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Sample records for chemoinduced multidrug resistance

  1. Radiation- and chemoinduced multidrug resistance in colon carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkowiak, Detlef; Stempfhuber, Michael; Wiegel, Thomas; Bottke, Dirk [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Background and purpose: radiation can induce multidrug resistance (MDR) and thus interfere with simultaneous or subsequent chemotherapy. In SW620 colon carcinoma cells, the interrelation of various biological endpoints of MDR was analyzed and the potential of fractionated irradiation and chemoselection to evoke MDR was compared. Material and methods: to induce/select an MDR phenotype, SW620 were exposed to either 27 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions or to 50% inhibiting concentrations of doxorubicin or cisplatin, given over 6-15 weeks. Expression of genes involved in MDR, including glutathione metabolism, was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). Efflux was analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with rhodamine-123 or 5-chloromethyl fluorescein diacetate. Apoptosis was monitored after pulse exposure to doxorubicin or cisplatin. Colony-forming assays were performed under continuous drug exposure. Results: a pronounced gene induction was found in MRP2 after cisplatin selection and up to 3 weeks after radiation. LRP was activated only shortly after radiation. Radiation enhanced rhodamine-123 efflux to a similar extent as short-term chemoselection but not as much as long-term drug exposure. Drug-induced apoptosis was slightly delayed in preirradiated cells. Clonogenic growth in the progeny of irradiated cells was less sensitive to cisplatin but not to doxorubicin. Conclusion: fractionated radiation can induce an MDR phenotype in SW620. However, long-term drug exposure establishes a more efficient selection. Various endpoints are not fully concordant regarding the extent of MDR. Posttranscriptional modifications, pleiotropic regulation, and alternative pathways may cause these discrepancies. (orig.)

  2. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-28

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.  Created: 10/28/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/28/2008.

  4. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Gaviria Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: tuberculosis is an increasing problem of global health and the microbialdrug resistance a generating element of worry.Clinical case: 19 year-old patient, who admitted to the emergency room for presentinghemoptysis and who had history of pulmonary tuberculosis with irregular treatment.Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was documented and different strategies of availablemedical treatment were considered. Due to the increased epidemiological risk and thehistory of poor adherence to the treatment, an in-hospital treatment was carried outwith a satisfactory response.Conclusion: multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a social risk, keeping the route oftransmission of the disease. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2013;4(1:159-164RESUMEN:Introducción: la tuberculosis (TB pulmonar es un problema creciente de saludmundial y la resistencia a los antibióticos un elemento de preocupación.Caso clínico: paciente de 19 años, quien ingresó al servicio de urgencias por presentarhemoptisis. Antecedente de TB con tratamiento irregular. Se documentó resistenciaa varios medicamentos. Se consideraron las diferentes estrategias de tratamientodisponible. Debido al elevado riesgo epidemiológico y la historia de pobre adherencia altratamiento, se realizó manejo intrahospitalario con respuesta satisfactoria.Conclusiones: la tuberculosis multirresistente (MDR-TB representa un riesgo parala comunidad, teniendo en cuenta la vía de transmisión de la entidad. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2013;4(1:159-164

  5. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  6. Multidrug resistance in ocular melanoma.

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, M.; Clynes, M.; Dunne, B; NicAmhlaoibh, R; Lee, W. R.; Barnes, C; Kennedy, S M

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Metastatic disease in patients with ocular melanoma is resistant to chemotherapy. One of the main mechanisms of modulating multidrug resistance is the expression of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) product (p-glycoprotein) by tumour cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of expression of the MDR1 gene in ocular melanoma whose primary treatment was surgical excision or enucleation. METHODS: Twelve recent ocular melanomas were received fresh, snap ...

  7. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Hendrik

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) was initially recongnized as the major cause of the failure of the drug-based treatment of human cancers. It has become increasingly clear that MDR occurs in mammalian cells but also in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The appearance of multiple antibiotic resistant micro-or

  8. Sphingolipids, rafts and multidrug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinrichs, Joann Wilhelm Jakob

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the research described in this thesis was to obtain more insight into the potential role of sphingolipids in multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. The approachinvolved the monitoring of sphingolipid dynamics in terms of metabolism and localization in relation to the acquisition

  9. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Bolhuis, Hendrik

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) was initially recongnized as the major cause of the failure of the drug-based treatment of human cancers. It has become increasingly clear that MDR occurs in mammalian cells but also in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The appearance of multiple antibiotic resistant micro-organisms forms the major cause for the re-emergence of a number of infectious diseases that were believed to be controlled or totally exterminated. ... Zie: Summary

  10. Drugs reverting multidrug resistance (chemosensitizers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Scienze Farmaceutiche

    1996-12-01

    Drug resistance is a phenomenon that frequently impairs proper treatment of cancer. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a particular case of acquired drug resistance, resulting from overexpression of a protein (P-170) that functions as a pump, clearing cells from the chemotherapic. The P-170 protein functions can be inhibited by a variety of lipophilic drugs containing a hydrophilic nitrogen, protonated at physiological pH. A considerable effort is underway to identify new drugs able to reverse MDR. Few of these molecules are already undergoing clinical trials.

  11. Sphingolipids, rafts and multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichs, Joann Wilhelm Jakob

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the research described in this thesis was to obtain more insight into the potential role of sphingolipids in multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. The approachinvolved the monitoring of sphingolipid dynamics in terms of metabolism and localization in relation to the acquisition of MDR and the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters involved in drug efflux. This research was conducted in two model cell lines, both human MDR cancer cells, over expressing eith...

  12. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get proper treatment. What is multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB)? Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) is caused by an organism that is ... poor quality. Who is at risk for getting MDR TB? Drug resistance is more common in people who: • • Do not ...

  13. [Multidrug resistance (MDR) in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvirón Rodríguez, A; Ruiz Gómez, M J; Morales Moreno, J A; Martínez Morillo, M

    1997-03-01

    Multidrug resistance or mdr is a frequent phenomenon for which tumor cells can develop, in only one step, cross-resistance to a different anticancer drugs such as antibiotics, vinca alkaloids and podophylotoxins. This is due to an extrusion of drugs out of the cells, since it is interrelated with the decrease of the intracellular concentration of the drug, compared to sensitive cells. This phenomeno of multidrug resistance (mdr) is considered one of the principal causes of failure in quimiotherapic treatment of cancer, and is associated in many cases to an hyperexpression of mdr-I gene, that codifies for a high molecular weight glycoprotein (p-170) (170-180 Kdaltons), also called p-glycoprotein (pgp). Locadet it in the cellular membrane extracts, like a pump, the quimiotherapic drugs with consumption of ATP. In humans, there are two principal genes that codify for pgp: mdr-I and mdr2/3; being the most important the mdr-I gene. The structure of p-glycoprotein consists in two symmetrical halves anchored in the cellular membrane that includes three extracellular dominances each one, and on intracellular portion with the ATP binding site. Also, has got an for extracellular carbohydrates chain. It is specially important to find drugs that reverse the multidrug resistance. Chemicals such as verapamil, nifedine, quinidine and calmodulin inhibitors are joined to pgp inhibiting it. A Cyclosporine and its non-immunosuppressors derivateds such as SDZ 280-125 and SDZ PSC 833 reverse mdr. At present it is being advancing in clinical trials, but the results are not satisfactory. Most useful chemicals are verapamil, better R-verapamil and A-cyclosporine or its non-immunosuppressors derivates. Futures possibilities are grateful. From diagnostic point of view the mains are: 1. Detection of mdr-I gene. 2. Recognition of the presence of mRNA for pgp. 3. Detection of pgp by flow cytometry or western blot. 4. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to pgp. 5. Rhodamine 123 to

  14. [Proteins in cancer multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popęda, Marta; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug Resistance (MDR) is defined as insensitivity to administered medicines that are structurally unrelated and have different molecular targets. Cancers possess numerous mechanisms of drug resistance, involving various aspects of cell biology. A pivotal role in this phenomenon is played by proteins--enzymatic or structural parts of the cell. Membrane transporters, including the main members of ABC protein family--P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP, as well as LRP, which builds structure of vaults, determine the multidrug-resistant phenotype by decreasing drug concentration within the cell or modifying its distribution to intracellular compartments. The π isoform of protein enzyme--glutathione S-transferase (GSTP-1), is responsible for excessive intensity of detoxification of cytostatics. A common example of altered drug target site that does not respond to chemotherapy is topoisomerase II α (TopoIIa). Alterations of programmed cell death result from expression of metallothionein (MT)--inhibitor of the process, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), which, if in high concentration, also prevents apoptosis of cells. Several methods of decreasing activity of these proteins have been developed, aiming to overcome MDR in cancer cells. However, for a variety of reasons, their clinical suitability is still very low, leading to continuous increase in death rate among patients. This paper presents current state of knowledge on the most important examples of proteins responsible for MDR of cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of their action. PMID:24864112

  15. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nafees Ahmad; Arshad Javaid; Syed Azhar Syed Sulaiman; Long Chiau Ming; Izaz Ahmad; Amer Hayat Khan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. Objective To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosi...

