicine, Via Roma 67, I-56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Until now, no data are present about the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} activation on the prototype Th1 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10] (CXCL10) and Th2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] (CCL2) chemokines secretion in thyroid cells. The role of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} activation on CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion was tested in Graves' disease (GD) and control primary thyrocytes stimulated with interferon (IFN){gamma} and tumor necrosis factor (TNF){alpha}. IFN{gamma} stimulated both CXCL10 and CCL2 secretion in primary GD and control thyrocytes. TNF{alpha} alone stimulated CCL2 secretion, while had no effect on CXCL10. The combination of IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} had a synergistic effect both on CXCL10 and CCL2 chemokines in GD thyrocytes at levels comparable to those of controls. PPAR{alpha} activators inhibited the secretion of both chemokines (stimulated with IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}) at a level higher (for CXCL10, about 60-72%) than PPAR{gamma} agonists (about 25-35%), which were confirmed to inhibit CXCL10, but not CCL2. Our data show that CCL2 is modulated by IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha} in GD and normal thyrocytes. Furthermore we first show that PPAR{alpha} activators inhibit the secretion of CXCL10 and CCL2 in thyrocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} may be involved in the modulation of the immune response in the thyroid.

  19. Impact of genetic variations in C-C chemokine receptors and ligands on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Tabish; Khan, M Y

    2016-10-01

    Chemokine receptors and ligands are crucial for extensive immune response against infectious diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, HIV and tuberculosis and a wide variety of other diseases. Role of chemokines are evidenced in the activation and regulation of immune cell migration which is important for immune response against diseases. Outcome of disease is determined by complex interaction among pathogen, host genetic variability and surrounding milieu. Variation in expression or function of chemokines caused by genetic polymorphisms could be associated with attenuated immune responses. Exploration of chemokine genetic polymorphisms in therapeutic response, gene regulation and disease outcome is important. Infectious agents in human host alter the expression of chemokines via epigenetic alterations and thus contribute to disease pathogenesis. Although some fragmentary data are available on chemokine genetic variations and their contribution in diseases, no unequivocal conclusion has been arrived as yet. We therefore, aim to investigate the association of CCR5-CCL5 and CCR2-CCL2 genetic polymorphisms with different infectious diseases, transcriptional regulation of gene, disease severity and response to therapy. Furthermore, the role of epigenetics in genes related to chemokines and infectious disease are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of CCL2 and CXCL8 chemokines in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue samples from dogs affected with canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, Elodie; Krafft, Emilie; Farnir, Frederic; Holopainen, Saila; Laurila, Henna P; Rajamäki, Minna M; Day, Michael J; Antoine, Nadine; Pirottin, Dimitri; Clercx, Cecile

    2015-10-01

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CIPF) is a progressive disease of the lung parenchyma that is more prevalent in dogs of the West Highland white terrier (WHWT) breed. Since the chemokines (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) have been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis in humans, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether these same chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of CIPF. CCL2 and CXCL8 concentrations were measured by ELISA in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from healthy dogs and WHWTs affected with CIPF. Expression of the genes encoding CCL2 and CXCL8 and their respective receptors, namely (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) and (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2), was compared in unaffected lung tissue and biopsies from dogs affected with CIPF by quantitative PCR and localisation of CCL2 and CXCL8 proteins were determined by immunohistochemistry. Significantly greater CCL2 and CXCL8 concentrations were found in the BALF from WHWTs affected with CIPF, compared with healthy dogs. Significantly greater serum concentrations of CCL2, but not CXCL8, were found in CIPF-affected dogs compared with healthy WHWTs. No differences in relative gene expression for CCL2, CXCL8, CCR2 or CXCR2 were observed when comparing lung biopsies from control dogs and those affected with CIPF. In affected lung tissues, immunolabelling for CCL2 and CXCL8 was observed in bronchial airway epithelial cells in dogs affected with CIPF. The study findings suggest that both CCL2 and CXCL8 are involved in the pathogenesis of CIPF. Further studies are required to determine whether these chemokines might have a clinical use as biomarkers of fibrosis or as targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Kaas, A.; Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated...... longitudinally circulating concentrations of CCR5 ligands of 256 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes. CCR5 ligands were differentially associated with beta-cell function and clinical remission. CCL5 was decreased in remitters and positively associated with HbA1c suggestive of a Th1 associated...... of CCR5 by therapeutic agents such as maraviroc may provide a new therapeutic target to ameliorate disease progression in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  2. Emerging role of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 related mechanisms in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-08-24

    Chemokines are critical components in pathology. The roles of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 (CCL4) and its receptor are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases. However, due to the complexity of these diseases, the specific effects of CCL4 remain unclear, although recent reports have suggested that multiple pathways are related to CCL4. In this review, we provide an overview of the role and potential mechanisms of CCL4 and one of its major receptors, fifth CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), in DM and cardiovascular diseases. CCL4-related mechanisms, including CCL4 and CCR5, might provide potential therapeutic targets in DM and/or atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases.

  3. cWords - systematic microRNA regulatory motif discovery from mRNA expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær; Jacobsen, Anders; Krogh, Anders

    2013-01-01

    and statistical methods of cWords, resulting in at least a factor 100 speed gain over the previous implementation. On a benchmark dataset of 19 microRNA (miRNA) perturbation experiments cWords showed equal or better performance than two comparable methods, miReduce and Sylamer. We have developed rigorous motif...... that demonstrate comparable or better performance than other existing methods. Rich visualization of results promotes intuitive and efficient interpretation of data. cWords is available as a stand-alone Open Source program at Github https://github.com/simras/cWords webcite and as a web-service at: http...

  4. Optogenetic control of chemokine receptor signal and T-cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuexin; Hyun, Young-Min; Lim, Kihong; Lee, Hyunwook; Cummings, Ryan J.; Gerber, Scott A.; Bae, Seyeon; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Lord, Edith M.; Kim, Minsoo

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of ex vivo-generated immune-promoting or tolerogenic T cells to either enhance immunity or promote tolerance in patients has been used with some success. However, effective trafficking of the transferred cells to the target tissue sites is the main barrier to achieving successful clinical outcomes. Here we developed a strategy for optically controlling T-cell trafficking using a photoactivatable (PA) chemokine receptor. Photoactivatable-chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4 (PA-CXCR4) transmitted intracellular CXCR4 signals in response to 505-nm light. Localized activation of PA-CXCR4 induced T-cell polarization and directional migration (phototaxis) both in vitro and in vivo. Directing light onto the melanoma was sufficient to recruit PA-CXCR4–expressing tumor-targeting cytotoxic T cells and improved the efficacy of adoptive T-cell transfer immunotherapy, with a significant reduction in tumor growth in mice. These findings suggest that the use of photoactivatable chemokine receptors allows remotely controlled leukocyte trafficking with outstanding spatial resolution in tissues and may be feasible in other cell transfer therapies. PMID:24733886

  5. C–C Chemokines Released by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Human Macrophages Suppress HIV-1 Infection in Both Macrophages and T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Alessia; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Comar, Manola; Tresoldi, Eleonora; Polo, Simona; Giacca, Mauro; Lusso, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Vercelli, Donata

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected in vitro is known to be inhibited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We show here that HIV-1 suppression is mediated by soluble factors released by MDM stimulated with physiologically significant concentrations of LPS. LPS-conditioned supernatants from MDM inhibited HIV-1 replication in both MDM and T cells. Depletion of C–C chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β) neutralized the ability of LPS-conditioned supernatants to inhibit HIV-1 replication in MDM. A combination of recombinant C–C chemokines blocked HIV-1 infection as effectively as LPS. Here, we report an inhibitory effect of C–C chemokines on HIV replication in primary macrophages. Our results raise the possibility that monocytes may play a dual role in HIV infection: while representing a reservoir for the virus, they may contribute to the containment of the infection by releasing factors that suppress HIV replication not only in monocytes but also in T lymphocytes. PMID:9120386

  6. Powdery mildew fungal effector candidates share N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmersen Jeppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdery mildew and rust fungi are widespread, serious pathogens that depend on developing haustoria in the living plant cells. Haustoria are separated from the host cytoplasm by a plant cell-derived extrahaustorial membrane. They secrete effector proteins, some of which are subsequently transferred across this membrane to the plant cell to suppress defense. Results In a cDNA library from barley epidermis containing powdery mildew haustoria, two-thirds of the sequenced ESTs were fungal and represented ~3,000 genes. Many of the most highly expressed genes encoded small proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. While these proteins are novel and poorly related, they do share a three-amino acid motif, which we named "Y/F/WxC", in the N-terminal of the mature proteins. The first amino acid of this motif is aromatic: tyrosine, phenylalanine or tryptophan, and the last is always cysteine. In total, we identified 107 such proteins, for which the ESTs represent 19% of the fungal clones in our library, suggesting fundamental roles in haustoria function. While overall sequence similarity between the powdery mildew Y/F/WxC-proteins is low, they do have a highly similar exon-intron structure, suggesting they have a common origin. Interestingly, searches of public fungal genome and EST databases revealed that haustoria-producing rust fungi also encode large numbers of novel, short proteins with signal peptides and the Y/F/WxC-motif. No significant numbers of such proteins were identified from genome and EST sequences from either fungi which do not produce haustoria or from haustoria-producing Oomycetes. Conclusion In total, we identified 107, 178 and 57 such Y/F/WxC-proteins from the barley powdery mildew, the wheat stem rust and the wheat leaf rust fungi, respectively. All together, our findings suggest the Y/F/WxC-proteins to be a new class of effectors from haustoria-producing pathogenic fungi.

  7. Interaction of Cu+ with cytosine and formation of i-motif-like C-M+-C complexes: alkali versus coinage metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Berden, G.; Rodgers, M.T.; Oomens, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Watson-Crick structure of DNA is among the most well-known molecular structures of our time. However, alternative base-pairing motifs are also known to occur, often depending on base sequence, pH, or the presence of cations. Pairing of cytosine (C) bases induced by the sharing of a single proton

  8. Novel chemokine-like activities of histones in tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Yangchun; Zhong, Xiao; Fu, Yongmin; Huang, Yan; Zhen, Yixiang; Pan, Pinhua; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L; Billiar, Timothy R; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2016-09-20

    Histones are intracellular nucleosomal components and extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that modulate chromatin remodeling, as well as the immune response. However, their extracellular roles in cell migration and invasion remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that histones are novel regulators of tumor metastasis with chemokine-like activities. Indeed, exogenous histones promote both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell migration and invasion through toll-like receptor (TLR)4, but not TLR2 or the receptor for advanced glycosylation end product. TLR4-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is required for histone-induced chemokine (e.g., C-C motif ligand 9/10) production. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TLR4-ERK-NF-κB signaling impairs histone-induced chemokine production and HCC cell migration. Additionally, TLR4 depletion (by using TLR4-/- mice and TLR4-shRNA) or inhibition of histone release/activity (by administration of heparin and H3 neutralizing antibody) attenuates lung metastasis of HCC cells injected via the tail vein of mice. Thus, histones promote tumor metastasis of HCC cells through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway and represent novel targets for treating patients with HCC.

  9. Plasma Chemokines in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorders: Association of CCL11 (Eotaxin-1) with Psychiatric Comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marchena, Nuria; Araos, Pedro Fernando; Barrios, Vicente; Sánchez-Marín, Laura; Chowen, Julie A.; Pedraz, María; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Ponce, Guillermo; Gavito, Ana L.; Decara, Juan; Silva, Daniel; Torrens, Marta; Argente, Jesús; Rubio, Gabriel; Serrano, Antonia; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have linked changes in peripheral chemokine concentrations to the presence of both addictive behaviors and psychiatric disorders. The present study further explore this link by analyzing the potential association of psychiatry comorbidity with alterations in the concentrations of circulating plasma chemokine in patients of both sexes diagnosed with alcohol use disorders (AUD). To this end, 85 abstinent subjects with AUD from an outpatient setting and 55 healthy subjects were evaluated for substance and mental disorders. Plasma samples were obtained to quantify chemokine concentrations [C–C motif (CC), C–X–C motif (CXC), and C–X3–C motif (CX3C) chemokines]. Abstinent AUD patients displayed a high prevalence of comorbid mental disorders (72%) and other substance use disorders (45%). Plasma concentrations of chemokines CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (p < 0.001) and CX3CL1/fractalkine (p < 0.05) were lower in AUD patients compared to controls, whereas CCL11/eotaxin-1 concentrations were strongly decreased in female AUD patients (p < 0.001). In the alcohol group, CXCL8 concentrations were increased in patients with liver and pancreas diseases and there was a significant correlation to aspartate transaminase (r = +0.456, p < 0.001) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (r = +0.647, p < 0.001). Focusing on comorbid psychiatric disorders, we distinguish between patients with additional mental disorders (N = 61) and other substance use disorders (N = 38). Only CCL11 concentrations were found to be altered in AUD patients diagnosed with mental disorders (p < 0.01) with a strong main effect of sex. Thus, patients with mood disorders (N = 42) and/or anxiety (N = 16) had lower CCL11 concentrations than non-comorbid patients being more evident in women. The alcohol-induced alterations in circulating chemokines were also explored in preclinical models of alcohol use with male Wistar rats. Rats exposed to

  10. Pharmacological targeting of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Harold H.; Wong, Yee M.; LaPorte, Heather M.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent evidence suggests that chemokine receptor CXCR4 regulates vascular α1-adrenergic receptor function and that the noncognate CXCR4 agonist ubiquitin has therapeutic potential after trauma/hemorrhage. Pharmacologic properties of ubiquitin in large animal trauma models, however, are poorly characterized. Thus, the aims of the present study were to determine the effects of CXCR4 modulation on resuscitation requirements after polytrauma, to assess whether ubiquitin influences survival times after lethal polytrauma-hemorrhage, and to characterize its dose-effect profile in porcine models. METHODS Anesthetized pigs underwent polytrauma (PT, femur fractures/lung contusion) alone (Series 1) or PT/hemorrhage (PT/H) to a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mmHg with subsequent fluid resuscitation (Series 2 and 3) or 40% blood volume hemorrhage within 15 minutes followed by 2.5% blood volume hemorrhage every 15 minutes without fluid resuscitation (Series 4). In Series 1, ubiquitin (175 and 350 nmol/kg), AMD3100 (CXCR4 antagonist, 350 nmol/kg), or vehicle treatment 60 minutes after PT was performed. In Series 2, ubiquitin (175, 875, and 1,750 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment 60 minutes after PT/H was performed. In Series 3, ubiquitin (175 and 875 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment at 60 and 180 minutes after PT/H was performed. In Series 4, ubiquitin (875 nmol/kg) or vehicle treatment 30 minutes after hemorrhage was performed. RESULTS In Series 1, resuscitation fluid requirements were significantly reduced by 40% with 350-nmol/kg ubiquitin and increased by 25% with AMD3100. In Series 2, median survival time was 190 minutes with vehicle, 260 minutes with 175-nmol/kg ubiquitin, and longer than 420 minutes with 875-nmol/kg and 1,750-nmol/kg ubiquitin (p 0.05). CONCLUSION These findings further suggest CXCR4 as a drug target after PT/H. Ubiquitin treatment reduces resuscitation fluid requirements and provides survival benefits after PT/H. The pharmacological effects of

  11. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  12. Relationships Among Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Plasma Cytokines in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gerald V; Sebastiani, Paola; Andrieu, Guillaume; Tran, Anna H; Strissel, Katherine J; Lombardi, Frank L; Palmer, Julie R

    2017-11-01

    The principal objective of this investigation was to identify novel cytokine associations with BMI and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Cytokines were profiled from African American women with obesity who donated plasma to the Komen Tissue Bank. Multiplex bead arrays of analytes were used to quantify 88 cytokines and chemokines in association with clinical diagnoses of metabolic health. Regression models were generated after elimination of outliers. Among women with obesity, T2D was associated with breast adipocyte hypertrophy and with six plasma analytes, including four chemokines (chemokine [C-C motif] ligand 2, chemokine [C-C motif] ligand 16, chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 1, and chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 16) and two growth factors (interleukin 2 and epidermal growth factor). In addition, three analytes were associated with obesity independently of diabetes: interleukin 4, soluble CD40 ligand, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3. Profiling of inflammatory cytokines combined with measures of BMI may produce a more personalized risk assessment for obesity-associated disease in African American women. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  13. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  14. Immune response CC chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Hashemi, Nastran; Weigt, Stephen S; Xue, Ying Ying; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Keane, Michael P; Strieter, Robert M; Fishbein, Michael C; Deng, Jane C; Lynch, Joseph P; Elashoff, Robert; Belperio, John A

    2011-04-04

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  15. C-X-C Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Plays a Crucial Role in Mediating Oxidative Stress-Induced Podocyte Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Hongyan; Wu, Qinyu; Miao, Jinhua; Luo, Congwei; Hong, Xue; Wang, Yongping; Tang, Lan; Hou, Fan Fan; Liu, Youhua; Zhou, Lili

    2017-08-20

    Oxidative stress plays a role in mediating podocyte injury and proteinuria. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the potential role of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), the receptor for stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury. In mouse model of adriamycin nephropathy (ADR), CXCR4 expression was significantly induced in podocytes as early as 3 days. This was accompanied by an increased upregulation of oxidative stress in podocyte, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde assay, nitrotyrosine staining and secretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine, and induction of NOX2 and NOX4, major subunits of NADPH oxidase. CXCR4 was also induced in human kidney biopsies with proteinuric kidney diseases and colocalized with advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), an established oxidative stress trigger. Using cultured podocytes and mouse model, we found that AOPPs induced significant loss of podocyte marker Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), nephrin, and podocalyxin, accompanied by upregulation of desmin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AOPPs worsened proteinuria and aggravated glomerulosclerosis in ADR. These effects were associated with marked activation of SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in podocytes. Administration of AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, reduced proteinuria and ameliorated podocyte dysfunction and renal fibrosis triggered by AOPPs in mice. In glomerular miniorgan culture, AOPPs also induced CXCR4 expression and downregulated nephrin and WT1. Innovation and Conclusion: These results suggest that chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a crucial role in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury, proteinuria, and renal fibrosis. CXCR4 could be a new target for mitigating podocyte injury, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 345-362.

  16. Role of the Box C/D Motif in Localization of Small Nucleolar RNAs to Coiled Bodies and Nucleoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Speckmann, Wayne; Terns, Rebecca; Terns, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are a large family of eukaryotic RNAs that function within the nucleolus in the biogenesis of ribosomes. One major class of snoRNAs is the box C/D snoRNAs named for their conserved box C and box D sequence elements. We have investigated the involvement of cis-acting sequences and intranuclear structures in the localization of box C/D snoRNAs to the nucleolus by assaying the intranuclear distribution of fluorescently labeled U3, U8, and U14 snoRNAs injected into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. Analysis of an extensive panel of U3 RNA variants showed that the box C/D motif, comprised of box C′, box D, and the 3′ terminal stem of U3, is necessary and sufficient for the nucleolar localization of U3 snoRNA. Disruption of the elements of the box C/D motif of U8 and U14 snoRNAs also prevented nucleolar localization, indicating that all box C/D snoRNAs use a common nucleolar-targeting mechanism. Finally, we found that wild-type box C/D snoRNAs transiently associate with coiled bodies before they localize to nucleoli and that variant RNAs that lack an intact box C/D motif are detained within coiled bodies. These results suggest that coiled bodies play a role in the biogenesis and/or intranuclear transport of box C/D snoRNAs. PMID:10397754

  17. The CXC chemokine cCAF stimulates precocious deposition of ECM molecules by wound fibroblasts, accelerating development of granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qi-Jing

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During wound repair, fibroblasts orchestrate replacement of the provisional matrix formed during clotting with tenascin, cellular fibronectin and collagen III. These, in turn, are critical for migration of endothelial cells, keratinocytes and additional fibroblasts into the wound site. Fibroblasts are also important in the deposition of collagen I during scar formation. The CXC chemokine chicken Chemotactic and Angiogenic Factor (cCAF, is highly expressed by fibroblasts after wounding and during development of the granulation tissue, especially in areas where extracellular matrix (ECM is abundant. We hypothesized that cCAF stimulates fibroblasts to produce these matrix molecules. Results Here we show that this chemokine can stimulate precocious deposition of tenascin, fibronectin and collagen I, but not collagen III. Studies in culture and in vivo show that tenascin stimulation can also be achieved by the N-terminal 15 aas of the protein and occurs at the level of gene expression. In contrast, stimulation of fibronectin and collagen I both require the entire molecule and do not involve changes in gene expression. Fibronectin accumulation appears to be linked to tenascin production, and collagen I to decreased MMP-1 levels. In addition, cCAF is chemotactic for fibroblasts and accelerates their migration. Conclusions These previously unknown functions for chemokines suggest that cCAF, the chicken orthologue of human IL-8, enhances healing by rapidly chemoattracting fibroblasts into the wound site and stimulating them to produce ECM molecules, leading to precocious development of granulation tissue. This acceleration of the repair process may have important application to healing of impaired wounds.

  18. Requirement for C-X-C chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant) in IgG immune complex-induced lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Warner, R L

    1997-01-01

    chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC). Both mRNA and protein for MIP-2 and CINC appeared in a time-dependent manner after initiation of IgG immune complex deposition in lung. There exists a 69% homology between the amino acid sequences...... for these proteins, and we found cross-reactivity between polyclonal Abs raised to these chemokines. By purifying the blocking Abs using double affinity methods (with Ag-immobilized beads), this cross-reactivity was removed. Individually, anti-MIP-2 and anti-CINC Ab significantly reduced lung injury (as measured...... activity in BAL fluids collected 2 h after injury from animals undergoing immune complex deposition could be shown to be chiefly due to the combined contributions of MIP-2 (39%), CINC (28%), and C5a (21%). When either MIP-2 or CINC was blocked in vivo, up-regulation of Mac-1 expression on neutrophils...

  19. Suppressive oligodeoxynucleotides containing TTAGGG motifs inhibit cGAS activation in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhagen, Folkert; Zillinger, Thomas; Peukert, Konrad; Fox, Mario; Thudium, Marcus; Barchet, Winfried; Putensen, Christian; Klinman, Dennis; Latz, Eicke; Bode, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is a critical mediator of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome (AGS). The recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) induces the production of type I IFN in response to cytosolic DNA and is potentially linked to SLE and AGS. Suppressive oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing repetitive TTAGGG motifs present in mammalian telomeres have proven useful in the treatment of autoimmune diseases including SLE. In this study, we demonstrate that the suppressive ODN A151 effectively inhibits activation of cGAS in response to cytosolic DNA, thereby inhibiting type I IFN production by human monocytes. In addition, A151 abrogated cGAS activation in response to endogenous accumulation of DNA using TREX1-deficient monocytes. We demonstrate that A151 prevents cGAS activation in a manner that is competitive with DNA. This suppressive activity of A151 was dependent on both telomeric sequence and phosphorothioate backbone. To our knowledge this report presents the first cGAS inhibitor capable of blocking self-DNA. Collectively, these findings might lead to the development of new therapeutics against IFN-driven pathologies due to cGAS activation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Roles for NHERF1 and NHERF2 on the regulation of C3a receptor signaling in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharan Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anaphylatoxin C3a binds to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR, C3aR and activates divergent signaling pathways to induce degranulation and cytokine production in human mast cells. Adapter proteins such as the Na(+/H(+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF1 and NHERF2 have been implicated in regulating functions of certain GPCRs by binding to the class I PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/Zo1 motifs present on their cytoplasmic tails. Although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, the possibility that it interacts with NHERF proteins to modulate signaling in human mast cells has not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, we found that NHERF1 and NHERF2 are expressed in human mast cell lines (HMC-1, LAD2 and CD34(+-derived primary human mast cells. Surprisingly, however, C3aR did not associate with these adapter proteins. To assess the roles of NHERFs on signaling downstream of C3aR, we used lentiviral shRNA to stably knockdown the expression of these proteins in human mast cells. Silencing the expression of NHERF1 and NHERF2 had no effect on C3aR desensitization, agonist-induced receptor internalization, ERK/Akt phosphorylation or chemotaxis. However, loss of NHERF1 and NHERF2 resulted in significant inhibition of C3a-induced mast cell degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, it does not associate with NHERF1 and NHERF2. Surprisingly, these proteins provide stimulatory signals for C3a-induced degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine generation in human mast cells. These findings reveal a new level of complexity for the functional regulation of C3aR by NHERFs in human mast cells.

  1. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis: examination of chemokine and chemokine receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Carl J; Williams, Jacqueline P; Okunieff, Paul; Finkelstein, Jacob N

    2002-03-01

    Fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic inflammation or injury. Pulmonary fibrosis may be the result of abnormal repair after an acute inflammatory response. The process of repair initiated by a tissue insult is largely a function of the activation of cells to produce important biological mediators such as cytokines, growth factors and chemokines, which orchestrate most aspects of the inflammatory response. Consequently, altered regulation of the production of inflammatory cell cytokines and chemokines after injury and repair likely contributes to the fibrosis. Our hypothesis is that chronic expression of specific chemokine and chemokine receptors during the fibrotic phase induced by thoracic irradiation may perpetuate the recruitment and activation of lymphocytes and macrophages, which may contribute to the development of fibrosis. Fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) and fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and hybridized using microarray analysis and RNase protection assays. At 26 weeks postirradiation, messages encoding the chemokines BLC (now known as Scyb13), C10 (now known as Scya6), IP-10 (now known as Scyb10), MCP-1 (now known as Scya2), MCP-3 (now known as Scya7), MIP-1gamma (now known as Scya9), and RANTES (now known as Scya5) and the chemokine receptors Ccr1, Ccr2, Ccr5 and Ccr6 were elevated in fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) mice. In contrast, only the messages encoding SDF-1alpha (now known as Sdf1) and Ccr1 were elevated 26 weeks postirradiation in fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice. Our results point to the CC and CCR family members as the predominant chemokine responders during the development of fibrosis. These studies suggest that monocyte/macrophage and lymphocyte recruitment and activation are key components of radiation-induced fibrosis.

  2. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin [Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wen-Jeng, E-mail: wjwang@mail.cgust.edu.tw [Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurological Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Guishan Dist., Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala–Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent. - Highlights: • The tetrameric convulxin (CVX) with WAD-motif

  3. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jeng

    2017-01-01

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala–Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent. - Highlights: • The tetrameric convulxin (CVX) with WAD-motif

  4. N-[C-11]Methyl-AMD3465 PET as a Tool for In Vivo Measurement of Chemokine Receptor 4 (CXCR4) Occupancy by Therapeutic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartimath, Siddanna; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi; van Waarde, Aren; de Vries, Erik

    Chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is overexpressed in many cancers and a potential drug target. We have recently developed the tracer N-[C-11]methyl-AMD3465 for imaging of CXCR4 expression by positron emission tomography (PET). We investigated the pharmacokinetics of N-[C-11]methyl-AMD3465 in rats

  5. Binding of the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor to two distinct RXXK motifs within Gab1 docker employs differential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Deegan, Brian J; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-01-01

    A ubiquitous component of cellular signaling machinery, Gab1 docker plays a pivotal role in routing extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to downstream targets such as transcription factors within the nucleus. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that although Gab1 contains four distinct RXXK motifs, designated G1, G2, G3, and G4, only G1 and G2 motifs bind to the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor and do so with distinct mechanisms. Thus, while the G1 motif strictly requires the PPRPPKP consensus sequence for high-affinity binding to the cSH3 domain, the G2 motif displays preference for the PXVXRXLKPXR consensus. Such sequential differences in the binding of G1 and G2 motifs arise from their ability to adopt distinct polyproline type II (PPII)- and 3(10) -helical conformations upon binding to the cSH3 domain, respectively. Collectively, our study provides detailed biophysical insights into a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of signaling cascades central to health and disease. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Insulin secretagogue use and circulating inflammatory C–C chemokine levels in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A.P. Wintrob

    2017-04-01

    Studied plasma samples were collected under a previously reported study design involving a population of women diagnosed with breast cancer presenting with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus at the time of breast cancer diagnosis (Wintrob et al., 2017, 2016 [1,2]. The data presented here shows the relationship between pre-existing use of insulin secretagogue, the inflammatory C–C chemokine profiles at the time of breast cancer diagnosis, and subsequent cancer outcomes. A Pearson correlation analysis stratified by secretagogue use and controls was implemented to evaluate the relationship between the investigated biomarkers and respectively each of these biomarkers and the other relevant reported cytokine datasets derived from the same patient population (Wintrob et al., 2017, 2016 [1,2].

  7. New PAH gene promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs influence transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Kristel; Stankovic, Biljana; Kotur, Nikola; Djordjevic, Maja; Zukic, Branka; Nikcevic, Gordana; Ugrin, Milena; Spasovski, Vesna; Srzentic, Sanja; Pavlovic, Sonja; Stojiljkovic, Maja

    2017-02-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disease caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Although the PAH genotype remains the main determinant of PKU phenotype severity, genotype-phenotype inconsistencies have been reported. In this study, we focused on unanalysed sequences in non-coding PAH gene regions to assess their possible influence on the PKU phenotype. We transiently transfected HepG2 cells with various chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter constructs which included PAH gene non-coding regions. Selected non-coding regions were indicated by in silico prediction to contain transcription factor binding sites. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift assays were performed to identify which transcriptional factors were engaged in the interaction. We found novel KLF1 motif in the PAH promoter, which decreases CAT activity by 50 % in comparison to basal transcription in vitro. The cytosine at the c.-170 promoter position creates an additional binding site for the protein complex involving KLF1 transcription factor. Moreover, we assessed for the first time the role of a multivariant variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) region located in the 3'-region of the PAH gene. We found that the VNTR3, VNTR7 and VNTR8 constructs had approximately 60 % of CAT activity. The regulation is mediated by the C/EBPalpha transcription factor, present in protein complex binding to VNTR3. Our study highlighted two novel promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs in the PAH gene which decrease transcription in vitro and, thus, could be considered as PAH expression modifiers. New transcription motifs in non-coding regions will contribute to better understanding of the PKU phenotype complexity and may become important for the optimisation of PKU treatment.

  8. Prostaglandin F2α–F-Prostanoid Receptor Signalling Promotes Neutrophil Chemotaxis via Chemokine (CXC motif) Ligand-1 in Endometrial Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Alison E; Sales, Kurt J; Catalano, Roberto D; Anderson, Richard A; Williams, Alistair RW; Wilson, Martin R; Schwarze, Jurgen; Wang, Hongwei; Rossi, Adriano G; Jabbour, Henry N

    2009-01-01

    The prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) receptor (FP) is elevated in endometrial adenocarcinoma. This study found that PGF2α signalling via FP regulates expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. Expression of CXCL1 and its receptor, CXCR2, are elevated in cancer tissue as compared to normal endometrium and localised to glandular epithelium, endothelium and stroma. Treatment of Ishikawa cells stably transfected with the FP receptor (FPS cells) with 100nM PGF2α increased CXCL1 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and these effects were abolished by co-treatment of cells with FP antagonist or chemical inhibitors of Gq, EGFR and ERK. Similarly, CXCL1 was elevated in response to 100 nM PGF2α in endometrial adenocarcinoma explant tissue. CXCL1 is a potent neutrophil chemoattractant. The expression of CXCR2 colocalised to neutrophils in endometrial adenocarcinoma and increased neutrophils were present in endometrial adenocarcinoma compared with normal endometrium. Conditioned media from PGF2α-treated FPS cells stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis which could be abolished by CXCL1 protein immunoneutralisation of the conditioned media or antagonism of CXCR2. Finally, xenograft tumours in nude mice arising from inoculation with FPS cells showed increased neutrophil infiltration compared to tumours arising from wild-type cells or following treatment of mice bearing FPS tumours with CXCL1-neutralising antibody. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a novel PGF2α-FP pathway that may regulate the inflammatory microenvironment in endometrial adenocarcinoma via neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:19549892

  9. Spectrometric study of the folding process of i-motif-forming DNA sequences upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucek, Pavel; Gargallo, Raimundo; Kudrev, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    The c-kit oncogene shows a cytosine-rich DNA region upstream of the transcription initiation site which forms an i-motif structure at slightly acidic pH values (Bucek et al. ). In the present study, the pH-induced formation of i-motif - forming sequences 5'-CCC CTC CCT CGC GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC1, native), 5'-CCC TTC CCT TGT GCC CGC CCG-3' (ckitC2) and 5'-CCCTT CCC TTTTT CCC T CCC T-3' (ckitC3) was studied by spectroscopic techniques, such as UV molecular absorption and circular dichroism (CD), in tandem with two multivariate data analysis methods, the hard modelling-based matrix method and the soft modelling-based MCR-ALS approach. Use of the hard chemical modelling enabled us to propose the equilibrium model, which describes spectral changes as functions of solution acidity. Additionally, the intrinsic protonation constant, K in , and the cooperativity parameters, ω c , and ω a , were calculated from the fitting procedure of the coupled CD and molecular absorption spectra. In the case of ckitC2 and ckitC3, the hard model correctly reproduced the spectral variations observed experimentally. The results indicated that folding was accompanied by a cooperative process, i.e. the enhancement of protonated structure stability upon protonation. In contrast, unfolding was accompanied by an anticooperative process. Finally, folding of the native sequence, ckitC1, seemed to follow a more complex mechanism.

  10. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate- and C-C Chemokine Receptor 2-Dependent Activation of CD4+ Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Bone Marrow Contributes to Signs of Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Anna; Pohlmann, Stephanie; Nehring, Melanie; Ali, Shafaqat; Mann-Nüttel, Ritu; Scheu, Stefanie; Antoni, Anne-Charlotte; Hansen, Wiebke; Büettner, Manuela; Gardiasch, Miriam J.; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Wirsdörfer, Florian; Pastille, Eva; Dudda, Marcel; Flohé, Stefanie B.

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is the dysregulated response of the host to systemic, mostly bacterial infection, and is associated with an enhanced susceptibility to life-threatening opportunistic infections. During polymicrobial sepsis, dendritic cells (DCs) secrete enhanced levels of interleukin (IL) 10 due to an altered differentiation in the bone marrow and contribute to the development of immunosuppression. We investigated the origin of the altered DC differentiation using murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a model for human polymicrobial sepsis. Bone marrow cells (BMC) were isolated after sham or CLP operation, the cellular composition was analyzed, and bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were generated in vitro. From 24 h on after CLP, BMC gave rise to BMDC that released enhanced levels of IL-10. In parallel, a population of CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs expanded in the bone marrow in a MyD88-dependent manner. Prior depletion of the CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs from BMC in vitro reversed the increased IL-10 secretion of subsequently differentiating BMDC. The expansion of the CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DC population in the bone marrow after CLP required the function of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and C-C chemokine receptor (CCR) 2, the receptor for C-C chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, but was not associated with monocyte mobilization. CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs were identified as plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) that had acquired an activated phenotype according to their increased expression of MHC class II and CD86. A redistribution of CD4+ pDCs from MHC class II− to MHC class II+ cells concomitant with enhanced expression of CD11c finally led to the rise in the number of CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs. Enhanced levels of CCL2 were found in the bone marrow of septic mice and the inhibition of CCR2 dampened the expression of CD86 on CD4+ pDCs after CLP in vitro. Depletion of pDCs reversed the bias of splenic DCs toward increased IL-10 synthesis after CLP in vivo. Thus, during polymicrobial sepsis, CD4+ pDCs are activated

  11. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate- and C-C Chemokine Receptor 2-Dependent Activation of CD4+ Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Bone Marrow Contributes to Signs of Sepsis-Induced Immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smirnov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is the dysregulated response of the host to systemic, mostly bacterial infection, and is associated with an enhanced susceptibility to life-threatening opportunistic infections. During polymicrobial sepsis, dendritic cells (DCs secrete enhanced levels of interleukin (IL 10 due to an altered differentiation in the bone marrow and contribute to the development of immunosuppression. We investigated the origin of the altered DC differentiation using murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, a model for human polymicrobial sepsis. Bone marrow cells (BMC were isolated after sham or CLP operation, the cellular composition was analyzed, and bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs were generated in vitro. From 24 h on after CLP, BMC gave rise to BMDC that released enhanced levels of IL-10. In parallel, a population of CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs expanded in the bone marrow in a MyD88-dependent manner. Prior depletion of the CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs from BMC in vitro reversed the increased IL-10 secretion of subsequently differentiating BMDC. The expansion of the CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DC population in the bone marrow after CLP required the function of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and C-C chemokine receptor (CCR 2, the receptor for C-C chemokine ligand (CCL 2, but was not associated with monocyte mobilization. CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs were identified as plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs that had acquired an activated phenotype according to their increased expression of MHC class II and CD86. A redistribution of CD4+ pDCs from MHC class II− to MHC class II+ cells concomitant with enhanced expression of CD11c finally led to the rise in the number of CD11chiMHCII+CD4+ DCs. Enhanced levels of CCL2 were found in the bone marrow of septic mice and the inhibition of CCR2 dampened the expression of CD86 on CD4+ pDCs after CLP in vitro. Depletion of pDCs reversed the bias of splenic DCs toward increased IL-10 synthesis after CLP in vivo. Thus, during polymicrobial sepsis, CD4+ pDCs are

  12. Antigen-driven C–C Chemokine-mediated HIV-1 Suppression by CD4+ T Cells from Exposed Uninfected Individuals Expressing the Wild-type CCR-5 Allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furci, Lucinda; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Burastero, Samuele; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Colognesi, Claudia; Quillent, Caroline; Longhi, Renato; Loverro, Patrizia; Borgonovo, Barbara; Gaffi, Davide; Carrow, Emily; Malnati, Mauro; Lusso, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Beretta, Alberto

    1997-01-01

    Despite repeated exposure to HIV-1, certain individuals remain persistently uninfected. Such exposed uninfected (EU) people show evidence of HIV-1–specific T cell immunity and, in rare cases, selective resistance to infection by macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. The latter has been associated with a 32–base pair deletion in the C–C chemokine receptor gene CCR-5, the major coreceptor of macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. We have undertaken an analysis of the HIV-specific T cell responses in 12 EU individuals who were either homozygous for the wild-type CCR-5 allele or heterozygous for the deletion allele (CCR-5Δ32). We have found evidence of an oligoclonal T cell response mediated by helper T cells specific for a conserved region of the HIV-1 envelope. These cells produce very high levels of C–C chemokines when stimulated by the specific antigen and suppress selectively the replication of macrophage-tropic, but not T cell–tropic, strains of HIV-1. These chemokine-producing helper cells may be part of a protective immune response that could be potentially exploited for vaccine development. PMID:9236198

  13. Semaphorin4D Drives CD8+ T-Cell Lesional Trafficking in Oral Lichen Planus via CXCL9/CXCL10 Upregulations in Oral Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yao; Dang, Erle; Shen, Shengxian; Zhang, Tongmei; Qiao, Hongjiang; Chang, Yuqian; Liu, Qing; Wang, Gang

    2017-11-01

    Chemokine-mediated CD8 + T-cell recruitment is an essential but not well-established event for the persistence of oral lichen planus (OLP). Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 is implicated in immune dysfunction, chemokine modulation, and cell migration, which are critical aspects for OLP progression, but its implication in OLP pathogenesis has not been determined. In this study, we sought to explicate the effect of Sema4D on human oral keratinocytes and its capacity to drive CD8 + T-cell lesional trafficking via chemokine modulation. We found that upregulations of sSema4D in OLP tissues and blood were positively correlated with disease severity and activity. In vitro observation revealed that Sema4D induced C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 9/C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 production by binding to plexin-B1 via protein kinase B-NF-κB cascade in human oral keratinocytes, which elicited OLP CD8 + T-cell migration. We also confirmed using clinical samples that elevated C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 9/C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 levels were positively correlated with sSema4D levels in OLP lesions and serum. Notably, we determined matrix metalloproteinase-9 as a new proteolytic enzyme for the cleavage of sSema4D from the T-cell surface, which may contribute to the high levels of sSema4D in OLP lesions and serum. Our findings conclusively revealed an amplification feedback loop involving T cells, chemokines, and Sema4D-dependent signal that promotes OLP progression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. C-Aryl glucoside SGLT2 inhibitors containing a biphenyl motif as potential anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuyang; Mao, Liufeng; Xu, Dengfeng; Xie, Hui; Yang, Ling; Xu, Hongjiang; Geng, Wenjun; Gao, Yong; Xia, Chunguang; Zhang, Xiquan; Meng, Qingyi; Wu, Donghai; Zhao, Junling; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-07-15

    A series of highly active C-aryl glucoside SGLT2 inhibitors containing a biphenyl motif were designed and synthesized for biological evaluation. Among the compounds tested, compound 16l demonstrated high inhibitory activity against SGLT2 (IC50=1.9 nM) with an excellent pharmacokinetic profile. Further study indicated that the in vivo efficacy of compound 16l was comparable to that of dapagliflozin, suggesting that further development would be worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma promoted by three chemokines, MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongxing Chu,1,* Bo Jia,1,* Xiaoling Qiu,2 Jie Pan,1 Xiang Sun,1 Zhiping Wang,1 Jianjiang Zhao1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Department of Endodontology, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The aim of this work was to investigate the role of chemokines in proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC. Out of the 80 cytokines surveyed by a human cytokine antibody array, three chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10, showed elevated expression in TSCC cells (CAL-27 and UM-1, compared to the oral mucosal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the high level of expression of MIP-3α in the TSCC tissues, especially in the high clinical stages. Furthermore, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining indicated that C-C chemokine receptor type 5, C-C chemokine receptor type 6, and C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3, which are the receptors for MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10, respectively, were expressed in the TSCC cells. Viability assay showed MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 led to the proliferation of the CAL-27 cells. Interestingly, MIP-1β and IP-10 also induced apoptosis in the TSCC cells. Transwell invasion assay showed MIP-3α and IP-10 could increase the invasive capability of TSCC cells; consistently, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased in the MIP-3α- and IP-10-treated cells. In summary, our results indicate the expression of MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 increased in the TSCC cells. The elevated expression of MIP-3α and IP-10 promoted proliferation and migration of TSCC. These chemokines, along with their receptors, could be potential biomarkers and

  16. Convulxin, a C-type lectin-like protein, inhibits HCASMCs functions via WAD-motif/integrin-αv interaction and NF-κB-independent gene suppression of GRO and IL-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Ho; Chiang, Tin-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jeng

    2017-03-15

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin-like protein (CLPs), is a potent platelet aggregation inducer. To evaluate its potential applications in angiogenic diseases, the multimeric CVX were further explored on its mode of actions toward human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). The N-terminus of β-chain of CVX (CVX-β) contains a putative disintegrin-like domain with a conserved motif upon the sequence comparison with other CLPs. Importantly, native CVX had no cytotoxic activity as examined by electrophoretic pattern. A Trp-Ala-Asp (WAD)-containing octapeptide, MTWADAEK, was thereafter synthesized and analyzed in functional assays. In the case of specific integrin antagonists as positive controls, the anti-angiogenic effects of CVX on HCASMCs were investigated by series of functional analyses. CVX showed to exhibit multiple inhibitory activities toward HCASMCs proliferation, adhesion and invasion with a dose- and integrin αvβ3-dependent fashion. However, the WAD-octapeptide exerting a minor potency could also work as an active peptidomimetic. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated both the intact CVX and synthetic peptide can specifically interact with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and CVX was shown to have a down-regulatory effect on the gene expression of CXC-chemokines, such as growth-related oncogene and interleukin-8. According to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation assay and Western blotting analysis, the NF-κB activation was not involved in the signaling events of CVX-induced gene expression. In conclusion, CVX may act as a disintegrin-like protein via the interactions of WAD-motif in CVX-β with integrin-αv on HCASMCs and it also is a gene suppressor with the ability to diminish the expression of two CXC-chemokines in a NF-κB-independent manner. Indeed, more extensive investigations are needed and might create a new avenue for the development of a novel angiostatic agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete cDNA sequence of human complement C1s and close physical linkage of the homologous genes C1s and C1r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.; Duponchel, C.; Meo, T.; Julier, C.

    1987-01-01

    Overlapping molecular clones encoding the complement subcomponent C1s were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence reconstructed from these clones spans about 85% of the length of the liver C1s messenger RNAs, which occur in three distinct size classes around 3 kilobases in length. Comparisons with the sequence of C1r, the other enzymatic subcomponent of C1, reveal 40% amino acid identity and conservation of all the cysteine residues. Beside the serine protease domain, the following sequence motifs, previously described in C1r, were also found in C1s: (a) two repeats of the type found in the Ba fragment of complement factor B and in several other complement but also noncomplement proteins, (b) a cysteine-rich segment homologous to the repeats of epidermal growth factor precursor, and (c) a duplicated segment found only in C1r and C1s. Differences in each of these structural motifs provide significant clues for the interpretation of the functional divergence of these interacting serine protease zymogens. Hybridizations of C1r and C1s probes to restriction endonuclease fragments of genomic DNA demonstrate close physical linkage of the corresponding genes. The implications of this finding are discussed with respect to the evolution of C1r and C1s after their origin by tandem gene duplication and to the previously observed combined hereditary deficiencies of Clr and Cls

  18. Increased C-C chemokine receptor 2 gene expression in monocytes of severe obstructive sleep apnea patients and under intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Pang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chang, Ying-Ling; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chao, I-Ju; Lin, Yuling; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be a risk factor of coronary artery disease. The chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium in the early atherosclerosis is important. This study aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSA, on the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Peripheral blood was sampled from 54 adults enrolled for suspected OSA. RNA was prepared from the isolated monocytes for the analysis of C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). The effect of intermittent hypoxia on the regulation and function of CCR2 was investigated on THP-1 monocytic cells and monocytes. The mRNA and protein expression levels were investigated by RT/real-time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Transwell filter migration assay and cell adhesion assay were performed to study the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Monocytic CCR2 gene expression was found to be increased in severe OSA patients and higher levels were detected after sleep. Intermittent hypoxia increased the CCR2 expression in THP-1 monocytic cells even in the presence of TNF-α and CRP. Intermittent hypoxia also promoted the MCP-1-mediated chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. Furthermore, inhibitor for p42/44 MAPK or p38 MAPK suppressed the activation of monocytic CCR2 expression by intermittent hypoxia. This is the first study to demonstrate the increase of CCR2 gene expression in monocytes of severe OSA patients. Monocytic CCR2 gene expression can be induced under intermittent hypoxia which contributes to the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes.