  16. Imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dizdarevic, S.; Peters, A M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Primary intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful cancer treatment. Functional molecular imaging of MDR in cancer using single photon or positron emitters may be helpful to identify multidrug-resistant tumours and predict not only those patients who are resistant to treatment, with a clinically unfavourable prognosis, but also those who are susceptible to the development of drug toxicity or even certain tumours . Variations in the mdr1 ge...

  17. Multidrug Resistance: Physiological Principles and Nanomedical Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Kunjachan, Sijumon; Rychlik, Błażej; Storm,Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug (MDR) resistance is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the ...

  18. The ABCs of multidrug resistance in malaria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Kavishe, R.A.; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Expanding drug resistance could become a major problem in malaria treatment, as only a limited number of effective antimalarials are available. Drug resistance has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms and an increased copy number of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), an ATP-bindi

  19. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunjachan, S.; Rychlik, B.; Storm, G.; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which

  20. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  1. Cytokine-mediated reversal of multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Ulrike; Walther, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of the multidrug resistance phenotype still represents a limiting factor for successful cancer chemotherapy. Numerous efforts have been made to develop strategies for reversal and/or modulation of this major therapy obstacle through targeting at different levels of intervention. The phenomenon of MDR is often associated with overexpression of resistance-associated genes. Since the classical type of MDR in human cancers is mainly mediated by the P-glycoprotein encoded by the mul...

  2. Bacterial multidrug resistance mediated by a homologue of the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, WN; Poelarends, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters known to date are of eukaryotic origin, such as the P-glycoproteins (Pgps) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). Only one well-characterized ABC multidrug transporter, LmrA, is of bacterial origin. On the basis of its structural a

  3. Primary disseminated extrapulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated tuberculosis is a common mode of presentation of tuberculosis in patients both with and without HIV/AIDS in India. However, primary multidrug resistance in disseminated tuberculosis involving only the extrapulmonary sites in an immunocompetent adult is rare. Here, we report a case of a 19-year-old man who had disseminated tuberculosis involving left pleura, pericardium, peritoneum and intraabdominal lymph nodes. He was initially taking WHO category I antituberculous drugs, but was not responding in spite of 5 months of chemotherapy. Culture of the pleural biopsy specimen grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis which was resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin. He was put on therapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis,following 24 months of chemotherapyhe had an uneventful recovery.

  4. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  5. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  6. Multi-drug resistant Ewingella Americana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of pneumonia due to multi-drug resistant Ewingella Americana in a young patient admitted in the Intensive Care Unit of Hera General Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia with severe head injury in a road traffic accident. He was an Indonesian pilgrim who had traveled to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to perform Hajj in December 2007. Ewingella Americana was identified to be the pathogen of pneumonia with clinical signs and symptoms along with positive radiological findings. (author)

  7. Multidrug Resistance: An Emerging Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Tanwar; Shrayanee Das; Zeeshan Fatima; Saif Hameed

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable i...

  8. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance

  9. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Koo; Yoo, Young Do

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance.

  10. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 μM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [γ-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance

  11. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  12. Congenital Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espiritu, Nora; Aguirre, Lino; Jave, Oswaldo; Sanchez, Luis; Kirwan, Daniela E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in a Peruvian infant. His mother was diagnosed with disseminated TB, and treatment commenced 11 days postpartum. The infant was diagnosed with TB after 40 days and died at 2 months and 2 days of age. Congenital transmission of TB to the infant was suspected, because direct postpartum transmission was considered unlikely; also, thorough screening of contacts for TB was negative. Spoligotyping confirmed that both mother and baby were infected with identical strains of the Beijing family (SIT1). PMID:24821847

  13. Trends in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. F. Dias-Baptista

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is an increasing global problem. The extent and burden of MDR-TB varies significantly from country to country and region to region. Globally, about three per cent of all newly diagnosed patients have MDR-TB and the proportion is higher in patients who had previously received anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB treatment reflecting the failure of programs designed to ensure complete cure of patients with tuberculosis. The management of MDR-TB is a challenge that should be undertaken by experienced clinicians at centers equipped with reliable laboratory services and implementation of DOTS-Plus strategy.

  14. [Innovative treatments for multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Tattevin; Aurélien, Lorleac'h; Matthieu, Revest

    2014-03-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has accelerated sharply in the last decade. According to the World Health Organization they are responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths in Europe each year. In addition, few new antibiotics are under development, raising the spectrum of a return to the "pre-antibiotic era". Non antibiotic antibacterial agents have recently attracted renewed interest. The most promising candidates are: i) phages (bacteria-infecting viruses) have been widely used in Eastern European countries since the 1930s but come up against logistic and regulatory obstacles due to the evolutionary nature of these biologic agents, while convincing clinical data are lacking; ii) bacteriocines are smallantibacterialpeptidesproducedby numerous bacteria; some have a rapid bactericidal effect, good tolerability, and a limited impact on the commensal flora; however, clinical use of bacteriocines is complicated by their fragility, poor penetration, and substantial risk of resistance selection ; iii) antisense oligonucleo tides act by inactivating genes through specific interaction with a complementary DNA or RNA fragment, potentially allowing specific inhibition of selected bacterial virulence factors. However, this therapeutic class may be more suitable for viral or genetic diseases than for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, owing to the difficulty of delivering them inside bacteria. PMID:26427289

  15. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of 99mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of 99mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure

  16. Clinical imaging of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Vecchi, S.; Ciarmiello, A.; Salvatore, M. [Naples Univ. Federico 2. (Italy). Medicina Nucleare. Dipt. di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali

    1999-06-01

    The most well-characterized mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane protein acting as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. The recognition of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi and other lipophilic cations as transport substrates for Pgp provided the necessary tool for the clinical assessment of Pgp function in patients with cancer. Many clinical studies from different institutions and trials including variety of malignancies indicate that both tumor uptake and clearance of {sup 9}9mTc-Sestamibi are correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of multidrug resistance. Although both parameters may predict tumor responsible to chemotherapy, the extraction of efflux rate constants appeared o provide a more direct index of Pgp function as compared tp tracer uptake ratio allowing to trace a continuous spectrum of drug transport activity. Preliminary studies the use of MDR imaging agents to monitor the modulating ability of revertant compounds. Although the results support the feasibility of this approach, the alteration of tracer pharmacokinetics induced by the modulators certainly constitute a challenge in the development of a simple functional test suitable in clinical practice. The extension of the acquired imaging methodology to tumors with redundant intrinsic resistant mechanism. Due to multifactorial nature of phenomenon, the development of new tracers with substrate specificity for other known the complex array of cellular mechanisms contributing to treatment failure.

  17. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant 'Superbugs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahper N; Khan, Asad U

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to "escape" from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  18. Is Resistance Useless? Multidrug Resistance and Collateral Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Matthew D.; Handley, Misty D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    When cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, it is frequently conferred by the ATP-dependent efflux pump P-glycoprotein (MDR1, P-gp, ABCB1). P-gp can efflux a wide range of cancer drugs; thus its expression confers cross-resistance, termed multidrug resistance (MDR), to a wide range of drugs. Strategies to overcome this resistance have been actively sought for over 30 years, yet no clinical solutions exist. A less understood aspect of MDR is the hypersensitivity of resistant can...

  19. Multidrug resistance mediated by a bacterial homolog of the human multidrug transporter MDR1.

    OpenAIRE

    van Veen, Hendrik W.; Venema, Koen; Bolhuis, Henk; Oussenko, Irina; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Resistance of Lactococcus lactis to cytotoxic compounds shares features with the multidrug resistance phenotype of mammalian tumor cells. Here, we report the gene cloning and functional characterization in Escherichia coli of LmrA, a lactococcal structural and functional homolog of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1. LmrA is a 590-aa polypeptide that has a putative topology of six alpha-helical transmembrane segments in the N-terminal hydrophobic domain, followed by a hydrophi...

  20. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this. PMID:25511378

  1. [Multidrug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Ben Salah, Dorra; Besbes, Makram; Mahjoubi, Faouzia; Ghozzi, Rafiaa; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hammami, Adnène

    2002-01-01

    The extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, especially the third generation cephalosporins (C3G), was followed by the emergence of newer plasmid mediated betalactamases called extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs). To assess the impact of K. pneumoniae resistant to 3GC in Tunisia, this study was conducted in 3 teaching hospitals. A total of 1110 strains of K pneumoniae was collected. The antibiotics susceptibilities were tested by diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar. The quality control was regularly performed. I ESBLs producing solates were detected using the double-disc synergy test. Data analysis was done using the Whonet 4 software. 23.6% K. pneumoniae isolates showed phenotype pattern of ESBLs producers. The double-disc synergy test was positive in 75% of the cases. These isolates were recovered from hospitalized patients in different wards but mainly from pediatrics (23.6%), medicine (23.2%), surgery (22.9%), intensive care units (11%) and neonatology (11%). 54% were isolated from urines, 22% from blood cultures. These isolates remained susceptible to imipenem (100%) and most of them to cefoxitin (96.4%) but all had associated resistance to aminoglycosides, quinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The prevalence of multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae is high. This resistance can be minimized by the implementation of infection control measures including handwashing and isolation procedures. PMID:12071040

  2. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a case report of 26 years old pregnant woman with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), treated at outpatient department of New Delhi Tuberculosis (NDTB) Centre, India with second line agents. Before presentation at NDTB Centre, she had been treated with first line drugs for approximately one and-a-half-year, including category II re-treatment DOTS regimen under RNTCP. Patient conceived twice during her anti-TB treatment. The first one was during her category II treatment, when put on second line drugs. We describe congenital abnormalities documented in her second child exposed in-utero to second line anti-tubercular drugs with a brief review of treatment of MDR TB in pregnancy. (author)

  3. Tandutinib (MLN518) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the multidrug resistance protein 7 (ABCC10)

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Wen; Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Jun-Jiang; KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; SUN, YUE-LI; CHEN, HAI-FAN; Fu, Li-wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major mechanisms that causes resistance to antineoplastic drugs in cancer cells. ABC transporters can significantly decrease the intracellular concentration of antineoplastic drugs by increasing their efflux, thereby lowering their cytotoxic activity. One of these transporters, the multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7/ABCC10), has already been shown to produce resistance to ant...

  4. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Tingfu; Guo Zhenhua; Liang Rui; Guo Yuxia; Xu Youhua; Jin Xianqing; Zhao Lihua; Sun Yanhui; Ding Xionghui

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP) (Ad-GFP-HA117), the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MD...

  5. Risk factors for acquired multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barroso Elizabeth Clara; Mota Rosa Maria Salani; Santos Raimunda Oliveira; Sousa Ana Lúcia Oliveira; Barroso Joana Brasileiro; Rodrigues Jorge Luís Nobre

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a severe and feared problem, that is difficult to control and has shown a tendency to increase worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the risk factors for acquired MDR-TB. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: A retrospective population-based case-control study was conducted. A bacillus was considered multidrug-resistant whenever it was resistant at least to rifampin (RFP) + isoniazid (INH), and a case was considered as sensitive tuberculosis (TB) if it had undergone t...

  6. Drug resistance pattern in multidrug resistance pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the frequency of drug resistance profiles of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis patients, against both the first and the second line drugs. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) ward of Ojha Institute of Chest Diseases (OICD), Karachi, from 1996 to 2006. Methodology: Culture proven MDR-TB cases (resistant to both isoniazid and Rifampicin) were retrospectively reviewed. Susceptibility testing was performed at the clinical laboratory of the Aga Khan University. Sensitivity against both first and second line anti-tuberculosis drugs was done. Susceptibility testing was performed using Agar proportion method on enriched middle brook 7H10 medium (BBL) for Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Streptomycin, Ethambutol, Ethionamide, Capreomycin and Ciprofloxacin. Pyrazinamide sensitivity was carried out using the BACTEC 7H12 medium. During the study period MTB H37Rv was used as control. Results: Out of total 577 patients, all were resistant to both Rifampicin and Isoniazid (INH). 56.5% isolates were resistant to all five first line drugs. Resistances against other first line drugs was 76.60% for Pyrazinamide, 73% for Ethambutol and 68.11% for Streptomycin. Five hundred and ten (88%) cases were MDR plus resistant to one more first line drug. Forty (07%) isolates were MDR plus Quinolone-resistant. They were sensitive to Capreomycin but sensitivity against Amikacin and Kanamycin were not tested. Conclusion: There were high resistance rates in MDR-TB to remaining first line and second line drugs. Continuous monitoring of drug resistance pattern especially of MDR isolates and treatment in specialized centers is a crucial need for future TB control in Pakistan. (author)

  7. Multidrug resistance in tumour cells: characterisation of the multidrug resistant cell line K562-Lucena 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. RUMJANEK

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients. The best characterised mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein. However, the resistance process is multifactorial. Studies of multidrug resistance mechanisms have relied on the analysis of cancer cell lines that have been selected and present cross-reactivity to a broad range of anticancer agents. This work characterises a multidrug resistant cell line, originally selected for resistance to the Vinca alkaloid vincristine and derived from the human erythroleukaemia cell K562. This cell line, named Lucena 1, overexpresses P-glycoprotein and have its resistance reversed by the chemosensitisers verapamil, trifluoperazine and cyclosporins A, D and G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylene blue was capable of partially reversing the resistance in this cell line. On the contrary, the use of 5-fluorouracil increased the resistance of Lucena 1. In addition to chemotherapics, Lucena 1 cells were resistant to ultraviolet A radiation and hydrogen peroxide and failed to mobilise intracellular calcium when thapsigargin was used. Changes in the cytoskeleton of this cell line were also observed.A resistência a múltiplos fármacos é o principal obstáculo no tratamento de pacientes com câncer. O mecanismo responsável pela resistência múltipla mais bem caracterizado envolve a expressão do produto do gene MDR-1, a glicoproteína P. Entretanto, o processo de resistência tem fatores múltiplos. Estudos de mecanismos de resistência m��ltipla a fármacos têm dependido da análise de linhagens celulares tumorais que foram selecionadas e apresentam reatividade cruzada a uma ampla faixa de agentes anti-tumorais. Este trabalho caracteriza uma linhagem celular com múltipla resistência a fármacos, selecionada originalmente pela resistência ao alcalóide de Vinca vincristina e derivado

  8. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate [P(BtO)2] led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)2 further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)2 induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation

  9. Multidrug resistant yeasts in synanthropic wild birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somanath Sushela

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of multidrug resistant yeasts in the faeces of synanthropic wild birds from the Bangsar suburb of Kuala Lumpur. Methods Species characterisations of yeast isolates and determinations of antimycotic susceptibility profiles were undertaken using the commercial characterization kit, Integral System Yeasts Plus (Liofilchem, Italy. Results Fourteen species of yeasts were detected in the bird faecal samples.Candida albicans was present in 28.89% of bird faecal samples, Candida krusei (13.33%, Candida tropicalis (4.44%, Candida glabrata (4.44%, Candida parapsilosis (2.22%, Candida lambica (2.22%, Candida stellatoidea (2.22%, Candida rugosa (2.22% and Candida lusitaniae (2.22%. Amongst the non-candidal yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii was present in 6.67% of bird faecal samples, Cryptococcus uniguttulatus (4.44%, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4.44%, Trichosporon pullulans (2.22%, Trichosporon pullulans/Cryptococcus albidus (8.89% and Rhodotorula rubra/Rhodotorula glutinis (4.44%. Of the isolated yeasts, 18.1% (or 26/144 were found to be resistant to all 11 antimycotic agents they were tested against i.e. Nystatin, Amphotericin B, Flucytosine, Econazole, Ketoconazole, Clotrimazole, Miconazole, Itraconazole, Voriconazole, Fluconazole 16 and Fluconazole 64. 45.8% (or 66/144 of the bird faecal yeast isolates were resistant to four or more of the 11 antimycotic agents they were tested against. Conclusions This finding is of public health significance as these synanthropic wild birds may be reservoirs for transmission of drug resistant yeast infections to humans.