  19. On the Michael addition of water to C = C bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, B.

    2015-01-01

    ?-Hydroxy carbonyl compounds are an important class of compounds often found as a common structural motif in natural products. Although the molecules themselves look rather simple, their synthesis can be challenging. Water addition to conjugated C = C bonds opens up a straightforward route for the

  20. Chemokines in teleost fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Tafalla, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines defined by the presence of four conserved cysteine residues which in mammals can be divided into four subfamilies depending on the arrangement of the first two conserved cysteines in their sequence: CXC (α), CC (β), C and CX(3)C classes. Evolutionarily, fish can be considered as an intermediate step between species which possess only innate immunity (invertebrates) and species with a fully developed acquired immune network such as mammals. Therefore, the functionality of their different immune cell types and molecules is sometimes also intermediate between innate and acquired responses. The first chemokine gene identified in a teleost was a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) chemokine designated as CK1 in 1998. Since then, many different chemokine genes have been identified in several fish species, but their role in homeostasis and immune response remains largely unknown. Extensive genomic duplication events and the fact that chemokines evolve more quickly than other immune genes, make it very difficult to establish true orthologues between fish and mammalian chemokines that would help us with the ascription of immune roles. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish, focusing mainly on which genes have been identified so far and highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation, due to the great lack of functional information available for them. As the number of chemokine genes begins to close down for some teleost species, there is an important need for functional assays that may elucidate the role of each of these molecules within the fish immune response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloning and functional characterization of the rabbit C-C chemokine receptor 2

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    Hamdouchi Chafiq

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC-family chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 is implicated in the trafficking of blood-borne monocytes to sites of inflammation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and atherosclerosis. The major challenge in the development of small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists is the lack of cross-species activity to the receptor in the preclinical species. Rabbit models have been widely used to study the role of various inflammatory molecules in the development of inflammatory processes. Therefore, in this study, we report the cloning and characterization of rabbit CCR2. Data regarding the activity of the CCR2 antagonist will provide valuable tools to perform toxicology and efficacy studies in the rabbit model. Results Sequence alignment indicated that rabbit CCR2 shares 80 % identity to human CCR2b. Tissue distribution indicated that rabbit CCR2 is abundantly expressed in spleen and lung. Recombinant rabbit CCR2 expressed as stable transfectants in U-937 cells binds radiolabeled 125I-mouse JE (murine MCP-1 with a calculated Kd of 0.1 nM. In competition binding assays, binding of radiolabeled mouse JE to rabbit CCR2 is differentially competed by human MCP-1, -2, -3 and -4, but not by RANTES, MIP-1α or MIP-1β. U-937/rabbit CCR2 stable transfectants undergo chemotaxis in response to both human MCP-1 and mouse JE with potencies comparable to those reported for human CCR2b. Finally, TAK-779, a dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist effectively inhibits the binding of 125I-mouse JE (IC50 = 2.3 nM to rabbit CCR2 and effectively blocks CCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Conclusion In this study, we report the cloning of rabbit CCR2 and demonstrate that this receptor is a functional chemotactic receptor for MCP-1.

  2. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the medullary dorsal horn are involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain

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    Zhang Zhi-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain in the trigeminal system is frequently observed in clinic, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In addition, the function of immune cells and related chemicals in the mechanism of pain has been recognized, whereas few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the trigeminal system in chronic pain. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-chemokine C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 signaling in the trigeminal nucleus is involved in the maintenance of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Methods The inferior alveolar nerve and mental nerve transection (IAMNT was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain. The expression of ATF3, CCL2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and CCR2 were detected by immunofluorescence histochemical staining and western blot. The cellular localization of CCL2 and CCR2 were examined by immunofluorescence double staining. The effect of a selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. Results IAMNT induced persistent (>21 days heat hyperalgesia of the orofacial region and ATF3 expression in the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion. Meanwhile, CCL2 expression was increased in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH from 3 days to 21 days after IAMNT. The induced CCL2 was colocalized with astroglial marker GFAP, but not with neuronal marker NeuN or microglial marker OX-42. Astrocytes activation was also found in the MDH and it started at 3 days, peaked at 10 days and maintained at 21 days after IAMNT. In addition, CCR2 was upregulated by IAMNT in the ipsilateral medulla and lasted for more than 21 days. CCR2 was mainly colocalized with NeuN and few cells were colocalized with GFAP. Finally, intracisternal injection of CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 (1, 10 μg significantly attenuated IAMNT-induced heat hyperalgesia. Conclusion The data suggest that CCL2-CCR

  3. Microenvironmental Regulation of Chemokine (C-X-C-motif) Receptor 4 in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Kim, Mijung; Liu, Yueying; Shepard, Jaclyn; Belmadani, Abdelhak; Miller, Richard J.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Stack, M. Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The majority of women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) succumb due to complications of metastatic disease, suggesting that anti-metastatic therapies may improve patient survival. EOC metastasis involves intra-peritoneal shedding of cells from the primary tumor, followed by adhesion and localized penetration of the submesothelial matrix to anchor metastatic implants. Accumulation of malignant ascites is also common. Thus, a unique microenvironmental niche is established, which includes malignant cells and a plethora of soluble factors secreted by – or in response to – tumor cells. As cells penetrating the sub-mesothelial surface encounter an interstitial collagen-rich ECM, we have used 3-dimensional type I collagen (3DCI) gels to model early events resulting from intra-peritoneal anchoring. In this study we demonstrate a novel pathway of CXCR4 upregulation through β1-integrin- and NFκB- dependent signaling pathways in response to 3DCI. We also demonstrate the involvement of CXCR4-SDF1 axis in collagen invasion and proliferation, relevant to the metastatic EOC. Our data show that CXCR4 expression in human EOCs, as well as SDF1 presence in the ascites, is correlated with disease progression and metastasis. These data emphasize the importance of CXCR4 – SDF1 axis in EOC metastasis and suggest that this mechanism should be accounted for when targeting EOC metastasis. PMID:20460402

  4. Manufacturing porcine islets: culture at 22°C has no advantage above culture at 37°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kate R; Martins, Kyra V; Murtaugh, Michael P; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Papas, Klearchos K

    2013-01-01

    Background The manufacturing process of islets includes a culture step which was originally introduced to ease the logistics of procedures in preparing the graft and transplant recipient. It has been suggested that culture at room temperature has an advantage over culture at 37°C, in part by reducing immunogenicity via preferential elimination of contaminating cells (such as passenger leukocytes) within islets. We investigated this using islets isolated from pancreata of adult pigs. Methods Porcine islets were isolated from three donors and cultured at 37°C for 1 day, and then under three different conditions: 37°C for 6 days (condition A); 22°C for 6 days (condition B); or 22°C for 5 days followed by 37°C for 1 day (condition C). Recovery was assessed by DNA measurement, viability by oxygen consumption rate normalized for DNA (OCR/DNA), and gene expression by RT-PCR for a series of 9 lymphocyte markers, 11 lymphokines and chemokines, and 14 apoptotic and stress markers. Results Post-culture islet recoveries were similar for the three culture conditions. Average OCR/DNA values were 129–159 nmol/min.mgDNA before culture, and 259–291, 204–212, and 207–228 nmol/min•mgDNA, respectively, for culture under conditions A, B, and C, respectively. Irrespective of culture condition, examined gene expression in all three series of lymphocyte markers, lymphokines and chemokines, and apoptotic and stress markers manifested a statistically significant decrease upon culture for 7 days. This decrease was most dramatic for condition A: in particular most of lymphocyte markers showed a >10-fold reduction and also 6 markers in the lymphokine and chemokine series: these reductions are consistent with the elimination of immune cells present within islets during culture. The reduction was less for apoptotic and stress markers. For culture under condition B the reduction in gene expression was less, and culture under condition C resulted in gene expression levels similar

  5. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1 Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif.

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    Julia Bender

    Full Text Available The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1 plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95, synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97, SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2. CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1 binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function.

  6. MicroRNA-17-92 cluster promotes the proliferation and the chemokine production of keratinocytes: implication for the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weigang; Yi, Xiuli; An, Yawen; Guo, Sen; Li, Shuli; Song, Pu; Chang, Yuqian; Zhang, Shaolong; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying

    2018-05-11

    Keratinocytes are the main epidermal cell type that constitutes the skin barrier against environmental damages, which emphasizes the balance between the growth and the death of keratinocytes in maintaining skin homeostasis. Aberrant proliferation of keratinocytes and the secretion of inflammatory factors from keratinocytes are related to the formation of chronic inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis. MicroRNA-17-92 (miRNA-17-92 or miR-17-92) is a miRNA cluster that regulates cell growth and immunity, but the role of miR-17-92 cluster in keratinocytes and its relation to skin diseases have not been well investigated. In the present study, we initially found that miR-17-92 cluster promoted the proliferation and the cell-cycle progression of keratinocytes via suppressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B). Furthermore, miR-17-92 cluster facilitated the secretion of C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) from keratinocytes by inhibiting suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), which enhanced the chemotaxis for T lymphocytes formed by keratinocytes. In addition, we detected increased expression of miR-17-92 cluster in psoriatic lesions and the level of lesional miR-17-92 cluster was positively correlated with the disease severity in psoriasis patients. At last, miR-17-92 cluster was increased in keratinocytes by cytokines through the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that cytokine-induced overexpression of miR-17-92 cluster can promote the proliferation and the immune function of keratinocytes, and thus may contribute to the development of inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis, which implicates miR-17-92 cluster as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and other skin diseases with similar inflammatory pathogenesis.

  7. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

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    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  8. The PDZ motif of the α1C subunit is not required for surface trafficking and adrenergic modulation of CaV1.2 channel in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Katchman, Alexander; Weinberg, Richard L; Abrams, Jeffrey; Samad, Tahmina; Wan, Elaine; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Marx, Steven O

    2015-01-23

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels play a key role in initiating muscle excitation-contraction coupling, neurotransmitter release, gene expression, and hormone secretion. The association of CaV1.2 with a supramolecular complex impacts trafficking, localization, turnover, and, most importantly, multifaceted regulation of its function in the heart. Several studies hint at an important role for the C terminus of the α1C subunit as a hub for multidimensional regulation of CaV1.2 channel trafficking and function. Recent studies have demonstrated an important role for the four-residue PDZ binding motif at the C terminus of α1C in interacting with scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, in the subcellular localization of CaV1.2 in neurons, and in the efficient signaling to cAMP-response element-binding protein in neurons. However, the role of the α1C PDZ ligand domain in the heart is not known. To determine whether the α1C PDZ motif is critical for CaV1.2 trafficking and function in cardiomyocytes, we generated transgenic mice with inducible expression of an N-terminal FLAG epitope-tagged dihydropyridine-resistant α1C with the PDZ motif deleted (ΔPDZ). These mice were crossed with α-myosin heavy chain reverse transcriptional transactivator transgenic mice, and the double-transgenic mice were fed doxycycline. The ΔPDZ channels expressed, trafficked to the membrane, and supported robust excitation-contraction coupling in the presence of nisoldipine, a dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blocker, providing functional evidence that they appropriately target to dyads. The ΔPDZ Ca(2+) channels were appropriately regulated by isoproterenol and forskolin. These data indicate that the α1C PDZ motif is not required for surface trafficking, localization to the dyad, or adrenergic stimulation of CaV1.2 in adult cardiomyocytes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

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    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  10. In vitro and in vivo dependency of chemokine generation on C5a and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Sarma, V; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    production in vitro and in vivo. Two rat CXC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)) as well as three rat CC chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) were investigated. Chemokine generation in vitro...

  11. Crystal structure and novel recognition motif of rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum: structural insights for recognition specificity and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S; Arvai, A S; Clancy, S B; Tainer, J A

    2001-01-05

    Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme inactivates the small GTP-binding protein family Rho by ADP-ribosylating asparagine 41, which depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton. C3 thus represents a major family of the bacterial toxins that transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to specific amino acids in acceptor proteins to modify key biological activities in eukaryotic cells, including protein synthesis, differentiation, transformation, and intracellular signaling. The 1.7 A resolution C3 exoenzyme structure establishes the conserved features of the core NAD-binding beta-sandwich fold with other ADP-ribosylating toxins despite little sequence conservation. Importantly, the central core of the C3 exoenzyme structure is distinguished by the absence of an active site loop observed in many other ADP-ribosylating toxins. Unlike the ADP-ribosylating toxins that possess the active site loop near the central core, the C3 exoenzyme replaces the active site loop with an alpha-helix, alpha3. Moreover, structural and sequence similarities with the catalytic domain of vegetative insecticidal protein 2 (VIP2), an actin ADP-ribosyltransferase, unexpectedly implicates two adjacent, protruding turns, which join beta5 and beta6 of the toxin core fold, as a novel recognition specificity motif for this newly defined toxin family. Turn 1 evidently positions the solvent-exposed, aromatic side-chain of Phe209 to interact with the hydrophobic region of Rho adjacent to its GTP-binding site. Turn 2 evidently both places the Gln212 side-chain for hydrogen bonding to recognize Rho Asn41 for nucleophilic attack on the anomeric carbon of NAD ribose and holds the key Glu214 catalytic side-chain in the adjacent catalytic pocket. This proposed bipartite ADP-ribosylating toxin turn-turn (ARTT) motif places the VIP2 and C3 toxin classes into a single ARTT family characterized by analogous target protein recognition via turn 1 aromatic and turn 2 hydrogen-bonding side-chain moieties. Turn 2 centrally anchors

  12. Permuting the PGF Signature Motif Blocks both Archaeosortase-Dependent C-Terminal Cleavage and Prenyl Lipid Attachment for the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Halim, Mohd Farid; Karch, Kelly R; Zhou, Yitian; Haft, Daniel H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2015-12-28

    For years, the S-layer glycoprotein (SLG), the sole component of many archaeal cell walls, was thought to be anchored to the cell surface by a C-terminal transmembrane segment. Recently, however, we demonstrated that the Haloferax volcanii SLG C terminus is removed by an archaeosortase (ArtA), a novel peptidase. SLG, which was previously shown to be lipid modified, contains a C-terminal tripartite structure, including a highly conserved proline-glycine-phenylalanine (PGF) motif. Here, we demonstrate that ArtA does not process an SLG variant where the PGF motif is replaced with a PFG motif (slg(G796F,F797G)). Furthermore, using radiolabeling, we show that SLG lipid modification requires the PGF motif and is ArtA dependent, lending confirmation to the use of a novel C-terminal lipid-mediated protein-anchoring mechanism by prokaryotes. Similar to the case for the ΔartA strain, the growth, cellular morphology, and cell wall of the slg(G796F,F797G) strain, in which modifications of additional H. volcanii ArtA substrates should not be altered, are adversely affected, demonstrating the importance of these posttranslational SLG modifications. Our data suggest that ArtA is either directly or indirectly involved in a novel proteolysis-coupled, covalent lipid-mediated anchoring mechanism. Given that archaeosortase homologs are encoded by a broad range of prokaryotes, it is likely that this anchoring mechanism is widely conserved. Prokaryotic proteins bound to cell surfaces through intercalation, covalent attachment, or protein-protein interactions play critical roles in essential cellular processes. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms that anchor proteins to archaeal cell surfaces remain poorly characterized. Here, using the archaeon H. volcanii as a model system, we report the first in vivo studies of a novel protein-anchoring pathway involving lipid modification of a peptidase-processed C terminus. Our findings not only yield important insights into poorly understood

  13. The constitutive activation of the CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene depends on C/EBPbeta in v-src transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagliardi, M; Maynard, S; Bojovic, B

    2001-01-01

    The CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene is expressed constitutively in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). This aberrant induction is controlled at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional activation depends on multiple elements of the CEF....../EBPbeta binds to a second element located in proximity of the TRE. A mutation of this distal CAAT box impaired the activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src) indicating that this element is also part of the SRU. Using the RCASBP retroviral vector, we expressed a dominant negative mutant of C....../EBPbeta (designated Delta184-C/EBPbeta) in RSV-transformed CEF. Delta184-C/EBPbeta decreased the accumulation of the CEF-4 mRNA and activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src). The induction of the Cox-2 gene (CEF-147) was also reduced by Delta184-C/EBPbeta. The effect of the dominant negative mutant was observed...

  14. Stem/Progenitor Cell Proteoglycans Decorated with 7-D-4, 4-C-3 and 3-B-3(-) Chondroitin Sulphate Motifs Are Morphogenetic Markers Of Tissue Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anthony J; Smith, Susan M; Caterson, Bruce; Melrose, James

    2018-06-11

    This study reviewed the occurrence of chondroitin sulphate (CS) motifs 4-C-3, 7-D-4 and 3-B-3(-) which are expressed by progenitor cells in tissues undergoing morphogenesis. These motifs have a transient early expression pattern during tissue development and also appear in mature tissues during pathological remodeling and attempted repair processes by activated adult stem cells. The CS motifs are information and recognition modules, which may regulate cellular behavior and delineate stem cell niches in developmental tissues. One of the difficulties in determining the precise role of stem cells in tissue development and repair processes is their short engraftment period and the lack of specific markers, which differentiate the activated stem cell lineages from the resident cells. The CS sulphation motifs 7-D-4, 4-C-3 and 3-B-3 (-) decorate cell surface proteoglycans on activated stem/progenitor cells and appear to identify these cells in transitional areas of tissue development and in tissue repair and may be applicable to determining a more precise role for stem cells in tissue morphogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Piv site-specific invertase requires a DEDD motif analogous to the catalytic center of the RuvC Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, John M; Robertson, Anne E; Poynter, David J; Denniston, Shelby S; Karls, Anna C

    2005-05-01

    Piv, a unique prokaryotic site-specific DNA invertase, is related to transposases of the insertion elements from the IS110/IS492 family and shows no similarity to the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine- or serine-recombinase families. Piv tertiary structure is predicted to include the RNase H-like fold that typically encompasses the catalytic site of the recombinases or nucleases of the retroviral integrase superfamily, including transposases and RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvases. Analogous to the DDE and DEDD catalytic motifs of transposases and RuvC, respectively, four Piv acidic residues D9, E59, D101, and D104 appear to be positioned appropriately within the RNase H fold to coordinate two divalent metal cations. This suggests mechanistic similarity between site-specific inversion mediated by Piv and transposition or endonucleolytic reactions catalyzed by enzymes of the retroviral integrase superfamily. The role of the DEDD motif in Piv catalytic activity was addressed using Piv variants that are substituted individually or multiply at these acidic residues and assaying for in vivo inversion, intermolecular recombination, and DNA binding activities. The results indicate that all four residues of the DEDD motif are required for Piv catalytic activity. The DEDD residues are not essential for inv recombination site recognition and binding, but this acidic tetrad does appear to contribute to the stability of Piv-inv interactions. On the basis of these results, a working model for Piv-mediated inversion that includes resolution of a Holliday junction is presented.

  16. TCR comodulation of nonengaged TCR takes place by a protein kinase C and CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Rasmussen, B. A.; Lauritsen, J P

    2003-01-01

    of comodulation. Like internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was dependent on protein tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, we found that in contrast to internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was highly dependent on protein kinase C activity and the CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif. Based...

  17. Elevated chemokine CC-motif receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) promotes cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fengqiong; Xu, Zhenhua; Wang, Zifeng; Yao, Hong; Shen, Zan; Yu, Fang; Tang, Yiping; Fu, Dengli; Lin, Sheng; Lu, Gang; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Poon, Wai Sang; Huang, Yunchao; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi

    2012-12-14

    Chemokine CC-motif receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) is a 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor which plays a key role in lung dendritic cell trafficking to peripheral lymph nodes. The function and expression of CCRL2 in cancer is not understood at present. Here we report that CCRL2 expression level is elevated in human glioma patient samples and cell lines. The magnitude of increase is positively associated with increasing tumor grade, with the highest level observed in grade IV glioblastoma. By gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies, we further showed that CCRL2 did not regulate the growth of human glioblatoma U87 and U373 cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that over-expression of CCRL2 significantly enhanced the migration rate and invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that elevated CCRL2 in glioma promotes cell migration and invasion. The potential roles of CCRL2 as a novel therapeutic target and biomarker warrant further investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. IFN-gamma shapes immune invasion of the central nervous system via regulation of chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Prince, E N; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic interplay between cytokines and chemokines directs trafficking of leukocyte subpopulations to tissues in autoimmune inflammation. We have examined the role of IFN-gamma in directing chemokine production and leukocyte infiltration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EA......-gamma in EAE, acting on T cell proliferation and directing chemokine production, with profound implications for the onset and progression of disease.......). BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are resistant to induction of EAE by immunization with myelin basic protein. However, IFN-gamma-deficient (BALB/c) and IFN-gammaR-deficient (C57BL/6) mice developed rapidly progressing lethal disease. Widespread demyelination and disseminated leukocytic infiltration of spinal...

  19. In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Tresoldi, E; Björndal, A; Fredriksson, R; Colognesi, C; Deng, H K; Malnati, M S; Plebani, A; Siccardi, A G; Littman, D R; Fenyö, E M; Lusso, P

    1997-11-01

    Following the identification of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta as major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-suppressive factors produced by CD8+ T cells, several chemokine receptors were found to serve as membrane co-receptors for primate immunodeficiency lentiretroviruses. The two most widely used co-receptors thus far recognized, CCR5 and CXCR4, are expressed by both activated T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. CCR5, a specific RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1 receptor, is used preferentially by non-MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains and by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), whereas CXCR4, a receptor for the C-X-C chemokine SDF-1, is used by MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2, but not by SIV. Other receptors with a more restricted cellular distribution, such as CCR2b, CCR3 and STRL33, can also function as co-receptors for selected viral isolates. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 has been fingered as a critical determinant of the co-receptor choice. Here, we document a consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection. Viral isolates obtained during the asymptomatic stages generally used only CCR5 as a co-receptor and were inhibited by RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, but not by SDF-1. By contrast, the majority of the isolates derived after the progression of the disease were resistant to C-C chemokines, having acquired the ability to use CXCR4 and, in some cases, CCR3, while gradually losing CCR5 usage. Surprisingly, most of these isolates were also insensitive to SDF-1, even when used in combination with RANTES. An early acquisition of CXCR4 usage predicted a poor prognosis. In children who progressed to AIDS without a shift to CXCR4 usage, all the sequential isolates were CCR5-dependent but showed a reduced sensitivity to C-C chemokines. Discrete changes in the V3 domain

  20. Expression, refolding and crystallizations of the Grb2-like (GADS) C-terminal SH3 domain complexed with a SLP-76 motif peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faravelli, Alessandro; Dimasi, Nazzareno

    2005-01-01

    Several crystals of the Grb2-like C-terminal SH3 domain in complex with a motif peptide from the SLP-76 protein were obtained and characterized. The Grb2-like adaptor protein GADS is composed of an N-terminal SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a proline-rich region and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GADS interacts through its C-terminal SH3 domain with the adaptor protein SLP-76, thus recruiting this protein and other associated molecules to the linker for activation of T-cell (LAT) protein. The DNA encoding the C-terminal SH3 domain of GADS (GADS-cSH3) was assembled synthetically using a recursive PCR technique and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified. Several crystals of this domain in complex with the SLP-76 peptide were obtained and characterized

  1. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the C-terminal domain of UvrC from E.coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Folkers, G.E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Boelens, R.; Wechselberger, R.W.; Niztayev, A.; Kaptein, R.

    2002-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the UvrC protein (UvrC CTD) is essential for 5' incision in the prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair process. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the UvrC CTD using heteronuclear NMR techniques. The structure shows two helix±hairpin±helix (HhH) motifs

  2. Onbaekwon Suppresses Colon Cancer Cell Invasion by Inhibiting Expression of the CXC Chemokine Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Buyun; Yoon, Jaewoo; Yoon, Seong Woo; Park, Byoungduck

    2017-06-01

    Cysteine X cysteine (CXC) chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) were originally identified as chemoattractants between immune cells and sites of inflammation. Since studies have validated an increased level of CXCL12 and its receptor in patients with colorectal cancers, CXCL12/CXCR4 axis has been considered as a valuable marker of cancer metastasis. Therefore, identification of CXCR4 inhibitors has great potential to abrogate tumor metastasis. Onbaekwon (OBW) is a complex herbal formula that is derived from the literature of traditional Korean medicine Dongeuibogam. In this study, we demonstrated that OBW suppressed CXCR4 expression in various cancer cell types in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors had no effect to prevent the OBW-induced suppression of CXCR4, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of OBW was not due to proteolytic degradation but occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay further confirmed that OBW could block endogenous activation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of CXCR4 in colon cancer cells. Consistent with the aforementioned molecular basis, OBW abolished cell invasion induced by CXCL12 in colon cancer cells. Together, our results suggest that OBW, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, could be a promising therapeutic agent contributing to cancer treatment.

  3. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the -C-X1-X2-C- motif in the active site of the thioredoxin superfamily: E. coli DsbA and its mutants as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Foloppe, Nicolas

    2013-08-27

    E. coli DsbA is an intensively studied enzyme of the thioredoxin superfamily of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases. DsbA catalyzes the disulfide bond formation and folding of proteins in the bacterial periplasm. DsbA and its mutants have highlighted the strong and puzzling influence of the -C-X1-X2-C- active site variants, found across the thioredoxin superfamily, on the ionization and redox properties of this site. However, the interpretation of these observations remains wanting, largely due to a dearth of structural information. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to provide extensive information on the structure and dynamics of reduced -C30-X31-X32-C33- motifs in wild type DsbA and 13 of its mutants. These simulations are combined with calculations of the pK of H32 and of the very low pK of the catalytic cysteine C30. In wild type DsbA, the titrations of C30 and H32 are shown to be coupled; the protonation states and dynamics of H32 are examined. The thiolate of C30 is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with the protein. Modulation of these hydrogen bonds by alteration of residue X32 has the greatest impact on the pK of C30, which rationalizes its higher pK in thioredoxin and tryparedoxin. Because of structural constrains, residue X31 has only an indirect and weak influence on the pK of C30. The dynamics of C30 is clearly related to its stabilizing interactions and pK value. Although relatively small differences between pKs were not reproduced in the calculations, the major trends are explained, adding new insights to our understanding of enzymes in this family.

  5. Manufacturing porcine islets: culture at 22 °C has no advantage above culture at 37 °C: a gene expression evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kate R; Martins, Kyra V; Murtaugh, Michael P; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Papas, Klearchos K

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing process of islets includes a culture step which was originally introduced to ease the logistics of procedures in preparing the graft and transplant recipient. It has been suggested that culture at room temperature has an advantage over culture at 37 °C, in part by reducing immunogenicity via preferential elimination of contaminating cells (such as passenger leukocytes) within islets. We investigated this using islets isolated from pancreata of adult pigs. Porcine islets were isolated from three donors and cultured at 37 °C for 1 day, and then under three different conditions: 37 °C for 6 days (condition A); 22 °C for 6 days (condition B); or 22 °C for 5 days followed by 37 °C for 1 day (condition C). Recovery was assessed by DNA measurement, viability by oxygen consumption rate normalized for DNA (OCR/DNA), and gene expression by RT-PCR for a series of 9 lymphocyte markers, 11 lymphokines and chemokines, and 14 apoptotic and stress markers. Post-culture islet recoveries were similar for the three culture conditions. Average OCR/DNA values were 129-159 nmol/min·mgDNA before culture, and 259-291, 204-212, and 207-228 nmol/min·mgDNA, respectively, for culture under conditions A, B, and C, respectively. Irrespective of culture condition, examined gene expression in all three series of lymphocyte markers, lymphokines and chemokines, and apoptotic and stress markers manifested a statistically significant decrease upon culture for 7 days. This decrease was most dramatic for condition A: in particular, most of lymphocyte markers showed a >10-fold reduction and also six markers in the lymphokine and chemokine series; these reductions are consistent with the elimination of immune cells present within islets during culture. The reduction was less for apoptotic and stress markers. For culture under condition B, the reduction in gene expression was less, and culture under condition C resulted in gene expression levels similar to those

  6. Biosynthesis of Single Thioether c-Type Cytochromes Provides Insight into Mechanisms Intrinsic to Holocytochrome c Synthase (HCCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Hsu, Jennifer; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2017-07-05

    C-type cytochromes (cyts c) are generally characterized by the presence of two thioether attachments between heme and two cysteine residues within a highly conserved CXXCH motif. Most eukaryotes use the System III cyt c biogenesis pathway composed of holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) to catalyze thioether formation. Some protozoan organisms express a functionally equivalent, natural variant of cyt c with an XXXCH heme-attachment motif, resulting in a single covalent attachment. Previous studies have shown that recombinant HCCS can produce low levels of the XXXCH single thioether variant. However, cyt c variants containing substitutions at the C-terminal cysteine of the heme-attachment site (i.e., resulting in CXXXH) have never been observed in nature, and attempts to biosynthesize a recombinant version of this cyt c variant have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we report the biochemical analyses of an HCCS-matured CXXXH cyt c variant, comparing its biosynthesis and properties to those of the XXXCH variant. The results indicate that although HCCS mediates heme attachment to the N-terminal cysteine in CXXXH cyt c variants, up to 50% of the cyt c produced is modified in an oxygen-dependent manner, resulting in a mixed population of cyt c. Since this aerobic modification occurs only in the context of CXXXH, we also propose that natural HCCS-mediated heme attachment to CXXCH likely initiates at the C-terminal cysteine.

  7. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated lo...

  8. Two CGTCA motifs and a GHF1/Pit1 binding site mediate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A regulation of human growth hormone gene expression in rat anterior pituitary GC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, A R; Zhang, W; Eberhardt, N L

    1994-01-21

    We established the cis-acting elements which mediate cAMP responsiveness of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene in transiently transfected rat anterior pituitary tumor GC cells. Analysis of the intact hGH gene or hGH 5'-flanking DNA (5'-FR) coupled to the hGh cDNA or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase or luciferase genes, indicated that cAMP primarily stimulated hGH promoter activity. Cotransfection of a protein kinase A inhibitory protein cDNA demonstrated that the cAMP response was mediated by protein kinase A. Mutational analysis of the hGH promoter identified two core cAMP response element motifs (CGTCA) located at nucleotides -187/-183 (distal cAMP response element; dCRE) and -99/-95 (proximal cAMP response element; pCRE) and a pituitary-specific transcription factor (GHF1/Pit1) binding site at nucleotides -123/-112 (dGHF1) which were required for cAMP responsiveness. GHF1 was not a limiting factor, since overexpression of GHF1 in cotransfections increased basal but not forskolin induction levels. Gel shift analyses indicated that similar, ubiquitous, thermostable protein(s) specifically bound the pCRE and dCRE motifs. The CGTCA motif-binding factors were cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1)-related, since the DNA-protein complex was competed by unlabeled CREB consensus oligonucleotide, specifically supershifted by antisera to CREB and ATF-1 but not ATF-2, and was bound by purified CREB with the same relative binding affinity (pCRE < dCRE < CREB) and mobility as the GC nuclear extract. UV cross-linking and Southwestern blot analyses revealed multiple DNA-protein interactions of which approximately 100- and approximately 45-kDa proteins were predominant; the approximately 45-kDa protein may represent CREB. These results indicate that CREB/ATF-1-related factors act coordinately with the cell-specific factor GHF1 to mediate cAMP-dependent regulation of hGH-1 gene transcription in anterior pituitary somatotrophs.

  9. Protective Role of Complement C3 Against Cytokine-Mediated beta-Cell Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Santos, Reinaldo S.; Marroqui, Laura; Grieco, Fabio A.

    2017-01-01

    silencing exacerbates apoptosis under both basal condition and following exposure to cytokines, and it increases chemokine expression upon cytokine treatment. C3 exerts its prosurvival effects via AKT activation and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition. Exogenously added C3 also protects against cytokine...

  10. Electrochemical Cobalt-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauermann, Nicolas; Meyer, Tjark H; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-06-19

    Carbon-heteroatom bonds represent omnipresent structural motifs of the vast majority of functionalized materials and bioactive compounds. C-H activation has emerged as arguably the most efficient strategy to construct C-Het bonds. Despite of major advances, these C-H transformations were largely dominated by precious transition metal catalysts, in combination with stoichiometric, toxic metal oxidants. Herein, we discuss the recent evolution of cobalt-catalyzed C-H activations that enable C-Het formations with electricity as the sole sustainable oxidant until May 2018. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The C-terminal domain of the Arabidopsis AtMBD7 protein confers strong chromatin binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemach, Assaf; Paul, Laju K.; Stambolsky, Perry; Efroni, Idan; Rotter, Varda; Grafi, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MBD7 (AtMBD7) - a naturally occurring poly MBD protein - was previously found to be functional in binding methylated-CpG dinucleotides in vitro and localized to highly methylated chromocenters in vivo. Furthermore, AtMBD7 has significantly lower mobility within the nucleus conferred by cooperative activity of its three MBD motifs. Here we show that besides the MBD motifs, AtMBD7 possesses a strong chromatin binding domain located at its C-terminus designated sticky-C (StkC). Mutational analysis showed that a glutamic acid residue near the C-terminus is essential though not sufficient for the StkC function. Further analysis demonstrated that this motif can render nuclear proteins highly immobile both in plant and animal cells, without affecting their native subnuclear localization. Thus, the C-terminal, StkC motif plays an important role in fastening AtMBD7 to its chromosomal, CpG-methylated sites. It may be possible to utilize this motif for fastening nuclear proteins to their chromosomal sites both in plant and animal cells for research and gene therapy applications.

  12. Construction of C35 gene bait recombinants and T47D cell cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Gui-Hua; Liu, Ye; Xiao, Ting; Zhu, Song; Yan, Ge

    2017-11-20

    C35 is a novel tumor biomarker associated with metastasis progression. To investigate the interaction factors of C35 in its high expressed breast cancer cell lines, we constructed bait recombinant plasmids of C35 gene and T47D cell cDNA library for yeast two-hybrid screening. Full length C35 sequences were subcloned using RT-PCR from cDNA template extracted from T47D cells. Based on functional domain analysis, the full-length C35 1-348bp was also truncated into two fragments C351-153bp and C35154-348bp to avoid auto-activation. The three kinds of C35 genes were successfully amplified and inserted into pGBKT7 to construct bait recombinant plasmids pGBKT7-C351-348bp, pGBKT7-C351-153bp and pGBKT7-C35154-348bp, then transformed into Y187 yeast cells by the lithium acetate method. Auto-activation and toxicity of C35 baits were detected using nutritional deficient medium and X-α-Gal assays. The T47D cell ds cDNA was generated by SMART TM technology and the library was constructed using in vivo recombination-mediated cloning in the AH109 yeast strain using a pGADT7-Rec plasmid. The transformed Y187/pGBKT7-C351-348bp line was intensively inhibited while the truncated Y187/pGBKT7-C35 lines had no auto-activation and toxicity in yeast cells. The titer of established cDNA library was 2 × 10 7 pfu/mL with high transformation efficiency of 1.4 × 10 6 , and the insert size of ds cDNA was distributed homogeneously between 0.5-2.0 kb. Our research generated a T47D cell cDNA library with high titer, and the constructed two C35 "baits" contained a respective functional immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif (ITAM) and the conserved last four amino acids Cys-Ile-Leu-Val (CILV) motif, and therefore laid a foundation for screening the C35 interaction factors in a BC cell line.

  13. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  14. The inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by full-length hepatitis C virus NS3/4A complex is due to ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoubala, M; Holt, J; Clegg, R A; Rowlands, D J; Harris, M

    2001-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, but the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis remain to be established. The HCV non-structural protein NS3 complexes with NS4A and has three enzymatic activities: a proteinase and a helicase/NTPase. Recently, catalytically inactive NS3 fragments containing an arginine-rich motif have been reported to interact with, and inhibit, the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C-subunit). Here we demonstrate that full-length, catalytically active NS3/4A, purified from recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells, is also able to inhibit PKA C-subunit in vitro. This inhibition was abrogated by mutation of either the arginine-rich motif or the conserved helicase motif II, both of which also abolished NTPase activity. As PKA C-subunit inhibition was also enhanced by poly(U) (an activator of NS3 NTPase activity), we hypothesized that PKA C-subunit inhibition could be due to NS3/4A-mediated ATP hydrolysis. This was confirmed by experiments in which a constant ATP concentration was maintained by addition of an ATP regeneration system--under these conditions PKA C-subunit inhibition was not observed. Interestingly, the mutations also abrogated the ability of wild-type NS3/4A to inhibit the PKA-regulated transcription factor CREB in transiently transfected hepatoma cells. Our data are thus not consistent with the previously proposed model in which the arginine-rich motif of NS3 was suggested to act as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor of PKA C-subunit. However, in vivo effects of NS3/4A suggest that ATPase activity may play a role in viral pathology in the infected liver.

  15. Neuroprotection by inhibiting the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway after cerebral ischemia occurs independently of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC/CXCL1 secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benakis Corinne

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral ischemia is associated with the activation of glial cells, infiltration of leukocytes and an increase in inflammatory mediators in the ischemic brain and systemic circulation. How this inflammatory response influences lesion size and neurological outcome remains unclear. D-JNKI1, an inhibitor of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway, is strongly neuroprotective in animal models of stroke. Intriguingly, the protection mediated by D-JNKI1 is high even with intravenous administration at very low doses with undetectable drug levels in the brain, pointing to a systemic mode of action, perhaps on inflammation. Findings We evaluated whether D-JNKI1, administered intravenously 3 h after the onset of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, modulates secretion of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in the plasma and from the spleen and brain at several time points after MCAO. We found an early release of both mediators in the systemic circulation followed by an increase in the brain and went on to show a later systemic increase in vehicle-treated mice. Release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine from the spleen of mice with MCAO was not significantly different from sham mice. Interestingly, the secretion of these inflammatory mediators was not altered in the systemic circulation or brain after successful neuroprotection with D-JNKI1. Conclusions We demonstrate that neuroprotection with D-JNKI1 after experimental cerebral ischemia is independent of systemic and brain release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the early systemic release of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine may not necessarily predict an unfavorable outcome in this model.

  16. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    stably to the APC/C. Whether MCC formation per se is sufficient for a functional SAC or MCC association with the APC/C is required remains unclear. Here, we analyze the role of two conserved motifs in Cdc20, IR and C-Box, in binding of the MCC to the APC/C. Mutants in both motifs assemble the MCC....../C is critical for a functional SAC....

  17. Deregulation of the endogenous C/EBPβ LIP isoform predisposes to tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégay, Valérie; Smink, Jeske J; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Zimmermann, Karin; Rudolph, Cornelia; Scheller, Marina; Steinemann, Doris; Leser, Ulf; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Stein, Harald; Leutz, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two long and one truncated isoforms (termed LAP*, LAP, and LIP, respectively) of the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) are expressed from a single intronless Cebpb gene by alternative translation initiation. Isoform expression is sensitive to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated activation of the translation initiation machinery and relayed through an upstream open reading frame (uORF) on the C/EBPβ mRNA. The truncated C/EBPβ LIP, initiated by high mTOR activity, has been implied in neoplasia, but it was never shown whether endogenous C/EBPβ LIP may function as an oncogene. In this study, we examined spontaneous tumor formation in C/EBPβ knockin mice that constitutively express only the C/EBPβ LIP isoform from its own locus. Our data show that deregulated C/EBPβ LIP predisposes to oncogenesis in many tissues. Gene expression profiling suggests that C/EBPβ LIP supports a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, resistance to apoptosis, and alteration of cytokine/chemokine expression. The results imply that enhanced translation reinitiation of C/EBPβ LIP promotes tumorigenesis. Accordingly, pharmacological restriction of mTOR function might be a therapeutic option in tumorigenesis that involves enhanced expression of the truncated C/EBPβ LIP isoform. Elevated C/EBPβ LIP promotes cancer in mice. C/EBPβ LIP is upregulated in B-NHL. Deregulated C/EBPβ LIP alters apoptosis and cytokine/chemokine networks. Deregulated C/EBPβ LIP may support a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment.

  18. cGMP signalling : different ways to create a pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Smith, Janet L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    Recently, a novel cGMP signalling cascade was uncovered in Dictyostelium, a eukaryote that diverged from the lineage leading to metazoa after plants and before yeast. In both Dictyostelium and metazoa, the ancient cAMP-binding (cNB) motif of bacterial CAP has been modified and assembled with other

  19. BayesMotif: de novo protein sorting motif discovery from impure datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Fan

    2010-01-18

    Protein sorting is the process that newly synthesized proteins are transported to their target locations within or outside of the cell. This process is precisely regulated by protein sorting signals in different forms. A major category of sorting signals are amino acid sub-sequences usually located at the N-terminals or C-terminals of protein sequences. Genome-wide experimental identification of protein sorting signals is extremely time-consuming and costly. Effective computational algorithms for de novo discovery of protein sorting signals is needed to improve the understanding of protein sorting mechanisms. We formulated the protein sorting motif discovery problem as a classification problem and proposed a Bayesian classifier based algorithm (BayesMotif) for de novo identification of a common type of protein sorting motifs in which a highly conserved anchor is present along with a less conserved motif regions. A false positive removal procedure is developed to iteratively remove sequences that are unlikely to contain true motifs so that the algorithm can identify motifs from impure input sequences. Experiments on both implanted motif datasets and real-world datasets showed that the enhanced BayesMotif algorithm can identify anchored sorting motifs from pure or impure protein sequence dataset. It also shows that the false positive removal procedure can help to identify true motifs even when there is only 20% of the input sequences containing true motif instances. We proposed BayesMotif, a novel Bayesian classification based algorithm for de novo discovery of a special category of anchored protein sorting motifs from impure datasets. Compared to conventional motif discovery algorithms such as MEME, our algorithm can find less-conserved motifs with short highly conserved anchors. Our algorithm also has the advantage of easy incorporation of additional meta-sequence features such as hydrophobicity or charge of the motifs which may help to overcome the limitations of

  20. Role of the ERC motif in the proximal part of the second intracellular loop and the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin F2alpha receptor (hFP-R) in G-protein coupling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2005-05-15

    The human FP-R (F2alpha prostaglandin receptor) is a Gq-coupled heptahelical ectoreceptor, which is of significant medical interest, since it is a potential target for the treatment of glaucoma and preterm labour. On agonist exposure, it mediates an increase in intracellular inositol phosphate formation. Little is known about the structures that govern the agonist-dependent receptor activation. In other prostanoid receptors, the C-terminal domain has been inferred in the control of agonist-dependent receptor activation. A DRY motif at the beginning of the second intracellular loop is highly conserved throughout the G-protein-coupled receptor family and appears to be crucial for controlling agonist-dependent receptor activation. It is replaced by an ERC motif in the FP-R and no evidence for the relevance of this motif in ligand-dependent activation of prostanoid receptors has been provided so far. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential role of the C-terminal domain and the ERC motif in agonist-controlled intracellular signalling in FP-R mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that substitution of the acidic Glu(132) in the ERC motif by a threonine residue led to full constitutive activation, whereas truncation of the receptor's C-terminal domain led to partial constitutive activation of all three intracellular signal pathways that had previously been shown to be activated by the FP-R, i.e. inositol trisphosphate formation, focal adhesion kinase activation and T-cell factor signalling. Inositol trisphosphate formation and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation were further enhanced by ligand binding in cells expressing the truncation mutant but not the E132T (Glu132-->Thr) mutant. Thus C-terminal truncation appeared to result in a receptor with partial constitutive activation, whereas substitution of Glu132 by threonine apparently resulted in a receptor with full constitutive activity.

  1. Viral replication and lung lesions in BALB/c mice experimentally inoculated with avian metapneumovirus subgroup C isolated from chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xu; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Du, Fang; Wei, Ting; Liu, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) emerged as an important respiratory pathogen causing acute respiratory tract infection in avian species. Here we used a chicken aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) isolate to inoculate experimentally BALB/c mice and found that the aMPV/C can efficiently replicate and persist in the lungs of mice for at least 21 days with a peak viral load at day 6 postinoculation. Lung pathological changes were characterized by increased inflammatory cells. Immunochemical assay showed the presence of viral antigens in the lungs and significant upregulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including MCP-1, MIP-1α, RANTES, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were detected following inoculation. These results indicate for the first time that chicken aMPV/C may replicate in the lung of mice. Whether aMPV/C has potential as zoonotic pathogen, further investigation will be required.

  2. Migration and chemokine receptor pattern of colitis-preventing DX5+NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Matthias; Werner, Jens M; Farkas, Stefan; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K

    2011-11-01

    DX5(+)NKT cells are a subpopulation of NKT cells expressing both T cell receptor and NK cell markers that show an immune-regulating function. Transferred DX5(+)NKT cells from immune competent Balb/c mice can prevent or reduce induced colitis in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Here, we investigated the in vivo migration of DX5(+)NKT cells and their corresponding chemokine receptor patterns. DX5(+)NKT cells were isolated from spleens of Balb/c mice and transferred into Balb/c SCID mice. After 2 and 8 days, in vivo migration was examined using in vivo microscopy. In addition, the chemokine receptor pattern was analyzed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and the migration assay was performed. Our results show that labeled DX5(+)NKT cells were primarily detectable in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen after transfer. After 8 days, DX5(+)NKT cells were observed in the colonic tissues, especially the appendix. FACS analysis of chemokine receptors in DX5(+)NKT cells revealed expression of CCR3, CCR6, CCR9, CXCR3, CXCR4, and CXCR6, but no CCR5, CXCR5, or the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7. Stimulation upregulated especially CCR7 expression, and chemokine receptor patterns were different between splenic and liver DX5(+)NKT cells. These data indicate that colitis-preventing DX5(+)NKT cells need to traffic through lymphoid organs to execute their immunological function at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, DX5(+)NKT cells express a specific chemokine receptor pattern with an upregulation of the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7 after activation.