  10. The imaging feature of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging features of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis by collecting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis verified by test of drug-sensitivity, which defined as resistance to three anti-tuberculosis drugs. Methods:Fifty-one cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were categorized as group of observed, and 46 cases of drug sensitive tuberculosis were categorized as control. Cultures were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in all cases with no other illness such as diabetes mellitus. All patients had chest radiographs available for review, while 64 cases had tomography and 30 cases had CT during the same time. All images were analyzed by three of the radiologists, disagreement among them was discussed and a consensus was reached. Results: There was no difference in the distribution of lesions between the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group and control group. However, the radiological findings in the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group were significantly more common than in control group, such as multiple nodules (10 cases), disseminated foci (23 cases), cavity (9 cases), and complications (10 cases). Comparing the dynamic cases, deteriorating cases were more commonly seen in observed group than in control group, while improved cases were less in observed group than in control group. Conclusion: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is the most serious tuberculosis, which is characterized with significant activity, more disseminated foci, cavity, and complications. The lesion deteriorated while correct anti-tuberculosis treatment is applied. (authors)

  11. Prognostic Significance of Multidrug Resistance Gene 1 (MDR1), Multidrug Resistance-related Protein (MRP) and Lung Resistance Protein (LRP) mRNA Expression in Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Hee Jin; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Jang, Seongsoo; Seo, Eul-Ju; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seo, Jong Jin; Moon, Hyung Nam; Ghim, Thad

    2006-01-01

    The prognostic significance of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression is controversial. We investigated whether multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) mRNA expression are associated with outcomes in acute leukemia patients. At diagnosis we examined MDR1, MRP and LRP mRNA expression in bone marrow samples from 71 acute leukemia patients (39 myeloid, 32 lymphoblastic) using nested RT-PCR. The expression of each of the...

  12. Visualization of multidrug resistance in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs, such as the drug efflux pumps, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). In this review the mechanisms involved in MDR are described and results are reviewed with particular attention to the in vivo imaging of Pgp and MRP. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However, these methods do not yield information about the dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. For the study of Pgp- and MRP-mediated transport, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available. Technetium-99m sestamibi is a substrate for Pgp and MRP, and has been used in clinical studies for tumour imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of the Pgp pump. Other 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals, such as 99mTc-tetrofosmin and several 99Tc-Q complexes, are also substrates for Pgp, but to date only results from in vitro and animal studies are available for these compounds. Several agents, including [11C]colchicine, [11C]verapamil and [11C]daunorubicin, have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo. The results suggest that radiolabelled colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin are feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumours. Uptake of [11C]colchicine and [11C]verapamil is relatively high in the chest area, reducing the value of both tracers for monitoring Pgp-mediated drug transport in tumours located in this region. In addition, it has to be borne in mind that only comparison of Pgp-mediated transport of radioalabelled substrates in the absence and in the presence of Pgp blockade gives quantitative information on Pgp-mediated pharmacokinetics. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP. Therefore, N-[11C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non

  13. Visualization of multidrug resistance in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikse, N.H. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Franssen, E.J.F. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Vries, E.G.E. de [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Vaalburg, W. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)

    1999-03-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs, such as the drug efflux pumps, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). In this review the mechanisms involved in MDR are described and results are reviewed with particular attention to the in vivo imaging of Pgp and MRP. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However, these methods do not yield information about the dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. For the study of Pgp- and MRP-mediated transport, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available. Technetium-99m sestamibi is a substrate for Pgp and MRP, and has been used in clinical studies for tumour imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of the Pgp pump. Other {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals, such as {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and several {sup 99}Tc-Q complexes, are also substrates for Pgp, but to date only results from in vitro and animal studies are available for these compounds. Several agents, including [{sup 11}C]colchicine, [{sup 11}C]verapamil and [{sup 11}C]daunorubicin, have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo. The results suggest that radiolabelled colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin are feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumours. Uptake of [{sup 11}C]colchicine and [{sup 11}C]verapamil is relatively high in the chest area, reducing the value of both tracers for monitoring Pgp-mediated drug transport in tumours located in this region. In addition, it has to be borne in mind that only comparison of Pgp-mediated transport of radioalabelled substrates in the absence and in the presence of Pgp blockade gives quantitative information on Pgp-mediated pharmacokinetics. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP. Therefore, N-[{sup 11}C]acetyl-leukotriene E

  14. Breaking the spell: Combating Multidrug resistant ‘Superbugs’

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shahper N.; Asad U Khan

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community health. Conventional antibiotics are getting increasingly ineffective as a consequence of resistance, and so it is imperative to realize new antimicrobial strategies. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported in the resistance process, the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enteroba...

  15. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shahper N.; Asad U Khan

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enteroba...

  16. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Sanath Kumar; Mun Mun Mukherjee; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is on...

  17. Biosynthesis of heterogeneous forms of multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, L M; Williams, S S; Horwitz, S B

    1987-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse macrophage-like cells, selected for resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, or taxol, overexpress antigenically related glycoproteins with distinct electrophoretic mobilities. These plasma membrane glycoproteins are likely to play a pivotal role in the expression of the multidrug resistance phenotype. To determine how these multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins differ, the biosynthesis and N-linked carbohydrate composition of these proteins were examined and compared. Vinblastineor colchicine-selected cells made a 125-kDa precursor that was rapidly processed (t1/2 approximately equal to 20 min) to mature forms of 135 and 140 kDa, respectively. Heterogeneity between the 135- and 140-kDa forms of the molecule can be attributed to N-linked carbohydrate. In contrast, taxol-selected cells made two precursors, 125 and 120 kDa, which appeared within 5 and 15 min after the onset of pulse labeling, respectively. They were processed to mature forms of 140 and 130 kDa. Since a single deglycosylated precursor or mature form was not observed after enzymatic removal of N-linked oligosaccharides, other differences, besides N-linked glycosylation, which occur in early processing compartments, are likely to account for the two multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins in taxol-selected cells. These results demonstrate that a family of multidrug resistance-associated glycoproteins can be differentially expressed. PMID:2888763

  18. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Blanco; Sara Hernando-Amado; Jose Antonio Reales-Calderon; Fernando Corona; Felipe Lira; Manuel Alcalde-Rico; Alejandra Bernardini; Maria Blanca Sanchez; Jose Luis Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of ant...

  19. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. Objective To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a programmatic management unit of drug resistant tuberculosis, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan. Two hundred and forty-three newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients consecutively enrolled for treatment at study site from January 1, 2012 to July 28, 2013 were included in the study. A standardized data collection form was used to collect patients’ socio-demographic, microbiological, and clinical data. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results High degree of drug resistance (median 5 drugs, range 2–8 was observed. High proportion of patients was resistant to all five first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (62.6%, and more than half were resistant to second line drugs (55.1%. The majority of the patients were ofloxacin resistant (52.7%. Upon multivariate analysis previous tuberculosis treatment at private (OR = 1.953, p = 0.034 and public private mix (OR = 2.824, p = 0.046 sectors were predictors of ofloxacin resistance. Conclusion The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public–private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

  20. Bedaquiline: A novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nagabushan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  1. Multidrug resistance related molecules in human and murine lung

    OpenAIRE

    Scheffer, G. L.; Pijnenborg, A C L M; Smit, E. F.; Müller, M.; Postma, D.S.; Timens, W.; van der Valk, P.; de Vries, E G E; Scheper, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Transporter proteins known to mediate multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumour cells—MDR1 P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1)—are thought to be involved in protecting the lungs against inhaled toxic pollutants. Recently, several new transporter family members have been identified—for example, MRP2, MRP3, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To study the possible contribution of these proteins and the earlier defined MDR1 and MDR3 P-gp molecules, M...

  2. Carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria cause big problems in health care. Infections with these bacteria are hard to treat and lead to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. In this PhD thesis, carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have been investigated in various se

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Andrew E.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M.; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul S; Lance B Price

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal–specific contamination.

  4. Centromere anatomy in the multidrug-resistant pathogen Enterococcus faecium

    OpenAIRE

    Derome, Andrew; Hoischen, Christian; Bussiek, Malte; Grady, Ruth; Adamczyk, Malgorzata; Kędzierska, Barbara; Diekmann, Stephan; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant variants of the opportunistic human pathogen Enterococcus have recently emerged as leading agents of nosocomial infection. The acquisition of plasmid-borne resistance genes is a driving force in antibiotic-resistance evolution in enterococci. The segregation locus of a high-level gentamicin-resistance plasmid, pGENT, in Enterococcus faecium was identified and dissected. This locus includes overlapping genes encoding PrgP, a member of the ParA superfamily of segregation pro...