  3. Anion induced conformational preference of Cα NN motif residues in functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Mahua; Banerjee, Raja; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb

    2017-12-01

    Among different ligand binding motifs, anion binding C α NN motif consisting of peptide backbone atoms of three consecutive residues are observed to be important for recognition of free anions, like sulphate or biphosphate and participate in different key functions. Here we study the interaction of sulphate and biphosphate with C α NN motif present in different proteins. Instead of total protein, a peptide fragment has been studied keeping C α NN motif flanked in between other residues. We use classical force field based molecular dynamics simulations to understand the stability of this motif. Our data indicate fluctuations in conformational preferences of the motif residues in absence of the anion. The anion gives stability to one of these conformations. However, the anion induced conformational preferences are highly sequence dependent and specific to the type of anion. In particular, the polar residues are more favourable compared to the other residues for recognising the anion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  5. Viral replication and lung lesions in BALB/c mice experimentally inoculated with avian metapneumovirus subgroup C isolated from chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    Full Text Available Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV emerged as an important respiratory pathogen causing acute respiratory tract infection in avian species. Here we used a chicken aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C isolate to inoculate experimentally BALB/c mice and found that the aMPV/C can efficiently replicate and persist in the lungs of mice for at least 21 days with a peak viral load at day 6 postinoculation. Lung pathological changes were characterized by increased inflammatory cells. Immunochemical assay showed the presence of viral antigens in the lungs and significant upregulation of pulmonary inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including MCP-1, MIP-1α, RANTES, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were detected following inoculation. These results indicate for the first time that chicken aMPV/C may replicate in the lung of mice. Whether aMPV/C has potential as zoonotic pathogen, further investigation will be required.

  6. Two distinct CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR3 and CXCR4) from the big-belly seahorse Hippocampus abdominalis: Molecular perspectives and immune defensive role upon pathogenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Oh, Minyoung; Bathige, S D N K; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Lee, Jehee

    2017-06-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) and 4 (CXCR4) are members of the seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor family, involved in pivotal physiological functions. In this study, seahorse CXCR3 and CXCR4 (designated as HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4) cDNA sequences were identified from the transcriptome library and subsequently molecularly characterized. HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 encoded 363 and 373 amino acid long polypeptides, respectively. The HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 deduced proteins have typical structural features of chemokine receptors, including seven transmembrane domains and a G protein coupled receptors family 1 profile with characteristic DRY motifs. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of these two CXC chemokine receptors revealed a close relationship to their corresponding teleost counterparts. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 were ubiquitously expressed in all the tested tissues, with highest expression levels in blood cells. The seahorse blood cells and kidney HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 mRNA expressions were differently modulated when challenged with Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, lipopolysaccharide, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, confirming their involvement in post immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice deficient in either the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha or its CCR5 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Kuziel, W A; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    -type mice in Th1 cytokine gene expression, the kinetics and severity of disease, and infiltration of the central nervous system by lymphocytes, macrophages and granulocytes. RNase protection assays showed comparable accumulation of mRNA for the chemokines interferon-inducible protein-10, RANTES, macrophage...... and its CCR5 receptor in the induction of EAE by immunizing C57BL / 6 mice deficient in either MIP-1alpha or CCR5 with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that MIP-1alpha-deficient mice were fully susceptible to MOG-induced EAE. These knockout animals were indistinguishable from wild...... chemoattractant protein-1, MIP-1beta, MIP-2, lymphotactin and T cell activation gene-3 during the course of the disease. CCR5-deficient mice were also susceptible to disease induction by MOG. The dispensability of MIP-1alpha and CCR5 for MOG-induced EAE in C57BL / 6 mice supports the idea that differential...

  8. Brain microvascular pericytes are immunoactive in culture: cytokine, chemokine, nitric oxide, and LRP-1 expression in response to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain microvascular pericytes are important constituents of the neurovascular unit. These cells are physically the closest cells to the microvascular endothelial cells in brain capillaries. They significantly contribute to the induction and maintenance of the barrier functions of the blood-brain barrier. However, very little is known about their immune activities or their roles in neuroinflammation. Here, we focused on the immunological profile of brain pericytes in culture in the quiescent and immune-challenged state by studying their production of immune mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. We also examined the effects of immune challenge on pericyte expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, a protein involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the brain-to-blood efflux of amyloid-β peptide. Methods Supernatants were collected from primary cultures of mouse brain pericytes. Release of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess reaction and the level of S-nitrosylation of pericyte proteins measured with a modified "biotin-switch" method. Specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors were used to determine involvement of these pathways on NO production. Cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by multianalyte technology. The expression of both subunits of LRP-1 was analyzed by western blot. Results Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced release of NO by pericytes in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated through MAPK pathways. Nitrative stress resulted in S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Eighteen of twenty-three cytokines measured were released constitutively by pericytes or with stimulation by LPS, including interleukin (IL-12, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, eotaxin, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-3, and CCL-4. Pericyte expressions of both subunits of

  9. Human papillomavirus-exposed Langerhans cells are activated by stabilized Poly-I:C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Diane M; Woodham, Andrew W; Rijkee, Laurie K; Skeate, Joseph G; Taylor, Julia R; Koopman, Maaike E; Brand, Heike E; Wong, Michael K; McKee, Greg M; Salazar, Andres M; Kast, W Martin

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) establish persistent infections because of evolved immune evasion mechanisms, particularly HPV-mediated suppression of the immune functions of Langerhans cells (LC), the antigen presenting cells of the epithelium. Polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid (Poly-I:C) is broadly immunostimulatory with the ability to enhance APC expression of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokines resulting in T cell activation. Here we investigated the activation of primary human LC derived from peripheral blood monocytes after exposure to HPV16 virus like particles followed by treatment with stabilized Poly-I:C compounds (s-Poly-I:C), and their subsequent induction of HPV16-specific T cells. Our results indicate that HPV16 particles alone were incapable of inducing LC activation as demonstrated by the lack of costimulatory molecules, inflammatory cytokines, chemokine-directed migration, and HPV16-specific CD8 + T cells in vitro . Conversely, s-Poly-I:C caused significant upregulation of costimulatory molecules and induction of chemokine-directed migration of LC that were pre-exposed to HPV16. In HLA-A*0201-positive donors, s-Poly-I:C treatment was able to induce CD8 + T cell immune responses against HPV16-derived peptides. Thus, s-Poly-I:C compounds are attractive for translation into therapeutics in which they could potentially mediate clearance of persistent HPV infection.

  10. Ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory chemokine ligand 2 gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the respiratory chain and serves in its reduced form, ubiquinol, as a potent antioxidant. Studies in vitro and in vivo provide evidence that ubiquinol reduces inflammatory processes via gene expression. Here we investigate the putative link between expression and DNA methylation of ubiquinol sensitive genes in monocytes obtained from human volunteers supplemented with 150 mg/ day ubiquinol for 14 days. Findings Ubiquinol decreases the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 gene (CXCL2 more than 10-fold. Bisulfite-/ MALDI-TOF-based analysis of regulatory regions of the CXCL2 gene identified six adjacent CpG islands which showed a 3.4-fold decrease of methylation status after ubiquinol supplementation. This effect seems to be rather gene specific, because ubiquinol reduced the expression of two other pro-inflammatory genes (PMAIP1, MMD without changing the methylation pattern of the respective gene. Conclusion In conclusion, ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory CXCL2 gene in humans. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26780329.

  11. Exploiting hidden symmetry in natural products: total syntheses of amphidinolides C and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Subham; Carter, Rich G

    2013-07-24

    The total synthesis of amphidinolide C and a second-generation synthesis of amphidinolide F have been accomplished through the use of a common intermediate to access both the C1-C8 and the C18-C25 sections. The development of a Ag-catalyzed cyclization of a propargyl benzoate diol is described to access both trans-tetrahydrofuran rings. The evolution of a Felkin-controlled, 2-lithio-1,3-dienyl addition strategy to incorporate C9-C11 diene as well as C8 stereocenter is detailed. Key controlling aspects in the sulfone alkylation/oxidative desulfurization to join the major subunits, including the exploration of the optimum masking group for the C18 carbonyl motif, are discussed. A Trost asymmetric alkynylation and a stereoselective cuprate addition to an alkynoate have been developed for the rapid construction of the C26-C34 subunit. A Tamura/Vedejs olefination to introduce the C26 side arm of amphidnolides C and F is employed. The late-stage incorporation of the C15, C18 diketone motif proved critical to the successful competition of the total syntheses.

  12. Protection mediated by chemokine CXCL10 in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania infantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Webertty Mayk Eufrásio; Viana, Sayonara de Melo; Alves, Dorotheia Teixeira; Guerra, Priscila Valera; Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo Branco; Barbosa, Helene Santos; Teixeira, Maria Jania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum is characterised by the loss of the ability of the host to generate an effective immune response. Chemokines have a direct involvement in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis, causing a rapid change in the expression of these molecules during infection by Leishmania. OBJECTIVES Herein, it was investigated the role of CXCL10 in controlling infection by L. infantum. METHODS RAW 264.7 macrophages were infected with L. infantum in vitro and treated or not with CXCL10 (25, 50 and 100 ng/mL). Parasite load, as well as nitric oxide (NO), IL-4 and IL-10 production were assessed at 24 and 48 h after infection. In vivo, BALB/c mice were infected and treated or not with CXCL10 (5 μg/kg) at one, three and seven days of infection. Parasite load, IFN-g, IL-4, TGF-β and IL-10 were evaluated one, seven and 23 days post treatment. FINDINGS In vitro, CXCL10 reduced parasitic load, not dependent on NO, and inhibited IL-10 and IL-4 secretion. In vivo, CXCL10 was able to reduce the parasite load in both liver and spleen, four weeks after infection, representing a higher decrease in the number of parasites in these organs, also induced IFN-γ at day 23 after treatment, correlating with the decrease in parasite load, and reduced IL-10 and TGF-β. MAIN CONCLUSIONS This study suggests a partial protective role of CXCL10 against L. infantum, mediated by IFN-g, not dependent on NO, and with suppression of IL-10 and TGF-β. These data may provide information for the development of new approaches for future therapeutic interventions for VL. PMID:28767981

  13. Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  14. Discovery of candidate KEN-box motifs using cell cycle keyword enrichment combined with native disorder prediction and motif conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Sushama; Travé, Gilles; Ramu, Chenna; Chica, Claudia; Gibson, Toby J

    2008-02-15

    KEN-box-mediated target selection is one of the mechanisms used in the proteasomal destruction of mitotic cell cycle proteins via the APC/C complex. While annotating the Eukaryotic Linear Motif resource (ELM, http://elm.eu.org/), we found that KEN motifs were significantly enriched in human protein entries with cell cycle keywords in the UniProt/Swiss-Prot database-implying that KEN-boxes might be more common than reported. Matches to short linear motifs in protein database searches are not, per se, significant. KEN-box enrichment with cell cycle Gene Ontology terms suggests that collectively these motifs are functional but does not prove that any given instance is so. Candidates were surveyed for native disorder prediction using GlobPlot and IUPred and for motif conservation in homologues. Among >25 strong new candidates, the most notable are human HIPK2, CHFR, CDC27, Dab2, Upf2, kinesin Eg5, DNA Topoisomerase 1 and yeast Cdc5 and Swi5. A similar number of weaker candidates were present. These proteins have yet to be tested for APC/C targeted destruction, providing potential new avenues of research.

  15. Improved i-motif thermal stability by insertion of anthraquinone monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gouda, Alaa S; Amine, Mahasen S.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2017-01-01

    In order to gain insight into how to improve thermal stability of i-motifs when used in the context of biomedical and nanotechnological applications, novel anthraquinone-modified i-motifs were synthesized by insertion of 1,8-, 1,4-, 1,5- and 2,6-disubstituted anthraquinone monomers into the TAA...... loops of a 22mer cytosine-rich human telomeric DNA sequence. The influence of the four anthraquinone linkers on the i-motif thermal stability was investigated at 295 nm and pH 5.5. Anthraquinone monomers modulate the i-motif stability in a position-depending manner and the modulation also depends...... unlocked nucleic acid monomers or twisted intercalating nucleic acid. The 2,6-disubstituted anthraquinone linker replacing T10 enabled a significant increase of i-motif thermal melting by 8.2 °C. A substantial increase of 5.0 °C in i-motif thermal melting was recorded when both A6 and T16 were modified...

  16. Evolutionarily conserved bias of amino-acid usage refines the definition of PDZ-binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Launey Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interactions between PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg, ZO-1 domains and PDZ-binding motifs play central roles in signal transductions within cells. Proteins with PDZ domains bind to PDZ-binding motifs almost exclusively when the motifs are located at the carboxyl (C- terminal ends of their binding partners. However, it remains little explored whether PDZ-binding motifs show any preferential location at the C-terminal ends of proteins, at genome-level. Results Here, we examined the distribution of the type-I (x-x-S/T-x-I/L/V or type-II (x-x-V-x-I/V PDZ-binding motifs in proteins encoded in the genomes of five different species (human, mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly and nematode. We first established that these PDZ-binding motifs are indeed preferentially present at their C-terminal ends. Moreover, we found specific amino acid (AA bias for the 'x' positions in the motifs at the C-terminal ends. In general, hydrophilic AAs were favored. Our genomics-based findings confirm and largely extend the results of previous interaction-based studies, allowing us to propose refined consensus sequences for all of the examined PDZ-binding motifs. An ontological analysis revealed that the refined motifs are functionally relevant since a large fraction of the proteins bearing the motif appear to be involved in signal transduction. Furthermore, co-precipitation experiments confirmed two new protein interactions predicted by our genomics-based approach. Finally, we show that influenza virus pathogenicity can be correlated with PDZ-binding motif, with high-virulence viral proteins bearing a refined PDZ-binding motif. Conclusions Our refined definition of PDZ-binding motifs should provide important clues for identifying functional PDZ-binding motifs and proteins involved in signal transduction.

  17. A study of serum levels of B cell-attracting chemokine-13 (CXCL 13 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of serum levels of B cell-attracting chemokine-13 (CXCL 13) and rheumatologic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in a cohort of Egyptian ... manifestations have been associated with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection including; arthralgia, myalgia, fatigue, fibromyalgia, vasculitis, and sicca syndrome.

  18. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Sutherland, Molly C; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2015-08-01

    Cytochromes c (cyt c) and c1 are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cyt c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for the import of apocytochrome c (apocyt c). Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cyt c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles of heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Human papillomavirus-exposed Langerhans cells are activated by stabilized Poly-I:C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV establish persistent infections because of evolved immune evasion mechanisms, particularly HPV-mediated suppression of the immune functions of Langerhans cells (LC, the antigen presenting cells of the epithelium. Polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid (Poly-I:C is broadly immunostimulatory with the ability to enhance APC expression of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokines resulting in T cell activation. Here we investigated the activation of primary human LC derived from peripheral blood monocytes after exposure to HPV16 virus like particles followed by treatment with stabilized Poly-I:C compounds (s-Poly-I:C, and their subsequent induction of HPV16-specific T cells. Our results indicate that HPV16 particles alone were incapable of inducing LC activation as demonstrated by the lack of costimulatory molecules, inflammatory cytokines, chemokine-directed migration, and HPV16-specific CD8+ T cells in vitro. Conversely, s-Poly-I:C caused significant upregulation of costimulatory molecules and induction of chemokine-directed migration of LC that were pre-exposed to HPV16. In HLA-A*0201-positive donors, s-Poly-I:C treatment was able to induce CD8+ T cell immune responses against HPV16-derived peptides. Thus, s-Poly-I:C compounds are attractive for translation into therapeutics in which they could potentially mediate clearance of persistent HPV infection. Keywords: Papillomavirus, HPV16, Langerhans cells, Immune escape

  20. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S.I. de Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involved in regulation of osr40c1 expression under different conditions were found in the 5′-upstream region of osr40c1. These are ABA-responsive element, light-responsive elements (ATCT-motif, Box I, G-box, GT1-motif, Gap-box and Sp1, myeloblastosis oncogene response element (CCAAT-box, auxin responsive element (TGA-element, gibberellin-responsive element (GARE-motif and fungal-elicitor responsive elements (Box E and Box-W1. A putative regulatory element, required for endosperm-specific pattern of gene expression designated as Skn-1 motif, was also detected in the Pokkali osr40c1 promoter region. In conclusion, the bioinformatic analysis of osr40c1 promoter region isolated from indica rice variety Pokkali led to the identification of several important stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements, and therefore, the isolated promoter sequence could be employed in rice genetic transformation to mediate expression of abiotic stress induced genes.

  1. Varicella zoster virus glycoprotein C increases chemokine-mediated leukocyte migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Motos, Víctor; Jürgens, Carina; Ritter, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a highly prevalent human pathogen that establishes latency in neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Primary infection causes varicella whereas reactivation results in zoster, which is often followed by chronic pain in adults. Following infection of epithelial c...

  2. Chemokines and chemokine receptors: new insights into cancer-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Gwendal; Richmond, Ann

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines are involved in cellular interactions and tropism in situations frequently associated with inflammation. Recently, the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation associated with carcinogenesis has been highlighted. Increasing evidence suggests that chemokines are produced by tumor cells as well as by cells of the tumor microenvironment including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), endothelial cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and more recently tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). In addition to affecting tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis, chemokines also seem to modulate senescence and cell survival. Here, we review recent progress on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in cancer-related inflammation, and discuss the mechanisms underlying chemokine action in cancer that might facilitate the development of novel therapies in the future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Downregulation of 5-HT7 Serotonin Receptors by the Atypical Antipsychotics Clozapine and Olanzapine. Role of Motifs in the C-Terminal Domain and Interaction with GASP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfra, Ornella; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Skieterska, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    have previously found that the atypical antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine inhibited G protein activation and, surprisingly, induced both internalization and lysosomal degradation of 5-HT7 receptors. Here, we aimed to determine the mechanism of clozapine- and olanzapine-mediated degradation of 5......-HT7 receptors. In the C-terminus of the 5-HT7 receptor, we identified two YXXΦ motifs, LR residues, and a palmitoylated cysteine anchor as potential sites involved in receptor trafficking to lysosomes followed by receptor degradation. Mutating either of these sites inhibited clozapine- and olanzapine...... of clozapine or olanzapine to the 5-HT7 receptor leads to antagonist-mediated lysosomal degradation by exposing key residues in the C-terminal tail that interact with GASP-1....

  4. Identification of a cobia (Rachycentron canadum) CC chemokine gene and its involvement in the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Jiang, Jingzhe; Wang, Jiangyong; Feng, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The chemokines regulate immune cell migration under inflammatory and physiological conditions. We investigated a CC chemokine gene (RcCC1) from cobia (Rachycentron canadum). The full-length RcCC1 cDNA is comprised 673 nucleotides and encodes a four-cysteine arrangement 99-amino-acid protein typical of known CC chemokines. The genomic DNA of RcCC1 consists of three exons and two introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RcCC1 was closest to the MIP group of CC chemokines. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed RcCC1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with relative strong expression in gill, blood, kidney, spleen, and head kidney. The RcCC1 transcripts in the head kidney, spleen, and liver were quickly up-regulated after stimulation with formalin-inactivated Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C). These results indicate RcCC1 not only plays a role in homeostasis, but also may be involved in inflammatory responses to bacterial and viral infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase sequence motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, MW; Kamerbeek, NM; van Berkel, WJH; Janssen, DB; Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    2002-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) form a distinct class of flavoproteins that catalyze the insertion of an oxygen atom in a C-C bond using dioxygen and NAD(P)H. Using newly characterized BVMO sequences, we have uncovered a BVMO-identifying sequence motif: FXGXXXRXXXW(P/D). Studies with

  6. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gukhan [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Won [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Whan, E-mail: swkim7@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  7. The effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on serum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study is to compare patients with atherosclerosis and chronic periodontitis and patients who are systemically healthy and chronic periodontitis using alteration of adrenomedullin (ADM), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 28 (CCL-28), white blood cell levels, platelet levels, high-density ...

  8. Low intensity shear stress increases endothelial ELR+ CXC chemokine production via a focal adhesion kinase-p38{beta} MAPK-NF-{kappa}B pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Sadiq S; Soltau, Thomas D; Chaturvedi, Gaurav; Totapally, Balagangadhar; Hagood, James S; Andrews, William W; Athar, Mohammad; Voitenok, Nikolai N; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Patel, Rakesh P; Fallon, Michael B; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2009-02-27

    CXC chemokines with a glutamate-leucine-arginine (ELR) tripeptide motif (ELR(+) CXC chemokines) play an important role in leukocyte trafficking into the tissues. For reasons that are not well elucidated, circulating leukocytes are recruited into the tissues mainly in small vessels such as capillaries and venules. Because ELR(+) CXC chemokines are important mediators of endothelial-leukocyte interaction, we compared chemokine expression by microvascular and aortic endothelium to investigate whether differences in chemokine expression by various endothelial types could, at least partially, explain the microvascular localization of endothelial-leukocyte interaction. Both in vitro and in vivo models indicate that ELR(+) CXC chemokine expression is higher in microvascular endothelium than in aortic endothelial cells. These differences can be explained on the basis of the preferential activation of endothelial chemokine production by low intensity shear stress. Low shear activated endothelial ELR(+) CXC chemokine production via cell surface heparan sulfates, beta(3)-integrins, focal adhesion kinase, the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38beta, mitogen- and stress-associated protein kinase-1, and the transcription factor.

  9. Dissection of Signaling Events Downstream of the c-Mpl Receptor in Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells Via Motif-Engineered Chimeric Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Koichiro; Lai, Chen-Yi; Nojima, Masanori; Kawahara, Masahiro; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a valuable resource in transplantation medicine. Cytokines are often used to culture HSCs aiming at better clinical outcomes through enhancement of HSC reconstitution capability. Roles for each signal molecule downstream of receptors in HSCs, however, remain puzzling due to complexity of the cytokine-signaling network. Engineered receptors that are non-responsive to endogenous cytokines represent an attractive tool for dissection of signaling events. We here tested a previously developed chimeric receptor (CR) system in primary murine HSCs, target cells that are indispensable for analysis of stem cell activity. Each CR contains tyrosine motifs that enable selective activation of signal molecules located downstream of the c-Mpl receptor upon stimulation by an artificial ligand. Signaling through a control CR with a wild-type c-Mpl cytoplasmic tail sufficed to enhance HSC proliferation and colony formation in cooperation with stem cell factor (SCF). Among a series of CRs, only one compatible with selective Stat5 activation showed similar positive effects. The HSCs maintained ex vivo in these environments retained long-term reconstitution ability following transplantation. This ability was also demonstrated in secondary recipients, indicating effective transmission of stem cell-supportive signals into HSCs via these artificial CRs during culture. Selective activation of Stat5 through CR ex vivo favored preservation of lymphoid potential in long-term reconstituting HSCs, but not of myeloid potential, exemplifying possible dissection of signals downstream of c-Mpl. These CR systems therefore offer a useful tool to scrutinize complex signaling pathways in HSCs.

  10. CXCL7-Mediated Stimulation of Lymphangiogenic Factors VEGF-C, VEGF-D in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghuan Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of lymphangiogenesis factors VEGF-C/D and heparanase has been correlated with the invasion of cancer. Furthermore, chemokines may modify matrix to facilitate metastasis, and they are associated with VEGF-C and heparanase. The chemokine CXCL7 binds heparin and the G-protein-linked receptor CXCR2. We investigated the effect of CXCR2 blockade on the expression of VEGF-C/D, heparanase, and on invasion. CXCL7 siRNA and a specific antagonist of CXCR2 (SB225002 were used to treat CXCL7 stably transfected MCF10AT cells. Matrigel invasion assays were performed. VEGF-C/D expression and secretion were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA assay, and heparanase activity was quantified by ELISA. SB225002 blocked VEGF-C/D expression and secretion (P<.01. CXCL7 siRNA knockdown decreased heparanase (P<.01. Both SB225002 and CXCL7 siRNA reduced the Matrigel invasion (P<.01. The MAP kinase signaling pathway was not involved. The CXCL7/CXCR2 axis is important for cell invasion and the expression of VEGF-C/D and heparanase, all linked to invasion.

  11. From the Cover: Lifelong Exposure of C57bl/6n Male Mice to Bisphenol A or Bisphenol S Reduces Recovery From a Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasneci, Amanda; Lee, Jun Seong; Yun, Tae Jin; Shang, Jijun; Lampen, Shaun; Gomolin, Tamar; Cheong, Cheolho C; Chalifour, Lorraine E

    2017-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) leaches from plastics to contaminate foodstuffs. Analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS), are now used increasingly in manufacturing. Greater BPA exposure has been correlated with exacerbation of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction (MI). To test the hypothesis that bisphenol exposure impairs cardiac healing, we exposed C57bl/6n mice to water containing 25ng/ml BPA or BPS from conception and surgically induced an MI in adult male progeny. Increased early death and cardiac dilation, and reduced cardiac function were found post-MI in BPA- and BPS-exposed mice. Flow cytometry revealed increased monocyte and macrophage infiltration that correlated with increased chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 expression in the infarct. In vitro BPA and BPS addition increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP) protein and secreted activity in RAW264.7 macrophage cells suggesting that invivo increases in MMP2 and MMP9 in exposed infarcts were myeloid-derived. Bone marrow-derived monocytes isolated from exposed mice had greater expression of pro-inflammatory polarization markers when chemokine stimulated indicating an enhanced susceptibility to develop a pro-inflammatory monocyte population. Chronic BPA exposure of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) deficient mice did not worsen early death, cardiac structure/function, or expression of myeloid markers after an MI. In contrast, BPS exposure of ERβ-deficient mice resulted in greater death and expression of myeloid markers. We conclude that lifelong exposure to BPA or BPS augmented the monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response and adverse remodeling from an MI thereby reducing the ability to survive and successfully recover, and that the adverse effect of BPA, but not BPS, is downstream of ERβ signaling. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infectio...

  13. Expression of inflammation-related genes is altered in gastric tissue of patients with advanced stages of NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rohini; Birerdinc, Aybike; Neupane, Arpan; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Afendy, Arian; Elariny, Hazem; Chandhoke, Vikas; Baranova, Ancha; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation perpetuated by visceral adipose. Other organs, particularly stomach and intestine, may also overproduce proinflammatory molecules. We examined the gene expression patterns in gastric tissue of morbidly obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and compared the changes in gene expression in different histological forms of NAFLD. Stomach tissue samples from 20 morbidly obese NAFLD patients who were undergoing sleeve gastrectomy were profiled using qPCR for 84 genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, their receptors, and other components of inflammatory cascades. Interleukin 8 receptor-beta (IL8RB) gene overexpression in gastric tissue was correlated with the presence of hepatic steatosis, hepatic fibrosis, and histologic diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Expression levels of soluble interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) were correlated with the presence of NASH and hepatic fibrosis. mRNA levels of interleukin 8 (IL8), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4 (CCL4), and its receptor chemokine (C-C motif) receptor type 5 (CCR5) showed a significant increase in patients with advanced hepatic inflammation and were correlated with the severity of the hepatic inflammation. The results of our study suggest that changes in expression patterns for inflammatory molecule encoding genes within gastric tissue may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related NAFLD.

  14. The CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Inhibits Autoimmune Cholangitis via CD8+ T Cells but Promotes Colitis via CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhi Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3, a receptor for the C-X-C motif chemokines (CXCL CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, which not only plays a role in chemotaxis but also regulates differentiation and development of memory and effector T cell populations. Herein, we explored the function of CXCR3 in the modulation of different organ-specific autoimmune diseases in interleukin (IL-2 receptor deficiency (CD25−/− mice, a murine model for both cholangitis and colitis. We observed higher levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the liver and colon and higher expression of CXCR3 on T cells of the CD25−/− mice compared with control animals. Deletion of CXCR3 resulted in enhanced liver inflammation but alleviated colitis. These changes in liver and colon pathology after CXCR3 deletion were associated with increased numbers of hepatic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, in particular effector memory CD8+ T cells, as well as decreased T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes and colon lamina propria. In addition, increased interferon-γ response and decreased IL-17A response was observed in both liver and colon after CXCR3 deletion. CXCR3 modulated the functions of T cells involved in different autoimmune diseases, whereas the consequence of such modulation was organ-specific regarding to their effects on disease severity. Our findings emphasize the importance of extra caution in immunotherapy for organ-specific autoimmune diseases, as therapeutic interventions aiming at a target such as CXCR3 for certain disease could result in adverse effects in an unrelated organ.

  15. Highly enantioselective rhodium(I)-catalyzed carbonyl carboacylations initiated by C-C bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillart, Laetitia; Cramer, Nicolai

    2014-09-01

    The lactone motif is ubiquitous in natural products and pharmaceuticals. The Tishchenko disproportionation of two aldehydes, a carbonyl hydroacylation, is an efficient and atom-economic access to lactones. However, these reaction types are limited to the transfer of a hydride to the accepting carbonyl group. The transfer of alkyl groups enabling the formation of CC bonds during the ester formation would be of significant interest. Reported herein is such asymmetric carbonyl carboacylation of aldehydes and ketones, thus affording complex bicyclic lactones in excellent enantioselectivities. The rhodium(I)-catalyzed transformation is induced by an enantiotopic CC bond activation of a cyclobutanone and the formed rhodacyclic intermediate reacts with aldehyde or ketone groups to give highly functionalized lactones. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded G protein-coupled-receptor US28 is believed to participate in virus dissemination through modulation of cell migration and immune evasion. US28 binds different CC chemokines and the CX3C chemokine CX3CL1. Membrane-anchored CX3CL1 is expressed by immune-activat...

  17. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  18. Prognostic value of the expression of C-Chemokine Receptor 6 and 7 and their ligands in non-metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassier, Philippe A; Mignotte, Hervé; Bathélémy-Dubois, Clarisse; Caux, Christophe; Lebecque, Serge; Blay, Jean-Yves; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bachelot, Thomas; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Trédan, Olivier; Goddard-Léon, Sophie; Pin, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are major actors of leukocytes trafficking and some have been shown to play an important role in cancer metastasis. Chemokines CCL19, CCL20 and CCL21 and their receptors CCR6 and CCR7, were assessed as potential biomarkers of metastatic dissemination in primary breast cancer. Biomarker expression levels were evaluated using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of breast cancer (n = 207). CCR6 was expressed by tumor cells in 35% of cases. CCR7 was expressed by spindle shaped stromal cells in 43% of cases but not by tumor cells in this series. CCL19 was the only chemokine found expressed in a significant number of breast cancers and was expressed by both tumor cells and dendritic cells (DC). CCR6, CCL19 and CCR7 expression correlated with histologic features of aggressive disease. CCR6 expression was associated with shorter relapse-free survival (RFS) in univariate and but not in multivariate analysis (p = 0.0316 and 0.055 respectively), and was not associated with shorter overall survival (OS). Expression of CCR7 was not significantly associated with shorter RFS or OS. The presence of CCL19-expressing DC was associated with shorter RFS in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.042 and 0.020 respectively) but not with shorter OS. These results suggest a contribution of CCR6 expression on tumor cells and CCL19-expressing DC in breast cancer dissemination. In our series, unlike what was previously published, CCR7 was exclusively expressed on stromal cells and was not associated with survival

  19. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  20. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  1. Sumoylation promotes optimal APC/C Activation and Timely Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine C; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao; Matunis, Michael J

    2018-03-08

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that functions as the gatekeeper to mitotic exit. APC/C activity is controlled by an interplay of multiple pathways during mitosis, including the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), that are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that sumoylation of the APC4 subunit of the APC/C peaks during mitosis and is critical for timely APC/C activation and anaphase onset. We have also identified a functionally important SUMO interacting motif in the cullin-homology domain of APC2 located near the APC4 sumoylation sites and APC/C catalytic core. Our findings provide evidence of an important regulatory role for SUMO modification and binding in affecting APC/C activation and mitotic exit. © 2018, Lee et al.

  2. Backbone dynamics of the human CC-chemokine eotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Jiqing; Mayer, Kristen L.; Stone, Martin J. [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    1999-10-15

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine with potent chemoattractant activity towards eosinophils. {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data have been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of recombinant human eotaxin. {sup 15}N longitudinal (R{sub 1}) and transverse (R{sub 2}) auto relaxation rates, heteronuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N steady-state NOEs, and transverse cross-relaxation rates ({eta}{sub xy}) were obtained at 30 deg. C for all resolved backbone secondary amide groups using {sup 1} H-detected two-dimensional NMR experiments. Ratios of transverse auto and cross relaxation rates were used to identify NH groups influenced by slow conformational rearrangement. Relaxation data were fit to the extended model free dynamics formalism, yielding parameters describing axially symmetric molecular rotational diffusion and the internal dynamics of each NH group. The molecular rotational correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) is 5.09{+-}0.02 ns, indicating that eotaxin exists predominantly as a monomer under the conditions of the NMR study. The ratio of diffusion rates about unique and perpendicular axes (D{sub parallel}/D{sub perpendicular}) is 0.81{+-}0.02. Residues with large amplitudes of subnanosecond motion are clustered in the N-terminal region (residues 1-19), the C-terminus (residues 68-73) and the loop connecting the first two {beta}-strands (residues 30-37). N-terminal flexibility appears to be conserved throughout the chemokine family and may have implications for the mechanism of chemokine receptor activation. Residues exhibiting significant dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale are located close to the two conserved disulfide bonds, suggesting that these motions may be coupled to disulfide bond isomerization.

  3. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the “cytokine storm” is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called “cytokine storm.” In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  4. CCL5 promotes VEGF-C production and induces lymphangiogenesis by suppressing miR-507 in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Hong; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Shih-Chia; Liu, Guan-Ting; Chen, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jih-Jung; Chan, Chia-Han; Lin, Ting-Yi; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Xu, Guo-Hong; Chen, Shiou-Sheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Wei

    2016-06-14

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequently occurring type of bone malignancy that is characterized by the distant metastasis propensity. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is the major lymphangiogenic factor, and makes crucial contributions to tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. Chemokine CCL5 has been reported to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis in chondrosarcoma. However, the effect of chemokine CCL5 on VEGF-C regulation and lymphangiogenesis in chondrosarcoma has largely remained a mystery. In this study, we showed a clinical correlation between CCL5 and VEGF-C as well as tumor stage in human chondrosarcoma tissues. We further demonstrated that CCL5 promoted VEGF-C expression and secretion in human chondrosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium (CM) from CCL5-overexpressed cells significantly induced tube formation of human lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Mechanistic investigations showed that CCL5 activated VEGF-C-dependent lymphangiogenesis by down-regulating miR-507. Moreover, inhibiting CCL5 dramatically reduced VEGF-C and lymphangiogenesis in the chondrosarcoma xenograft animal model. Collectively, we document for the first time that CCL5 induces tumor lymphangiogenesis by the induction of VEGF-C in human cancer cells. Our present study reveals miR-507/VEGF-C signaling as a novel mechanism in CCL5-mediated tumor lymphangiogenesis. Targeting both CCL5 and VEGF-C pathways might serve as the potential therapeutic strategy to block cancer progression and metastasis in chondrosarcoma.

  5. Effect of budesonide and cetirizine hydrochloride on neurotrophic factor, airway function and chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 in patients with allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride on neurotrophic factor, airway function and chemokines CCL17 and CCL12 in patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods: A total of 123 patients with Allergic Rhinitis were randomly divided into three groups, A group treated with budesonide nasal spray, B group treated with cetirizine hydrochloride, C group treated with budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride, then the Neurotrophic factors, airway function indexes and chemokines CCL17 and CCL12 levels in three groups were compared. Results: Before the treatments, the three groups of patients in neurotrophic factor, airway function index and chemokines CCL17, CCL22 have no differences, Compared with before the treatments, after receiving different treatments, the three groups of patients in all indicators were Showed significant differences. In the indexes of neurotrophic factor (NGF, BDNF, NT-3mRNA expression, there was no significant difference between group A and group B, and group C was lower than group A and B. In airway function indexes (FVC, FEV1 and PEF, A group was significantly higher than B group, C group was significantly higher than A group; In the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 indicators, C group was lower than A group, A group was lower than B group, the difference was significant. Conclusions: Budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride in the treatment of Allergic Rhinitis, can effectively control the patients' neurotrophic factor, pulmonary ventilation and chemokine CC17, CCL22 indicators, the effect is better than Budesonide alone or Cetirizine hydrochloride.

  6. Design, synthesis, and functionalization of dimeric peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmer, O.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Schumacher, U.; Marinelli, L.; Cosconati, S.; Gourni, E.; Wester, H.J.; Kessler, H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a critical regulator of inflammation and immune surveillance, and it is specifically implicated in cancer metastasis and HIV-1 infection. On the basis of the observation that several of the known antagonists remarkably share a C(2) symmetry element, we constructed

  7. Polymerisation of fibrin αC-domains promotes endothelial cell migration and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, S; Mikhailenko, I; Tsurupa, G; Belkin, A M; Medved, L

    2014-12-01

    Upon conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin, fibrinogen αC-domains containing the RGD recognition motif form ordered αC polymers. Our previous study revealed that polymerisation of these domains promotes integrin-dependent adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells, as well as integrin-mediated activation of the FAK and ERK1/2 signalling pathways. The major goal of this study was to test the impact of αC-domain polymerisation on endothelial cell migration and proliferation during wound healing, and to clarify the mechanism underlying superior activity of αC polymers toward endothelial cells. In an in vitro wound healing assay, confluent endothelial cell monolayers on tissue culture plates coated with the αC monomer or αC polymers were wounded by scratching and wound closure was monitored by time-lapse videomicroscopy. Although the plates were coated with equal amounts of αC species, as confirmed by ELISA, wound closure by the cells occurred much faster on αC polymers, indicating that αC-domain polymerisation promotes cell migration and proliferation. In agreement, endothelial cell proliferation was also more efficient on αC polymers, as revealed by cell proliferation assay. Wound closure on both types of substrates was equally inhibited by the integrin-blocking GRGDSP peptide and a specific antagonist of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. In contrast, blocking the FAK signaling pathway by a specific antagonist decreased wound closure only on αC polymers. These results indicate that polymerisation of the αC-domains enhances integrin-dependent endothelial cell migration and proliferation mainly through the FAK signalling pathway. Furthermore, clustering of integrin-binding RGD motifs in αC polymers is the major mechanism triggering these events.

  8. Partial reconstitution of photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase characteristics in cGMP phosphodiesterase-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, A E; Artemyev, N O

    2001-06-15

    Photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterases (PDE6) are uniquely qualified to serve as effector enzymes in the vertebrate visual transduction cascade. In the dark-adapted photoreceptors, the activity of PDE6 is blocked via tight association with the inhibitory gamma-subunits (Pgamma). The Pgamma block is removed in the light-activated PDE6 by the visual G protein, transducin. Transducin-activated PDE6 exhibits an exceptionally high catalytic rate of cGMP hydrolysis ensuring high signal amplification. To identify the structural determinants for the inhibitory interaction with Pgamma and the remarkable cGMP hydrolytic ability, we sought to reproduce the PDE6 characteristics by mutagenesis of PDE5, a related cyclic GMP-specific, cGMP-binding PDE. PDE5 is insensitive to Pgamma and has a more than 100-fold lower k(cat) for cGMP hydrolysis. Our mutational analysis of chimeric PDE5/PDE6alpha' enzymes revealed that the inhibitory interaction of cone PDE6 catalytic subunits (PDE6alpha') with Pgamma is mediated primarily by three hydrophobic residues at the entry to the catalytic pocket, Met(758), Phe(777), and Phe(781). The maximal catalytic rate of PDE5 was enhanced by at least 10-fold with substitutions of PDE6alpha'-specific glycine residues for the corresponding PDE5 alanine residues, Ala(608) and Ala(612). The Gly residues are adjacent to the highly conserved metal binding motif His-Asn-X-X-His, which is essential for cGMP hydrolysis. Our results suggest that the unique Gly residues allow the PDE6 metal binding site to adopt a more favorable conformation for cGMP hydrolysis.

  9. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  10. Differences in innate immune response gene regulation in the middle ear of children who are otitis prone and in those not otitis prone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Janet; Pichichero, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute otitis media (AOM) causes an inflammatory response in the middle ear. We assessed differences in innate immune responses involved in bacterial defense at onset of AOM in children who were stringently defined as otitis prone (sOP) and children not otitis prone (NOP). Study Design: Innate immune genes analysis from middle ear fluid (MEF) samples of children. Methods: Genes of toll-like receptors (TLR), nod-like and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, downstream effectors important for inflammation and apoptosis, including cytokines and chemokines, were studied from MEF samples by using a real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Protein levels of differentially regulated genes were measured by Luminex. Results: Gene expression in MEF among children who were sOP was significantly different in upregulation of interleukin 8, secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3, and in downregulation of interferon regulatory factor 7 and its related signaling molecules interferon alpha, Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 2, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, and mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 compared with children who were NOP. Differences in innate gene regulation were similar when AOM was caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae or nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Conclusion: Innate-immune response genes are differentially regulated in children who were sOP compared with children with NOP. PMID:28124644

  11. Expression of Inflammation-Related Genes Is Altered in Gastric Tissue of Patients with Advanced Stages of NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation perpetuated by visceral adipose. Other organs, particularly stomach and intestine, may also overproduce proinflammatory molecules. We examined the gene expression patterns in gastric tissue of morbidly obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and compared the changes in gene expression in different histological forms of NAFLD. Stomach tissue samples from 20 morbidly obese NAFLD patients who were undergoing sleeve gastrectomy were profiled using qPCR for 84 genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, their receptors, and other components of inflammatory cascades. Interleukin 8 receptor-beta (IL8RB gene overexpression in gastric tissue was correlated with the presence of hepatic steatosis, hepatic fibrosis, and histologic diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Expression levels of soluble interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN were correlated with the presence of NASH and hepatic fibrosis. mRNA levels of interleukin 8 (IL8, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 4 (CCL4, and its receptor chemokine (C-C motif receptor type 5 (CCR5 showed a significant increase in patients with advanced hepatic inflammation and were correlated with the severity of the hepatic inflammation. The results of our study suggest that changes in expression patterns for inflammatory molecule encoding genes within gastric tissue may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related NAFLD.

  12. Cordyceps sinensis protects against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Pin; Liu, Ching-Wen; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Wei; Sung, Ya-Zhu; Chang, Li-Ching

    2013-03-01

    Cordyceps sinensis (CS) is an entomogenous fungus used as a tonic food and Chinese medicine to replenish health. This study investigated the protective effects of CS in rats post-renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) sequence by analyzing the influence on stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) expressions and senescence during recovery. Chemokine SDF-1 [now called chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12)] and its receptor CXCR4 are crucial in kidney repair after ischemic acute renal failure. CS treatment significantly alleviated I/R-induced renal damage assessed by creatinine levels (p < 0.05) and abated renal tubular damages assessed by periodic acid-Schiff with diastase (PASD) staining. CS induced early SDF-1α expression and increased CXCR4 expression 1-6 h post-reperfusion. Histology studies have revealed that CS induced SDF-1α in squamous cells of Bowman's capsule, mesangial cells, distal convoluted tubules (DCT), and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT). CS also improved renal repair in I/R-induced injury by increasing Ki-67 staining. I/R induced renal senescence after 3 and 6 h of reperfusion. However, CS alleviated I/R-induced senescence at early stage (1 and 3 h). We conclude that CS protects against I/R injury via the SDF-1/CXCR4-signaling axis and alleviates senescence.

  13. CD11c(hi) Dendritic Cells Regulate Ly-6C(hi) Monocyte Differentiation to Preserve Immune-privileged CNS in Lethal Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Seong Bum; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Han, Young Woo; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-12-02

    Although the roles of dendritic cells (DCs) in adaptive defense have been defined well, the contribution of DCs to T cell-independent innate defense and subsequent neuroimmunopathology in immune-privileged CNS upon infection with neurotropic viruses has not been completely defined. Notably, DC roles in regulating innate CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocyte functions during neuroinflammation have not yet been addressed. Using selective ablation of CD11c(hi)PDCA-1(int/lo) DCs without alteration in CD11c(int)PDCA-1(hi) plasmacytoid DC number, we found that CD11c(hi) DCs are essential to control neuroinflammation caused by infection with neurotropic Japanese encephalitis virus, through early and increased infiltration of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and higher expression of CC chemokines. More interestingly, selective CD11c(hi) DC ablation provided altered differentiation and function of infiltrated CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in the CNS through Flt3-L and GM-CSF, which was closely associated with severely enhanced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes generated in CD11c(hi) DC-ablated environment had a deleterious rather than protective role during neuroinflammation, and were more quickly recruited into inflamed CNS, depending on CCR2, thereby exacerbating neuroinflammation via enhanced supply of virus from the periphery. Therefore, our data demonstrate that CD11c(hi) DCs provide a critical and unexpected role to preserve the immune-privileged CNS in lethal neuroinflammation via regulating the differentiation, function, and trafficking of CD11b(+)Ly-6C(hi) monocytes.

  14. Phase diagrams for pseudo-binary carbide systems TiC-NbC, TiC-TaC, ZrC-NbC, ZrC-TaC and HfC-TaC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Parameters of interaction and energy of mutual exchange in the liquid and solid phases of pseudobinary TiC-NbC, TiC-TaC, ZrC-NbC, ZrC-TaC, HfC-TaC systems are calculated with account of dependence on composition and temperature. Positions of liquidus-solidus phase boundaries on the phase diagrams of the mentioned systems are calculated on the basis of the determined mutual exchange energies in approximati.on of subregular solutions. The existance of latent decomposition ranges in the solid phase on the phase diagrams of the investgated systems is established

  15. Nucleotide and Predicted Amino Acid Sequence-Based Analysis of the Avian Metapneumovirus Type C Cell Attachment Glycoprotein Gene: Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Epidemiology of U.S. Pneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Rene; Lwamba, Humphrey M.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Seal, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    A serologically distinct avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated in the United States after an outbreak of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) in February 1997. The newly recognized U.S. virus was subsequently demonstrated to be genetically distinct from European subtypes and was designated aMPV serotype C (aMPV/C). We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the cell attachment glycoprotein (G) of aMPV/C (Colorado strain and three Minnesota isolates) and predicted amino acid sequence by sequencing cloned cDNAs synthesized from intracellular RNA of aMPV/C-infected cells. The nucleotide sequence comprised 1,321 nucleotides with only one predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 435 amino acids, with a predicted Mr of 48,840. The structural characteristics of the predicted G protein of aMPV/C were similar to those of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) attachment G protein, including two mucin-like regions (heparin-binding domains) flanking both sides of a CX3C chemokine motif present in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. Comparison of the deduced G-protein amino acid sequence of aMPV/C with those of aMPV serotypes A, B, and D, as well as hRSV revealed overall predicted amino acid sequence identities ranging from 4 to 16.5%, suggesting a distant relationship. However, G-protein sequence identities ranged from 72 to 97% when aMPV/C was compared to other members within the aMPV/C subtype or 21% for the recently identified human MPV (hMPV) G protein. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes were greater than one in the G gene when comparing the more recent Minnesota isolates to the original Colorado isolate. Epidemiologically, this indicates positive selection among U.S. isolates since the first outbreak of TRT in the United States. PMID:12682171

  16. Effects of peritoneal fluid from endometriosis patients on the release of monocyte-specific chemokines by leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yong-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Seung-Chul; Joo, Jong-Kil; Wang, Ji-Won; Jin, Jun-O; Kwak, Jong-Young; Lee, Kyu-Sup

    2011-06-01

    Chemokines have been implicated in the pathological process of endometriosis. We compared the effects of peritoneal fluid obtained from patients with endometriosis (ePF) and controls without endometriosis (cPF) on the release of monocyte-specific CC chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) by neutrophils, monocytes, and T cells. Moreover, we evaluated the correlation between the levels of chemokines in ePF and their release by these cells. Cells were obtained from healthy young volunteers and cultured with ePF (n = 12) or cPF (n = 8). The chemokine levels in the ePF and the supernatants of cultured cells with ePF were then measured by ELISA. There was a positive correlation between the levels of MCP-1 and MIP-1α in ePF. The addition of ePF to the cell cultures failed to increase the release of MCP-1, RANTES, and MIP-1α when compared to cPF, but the levels of RANTES in ePF were positively correlated with the release of RANTES by ePF-treated monocytes and T cells. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the levels of RANTES and MIP-1α released by neutrophils and between the levels of MCP-1 and MIP-1α released by T cells. Finally, the levels of RANTES released by monocyte-derived macrophages and monocytes cultured with ePF were positively correlated. These findings suggest that monocytes, neutrophils, and T cells release differential levels of MCP-1, RANTES, and MIP-1α in response to stimulation with ePF.