  5. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is next?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Jain; Pratima Dixit

    2008-11-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis is a man made problem. While tuberculosis is hundred percent curable, multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is difficult to treat. Inadequate and incomplete treatment and poor treatment adherence has led to a newer form of drug resistance known as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, which is resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid among the first line anti tubercular drugs (MDR-TB) in addition to resistance to any fluroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second line anti tubercular drugs i.e. amikacin, kanamycin and/or capreomycin. Mismanagement of tuberculosis paves the way to drug resistant tuberculosis. Emergence of XDR-TB is reported world wide. Reported prevalence rates of XDR-TB of total MDR cases are; 6.6% overall worldwide, 6.5% in industrialized countries, 13.6% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1.5% in Asia, 0.6% in Africa and Middle East and 15.4% in Republic of Korea. Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified doctors, access to standard microbiology laboratory, co-morbitidy of HIV and tuberculosis, new anti-TB drug regimens, better diagnostic tests, international standards for second line drugs (SLD)-susceptibility testing, invention of newer anti-tubercular molecules and vaccines and knowing the real magnitude of XDR-TB are some of the important issues to be addressed for effective prevention and management of XDR-TB.

  6. Nuclear Multidrug-Resistance Related Protein 1 Contributes to Multidrug-Resistance of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Mainly via Regulating Multidrug-Resistance Protein 1: A Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Cells Model and Spearman's Rank Correlation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bolei Cai; Ye Miao; Yuan Liu; Xiaofang Xu; Sumin Guan; Junzheng Wu; Yanpu Liu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1) are both membrane-bound drug transporters. In contrast to MDR1, MRP1 also transports glutathione (GSH) and drugs conjugated to GSH. Due to its extraordinary transport properties, MRP1/ABCC1 contributes to several physiological functions and pathophysiological incidents. We previously found that nuclear translocation of MRP1 contributes to multidrug-resistance (MDR) of...

  7. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Kali, Arunava; Pradeep, Jothimani

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone. PMID:27013815

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Treating Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Resch, Stephen C; Salomon, Joshua A.; Murray, Megan; Weinstein, Milton C

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary   Background. Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most entrenched diseases on the planet—an estimated one in three people worldwide are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes the disease. Although effective drugs exist, a major reason for the failure to stem the spread of TB lies in the rise of drug-resistant strains of the bacterium. Some strains are resistant to several drugs; patients with this sort of infection are said to have multidrug-resistant (MDR) T...

  9. Immunotherapy: A useful strategy to help combat multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Curiel, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) renders cancer cells relatively invulnerable to treatment with many standard cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. Cancer immunotherapy could be an important adjunct other strategies to treat MDR positive cancers, as resistance to immunotherapy generally is unrelated to mechanisms of resistance to cytotoxic agents. Immunotherapy to combat MDR positive tumors could use any of the following strategies: direct immune attack against MDR positive cells, using MDR as an immune ta...

  10. Multidrug Resistant Shigella flexneri Infection Simulating Intestinal Intussusception

    OpenAIRE

    Srirangaraj Sreenivasan; Arunava Kali; Jothimani Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, w...

  11. Synthesis of 5-oxyquinoline derivatives for reversal of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Dittrich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of ABC (ATP binding cassette transporters is considered a powerful tool to reverse multidrug resistance. Zosuquidar featuring a difluorocyclopropyl-annulated dibenzosuberyl moiety has been found to be an inhibitor of the P-glycoprotein, one of the best-studied multidrug efflux pumps. Twelve 5-oxyisoquinoline derivatives, which are analogues of zosuquidar wherein the dibenzosuberyl-piperazine moiety is replaced by either a diarylaminopiperidine or a piperidone-derived acetal or thioacetal group, have been synthesized as pure enantiomers. Their inhibitory power has been evaluated for the bacterial multidrug-resistance ABC transporter LmrCD and fungal Pdr5. Four of the newly synthesized compounds reduced the transport activity to a higher degree than zosuquidar, being up to fourfold more efficient than the lead compound in the case of LmrCD and about two times better for Pdr5.

  12. Tailoring Cytotoxicity of Antimicrobial Peptidomimetics with High Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Vissing, Karina Juul;

    2014-01-01

    Infections with multidrug-resistant pathogens are an increasing concern for public health. Recently, subtypes of peptide-peptoid hybrids were demonstrated to display potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here, structural variation of these antibacterial peptidomimetics...... mammalian cells. Thus, lead compounds with a high selectivity toward killing of clinically important multidrug-resistant E. coli were identified....

  13. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Blanco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  14. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Veterinary Clinics, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, Sabrina; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Weiss, Reinhard; van der Reijden, Tanny; van den Broek, Peterhans; Baljer, Georg; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. in hospitalized animals was observed at the Justus-Liebig-University (Germany). Genotypic analysis of 56 isolates during 2000–2008 showed 3 clusters that corresponded to European clones I–III. Results indicate spread of genotypically related strains within and among veterinary clinics in Germany.

  15. Reduced virulence of Candida albicans mutants affected in multidrug resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, J. M.; Henry, L K; Jiang, W; Koltin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Disruption of a multidrug resistance gene (CaMDR1) in Candida albicans resulted in mutant strains that colonized mouse kidneys to very high levels but were markedly reduced in their virulence. No obvious differences in several properties related to colonization and dissemination were noted among MDR+ or mdr- strains. These results suggest that specific fungal efflux pumps play a role in fungal pathogenicity.

  16. Ecological aspects of the multidrug resistance to chemotherapy agents

    OpenAIRE

    Volkova Tatyana; Bagina Ulyana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents generalized and analyzed literature data concerning the main mechanisms of the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) produced by tumour cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The conclusion is made about the biological role of acquired MDR phenotype for the tumour cell population.

  17. Molecular Surveillance for Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum, Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Naman K; Alker, Alisa P.; Sem, Rithy; Susanti, Agustina Ika; Muth, Sinuon; Maguire, Jason D.; Duong, Socheat; Ariey, Frederic; Meshnick, Steven R.; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda

    2008-01-01

    We conducted surveillance for multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia during 2004–2006 by assessing molecular changes in pfmdr1. The high prevalence of isolates with multiple pfmdr1 copies found in western Cambodia near the Thai border, where artesunate–mefloquine therapy failures occur, contrasts with isolates from eastern Cambodia, where this combination therapy remains highly effective.

  18. Multidrug transporters and antibiotic resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis produces two distinct multidrug transporters, designated LmrA and LmrP, that both confer resistance to a wide variety of cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as to many clinically relevant antibiotics. While LmrP is a proton/drug antiporter t

  19. Drug accumulation in the presence of the multidrug resistance pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, S; Litman, Thomas; Stein, W D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the interaction between the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, and two compounds that interact with it: vinblastine, a classical substrate of the pump, and verapamil, a classical reverser. Steady-state levels of accumulation of these two drugs were determined in a multidrug resistant...... P388 leukemia cell line, P388/ADR. The time course of accumulation of these drugs, and the effect of energy starvation and the presence of chloroquine on the level of their steady-state accumulation were quite disparate. Vinblastine inhibited the accumulation of verapamil whereas it enhanced the...

  20. Horizontal gene transfer—emerging multidrug resistance in hospital bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SenkaDZIDIC; VladimirBEDEKOVIC

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and spectrum of antibiotic resistant infections have increased worldwide during the past few decades. This increase has been attributed to a combination of microbial characteristics, the selective pressure of antimicrobial use, and social and technical changes that enhance the transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance is acquired by mutational changer or by the acquisition of resistance-encoding genetic material which is transfered from another bacteria. The spread of antibiotic resistance genes may be causally related to the overuse of antibiotics in human health care and in animal feeds, increased use of invasive devices and procedures, a greater number of susceptible hosts, and lapses in infection control practices leading to increased transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance gene sequences are integrated by recombination into several classes of naturally occurring gene expression cassettes and disseminated within the microbial population by horizontal gene transfer mechanisms: transformation, conjugation or transduction. In the hospital, widespread use of antimicrobials in the intensive care units (ICU) and for immunocompromised patients has resulted in the selection of multidrug-resistant organisms. Methicilin-resistant Staphylococci, vancomycin resistant Enterococci and extended-spectrum betalactamase(ESBL) producing Gram negative bacilli are identified as major phoblem in nosocomial infections. Recent surveillance studies have demonstrated trend towares more seriously ill patients suffering from multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria and spread of resistance genes should enforce the aplication of strict prevention strategies, including changes in antibiotic treatment regimens, hygiene measures, infection prevention and control of horizontal nosocomial transmission of organisms.

  1. Heteroresistance to Colistin in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Jian LI; Rayner, Craig R; Nation, Roger L; Owen, Roxanne J.; Spelman, Denis; Tan, Kar Eng; Liolios, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant clinical problem worldwide and colistin is being used increasingly as “salvage” therapy. MICs of colistin against A. baumannii indicate its significant activity. However, resistance to colistin in A. baumannii has been reported recently. Clonotypes of 16 clinical A. baumannii isolates and ATCC 19606 were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and colistin MICs were measured. The time-kill kinetics of coli...

  2. Bedaquiline: A novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagabushan, H.; H. S. Roopadevi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Dr...

  3. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological p...

  4. Multidrug resistance of tumor cells: some new trends in research

    OpenAIRE

    Stavrovskaya, A. A.; G. P. Guens

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells is the resistance to a broad spectrum of structurally unrelated cytotoxic drugs with different mechanisms of action. One of the main causes of MDR phenotype is the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters). ABC transporters efflux toxic compounds from the cells. All living cells contain ABC transporters. This review is dedicated to the studies of three-dimensional structure of ABC transporters, to the data concerning MDR evoluti...

  5. Assessment of Multidrug Resistance Reversal Using Dielectrophoresis and Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Labeed, Fatima H.; Coley, Helen M; Thomas, Hilary; Hughes, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    In cancer, multidrug resistance (MDR) is the simultaneous resistance of tumor cells to different natural product anticancer drugs that have no common structure. This is an impediment to the successful treatment of many human cancers. A common correlate of MDR is the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein. Many studies have shown that MDR can be reversed after the use of substrate analogs, called MDR modulators. However, our understanding of MDR modulation is incomplete. In this ...

  6. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S. M.; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional cha...

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Enterococci Lack CRISPR-cas

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Kelli L.; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific, acquired defense against plasmids and phage. Because mobile elements constitute up to 25% of the genome of multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci, it was of interest to examine the codistribution of CRISPR and acquired antibiotic resistance in enterococcal lineages. A database was built from 16 Enterococcus faecalis draft genome sequences to identify commonalities and polymo...

  8. Carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Haverkate, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria cause big problems in health care. Infections with these bacteria are hard to treat and lead to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. In this PhD thesis, carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have been investigated in various settings. Mathematical models were used to derive estimates for these epidemiological traits. Mathematical modeling can support in the decision making and provide guidance to policymakers on how to m...

  9. Dynamic Assessment of Mitoxantrone Resistance and Modulation of Multidrug Resistance by Valspodar (PSC833) in Multidrug Resistance Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Fei; Barbara J Bailey; Chu, Shaoyou; Bence, Aimee K.; Xue, Xinjian; Erickson, Priscilla; Safa, Ahmad R.; Beck, William T.; Erickson, Leonard C.

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, is one of the major causes for multidrug resistance (MDR). We report using confocal microscopy to study the roles of Pgp in mediating the efflux of the anticancer agent mitoxantrone and the reversal of MDR by the specific Pgp inhibitor valspodar (PSC833). The net uptake and efflux of mitoxantrone and the effect of PSC833 were quantified and compared in Pgp-expressing human cancer MDA-MB-435 ...

  10. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2010-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther, Gunar; van Leth, Frank; Alexandru, Sofia;

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients with...... resistant to pyrazinamide, 51.1% were resistant to ≥1 second-line drug, 26.6% were resistant to second-line injectable drugs, 17.6% were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 6.8% were extensively drug resistant. Previous treatment for TB was the strongest risk factor for MDR TB. High levels of primary...... transmission and advanced resistance to second-line drugs characterize MDR TB cases in Europe....

  11. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis that required 2 years for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Isoniazid (H) or rifampicin (R) mono-resistant disease can be treated easily and effectively with first-line drugs, while combined H and R resistance (ie, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB)) requires treatment with at least four agents, including a quinolone and an injectable agent. Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are reported to be extremely difficult to cultivate invitro. The authors report a case of MDRTB that required 2 years for diagnosis, and was detected only in sputum culture on solid medium. Physicians should consider MDRTB if TB is suspected but pathogens are not detected. PMID:22605803

  12. EXPRESSION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE GENE AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN GENE IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Yong-rong; MA Jie; LU Yu-ying; NU Wei-lin; XIANG Zhi-fu

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression and clinical significance of multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) gene in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of mdr1 and MRP assay in 55 patients with acute leukemia (AL) by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: The mdr1 and MRP gene expression levels in the relapsed AL and the blastic plastic phases of CML were significantly higher than those in the newly diagnostic AL and controls. The mdr1 and MRP gene expression levels in the clinical drug-resistant group were significantly higher than those in the non-drug-resistant group. The complete remission (CR) rate in patients with high mdr1 expression (14.3%) was significantly lower than that with low mdr1 expression (57.5%); similarly the CR rate in patients with high MRP level was also lower than that with low MRP level. Using both high expression of mdr1 and MRP gene as the indicator for evaluating multidrug resistance (MDR),the positive predictive value and accuracy increased in comparison with single gene high expression. Conclusion:Elevated level of mdr1 or MRP gene expression might be unfavorable prognostic factors for AL patient and may be used as an important index for predicting drug-resistance and relapse in AL patient. Measuring both mdr1 and MRP gene expression would increase accuracy and sensibility of evaluating MDR in acute leukemia.

  13. Efflux-mediated multidrug resistance in Bacillus subtilis: similarities and dissimilarities with the mammalian system.

    OpenAIRE

    Neyfakh, A A; Bidnenko, V E; L. B. CHEN

    1991-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis cells selected for their resistance to rhodamine 6G demonstrated a multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype resembling that of mammalian MDR cells. Like MDR in mammalian cells, MDR in bacteria was mediated by the efflux of the drugs from the cells. The bacterial multidrug efflux system transported similar drugs and was sensitive to similar inhibitors as the mammalian multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein. The gene coding for the bacterial multidrug transporter, like the P-glycop...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Novel remedies in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains are urgently needed, and one obvious approach involves antimicrobial peptides and mimics hereof. The impact of a- and ß-peptoid as well as ß(3)-amino acid modifications on the activity profile against ß......-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...... inactive peptides. Nevertheless, differences in hemolytic activities indicate that a careful choice of backbone design constitutes a significant parameter in the search for effective cationic antimicrobial peptidomimetics targeting specific bacteria....

  15. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratitis: diagnosis and treatment considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Sergio; Sharpe, Kendall; Morris, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic keratitis is an ocular infective process derived from any fungal species capable of corneal invasion. Despite its rarity in developed countries, its challenging and elusive diagnosis may result in keratoplasty or enucleation following failed medical management. Filamentous fungi such as Fusarium are often implicated in mycotic keratitis. Bearing greater morbidity than its bacterial counterpart, mycotic keratitis requires early clinical suspicion and initiation of antifungal therapy to prevent devastating consequences. We describe a case of multidrug-resistant mycotic keratitis in a 46-year-old man who continued to decline despite maximal therapy and therapeutic keratoplasty. Finally, enucleation was performed as a means of source control preventing dissemination of a likely untreatable fungal infection into the orbit. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium is rare, and may progress to endophthalmitis. We discuss potential management options which may enhance diagnosis and outcome in this condition. PMID:27489066

  16. Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter ventilator-associated pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Shete, Vishal B.; Dnyaneshwari P Ghadage; Vrishali A Muley; Bhore, Arvind V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to a multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter is one of the most dreadful complications, which occurs in the critical care setting. Aims and objectives: To find out the incidence of Acinetobacter infection in VAP cases, to determine various risk factors responsible for acquisition of Acinetobacter infection and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 endotracheal aspirate...

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Treating Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Resch, Stephen C; Salomon, Joshua A.; Murray, Megan Blanche; Weinstein, Milton C

    2006-01-01

    Background: Despite the existence of effective drug treatments, tuberculosis (TB) causes 2 million deaths annually worldwide. Effective treatment is complicated by multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) strains that respond only to second-line drugs. We projected the health benefits and cost-effectiveness of using drug susceptibility testing and second-line drugs in a lower-middle-income setting with high levels of MDR TB. Methods and Findings: We developed a dynamic state-transition model of TB. In...

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Risk Factors and Clinical Impact†

    OpenAIRE

    Aloush, Valerie; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Seigman-Igra, Yardena; Cabili, Shaltiel; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading nosocomial pathogen, may become multidrug resistant (MDR). Its rate of occurrence, the individual risk factors among affected patients, and the clinical impact of infection are undetermined. We conducted an epidemiologic evaluation and molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 36 isolates for 82 patients with MDR P. aeruginosa and 82 controls matched by ward, length of hospital stay, and calendar time. A matched case-control study iden...

  19. Principles for designing future regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Fewer than 20% of patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are receiving treatment and there is an urgent need to scale up treatment programmes. One of the biggest barriers to scale-up is the treatment regimen, which is lengthy, complex, ineffective, poorly tolerated and expensive. For the first time in over 50 years, new drugs have been developed specifically to treat tuberculosis, with bedaquiline and potentially delamanid expected to be available soon for treatment of MDR cases...