  17. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  18. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M. Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P.; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis. PMID:16581912

  19. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  20. [Characterization and transcriptional analysis of a new CC chemokine associated with innate imimune response in cobia (Rachycentron canadum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y; Feng, J; Sun, X; Guo, Z; Xu, L; Jiang, J

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides, known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations under both pathological and physiological conditions. On the basis of previously constructed express sequence tags (ESTs) of the head kidney and spleen cDNA library of the perciform marine fish Rachycentron canadum (common name cobia). We used bi-directional rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and obtained a full-length cDNA of a new CC chemokine gene (designated RcCC3). The RcCC3 putative peptide exhibits sequence similarity to the group of CCL19/21/25 CC chemokines. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used in transcript expression studies of RcCC3. We examined the constitutive expression of the transcripts in 12 tissues of non-stressed cobia; RcCC3 transcripts were detected in all tissues examined, with the highest expression in gill and liver, following by head kidney, kidney, spleen, skin, intestine, muscle, stomach, heart, blood and brain. Transcript expression of RcCC3 was examined in immune-related organs, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of phosphate-buffered saline control, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine). The transcripts in these tissues were quickly up-regulated by the injection of poly(I:C) and bacterial vaccine at early time points, although with different expression profiles. These results indicate RcCC3 represents an important component of innate immunity in cobia.

  1. Interleukin-17A and Toll-Like Receptor 3 Ligand Poly(I:C Synergistically Induced Neutrophil Chemoattractant Production by Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are common respiratory disorders worldwide. Exacerbations of these diseases are frequent and worsen patients' respiratory condition and overall health. However, the mechanisms of exacerbation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, it was reported that interleukin (IL-17A might play an important role in neutrophilic inflammation, which is characteristic of such exacerbations, through increased production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-17A was involved in the pathogenesis of acute exacerbation, due to viral infection in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. In this study, we assessed chemokine production by bronchial epithelial cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms. Comprehensive chemokine analysis showed that, compared with poly(I:C alone, co-stimulation of BEAS-2B cells with IL-17A and poly(I:C strongly induced production of such neutrophil chemoattractants as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL8, growth-related oncogene (GRO, and CXCL1. Co-stimulation synergistically induced CXCL8 and CXCL1 mRNA and protein production by BEAS-2B cells and normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced chemokine expression by BEAS-2B cells mainly via Toll-like receptor 3/TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β-mediated signals. The co-stimulation with IL-17A and poly(I:C markedly activated the p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway, compared with poly(I:C, although there was little change in nuclear factor-κB translocation into the nucleus or the transcriptional activities of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein 1. IL-17A promoted stabilization of CXCL8 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells treated with poly(I:C. In conclusion, IL-17A appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory airway disease exacerbation, due to viral infection by promoting release of neutrophil

  2. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs of human RAD51D in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M; Tebbs, Robert S; Nham, Peter B; Urbin, Salustra S; Collins, David W; Thompson, Larry H; Schild, David

    2006-01-01

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Ectopic expression of wild-type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  3. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. LEVELS OF ANGIOGENESIS-REGULATORY CHEMOKINES IN THE SYNOVIAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zhebrun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of chemokines in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been actively investigated in recent years. Angiogenic and angiostatic chemokines are important mediators of angiogenesis in the development and extent of pannus. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid (SF is a major biomaterial in clinical and immunological studies. At the same time, it is the SF test that may yield the most informative results since that gives an idea of the processes that occur locally within a joint. Objective: to perform a comparative analysis of the levels of a number of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in the SF of patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA, and joint injuries. Subjects and methods. The multiplex analysis using xMAP technology (Luminex, USA was used to analyze levels of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in SF and serum of patients with RA (n = 20, OA (n = 9 and controls (n = 9. Results and discussion. The SF levels of CCL24/eotaxin-2, as well as those of the angiostatic chemokines CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP10, CXCL11/ITAC, and CXCL13/BCA-1 were higher in the RA group than in the control and OA groups. There was a direct correlation between SF levels of CCL5/RANTES and DAS28, as well as patient global disease activity assessment on visual analogue scale, and that between the level of CCL2/MCP-1 in the SF and that of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies in the serum. The SF concentrations of CXCL5/ENA78 and CXCL7/NAP-2 were shown to depend on the presence of serum anti-CCP. Serum CXCL13/BCA-1 levels were higher in RA than those in OA, as that of CXCL7/NAP-2 than in the control group.

  7. Insight into DEG/ENaC channel gating from genetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Amy L; Goodman, Miriam B

    2012-10-01

    The founding members of the superfamily of DEG/ENaC ion channel proteins are C. elegans proteins that form mechanosensitive channels in touch and pain receptors. For more than a decade, the research community has used mutagenesis to identify motifs that regulate gating. This review integrates insight derived from unbiased in vivo mutagenesis screens with recent crystal structures to develop new models for activation of mechanically gated DEGs.

  8. Enhanced T{sub c} in a dual-layered molecular superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Mariano de; Lang, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, SFB/TR49, D-60438 Frankfurt/M (Germany); Wiehl, Leonor [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt/M (Germany); Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We have revisited the structural and electronic properties of the filamentary organic superconductor (BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Ag(CF{sub 3}){sub 4}(TCE), first synthesized in 1994. Detailed structural investigations reveal that the BEDT-TTF molecules are arranged in two distinctly different packing motifs, {kappa} and {alpha}', which alternate from layer to layer. This molecule-based superconductor with dual BEDT-TTF packing motifs has a T{sub c} five times higher than that of its polymorph that contains only {kappa}-type packing. Using the established empirical correlations between the bond lengths (C-S and C=S) and the oxidation state of the BEDT-TTF molecule, we have found that there is a uniform charge distribution in the {kappa}-layers (corresponding to an oxidation state of +0.5 for all BEDT-TTF molecules), whereas in the {alpha}'-layer, half of the molecules are nearly fully oxidized to +1, while the other half are close to neutral, resulting in a charge-ordered neutral layer. These findings indicate that this material can be considered as a promising candidate for a distinctly two-dimensional superconductor.

  9. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of four fish-specific CC chemokine receptors CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Holland, Jason W; Jiang, Yousheng; Secombes, Christopher J; Nie, Pin; Wang, Tiehui

    2017-09-01

    The chemokine and chemokine receptor networks regulate leukocyte trafficking, inflammation, immune cell differentiation, cancer and other biological processes. Comparative immunological studies have revealed that both chemokines and their receptors have expanded greatly in a species/lineage specific way. Of the 10 human CC chemokine receptors (CCR1-10) that bind CC chemokines, orthologues only to CCR6, 7, 9 and 10 are present in teleost fish. In this study, four fish-specific CCRs, termed as CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11, with a close link to human CCR1-5 and 8, in terms of amino acid homology and syntenic conservation, have been identified and characterized in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These CCRs were found to possess the conserved features of the G protein-linked receptor family, including an extracellular N-terminal, seven TM domains, three extracellular loops and three intracellular loops, and a cytoplasmic carboxyl tail with multiple potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Four cysteine residues known to be involved in forming two disulfide bonds are present in the extracellular domains and a DRY motif is present in the second intracellular loop. Signaling mediated by these receptors might be regulated by N-glycosylation, tyrosine sulfation, S-palmitoylation, a PDZ ligand motif and di-leucine motifs. Studies of intron/exon structure revealed distinct fish-specific CCR gene organization in different fish species/lineages that might contribute to the diversification of the chemokine ligand-receptor networks in different fish lineages. Fish-specific trout CCRs are highly expressed in immune tissues/organs, such as thymus, spleen, head kidney and gills. Their expression can be induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFNγ, by the pathogen associated molecular patterns, PolyIC and peptidoglycan, and by bacterial infection. These data suggest that fish-specific CCRs are likely to have an important role in immune

  10. Shear Stress Enhances Chemokine Secretion from Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J; Dallo, Shatha F; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that is considered a highly likely risk factor for atherosclerosis. C. pneumoniae is disseminated from the lung into systemic circulation via infected monocytes and lodges at the atherosclerotic sites. During transit, C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes in circulation are subjected to shear stress due to blood flow. The effect of mechanical stimuli on infected monocytes is largely understudied in the context of C. pneumoniae infection and inflammation. We hypothesized that fluid shear stress alters the inflammatory response of C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes and contributes to immune cell recruitment to the site of tissue damage. Using an in vitro model of blood flow, we determined that a physiological shear stress of 7.5 dyn/cm 2 for 1 h on C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes enhances the production of several chemokines, which in turn is correlated with the recruitment of significantly large number of monocytes. Taken together, these results suggest synergistic interaction between mechanical and chemical factors in C. pneumoniae infection and associated inflammation.

  11. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  12. Association of CCL11 promoter polymorphisms with schizophrenia in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Won Sub; Kim, Young Jong; Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Su Kang; Paik, Jong-Woo; Kim, Jong Woo

    2018-05-20

    Immunological alterations and dysregulation of the inflammatory response have been suggested to play a crucial role in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Growing evidence supports the involvement of chemokines in brain development, thus many chemokines have been studied in relation with schizophrenia. The C-C motif chemokine ligand 11 (CCL11) has been shown to be related with synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Moreover, altered levels of CCL11 have been observed in schizophrenia patients. Therefore, we examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CCL11 in the promoter region contribute to susceptibility to schizophrenia. Four promoter SNPs [rs17809012 (-384T>C), rs16969415 (-426C>T), rs17735961 (-488C>A), and rs4795896 (576G>A)] were genotyped in 254 schizophrenia patients and 405 control subjects using Fluidigm SNPtype assays. The genotype frequency of CCL11 rs4795896 (-576G>A) showed significant association with schizophrenia in a recessive model (AA vs. GG/AG, p schizophrenia (p schizophrenia (p = 0.0044, p schizophrenia in a Korean population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High IL-17E and low IL-17C dermal expression identifies a fibrosis-specific motif common to morphea and systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Adele Lonati

    identifies a fibrosis-specific motif. The specific IL-17C/IL-17E cytokine combination may thus play a role in the development of fibrosis.

  14. Allergic Sensitization at School Age is a Systemic Low-grade Inflammatory Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B. L.; Stokholm, J.; Schoos, A.-M. M.

    2017-01-01

    allergic sensitization. Methods High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) were measured in plasma at age 6 months (N = 214) and 7 years (N = 277) in children from the Copenhagen Prospective...... sensitization in school-aged children suggesting systemic low-grade inflammation as a phenotypic characteristic of this early-onset NCD....

  15. Fine-tuning of T-cell development by the CD3γ di-leucine-based TCR-sorting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Boding, Lasse; Buus, Terkild B

    2015-01-01

    The CD3γ di-leucine-based (diL) receptor-sorting motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation and in clonal expansion of virus-specific T cells. However, the role of the CD3γ diL motif in T-cell development is not known. In this study, we show that protein kinase C-induced TCR down-regulatio......The CD3γ di-leucine-based (diL) receptor-sorting motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation and in clonal expansion of virus-specific T cells. However, the role of the CD3γ diL motif in T-cell development is not known. In this study, we show that protein kinase C-induced TCR down...

  16. The early activation marker CD69 regulates the expression of chemokines and CD4 T cell accumulation in intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Radulovic

    Full Text Available Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4(+ T cells and/or CD4(- cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69(-/- CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69(-/- CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69(-/- mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69(-/- CD45RB(high CD4 T cells into RAG(-/- hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR- γ expression has been shown in thyroid tissue from patients with thyroiditis or Graves’ disease and furthermore in the orbital tissue of patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO, such as in extraocular muscle cells. An increasing body of evidence shows the importance of the (C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3 and cognate chemokines (C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, in the T helper 1 immune response and in inflammatory diseases such as thyroid autoimmune disorders. PPAR-γ agonists show a strong inhibitory effect on the expression and release of CXCR3 chemokines, in vitro, in various kinds of cells, such as thyrocytes, and in orbital fibroblasts, preadipocytes, and myoblasts from patients with GO. Recently, it has been demonstrated that rosiglitazone is involved in a higher risk of heart failure, stroke, and all-cause mortality in old patients. On the contrary, pioglitazone has not shown these effects until now; this favors pioglitazone for a possible use in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. However, further studies are ongoing to explore the use of new PPAR-γ agonists in the treatment of thyroid autoimmune disorders.

  18. The chemokine Bv8/prokineticin 2 is up-regulated in inflammatory granulocytes and modulates inflammatory pain

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, Elisa; Lattanzi, Roberta; Nicotra, Annalisa; Campese, Antonio F.; Grazioli, Paola; Screpanti, Isabella; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Sacerdote, Paola; Negri, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into injured tissues is invariably accompanied by pain. Bv8/prokineticin 2 (PK2), a chemokine characterized by a unique structural motif comprising five disulfide bonds, is highly expressed in inflamed tissues associated to infiltrating cells. Here, we demonstrate the fundamental role of granulocyte-derived PK2 (GrPK2) in initiating inflammatory pain and driving peripheral sensitization. In animal models of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced paw inflammation the developme...

  19. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  20. Extracellular histones are essential effectors of C5aR- and C5L2-mediated tissue damage and inflammation in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmann, Markus; Grailer, Jamison J; Ruemmler, Robert; Russkamp, Norman F; Zetoune, Firas S; Sarma, J Vidya; Standiford, Theodore J; Ward, Peter A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated how complement activation promotes tissue injury and organ dysfunction during acute inflammation. Three models of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by LPS, IgG immune complexes, or C5a were used in C57BL/6 mice, all models requiring availability of both C5a receptors (C5aR and C5L2) for full development of ALI. Ligation of C5aR and C5L2 with C5a triggered the appearance of histones (H3 and H4) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). BALF from humans with ALI contained H4 histone. Histones were absent in control BALF from healthy volunteers. In mice with ALI, in vivo neutralization of H4 with IgG antibody reduced the intensity of ALI. Neutrophil depletion in mice with ALI markedly reduced H4 presence in BALF and was highly protective. The direct lung damaging effects of extracellular histones were demonstrated by airway administration of histones into mice and rats (Sprague-Dawley), which resulted in ALI that was C5a receptor-independent, and associated with intense inflammation, PMN accumulation, damage/destruction of alveolar epithelial cells, together with release into lung of cytokines/chemokines. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated lung damage, edema and consolidation in histone-injured lungs. These studies confirm the destructive C5a-dependent effects in lung linked to appearance of extracellular histones.

  1. Correlation between the 12C+12C, 12C+13C, and 13C+13C fusion cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notani, M.; Esbensen, H.; Fang, X.; Bucher, B.; Davies, P.; Jiang, C. L.; Lamm, L.; Lin, C. J.; Ma, C.; Martin, E.; Rehm, K. E.; Tan, W. P.; Thomas, S.; Tang, X. D.; Brown, E.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion cross section for 12C+13C has been measured down to Ec.m.=2.6 MeV, at which the cross section is of the order of 20 nb. By comparing the cross sections for the three carbon isotope systems, 12C+12C, 12C+13C, and 13C+13C, it is found that the cross sections for 12C+13C and 13C+13C provide an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C+12C over a wide energy range. After calibrating the effective nuclear potential for 12C+12C using the 12C+13C and 13C+13C fusion cross sections, it is found that a coupled-channels calculation with the ingoing wave boundary condition (IWBC) is capable of predicting the major peak cross sections in 12C+12C. A qualitative explanation for this upper limit is provided by the Nogami-Imanishi model and by level density differences among the compound nuclei. It is found that the strong resonance found at 2.14 MeV in 12C+12C exceeds this upper limit by a factor of more than 20. The preliminary result from the most recent measurement shows a much smaller cross section at this energy, which agrees with our predicted upper limit.

  2. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  3. c-Myb is required for plasma cell migration to bone marrow after immunization or infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Kristy; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Nutt, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell migration is crucial to immunity, but little is known about the molecular regulators of their migratory programs. Here, we detail the critical role of the transcription factor c-Myb in determining plasma cell location. In the absence of c-Myb, no IgG+ antigen-specific plasma cells were detected in the bone marrow after immunization or virus infection. This was correlated with a dramatic reduction of plasma cells in peripheral blood, mislocalization in spleen, and an inability of c-Myb–deficient plasma cells to migrate along a CXCL12 gradient. Therefore, c-Myb plays an essential, novel role in establishing the long-lived plasma cell population in the BM via responsiveness to chemokine migration cues. PMID:26077717

  4. Functional characteristics of HIV-1 subtype C compatible with increased heterosexual transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Brandon L; Armitage, Andrew E; Graham, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the existence of over 50 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1, subtype C dominates the heterosexual pandemic causing approximately 56% of all infections. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether viral genetic factors may contribute to the observed subtype-C predominance. ....... CONCLUSION: As CD4-CCR5-T cells are key targets for genital HIV infection and cervical selection can favor compact V1-V2 loops and 316T, which increase viral infectivity, we propose that these conserved subtype-C motifs may contribute to transmission and spread of this subtype....

  5. Linear motif atlas for phosphorylation-dependent signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, LJ; Diella, F

    2008-01-01

    bind to them remains a challenge. NetPhorest is an atlas of consensus sequence motifs that covers 179 kinases and 104 phosphorylation-dependent binding domains [Src homology 2 (SH2), phosphotyrosine binding (PTB), BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT), WW, and 14-3-3]. The atlas reveals new aspects of signaling...

  6. Identification of helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of {beta}-turns: I, II, I Prime , II Prime and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7-0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  7. Identification of helix capping and β-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of β-turns: I, II, I′, II′ and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and β-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7–0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  8. STUDYING THE INFLUENCE OF THE PYRENE INTERCALATOR TINA ON THE STABILITY OF DNA i-MOTIFS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Ahmed A.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Khaireldin, Nahid A.

    2012-01-01

    Certain cytosine-rich (C-rich) DNA sequences can fold into secondary structures as four-stranded i-motifs with hemiprotonated base pairs. Here we synthesized C-rich TINA-intercalating oligonucleotides by inserting a nonnucleotide pyrene moiety between two C-rich regions. The stability of their i-...

  9. Selective Alkylation of C-Rich Bulge Motifs in Nucleic Acids by Quinone Methide Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnberg, Tuomas; Hutchinson, Mark; Rokita, Steven

    2015-09-07

    A quinone methide precursor featuring a bis-cyclen anchoring moiety has been synthesized and its capacity to alkylate oligonucleotide targets quantified in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions (Zn(2+) , Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) ). The oligonucleotides were designed for testing the sequence and secondary structure specificity of the reaction. Gel electrophoretic analysis revealed predominant alkylation of C-rich bulges, regardless of the presence of divalent metal ions or even the bis-cyclen anchor. This C-selectivity appears to be an intrinsic property of the quinone methide electrophile as reflected by its reaction with an equimolar mixture of the 2'-deoxynucleosides. Only dA-N1 and dC-N3 alkylation products were detected initially and only the dC adduct persisted for detection under conditions of the gel electrophoretic analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [Cloning of cDNA for RNA polymerase subunit from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by heterospecific complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Lebedenko, E N; Thuriaux, P

    1997-02-01

    The rpb10 cDNA of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, encoding one of the five small subunits common to all three nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, was isolated from an expression cDNA library by two independent approaches: PCR-based screening and direct suppression by means of heterospecific complementation of a temperature-sensitive mutant defective in the corresponding gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cloned Sz. pombe cDNA encodes a protein Rpb10 of 71 amino acids with an M of 8,275 Da, sharing 51 amino acids (71% identity) with the subunit ABC10 beta of RNA polymerases I-III from S. cerevisiae. All eukaryotic members of this protein family have the same general organization featuring two highly conserved motifs (RCFT/SCGK and RYCCRRM) around an atypical zinc finger and an additional invariant HVDLIEK motif toward the C-terminal end. The last motif is only characteristics for homologs from eukaryotes. In keeping with this remarkable structural conservation, the Sz. pombe cDNA also fully complemented a S. cerevisiae deletion mutant lacking subunit ABC10 beta (null allele rpb10-delta 1::HIS3).

  11. Organofluorine chemistry: synthesis and conformation of vicinal fluoromethylene motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, David

    2012-04-20

    The C-F bond is the most polar bond in organic chemistry, and thus the bond has a relatively large dipole moment with a significant -ve charge density on the fluorine atom and correspondingly a +ve charge density on carbon. The electrostatic nature of the bond renders it the strongest one in organic chemistry. However, the fluorine atom itself is nonpolarizable, and thus, despite the charge localization on fluorine, it is a poor hydrogen-bonding acceptor. These properties of the C-F bond make it attractive in the design of nonviscous but polar organic compounds, with a polarity limited to influencing the intramolecular nature of the molecule and less so intermolecular interactions with the immediate environment. In this Perspective, the synthesis of aliphatic chains carrying multivicinal fluoromethylene motifs is described. It emerges that the dipoles of adjacent C-F bonds orientate relative to each other, and thus, individual diastereoisomers display different backbone carbon chain conformations. These conformational preferences recognize the influence of the well-known gauche effect associated with 1,2-difluoroethane but extend to considering 1,3-fluorine-fluorine dipolar repulsions. The synthesis of carbon chains carrying two, three, four, five, and six vicinal fluoromethylene motifs is described, with an emphasis on our own research contributions. These motifs obey almost predictable conformational behavior, and they emerge as candidates for inclusion in the design of performance organic molecules. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Investigation into solubility and diffusion in SiC-NbC, SiC-TiC, SiC-ZrC systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safaraliev, G.K.; Tairov, Yu.M.; Tsvetkov, V.F.; Shabanov, Sh.Sh.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is carried out which demonstrates solid-phase interaction between SiC and NbC, TiC and ZrC monocrystals. The monocrystals are subjected to hot pressing in SiC powder with dispersity of 5x10 -6 m. The pressing temperature is 2270-2570 K and pressure is varied in the range of 20-40 MPa. Element composition and the distribution profile in a thin layer near the boundary of SiC-NbC, SiC-TiC and SiC-ZrC are investigated by the Anger spectroscopy method. The obtained results permit to make the conclusion in the possibility of solid solution formation in investigated systems

  13. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  14. Characterization of full-length sequenced cDNA inserts (FLIcs) from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Rune; Lunner, Sigbjørn; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the Atlantic salmon genome is now being planned by an international research consortium. Full-length sequenced inserts from cDNAs (FLIcs) are an important tool for correct annotation and clustering of the genomic sequence in any species. The large amount of highly similar duplicate sequences caused by the relatively recent genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor represents a particular challenge for the genome project. FLIcs will therefore be an extremely useful resource for the Atlantic salmon sequencing project. In addition to be helpful in order to distinguish between duplicate genome regions and in determining correct gene structures, FLIcs are an important resource for functional genomic studies and for investigation of regulatory elements controlling gene expression. In contrast to the large number of ESTs available, including the ESTs from 23 developmental and tissue specific cDNA libraries contributed by the Salmon Genome Project (SGP), the number of sequences where the full-length of the cDNA insert has been determined has been small. Results High quality full-length insert sequences from 560 pre-smolt white muscle tissue specific cDNAs were generated, accession numbers [GenBank: BT043497 - BT044056]. Five hundred and ten (91%) of the transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 440 of the FLIcs are likely to contain a complete coding sequence (cCDS). The sequence information was used to identify putative paralogs, characterize salmon Kozak motifs, polyadenylation signal variation and to identify motifs likely to be involved in the regulation of particular genes. Finally, conserved 7-mers in the 3'UTRs were identified, of which some were identical to miRNA target sequences. Conclusion This paper describes the first Atlantic salmon FLIcs from a tissue and developmental stage specific cDNA library. We have demonstrated that many FLIcs contained a complete coding sequence (cCDS). This suggests that the remaining c

  15. Characterization of full-length sequenced cDNA inserts (FLIcs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunner Sigbjørn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the Atlantic salmon genome is now being planned by an international research consortium. Full-length sequenced inserts from cDNAs (FLIcs are an important tool for correct annotation and clustering of the genomic sequence in any species. The large amount of highly similar duplicate sequences caused by the relatively recent genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor represents a particular challenge for the genome project. FLIcs will therefore be an extremely useful resource for the Atlantic salmon sequencing project. In addition to be helpful in order to distinguish between duplicate genome regions and in determining correct gene structures, FLIcs are an important resource for functional genomic studies and for investigation of regulatory elements controlling gene expression. In contrast to the large number of ESTs available, including the ESTs from 23 developmental and tissue specific cDNA libraries contributed by the Salmon Genome Project (SGP, the number of sequences where the full-length of the cDNA insert has been determined has been small. Results High quality full-length insert sequences from 560 pre-smolt white muscle tissue specific cDNAs were generated, accession numbers [GenBank: BT043497 - BT044056]. Five hundred and ten (91% of the transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO terms and 440 of the FLIcs are likely to contain a complete coding sequence (cCDS. The sequence information was used to identify putative paralogs, characterize salmon Kozak motifs, polyadenylation signal variation and to identify motifs likely to be involved in the regulation of particular genes. Finally, conserved 7-mers in the 3'UTRs were identified, of which some were identical to miRNA target sequences. Conclusion This paper describes the first Atlantic salmon FLIcs from a tissue and developmental stage specific cDNA library. We have demonstrated that many FLIcs contained a complete coding sequence (cCDS. This

  16. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity......-contributing interactions are attributed to different domains and known to occur in two steps. Here, knowledge on chemokine and receptor domains involved in the first binding-step and the second activation-step is reviewed. A mechanism comprising at least two steps seems consistent; however, several intermediate...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  17. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Richard J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360, cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases.

  18. Iron-Catalyzed C-O Bond Activation: Opportunity for Sustainable Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisz, Elwira; Szostak, Michal

    2017-10-23

    Oxygen-based electrophiles have emerged as some of the most valuable cross-coupling partners in organic synthesis due to several major strategic and environmental benefits, such as abundance and potential to avoid toxic halide waste. In this context, iron-catalyzed C-O activation/cross-coupling holds particular promise to achieve sustainable catalytic protocols due to its natural abundance, inherent low toxicity, and excellent economic and ecological profile. Recently, tremendous progress has been achieved in the development of new methods for functional-group-tolerant iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions by selective C-O cleavage. These methods establish highly attractive alternatives to traditional cross-coupling reactions by using halides as electrophilic partners. In particular, new easily accessible oxygen-based electrophiles have emerged as substrates in iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, which significantly broaden the scope of this catalysis platform. New mechanistic manifolds involving iron catalysis have been established; thus opening up vistas for the development of a wide range of unprecedented reactions. The synthetic potential of this sustainable mode of reactivity has been highlighted by the development of new strategies in the construction of complex motifs, including in target synthesis. The most recent advances in sustainable iron-catalyzed cross-coupling of C-O-based electrophiles are reviewed, with a focus on both mechanistic aspects and synthetic utility. It should be noted that this catalytic manifold provides access to motifs that are often not easily available by other methods, such as the assembly of stereodefined dienes or C(sp 2 )-C(sp 3 ) cross-couplings, thus emphasizing the synthetic importance of this mode of reactivity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the chemokine-binding protein from orf virus (Poxviridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couñago, Rafael Miguez; Fleming, Stephen B.; Mercer, Andrew A.; Krause, Kurt L.

    2010-01-01

    The chemokine-binding protein from orf virus was purified and crystallized. The morphology and diffraction behaviour of these crystals was significantly improved through the use of additives known as Silver Bullets. The parapoxvirus orf virus (ORFV) encodes a chemokine-binding protein (CBP) that functions to downregulate the host’s immune response at the site of infection by blocking the chemokine-induced recruitment of immune cells. In order to shed light on the structural determinants of CBP–chemokine binding, ORFV CBP was crystallized as part of an ongoing structure–function study on this protein. ORFV CBP crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using ammonium citrate as a precipitant. The crystal quality was greatly improved through the addition of small-molecule additives to the crystallization mother liquor. ORFV CBP crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.50 Å resolution and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 22 or its enantiomorph P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.62, c = 282.49 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°

  20. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in α helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa

  1. Cloning, Characterization, and Functional Expression of Phospholipase Dα cDNA from Banana (Musa acuminate L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD plays a key role in adaptive responses of postharvest fruits. A cDNA clone of banana (Musa acuminate L. PLDα (MaPLDα was obtained by RT-PCR in this study. The MaPLDα gene contains a complete open reading frame (ORF encoding a 92-kDa protein composed of 832 amino acid residues and possesses a characteristic C2 domain and two catalytic H×K×××D (abbr. HKD motifs. The two HKD motifs are separated by 341 amino acid residues in the primary structure. Relatively higher PLD activity and expression of MaPLDα mRNA were detected in developing tissues compared to senescent or mature tissues in individual leaves, flower, stem, and fruit organs, respectively. The expression profile of PLDα mRNA in postharvest banana fruits at different temperatures was determined, and the MaPLDα mRNA reached the highest expression peak on day 5 at 25°C and on day 7 at 12°C. The results provide useful information for maintaining postharvest quality and extending the storage life of banana fruit.

  2. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringman, Jasper J.; Oostendorp, Roos L.; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    The development of specific targeted therapies, such as anti-TNF-alpha treatment, for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, has significantly improved treatment, although not all patients respond. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors as

  3. Human telomeric DNA: G-quadruplex, i-motif and Watson–Crick double helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anh Tuân; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    Human telomeric DNA composed of (TTAGGG/CCCTAA)n repeats may form a classical Watson–Crick double helix. Each individual strand is also prone to quadruplex formation: the G-rich strand may adopt a G-quadruplex conformation involving G-quartets whereas the C-rich strand may fold into an i-motif based on intercalated C·C+ base pairs. Using an equimolar mixture of the telomeric oligonucleotides d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] and d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT], we defined which structures existed and which would be the predominant species under a variety of experimental conditions. Under near-physiological conditions of pH, temperature and salt concentration, telomeric DNA was predominantly in a double-helix form. However, at lower pH values or higher temperatures, the G-quadruplex and/or the i-motif efficiently competed with the duplex. We also present kinetic and thermodynamic data for duplex association and for G-quadruplex/i-motif unfolding. PMID:12409451

  4. Processing of natural and recombinant CXCR3-targeting chemokines and implications for biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensbergen, P J; van der Raaij-Helmer, E M; Dijkman, R; van der Schors, R C; Werner-Felmayer, G; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; Willemze, R; Tensen, C P

    2001-09-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of peptides with chemotactic activity towards leukocytes. The potency of different chemokines for the same receptor often varies as a result of differences in primary structure. In addition, post-translational modifications have been shown to affect the effectiveness of chemokines. Although in several studies, natural CXCR3-targeting chemokines have been isolated, detailed information about the proteins and their possible modifications is lacking. Using a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry we studied the protein profile of CXCR3-targeting chemokines expressed by interferon-gamma-stimulated human keratinocytes. The biological implications of one of the identified modifications was studied in more detail using calcium mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We found that the primary structure of human CXCL10 is different from the generally accepted sequence. In addition we identified a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, lacking the last four amino acids. Native CXCL11 was primarily found in its intact mature form but we also found a mass corresponding to an N-terminally truncated human CXCL11, lacking the first two amino acids FP, indicating that this chemokine is a substrate for dipeptidylpeptidase IV. Interestingly, this same truncation was found when we expressed human CXCL11 in Drosophila S2 cells. The biological activity of this truncated form of CXCL11 was greatly reduced, both in calcium mobilization (using CXCR3 expressing CHO cells) as well as its chemotactic activity for CXCR3-expressing T-cells. It is concluded that detailed information on chemokines at the protein level is important to characterize the exact profile of these chemotactic peptides as modifications can severely alter their biological activity.

  5. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...

  6. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs (G/CCGGAAGTGACGTCA) Preferentially Bound by GABPα and CREB Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Vinson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X4-N1-30-X4) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif (C/GCCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif (C/GCGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif. PMID:23050235

  7. Can New Inflammatory Markers Improve the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Manne; Rubér, Marie; Ekerfelt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of appendicitis is difficult and resource consuming. New inflammatory markers have been proposed for the diagnosis of appendicitis, but their utility in combination with traditional diagnostic variables has not been tested. Our objective is to explore the potential of new...... inflammatory markers for improving the diagnosis of appendicitis.METHODS: The diagnostic properties of the six most promising out of 21 new inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, chemokine ligand [CXCL]-8, chemokine C-C motif ligand [CCL]-2, serum amyloid A [SAA], matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-9......, and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were compared with traditional diagnostic variables included in the Appendicitis Inflammatory Response (AIR) score (right iliac fossa pain, vomiting, rebound tenderness, guarding, white blood cell [WBC] count, proportion neutrophils, C-reactive protein and body temperature) in 432 patients...

  8. Expression and function of the SDF-1 chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 during mouse limb muscle development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Conny; Ödemis, Veysel; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-10-15

    The chemokine, SDF-1/CXCL12, and its receptor, CXCR4, have been implied to play major roles during limb myogenesis. This concept was recently challenged by the identification of CXCR7 as an alternative SDF-1 receptor, which can either act as a scavenger receptor, a modulator of CXCR4, or an active chemokine receptor. We have now re-examined this issue by determining whether SDF-1 would signal to C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently influence their differentiation via CXCR4 and/or CXCR7. In addition, we have analyzed CXCR7, CXCR4, and SDF-1 expression in developing and injured mouse limb muscles. We demonstrate that in undifferentiated C2C12 cells, SDF-1-dependent cell signaling and resulting inhibitory effects on myogenic differentiation are entirely mediated by CXCR4. We further demonstrate that CXCR7 expression increases in differentiating C2C12 cells, which in turn abrogates CXCR4 signaling. Moreover, consistent with the view that CXCR4 and CXCR7 control limb myogenesis in vivo by similar mechanisms, we found that CXCR4 expression is the highest in late embryonic hindlimb muscles and drops shortly after birth when secondary muscle growth terminates. Vice versa, CXCR7 expression increased perinatally and persisted into adult life. Finally, underscoring the role of the SDF-1 system in muscle regeneration, we observed that SDF-1 is continuously expressed by endomysial cells of postnatal and adult muscle fibers. Analysis of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice additionally revealed that muscle regeneration is associated with muscular re-expression of CXCR4. The apparent tight control of limb muscle development and regeneration by CXCR4 and CXCR7 points to these chemokine receptors as promising therapeutic targets for certain muscle disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A distance constrained synaptic plasticity model of C. elegans neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh

    2017-03-01

    Brain research has been driven by enquiry for principles of brain structure organization and its control mechanisms. The neuronal wiring map of C. elegans, the only complete connectome available till date, presents an incredible opportunity to learn basic governing principles that drive structure and function of its neuronal architecture. Despite its apparently simple nervous system, C. elegans is known to possess complex functions. The nervous system forms an important underlying framework which specifies phenotypic features associated to sensation, movement, conditioning and memory. In this study, with the help of graph theoretical models, we investigated the C. elegans neuronal network to identify network features that are critical for its control. The 'driver neurons' are associated with important biological functions such as reproduction, signalling processes and anatomical structural development. We created 1D and 2D network models of C. elegans neuronal system to probe the role of features that confer controllability and small world nature. The simple 1D ring model is critically poised for the number of feed forward motifs, neuronal clustering and characteristic path-length in response to synaptic rewiring, indicating optimal rewiring. Using empirically observed distance constraint in the neuronal network as a guiding principle, we created a distance constrained synaptic plasticity model that simultaneously explains small world nature, saturation of feed forward motifs as well as observed number of driver neurons. The distance constrained model suggests optimum long distance synaptic connections as a key feature specifying control of the network.

  10. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  11. Peptide-binding motifs of two common equine class I MHC molecules in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Lindvall, Mikaela; Moore, Erin; Moore, Eugene; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Myers, Paisley T; Malaker, Stacy A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Hunt, Donald F; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I alleles provide a valuable tool to efficiently identify putative T cell epitopes. Detailed information on equine MHC class I alleles is still very limited, and to date, only a single equine MHC class I allele, Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3 haplotype), has been characterized. The present study extends the number of characterized ELA class I specificities in two additional haplotypes found commonly in the Thoroughbred breed. Accordingly, we here report quantitative binding motifs for the ELA-A2 allele Eqca-16*00101 and the ELA-A9 allele Eqca-1*00201. Utilizing analyses of endogenously bound and eluted ligands and the screening of positional scanning combinatorial libraries, detailed and quantitative peptide-binding motifs were derived for both alleles. Eqca-16*00101 preferentially binds peptides with aliphatic/hydrophobic residues in position 2 and at the C-terminus, and Eqca-1*00201 has a preference for peptides with arginine in position 2 and hydrophobic/aliphatic residues at the C-terminus. Interestingly, the Eqca-16*00101 motif resembles that of the human HLA A02-supertype, while the Eqca-1*00201 motif resembles that of the HLA B27-supertype and two macaque class I alleles. It is expected that the identified motifs will facilitate the selection of candidate epitopes for the study of immune responses in horses.

  12. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.mantovani@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan (Italy)

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  13. Chemokines: novel targets for breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Simi; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the possible involvement of chemokines and their receptors in breast cancer progression and metastasis. Chemokines and their receptors constitute a superfamily of signalling factors whose prognosis value in breast cancer progression remains unclear. We will examine here the expression pattern of chemokines and their receptors in mammary gland physiology and carcinogenesis. The nature of the cells producing chemokines or harboring chemokine receptors appears to be crucial in certain conditions for example, the infiltration of the primary tumor by leukocytes and angiogenesis. In addition, chemokines, their receptors and the interaction with glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) are key players in the homing of cancer cells to distant metastasis sites. Several lines of evidence, including in vitro and in vivo models, suggest that the mechanism of action of chemokines in cancer development involves the modulation of proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, leukocyte recruitment or angiogenesis. Furthermore, we will discuss the regulation of chemokine network in tumor neovascularity by decoy receptors. The reasons accounting for the deregulation of chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in breast cancer are certainly crucial for the comprehension of chemokine role in breast cancer and are in several cases linked to estrogen receptor status. The targeting of chemokines and chemokine receptors by antibodies, small molecule antagonists, viral chemokine binding proteins and heparins appears as promising tracks to develop therapeutic strategies. Thus there is significant interest in developing strategies to antagonize the chemokine function, and an opportunity to interfere with metastasis, the leading cause of death in most patients. PMID:17717637

  14. Structure of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 with a Potent Chemokine Antagonist Reveals Mechanisms of Chemokine Recognition and Molecular Mimicry by HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Han, Gye Won; Abagyan, Ruben; Wu, Beili; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M. (USC); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2017-06-01

    CCR5 is the primary chemokine receptor utilized by HIV to infect leukocytes, whereas CCR5 ligands inhibit infection by blocking CCR5 engagement with HIV gp120. To guide the design of improved therapeutics, we solved the structure of CCR5 in complex with chemokine antagonist [5P7]CCL5. Several structural features appeared to contribute to the anti-HIV potency of [5P7]CCL5, including the distinct chemokine orientation relative to the receptor, the near-complete occupancy of the receptor binding pocket, the dense network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the similarity of binding determinants with the FDA-approved HIV inhibitor Maraviroc. Molecular modeling indicated that HIV gp120 mimicked the chemokine interaction with CCR5, providing an explanation for the ability of CCR5 to recognize diverse ligands and gp120 variants. Our findings reveal that structural plasticity facilitates receptor-chemokine specificity and enables exploitation by HIV, and provide insight into the design of small molecule and protein inhibitors for HIV and other CCR5-mediated diseases.

  15. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  16. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Zboray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  17. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP-C is ins......Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP...... or anionic phospholipid monolayers. The peptide expands the pi-A compression isotherms of interfacial phospholipid/peptide films, and perturbs the lipid packing of phospholipid films during compression-driven liquid-expanded to liquid-condensed lateral transitions, as observed by epifluorescence microscopy....... These results demonstrate that the sequence of the SP-C N-terminal region has intrinsic ability to interact with, insert into, and perturb the structure of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid films, even in the absence of the palmitic chains attached to this segment in the native protein. This effect has been...

  18. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. Host Gene Expression Analysis in Sri Lankan Melioidosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-19

    CCL5 Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 /RANTES. IFNγ Interferon gamma TNFα Tumor necrosis factor alpha HMGB1 High mobility group box 1 protein /high...aim of this study was to analyze gene expression levels of human host factors in melioidosis patients and establish useful correlation with disease...PBMC’s) of study subjects. Gene expression profiles of 25 gene targets including 19 immune response genes and 6 epigenetic factors were analyzed by

  20. CompariMotif: quick and easy comparisons of sequence motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard J; Davey, Norman E; Shields, Denis C

    2008-05-15

    CompariMotif is a novel tool for making motif-motif comparisons, identifying and describing similarities between regular expression motifs. CompariMotif can identify a number of different relationships between motifs, including exact matches, variants of degenerate motifs and complex overlapping motifs. Motif relationships are scored using shared information content, allowing the best matches to be easily identified in large comparisons. Many input and search options are available, enabling a list of motifs to be compared to itself (to identify recurring motifs) or to datasets of known motifs. CompariMotif can be run online at http://bioware.ucd.ie/ and is freely available for academic use as a set of open source Python modules under a GNU General Public License from http://bioinformatics.ucd.ie/shields/software/comparimotif/

  1. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding...

  2. Identification and expression analysis of a CC chemokine from cobia (Rachycentron canadum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Sun, Xiuxiu; Wang, Yunxin

    2013-06-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations and regulate the immune response mechanisms. The cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a marine finfish species, has a great potential for net cage aquaculture in the South China Sea. We isolated and characterized a CC chemokine cDNA from cobia-designated RcCC2. Its cDNA is 783 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 110 amino acids. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the RcCC2 gene, which contains four conserved cysteine residues, shares a high degree of similarity with other known CC chemokine sequences and is closest to the CCL19/21 clade. The mRNA of RcCC2 is expressed constitutively in all tested tissues, including gill, liver, muscle, spleen, kidney, head kidney, skin, brain, stomach, intestine and heart, but not blood, with the highest level of expression in gill and liver. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of the RcCC2 gene in immune-related tissues, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) and phosphate-buffered saline as a control. RcCC2 gene expression was up-regulated differentially in head kidney, spleen and liver during 12 h after challenge. These results indicate that the RcCC2 gene is inducible and is involved in immune responses, suggesting RcCC2 has an important role in the early stage of viral and bacterial infections.

  3. Aberrant Receptor Internalization and Enhanced FRS2-dependent Signaling Contribute to the Transforming Activity of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 IIIb C3 Isoform*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Maddileti, Savitri; Mitin, Natalia; Harden, T. Kendall; Der, Channing J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splice variants of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) IIIb, designated C1, C2, and C3, possess progressive reduction in their cytoplasmic carboxyl termini (822, 788, and 769 residues, respectively), with preferential expression of the C2 and C3 isoforms in human cancers. We determined that the progressive deletion of carboxyl-terminal sequences correlated with increasing transforming potency. The highly transforming C3 variant lacks five tyrosine residues present in C1, and we determined that the loss of Tyr-770 alone enhanced FGFR2 IIIb C1 transforming activity. Because Tyr-770 may compose a putative YXXL sorting motif, we hypothesized that loss of Tyr-770 in the 770YXXL motif may cause disruption of FGFR2 IIIb C1 internalization and enhance transforming activity. Surprisingly, we found that mutation of Leu-773 but not Tyr-770 impaired receptor internalization and increased receptor stability and activation. Interestingly, concurrent mutations of Tyr-770 and Leu-773 caused 2-fold higher transforming activity than caused by the Y770F or L773A single mutations, suggesting loss of Tyr and Leu residues of the 770YXXL773 motif enhances FGFR2 IIIb transforming activity by distinct mechanisms. We also determined that loss of Tyr-770 caused persistent activation of FRS2 by enhancing FRS2 binding to FGFR2 IIIb. Furthermore, we found that FRS2 binding to FGFR2 IIIb is required for increased FRS2 tyrosine phosphorylation and enhanced transforming activity by Y770F mutation. Our data support a dual mechanism where deletion of the 770YXXL773 motif promotes FGFR2 IIIb C3 transforming activity by causing aberrant receptor recycling and stability and persistent FRS2-dependent signaling. PMID:19103595

  4. HfC plasma coating of C/C composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncoeur, M.; Schnedecker, G.; Lulewicz, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface properties of C/C composites such as hardness and corrosion or erosion resistance can be modified by a ceramic coating applied by plasma torch. The technique of plasma spraying in controlled temperature and atmosphere, that was developed and patented by the CEA, makes it possible to apply coatings to the majority of metals and ceramics without affecting the characteristics of the composite. An example of hard deposit of HfC on a C/C composite is described. The characteristics of the deposit and of the bonding with the C/C composite were studied before and after a heat treatment under vacuum for 2 hours at 1000 C. 2 refs

  5. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  6. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  7. Circadian clock protein KaiC forms ATP-dependent hexameric rings and binds DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Saveliev, Sergei V; Xu, Yao; Stafford, Walter F; Cox, Michael M; Inman, Ross B; Johnson, Carl H

    2002-12-24

    KaiC from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (KaiC) is an essential circadian clock protein in cyanobacteria. Previous sequence analyses suggested its inclusion in the RecADnaB superfamily. A characteristic of the proteins of this superfamily is that they form homohexameric complexes that bind DNA. We show here that KaiC also forms ring complexes with a central pore that can be visualized by electron microscopy. A combination of analytical ultracentrifugation and chromatographic analyses demonstrates that these complexes are hexameric. The association of KaiC molecules into hexamers depends on the presence of ATP. The KaiC sequence does not include the obvious DNA-binding motifs found in RecA or DnaB. Nevertheless, KaiC binds forked DNA substrates. These data support the inclusion of KaiC into the RecADnaB superfamily and have important implications for enzymatic activity of KaiC in the circadian clock mechanism that regulates global changes in gene expression patterns.