  20. Ethionamide activation and sensitivity in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    DeBarber, Andrea E.; Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Bosman, Marlein; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Barry, Clifton E.

    2000-01-01

    Ethionamide (ETA) is an important component of second-line therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Synthesis of radiolabeled ETA and an examination of drug metabolites formed by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) have allowed us to demonstrate that ETA is activated by S-oxidation before interacting with its cellular target. ETA is metabolized by MTb to a 4-pyridylmethanol product remarkably similar in structure to that formed by the activation of isoniazid ...

  1. Nanodrugs: optimism for emerging trend of multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Khan AU

    2012-01-01

    Asad U KhanMedical Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, IndiaThis is with reference to an article published recently in your journal regarding the antibiotic activity of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles.1 This is an inspiring move towards control of infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria which has become a serious problem for clinicians and physicians worldwide.2 At the moment, carbapenems are be...

  2. Modeling epidemics of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis of heterogeneous fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Ted; Murray, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical models have recently been used to predict the future burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB)1-3. These models suggest the threat of multidrug resistance to TB control will depend on the relative ‘fitness’ of MDR strains and imply that if the average fitness of MDR strains is considerably less than that of drug-sensitive strains, the emergence of resistance will not jeopardize the success of tuberculosis control efforts. Multidrug resistance in M. tuberculosis is confer...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sequence Type 1407, a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A; Ciammaruconi, A; Carannante, A; Neri, A; Fazio, C; Fortunato, A; Palozzi, A M; Vacca, P; Fillo, S; Lista, F; Stefanelli, P

    2015-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable due to the spread of resistant or multidrug-resistant strains. Cefixime-resistant gonococci belonging to sequence type 1407 have been described worldwide. We report the genome sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain G2891, a multidrug-resistant isolate of sequence type 1407, collected in Italy in 2013. PMID:26272575

  4. Ribozyme-mediated reversal of the multidrug-resistant phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, K J; Ishida, H.; Kashani-Sabet, M

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effects of suppressing c-fos oncogene expression on multidrug resistance (MDR). A2780S human ovarian carcinoma cells with resistance to actinomycin D were isolated and the resultant A2780AD cells exhibited the MDR phenotype. A hammerhead ribozyme designed to cleave fos RNA cloned into the pMAMneo plasmid was transfected into A2780AD cells. Induction of the ribozyme resulted in decreased expression of c-fos, as well as that of the MDR gene (mdr-1), c-jun, and mutant p53...

  5. Risk factors for acquired multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroso Elizabeth Clara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is a severe and feared problem, that is difficult to control and has shown a tendency to increase worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the risk factors for acquired MDR-TB. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: A retrospective population-based case-control study was conducted. A bacillus was considered multidrug-resistant whenever it was resistant at least to rifampin (RFP + isoniazid (INH, and a case was considered as sensitive tuberculosis (TB if it had undergone the first treatment during a similar period as the first treatment of an MDR-TB case, but was cured at the time of the interview. Case selection was made based on the list of Sensitivity Tests (ST performed at the Central Public Health Laboratory of the State of Ceará, from 1990 through 1999. The Proportion Method was used to investigate resistance to the six antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ethionamide, streptomycin used as the standard treatment in Brazil. Controls were selected from the registry of the TB Control Program. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed, with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Out of the 1,500 STs performed during the studied period, 266 strains were multidrug-resistant; 153 patients were identified, 19 of which were excluded. The Group of Cases comprised 134 patients, and the Group of Controls comprised 185. Multivariate analysis helped to detect the following risk factors: lack of home sewer system, alcoholism + smoking, number of previous treatments, irregular treatment, and lung cavities. CONCLUSION: These five factors are important for the development of acquired MDR-TB, and an attempt to neutralize them might contribute to control TB.

  6. Selective Conditions for a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid Depend on the Sociality of Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bottery, Michael; Wood, A. Jamie; Brockhurst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes conferring qualitatively different mechanisms of resistance. We show here that the antibiotic concentrations selecting for the RK2 plasmid in Escherichia coli depend upon the sociality of the drug resistance: the selection for selfish drug resistance (efflux pump) occurred at very low drug concentrations, just 1.3% of the MIC of the plasmid-free antibiotic-sensitive strain, whereas selection for cooperative drug ...

  7. Diversity and evolution of the small multidrug resistance protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Raymond J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the small multidrug resistance (SMR protein family are integral membrane proteins characterized by four α-helical transmembrane strands that confer resistance to a broad range of antiseptics and lipophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC in bacteria. Due to their short length and broad substrate profile, SMR proteins are suggested to be the progenitors for larger α-helical transporters such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS and drug/metabolite transporter (DMT superfamily. To explore their evolutionary association with larger multidrug transporters, an extensive bioinformatics analysis of SMR sequences (> 300 Bacteria taxa was performed to expand upon previous evolutionary studies of the SMR protein family and its origins. Results A thorough annotation of unidentified/putative SMR sequences was performed placing sequences into each of the three SMR protein subclass designations, namely small multidrug proteins (SMP, suppressor of groEL mutations (SUG, and paired small multidrug resistance (PSMR using protein alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Examination of SMR subclass distribution within Bacteria and Archaea taxa identified specific Bacterial classes that uniquely encode for particular SMR subclass members. The extent of selective pressure acting upon each SMR subclass was determined by calculating the rate of synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions using Syn-SCAN analysis. SUG and SMP subclasses are maintained under moderate selection pressure in comparison to integron and plasmid encoded SMR homologues. Conversely, PSMR sequences are maintained under lower levels of selection pressure, where one of the two PSMR pairs diverges in sequence more rapidly than the other. SMR genomic loci surveys identified potential SMR efflux substrates based on its gene association to putative operons that encode for genes regulating amino acid biogenesis and QAC-like metabolites. SMR subclass protein

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Shigella Infections in Patients with Diarrhea, Cambodia, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Chiek, Sivhour; Oransathid, Wilawan; Ruekit, Sirigade; Nobthai, Panida; Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Lon, Chanthap; Swierczewski, Brett

    2016-09-01

    We observed multidrug resistance in 10 (91%) of 11 Shigella isolates from a diarrheal surveillance study in Cambodia. One isolate was resistant to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins and showed decreased susceptibility to azithromycin. We found mutations in gyrA, parC, β-lactamase, and mphA genes. Multidrug resistance increases concern about shigellosis treatment options. PMID:27532684

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Shigella Infections in Patients with Diarrhea, Cambodia, 2014–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Chiek, Sivhour; Oransathid, Wilawan; Ruekit, Sirigade; Nobthai, Panida; Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Lon, Chanthap; Swierczewski, Brett

    2016-01-01

    We observed multidrug resistance in 10 (91%) of 11 Shigella isolates from a diarrheal surveillance study in Cambodia. One isolate was resistant to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins and showed decreased susceptibility to azithromycin. We found mutations in gyrA, parC, β-lactamase, and mphA genes. Multidrug resistance increases concern about shigellosis treatment options. PMID:27532684

  10. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  11. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  12. Expression of multidrug resistance-related markers in primary neuroblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕庆杰; 董芳; 张锦华; 李晓晗; 马颖; 姜卫国

    2004-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance is associated with a poor prognosis in various human cancers. However, the clinical significance of the expression of multidrug resistance-related markers in neuroblastoma is still on debate. In this study, the effect of the expression of p-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) in neuroblastoma was evaluated. Methods The streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase (SP) technique was used to evaluate the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP in 70 cases of untreated primary neuroblastoma. Results The frequencies of the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP were 61.4%, 38.6%, and 24.3%, respectively. A significant positive correlation was observed between P-gp and MRP expression (P=0.001), as well as between LRP and MRP expression (P=0.01). The rates of expression of P-gp and MRP were higher in tumors from patients aged greater than one year old than in tumors from patients aged less than 1 year old at time of diagnosis (P=0.01 and 0.018, respectively). MRP expression in tumors that had metastasized was significantly more frequent than in tumors that had not metastasized (P=0.015). The expression of all tested proteins showed a significant relationship with whether or not the tumor had differentiated (P=0.006, 0.000 or 0.001, respectively). MRP expression was significantly associated with a reduction in both median survival time and 2-year cumulative survival (P=0.02). By contrast, P-gp and MRP expression did not correlate with survival. According to Cox regression analysis, only the co-expression of P-gp and MRP had significant prognostic value (relative hazard, 3.513, P=0.033). Conclusions The intrinsic, multidrug resistance of neuroblastoma involves the combined effects of P-gp, MRP, and LRP. MRP expression may be an important factor determining prognosis in neuroblastoma.