  8. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptors...... of others has been termed signaling bias and can accordingly be grouped into ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue bias. Bias has so far been broadly overlooked in the process of drug development. The low number of currently approved drugs targeting the chemokine system, as well as the broad range...... of failed clinical trials, reflects the need for a better understanding of the chemokine system. Thus, understanding the character, direction, and consequence of biased signaling in the chemokine system may aid the development of new therapeutics. This review describes experiments to assess G protein...

  9. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  10. Excitation functions of the systems 12C+14C and 13C+12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haindl, E.

    1975-01-01

    The excitation functions of the systems 12 C+ 14 C and 13 C+ 12 C are investigated for different exit channels. The excitation functions measured do not show correlated structures as in the system 12 C+ 12 C. (WL/AK) [de

  11. The group B streptococcal alpha C protein binds alpha1beta1-integrin through a novel KTD motif that promotes internalization of GBS within human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Gilles R; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2007-12-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis among neonates and a cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. GBS epithelial cell invasion is associated with expression of alpha C protein (ACP). Loss of ACP expression results in a decrease in GBS internalization and translocation across human cervical epithelial cells (ME180). Soluble ACP and its 170 amino acid N-terminal region (NtACP), but not the repeat protein RR', bind to ME180 cells and reduce internalization of wild-type GBS to levels obtained with an ACP-deficient isogenic mutant. In the current study, ACP colocalized with alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin, resulting in integrin clustering as determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. NtACP contains two structural domains, D1 and D2. D1 is structurally similar to fibronectin's integrin-binding region (FnIII10). D1's (KT)D146 motif is structurally similar to the FnIII10 (RG)D1495 integrin-binding motif, suggesting that ACP binds alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin via the D1 domain. The (KT)D146A mutation within soluble NtACP reduced its ability to bind alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin and inhibit GBS internalization within ME180 cells. Thus ACP binding to human epithelial cell integrins appears to contribute to GBS internalization within epithelial cells.

  12. [Peptide fragments of chemokine domain of fractalkine: effect on human monocyte migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtina, N B; Aref'eva, T I; Ruleva, N Iu; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Bespalova, Zh D; Krasnikova, T L

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis to the area of tissue damage is mediated by chemokines. According to the primary structure, chemokines are divided into four families, fractalkine (CX3CL1) is the only one member of CX3C family and the only membrane-bound chemokine. Fractalkine molecule includes the extracellular N-terminal chemokine domain, mucin-like rod, the transmembrane and the intracellular domains. In membrane-bound state fractalkine has the properties of an adhesion molecule. Chemokine domain of fractalkine (CDF) is released from cell membrane by proteolysis, and this soluble form acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes expressing fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. Fractalkine is involved in development of a number of pathological processes caused by inflammation, and therefore a search for fractalkine inhibitors is very important. For this purpose we identified several antigenic determinants--the fragments of CDF, and the following peptides were synthesized--P41-52 H-Leu-Glu-Thr-Arg-Gln-His-Arg-Leu-Phe-Cys-Ala-Asp-NH2, P53-60 H-Pro-Lys-Glu-Gln-Trp-Val-Lys-Asp-NH2 and P60-71 H-Asp-Ala-Met-Gln-His-Leu-Asp-Arg-Gln-Ala-Ala-Ala-NH2. The peptide effects on adhesion and migration of human peripheral blood monocytes expressing fractalkine receptors were investigated. In the presence of CDF and P41-52 we observed the increased adhesion and migration of monocytes compared with spontaneous values. Peptides P53-60 and P60-71 significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion and migration stimulated by CDF. Since the chemotactic activity of chemokines was shown to be dependent on their binding to glycosaminoglycans of the cell surface and extracellular matrix, the effect ofpeptides on the interaction of CDF with heparin was analyzed by ELISA. Peptide P41-52 competed with CDF for heparin binding, while peptides P53-60 and P60-71 had no significant activity.

  13. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonets, Denis V; Nepomnyashchikh, Tatyana S; Shchelkunov, Sergei N

    2010-10-27

    Variola virus (VARV) the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF) through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor) is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI) and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  14. Cyclin E/Cdk2, P/CAF, and E1A regulate the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierstra, Inken; Alves, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    FOXM1c transactivates the c-myc promoter by binding directly to its TATA-boxes. The present study demonstrates that the transactivation of the c-myc promoter by FOXM1c is enhanced by the key proliferation signal cyclin E/Cdk2, but repressed by P/CAF and the adenoviral oncoprotein E1A. Furthermore, FOXM1c interacts with the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase P/CAF. This study shows that, on the c-myc-P1 TATA-box, FOXM1c does not function simply as normal transcription factor just binding to an unusual site. Moreover, the inhibitory N-terminus of FOXM1c does not inhibit its transrepression domain or its EDA. Others reported that a cyclin/Cdk-binding LXL-motif of the splice variant FoxM1b is required for its interaction with Cdk2, Cdk1, and p27, its phosphorylation by Cdk1 and its activation by Cdc25B. In contrast, we now demonstrate that this LXL-motif is not required for the activation of FOXM1c by cyclin D1/Cdk4, cyclin E/Cdk and cyclin A/Cdk2 or for the repression of FOXM1c by p27

  15. Short Arginine Motifs Drive Protein Stickiness in the Escherichia coli Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Ciara; Crowley, Peter B

    2017-09-19

    Although essential to numerous biotech applications, knowledge of molecular recognition by arginine-rich motifs in live cells remains limited. 1 H, 15 N HSQC and 19 F NMR spectroscopies were used to investigate the effects of C-terminal -GR n (n = 1-5) motifs on GB1 interactions in Escherichia coli cells and cell extracts. While the "biologically inert" GB1 yields high-quality in-cell spectra, the -GR n fusions with n = 4 or 5 were undetectable. This result suggests that a tetra-arginine motif is sufficient to drive interactions between a test protein and macromolecules in the E. coli cytoplasm. The inclusion of a 12 residue flexible linker between GB1 and the -GR 5 motif did not improve detection of the "inert" domain. In contrast, all of the constructs were detectable in cell lysates and extracts, suggesting that the arginine-mediated complexes were weak. Together these data reveal the significance of weak interactions between short arginine-rich motifs and the E. coli cytoplasm and demonstrate the potential of such motifs to modify protein interactions in living cells. These interactions must be considered in the design of (in vivo) nanoscale assemblies that rely on arginine-rich sequences.

  16. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by its KFERQ motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Seon; Kim, Dong-Hou; Yoon, Seung-Yong

    2016-06-01

    Understanding of trafficking, processing, and degradation mechanisms of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is important because APP can be processed to produce β-amyloid (Aβ), a key pathogenic molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we found that APP contains KFERQ motif at its C-terminus, a consensus sequence for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) or microautophagy which are another types of autophagy for degradation of pathogenic molecules in neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion of KFERQ in APP increased C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and secreted N-terminal fragments of APP and kept it away from lysosomes. KFERQ deletion did not abolish the interaction of APP or its cleaved products with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), a protein necessary for CMA or microautophagy. These findings suggest that KFERQ motif is important for normal processing and degradation of APP to preclude the accumulation of APP-CTFs although it may not be important for CMA or microautophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 337-342].

  17. Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness during late gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Lopez Nardhy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parturition has been widely described as an immunological response; however, it is unknown how this is triggered. We hypothesized that an early event in parturition is an increased responsiveness of peripheral leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli expressed by reproductive tissues, and this precedes expression of tissue chemotactic activity, uterine activation and the systemic progesterone/estradiol shift. Methods Tissues and blood were collected from pregnant Long-Evans rats on gestational days (GD 17, 20 and 22 (term gestation. We employed a validated Boyden chamber assay, flow cytometry, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results We found that GD20 maternal peripheral leukocytes migrated more than those from GD17 when these were tested with GD22 uterus and cervix extracts. Leukocytes on GD20 also displayed a significant increase in chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (Ccl2 gene expression and this correlated with an increase in peripheral granulocyte proportions and a decrease in B cell and monocyte proportions. Tissue chemotactic activity and specific chemokines (CCL2, chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1/CXCL1, and CXCL10 were mostly unchanged from GD17 to GD20 and increased only on GD22. CXCL10 peaked on GD20 in cervical tissues. As expected, prostaglandin F2α receptor and oxytocin receptor gene expression increased dramatically between GD20 and 22. Progesterone concentrations fell and estradiol-17β concentrations increased in peripheral serum, cervical and uterine tissue extracts between GD20 and 22. Conclusion Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness, which leads to their infiltration into the uterus where they may participate in the process of parturition.

  18. Total Synthesis of Zoanthamine Alkaloids, Part 2. Construction of the C1-C5, C6-C10 and C11-C24 Fragments of Zoanthamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Tedenborg, Lars; Somfai, Peter

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of three key intermediates for a projected total synthesis of the marine alkaloid zoanthamine. These building blocks, corresponding to the C1-C5, C6-C10 and C11-C24 fragments of the target molecule, are synthesised efficiently form (R)-hydroxymethyl-butyrolac......This paper describes the construction of three key intermediates for a projected total synthesis of the marine alkaloid zoanthamine. These building blocks, corresponding to the C1-C5, C6-C10 and C11-C24 fragments of the target molecule, are synthesised efficiently form (R...

  19. Lack of integrase inhibitors associated resistance mutations among HIV-1C isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu, Andargachew; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Although biochemical analysis of HIV-1 integrase enzyme suggested the use of integrase inhibitors (INIs) against HIV-1C, different viral subtypes may favor different mutational pathways potentially leading to varying levels of drug resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to search for the occurrence and natural evolution of integrase polymorphisms and/or resistance mutations in HIV-1C Ethiopian clinical isolates prior to the introduction of INIs. Plasma samples from chronically infected drug naïve patients (N = 45), of whom the PR and RT sequence was determined previously, were used to generate population based sequences of HIV-1 integrase. HIV-1 subtype was determined using the REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool. Resistance mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford HIV drug resistance database ( http://hivdb.stanford.edu ) and the updated International Antiviral Society (IAS)-USA mutation lists. Moreover, rates of polymorphisms in the current isolates were compared with South African and global HIV-1C isolates. All subjects were infected with HIV-1C concordant to the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions. Neither major resistance-associated IN mutations (T66I/A/K, E92Q/G, T97A, Y143HCR, S147G, Q148H/R/K, and N155H) nor silent mutations known to change the genetic barrier were observed. Moreover, the DDE-catalytic motif (D64G/D116G/E152 K) and signature HHCC zinc-binding motifs at codon 12, 16, 40 and 43 were found to be highly conserved. However, compared to other South African subtype C isolates, the rate of polymorphism was variable at various positions. Although the sample size is small, the findings suggest that this drug class could be effective in Ethiopia and other southern African countries where HIV-1C is predominantly circulating. The data will contribute to define the importance of integrase polymorphism and to improve resistance interpretation algorithms in HIV-1C isolates.

  20. High temperature oxidation of carbide-carbon materials of NbC-C, NbC-TiC-C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, Yu.D.; Shalaginov, V.N.; Beketov, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of titanium carbide additions on the oxidation of carbide - carbon composition NbC-TiC-C in oxygen under the pressure of 10 mm Hg and in the air at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 800-1300 deg is studied. It is shown that the region of negative temperature coefficient during oxidation in the system NbC+C is determined by the processes of sintering and polymorphous transformation. The specific character of the oxide film, formed during oxidation of Nbsub(x)Tisub(y)C+C composites is connected with non-equilibrium nature of carbide grain in its composition. Carbon gasification takes place with the formation of carbon dioxide. Composite materials, containing titanium carbide in complex carbide up to 50-83 mol. %, are the most corrosion resisting ones [ru

  1. Low intraprostatic DHT promotes the infiltration of CD8+ T cells in BPH tissues via modulation of CCL5 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu; Hu, Shuai; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Fei; Li, Xin; Yu, Wei; Cui, Yun; Sun, Mengkui; Lv, Tianjing; He, Qun; Jin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies suggested thatandrogen might be associated with infiltrating T cells in prostate of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients, but detail of T-cell subset and mechanism still remained unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that intraprostatic 5 α -dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exerts effects on T cells recruitment by BPH epithelial cells. Prostate tissues from 64 cases of BPH patients after transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) were divided into 2 groups: (1) no medication history; (2) administration of 5 α -reductase type II inhibitor-finasteride 5 mg daily for at least 6 months before surgery. Group 2 presented significantly higher CD8+ T cells infiltration than group 1, but no changes in CD4+ T cells (immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry). In vitro study more CD8+ T cell migrated to the prostate tissue lysates from group 2 and BPH-1 cells in low DHT condition. Transcription of chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 5 (CCL5) mRNA in BPH-1 cells and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) mRNA in CD8+ T cells were upregulated in low DHT condition (q-PCR). CCL5 expression was also identified to be higher in group 2 prostate tissues by IHC. This study suggested that intraprostatic DHT may participate in regulating inflammatory response which was induced by human prostatic epithelial cell, via modulating CCL5 secretion.

  2. Low Intraprostatic DHT Promotes the Infiltration of CD8+ T Cells in BPH Tissues via Modulation of CCL5 Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies suggested thatandrogen might be associated with infiltrating T cells in prostate of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients, but detail of T-cell subset and mechanism still remained unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that intraprostatic 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT exerts effects on T cells recruitment by BPH epithelial cells. Prostate tissues from 64 cases of BPH patients after transurethral resection of prostate (TURP were divided into 2 groups: (1 no medication history; (2 administration of 5α-reductase type II inhibitor-finasteride 5 mg daily for at least 6 months before surgery. Group 2 presented significantly higher CD8+ T cells infiltration than group 1, but no changes in CD4+ T cells (immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In vitro study more CD8+ T cell migrated to the prostate tissue lysates from group 2 and BPH-1 cells in low DHT condition. Transcription of chemokine (C-C motif Ligand 5 (CCL5 mRNA in BPH-1 cells and chemokine (C-C motif receptor 5 (CCR5 mRNA in CD8+ T cells were upregulated in low DHT condition (q-PCR. CCL5 expression was also identified to be higher in group 2 prostate tissues by IHC. This study suggested that intraprostatic DHT may participate in regulating inflammatory response which was induced by human prostatic epithelial cell, via modulating CCL5 secretion.

  3. Correlating HIV tropism with immunological response under combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, J; Schöni-Affolter, F; Böni, J; Gorgievski-Hrisoho, M; Martinetti, G; Battegay, M; Klimkait, T

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of patients infected with HIV-1 experience only suboptimal CD4 cell recovery while treated with combination therapy (cART). It is still unclear whether viral properties such as cell tropism play a major role in this incomplete immune response. This study therefore intended to follow the tropism evolution of the HIV-1 envelope during periods of suppressive cART. Viruses from two distinct patient groups, one with good and another one with poor CD4 recovery after 5 years of suppressive cART, were genotypically analysed for viral tropism at baseline and at the end of the study period. Patients with CCR5-tropic CC-motif chemokine receptor 5 viruses at baseline tended to maintain this tropism to the study end. Patients who had a CXCR4-tropic CXC-motif chemokine receptor 4 virus at baseline were overrepresented in the poor CD4 recovery group. Overall, however, the majority of patients presented with CCR5-tropic viruses at follow-up. Our data lend support to the hypothesis that tropism determination can be used as a parameter for disease progression even if analysed long before the establishment of a poorer immune response. Moreover, the lasting predominating CCR5-tropism during periods of full viral control suggests the involvement of cellular mechanisms that preferentially reduce CXCR4-tropic viruses during cART. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  4. Linear ketenimines. Variable structures of C,C-dicyanoketenimines and C,C-bis-sulfonylketenimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Justin; Mitschke, Ullrich; Wentrup, Curt

    2002-02-22

    C,C-dicyanoketenimines 10a-c were generated by flash vacuum thermolysis of ketene N,S-acetals 9a-c or by thermal or photochemical decomposition of alpha-azido-beta-cyanocinnamonitrile 11. In the latter reaction, 3,3-dicyano-2-phenyl-1-azirine 12 is also formed. IR spectroscopy of the keteniminines isolated in Ar matrixes or as neat films, NMR spectroscopy of 10c, and theoretical calculations (B3LYP/6-31G) demonstrate that these ketenimines have variable geometry, being essentially linear along the CCN-R framework in polar media (neat films and solution), but in the gas phase or Ar matrix they are bent, as is usual for ketenimines. Experiments and calculations agree that a single CN substituent as in 13 is not enough to enforce linearity, and sulfonyl groups are less effective that cyano groups in causing linearity. C,C-bis(methylsulfonyl)ketenimines 4-5 and a C-cyano-C-(methylsulfonyl)ketenimine 15 are not linear. The compound p-O2NC6H4N=C=C(COOMe)2 previously reported in the literature is probably somewhat linearized along the CCNR moiety. A computational survey (B3LYP/6-31G) of the inversion barrier at nitrogen indicates that electronegative C-substituents dramatically lower the barrier; this is also true of N-acyl substituents. Increasing polarity causes lower barriers. Although N-alkylbis(methylsulfonyl)ketenimines are not calculated to be linear, the barriers are so low that crystal lattice forces can induce planarity in N-methylbis(methylsulfonyl)ketenimine 3.

  5. Interaction of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric state with its endogenous ligand CXCL12: coarse-grained simulations identify differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Pasquale; Basdevant, Nathalie; Bernadat, Guillaume; Bachelerie, Françoise; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2017-02-01

    Despite the recent resolutions of the crystal structure of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in complex with small antagonists or viral chemokine, a description at the molecular level of the interactions between the full-length CXCR4 and its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12, in relationship with the receptor recognition and activation, is not yet completely elucidated. Moreover, since CXCR4 is able to form dimers, the question of whether the CXCR4-CXCL12 complex has a 1:1 or 2:1 preferential stoichiometry is still an open question. We present here results of coarse-grained protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics simulations of CXCL12 in association with CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric states. Our proposed models for the 1:1 and 2:1 CXCR4-CXCL12 quaternary structures are consistent with recognition and activation motifs of both partners provided by the available site-directed mutagenesis data. Notably, we observed that in the 2:1 complex, the chemokine N-terminus makes more steady contacts with the receptor residues critical for binding and activation than in the 1:1 structure, suggesting that the 2:1 stoichiometry would favor the receptor signaling activity with respect to the 1:1 association.

  6. The NADPH thioredoxin reductase C functions as an electron donor to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin in a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueoka, Keigo; Yamazaki, Teruaki; Hiyama, Tetsuo; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    An NADPH thioredoxin reductase C was co-purified with a 2-Cys peroxiredoxin by the combination of anion exchange chromatography and electroelution from gel slices after native PAGE from a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus as an NAD(P)H oxidase complex induced by oxidative stress. The result provided a strong evidence that the NADPH thioredoxin reductase C interacts with the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin in vivo. An in vitro reconstitution assay with purified recombinant proteins revealed that both proteins were essential for an NADPH-dependent reduction of H 2 O 2 . These results suggest that the reductase transfers the reducing power from NADPH to the peroxiredoxin, which reduces peroxides in the cyanobacterium under oxidative stress. In contrast with other NADPH thioredoxin reductases, the NADPH thioredoxin reductase C contains a thioredoxin-like domain in addition to an NADPH thioredoxin reductase domain in the same polypeptide. Each domain contains a conserved CXYC motif. A point mutation at the CXYC motif in the NADPH thioredoxin reductase domain resulted in loss of the NADPH oxidation activity, while a mutation at the CXYC motif in the thioredoxin-like domain did not affect the electron transfer, indicating that this motif is not essential in the electron transport from NADPH to the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin.

  7. The impact of CCR5-Δ32 deletion on C-reactive protein levels and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khoa Manh; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The C-C chemokine receptor 5-Δ32 deletion (CCR5-Δ32) has been associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the effect on cardiovascular diseases is uncertain. This study addresses the impact of CCR5-Δ32 on the risk of low-grade inflammation...... and hospitalization with cardiovascular diseases in a large cohort of blood donors. METHODS: Genotyping of 15,206 healthy participants from The Danish Blood Donor Study for CCR5-Δ32 was performed and combined with CRP measurements and questionnaire data. Cardiovascular disease diagnoses were identified by ICD-10......: In this cohort, carriers of the CCR5-Δ32 deletion had normal CRP levels but a borderline significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases....

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles Conjugated with Peptides Derived from Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 as a Tool for Targeting Atherosclerosis

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    Chung-Wei Kao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that may progress silently for long period, and it is also widely accepted as the main cause of cardiovascular diseases. To prevent atherosclerotic plaques from generating, imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression are desired. During inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into incipient lipid accumulation in the artery wall, following conditioning by local growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines; therefore, monocyte accumulation in the arterial wall can be observed in fatty streaks, rupture-prone plaques, and experimental atherosclerosis. In this work, we synthesized monocyte-targeting iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, which were incorporated with the peptides derived from the chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2-binding motif of monocytes chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 as a diagnostic tool for potential atherosclerosis. MCP-1-motif MNPs co-localized with monocytes in in vitro fluorescence imaging. In addition, with MNPs injection in ApoE knockout mice (ApoE KO mice, the well-characterized animal model of atherosclerosis, MNPs were found in specific organs or regions which had monocytes accumulation, especially the aorta of atherosclerosis model mice, through in vivo imaging system (IVIS imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We also performed Oil Red O staining and Prussian Blue staining to confirm the co-localization of MCP-1-motif MNPs and atherosclerosis. The results showed the promising potential of MCP-1-motif MNPs as a diagnostic agent of atherosclerosis.

  9. The conserved basic residues and the charged amino acid residues at the α-helix of the zinc finger motif regulate the nuclear transport activity of triple C2H2 zinc finger proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) motifs on proteins are frequently recognized as a structure for DNA binding. Accumulated reports indicate that ZF motifs contain nuclear localization signal (NLS) to facilitate the transport of ZF proteins into nucleus. We investigated the critical factors that facilitate the nuclear transport of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. Three conserved basic residues (hot spots) were identified among the ZF sequences of triple C2H2 ZF proteins that reportedly have NLS function. Additional basic residues can be found on the α-helix of the ZFs. Using the ZF domain (ZFD) of Egr-1 as a template, various mutants were constructed and expressed in cells. The nuclear transport activity of various mutants was estimated by analyzing the proportion of protein localized in the nucleus. Mutation at any hot spot of the Egr-1 ZFs reduced the nuclear transport activity. Changes of the basic residues at the α-helical region of the second ZF (ZF2) of the Egr-1 ZFD abolished the NLS activity. However, this activity can be restored by substituting the acidic residues at the homologous positions of ZF1 or ZF3 with basic residues. The restored activity dropped again when the hot spots at ZF1 or the basic residues in the α-helix of ZF3 were mutated. The variations in nuclear transport activity are linked directly to the binding activity of the ZF proteins with importins. This study was extended to other triple C2H2 ZF proteins. SP1 and KLF families, similar to Egr-1, have charged amino acid residues at the second (α2) and the third (α3) positions of the α-helix. Replacing the amino acids at α2 and α3 with acidic residues reduced the NLS activity of the SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The reduced activity can be restored by substituting the α3 with histidine at any SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The results show again the interchangeable role of ZFs and charge residues in the α-helix in regulating the NLS activity of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. PMID:29381770

  10. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules (HLA-I in humans) present peptides derived from endogenous proteins to CTLs. Whereas the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-A and -B molecules have been studied extensively, little is known about HLA-C specificities. Combining a positional scanning combinatorial peptide...... library approach with a peptide-HLA-I dissociation assay, in this study we present a general strategy to determine the peptide-binding specificity of any MHC class I molecule. We applied this novel strategy to 17 of the most common HLA-C molecules, and for 16 of these we successfully generated matrices...... representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  11. Systematic analysis of phosphotyrosine antibodies recognizing single phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs in CagA of Western-type Helicobacter pylori strains.

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    Judith Lind

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infections is determined by multiple host-pathogen interactions that may develop to chronic gastritis, and sometimes peptic ulcers or gastric cancer. Highly virulent strains encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS that delivers the effector protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Translocated CagA undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation at EPIYA-sequence motifs, called A, B and C in Western-type strains, by members of the oncogenic Src and Abl host kinases. Phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs mediate interactions of CagA with host signaling factors--in particular various SH2-domain containing human proteins--thereby hijacking multiple downstream signaling cascades. Observations of tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA are mainly based on the use of commercial phosphotyrosine antibodies, which originally were selected to detect phosphotyrosines in mammalian proteins. Systematic studies of phosphorylated EPIYA-motif detection by the different antibodies would be very useful, but are not yet available. To address this issue, we synthesized phospho- and non-phosphopeptides representing each predominant Western CagA EPIYA-motif, and determined the recognition patterns of seven different phosphotyrosine antibodies in Western blots, and also performed infection studies with diverse representative Western H. pylori strains. Our results show that a total of 9-11 amino acids containing the phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs are necessary and sufficient for specific detection by these antibodies, but revealed great variability in sequence recognition. Three of the antibodies recognized phosphorylated EPIYA-motifs A, B and C similarly well; whereas preferential binding to phosphorylated motif A and motifs A and C was found with two and one antibodies, respectively, and the seventh anti-phosphotyrosine antibody did not recognize any phosphorylated EPIYA-motif. Controls showed that none of the antibodies recognized the corresponding non

  12. AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT expression through the long range interaction between promoter and intronic enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Genjie; Hu, Qingzhu; Xiao, Xichun; Chen, Shuxia

    2018-04-01

    The AML1/ETO onco-fusion protein is crucial for the genesis of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is well documented as a transcriptional repressor through dominant-negative effect. However, little is known about the transactivation mechanism of AML1/ETO. Through large cohort of patient's expression level data analysis and a series of experimental validation, we report here that AML1/ETO transactivates c-KIT expression through directly binding to and mediating the long-range interaction between the promoter and intronic enhancer regions of c-KIT. Gene expression analyses verify that c-KIT expression is significantly high in t(8;21) AML. Further ChIP-seq analysis and motif scanning identify two regulatory regions located in the promoter and intronic enhancer region of c-KIT, respectively. Both regions are enriched by co-factors of AML1/ETO, such as AML1, CEBPe, c-Jun, and c-Fos. Further luciferase reporter assays show that AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT promoter activity through directly recognizing the AML1 motif and the co-existence of co-factors. The induction of c-KIT promoter activity is reinforced with the existence of intronic enhancer region. Furthermore, ChIP-3C-qPCR assays verify that AML1/ETO mediates the formation of DNA-looping between the c-KIT promoter and intronic enhancer region through the long-range interaction. Collectively, our data uncover a novel transcriptional activity mechanism of AML1/ETO and enrich our knowledge of the onco-fusion protein mediated transcription regulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Susceptibility to experimental biliary atresia linked to different hepatic gene expression profiles in two mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Johannes; Kuebler, Joachim F; Turowski, Carmen; Tschernig, Thomas; Geffers, Robert; Petersen, Claus

    2010-02-01

    To compare hepatic gene expression during the development of experimental biliary atresia (BA) in two different mouse strains. Balb/c mice and C57Black/6 (Black/6) mice were infected with rhesus rotavirus (RRV) postpartum, clinical signs of BA and survival were noted. Liver sections were assessed for cluster of differentiation antigen (CD) 3, CD4 and CD8 expression, and the hepatic virus load was determined. Second, mice of both strains were sacrificed three days after infection. Isolated hepatic RNA was subjected to gene expression analysis using Affymetrix Gene Chip MOE 430 2.0. The incidence of BA was significantly lower in Black/6 mice compared to Balb/c mice (13.5% vs. 67%, P < 0.05). The mean virus titers were higher in mice with BA compared to mice without BA. Different gene profiles three days after virus infection were noted, with differential expression of 201 genes, including those regulating apoptosis, nucleic acid binding, transport function and particularly the immune response (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2, toll-like receptor 3, CD antigen 14, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands 10 and 11). This correlated with a significant increase of CD4 positive cells only in Balb/c mice with BA compared to healthy mice (13.5 vs. 5.0; P < 0.05). Black/6 mice did not exhibit any significant increase of CD3 or CD4 leukocytes despite cholestasis. The different susceptibility to experimental BA was associated with an increase of CD4 T-cells in the liver of Balb/c mice, which is linked to different gene profiles at the onset of bile duct obstruction.

  14. Emodin Protects Against Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis in Mice Through Inhibiting Activation of the p38 MAPK-NF-κB Signaling Pathway

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    Jihua Xue

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the effects of emodin on concanavalin A (Con A-induced hepatitis in mice and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods: A fulminant hepatitis model was established successfully by the intravenous administration of Con A (20 mg/kg to male Balb/c mice. Emodin was administered to the mice by gavage before and after Con A injection. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, numbers of CD4+ and F4/80+ cells infiltrated into the liver, and amounts of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and NF-γB in mouse livers and RAW264.7 and EL4 cells were measured. Results: Pretreatment with emodin significantly protected the animals from T cell-mediated hepatitis, as shown by the decreased elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST, as well as reduced hepatic necrosis. In addition, emodin pretreatment markedly reduced the intrahepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a, interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, integrin alpha M (ITGAM, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2 and chemokine (CXC motif receptor 2 (CXCR2. Furthermore, emodin pretreatment dramatically suppressed the numbers of CD4+ and F4/80+ cells infiltrating into the liver as well as the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-γB in Con A-treated mouse livers and RAW264.7 and EL4 cells. Conclusion: The results indicate that emodin pretreatment protects against Con A-induced liver injury in mice; these beneficial effects may occur partially through inhibition of both the infiltration of CD4+ and F4/80+ cells and the activation of the p38 MAPK-NF-γB pathway in CD4+ T cells and macrophages.

  15. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

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    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  16. The combinatorial PP1-binding consensus Motif (R/Kx( (0,1V/IxFxx(R/Kx(R/K is a new apoptotic signature.

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    Angélique N Godet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies established that PP1 is a target for Bcl-2 proteins and an important regulator of apoptosis. The two distinct functional PP1 consensus docking motifs, R/Kx((0,1V/IxF and FxxR/KxR/K, involved in PP1 binding and cell death were previously characterized in the BH1 and BH3 domains of some Bcl-2 proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we demonstrate that DPT-AIF(1, a peptide containing the AIF(562-571 sequence located in a c-terminal domain of AIF, is a new PP1 interacting and cell penetrating molecule. We also showed that DPT-AIF(1 provoked apoptosis in several human cell lines. Furthermore, DPT-APAF(1 a bi-partite cell penetrating peptide containing APAF-1(122-131, a non penetrating sequence from APAF-1 protein, linked to our previously described DPT-sh1 peptide shuttle, is also a PP1-interacting death molecule. Both AIF(562-571 and APAF-1(122-131 sequences contain a common R/Kx((0,1V/IxFxxR/KxR/K motif, shared by several proteins involved in control of cell survival pathways. This motif combines the two distinct PP1c consensus docking motifs initially identified in some Bcl-2 proteins. Interestingly DPT-AIF(2 and DPT-APAF(2 that carry a F to A mutation within this combinatorial motif, no longer exhibited any PP1c binding or apoptotic effects. Moreover the F to A mutation in DPT-AIF(2 also suppressed cell penetration. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the combinatorial PP1c docking motif R/Kx((0,1V/IxFxxR/KxR/K, deduced from AIF(562-571 and APAF-1(122-131 sequences, is a new PP1c-dependent Apoptotic Signature. This motif is also a new tool for drug design that could be used to characterize potential anti-tumour molecules.

  17. In Silico Analysis for Transcription Factors With Zn(II2C6 Binuclear Cluster DNA-Binding Domains in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Maicas

    2005-01-01

    presence of the CysX2CysX6CysX5-16CysX2CysX6-8Cys motif and a putative nuclear localization signal. Using this approach, 70 putative Zn(II2C6 transcription factors have been found in the genome of C. albicans.

  18. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis is functional in neuroendocrine tumors and signals on mTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circelli, Luisa; Sciammarella, Concetta; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; del Basso de Caro, Marialaura; Botti, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Luciano; Aria, Massimo; Ramundo, Valeria; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Ieranò, Caterina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-05

    To evaluate the possible crosstalk between C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12)/C-X-C chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) axis with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Sixty-one human NETs were included into the study. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis and mTOR pathway were assessed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The effect of mTOR inhibitor, RAD001, was evaluated on CXCR4 pathway through proliferation and p-Erk and p-AKT induction. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis and p-mTOR were found to be active and correlated with grading, Ki67 index and tumor stage. mTOR pathway activation significantly correlated with poor prognosis. In human NET cells, CXCL12 induced mTOR signalling while AMD3100 (CXCR4-antagonist) impaired it. The mTOR-antagonist, RAD001, impaired the CXCL12-dependent induction of CXCR4 downstream effectors. Combination of AMD3100 and RAD001 potentiate cell growth inhibition. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis is active in NETs and signals on mTOR. CXCR4 might be considered a prognostic factor in NETs. Combined treatment with AMD3100 and RAD001 may provide clinical benefits in NET patients with drug-resistant.

  19. G+C content dominates intrinsic nucleosome occupancy

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    Hughes Timothy R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relative preference of nucleosomes to form on individual DNA sequences plays a major role in genome packaging. A wide variety of DNA sequence features are believed to influence nucleosome formation, including periodic dinucleotide signals, poly-A stretches and other short motifs, and sequence properties that influence DNA structure, including base content. It was recently shown by Kaplan et al. that a probabilistic model using composition of all 5-mers within a nucleosome-sized tiling window accurately predicts intrinsic nucleosome occupancy across an entire genome in vitro. However, the model is complicated, and it is not clear which specific DNA sequence properties are most important for intrinsic nucleosome-forming preferences. Results We find that a simple linear combination of only 14 simple DNA sequence attributes (G+C content, two transformations of dinucleotide composition, and the frequency of eleven 4-bp sequences explains nucleosome occupancy in vitro and in vivo in a manner comparable to the Kaplan model. G+C content and frequency of AAAA are the most important features. G+C content is dominant, alone explaining ~50% of the variation in nucleosome occupancy in vitro. Conclusions Our findings provide a dramatically simplified means to predict and understand intrinsic nucleosome occupancy. G+C content may dominate because it both reduces frequency of poly-A-like stretches and correlates with many other DNA structural characteristics. Since G+C content is enriched or depleted at many types of features in diverse eukaryotic genomes, our results suggest that variation in nucleotide composition may have a widespread and direct influence on chromatin structure.

  20. Is the C-terminal insertional signal in Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins species-specific or not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramasivam Nagarajan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane is composed of an asymmetric lipid bilayer of phopspholipids and lipopolysaccharides, and the transmembrane proteins that reside in this membrane are almost exclusively β-barrel proteins. These proteins are inserted into the membrane by a highly conserved and essential machinery, the BAM complex. It recognizes its substrates, unfolded outer membrane proteins (OMPs, through a C-terminal motif that has been speculated to be species-specific, based on theoretical and experimental results from only two species, Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, where it was shown on the basis of individual sequences and motifs that OMPs from the one cannot easily be over expressed in the other, unless the C-terminal motif was adapted. In order to determine whether this species specificity is a general phenomenon, we undertook a large-scale bioinformatics study on all predicted OMPs from 437 fully sequenced proteobacterial strains. Results We were able to verify the incompatibility reported between Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, using clustering techniques based on the pairwise Hellinger distance between sequence spaces for the C-terminal motifs of individual organisms. We noticed that the amino acid position reported to be responsible for this incompatibility between Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis does not play a major role for determining species specificity of OMP recognition by the BAM complex. Instead, we found that the signal is more diffuse, and that for most organism pairs, the difference between the signals is hard to detect. Notable exceptions are the Neisseriales, and Helicobacter spp. For both of these organism groups, we describe the specific sequence requirements that are at the basis of the observed difference. Conclusions Based on the finding that the differences between the recognition motifs of almost all organisms are small, we assume that

  1. SECRET domain of variola virus CrmB protein can be a member of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins family

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    Shchelkunov Sergei N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variola virus (VARV the causative agent of smallpox, eradicated in 1980, have wide spectrum of immunomodulatory proteins to evade host immunity. Recently additional biological activity was discovered for VARV CrmB protein, known to bind and inhibit tumour necrosis factor (TNF through its N-terminal domain homologous to cellular TNF receptors. Besides binding TNF, this protein was also shown to bind with high affinity several chemokines which recruit B- and T-lymphocytes and dendritic cells to sites of viral entry and replication. Ability to bind chemokines was shown to be associated with unique C-terminal domain of CrmB protein. This domain named SECRET (Smallpox virus-Encoded Chemokine Receptor is unrelated to the host proteins and lacks significant homology with other known viral chemokine-binding proteins or any other known protein. Findings De novo modelling of VARV-CrmB SECRET domain spatial structure revealed its apparent structural homology with cowpox virus CC-chemokine binding protein (vCCI and vaccinia virus A41 protein, despite low sequence identity between these three proteins. Potential ligand-binding surface of modelled VARV-CrmB SECRET domain was also predicted to bear prominent electronegative charge which is characteristic to known orthopoxviral chemokine-binding proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that SECRET should be included into the family of poxviral type II chemokine-binding proteins and that it might have been evolved from the vCCI-like predecessor protein.

  2. Polymorphisms in chemokine and receptor genes and gastric cancer risk and survival in a high risk Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Andrew J; Fought, Angela J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Ye, Weimin; Zhang, Xiao; Chow, Wong-Ho; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Hou, Lifang

    2011-03-01

    To examine if genetic variations in chemokine receptor and ligand genes are associated with gastric cancer risk and survival. The study included 298 cases and 417 controls from a population-based study of gastric cancer conducted in Warsaw, Poland in 1994-1996. We investigated seven single nucleotide polymorphisms in a chemokine ligand (CXCL12) and chemokine receptor (CCR2, CCR5, CX3CR1) genes and one frameshift deletion (CCR5) in blood leukocyte DNA in relation to gastric cancer risk and survival. Genotyping was conducted at the NCI Core Genotyping Facility. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards models. Gastric cancer risk was not associated with single chemokine polymorphisms. A CCR5 haplotype that contained the common alleles of IVS1+151 G>T (rs2734648), IVS2+80 C>T (rs1800024) and minor allele of IVS1+246 A>G (rs1799987) was associated with a borderline significantly increased risk (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0?2.2). For gastric cancer cases, there was a greater risk of death for carriers of the minor alleles of CCR2 Ex2+241 G>A (rs1799864) (HR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) and CCR5 IVS2+80 C>T (rs1800024) (HR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1). Carriers of the CCR5 minor allele of IVS1+151 G>T (rs2734648) had a decreased risk of death compared to homozygote carriers of the common allele (HR = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-1.0). Our findings do not support an association between gastric cancer risk and single chemokine genetic variation. The observed associations between cancer risk and a CCR5 haplotype and between survival and polymorphisms in CCR2 and CCR5 need replication in future studies.

  3. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

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    Wang, Chengliang [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Zhang, Qiongdi [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Hang, Tianrong [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Tao, Yue [Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, 1678 Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120, People’s Republic of (China); Ma, Xukai [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn; Zang, Jianye, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China)

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  4. Insights into the motif preference of APOBEC3 enzymes.

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    Diako Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available We used a multivariate data analysis approach to identify motifs associated with HIV hypermutation by different APOBEC3 enzymes. The analysis showed that APOBEC3G targets G mainly within GG, TG, TGG, GGG, TGGG and also GGGT. The G nucleotides flanked by a C at the 3' end (in +1 and +2 positions were indicated as disfavoured targets by APOBEC3G. The G nucleotides within GGGG were found to be targeted at a frequency much less than what is expected. We found that the infrequent G-to-A mutation within GGGG is not limited to the inaccessibility, to APOBEC3, of poly Gs in the central and 3'polypurine tracts (PPTs which remain double stranded during the HIV reverse transcription. GGGG motifs outside the PPTs were also disfavoured. The motifs GGAG and GAGG were also found to be disfavoured targets for APOBEC3. The motif-dependent mutation of G within the HIV genome by members of the APOBEC3 family other than APOBEC3G was limited to GA→AA changes. The results did not show evidence of other types of context dependent G-to-A changes in the HIV genome.

  5. Total Synthesis of Zoanthamine Alkaloids, Part 2. Construction of the C1-C5, C6-C10 and C11-C24 Fragments of Zoanthamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Tedenborg, Lars; Somfai, Peter

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of three key intermediates for a projected total synthesis of the marine alkaloid zoanthamine. These building blocks, corresponding to the C1-C5, C6-C10 and C11-C24 fragments of the target molecule, are synthesised efficiently form (R...

  6. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST methods for the emerging Campylobacter species C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus and C. curvus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Miller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus sequence typing (MLST systems have been reported previously for multiple food- and food animal-associated Campylobacter species (e.g. C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari and C. fetus to both differentiate strains and identify clonal lineages. These MLST methods focused primarily on campylobacters of human clinical (e.g. C. jejuni or veterinary (e.g. C. fetus relevance. However, other, emerging, Campylobacter species have been isolated increasingly from environmental, food animal or human clinical samples. We describe herein MLST methods for five emerging Campylobacter species: C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus and C. curvus. The concisus/curvus method uses the loci aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, ilvD and pgm, whereas the other methods use the seven loci defined for C. jejuni (i.e., aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, pgm, and tkt. Multiple food animal and human clinical C. hyointestinalis (n=48, C. lanienae (n=34 and C. sputorum (n=24 isolates were typed, along with 86 human clinical C. concisus and C. curvus isolates. A large number of sequence types (STs were identified using all four MLST methods. Similar to Campylobacter MLST methods described previously, these novel MLST methods identified mixed isolates containing two or more strains of the same species. Additionally, these methods speciated unequivocally isolates that had been typed ambiguously using other molecular-based speciation methods, such as 16S rDNA sequencing. Finally, the design of degenerate primer pairs for some methods permitted the typing of related species; for example, the C. hyointestinalis primer pairs could be used to type C. fetus strains. Therefore, these novel Campylobacter MLST methods will prove useful in speciating and differentiating strains of multiple, emerging Campylobacter species.

  7. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  8. MotifNet: a web-server for network motif analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoly, Ilan Y; Lerman, Eugene; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-06-15

    Network motifs are small topological patterns that recur in a network significantly more often than expected by chance. Their identification emerged as a powerful approach for uncovering the design principles underlying complex networks. However, available tools for network motif analysis typically require download and execution of computationally intensive software on a local computer. We present MotifNet, the first open-access web-server for network motif analysis. MotifNet allows researchers to analyze integrated networks, where nodes and edges may be labeled, and to search for motifs of up to eight nodes. The output motifs are presented graphically and the user can interactively filter them by their significance, number of instances, node and edge labels, and node identities, and view their instances. MotifNet also allows the user to distinguish between motifs that are centered on specific nodes and motifs that recur in distinct parts of the network. MotifNet is freely available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/motifnet . The website was implemented using ReactJs and supports all major browsers. The server interface was implemented in Python with data stored on a MySQL database. estiyl@bgu.ac.il or michaluz@cs.bgu.ac.il. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Synthetic Swan band profile of (1,0) of 12C12C and (0,0) of 12C12C and 12C13C in comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, K.S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium calculations of the 12 C 13 C molecule based on the resonance fluorescence process give similar results to those of the normal molecule. Therefore the assumption that the observed intensities of bands of the normal and the isotopic molecule differ only by their abundance ratio is reasonable. The synthetic profile of the (1,0) Swan band of 12 C 13 C (0,0) band of 12 C 12 C and 12 C 13 C have been calculated. The relative merits of using the rotational structure of the (1,0) or (0,0) band for the determination of the isotopic ratio 12 C/ 13 C is discussed briefly. (author)

  10. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Solution structure of CXCL5--a novel chemokine and adipokine implicated in inflammation and obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan Sepuru

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL5 is selectively expressed in highly specialized cells such as epithelial type II cells in the lung and white adipose tissue macrophages in muscle, where it mediates diverse functions from combating microbial infections by regulating neutrophil trafficking to promoting obesity by inhibiting insulin signaling. Currently very little is known regarding the structural basis of how CXCL5 mediates its novel functions. Towards this missing knowledge, we have solved the solution structure of the CXCL5 dimer by NMR spectroscopy. CXCL5 is a member of a subset of seven CXCR2-activating chemokines (CAC that are characterized by the highly conserved ELR motif in the N-terminal tail. The structure shows that CXCL5 adopts the typical chemokine fold, but also reveals several distinct differences in the 30 s loop and N-terminal residues; not surprisingly, crosstalk between N-terminal and 30 s loop residues have been implicated as a major determinant of receptor activity. CAC function also involves binding to highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG, and the CXCL5 structure reveals a distinct distribution of positively charged residues, suggesting that differences in GAG interactions also influence function. The availability of the structure should now facilitate the design of experiments to better understand the molecular basis of various CXCL5 functions, and also serve as a template for the design of inhibitors for use in a clinical setting.

  12. Substrate-Mediated C-C and C-H Coupling after Dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Huihui; Yang, Sha; Gao, Hongying; Timmer, Alexander; Hill, Jonathan P; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Mönig, Harry; Huang, Xinyan; Tang, Qin; Ji, Qingmin; Liu, Wei; Fuchs, Harald

    2017-03-15

    Intermolecular C-C coupling after cleavage of C-X (mostly, X = Br or I) bonds has been extensively studied for facilitating the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures. However, the accidental appearance of C-H coupling at the terminal carbon atoms would limit the successive extension of covalent polymers. To our knowledge, the selective C-H coupling after dehalogenation has not so far been reported, which may illuminate another interesting field of chemical synthesis on surfaces besides in situ fabrication of polymers, i.e., synthesis of novel organic molecules. By combining STM imaging, XPS analysis, and DFT calculations, we have achieved predominant C-C coupling on Au(111) and more interestingly selective C-H coupling on Ag(111), which in turn leads to selective synthesis of polymeric chains or new organic molecules.

  13. Mutational analysis of the extracellular disulphide bridges of the atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 uncovers multiple binding and activation modes for its chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowska, Martyna; Meyrath, Max; Reynders, Nathan; Counson, Manuel; Hanson, Julien; Steyaert, Jan; Chevigné, Andy

    2018-07-01

    The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes but also in viral infection and cancer. ACKR3 shows strong propensity for activation and, unlike classical chemokine receptors, can respond to chemokines from both the CXC and CC families as well as to the endogenous peptides BAM22 and adrenomedullin. Moreover, despite belonging to the G protein coupled receptor family, its function appears to be mainly dependent on β-arrestin. ACKR3 has also been shown to continuously cycle between the plasma membrane and the endosomal compartments, suggesting a possible role as a scavenging receptor. So far, the molecular basis accounting for these atypical binding and signalling properties remains elusive. Noteworthy, ACKR3 extracellular domains bear three disulphide bridges. Two of them lie on top of the two main binding subpockets and are conserved among chemokine receptors, and one, specific to ACKR3, forms an intra-N terminus four-residue-loop of so far unknown function. Here, by mutational and functional studies, we examined the impact of the different disulphide bridges for ACKR3 folding, ligand binding and activation. We showed that, in contrast to most classical chemokine receptors, none of the extracellular disulphide bridges was essential for ACKR3 function. However, the disruption of the unique ACKR3 N-terminal loop drastically reduced the binding of CC chemokines whereas it only had a mild impact on CXC chemokine binding. Mutagenesis also uncovered that chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine ligands interact and activate ACKR3 according to distinct binding modes characterized by different transmembrane domain subpocket occupancy and N-terminal loop contribution, with BAM22 mimicking the binding mode of CC chemokine N terminus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, C. Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan Dejin; You Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Liu Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process

  15. Distinct Signaling Roles of cIMP, cCMP, and cUMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Roland

    2016-10-04

    The cyclic purine nucleotide cIMP and the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP are emerging second messengers. These cNMPs show different biological effects, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this issue of Structure, Ng et al. (2016) provide structural evidence for distinct interactions of cIMP, cCMP, and cUMP with ion channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes (C26–C32 via single-crystal and powder diffraction and DFT-D optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Brooks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes have been determined from single-crystal or high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Mono-methyl alkanes can be found on the cuticles of insects and are believed to act as recognition pheromones in some social species, e.g. ants, wasps etc. The molecules were synthesized as pure S enantiomers and are (S-9-methylpentacosane, C26H54; (S-9-methylheptacosane and (S-11-methylheptacosane, C28H58; (S-7-methylnonacosane, (S-9-methylnonacosane, (S-11-methylnonacosane and (S-13-methylnonacosane, C30H62; and (S-9-methylhentriacontane, C32H66. All crystallize in space group P21. Depending on the position of the methyl group on the carbon chain, two packing schemes are observed, in which the molecules pack together hexagonally as linear rods with terminal and side methyl groups clustering to form distinct motifs. Carbon-chain torsion angles deviate by less than 10° from the fully extended conformation, but with one packing form showing greater curvature than the other near the position of the methyl side group. The crystal structures are optimized by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations, because of the difficulties in refining accurate structural parameters from powder diffraction data from relatively poorly crystalline materials.

  17. Local Production of Chemokines during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Michael; Taylor, Brad; Lukacs, Nicholas; Fidel, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused by Candida albicans, is a significant problem in women of childbearing age. Although cell-mediated immunity (CMI) due to T cells and cytokines is the predominant host defense mechanism against C. albicans at mucosal tissue sites, host defense mechanisms against C. albicans at the vaginal mucosa are poorly understood. Based on an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis, our data suggest that systemic CMI is ineffective against C. albicans vaginal infections. Thus, we have postulated that local immune mechanisms are critical for protection against infection. In the present study, the kinetic production of chemokines normally associated with the chemotaxis of T cells, macrophages (RANTES, MIP-1α, MCP-1), and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (MIP-2) was examined following intravaginal inoculation of C. albicans in estrogen-treated or untreated mice. Results showed significant increases in MCP-1 protein and mRNA in vaginal tissue of infected mice as early as 2 and 4 days postinoculation, respectively, that continued through a 21-day observation period, irrespective of estrogen status. No significant changes were observed with RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-2, although relatively high constitutive levels of RANTES mRNA and MIP-2 protein were observed. Furthermore, intravaginal immunoneutralization of MCP-1 with anti-MCP-1 antibodies resulted in a significant increase in vaginal fungal burden early during infection, suggesting that MCP-1 plays some role in reducing the fungal burden during vaginal infection. However, the lack of changes in leukocyte profiles in vaginal lavage fluids collected from infected versus uninfected mice suggests that MCP-1 functions to control vaginal C. albicans titers in a manner independent of cellular chemotactic activity. PMID:10531235

  18. In vivo inhibition of CC and CX3C chemokine-induced leukocyte infiltration and attenuation of glomerulonephritis in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats by vMIP-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Bacon, K B; Li, L; Garcia, G E; Xia, Y; Lo, D; Thompson, D A; Siani, M A; Yamamoto, T; Harrison, J K; Feng, L

    1998-07-06

    Chemokines play a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. It has been observed recently that certain viruses have evolved molecular piracy and mimicry mechanisms by encoding and synthesizing proteins that interfere with the normal host defense response. One such viral protein, vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, has been identified with in vitro antagonistic activities against CC and CXC chemokine receptors. We report here that vMIP-II has additional antagonistic activity against CX3CR1, the receptor for fractalkine. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of this broad-spectrum chemokine antagonist, we studied the antiinflammatory activity of vMIP-II in a rat model of experimental glomerulonephritis induced by an antiglomerular basement membrane antibody. vMIP-II potently inhibited monocyte chemoattractant protein 1-, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta-, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted)-, and fractalkine-induced chemotaxis of activated leukocytes isolated from nephritic glomeruli, significantly reduced leukocyte infiltration to the glomeruli, and markedly attenuated proteinuria. These results suggest that molecules encoded by some viruses may serve as useful templates for the development of antiinflammatory compounds.

  19. Evolution and structural organization of the C proteins of paramyxovirinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K Lo

    Full Text Available The phosphoprotein (P gene of most Paramyxovirinae encodes several proteins in overlapping frames: P and V, which share a common N-terminus (PNT, and C, which overlaps PNT. Overlapping genes are of particular interest because they encode proteins originated de novo, some of which have unknown structural folds, challenging the notion that nature utilizes only a limited, well-mapped area of fold space. The C proteins cluster in three groups, comprising measles, Nipah, and Sendai virus. We predicted that all C proteins have a similar organization: a variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved, α-helical C-terminus. We confirmed this predicted organization by biophysically characterizing recombinant C proteins from Tupaia paramyxovirus (measles group and human parainfluenza virus 1 (Sendai group. We also found that the C of the measles and Nipah groups have statistically significant sequence similarity, indicating a common origin. Although the C of the Sendai group lack sequence similarity with them, we speculate that they also have a common origin, given their similar genomic location and structural organization. Since C is dispensable for viral replication, unlike PNT, we hypothesize that C may have originated de novo by overprinting PNT in the ancestor of Paramyxovirinae. Intriguingly, in measles virus and Nipah virus, PNT encodes STAT1-binding sites that overlap different regions of the C-terminus of C, indicating they have probably originated independently. This arrangement, in which the same genetic region encodes simultaneously a crucial functional motif (a STAT1-binding site and a highly constrained region (the C-terminus of C, seems paradoxical, since it should severely reduce the ability of the virus to adapt. The fact that it originated twice suggests that it must be balanced by an evolutionary advantage, perhaps from reducing the size of the genetic region vulnerable to mutations.

  20. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jingqun; Ding, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yinnan; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-12-10

    The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs) play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR) from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD), an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1-C6), a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp) and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp). Ca(2+) binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and guppy (Poecilia retitculata) CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR) protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish.

  1. Molecular Characterization and Biological Effects of a C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor in Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqun Ao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin-like receptors (CTLRs play important roles in innate immunity as one type of pattern recognition receptors. Here, we cloned and characterized a C-type lectin-like receptor (LycCTLR from large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The full-length cDNA of LycCTLR is 880 nucleotides long, encoding a protein of 215 amino acids. The deduced LycCTLR contains a C-terminal C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD, an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and a transmembrane region. The CTLD of LycCTLR possesses six highly conserved cysteine residues (C1–C6, a conserved WI/MGL motif, and two sugar binding motifs, EPD (Glu-Pro-Asp and WYD (Trp-Tyr-Asp. Ca2+ binding site 1 and 2 were also found in the CTLD. The LycCTLR gene consists of five exons and four introns, showing the same genomic organization as tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus and guppy (Poecilia retitculata CTLRs. LycCTLR was constitutively expressed in various tissues tested, and its transcripts significantly increased in the head kidney and spleen after stimulation with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine. Recombinant LycCTLR (rLycCTLR protein produced in Escherichia coli BL21 exhibited not only the hemagglutinating activity and a preference for galactose, but also the agglutinating activity against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria E. coli and Bacillus cereus in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results indicate that LycCTLR is a potential galactose-binding C-type lectin that may play a role in the antibacterial immunity in fish.

  2. Pharmacogenetic characterization of naturally occurring germline NT5C1A variants to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Jason; Zabriskie, Ryan; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Powell, Bradford C; Hicks, Stephanie; Kimmel, Marek; Meng, Qingchang; Ritter, Deborah I; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Tsai, Francis T F; Plon, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations or alteration in expression of the 5’ nucleotidase gene family can confer altered responses to treatment with nucleoside analogs. While investigating leukemia susceptibility genes, we discovered a very rare p.L254P NT5C1A missense variant in the substrate recognition motif. Given the paucity of cellular drug response data from NT5C1A germline variation, we characterized p.L254P and eight rare variants of NT5C1A from genomic databases. Methods Through lentiviral infection, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably overexpress wildtype NT5C1A, p.L254P, or eight NT5C1A variants reported in the NHLBI Exome Variant server (one truncating and seven missense). IC50 values were determined by cytotoxicity assays after exposure to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs (Cladribine, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil). In addition, we used structure-based homology modeling to generate a 3D model for the C-terminal region of NT5C1A. Results The p.R180X (truncating), p.A214T, and p.L254P missense changes were the only variants that significantly impaired protein function across all nucleotide analogs tested (>5-fold difference versus WT; p<.05). Several of the remaining variants individually displayed differential effects (both more and less resistant) across the analogs tested. The homology model provided a structural framework to understand the impact of NT5C1A mutants on catalysis and drug processing. The model predicted active site residues within NT5C1A motif III and we experimentally confirmed that p.K314 (not p.K320) is required for NT5C1A activity. Conclusion We characterized germline variation and predicted protein structures of NT5C1A. Individual missense changes showed substantial variation in response to the different nucleoside analogs tested, which may impact patients’ responses to treatment. PMID:26906009

  3. Characterisation of a New Family of Carboxyl Esterases with an OsmC Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Britt V Jensen

    Full Text Available Proteins in the serine esterase family are widely distributed in bacterial phyla and display activity against a range of biologically produced and chemically synthesized esters. A serine esterase from the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica with a C-terminal OsmC-like domain was recently characterized; here we report on the identification and characterization of further putative esterases with OsmC-like domains constituting a new esterase family that is found in a variety of bacterial species from different environmental niches. All of these proteins contained the Ser-Asp-His motif common to serine esterases and a highly conserved pentapeptide nucleophilic elbow motif. We produced these proteins heterologously in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their activity against a range of esterase substrates. Two of the esterases characterized have activity of over two orders of magnitude higher than other members of the family, and are active over a wide temperature range. We determined the crystal structure of the esterase domain of the protein from Rhodothermus marinus and show that it conforms to the classical α/β hydrolase fold with an extended 'lid' region, which occludes the active site of the protein in the crystal. The expansion of characterized members of the esterase family and demonstration of activity over a wide-range of temperatures could be of use in biotechnological applications such as the pharmaceutical, detergent, bioremediation and dairy industries.

  4. Evidence That Ly6C(hi) Monocytes are Protective in Acute Ischemic Stroke by Promoting M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hannah X; Broughton, Brad R S; Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Seyoung; Drummond, Grant R; Sobey, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    Ly6C(hi) monocytes are generally thought to exert a proinflammatory role in acute tissue injury, although their impact after injuries to the central nervous system is poorly defined. CC chemokine receptor 2 is expressed on Ly6C(hi) monocytes and plays an essential role in their extravasation and transmigration into the brain after cerebral ischemia. We used a selective CC chemokine receptor 2 antagonist, INCB3344, to assess the effect of Ly6C(hi) monocytes recruited into the brain early after ischemic stroke. Male C57Bl/6J mice underwent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1 hour followed by 23 hours of reperfusion. Mice were administered either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/carboxymethylcellulose) or INCB3344 (10, 30 or 100 mg/kg IP) 1 hour before ischemia and at 2 and 6 hours after ischemia. At 24 hours, we assessed functional outcomes, infarct volume, and quantified the immune cells in blood and brain by flow cytometry or immunofluorescence. Gene expression of selected inflammatory markers was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ly6C(hi) monocytes were increased 3-fold in the blood and 10-fold in the brain after stroke, and these increases were selectively prevented by INCB3344 in a dose-dependent manner. Mice treated with INCB3344 exhibited markedly worse functional outcomes and larger infarct volumes, in association with reduced M2 polarization and increased peroxynitrite production in macrophages, compared with vehicle-treated mice. Our data suggest that Ly6C(hi) monocytes exert an acute protective effect after ischemic stroke to limit brain injury and functional deficit that involves promotion of M2 macrophage polarization. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Effects of deoxynivalenol- and zearalenone-contaminated feed on the gene expression profiles in the kidneys of piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondreddy Eswar Reddy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN, common contaminants in the feed of farm animals, cause immune function impairment and organ inflammation. Consequently, the main objective of this study was to elucidate DON and ZEN effects on the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other immune related genes in the kidneys of piglets. Methods Fifteen 6-week-old piglets were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments for 4 weeks: control diet, and diets contaminated with either 8 mg DON/kg feed or 0.8 mg ZEN/kg feed. Kidney samples were collected after treatment, and RNA-seq was used to investigate the effects on immune-related genes and gene networks. Results A total of 186 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened (120 upregulated and 66 downregulated. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the immune response, and cellular and metabolic processes were significantly controlled by these DEGs. The inflammatory stimulation might be an effect of the following enriched Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes pathway analysis found related to immune and disease responses: cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, chemokine signaling pathway, toll-like receptor signaling pathway, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, tuberculosis, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and chemical carcinogenesis. The effects of DON and ZEN on genome-wide expression were assessed, and it was found that the DEGs associated with inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 receptor, beta, chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 9, CXCL10, chemokine [C-C motif] ligand 4, proliferation (insulin like growth factor binding protein 4, IgG heavy chain, receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase C, cytochrome P450 1A1, ATP-binding cassette sub-family 8, and other immune response networks (lysozyme, complement component 4 binding protein alpha, oligoadenylate synthetase 2, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-9, α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase

  6. Identification of a c-Type Cytochrome Specific for Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Reduction in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Nissen, S.; Liu, X.; Chourey, K.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Hettich, R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a metabolically versatile Deltaproteobacterium and conserves energy from the reduction of various electron acceptors, including insoluble MnO2 and ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides (FeOOH). The goal of this study was to identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to MnO2. The characterization of deletion mutants has revealed a number of c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid metal oxides in Shewanella spp. and Geobacter spp; however, a genetic system for Anaeromyxobacter is not available. The A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C genome encodes 68 putative c-type cytochromes, which all lack functional assignments. To identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid MnO2, protein expression profiles of A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C cells grown with acetate as electron donor and MnO2, ferric citrate, FeOOH, nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors were compared. Whole cell proteomes were analyzed after trypsin proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed with cells grown with different electron acceptors. A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C grown with MnO2 expressed 25 out of the 68 c-type cytochromes encoded on the genome. The c-type cytochrome Adeh_1278 was only expressed in strain 2CP-C grown with MnO2. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed that the Adeh_1278 gene was transcribed in MnO2-grown cells but not in cells grown with other terminal electron acceptors. The expression of the Adeh_1278 gene correlated with Mn(IV) reduction activity. Adeh_1278 has three heme binding motifs and is predicted to be located in the periplasm. The identification of Adeh_1278 as a protein uniquely expressed when MnO2 serves as electron acceptor suggests its utility as a biomarker for MnO2 reduction. This example demonstrates the value of the LC-MS/MS approach for identifying specific proteins of interest and making functional assignments

  7. Inactivated Sendai virus particle upregulates cancer cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and enhances natural killer cell sensitivity on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2017-12-01

    We have already reported that the inactivated Sendai virus (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; HVJ) envelope (HVJ-E) has multiple anticancer effects, including induction of cancer-selective cell death and activation of anticancer immunity. The HVJ-E stimulates dendritic cells to produce cytokines and chemokines such as β-interferon, interleukin-6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10, which activate both CD8 + T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and recruit them to the tumor microenvironment. However, the effect of HVJ-E on modulating the sensitivity of cancer cells to immune cell attack has yet to be investigated. In this study, we found that HVJ-E induced the production of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), a ligand of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1, in several cancer cell lines through the activation of nuclear factor-κB downstream of retinoic acid-inducible gene I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling pathway. The upregulation of ICAM-1 on the surface of cancer cells increased the sensitivity of cancer cells to NK cells. Knocking out expression of ICAM-1 in MDA-MB-231 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 method significantly reduced the killing effect of NK cells on ICAM-1-depleted MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, HVJ-E suppressed tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing SCID mice, and the HVJ-E antitumor effect was impaired when NK cells were depleted by treatment with the anti-asialo GM1 antibody. Our findings suggest that HVJ-E enhances NK cell sensitivity against cancer cells by increasing ICAM-1 expression on the cancer cell surface. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 alzheimer's disease candidate proteins: significant associations with proteins involved in amyloid processing and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauwe, John S K; Bailey, Matthew H; Ridge, Perry G; Perry, Rachel; Wadsworth, Mark E; Hoyt, Kaitlyn L; Staley, Lyndsay A; Karch, Celeste M; Harari, Oscar; Cruchaga, Carlos; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

    2014-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 42 amino acid species of amyloid beta (Aβ42) and tau levels are strongly correlated with the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology including amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration and have been successfully used as endophenotypes for genetic studies of AD. Additional CSF analytes may also serve as useful endophenotypes that capture other aspects of AD pathophysiology. Here we have conducted a genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 AD-related analytes. All analytes were measured using the Rules Based Medicine Human DiscoveryMAP Panel, which includes analytes relevant to several disease-related processes. Data from two independently collected and measured datasets, the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), were analyzed separately, and combined results were obtained using meta-analysis. We identified genetic associations with CSF levels of 5 proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4 (CCL4), Interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) and Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3)) with study-wide significant p-values (pprocessing and pro-inflammatory signaling. SNPs associated with ACE, IL6R and MMP3 protein levels are located within the coding regions of the corresponding structural gene. The SNPs associated with CSF levels of CCL4 and CCL2 are located in known chemokine binding proteins. The genetic associations reported here are novel and suggest mechanisms for genetic control of CSF and plasma levels of these disease-related proteins. Significant SNPs in ACE and MMP3 also showed association with AD risk. Our findings suggest that these proteins/pathways may be valuable therapeutic targets for AD. Robust associations in cognitively normal individuals suggest that these SNPs also influence regulation of these proteins more generally and may therefore be relevant to other diseases.

  9. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  10. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  11. Laser capture microdissection and cDNA array analysis of endometrium identify CCL16 and CCL21 as epithelial-derived inflammatory mediators associated with endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Rebecca L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the pathophysiology of chemokine secretion in endometriosis may offer a novel area of therapeutic intervention. This study aimed to identify chemokines differentially expressed in epithelial glands in eutopic endometrium from normal women and those with endometriosis, and to establish the expression profiles of key chemokines in endometriotic lesions. Methods Laser capture microdissection isolated epithelial glands from endometrial eutopic tissue from women with and without endometriosis in the mid-secretory phase of their menstrual cycles. Gene profiling of the excised glands used a human chemokine and receptor cDNA array. Selected chemokines were further examined using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results 22 chemokine/receptor genes were upregulated and two downregulated in pooled endometrial epithelium of women with endometriosis compared with controls. CCL16 and CCL21 mRNA was confirmed as elevated in some women with endometriosis compared to controls on individual samples. Immunoreactive CCL16 and CCL21 were predominantly confined to glands in eutopic and ectopic endometrium: leukocytes also stained. Immunoreactive CCL16 was overall higher in glands in ectopic vs. eutopic endometrium from the same woman (P Conclusion This study provides novel candidate molecules and suggests a potential local role for CCL16 and CCL21 as mediators contributing to the inflammatory events associated with endometriosis.

  12. 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Bharat G.; Moates, Derek B. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Kim, Heung-Bok [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Green, Todd J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Kim, Chang-Yub; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); DeLucas, Lawrence J., E-mail: duke2@uab.edu [University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1025 18th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    The 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from M. tuberculosis reveals a novel fold. The crystallographic structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) protein Rv3902c (176 residues; molecular mass of 19.8 kDa) was determined at 1.55 Å resolution. The function of Rv3902c is unknown, although several TB genes involved in bacterial pathogenesis are expressed from the operon containing the Rv3902c gene. The unique structural fold of Rv3902c contains two domains, each consisting of antiparallel β-sheets and α-helices, creating a hand-like binding motif with a small binding pocket in the palm. Structural homology searches reveal that Rv3902c has an overall structure similar to that of the Salmonella virulence-factor chaperone InvB, with an r.m.s.d. for main-chain atoms of 2.3 Å along an aligned domain.

  13. 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Bharat G.; Moates, Derek B.; Kim, Heung-Bok; Green, Todd J.; Kim, Chang-Yub; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    The 1.55 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rv3902c from M. tuberculosis reveals a novel fold. The crystallographic structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) protein Rv3902c (176 residues; molecular mass of 19.8 kDa) was determined at 1.55 Å resolution. The function of Rv3902c is unknown, although several TB genes involved in bacterial pathogenesis are expressed from the operon containing the Rv3902c gene. The unique structural fold of Rv3902c contains two domains, each consisting of antiparallel β-sheets and α-helices, creating a hand-like binding motif with a small binding pocket in the palm. Structural homology searches reveal that Rv3902c has an overall structure similar to that of the Salmonella virulence-factor chaperone InvB, with an r.m.s.d. for main-chain atoms of 2.3 Å along an aligned domain

  14. Synthesis of the C(18)-C(34) fragment of amphidinolide C and the C(18)-C(29) fragment of amphidinolide F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Spilling, Christopher D

    2010-11-19

    A convergent synthesis of the C(18)-C(34) fragment of amphidinolide C and the C(18)-C(29) fragment of amphidinolide F is reported. The approach involves the synthesis of the common intermediate tetrahydrofuranyl-β-ketophosphonate via cross metathesis, Pd(0)-catalyzed cyclization, and hydroboration-oxidation. The β-ketophosphonate was coupled to three side chain aldehydes using a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination reaction to give dienones, which were reduced with l-selectride to give the fragments of amphidinolide C and F.

  15. Myosin-1A Targets to Microvilli Using Multiple Membrane Binding Motifs in the Tail Homology 1 (TH1) Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerik, Jessica N.; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most abundant components of the enterocyte brush border is the actin-based monomeric motor, myosin-1a (Myo1a). Within brush border microvilli, Myo1a carries out a number of critical functions at the interface between membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Proper physiological function of Myo1a depends on its ability to bind to microvillar membrane, an interaction mediated by a C-terminal tail homology 1 (TH1) domain. However, little is known about the mechanistic details of the Myo1a-TH1/membrane interaction. Structure-function analysis of Myo1a-TH1 targeting in epithelial cells revealed that an N-terminal motif conserved among class I myosins and a C-terminal motif unique to Myo1a-TH1 are both required for steady state microvillar enrichment. Purified Myo1a bound to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, with moderate affinity in a charge-dependent manner. Additionally, peptides of the N- and C-terminal regions required for targeting were able to compete with Myo1a for binding to highly charged liposomes in vitro. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that these motifs are also necessary for slowing the membrane detachment rate in cells. Finally, Myo1a-TH1 co-localized with both lactadherin-C2 (a phosphatidylserine-binding protein) and PLCδ1-PH (a phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding protein) in microvilli, but only lactaderin-C2 expression reduced brush border targeting of Myo1a-TH1. Together, our results suggest that Myo1a targeting to microvilli is driven by membrane binding potential that is distributed throughout TH1 rather than localized to a single motif. These data highlight the diversity of mechanisms that enable different class I myosins to target membranes in distinct biological contexts. PMID:22367206

  16. Why Y-c.c

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chodounský, David; Zapletal, Jindřich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 11 (2015), s. 1123-1149 ISSN 0168-0072 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GF15-34700L Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : c.c.c. partitions * proper forcing * forcing axiom Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.582, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007215000664

  17. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  18. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A

    2010-01-01

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Alkane Activation at Ambient Temperatures: Unusual Selectivities, C-C, C-H Bond Scission versus C-C Bond Coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trionfetti, C.; Agiral, A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2008-01-01

    Activating bonds: A cold plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge in a microreactor converts alkanes (C1–C3) at atmospheric pressure. Large amounts of products with higher molecular weight than the starting hydrocarbons are observed showing that C-H activation at lower T favourably leads to

  20. Surface targeting of the dopamine transporter involves discrete epitopes in the distal C terminus but does not require canonical PDZ domain interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerggaard, Christian; Fog, Jacob U; Hastrup, Hanne; Madsen, Kenneth; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2004-08-04

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains a C-terminal type 2 PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/zona occludens 1) domain-binding motif (LKV) known to interact with PDZ domain proteins such as PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1). As reported previously, we found that, after deletion of this motif, hDAT was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and Neuro2A cells, suggesting that PDZ domain interactions might be critical for hDAT targeting. Nonetheless, substitution of LKV with SLL, the type 1 PDZ-binding sequence from the beta2-adrenergic receptor, did not disrupt plasma membrane targeting. Moreover, the addition of an alanine to the hDAT C terminus (+Ala), resulting in an LKVA termination sequence, or substitution of LKV with alanines (3xAla_618-620) prevented neither plasma membrane targeting nor targeting into sprouting neurites of differentiated N2A cells. The inability of +Ala and 3xAla_618-620 to bind PDZ domains was confirmed by lack of colocalization with PICK1 in cotransfected HEK293 cells and by the inability of corresponding C-terminal fusion proteins to pull down purified PICK1. Thus, although residues in the hDAT C terminus are indispensable for proper targeting, PDZ domain interactions are not required. By progressive substitutions with beta2-adrenergic receptor sequence, and by triple-alanine substitutions in the hDAT C terminus, we examined the importance of epitopes preceding the LKV motif. Substitution of RHW(615-617) with alanines caused retention of the transporter in the ER despite preserved ability of this mutant to bind PICK1. We propose dual roles of the hDAT C terminus: a role independent of PDZ interactions for ER export and surface targeting, and a not fully clarified role involving PDZ interactions with proteins such as PICK1.

  1. Effect of vitamin C on innate immune responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Esther; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2017-08-01

    Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is an essential micronutrient that influences a wide variety of physiological processes, including immunological functions. Although the positive effects of vitamin C supplementation on the immunological status of fish has been established in different species, the bases for these positive effects are still unknown. Hence, the aim of our study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of vitamin C on several innate immune functions of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) leukocyte populations. For this, we assessed the effects exerted on the established rainbow trout monocyte-macrophage cell line RTS11, and compared them to those observed in trout head kidney leukocytes. Our results demonstrate that vitamin C increases the production of reactive oxygen species and the percentage of phagocytic cells in both cell populations. On the other hand, vitamin C had no effect on the surface MHC II levels and only in the case of RTS11 cells increased the capacity of these cells to migrate towards the CK9 chemokine. Finally, vitamin C also increased the transcription of several pro-inflammatory and antimicrobial genes elicited by Escherichia coli, with some differences depending on the cell population studied. Our results contribute to further understand how vitamin C supplementation regulates the fish immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    binding. Attempts to unravel the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors have led to the conclusion that activation involves movements of the transmembrane segments VI and VII in particular, as recently gathered in the Global Toggle Switch Model. However, to understand the activation mechanism completely......, more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  3. SMM-chemokines: a class of unnatural synthetic molecules as chemical probes of chemokine receptor biology and leads for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Choi, Won-Tak; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Madani, Navid; Tian, Shaomin; Liu, Dongxiang; Wang, Youli; Pesavento, James; Wang, Jun; Fan, Xuejun; Yuan, Jian; Fritzsche, Wayne R; An, Jing; Sodroski, Joseph G; Richman, Douglas D; Huang, Ziwei

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. To develop natural chemokines into receptor probes and inhibitors of pathological processes, the lack of chemokine-receptor selectivity must be overcome. Here, we apply chemical synthesis and the concept of modular modifications to generate unnatural synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokines that have high receptor selectivity and affinity, and reduced toxicity. A proof of the concept was shown by transforming the nonselective viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II into new analogs with enhanced selectivity and potency for CXCR4 or CCR5, two principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry. These new analogs provided insights into receptor binding and signaling mechanisms and acted as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. These results support the concept of SMM-chemokines for studying and controlling the function of other chemokine receptors.

  4. C59N+ and C69N+: isoelectronic heteroanalogues of C60 and C70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamparth, I.; Nuber, B.; Schick, G.; Skiebe, A.; Groesser, T.; Hirsch, A.

    1995-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions in the mass spectrometer were used to generate the first characterized nitrogen heterofullerene ions C 59 N + and C 69 N + from regioselectively synthesized oligoiminofullerenes. During this process one carbon atom in the fullerene core is removed and replaced with a nitrogen atom. C 59 N + has almost the same structure as the isoelectronic C 60 . (orig.)

  5. Neurotropism In Vitro and Mouse Models of Severe and Mild Infection with Clinical Strains of Enterovirus 71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a common etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease and fatal neurological diseases in children. The neuropathogenicity of severe EV71 infection has been documented, but studies comparing mouse models of severe and mild EV71 infection are lacking. The aim of the study was to investigate the neurovirulence of EV71 strains and the differences in serum cytokine and chemokine levels in mouse models of severe and mild EV71 infection. Nine EV71 isolates belonging to the C4 subgenogroup (proposed as genotype D displayed infectivity in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells; moreover, ultrastructural observation confirmed viral particle replication. The survival rate of the severe model was 71.43% (5/7, and 60% (3/5 of the surviving severe model mice displayed sequelae of paralysis, whereas the only symptom in mild model mice was ruffled fur. Dynamic detection of serum cytokine and chemokine levels demonstrated that interleukin (IL-5, IL-13, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1, and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (also called Regulated upon Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed, and Secreted (CCL5/RANTES were significantly up-regulated at the early period of infection, indicating that these factors might herald a severe outcome. Our findings suggest that elevated cytokines and chemokines may have potential value as prognostic markers in mouse models.

  6. Crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met and its complex with the microbial alkaloid K-252a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiering, Nikolaus; Knapp, Stefan; Marconi, Marina; Flocco, Maria M; Cui, Jean; Perego, Rita; Rusconi, Luisa; Cristiani, Cinzia

    2003-10-28

    The protooncogene c-met codes for the hepatocyte growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase. Binding of its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor, stimulates receptor autophosphorylation, which leads to pleiotropic downstream signaling events in epithelial cells, including cell growth, motility, and invasion. These events are mediated by interaction of cytoplasmic effectors, generally through Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, with two phosphotyrosine-containing sequence motifs in the unique C-terminal tail of c-Met (supersite). There is a strong link between aberrant c-Met activity and oncogenesis, which makes this kinase an important cancer drug target. The furanosylated indolocarbazole K-252a belongs to a family of microbial alkaloids that also includes staurosporine. It was recently shown to be a potent inhibitor of c-Met. Here we report the crystal structures of an unphosphorylated c-Met kinase domain harboring a human cancer mutation and its complex with K-252a at 1.8-A resolution. The structure follows the well established architecture of protein kinases. It adopts a unique, inhibitory conformation of the activation loop, a catalytically noncompetent orientation of helix alphaC, and reveals the complete C-terminal docking site. The first SH2-binding motif (1349YVHV) adopts an extended conformation, whereas the second motif (1356YVNV), a binding site for Grb2-SH2, folds as a type II Beta-turn. The intermediate portion of the supersite (1353NATY) assumes a type I Beta-turn conformation as in an Shc-phosphotyrosine binding domain peptide complex. K-252a is bound in the adenosine pocket with an analogous binding mode to those observed in previously reported structures of protein kinases in complex with staurosporine.

  7. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Petrosiute

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants.

  8. The methyltransferase NSD3 has chromatin-binding motifs, PHD5-C5HCH, that are distinct from other NSD (nuclear receptor SET domain) family members in their histone H3 recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Li, Fudong; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-02-15

    The NSD (nuclear receptor SET domain-containing) family members, consisting of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1), are SET domain-containing methyltransferases and aberrant expression of each member has been implicated in multiple diseases. They have specific mono- and dimethylase activities for H3K36, whereas play nonredundant roles during development. Aside from the well characterized catalytic SET domain, NSD proteins have multiple potential chromatin-binding motifs that are clinically relevant, including the fifth plant homeodomain (PHD5) and the adjacent Cys-His-rich domain (C5HCH) located at the C terminus. Herein, we report the crystal structures of the PHD5-C5HCH module of NSD3, in the free state and in complex with H3(1-7) (H3 residues 1-7), H3(1-15) (H3 residues 1-15), and H3(1-15)K9me3 (H3 residues 1-15 with trimethylation on K9) peptides. These structures reveal that the PHD5 and C5HCH domains fold into a novel integrated PHD-PHD-like structural module with H3 peptide bound only on the surface of PHD5 and provide the molecular basis for the recognition of unmodified H3K4 and trimethylated H3K9 by NSD3 PHD5. Structural studies and binding assays show that differences exist in histone binding specificity of the PHD5 domain between three members of the NSD family. For NSD2, the PHD5-C5HCH:H3 N terminus interaction is largely conserved, although with a stronger preference for unmethylated H3K9 (H3K9me0) than trimethylated H3K9 (H3K9me3), and NSD1 PHD5-C5HCH does not bind to H3 peptides. Our results shed light on how NSD proteins that mediate H3K36 methylation are localized to specific genomic sites and provide implications for the mechanism of functional diversity of NSD proteins.

  9. Joining of SiC ceramics and SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, B.H. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This project has successfully developed a practical and reliable method for fabricating SiC ceramic-ceramic joints. This joining method will permit the use of SiC-based ceramics in a variety of elevated temperature fossil energy applications. The technique is based on a reaction bonding approach that provides joint interlayers compatible with SiC, and excellent joint mechanical properties at temperatures exceeding 1000{degrees}C. Recent emphasis has been given to technology transfer activities, and several collaborative research efforts are in progress. Investigations are focusing on applying the joining method to sintered {alpha}-SiC and fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composites for use in applications such as heat exchangers, radiant burners and gas turbine components.

  10. Crystal structure and dimerization equilibria of PcoC, a methionine-rich copper resistance protein from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, A.K.; Huffman, D.L.; Finney, L.A.; Demeler, B.; O' Halloran, T.V.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    PcoC is a soluble periplasmic protein encoded by the plasmid-born pco copper resistance operon of Escherichia coli. Like PcoA, a multicopper oxidase encoded in the same locus and its chromosomal homolog CueO, PcoC contains unusual methionine rich sequences. Although essential for copper resistance, the functions of PcoC, PcoA, and their conserved methionine-rich sequences are not known. Similar methionine motifs observed in eukaryotic copper transporters have been proposed to bind copper, but there are no precedents for such metal binding sites in structurally characterized proteins. The high-resolution structures of apo PcoC, determined for both the native and selenomethionine-containing proteins, reveal a seven-stranded barrel with the methionines unexpectedly housed on a solvent-exposed loop. Several potential metal-binding sites can be discerned by comparing the structures to spectroscopic data reported for copper-loaded PcoC. In the native structure, the methionine loop interacts with the same loop on a second molecule in the asymmetric unit. In the selenomethionine structure, the methionine loops are more exposed, forming hydrophobic patches on the protein surface. These two arrangements suggest that the methionine motifs might function in protein-protein interactions between PcoC molecules or with other methionine-rich proteins such as PcoA. Analytical ultracentrifugation data indicate that a weak monomer-dimer equilibrium exists in solution for the apo protein. Dimerization is significantly enhanced upon binding Cu(I) with a measured {Delta}({Delta}G{sup o}) {le} -8.0 kJ/mole, suggesting that copper might bind at the dimer interface.

  11. Structures, stabilities, aromaticity, and electronic properties of C66 fullerene isomers, anions (C662-, C664-, C666-), and metallofullerenes (Sc2-C66)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yanhong; Tian, Wei Quan; Feng Jikang; Chen Deli

    2010-01-01

    Among all the 4478 classical isomers of C 66 , C 66 (C s :0060) with the lowest number of pentagon-pentagon fusions was predicted to be the most stable isomer, followed by isomers C 66 (C 2v :0011) and C 66 (C 2 :0083). The infrared spectra and aromaticity of the most stable isomers were predicted. The relative stabilities of C 66 isomers change with charges or doping of metals. The structures and relative stabilities of the most stable metallofullerenes were delineated and compared with experiment. Sc 2 -C 66 (C 2 :0083) was predicted to be the most stable metallofullerene, although Sc 2 -C 66 (C 2v :0011) was observed. Charge-transfer from Sc 2 to the fused pentagons and the bonding between these two moieties significantly decrease the strain energies caused by the pair of fused pentagons thereby stabilizing the fullerene cage.

  12. Cis-acting elements in the promoter region of the human aldolase C gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, P; de Conciliis, L; Olivetta, E; Izzo, P; Salvatore, F

    1993-08-16

    We investigated the cis-acting sequences involved in the expression of the human aldolase C gene by transient transfections into human neuroblastoma cells (SKNBE). We demonstrate that 420 bp of the 5'-flanking DNA direct at high efficiency the transcription of the CAT reporter gene. A deletion between -420 bp and -164 bp causes a 60% decrease of CAT activity. Gel shift and DNase I footprinting analyses revealed four protected elements: A, B, C and D. Competition analyses indicate that Sp1 or factors sharing a similar sequence specificity bind to elements A and B, but not to elements C and D. Sequence analysis shows a half palindromic ERE motif (GGTCA), in elements B and D. Region D binds a transactivating factor which appears also essential to stabilize the initiation complex.

  13. A role for the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the little skate, Leucoraja erinacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Taylor A; Dimond, Alexandria L; Ruth, Brittany A; Lupica, Noah V; Bruce, Jacob C; Kelley, John M; King, Benjamin L; Lutton, Bram V

    2018-04-11

    The interaction between C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and its cognate ligand, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), plays a critical role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell activation and subsequent cellular mobilization. Extensive studies of these genes have been conducted in mammals, but much less is known about the expression and function of CXCR4 and CXCL12 in non-mammalian vertebrates. In the present study, we identify simultaneous expression of CXCR4 and CXCL12 orthologues in the epigonal organ (the primary hematopoietic tissue) of the little skate, Leucoraja erinacea. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses were functionally supported by significant mobilization of leukocytes following administration of Plerixafor: a CXCR4 antagonist and clinically important drug. Our results provide evidence that, as in humans, Plerixafor disrupts CXCR4/CXCL12 binding in the little skate, facilitating release of leukocytes into the bloodstream. Our study illustrates the value of the little skate as a model organism, particularly in studies of hematopoiesis, and potentially for pre-clinical research on hematological and vascular disorders.

  14. Oxidation protection of multilayer CVD SiC/B/SiC coatings for 3D C/SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongsheng; Cheng Laifei; Zhang Litong; Wu Shoujun; Li Duo; Xu Yongdong

    2007-01-01

    A CVD boron coating was introduced between two CVD SiC coating layers. EDS and XRD results showed that the CVD B coating was a boron crystal without other impurity elements. SEM results indicated that the CVD B coating was a flake-like or column-like crystal with a compact cross-section. The crack width in the CVD SiC coating deposited on CVD B is smaller than that in a CVD SiC coating deposited on CVD SiC coating. After oxidation at 700 deg. C and 1000 deg. C, XRD results indicated that the coating was covered by product B 2 O 3 or B 2 O 3 .xSiO 2 film. The cracks were sealed as observed by SEM. There was a large amount of flake-like material on hybrid coating surface after oxidation at 1300 deg. C. Oxidation weight loss and residual flexural strength results showed that hybrid SiC/B/SiC multilayer coating provided better oxidation protection for C/SiC composite than a three layer CVD SiC coating at temperatures from 700 deg. C to 1000 deg. C for 600 min, but worse oxidation protection above 1000 deg. C due to the large amount of volatilization of B 2 O 3 or B 2 O 3 .xSiO 2

  15. The computational worm: spatial orientation and its neuronal basis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockery, Shawn R

    2011-10-01

    Spatial orientation behaviors in animals are fundamental for survival but poorly understood at the neuronal level. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans orients to a wide range of stimuli and has a numerically small and well-described nervous system making it advantageous for investigating the mechanisms of spatial orientation. Recent work by the C. elegans research community has identified essential computational elements of the neural circuits underlying two orientation strategies that operate in five different sensory modalities. Analysis of these circuits reveals novel motifs including simple circuits for computing temporal derivatives of sensory input and for integrating sensory input with behavioral state to generate adaptive behavior. These motifs constitute hypotheses concerning the identity and functionality of circuits controlling spatial orientation in higher organisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gibberellic acid and cGMP-dependent transcriptional regulation in arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bastian, René

    2010-03-01

    An ever increasing amount of transcriptomic data and analysis tools provide novel insight into complex responses of biological systems. Given these resources we have undertaken to review aspects of transcriptional regulation in response to the plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) and its second messenger guanosine 3\\',5\\'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in Arabidopsis thaliana, both wild type and selected mutants. Evidence suggests enrichment of GA-responsive (GARE) elements in promoters of genes that are transcriptionally upregulated in response to cGMP but downregulated in a GA insensitive mutant (ga1-3). In contrast, in the genes upregulated in the mutant, no enrichment in the GARE is observed suggesting that GARE motifs are diagnostic for GA-induced and cGMP-dependent transcriptional upregulation. Further, we review how expression studies of GA-dependent transcription factors and transcriptional networks based on common promoter signatures derived from ab initio analyses can contribute to our understanding of plant responses at the systems level. © 2010 Landes Bioscience.

  17. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  18. Generation of a C3c specific monoclonal antibody and assessment of C3c as a putative inflammatory marker derived from complement factor C3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palarasah, Yaseelan; Skjodt, Karsten; Brandt, Jette

    2010-01-01

    complex (C5b-C9) and quantification of complement split products by precipitation-in-gel techniques (e.g. C3d). We have developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that is able to detect fluid phase C3c without interference from other products generated from the complement component C3. The C3c specific m....... The C3c mAb was confirmed to be C3c specific, as it showed no cross-reactivity with native (un-cleaved) C3, with C3b, iC3b, or with C3d. Also, no significant reaction was observed with C3 fragments in factor I deficient sera or plasma. This antibody forms the basis for the generation of a robust ELISA...... that allows for a quick and reliable evaluation of complement activation and consumption as a marker for inflammatory processes. We established the C3c plasma range in 100 healthy Danish blood donors with a mean of 3.47 μg/ml and a range of 2.12-4.92 μg/ml. We believe that such an antibody might...

  19. Intrinsic bent DNA sites in the chromosomal replication origin of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gimenes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The features of the nucleotide sequences in both replication and promoter regions have been investigated in many organisms. Intrinsically bent DNA sites associated with transcription have been described in several prokaryotic organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate intrinsic bent DNA sites in the segment that holds the chromosomal replication origin, oriC, of Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c. Electrophoretic behavior analyses, as well as in silico analyses of both the 2-D projection and helical parameters, were performed. The chromosomal segment analyzed contains the initial sequence of the rpmH gene, an intergenic region, the dnaA gene, the oriC sequence, and the 5' partial sequence of the dnaN gene. The analysis revealed fragments with reduced electrophoretic mobility, which indicates the presence of curved DNA segments. The analysis of the helical parameter ENDS ratio revealed three bent DNA sites (b1, b2, and b3 located in the rpmH-dnaA intergenic region, the dnaA gene, and the oriC 5' end, respectively. The chromosomal segment of X. fastidiosa analyzed here is rich in phased AT tracts and in CAnT motifs. The 2-D projection indicated a segment whose structure was determined by the cumulative effect of all bent DNA sites. Further, the in silico analysis of the three different bacterial oriC sequences indicated similar negative roll and twist >34.00° values. The DnaA box sequences, and other motifs in them, may be associated with the intrinsic DNA curvature.

  20. Solution structure of a DNA mimicking motif of an RNA aptamer against transcription factor AML1 Runt domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Fukunaga, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Chiba, Manabu; Iibuchi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Kozu, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Taiichi

    2013-12-01

    AML1/RUNX1 is an essential transcription factor involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. AML1 binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. In a previous study, we obtained RNA aptamers against the AML1 Runt domain by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and revealed that RNA aptamers exhibit higher affinity for the Runt domain than that for RDE and possess the 5'-GCGMGNN-3' and 5'-N'N'CCAC-3' conserved motif (M: A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs) that is important for Runt domain binding. In this study, to understand the structural basis of recognition of the Runt domain by the aptamer motif, the solution structure of a 22-mer RNA was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. The motif contains the AH(+)-C mismatch and base triple and adopts an unusual backbone structure. Structural analysis of the aptamer motif indicated that the aptamer binds to the Runt domain by mimicking the RDE sequence and structure. Our data should enhance the understanding of the structural basis of DNA mimicry by RNA molecules.

  1. Structural basis for substrate placement by an archaeal box C/D ribonucleoprotein particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Song; Wang, Ruiying; Yang, Fangping; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P; Zhang, Xinxin; Maxwell, E Stuart; Li, Hong

    2010-09-24

    Box C/D small nucleolar and Cajal body ribonucleoprotein particles (sno/scaRNPs) direct site-specific 2'-O-methylation of ribosomal and spliceosomal RNAs and are critical for gene expression. Here we report crystal structures of an archaeal box C/D RNP containing three core proteins (fibrillarin, Nop56/58, and L7Ae) and a half-mer box C/D guide RNA paired with a substrate RNA. The structure reveals a guide-substrate RNA duplex orientation imposed by a composite protein surface and the conserved GAEK motif of Nop56/58. Molecular modeling supports a dual C/D RNP structure that closely mimics that recently visualized by electron microscopy. The substrate-bound dual RNP model predicts an asymmetric protein distribution between the RNP that binds and methylates the substrate RNA. The predicted asymmetric nature of the holoenzyme is consistent with previous biochemical data on RNP assembly and provides a simple solution for accommodating base-pairing between the C/D guide RNA and large ribosomal and spliceosomal substrate RNAs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson,J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered {alpha}-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin.

  3. The Structure of the Human Centrin 2-Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Protein Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.; Ryan, Z.; Salisbury, J.; Kumar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Human centrin-2 plays a key role in centrosome function and stimulates nucleotide excision repair by binding to the xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. To determine the structure of human centrin-2 and to develop an understanding of molecular interactions between centrin and xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein, we characterized the crystal structure of calcium-loaded full-length centrin-2 complexed with a xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptide. Our structure shows that the carboxyl-terminal domain of centrin-2 binds this peptide and two calcium atoms, whereas the amino-terminal lobe is in a closed conformation positioned distantly by an ordered α-helical linker. A stretch of the amino-terminal domain unique to centrins appears disordered. Two xeroderma pigmentosum group C peptides both bound to centrin-2 also interact to form an α-helical coiled-coil. The interface between centrin-2 and each peptide is predominantly nonpolar, and key hydrophobic residues of XPC have been identified that lead us to propose a novel binding motif for centrin

  4. Volatility study of [C1C1im][NTf2] and [C2C3im][NTf2] ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Marisa A.A.; Ribeiro, Filipe M.S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, João A.P.; Santos, Luís M.N.B.F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vapor pressures of [C 1 C 1 im][NTf 2 ] and [C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ] ionic liquids are reported. • [C 1 C 1 im][NTf 2 ] presents higher enthalpy and entropy of vaporization than expected. • The high volatility of [C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ] is a result from its asymmetric character. -- Abstract: Vapor pressures of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C 1 C 1 im][NTf 2 ]) and 1-ethyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ]) ionic liquids were measured as a function of temperature using a Knudsen effusion apparatus combined with a quartz crystal microbalance. Enthalpies and entropies of vaporization were derived from the fitting of vapor pressure and temperature results to the Clarke and Glew equation. [C 1 C 1 im][NTf 2 ] presents a higher enthalpy and entropy of vaporization than the neighboring members of the series. The enthalpy of vaporization of [C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ] lies in between the asymmetric and symmetric ionic liquid series, reflecting a decrease in the electrostatic interactions due to a decrease of the charge accessibility between the ionic pairs when the methyl group is replaced by an ethyl group. The obtained higher volatility of [C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ] arises from its asymmetric character, leading to an higher entropic contribution that compensates the enthalpic penalty. The border conditions ([C 1 C 1 im][NTf 2 ], [C 2 C 1 im][NTf 2 ] and [C 2 C 2 im][NTf 2 ]), topology ([C 2 C 3 im][NTf 2 ]) and symmetry/asymmetry of the ILs effect were evaluated and rationalized based on a comparative analysis of the thermodynamic properties, enthalpies and entropies of vaporization

  5. Epitaxial growth of 3C-SiC by using C{sub 60} as a carbon source; Untersuchungen zum epitaktischen Wachstum von 3C-SiC bei Verwendung einer C{sub 60}-Kohlenstoffquelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, Sascha

    2006-01-15

    Within this work epitaxial 3C-SiC-films were grown on Si(001) substrates and on ion beam synthesized 3C-SiC(001) pseudo substrates. A rather new process was used which is based on the simultaneous deposition of C60 and Si. In order to set up the necessary experimental conditions an ultra-high vacuum chamber has been designed and built. A RHEED system was used to examine SiC film growth in-situ. Using the described technique 3C-SiC films were grown void-free on Si(001) substrates. Deposition rates of C60 and Si were chosen adequately to maintain a Si:C ratio of approximately one during the deposition process. It was shown that stoichiometric and epitaxial 3C-SiC growth with the characteristic relationship (001)[110]Si(001)[110]3C-SiC could be achieved. TEM investigations revealed that the grown 3C-SiC films consist of individual grains that extend from the Si substrate to the film surface. Two characteristic grain types could be identified. The correlation between structure and texture of void-free grown 3C-SiC films and film thickness was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Pole figure measurements showed that thin films only contain first-order 3C-SiC twins. With higher film thickness also second-order twins are found which are located as twin lamellae in grain type 2. Improvement of polar texture with increasing film thickness couldn't be observed in the investigated range of up to 550 nm. On ion beam synthesized 3C-SiC pseudo substrates homoepitaxial 3C-SiC growth could be demonstrated for the first time by using a C{sub 60} carbon source. In respect to the crystalline quality of the grown films the surface quality of the used substrates was identified as a crucial factor. Furthermore a correlation between the ratio of deposition rates of C{sub 60} and Si and 3C-SiC film quality could be found. Under silicon-rich conditions, i.e. with a Si:C ratio of slightly greater one, homoepitaxial 3C-SiC layer-by-layer growth can be achieved. Films grown under these

  6. Bovine adenovirus type 3 containing heterologous protein in the C-terminus of minor capsid protein IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander; Connors, Wayne; Van Kessel, Andrew; Tikoo, Suresh Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Earlier, we detected pIX of BAdV-3 as a 14-kDa protein in purified virions. Analysis of BAdV-3 pIX using different region antibodies revealed that the N-terminus and central domain of the pIX contain immunogenic sites and are not exposed on the surface of BAdV-3 virion. This suggested that the C-terminus of BAdV-3 pIX (125 amino acid) may be exposed on the virion and may be used as a site for incorporation of heterologous peptides or proteins. We constructed recombinant BAV950 containing a small peptide (21 amino acid), including the RGD motif or recombinant BAV951 containing enhanced yellow-green fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to the C-terminus of pIX. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the chimeric pIX-RGD was incorporated into virion capsids. Incorporation of the RGD motif into the pIX resulted in significant augmentation of BAdV-3 fiber knob-independent infection of the integrin-positive cells, suggesting that RGD motifs are displayed on the surface of virion capsids and are accessible for binding to integrins. Analysis of BAV951 revealed that the chimeric pIX is incorporated into virion capsids and EYFP containing the C-terminus of pIX is exposed on the surface of the virion. Moreover, insertion of chimeric pIXs was maintained without change through successive rounds of viral replication. These results suggested that in contrast to major capsid proteins (hexon, penton, fiber), the minor capsid protein IX can be use for the incorporation of targeting ligands based on either small peptides or longer polypeptides

  7. Anti-chemokine small molecule drugs: a promising future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Power, Christine A; Schwarz, Matthias K

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines have principally been associated with inflammation due to their role in the control of leukocyte migration, but just over a decade ago chemokine receptors were also identified as playing a pivotal role in the entry of the HIV virus into cells. Chemokines activate seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, making them extremely attractive therapeutic targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Although there are now a large number of molecules targeting chemokines and chemokine receptors including neutralizing antibodies in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, the results to date have not always been positive, which has been disappointing for the field. These failures have often been attributed to redundancy in the chemokine system. However, other difficulties have been encountered in drug discovery processes targeting the chemokine system, and these will be addressed in this review. In this review, the reader will get an insight into the hurdles that have to be overcome, learn about some of the pitfalls that may explain the lack of success, and get a glimpse of the outlook for the future. In 2007, the FDA approved maraviroc, an inhibitor of CCR5 for the prevention of HIV infection, the first triumph for a small-molecule drug acting on the chemokine system. The time to market, 11 years from discovery of CCR5, was fast by industry standards. A second small-molecule drug, a CXCR4 antagonist for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, was approved by the FDA at the end of 2008. The results of a Phase III trial with a CCR9 inhibitor for Crohn's disease are also promising. This could herald the first success for a chemokine receptor antagonist as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic and confirms the importance of chemokine receptors as a target class for anti-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  8. A Stretch of 17 Amino Acids in the Prosaposin C Terminus Is Critical for Its Binding to Sortilin and Targeting to Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libin; Morales, Carlos R.

    2010-01-01

    Prosaposin, the precursor of four lysosomal cofactors required for the hydrolysis of sphingolipids, is transported to the lysosomes via the alternative receptor, sortilin. In this study, we identified a specific domain of 17 amino acids within the C terminus of prosaposin involved in binding to this sorting receptor. We generated six prosaposin deletion constructs and examined the effect of truncation by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. The experiments revealed that the first half of the prosaposin C terminus (aa 524–540), containing a saposin-like motif, was required and necessary to bind sortilin and to transport it to the lysosomes. Based on this result, we introduced twelve site-directed point mutations within the first half of the C terminus. Although the interaction of prosaposin with sortilin was pH dependent, the mutation of hydrophilic amino acids that usually modulate pH-dependent protein interactions did not affect the binding of prosaposin to sortilin. Conversely, a tryptophan (W530) and two cysteines (C528 and C536) were essential for its interaction with sortilin and for its transport to the lysosomes. In conclusion, our investigation demonstrates that a saposin-like motif within the first half of the prosaposin C terminus contains the sortilin recognition site. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:287–300, 2010) PMID:19934382

  9. BC-Box Motif-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Somatic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kanno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL functions to induce neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs and skin-derived precursors (SKPs. Here we identified a neuronal differentiation domain (NDD in pVHL. Neuronal differentiation of SKPs was induced by intracellular delivery of a peptide composed of the amino-acid sequences encoded by the NDD. Neuronal differentiation mediated by the NDD was caused by the binding between it and elongin C followed by Janus kinase-2 (JAK2 ubiquitination of JAK2 and inhibition of the JAK2/the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3(STAT3 pathway. The NDD in pVHL contained the BC-box motif ((A,P,S,TLXXX (A,C XXX(A,I,L,V corresponding to the binding site of elongin C. Therefore, we proposed that other BC-box proteins might also contain an NDD; and subsequently also identified in them an NDD containing the amino-acid sequence encoded by the BC-box motif in BC-box proteins. Furthermore, we showed that different NDD peptide-delivered cells differentiated into different kinds of neuron-like cells. That is, dopaminergic neuron-like cells, cholinergic neuron-like cells, GABAnergic neuron-like cells or rhodopsin-positive neuron-like cells were induced by different NDD peptides. These novel findings might contribute to the development of a new method for promoting neuronal differentiation and shed further light on the mechanism of neuronal differentiation of somatic stem cells.

  10. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.c.677 C>T and c.c.1298 A>C polymorphisms in reproductive failures: Experience from an RSA and RIF study on a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Izabela; Bylińska, Aleksandra; Wilczyńska, Karolina; Wiśniewski, Andrzej; Malinowski, Andrzej; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Radwan, Paweł; Radwan, Michał; Barcz, Ewa; Płoski, Rafał; Motak-Pochrzęst, Hanna; Banasik, Małgorzata; Sobczyński, Maciej; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Almost 1600 individuals from the Polish population were recruited to this study. Among them 319 were fertile couples, 289 were recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) couples, and 131 were in the group of recurrent implantation failure (RIF) following in vitro fertilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MTHFR c.c.677 C>T and c.c.1298 A>C polymorphisms' association with RSA and RIF. We used PCR-RFLP with HinfI (677 C>T) and MboII (1298 A>C) digestion. We observed a protective effect of the female AC genotype (OR = 0.64, p = 0.01) and the C allele (AC+CC genotypes; OR = 0.65, p = 0.009) against RSA. Moreover, 1298 AA/677 CT women were more frequent in RSA (31.14%) and RIF (25.20%) groups in comparison to fertile women (22.88%), although this difference was significant only in the case of RSA (p = 0.022, OR = 1.52). Male combined genotype analysis revealed no association with reproductive failure of their partners. Nevertheless, the female/male combination AA/AC of the 1298 polymorphism was more frequent in RSA couples (p = 0.049, OR = 1.49). However, the significant results became insignificant after Bonferroni correction. In addition, analysis of haplotypes showed significantly higher frequency of the C/C haplotype (1298 C/677 C) in the female control group than in the female RSA group (p = 0.03, OR = 0.77). Moreover, the association between elevated homocysteine (Hcy) level in plasma of RSA and RIF women and MTHFR polymorphisms was investigated but did not reveal significant differences. In conclusion, for clinical practice, it is better to check the homocysteine level in plasma and, if the Hcy level is increased, to recommend patients to take folic acid supplements rather than undergo screening of MTHFR for 1298 A>C and 677 C>T polymorphisms.

  11. Synthesis of the C(18)–C(34) Fragment of Amphidinolide C and the C(18)–C(29) Fragment of Amphidinolide F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Spilling, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    A convergent synthesis of the C(18)–C(34) fragment of amphidinolide C and the C(18)–C(29) fragment of amphidinolide F is reported. The approach involves the synthesis of the common intermediate tetrahydrofuranyl-β-ketophosphonate via cross metathesis, Pd(0)-catalyzed cyclization and hydroboration-oxidation. The β-ketophosphonate was coupled to three side chain aldehydes using a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination reaction to give dienones, which were reduced with L-selectride to give the fragments of amphidinolide C and F. PMID:21028791

  12. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chun-Ling; Pan, Wen-Ching; Liaw, Shwu-Huey; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Hwang, Lih-Hwa; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2001-01-01

    The carboxyl terminus of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) possesses ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity. Based on the conserved sequence motifs and the crystal structures of the helicase domain, 17 mutants of the HCV NS3 helicase were generated. The ATP hydrolysis, RNA binding, and RNA unwinding activities of the mutant proteins were examined in vitro to determine the functional role of the mutated residues. The data revealed that Lys-210 in the Walker A motif and Asp-290, Glu-291, and His-293 in the Walker B motif were crucial to ATPase activity and that Thr-322 and Thr-324 in motif III and Arg-461 in motif VI significantly influenced ATPase activity. When the pairing between His-293 and Gln-460, referred to as gatekeepers, was replaced with the Asp-293/His-460 pair, which makes the NS3 helicase more like the DEAD helicase subgroup, ATPase activity was not restored. It thus indicated that the whole microenvironment surrounding the gatekeepers, rather than the residues per se, was important to the enzymatic activities. Arg-461 and Trp-501 are important residues for RNA binding, while Val-432 may only play a coadjutant role. The data demonstrated that RNA helicase activity was possibly abolished by the loss of ATPase activity or by reduced RNA binding activity. Nevertheless, a low threshold level of ATPase activity was found sufficient for helicase activity. Results in this study provide a valuable reference for efforts under way to develop anti-HCV therapeutic drugs targeting NS3. PMID:11483774

  13. Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quickly than others, resulting in chronic anemia. Hemoglobin C disease Hemoglobin C disease occurs mostly in blacks. ... a common complication of hemoglobin C disease. Hemoglobin S-C disease Hemoglobin S-C disease occurs in people who ...

  14. The long non-coding RNA GAS5 cooperates with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E to regulate c-Myc translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhen Hu

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of transcription; however, their involvement in protein translation is not well known. Here we explored whether the lncRNA GAS5 is associated with translation initiation machinery and regulates translation. GAS5 was enriched with eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E in an RNA-immunoprecipitation assay using lymphoma cell lines. We identified two RNA binding motifs within eIF4E protein and the deletion of each motif inhibited the binding of GAS5 with eIF4E. To confirm the role of GAS5 in translation regulation, GAS5 siRNA and in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA were used to knock down or overexpress GAS5, respectively. GAS5 siRNA had no effect on global protein translation but did specifically increase c-Myc protein level without an effect on c-Myc mRNA. The mechanism of this increase in c-Myc protein was enhanced association of c-Myc mRNA with the polysome without any effect on protein stability. In contrast, overexpression of in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA suppressed c-Myc protein without affecting c-Myc mRNA. Interestingly, GAS5 was found to be bound with c-Myc mRNA, suggesting that GAS5 regulates c-Myc translation through lncRNA-mRNA interaction. Our findings have uncovered a role of GAS5 lncRNA in translation regulation through its interactions with eIF4E and c-Myc mRNA.

  15. Detection of Cytosolic Shigella flexneri via a C-Terminal Triple-Arginine Motif of GBP1 Inhibits Actin-Based Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S. Piro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamin-like guanylate binding proteins (GBPs are gamma interferon (IFN-γ-inducible host defense proteins that can associate with cytosol-invading bacterial pathogens. Mouse GBPs promote the lytic destruction of targeted bacteria in the host cell cytosol, but the antimicrobial function of human GBPs and the mechanism by which these proteins associate with cytosolic bacteria are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that human GBP1 is unique among the seven human GBP paralogs in its ability to associate with at least two cytosolic Gram-negative bacteria, Burkholderia thailandensis and Shigella flexneri. Rough lipopolysaccharide (LPS mutants of S. flexneri colocalize with GBP1 less frequently than wild-type S. flexneri does, suggesting that host recognition of O antigen promotes GBP1 targeting to Gram-negative bacteria. The targeting of GBP1 to cytosolic bacteria, via a unique triple-arginine motif present in its C terminus, promotes the corecruitment of four additional GBP paralogs (GBP2, GBP3, GBP4, and GBP6. GBP1-decorated Shigella organisms replicate but fail to form actin tails, leading to their intracellular aggregation. Consequentially, the wild type but not the triple-arginine GBP1 mutant restricts S. flexneri cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, human-adapted S. flexneri, through the action of one its secreted effectors, IpaH9.8, is more resistant to GBP1 targeting than the non-human-adapted bacillus B. thailandensis. These studies reveal that human GBP1 uniquely functions as an intracellular “glue trap,” inhibiting the cytosolic movement of normally actin-propelled Gram-negative bacteria. In response to this powerful human defense program, S. flexneri has evolved an effective counterdefense to restrict GBP1 recruitment.

  16. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Productive viral replication requires overcoming many barriers posed by the host innate immune system. Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) is a newly identified antiviral factor that is specifically targeted by poxvirus proteins belonging to the C7 family of host-range factors. Here we provide the first, to our knowledge, atomic view of two functionally divergent proteins from the C7 family and determine the molecular basis that dictates whether they can target SAMD9 effecti...

  17. C r C =

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    C r. C. = CTPPY: concentration of TPPY; CAuNPs: concentration of Au NPs. The concentration of the Au NPs is calculated as follows: (1) The weight of Au (WAu) produced from the complete reduction of HAuCl4 is calculated by multiplying the mole of added HAuCl4 (weight of added. HAuCl4·4H2O divided by molecular ...

  18. MotifMark: Finding regulatory motifs in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Kolhe, Pushkar; Isbell, Charles L; Wang, May D

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between proteins and DNA is a key driving force in a significant number of biological processes such as transcriptional regulation, repair, recombination, splicing, and DNA modification. The identification of DNA-binding sites and the specificity of target proteins in binding to these regions are two important steps in understanding the mechanisms of these biological activities. A number of high-throughput technologies have recently emerged that try to quantify the affinity between proteins and DNA motifs. Despite their success, these technologies have their own limitations and fall short in precise characterization of motifs, and as a result, require further downstream analysis to extract useful and interpretable information from a haystack of noisy and inaccurate data. Here we propose MotifMark, a new algorithm based on graph theory and machine learning, that can find binding sites on candidate probes and rank their specificity in regard to the underlying transcription factor. We developed a pipeline to analyze experimental data derived from compact universal protein binding microarrays and benchmarked it against two of the most accurate motif search methods. Our results indicate that MotifMark can be a viable alternative technique for prediction of motif from protein binding microarrays and possibly other related high-throughput techniques.

  19. Memetic algorithms for de novo motif-finding in biomedical sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chengpeng

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study are to design and implement a new memetic algorithm for de novo motif discovery, which is then applied to detect important signals hidden in various biomedical molecular sequences. In this paper, memetic algorithms are developed and tested in de novo motif-finding problems. Several strategies in the algorithm design are employed that are to not only efficiently explore the multiple sequence local alignment space, but also effectively uncover the molecular signals. As a result, there are a number of key features in the implementation of the memetic motif-finding algorithm (MaMotif), including a chromosome replacement operator, a chromosome alteration-aware local search operator, a truncated local search strategy, and a stochastic operation of local search imposed on individual learning. To test the new algorithm, we compare MaMotif with a few of other similar algorithms using simulated and experimental data including genomic DNA, primary microRNA sequences (let-7 family), and transmembrane protein sequences. The new memetic motif-finding algorithm is successfully implemented in C++, and exhaustively tested with various simulated and real biological sequences. In the simulation, it shows that MaMotif is the most time-efficient algorithm compared with others, that is, it runs 2 times faster than the expectation maximization (EM) method and 16 times faster than the genetic algorithm-based EM hybrid. In both simulated and experimental testing, results show that the new algorithm is compared favorably or superior to other algorithms. Notably, MaMotif is able to successfully discover the transcription factors' binding sites in the chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data, correctly uncover the RNA splicing signals in gene expression, and precisely find the highly conserved helix motif in the transmembrane protein sequences, as well as rightly detect the palindromic segments in the primary micro

  20. Fourier spectroscopy of the 12C2, 13C2, and 12C13C (0-0) swan bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiot, C.

    1983-01-01

    The (0-0) band of the C 2 Swan electronic system d 3 Pi/sub g/→a 3 Pi/sub u/ has been recorded by Fourier spectroscopy. The three isotopes species 12 C 2 , 13 C 2 , and 12 C 13 C were investigated. The observed wavenumbers were reduced to molecular parameters using a nonlinear least-square fitting procedure. Well-known perturbations at N' = 47 and N' = 51 again observed in the e 12 C 2 d 3 Pi/sub g/ (v = 0) level. Perturbations of the same kind are present in the 13 C 2 spectrum at N' = 34 and N' = 44,48,52. The 12 C 13 C spectrum exhibits in the observed spectral range a unique perturbation for N' = 41

  1. Advanced C and C++ compiling

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Learning how to write C/C++ code is only the first step. To be a serious programmer, you need to understand the structure and purpose of the binary files produced by the compiler: object files, static libraries, shared libraries, and, of course, executables.Advanced C and C++ Compiling explains the build process in detail and shows how to integrate code from other developers in the form of deployed libraries as well as how to resolve issues and potential mismatches between your own and external code trees.With the proliferation of open source, understanding these issues is increasingly the res

  2. Interstitial Fluid Flow Increases Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Invasion through CXCR4/CXCL12 and MEK/ERK Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer (~80%), and it is one of the few cancer types with rising incidence in the United States. This highly invasive cancer is very difficult to detect until its later stages, resulting in limited treatment options and low survival rates. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms associated with the effects of biomechanical forces such as interstitial fluid flow (IFF) on hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. We hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow enhanced hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion through chemokine-mediated autologous chemotaxis. Utilizing a 3D in vitro invasion assay, we demonstrated that interstitial fluid flow promoted invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that autologous chemotaxis influences this interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma derived cell lines via the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) signaling axis. We also demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling affects interstitial fluid flow-induced invasion; however, this pathway was separate from CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the potential role of interstitial fluid flow in hepatocellular carcinoma invasion. Uncovering the mechanisms that control hepatocellular carcinoma invasion will aid in enhancing current liver cancer therapies and provide better treatment options for patients. PMID:26560447

  3. Oxidation behavior of TiC, ZrC, and HfC dispersed in oxide matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arun, R.; Subramanian, M.; Mehrotra, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hot pressed TiC-Al 2 O 3 , TiC-ZrO 2 , ZrC-ZrO 2 , and HfC-HfO 2 composites has been investigated at 1273 K. The oxidation of TiC, ZrC, and HfC in hot-pressed composites containing ZrO 2 and HfO 2 has been found to be extremely rapid. The kinetics of oxidation of TiC and a 90 wt% TiC-Al 2 O 3 composite appear to be faster compared to that of pure TiC. X-ray diffraction results for hot-pressed ZrC-HfO 2 and HfC-HfO 2 composites indicate partial stabilization of tetragonal ZrO 2 and HfO 2 phases in these composites

  4. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2003-01-01

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...

  5. Structural Differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae Housekeeping and Pilus-Specific Sortases: SrtA and SrtC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, B.; Krishnan, V.; Rajashankar, K.R.; I-Hsiu, H.; Xin, M.; Ton-That, H.; Narayana, S.V. (Texas-HSC); (Cornell); (UAB)

    2011-10-21

    The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2) and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104). Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y) motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  6. Structural differences between the Streptococcus agalactiae housekeeping and pilus-specific sortases: SrtA and SrtC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Khare

    Full Text Available The assembly of pili on the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria requires transpeptidase enzymes called sortases. In Streptococcus agalactiae, the PI-1 pilus island of strain 2603V/R encodes two pilus-specific sortases (SrtC1 and SrtC2 and three pilins (GBS80, GBS52 and GBS104. Although either pilus-specific sortase is sufficient for the polymerization of the major pilin, GBS80, incorporation of the minor pilins GBS52 and GBS104 into the pilus structure requires SrtC1 and SrtC2, respectively. The S. agalactiae housekeeping sortase, SrtA, whose gene is present at a different location and does not catalyze pilus polymerization, was shown to be involved in cell wall anchoring of pilus polymers. To understand the structural basis of sortases involved in such diverse functions, we determined the crystal structures of S. agalactiae SrtC1 and SrtA. Both enzymes are made of an eight-stranded beta-barrel core with variations in their active site architecture. SrtA exhibits a catalytic triad arrangement similar to that in Streptococcus pyogenes SrtA but different from that in Staphylococcus aureus SrtA. In contrast, the SrtC1 enzyme contains an N-terminal helical domain and a 'lid' in its putative active site, which is similar to that seen in Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus-specific sortases, although with subtle differences in positioning and composition. To understand the effect of such differences on substrate recognition, we have also determined the crystal structure of a SrtC1 mutant, in which the conserved DP(W/F/Y motif was replaced with the sorting signal motif of GBS80, IPNTG. By comparing the structures of WT wild type SrtA and SrtC1 and the 'lid' mutant of SrtC1, we propose that structural elements within the active site and the lid may be important for defining the role of specific sortase in pili biogenesis.

  7. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  8. De novo Transcriptome Assembly and Comparison of C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Tribe Salsoleae (Chenopodiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Lauterbach

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available C4 photosynthesis is a carbon-concentrating mechanism that evolved independently more than 60 times in a wide range of angiosperm lineages. Among other alterations, the evolution of C4 from ancestral C3 photosynthesis requires changes in the expression of a vast number of genes. Differential gene expression analyses between closely related C3 and C4 species have significantly increased our understanding of C4 functioning and evolution. In Chenopodiaceae, a family that is rich in C4 origins and photosynthetic types, the anatomy, physiology and phylogeny of C4, C2, and C3 species of Salsoleae has been studied in great detail, which facilitated the choice of six samples of five representative species with different photosynthetic types for transcriptome comparisons. mRNA from assimilating organs of each species was sequenced in triplicates, and sequence reads were de novo assembled. These novel genetic resources were then analyzed to provide a better understanding of differential gene expression between C3, C2 and C4 species. All three analyzed C4 species belong to the NADP-ME type as most genes encoding core enzymes of this C4 cycle are highly expressed. The abundance of photorespiratory transcripts is decreased compared to the C3 and C2 species. Like in other C4 lineages of Caryophyllales, our results suggest that PEPC1 is the C4-specific isoform in Salsoleae. Two recently identified transporters from the PHT4 protein family may not only be related to the C4 syndrome, but also active in C2 photosynthesis in Salsoleae. In the two populations of the C2 species S. divaricata transcript abundance of several C4 genes are slightly increased, however, a C4 cycle is not detectable in the carbon isotope values. Most of the core enzymes of photorespiration are highly increased in the C2 species compared to both C3 and C4 species, confirming a successful establishment of the C2 photosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, a function of PEP-CK in C2 photosynthesis

  9. Crystal structure of conjugated polyketone reductase (CPR-C1) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 complexed with NADPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui-Min; Yamamura, Akihiro; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase (CPR-C1) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 is a member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily and reduces ketopantoyl lactone to d-pantoyl lactone in a NADPH-dependent and stereospecific manner. We determined the crystal structure of CPR-C1.NADPH complex at 2.20 Å resolution. CPR-C1 adopted a triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold at the core of the structure in which Thr25 and Lys26 of the GXGTX motif bind uniquely to the adenosine 2'-phosphate group of NADPH. This finding provides a novel structural basis for NADPH binding of the AKR superfamily. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Distinct chemokine receptor and cytokine expression profile in secondary progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS).......Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)....

  11. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Progression to AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  12. Immunotoxicity of nanoparticles: a computational study suggests that CNTs and C60 fullerenes might be recognized as pathogens by Toll-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turabekova, M.; Rasulev, B.; Theodore, M.; Jackman, J.; Leszczynska, D.; Leszczynski, J.

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade, a great deal of attention has been devoted to study the inflammatory response upon exposure to multi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and different fullerene derivatives. In particular, carbon nanoparticles are reported to provoke substantial inflammation in alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells, epidermal keratinocytes, cultured monocyte-macrophage cells, etc. We suggest a hypothetical model providing the potential mechanistic explanation for immune and inflammatory responses observed upon exposure to carbon nanoparticles. Specifically, we performed a theoretical study to analyze CNT and C60 fullerene interactions with the available X-ray structures of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) homo- and hetero-dimer extracellular domains. This assumption was based on the fact that similar to the known TLR ligands both CNTs and fullerenes induce, in cells, the secretion of certain inflammatory protein mediators, such as interleukins and chemokines. These proteins are observed within inflammation downstream processes resulted from the ligand molecule dependent inhibition or activation of TLR-induced signal transduction. Our computational studies have shown that the internal hydrophobic pockets of some TLRs might be capable of binding small-sized carbon nanostructures (5,5 armchair SWCNTs containing 11 carbon atom layers and C60 fullerene). High binding scores and minor structural alterations induced in TLR ectodomains upon binding C60 and CNTs further supported our hypothesis. Additionally, the proposed hypothesis is strengthened by the indirect experimental findings indicating that CNTs and fullerenes induce an excessive expression of specific cytokines and chemokines (i.e. IL-8 and MCP1).Over the last decade, a great deal of attention has been devoted to study the inflammatory response upon exposure to multi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and different fullerene derivatives. In particular, carbon nanoparticles are reported to provoke

  13. Alcohol binding in the C1 (C1A + C1B) domain of protein kinase C epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pany, Satyabrata; Das, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol regulates the expression and function of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε). In a previous study we identified an alcohol binding site in the C1B, one of the twin C1 subdomains of PKCε. Methods In this study, we investigated alcohol binding in the entire C1 domain (combined C1A and C1B) of PKCε. Fluorescent phorbol ester, SAPD and fluorescent diacylglycerol (DAG) analog, dansyl-DAG were used to study the effect of ethanol, butanol, and octanol on the ligand binding using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). To identify alcohol binding site(s), PKCεC1 was photolabeled with 3-azibutanol and 3-azioctanol, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The effects of alcohols and the azialcohols on PKCε were studied in NG108-15 cells. Results In the presence of alcohol, SAPD and dansyl-DAG showed different extent of FRET, indicating differential effects of alcohol on the C1A and C1B subdomains. Effects of alcohols and azialcohols on PKCε in NG108-15 cells were comparable. Azialcohols labeled Tyr-176 of C1A and Tyr-250 of C1B. Inspection of the model structure of PKCεC1 reveals that these residues are 40 Å apart from each other indicating that these residues form two different alcohol binding sites. Conclusions The present results provide evidence for the presence of multiple alcohol-binding sites on PKCε and underscore the importance of targeting this PKC isoform in developing alcohol antagonists. PMID:26210390

  14. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  15. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar, E-mail: snimmag1@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer.

  16. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer.

  17. Molecular resonances in sub-Coulomb energy region (12C-12C, 12C-24Mg, 12C-9Be systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Kiyohiko; Shimomura, Susumu; Tanaka, Makoto; Murakami, Tetsuya; Fukada, Mamoru; Sakaguchi, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    Molecular resonance in sub-Coulomb energy region was studied on 12 C- 12 C, 12 C- 24 Mg and 12 C- 9 Be systems. The excitation functions and the angular distributions were measured on the reactions 12 C( 12 C, 8 Besub(g,s,)) 16 Osub(g,s,), 24 Mg( 12 C, α) 32 S and 9 Be ( 12 C, 8 Besub(g,s,)) 13 Csub(g,s,). Sub-Coulomb resonances were observed in all systems and the contribution of the 12 Csub(2nd)*(0 + , 7.65 MeV) state is proposed. (author)

  18. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  19. Premalignant lesions skew spleen cell responses to immune modulation by adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielma, Silvana A; Klein, Richard L; Levingston, Corinne A; Young, M Rita I

    2013-05-01

    Obesity can promote a chronic inflammatory state and is associated with an increased risk for cancer. Since adipocytes can produce mediators that can regulate conventional immune cells, this study sought to determine if the presence of premalignant oral lesions would skew how immune cells respond to adipocyte-derived mediators to create an environment that may be more favorable for their progression toward cancer. While media conditioned by adipocytes stimulated normal spleen cell production of the T helper (Th) type-1 cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-12 and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM CSF), media from premalignant lesion cells either blocked or had no added affect on the adipocyte-stimulated Th1 cytokine production. In contrast, media conditioned by premalignant lesion cells exacerbated adipocyte-stimulated spleen cell production of the Th2 cytokines IL-10 and IL-13, although it did not further enhance the adipocyte-stimulated spleen cell production of IL-4 and TGF-β. The premalignant lesion environment also heightened the adipocyte-stimulated spleen cell production of the inflammatory mediators IL 1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-9, although it did not further increase the adipocyte-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). IL 17 production was unaffected by the adipocyte-derived mediators, but was synergistically triggered by adding media from premalignant lesion cells. These stimulatory effects on spleen cell production of Th2 and inflammatory mediators were not induced in the absence of media conditioned by adipocytes. In contrast, media conditioned by adipocytes did not stimulate production of predominantly monocyte-derived chemokine C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL)9, chemokine C-C motif ligand (CCL)3 or CCL4, although it stimulated production of CCL2 and the predominantly T cell-derived chemokine CCL5, which was the only chemokine whose production was further increased by media from premalignant lesions

  20. Borane-catalyzed cracking of C-C bonds in coal; Boran-katalysierte C-C-Bindungungsspaltung in Steinkohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narangerel, J; Haenel, M W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Coal, especially coking coal, was reacted with hydrogen at comparatively mild reaction conditions (150-280 degrees centigrade, 20 MPa hydrogen pressure) in the presence of catalysts consisting of borange reagents and certain transition metal halides to obtaine more than 80 percent of pyridine-soluble products. The influence of the degree of coalification, catalyst and temperature on the borane-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds in coal was investigated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Steinkohlen, insbesondere im Inkohlungsbereich der Fettkohlen (Kokskohlen), werden in Gegenwart von Katalysatoren aus Boran-Reagentien und bestimmten Uebergangsmetallhalogeniden mit Wasserstoff bei vergleichsweise milden Reaktionsbedingungen (250-280 C, 20 MPa Wasserstoffdruck) in zu ueber 80% pyridinloesliche Produkte umgewandelt. Der Einfluss von Inkohlungsgrad, Katalysator und Temperatur auf die Boran-katalysierte C-C-Bindungshydrogenolyse in Kohle wurde untersucht. (orig.)

  1. Isolation and characterisation of the cDNA encoding a glycosylated accessory protein of pea chloroplast DNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaikwad, A; Tewari, K K; Kumar, D; Chen, W; Mukherjee, S K

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding p43, a DNA binding protein from pea chloroplasts (ct) that binds to cognate DNA polymerase and stimulates the polymerase activity, has been cloned and characterised. The characteristic sequence motifs of hydroxyproline-rich glyco-proteins (HRGP) are present in the cDNA corres-ponding to the N-terminal domain of the mature p43. The protein was found to be highly O-arabinosylated. Chemically deglycosylated p43 (i.e. p29) retains its binding to both DNA and pea ct-DNA polymeras...

  2. Determination of material properties for short fibre reinforced C/C-SiC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausherr J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the mechanical properties of short fibre reinforced CMC using standard sized coupons has always been a challenge due to a high statistical scattering of the measured values. Although the random orientation of short fibres results in a quasi-isotropic material behavior of 2D-structures with a sufficiently large volume, the small volume typical for test coupons usually results in a non-isotropic fibre orientation in the tested volume. This paper describes a method for manufacturing unidirectional oriented short fibre reinforced CMC materials and presents material properties of UD-C/C-SiC. After verifying the fibre orientation of the CMC using micro-computed tomography, coupons were extracted to determine the orthotropic material properties. These orthotropic material properties were then used to predict the properties of C/C-SiC with randomly distributed short fibres. To validate the method, micro-computed tomography is used to quantitatively determine the fibre orientation within coupons extracted from randomly distributed short fibre C/C-SiC. After mechanical three-point-bending tests, the measured stiffness and bending strength is compared with the predicted properties. Finally, the data are used to devise a method suited for reducing the inherent large spread of material properties associated with the measurement of CMC materials with randomly distributed short fibres.

  3. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  4. Synthesis of [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]olivetolic acid, methyl [1'-13C]olivetolate and [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]cannabigerolic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porwoll, J.P.; Leete, E.

    1985-01-01

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous 13 C atoms and 14 C. Methyl [5,6- 13 C 2 , 1- 14 C]olivetolate was prepared from lithium [ 13 C 2 ]acetylide and dimethyl [2- 14 C]malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl [5,6- 13 C 2 , 1- 14 C]cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The 13 C- 13 C couplings observable in the 13 C NMR spectra of these 13 C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl [1'- 14 C]olivetolate was prepared from 13 CO 2 to confirm assignments of the 13 C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds. (author)

  5. Synthesis of [2-13C, 2-14C] 2-aminoethanol, [1-13C, 1-14C] 2-chloroethylamine, N,N'-bis([1-13C, 1-14C] 2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea(BCNU) and N-([1-13C, 1-14C] 2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea(CNU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, R.; Chang, C-j.

    1982-01-01

    [2- 13 C, 2- 14 C]2-Aminoethanol hydrochloride was prepared in good yield from Na*CN in a two step sequence by first converting the Na*CN to OHCH 2 *CN and then reducing the nitrile directly with a solution of borane-tetrahydrofuran complex. The reaction procedure was simple and the pure product could be obtained readily. Using this specifically labelled precursor, the synthesis of [1- 13 C, 1- 14 C]2-chloroethylamine hydrochloride, N-([1- 13 C, 1- 14 C]2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea(CNU) and N,N'-bis([1- 13 C, 1- 14 C]2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea(BCNU) in good yield without isotope scrambling was also reported. (author)

  6. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C. PMID:26782977

  7. A sialoreceptor binding motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae adhesin VlhA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan May

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853(T. Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01 in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01 than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05. Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01 when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA-X-F-X-(BCAA-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a

  8. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Ishii, Ryohei; Goto, Eiji; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  9. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Kato

    Full Text Available The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING, resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  10. Gas-phase reactivity of lanthanide cations with fluorocarbons: C-F versus C-H and C-C bond activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornehl, H.H.; Hornung, G.; Schwarz, H.

    1996-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of the fluorinated hydrocarbons CF 4 , CHF 3 , CH 3 F, C 2 F 6 , 1,1-C 2 H 4 F 2 , and C 6 F 6 with the lanthanide cations Ce + , Pr + , Sm + , Ho + , Tm + , and Yb + and the reactivity of C 6 H 5 F with all lanthanide cations Ln + (Ln = La-Lu, with the exception of Pm + ) have been examined by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The perfluorinated compounds tetrafluoromethane and hexafluoroethane as well as trifluoromethane do not react with any lanthanide cation. Selective activation of the strong C-F bonds in fluoromethane, 1,1-difluoroethane, hexafluorobenzene, and fluorobenzene appears as a general reaction scheme along the 4f row. Experimental evidence is given for a 'harpoon'-like mechanism for the F atom abstraction process which operates via an initial electron transfer from the lanthanide cation to the fluorinated substrate in the encounter complex Ln + RF. The most reactive lanthanides La + , Ce + , Gd + , and Tb + and also the formal closed-shell species Lu + exhibit additional C-H and C-C bond activation pathways in the reaction with fluorobenzene, namely dehydrohalogenation as well as loss of a neutral acetylene molecule. In the case of Tm + and Yb + the formation of neutral LnF 3 is observed in a multistep process via C-C coupling and charge transfer. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Atmospheric histories and growth trends of C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16 and C8F18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Weiss

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric observations and trends are presented for the high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs: decafluorobutane (C4F10, dodecafluoropentane (C5F12, tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14, hexadecafluoroheptane (C7F16 and octadecafluorooctane (C8F18. Their atmospheric histories are based on measurements of 36 Northern Hemisphere and 46 Southern Hemisphere archived air samples collected between 1973 to 2011 using the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE "Medusa" preconcentration gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems. A new calibration scale was prepared for each PFC, with estimated accuracies of 6.8% for C4F10, 7.8% for C5F12, 4.0% for C6F14, 6.6% for C7F16 and 7.9% for C8F18. Based on our observations the 2011 globally averaged dry air mole fractions of these heavy PFCs are: 0.17 parts-per-trillion (ppt, i.e., parts per 1012 for C4F10, 0.12 ppt for C5F12, 0.27 ppt for C6F14, 0.12 ppt for C7F16 and 0.09 ppt for C8F18. These atmospheric mole fractions combine to contribute to a global average radiative forcing of 0.35 mW m−2, which is 6% of the total anthropogenic PFC radiative forcing (Montzka and Reimann, 2011; Oram et al., 2012. The growth rates of the heavy perfluorocarbons were largest in the late 1990s peaking at 6.2 parts per quadrillion (ppq, i.e., parts per 1015 per year (yr for C4F10, at 5.0 ppq yr−1 for C5F12 and 16.6 ppq yr−1 for C6F14 and in the early 1990s for C7F16 at 4.7 ppq yr−1 and in the mid 1990s for C8F18 at 4.8 ppq yr−1. The 2011 globally averaged mean atmospheric growth rates of these PFCs are subsequently lower at 2.2 ppq yr−1 for C4F10, 1.4 ppq yr−1 for C5F12, 5.0 ppq yr−1 for C6F14, 3.4 ppq yr−1 for C7F16 and 0.9 ppq yr−1 for C8F18. The more recent slowdown in the growth rates suggests that emissions are declining as compared to the 1980s and 1990s.

  12. Factors Affecting the Binding of a Recombinant Heavy Metal-Binding Domain (CXXC motif Protein to Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Boonyodying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of heavy metal-binding proteins have been used to study bioremediation. CXXC motif, a metal binding domain containing Cys-X-X-Cys motif, has been identified in various organisms. These proteins are capable of binding various types of heavy metals. In this study, heavy metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein encoded from mcsA gene of S. aureus were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The factors involved in the metal-binding activity were determined in order to analyze the potential of recombinant protein for bioremediation. A recombinant protein can be bound to Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The thermal stability of a recombinant protein was tested, and the results showed that the metal binding activity to Cu2+ and Zn2+ still exist after treating the protein at 85ºC for 30 min. The temperature and pH that affected the metal binding activity was tested and the results showed that recombinant protein was still bound to Cu2+ at 65ºC, whereas a pH of 3-7 did not affect the metal binding E. coli harboring a pRset with a heavy metal-binding domain CXXC motif increased the resistance of heavy metals against CuCl2 and CdCl2. This study shows that metal binding domain (CXXC motif recombinant protein can be effectively bound to various types of heavy metals and may be used as a potential tool for studying bioremediation.

  13. Chemokine Signaling in Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Toward Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2018-06-22

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common skin disease that results in significant cost and morbidity. Despite its high prevalence, therapeutic options are limited. Allergic contact dermatitis is regulated primarily by T cells within the adaptive immune system, but also by natural killer and innate lymphoid cells within the innate immune system. The chemokine receptor system, consisting of chemokine peptides and chemokine G protein-coupled receptors, is a critical regulator of inflammatory processes such as ACD. Specific chemokine signaling pathways are selectively up-regulated in ACD, most prominently CXCR3 and its endogenous chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. Recent research demonstrates that these 3 chemokines are not redundant and indeed activate distinct intracellular signaling profiles such as those activated by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestin adapter proteins. Such differential signaling provides an attractive therapeutic target for novel ACD therapies and other inflammatory diseases.

  14. CD3 gamma contains a phosphoserine-dependent di-leucine motif involved in down-regulation of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Hou, X; Wegener, A M

    1994-01-01

    -regulation of the TCR. Furthermore, analysis of a series of CD3 gamma truncation mutants indicated that in addition to S126 phosphorylation a motif C-terminal of S126 was required for TCR down-regulation. Point mutation analyses confirmed this observation and demonstrated that a membrane-proximal di-leucine motif (L131......, indicating that the TCR was down-regulated by endocytosis via clathrin coated pits. Based on the present results and previously published observations on intracellular receptor sorting, a general model for intracellular sorting of receptors containing di-leucine- or tyrosine-based motifs is proposed....

  15. A specific assay for quantification of human C4c by use of an anti-C4c monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilely, Katrine; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that is able to detect fluid phase C4c without interference from other products generated from the complement component C4. The C4c specific mAb was tested in different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) combinations with various types of in vitro activated sera...

  16. Disruption of Fyn SH3 domain interaction with a proline-rich motif in liver kinase B1 results in activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Yamada

    Full Text Available Fyn-deficient mice display increased AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK activity as a result of Fyn-dependent regulation of Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1 in skeletal muscle. Mutation of Fyn-specific tyrosine sites in LKB1 results in LKB1 export into the cytoplasm and increased AMPK activation site phosphorylation. This study characterizes the structural elements responsible for the physical interaction between Fyn and LKB1. Effects of point mutations in the Fyn SH2/SH3 domains and in the LKB1 proline-rich motif on 1 Fyn and LKB1 binding, 2 LKB1 subcellular localization and 3 AMPK phosphorylation were investigated in C2C12 muscle cells. Additionally, novel LKB1 proline-rich motif mimicking cell permeable peptides were generated to disrupt Fyn/LKB1 binding and investigate the consequences on AMPK activity in both C2C12 cells and mouse skeletal muscle. Mutation of either Fyn SH3 domain or the proline-rich motif of LKB1 resulted in the disruption of Fyn/LKB1 binding, re-localization of 70% of LKB1 signal in the cytoplasm and a 2-fold increase in AMPK phosphorylation. In vivo disruption of the Fyn/LKB1 interaction using LKB1 proline-rich motif mimicking cell permeable peptides recapitulated Fyn pharmacological inhibition. We have pinpointed the structural elements within Fyn and LKB1 that are responsible for their binding, demonstrating the functionality of this interaction in regulating AMPK activity.

  17. Ruthenium(II)-catalysed remote C-H alkylations as a versatile platform to meta-decorated arenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Korvorapun, Korkit; de Sarkar, Suman; Rogge, Torben; Burns, David J.; Warratz, Svenja; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-06-01

    The full control of positional selectivity is of prime importance in C-H activation technology. Chelation assistance served as the stimulus for the development of a plethora of ortho-selective arene functionalizations. In sharp contrast, meta-selective C-H functionalizations continue to be scarce, with all ruthenium-catalysed transformations currently requiring difficult to remove or modify nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Herein, we describe a unifying concept to access a wealth of meta-decorated arenes by a unique arene ligand effect in proximity-induced ruthenium(II) C-H activation catalysis. The transformative nature of our strategy is mirrored by providing a step-economical entry to a range of meta-substituted arenes, including ketones, acids, amines and phenols--key structural motifs in crop protection, material sciences, medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Early antihepatitis C virus response with second-generation C200/C22 ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, C. L.; Bresters, D.; Reesink, H. W.; Plaisier, A. A.; Schaasberg, W.; Leentvaar-Kuypers, A.; Choo, Q. L.; Quan, S.; Polito, A.; Houghton, M.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of early antibody to hepatitis C virus (HCV) by a new second-generation C200/C22 anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a four-antigen recombinant immunoblot assay (4-RIBA) was compared with the first-generation anti-HCV C100 ELISA using sequential serum samples of 9

  19. Role of Tumor-Derived Chemokines in Osteolytic Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore J. Coniglio

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. The bone marrow is a common destination for many malignant cancers, including breast carcinoma (BC, prostate carcinoma, multiple myeloma, lung carcinoma, uterine cancer, thyroid cancer, bladder cancer, and neuroblastoma. The molecular mechanism by which metastatic cancer are able to recognize, infiltrate, and colonize bone are still unclear. Chemokines are small soluble proteins which under normal physiological conditions mediate chemotactic trafficking of leukocytes to specific tissues in the body. In the context of metastasis, the best characterized role for the chemokine system is in the regulation of primary tumor growth, survival, invasion, and homing to specific secondary sites. However, there is ample evidence that metastatic tumors exploit chemokines to modulate the metastatic niche within bone which ultimately results in osteolytic bone disease. In this review, we examine the role of chemokines in metastatic tumor growth within bone. In particular, the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, IL-8/CXCL8, and CXCL12 are consistently involved in promoting osteoclastogenesis and tumor growth. We will also evaluate the suitability of chemokines as targets for chemotherapy with the use of neutralizing antibodies and chemokine receptor-specific antagonists.

  20. Despite phylogenetic effects, C3-C4 lineages bridge the ecological gap to C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Christin, Pascal-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    C 4 photosynthesis is a physiological innovation involving several anatomical and biochemical components that emerged recurrently in flowering plants. This complex trait evolved via a series of physiological intermediates, broadly termed 'C 3 -C 4 ', which have been widely studied to understand C 4 origins. While this research program has focused on biochemistry, physiology, and anatomy, the ecology of these intermediates remains largely unexplored. Here, we use global occurrence data and local habitat descriptions to characterize the niches of multiple C 3 -C 4 lineages, as well as their close C 3 and C 4 relatives. While C 3 -C 4 taxa tend to occur in warm climates, their abiotic niches are spread along other dimensions, making it impossible to define a universal C 3 -C 4 niche. Phylogeny-based comparisons suggest that, despite shifts associated with photosynthetic types, the precipitation component of the C 3 -C 4 niche is particularly lineage specific, being highly correlated with that of closely related C 3 and C 4 taxa. Our large-scale analyses suggest that C 3 -C 4 lineages converged toward warm habitats, which may have facilitated the transition to C 4 photosynthesis, effectively bridging the ecological gap between C 3 and C 4 plants. The intermediates retained some precipitation aspects of their C 3 ancestors' habitat, and likely transmitted them to their C 4 descendants, contributing to the diversity among C 4 lineages seen today. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Alterations in protein kinase C activity and processing during zinc-deficiency-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Susan S; Clegg, Michael S; Momma, Tony Y; Niles, Brad J; Duffy, Jodie Y; Daston, George P; Keen, Carl L

    2004-10-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are critical for signal transduction pathways involved in growth, differentiation and cell death. All PKC isoforms have four conserved domains, C1-C4. The C1 domain contains cysteine-rich finger-like motifs, which bind two zinc atoms. The zinc-finger motifs modulate diacylglycerol binding; thus, intracellular zinc concentrations could influence the activity and localization of PKC family members. 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient or zinc-supplemented medium for up to 32 h. Cells cultured in zinc-deficient medium had decreased zinc content, lowered cytosolic classical PKC activity, increased caspase-3 processing and activity, and reduced cell number. Zinc-deficient cytosols had decreased activity and expression levels of PKC-alpha, whereas PKC-alpha phosphorylation was not altered. Inhibition of PKC-alpha with Gö6976 had no effect on cell number in the zinc-deficient group. Proteolysis of the novel PKC family member, PKC-delta, to its 40-kDa catalytic fragment occurred in cells cultured in the zinc-deficient medium. Occurrence of the PKC-delta fragment in mitochondria was co-incident with caspase-3 activation. Addition of the PKC-delta inhibitor, rottlerin, or zinc to deficient medium reduced or eliminated proteolysis of PKC-delta, activated caspase-3 and restored cell number. Inhibition of caspase-3 processing by Z-DQMD-FMK (Z-Asp-Gln-Met-Asp-fluoromethylketone) did not restore cell number in the zinc-deficient group, but resulted in processing of full-length PKC-delta to a 56-kDa fragment. These results support the concept that intracellular zinc concentrations influence PKC activity and processing, and that zinc-deficiency-induced apoptosis occurs in part through PKC-dependent pathways.

  2. Geometric factors in f.c.c. and b.c.c. metal-on-metal epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, L.A.; Jaeger, H.

    1978-01-01

    Deposits of Ni, Au and Ag formed by condensing metal vapour in U.H.V. onto (001)W, held at a temperature Tsub(s) in the range 300K< Tsub(s)<1200 K, always form epitaxial layers. However, while Au and Ag form (001) epitaxial layers of f.c.c. single crystals, (001)d parallel to (001)s with, say, [110]d parallel to [010]s, Ni and Cu occur in two orthogonal domains, each characterized by an exclusive set of fault (or twin) planes. Within a fault plane, atoms are hexagonally close-packed and, within a domain, fault planes are normal to either [1-1-0]s or [1-10]s and a close-packed direction in the planes is normal to the substrate. The lateral stacking of the fault planes may range from random at low values of Tsub(s) to that of, say, (11-1-) planes in heavily faulted and/or twinned (110) epitaxed f.c.c. material, or of basal planes in (110) epitaxed h.c.p. material at high values of Tsub(s). The results are readily explained on the basis of a growth model developed for deposits of Ni and Cu on (001) Ag. (author)

  3. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today

  4. Complement C3 gene: Expression characterization and innate immune response in razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Maoxiao; Niu, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Chen, Zhiyi; Li, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is central to the complement system, playing an important role in immune defense, immune regulation and immune pathology. Several C3 genes have been characterized in invertebrates but very few in shellfish. The C3 gene was identified from the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta, referred to here as Sc-C3. It was found to be highly homologous with the C3 gene of Ruditapes decussatus. All eight model motifs of the C3 gene were found to be included in the thiolester bond and the C345C region. Sc-C3 was widely expressed in all healthy tissues with expression being highest in hemolymph. A significant difference in expression was revealed at the umbo larvae development stage. The expression of Sc-C3 was highly regulated in the hemolymph and liver, with a distinct response pattern being noted after a challenge with Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Vibrio parahemolyticus. It is therefore suggested that a complicated and unique response pathway may be present in S. constricta. Further, serum of S. constricta containing Sc-C3 was extracted. This was activated by LPS or bacterium for verification for function. The more obvious immune function of Sc-C3 was described as an effective membrane rupture in hemocyte cells of rabbit, V. parahemolyticus and Vibrio anguillarum. Thus, Sc-C3 plays an essential role in the immune defense of S. constricta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low dose irradiation performance of SiC interphase SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Lowden, R.A.; Strizak, J.; More, K.L.; Eatherly, W.S.; Bailey, J.; Williams, A.M.; Osborne, M.C.; Shinavski, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Reduced oxygen Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced composite SiC materials were densified with a chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and interphases of either 'porous' SiC or multilayer SiC and irradiated to a neutron fluence of 1.1 x 10 25 n m -2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the temperature range of 260 to 1060 C. The unirradiated properties of these composites are superior to previously studied ceramic grade Nicalon fiber reinforced/carbon interphase materials. Negligible reduction in the macroscopic matrix microcracking stress was observed after irradiation for the multilayer SiC interphase material and a slight reduction in matrix microcracking stress was observed for the composite with porous SiC interphase. The reduction in strength for the porous SiC interfacial material is greatest for the highest irradiation temperature. The ultimate fracture stress (in four point bending) following irradiation for the multilayer SiC and porous SiC interphase materials was reduced by 15% and 30%, respectively, which is an improvement over the 40% reduction suffered by irradiated ceramic grade Nicalon fiber materials fabricated in a similar fashion, though with a carbon interphase. The degradation of the mechanical properties of these composites is analyzed by comparison with the irradiation behavior of bare Hi-Nicalon fiber and Morton chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC. It is concluded that the degradation of these composites, as with the previous generation ceramic grade Nicalon fiber materials, is dominated by interfacial effects, though the overall degradation of fiber and hence composite is reduced for the newer low-oxygen fiber. (orig.)

  6. Highly Stable [C60AuC60]+/- Dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Marcelo; Kuhn, Martin; Martini, Paul; Chen, Lei; Hagelberg, Frank; Kaiser, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M

    2018-05-17

    Ionic complexes between gold and C 60 have been observed for the first time. Cations and anions of the type [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- are shown to have particular stability. Calculations suggest that these ions adopt a C 60 -Au-C 60 sandwich-like (dumbbell) structure, which is reminiscent of [XAuX] +/- ions previously observed for much smaller ligands. The [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- ions can be regarded as Au(I) complexes, regardless of whether the net charge is positive or negative, but in both cases, the charge transfer between the Au and C 60 is incomplete, most likely because of a covalent contribution to the Au-C 60 binding. The C 60 -Au-C 60 dumbbell structure represents a new architecture in fullerene chemistry that might be replicable in synthetic nanostructures.

  7. SiC-SiC and C-SiC Honeycomb for Advanced Flight Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project builds upon the work done in Phase I with the development of a C-SiC CMC honeycomb material that was successfully tested for mechanical...

  8. Quantification of C=C and C=O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ~5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C=C carbon fraction is only 1.1 ± 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or “bucky diamond” shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ~5% each. C=O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 °C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed C–H, C–OH, C=O, and C=C groups account for 12–14% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  9. A comparative study of low energy radiation responses of SiC, TiC and ZrC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, M.; Xiao, H.Y.; Zhang, H.B.; Peng, S.M.; Xu, C.H.; Liu, Z.J.; Zu, X.T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an ab initio molecular dynamics method is employed to compare the responses of SiC, TiC and ZrC to low energy irradiation. It reveals that C displacements are dominant in the cascade events of the three carbides. The associated defects in SiC are mainly Frenkel pairs and antisite defects, whereas damage end states in TiC and ZrC generally consist of Frenkel pairs and very few antisite defects are created. It is proposed that the susceptibility to antisite formation in SiC contributes to its crystalline-to-amorphous transformation under irradiation that is observed experimentally. The stronger radiation tolerance of TiC and ZrC than SiC can be originated from their different electronic structures, i.e., the C> and C> bonds are a mixture of covalent, metallic, and ionic character, whereas the C> bond is mainly covalent. The presented results provide underlying mechanisms for defect generation in SiC, TiC and ZrC, and advance the fundamental understanding of the radiation resistances of carbide materials.

  10. A self-assembling peptide RADA16-I integrated with spider fibroin uncrystalline motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lijuan Sun1,2, Xiaojun Zhao1,31West China Hospital Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China; 2Dept of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong, China; 3Center for Biomedical Engineering NE47-378, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, USAAbstract: Mechanical strength of nanofiber scaffolds formed by the self-assembling peptide RADA16-I or its derivatives is not very good and limits their application. To address this problem, we inserted spidroin uncrystalline motifs, which confer incomparable elasticity and hydrophobicity to spider silk GGAGGS or GPGGY, into the C-terminus of RADA16-I to newly design two peptides: R3 (n-RADARADARADARADA-GGAGGS-c and R4 (n-RADARADARADARADA-GPGGY-c, and then observed the effect of these motifs on biophysical properties of the peptide. Atomic force microscopy, transmitting electron microscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm that R3 and R4 display ß-sheet structure and self-assemble into long nanofibers. Compared with R3, the ß-sheet structure and nanofibers formed by R4 are more stable; they change to random coil and unordered aggregation at higher temperature. Rheology measurements indicate that novel peptides form hydrogel when induced by DMEM, and the storage modulus of R3 and R4 hydrogel is 0.5 times and 3 times higher than that of RADA16-I, respectively. Furthermore, R4 hydrogel remarkably promotes growth of liver cell L02 and liver cancer cell SMCC7721 compared with 2D culture, determined by MTT assay. Novel peptides still have potential as hydrophobic drug carriers; they can stabilize pyrene microcrystals in aqueous solution and deliver this into a lipophilic environment, identified by fluorescence emission spectra. Altogether, the spider fibroin motif GPGGY most effectively enhances mechanical

  11. Enrichment of Circular Code Motifs in the Genes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Michel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A set X of 20 trinucleotides has been found to have the highest average occurrence in the reading frame, compared to the two shifted frames, of genes of bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses. This set X has an interesting mathematical property, since X is a maximal C 3 self-complementary trinucleotide circular code. Furthermore, any motif obtained from this circular code X has the capacity to retrieve, maintain and synchronize the original (reading frame. Since 1996, the theory of circular codes in genes has mainly been developed by analysing the properties of the 20 trinucleotides of X , using combinatorics and statistical approaches. For the first time, we test this theory by analysing the X motifs, i.e., motifs from the circular code X , in the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several properties of X motifs are identified by basic statistics (at the frequency level, and evaluated by comparison to R motifs, i.e., random motifs generated from 30 different random codes R . We first show that the frequency of X motifs is significantly greater than that of R motifs in the genome of S. cerevisiae. We then verify that no significant difference is observed between the frequencies of X and R motifs in the non-coding regions of S. cerevisiae, but that the occurrence number of X motifs is significantly higher than R motifs in the genes (protein-coding regions. This property is true for all cardinalities of X motifs (from 4 to 20 and for all 16 chromosomes. We further investigate the distribution of X motifs in the three frames of S. cerevisiae genes and show that they occur more frequently in the reading frame, regardless of their cardinality or their length. Finally, the ratio of X genes, i.e., genes with at least one X motif, to non- X genes, in the set of verified genes is significantly different to that observed in the set of putative or dubious genes with no experimental evidence. These results, taken together

  12. Enrichment of Circular Code Motifs in the Genes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Christian J; Ngoune, Viviane Nguefack; Poch, Olivier; Ripp, Raymond; Thompson, Julie D

    2017-12-03

    A set X of 20 trinucleotides has been found to have the highest average occurrence in the reading frame, compared to the two shifted frames, of genes of bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses. This set X has an interesting mathematical property, since X is a maximal C3 self-complementary trinucleotide circular code. Furthermore, any motif obtained from this circular code X has the capacity to retrieve, maintain and synchronize the original (reading) frame. Since 1996, the theory of circular codes in genes has mainly been developed by analysing the properties of the 20 trinucleotides of X, using combinatorics and statistical approaches. For the first time, we test this theory by analysing the X motifs, i.e., motifs from the circular code X, in the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Several properties of X motifs are identified by basic statistics (at the frequency level), and evaluated by comparison to R motifs, i.e., random motifs generated from 30 different random codes R. We first show that the frequency of X motifs is significantly greater than that of R motifs in the genome of S. cerevisiae . We then verify that no significant difference is observed between the frequencies of X and R motifs in the non-coding regions of S. cerevisiae , but that the occurrence number of X motifs is significantly higher than R motifs in the genes (protein-coding regions). This property is true for all cardinalities of X motifs (from 4 to 20) and for all 16 chromosomes. We further investigate the distribution of X motifs in the three frames of S. cerevisiae genes and show that they occur more frequently in the reading frame, regardless of their cardinality or their length. Finally, the ratio of X genes, i.e., genes with at least one X motif, to non-X genes, in the set of verified genes is significantly different to that observed in the set of putative or dubious genes with no experimental evidence. These results, taken together, represent the first

  13. Reducing the n-gram feature space of class C GPCRs to subtype-discriminating patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    König Caroline

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are a large and heterogeneous superfamily of receptors that are key cell players for their role as extracellular signal transmitters. Class C GPCRs, in particular, are of great interest in pharmacology. The lack of knowledge about their full 3-D structure prompts the use of their primary amino acid sequences for the construction of robust classifiers, capable of discriminating their different subtypes. In this paper, we investigate the use of feature selection techniques to build Support Vector Machine (SVM-based classification models from selected receptor subsequences described as n-grams. We show that this approach to classification is useful for finding class C GPCR subtype-specific motifs.

  14. Essential oils from Calyptranthes concinna, C. lucida and C. rubella (Myrtaceae Óleos essenciais de Calyptranthes concinna, C. lucida and C. rubella (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Pereira Limberger

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils from Calyptranthes concinna, C. lucida and C. rubella, collected in Southern Brazil, were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Sixty-two compounds were identified representing about 98% of the oil contents. All samples were rich in cyclic sesquiterpenes (more than 90 %, mainly those from cadinane, bisabolane and germacrane cyclization pathway. The mainly components characterized were bicyclogermacrene (22.1% in C. concinna;11.7% in C. rubella, cis-calamenene (10.3% in C. concinna, beta-caryophyllene (16.5% in C. rubella; 9.4% in C. lucida, beta-bisabolene (25.5% in C. lucida, spathulenol (15.4% in C. rubella and caryophyllene oxide (7.6% in C. concinna.Os óleos essenciais de Calyptranthes concinna, C. lucida e C. rubella, coletadas no sul do Brasil, foram analisados por GC/FID e GC/MS. Sessenta e dois constituintes foram identificados representando cerca de 98% do óleo. Todas as amostras mostraram-se ricas em sesquiterpenos cíclicos (mais de 90%, principalmente aquelas da via de ciclização dos cadinanos, bisabolanos e germacranos. Os principais constituintes caracterizados foram biciclogermacreno (22,1% em C. concinna; 11,7% em C. rubella, cis-calameneno (10,3% em C. concinna, betacariofileno (16,5% em C. rubella; 9,4% em C. lucida, beta-bisaboleno (25,5% em C. lucida, espatulenol (15,4% em C. rubella e óxido de cariofileno (7,6% em C. concinna.

  15. Thermal effect of TiC in the Mo/TiC/SiC system at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, Jerome; Audubert, Fabienne; Le Petitcorps, Yann

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect induced by the addition of a TiC interlayer on the stability of the Mo/SiC system at high temperature. Indeed, Mo/SiC couple is unstable at high temperature with formation of Mo 2 C and Mo 5 Si 3 C x phases. In order to limit the degradation of Mo mechanical properties, a TiC film was inserted between Mo and SiC. Samples used in this work were prepared on metallic wires substrates, SiC and TiC being deposited by CVD. The protection given by TiC layer was considered in the 1473-1673 K temperature range and for TiC thicknesses up to about 60 μm. From our results, TiC is not effective enough to mitigate C and Si atoms diffusion. Nevertheless, a notable reduction of the reaction extent is obtained at any temperatures. The so-observed effect depends on the TiC thickness and the temperature. In actual fact, TiC efficiency increases when temperature and/or TiC layer thickness increases without reaching a complete protection.

  16. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  17. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  18. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  19. The Λc(2860), Λc(2880), Ξc(3055) and Ξc(3080) as D-wave baryon states in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we tentatively assign the Λc (2860), Λc (2880), Ξc (3055) and Ξc (3080) to be the D-wave baryon states with the spin-parity JP = 3/2+, 5/2 +, 3/2+ and 5/2+, respectively, and study their masses and pole residues with the QCD sum rules in a systematic way by constructing three-types interpolating currents with the quantum numbers (Lρ ,Lλ) = (0 , 2), (2 , 0) and (1 , 1), respectively. The present predictions favor assigning the Λc (2860), Λc (2880), Ξc (3055) and Ξc (3080) to be the D-wave baryon states with the quantum numbers (Lρ ,Lλ) = (0 , 2) and JP = 3/2+, 5/2+, 3/2+ and 5/2+, respectively. While the predictions for the masses of the (Lρ ,Lλ) = (2 , 0) and (1 , 1) D-wave Λc and Ξc states can be confronted to the experimental data in the future.

  20. Functional analysis of the murine cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue M33: ablation of constitutive signaling is associated with an attenuated phenotype in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Ruth; Sharp, Emma; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2007-01-01

    the salivary glands. In this study, we probed N- and C-terminal regions of M33 as well as known 7TMR signature motifs in transmembrane (TM) II and TM III to determine the impact on cell surface expression, constitutive signaling, and in vivo phenotype. The region between amino acids R(340) and A(353) of the C...

  1. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  2. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  3. Beginning C

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Ivor

    2013-01-01

    Beginning C, 5th Edition teaches you how to program using the widely-available C language. You'll begin from first-principles and progress through step-by-step examples to become a competent, C-language programmer. All you need are this book and any of the widely available free or commercial C or C++ compilers, and you'll soon be writing real C programs. C is a foundational language that every programmer ought to know. C is the basis for C# used in Microsoft .NET programming. It is the basis for Objective-C used in programming for the iPhone, the iPad, and other Apple devices. It is the basis

  4. SystemC and systemC-AMS in practice systemC 2.3, 2.2 and systemC-AMS 1.0

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Amal

    2013-01-01

    This book describes how engineers can make optimum use of the two industry standard analysis/design tools, SystemC and SystemC-AMS.  The authors use a system-level design approach, emphasizing how SystemC and SystemC-AMS features can be exploited most effectively to analyze/understand a given electronic system and explore the design space. The approach taken by this book enables system engineers to concentrate on only those SystemC/SystemC-AMS features that apply to their particular problem, leading to more efficient design. The presentation includes numerous, realistic and complete examples,

  5. Transduplication resulted in the incorporation of two protein-coding sequences into the Turmoil-1 transposable element of C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pupko Tal

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements may acquire unrelated gene fragments into their sequences in a process called transduplication. Transduplication of protein-coding genes is common in plants, but is unknown of in animals. Here, we report that the Turmoil-1 transposable element in C. elegans has incorporated two protein-coding sequences into its inverted terminal repeat (ITR sequences. The ITRs of Turmoil-1 contain a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM that originated from the rsp-2 gene and a fragment from the protein-coding region of the cpg-3 gene. We further report that an open reading frame specific to C. elegans may have been created as a result of a Turmoil-1 insertion. Mutations at the 5' splice site of this open reading frame may have reactivated the transduplicated RRM motif. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dan Graur and William Martin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section.

  6. Hot pressing of B4C/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, F.C.; Turhan, E.; Yesilcubuk, S.A.; Addemir, O.

    2005-01-01

    B 4 C/SiC ceramic composites containing 10-20-30 vol % SiC were prepared by hot pressing method. The effect of SiC addition and hot pressing temperature on sintering behaviour and mechanical properties of hot pressed composites were investigated. Microstructures of hot pressed samples were examined by SEM technique. Three different temperatures (2100 deg. C, 2200 deg. C and 2250 deg. C) were used to optimize hot pressing temperature applying 100 MPa pressure under argon atmosphere during the sintering procedure. The highest relative density of 98.44 % was obtained by hot pressing at 2250 deg. C. However, bending strengths of B 4 C/SiC composite samples were lower than monolithic B 4 C in all experimental conditions. (authors)

  7. Molecular dynamic simulation of the self-assembly of DAP12-NKG2C activating immunoreceptor complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    Full Text Available The DAP12-NKG2C activating immunoreceptor complex is one of the multisubunit transmembrane protein complexes in which ligand-binding receptor chains assemble with dimeric signal-transducing modules through non-covalent associations in their transmembrane (TM domains. In this work, both coarse grained and atomistic molecular dynamic simulation methods were applied to investigate the self-assembly dynamics of the transmembrane domains of the DAP12-NKG2C activating immunoreceptor complex. Through simulating the dynamics of DAP12-NKG2C TM heterotrimer and point mutations, we demonstrated that a five-polar-residue motif including: 2 Asps and 2 Thrs in DAP12 dimer, as well as 1 Lys in NKG2C TM plays an important role in the assembly structure of the DAP12-NKG2C TM heterotrimer. Furthermore, we provided clear evidences to exclude the possibility that another NKG2C could stably associate with the DAP12-NKG2C heterotrimer. Based on the simulation results, we proposed a revised model for the self-assembly of DAP12-NKG2C activating immunoreceptor complex, along with a plausible explanation for the association of only one NKG2C with a DAP12 dimer.

  8. Detecting remote sequence homology in disordered proteins: discovery of conserved motifs in the N-termini of Mononegavirales phosphoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Karlin

    Full Text Available Paramyxovirinae are a large group of viruses that includes measles virus and parainfluenza viruses. The viral Phosphoprotein (P plays a central role in viral replication. It is composed of a highly variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved C-terminus. A second viral protein alternatively expressed, the V protein, also contains the N-terminus of P, fused to a zinc finger. We suspected that, despite their high variability, the N-termini of P/V might all be homologous; however, using standard approaches, we could previously identify sequence conservation only in some Paramyxovirinae. We now compared the N-termini using sensitive sequence similarity search programs, able to detect residual similarities unnoticeable by conventional approaches. We discovered that all Paramyxovirinae share a short sequence motif in their first 40 amino acids, which we called soyuz1. Despite its short length (11-16aa, several arguments allow us to conclude that soyuz1 probably evolved by homologous descent, unlike linear motifs. Conservation across such evolutionary distances suggests that soyuz1 plays a crucial role and experimental data suggest that it binds the viral nucleoprotein to prevent its illegitimate self-assembly. In some Paramyxovirinae, the N-terminus of P/V contains a second motif, soyuz2, which might play a role in blocking interferon signaling. Finally, we discovered that the P of related Mononegavirales contain similarly overlooked motifs in their N-termini, and that their C-termini share a previously unnoticed structural similarity suggesting a common origin. Our results suggest several testable hypotheses regarding the replication of Mononegavirales and suggest that disordered regions with little overall sequence similarity, common in viral and eukaryotic proteins, might contain currently overlooked motifs (intermediate in length between linear motifs and disordered domains that could be detected simply by comparing orthologous proteins.

  9. Cell intrinsic immunity spreads to bystander cells via the intercellular transfer of cGAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Hemmerling, Inga; Horvath, Gabor L; Schmidt, Tobias; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit

    2013-11-28

    The innate immune defence of multicellular organisms against microbial pathogens requires cellular collaboration. Information exchange allowing immune cells to collaborate is generally attributed to soluble protein factors secreted by pathogen-sensing cells. Cytokines, such as type I interferons (IFNs), serve to alert non-infected cells to the possibility of pathogen challenge. Moreover, in conjunction with chemokines they can instruct specialized immune cells to contain and eradicate microbial infection. Several receptors and signalling pathways exist that couple pathogen sensing to the induction of cytokines, whereas cytosolic recognition of nucleic acids seems to be exquisitely important for the activation of type I IFNs, master regulators of antiviral immunity. Cytosolic DNA is sensed by the receptor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyses the synthesis of the second messenger cGAMP(2'-5'). This molecule in turn activates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident receptor STING, thereby inducing an antiviral state and the secretion of type I IFNs. Here we find in murine and human cells that cGAS-synthesized cGAMP(2'-5') is transferred from producing cells to neighbouring cells through gap junctions, where it promotes STING activation and thus antiviral immunity independently of type I IFN signalling. In line with the limited cargo specificity of connexins, the proteins that assemble gap junction channels, most connexins tested were able to confer this bystander immunity, thus indicating a broad physiological relevance of this local immune collaboration. Collectively, these observations identify cGAS-triggered cGAMP(2'-5') transfer as a novel host strategy that serves to rapidly convey antiviral immunity in a transcription-independent, horizontal manner.

  10. Preparation and oxidation protection of CVD SiC/a-BC/SiC coatings for 3D C/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongsheng; Zhang Litong; Cheng Laifei; Yang Wenbin; Zhang Weihua; Xu Yongdong

    2009-01-01

    An amorphous boron carbide (a-BC) coating was prepared by LPCVD process from BCl 3 -CH 4 -H 2 -Ar system. XPS result showed that the boron concentration was 15.0 at.%, and carbon was 82.0 at.%. One third of boron was distributed to a bonding with carbon and 37.0 at.% was dissolved in graphite lattice. A multiple-layered structure of CVD SiC/a-BC/SiC was coated on 3D C/SiC composites. Oxidation tests were conducted at 700, 1000, and 1200 deg. C in 14 vol.% H 2 O/8 vol.% O 2 /78 vol.% Ar atmosphere up to 100 h. The 3D C/SiC composites with the modified coating system had a good oxidation resistance. This resulted in the high strength retained ratio of the composites even after the oxidation.

  11. Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Activation of Imidamides and Divergent Couplings with Diazo Compounds: Substrate-Controlled Synthesis of Indoles and 3H-Indoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyun; Qi, Zisong; Wang, He; Yang, Xifa; Li, Xingwei

    2016-09-19

    Indoles are an important structural motif that is commonly found in biologically active molecules. In this work, conditions for divergent couplings between imidamides and acceptor-acceptor diazo compounds were developed that afforded NH indoles and 3H-indoles under ruthenium catalysis. The coupling of α-diazoketoesters afforded NH indoles by cleavage of the C(N2 )-C(acyl) bond whereas α-diazomalonates gave 3H-indoles by C-N bond cleavage. This reaction constitutes the first intermolecular coupling of diazo substrates with arenes by ruthenium-catalyzed C-H activation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. ATR-Chk1-APC/C-dependent stabilization of Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) kinase is required for DNA lesion bypass under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Mistrik, M.

    2013-01-01

    replication. Stalled DNA replication evoked stabilization of the Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) complex in a manner dependent on ATR-Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling and its interplay with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosomeCdh1 (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. Mechanistically, Chk1 kinase inactivates APC/C through...... degradation of Cdh1 upon replication block, thereby stabilizing APC/C substrates, including Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4). Furthermore, motif C of ASK (Dbf4) interacts with the N-terminal region of RAD18 ubiquitin ligase, and this interaction is required for chromatin binding of RAD18. Impaired interaction of ASK (Dbf4...

  13. Cloning and characterization of a novel human zinc finger gene, hKid3, from a C2H2-ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Li; Sun Chong; Qiu Hongling; Liu Hui; Shao Huanjie; Wang Jun; Li Wenxin

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the zinc finger genes involved in human embryonic development, we constructed a C 2 H 2 -ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library, from which a novel human gene named hKid3 was identified. The hKid3 cDNA encodes a 554 amino acid protein with an amino-terminal KRAB domain and 11 carboxyl-terminal C 2 H 2 zinc finger motifs. Northern blot analysis indicates that two hKid3 transcripts of 6 and 8.5 kb express in human fetal brain and kidney. The 6 kb transcript can also be detected in human adult brain, heart, and skeletal muscle while the 8.5 kb transcript appears to be embryo-specific. GFP-fused hKid3 protein is localized to nuclei and the ZF domain is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization. To explore the DNA-binding specificity of hKid3, an oligonucleotide library was selected by GST fusion protein of hKid3 ZF domain, and the consensus core sequence 5'-CCAC-3' was evaluated by competitive electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, The KRAB domain of hKid3 exhibits transcription repressor activity when tested in GAL4 fusion protein assay. These results indicate that hKid3 may function as a transcription repressor with regulated expression pattern during human development of brain and kidney

  14. Thieno[3,4-c]Pyrrole-4,6-Dione-Based Polymer Acceptors for High Open-Circuit Voltage All-Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shengjian; Song, Xin; Thomas, Simil; Kan, Zhipeng; Cruciani, Federico; Laquai, Fré dé ric; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Beaujuge, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    limits the perspectives to meet the 10% efficiency threshold in all-polymer solar cells. This report examines two polymer acceptor analogs composed of thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD) and 3,4-difluorothiophene ([2F]T) motifs, and their BHJ solar cell

  15. Interfacial characterization of CVI-SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.; Kohyama, A.; Noda, T.; Katoh, Y.; Hinoki, T.; Araki, H.; Yu, J.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the interfaces of two families of chemical vapor infiltration SiC/SiC composites, advanced Tyranno-SA and Hi-Nicalon fibers reinforced SiC/SiC composites with various carbon and SiC/C interlayers, were investigated by single fiber push-out/push-back tests. Interfacial debonding and fibers sliding mainly occurred adjacent to the first carbon layer on the fibers. The interfacial debonding strengths and frictional stresses for both Tyranno-SA/SiC and Hi-Nicalon/SiC composites were correlated with the first carbon layer thickness. Tyranno-SA/SiC composites exhibited much larger interfacial frictional stresses compared to Hi-Nicalon/SiC composites. This was assumed to be mainly contributed by the rather rough surface of the Tyranno-SA fiber

  16. Stereochemical preference of yeast epoxide hydrolase for the O-axial C3 epimers of 1-oxaspiro[2.5] octanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Koenst, P.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octane moiety is a common motif in many biologically active spiroepoxide compounds. Stereochemistry plays an important role in the action of these spiroepoxides, since the O-axial C3 epimers are predominantly responsible for biological activity. In view of this, the reactivity of

  17. Mechanisms controlling the temporal degradation of Nek2A and Kif18A by the APC/C-Cdc20 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Hayward, D.G.; Nilsson, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) in complex with its co-activator Cdc20 is responsible for targeting proteins for ubiquitin-mediated degradation during mitosis. The activity of APC/C-Cdc20 is inhibited during prometaphase by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) yet certain...... substrates escape this inhibition. Nek2A degradation during prometaphase depends on direct binding of Nek2A to the APC/C via a C-terminal MR dipeptide but whether this motif alone is sufficient is not clear. Here, we identify Kif18A as a novel APC/C-Cdc20 substrate and show that Kif18A degradation depends...... by the APC/C. Nek2A and the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) have an overlap in APC/C subunit requirements for binding and we propose that Nek2A binds with high affinity to apo-APC/C and is degraded by the pool of Cdc20 that avoids inhibition by the SAC....

  18. Management of C2-C3 fracture subluxation by anterior cervical approach and C2-C3 trans-cortical screw placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine injuries are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma victims. Upper cervical spine injuries account for about 24% of acute fractures and dislocations and one third of fractures occur at the level of C2, while one half of injuries occur at the C6 or C7 levels. In contrast to this approach we used the transverse cervical, platysma splitting incision at a lower (C3-C4 disc to expose the upper cervical spine particularly lower border of C3 (entry point for the screw.

  19. Effective modern C++ 42 specific ways to improve your use of C++11 and C++14

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Scott

    2015-01-01

    At first glance, C++11 and C++14 are defined by the new features they introduce, e.g., auto type declarations, move semantics, lambda expressions, and concurrency support. Information on these features is easy to come by, but learning to apply them effectively (such that the resulting software is correct, efficient, maintainable, and portable) is more challenging. That’s the role of this book. It describes how to write effective software using C++11 and C++14, i.e., using modern C++. Topics include: * The pros and cons of uniform initialization, noexcept specifications, perfect forwarding, and smart pointer make functions. * The relationships among std::move, std::forward, rvalues references, and universal references. * The most effective forms of lambda capture. * How best practices in “old” C++ programming (i.e., C++98) require revision for modern C++. Effective Modern C++ follows the proven format of Scott Meyers’ earlier Effective books (Effective C++, More Effective C++, and Effective STL), but c...

  20. Phosphorylation of the Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurC by a eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Shaun P; Weisblum, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains a single Ser/Thr kinase-phosphatase pair known as StkP-PhpP. Here, we report the interaction of StkP-PhpP with S. pneumoniae UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl:L-alanine ligase, MurC, an enzyme that synthesizes an essential intermediate of the cell wall peptidoglycan pathway. Combinatorial phage display using StkP as target selected the peptide sequence YEVCGSDTVGC as an interacting partner and subsequently confirmed by ELISA. The phage peptide sequence YEVCGSDTVGC aligns closely with the MurC motif spanning S. pneumoniae amino acid coordinates 31-37. We show that MurC is phosphorylated by StkP and that phosphoMurC is dephosphorylated by PhpP. These data suggest a link between StkP-PhpP with the coordinated regulation of cell wall biosynthesis via MurC. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. On the sintering behaviour of steel bonded TiC-Cr3C2 and TiC-Cr3C2-WC mixed carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanov, L.G.; Exner, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Powder mixtures of TiC+Cr 3 C 2 and TiC+Cr 3 C 2 + WC were hot pressed to nearly full density. The lattice parameter of the resulting cubic mixed crystal decreases linearly with increasing additions of Cr 3 C 2 and (Cr 3 C 2 +WC 1:1). Microhardness increases with Cr 3 C 2 content up to 20 wt.%. By addition of WC, microhardness is increased further and reaches a maximum value of approx. 38 000 MN/m 2 for 20 wt.% Cr 3 C 2 and 20 wt.% WC. From these solid solutions powder compositions of Ferro-TiC type were produced by milling with 55 wt.% Fe and 0.4 wt.% C. The sintering behaviour of these powders was studied in a vacuum dilatometer. The pronounced increase of shrinkage by Cr 3 C 2 and higher amounts of Cr 3 C 2 +WC dissolved in TiC previous to binder phase melting is attributed to the increased solubility of the carbide in solid iron. Presintering at 700 0 C in hydrogen has a negative influence on sintering activity and requires much higher temperatures for complete densification during subsequent vacuum sintering. (orig.) [de

  2. Irradiation effect on Nite-SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinoki, T.; Choi, Y.B.; Kohyama, A.; Ozawa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Silicon carbide (SiC) and SiC composites are significantly attractive materials for nuclear application in particular due to exceptional low radioactivity, excellent high temperature mechanical properties and chemical stability. Despite of the excellent potential of SiC/SiC composites, the prospect of industrialization has not been clear mainly due to the low productivity and the high material cost. Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) method can produce the excellent SiC/SiC composites with highly crystalline and excellent mechanical properties. It has been reported that the high purity SiC/SiC composites reinforced with highly crystalline fibers and fabricated by CVI method is very stable to neutron irradiation. However the production cost is high and it is difficult to fabricate thick and dense composites by CVI method. The novel processing called Nano-powder Infiltration and Transient Eutectic Phase (NITE) Processing has been developed based on the liquid phase sintering (LPS) process modification. The NITE processing can achieve both the excellent material quality and the low processing cost. The productivity of the processing is also excellent, and various kinds of shape and size of SiC/SiC composites can be produced by the NITE processing. The NITE processing can form highly crystalline matrix, which is requirement for nuclear application. The objective of this work is to understand irradiation effect of the NITESiC/SiC composites. The SiC/SiC composites used were reinforced with high purity SiC fibers, Tyranno TM SA and fabricated by the NITE method. The NITE-SiC/SiC composite bars and reference monolithic SiC bars fabricated by CVI and NITE were irradiated at up to 1.0 dpa and 600-1000 deg. C at JMTR, Japan. Mechanical properties of non-irradiated and irradiated NITESiC/ SiC composites bars were evaluated by tensile tests. Monolithic SiC bars were evaluated by flexural tests. The fracture surface was examined by SEM. Ultimate

  3. Investigation of Chemokine Receptor CCR2V64Il Gene Polymorphism and Migraine without Aura in the Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zandifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Migraine is a multifactorial common neurovascular disease with a polygenic inheritance. Inflammation plays an important part in migraine pathophysiology. C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 is an important chemokine for monocyte aggregation and transendothelial monocyte migration. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of migraine with CCR2V64Il polymorphism in the Iranian population. Methods. We assessed 103 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 100 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood and genotypes of CCR2V64Il gene polymorphism were determined. For measuring the severity of headache, every patient filled out the MIGSEV questionnaire. Results. There were no significant differences in the distribution of both 64Il allele and heterozygote (GA genotype of CCR2 gene polymorphism (P=0.396; OR=0.92, 95% CI = 0.50–1.67 and P=0.388; OR=0.91, 95% CI = 0.47–1.73, resp. between case and control groups. There was no significant difference of alleles frequency between three grades of MIGSEV (P=0.922. Conclusions. In conclusion our results revealed no association between CCR2V64Il polymorphism and susceptibility to migraine and also headache severity in the Iranian population.

  4. Studying of the function of expected ABC transporter Rv1458c-Rv1457c-Rv1456c in mycobacteria; Studium funkcie predpokladaneho ABC transportera Rv1458c-Rv1457c-Rv1456c v mykobakteriach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkan, M; Mikusova, K; Kordulakova, J [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra biochemie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    The bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the originator of tuberculosis in humans - is characterized by a complex cell wall, which is responsible for a high bacteria resistant to adverse external environmental conditions, as well as to the common antibiotics. The structure of the cell wall components and enzymes involved into its biosynthesis are relatively well described, but there is no information on the transfer of intermediate products of its biosynthetic across the plasmatic membrane. Orthologues of genes rv1459c-rv1458c-rv1457c-rv1456c of M. tuberculosis are in the same configuration in genomes of all previously sequenced mycobacterial strains. Rv1459c gene encodes a probable glycosyltransferases and genes rv1458c, rv1457c rv1456c code nucleotide binding and transmembrane subunits of expected ABC transporter. In our work we focused on the study of the function of expected ABC transporter Rv1458c-Rv1457c-Rv1456c, through analysis of phenotypes of strains M. Smegmatis. They have orthologues of genes encoding the transmembrane subunits of this transporter suspended by fragment encoding resistance to kanamycin. (authors)

  5. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  6. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  7. Dicty_cDB: CHH542 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 35.1 UCRCS08_0003L02_f Parent Washington Navel Orange Callus cDNA Library UCRCS08...cDNA library - UCR Poncirus trifoliata cDNA clone UCRPT01_02_C04, mRNA sequence. 40 0.002 2 CV714035 |CV7140

  8. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  9. Measurements of psi -> K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c. and psi -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Duan, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. 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S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV and collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present studies of the decays psi(3686) -> K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c.

  10. $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ As the Lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ State

    CERN Document Server

    Lebed, Richard F.

    2016-05-23

    The state $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ has recently been demoted by the Particle Data Group from its previous status as the conventional $c\\bar c$ $2 {}^3P_0$ state, largely due to the absence of expected $D\\bar D$ decays. We propose that $\\chi^{\\vphantom\\dagger}_{c0}(3915)$ is actually the lightest $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state, and calculate the spectrum of such states using the diquark model, identifying many of the observed charmoniumlike states that lack open-charm decay modes as $c\\bar c s \\bar s$. Among other results, we argue that $Y(4140)$ is a $J^{PC} = 1^{++}$ $c\\bar c s \\bar s$ state that has been not been seen in two-photon fusion largely as a consequence of the Landau-Yang theorem.

  11. Isomerisation of c4-c6 aldoses with zeolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to isomerization of C4-C6 aldoses to their corresponding C4-C6 ketoses. In particular, the invention concerns isomerization of C4-C6 aldoses over solid zeolite catalysts free of any metals other than aluminum, in the presence of suitable solvent(s) at suitable elevated...... temperatures. C6 and C5 aldose sugars such as glucose and xylose, which are available in large amounts from biomass precursors, are isomerized to fructose and xylulose respectively, in a one or two-step process over inexpensive commercially available zeolite catalysts, containing aluminum as the only metal...

  12. Development of Novel Promiscuous Anti-Chemokine Peptibodies for Treating Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Abraham

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines and their receptors play critical roles in the progression of autoimmunity and inflammation. Typically, multiple chemokines are involved in the development of these pathologies. Indeed, targeting single chemokines or chemokine receptors has failed to achieve significant clinical benefits in treating autoimmunity and inflammation. Moreover, the binding of host atypical chemokine receptors to multiple chemokines as well as the binding of chemokine-binding proteins secreted by various pathogens can serve as a strategy for controlling inflammation. In this work, promiscuous chemokine-binding peptides that could bind and inhibit multiple inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL9/10/11, were selected from phage display libraries. These peptides were cloned into human mutated immunoglobulin Fc-protein fusions (peptibodies. The peptibodies BKT120Fc and BKT130Fc inhibited the ability of inflammatory chemokines to induce the adhesion and migration of immune cells. Furthermore, BKT120Fc and BKT130Fc also showed a significant inhibition of disease progression in a variety of animal models for autoimmunity and inflammation. Developing a novel class of antagonists that can control the courses of diseases by selectively blocking multiple chemokines could be a novel way of generating effective therapeutics.

  13. Review of the thermodynamics of the U--C, Pu--C, and U--Pu--C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetenbaum, M.; Sheth, A.; Olson, W.

    1975-06-01

    Thermodynamic properties such as enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, heat and free energy of formation, and vaporization behavior are presented for the U--C, Pu--C, and U--Pu--C systems. These properties are of interest to scientists and engineers involved in the expanding field of advanced fuel LMFBR systems. The information on these systems has been derived largely from the discussions of the IAEA Panel on the assessment of thermodynamic properties of the U--C, Pu--C, and U--Pu--C systems. (U.S.)

  14. BURNER RIG TESTING OF A500 C/SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-17

    AFRL-RX-WP-TR-2018-0071 BURNER RIG TESTING OF A500® C /SiC Larry P. Zawada Universal Technology Corporation Jennifer Pierce UDRI...TITLE AND SUBTITLE BURNER RIG TESTING OF A500® C /SiC 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6...test program characterized the durability behavior of A500® C /SiC ceramic matrix composite material at room and elevated temperature. Specimens were

  15. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-02-20

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

  16. χ_{c1} and χ_{c2} Resonance Parameters with the Decays χ_{c1,c2}→J/ψμ^{+}μ^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

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