  13. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a threat to global control of tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandhi, N.R.; Nunn, P.; Dheda, K.; Schaaf, H.S.; Zignol, M.; Soolingen, D. van; Jensen, P.; Bayona, J.

    2010-01-01

    Although progress has been made to reduce global incidence of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis during the past decade threatens to undermine these advances. However, countries are responding far too slowly. Of

  14. Second-line drug resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases of various origins in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Wright, A.; Laan, T.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Soolingen, D van

    2008-01-01

    SETTING: The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of resistance to second-line drugs among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases and its correlation with patients' geographic origin. DESIGN: Retrospective laboratory database study of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberc

  15. Interaction of tamoxifen with the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, R; Higgins, C F

    1995-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an anti-oestrogen which is currently being assessed as a prophylactic for women at high risk of breast cancer. Taxoxifen has also been shown to reverse multidrug resistance in P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-expressing cells, although the mechanism of action is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that tamoxifen interacts directly with P-gp. Plasma membranes from P-gp-expressing cells bound [3H]tamoxifen in a specific and saturable fashion. A 180 kDa membrane protein in these membranes, l...

  16. Overcoming multidrug resistance(MDR) in cancer by nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The emerging nanotechnology-based drug delivery holds tremendous potential to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs for treatment of multidrug resistance(MDR) cancer.This drug delivery system could improve the pharmacokinetic behavior of antitumor drugs,deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to target sites,control release of drugs,and reduce the systemic toxicity of drugs in MDR cancer.This review addresses the use of nanotechnology to overcome MDR classified on the bases of the fundamental mechanisms of MDR and various approaches to deliver drugs for treatment of MDR cancer.

  17. Effect of methylglyoxal on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KunihikoNishino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Honey has a complex chemistry, and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity varies with floral source, climate, and harvesting conditions. Methylglyoxal was identified as the dominant antibacterial component of manuka honey. Although it has been known that methylglyoxal has antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, there is not much information describing its activity against gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the effect of methylglyoxal against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP using 53 clinically isolated strains. We also assessed the effect of deleting the five multidrug efflux systems in P. aeruginosa, as well as the efflux systems in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on MICs of methylglyoxal. Our results indicate that methylglyoxal inhibits the growth of MDRP at concentrations of 128–512 µg/ml (1.7–7.1 mM and is not recognized by drug efflux systems.

  18. Breaking the Spell: Combating Multidrug Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahper N.; Khan, Asad U.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a severe threat to community wellbeing. Conventional antibiotics are getting progressively more ineffective as a consequence of resistance, making it imperative to realize improved antimicrobial options. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported of being resistance, referred as ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacteriaceae) accentuating their capacity to “escape” from routine antimicrobial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at prelude of a drug development process, will enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and will maximize or predict therapeutic potential before clinical testing. PMID:26925046

  19. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in the United Kingdom and Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, X; Hutchison, D C S; Drobniewski, F A; Pimkina, E; Davidaviciene, E

    2014-06-01

    Rates of resistance to first- and second-line drugs in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in the United Kingdom were studied during 2010-2012. The highest rates for ethambutol, pyrazinamide and aminoglycosides occurred among patients originating in Eastern Europe, of whom 47% were Lithuanian. Rates of resistance to kanamycin were significantly lower (P < 0.0001) in the Lithuanian National TB Register than among Lithuanian patients resident in the United Kingdom (5% vs. 78%). In 2010, the majority of UK patients of Eastern European origin were located within the London region, whereas in 2011 the majority were located outside this region, a significant change (P = 0.01). PMID:24903935

  20. Breaking the spell: Combating Multidrug resistant ‘Superbugs’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahper N Khan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria have become a severe threat to community health. Conventional antibiotics are getting increasingly ineffective as a consequence of resistance, and so it is imperative to realize new antimicrobial strategies. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported in the resistance process, the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterobacteriaceae accentuating their capacity to escape from common antibacterial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at early stages of the drug development enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and moreover to maximize or predict efficacy before clinical development.

  1. Nanodrug Delivery in Reversing Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali eKapse-Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance(MDR which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated proteins(MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP. Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1 gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-B. Theragnostics combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  2. Multiwavelength videomicrofluorometry for multiparametric investigations of multidrug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Emmanuelle; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean; Viallet, Pierre M.

    1996-05-01

    A major problem in the cancer chemotherapy is the development of resistance to a whole range of drugs not only similar to the drugs used for resistance induction but also to some functionally and structurally unrelated. It's one of the multifactorial causes of failure of chemotherapy. Thus it appears essential to evaluate the multi-drug resistance (MDR) in living cells populations to: detect the MDR phenotype, to discriminate between resistant and sensitive cells, to identify mechanisms which are involved in the induction or the reversion of resistance and to study the cytotoxic process. Such a challenge implies the use of multiparametric approach that has been possible using a protocol involving microfluorometry connected to numerical image analysis on single living cells. This protocol relays on the correlation existing between the decreased intracellular accumulation of some fluorescent probes such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho342) and Rhodamine 123 (R123) in resistant cells. The simultaneous estimation of the fluorescence intensities of these probes has required the use of a third probe, the Nile Red, for cell contour delineation. The analysis of parameters related to Ho342 and R123 allows the discrimination of sensitive and resistant cells. So the multiparametric approach using multi-wavelength image analysis, which appears to be a powerful technique, has allowed us to show on human lymphoblastoid CCRF-CEM cells lines that the cytotoxic effects could be different depending on the cell resistance or on the cytotoxic drug used: Adriamycine, Vinblastine and the different cell behavior could be used for cell differentiation.

  3. ▼Bedaquiline for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Resistance to drugs used to treat tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem that threatens progress made in TB management and control worldwide. It may result from improper use of antibiotics, including prescription of non-standard treatment regimens and poor adherence to drug therapy. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is defined as resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, with or without resistance to other first-line drugs. Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) refers to resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, and to any fluoroquinolone, and to any of the three second-line injectables  (amikacin, capreomycin and kanamycin). In 2012, DTB discussed the investigation, management and treatment of patients with MDR- and XDR-TB. Earlier this year, ▼bedaquiline (Sirturo) and ▼delamanid (Deltyba) were authorised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) under its 'conditional market authorisation' scheme for use as part of an appropriate combination regimen for pulmonary MDR-TB in adult patients "when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be composed for reasons of resistance or tolerability." In this article, we review the evidence for bedaquiline in the management of MDR-TB. PMID:25395481

  4. Functional imaging of the multidrug resistance in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although diverse mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance for chemotherapeutic drugs, the development of cellular P-glycoprotein(Pgp) and multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) are improtant factors in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However these methods do not yield information about dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. Single photon emission tomograpy (SPECT) and positron emission tomograpy (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transport. 99mTc-sestaMIBI and other 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies of tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with 11C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-(11C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. Results obtained from recent publications are reviewed to confirm the feasibility of using SPECT and PET to study the functionality of MDR transportes in vivo

  5. Functional imaging of the multidrug resistance in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Although diverse mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance for chemotherapeutic drugs, the development of cellular P-glycoprotein(Pgp) and multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) are improtant factors in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However these methods do not yield information about dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. Single photon emission tomograpy (SPECT) and positron emission tomograpy (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transport. {sup 99m}Tc-sestaMIBI and other {sup 99m}Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies of tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-{sup (11}C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. Results obtained from recent publications are reviewed to confirm the feasibility of using SPECT and PET to study the functionality of MDR transportes in vivo.

  6. pH regulation in sensitive and multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Pedersen, Stine F.; Kramhøft, Birte;

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug resistance; P-glycoprotein; Intracellular pH; acidification; glucose; Na*O+/H*O+ exchanger; H*O+ efflux......Multidrug resistance; P-glycoprotein; Intracellular pH; acidification; glucose; Na*O+/H*O+ exchanger; H*O+ efflux...

  7. The lactococcal secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, M; van Veen, HW; Degener, JE; Konings, WN

    2001-01-01

    The active efflux of toxic compounds by (multi)drug transporters is one of the mechanisms that bacteria have developed to resist cytotoxic drugs. The authors describe the role of the lactococcal secondary multidrug transporter LmrP in the resistance to a broad range of clinically important antibioti

  8. (Patho)physiological function of the Multidrug Resistance protein MRP1

    OpenAIRE

    Renes, Jan Willem

    2000-01-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug resistance protein MRP1 confer multidrug resistance (MDR) to cancer cells. The contents of this thesis describe the involvement of MRP1 in MDR and its importance as transporter for physiological phase II detoxification conjugates. ... Zie: Chapter 8

  9. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  10. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  11. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  12. Effects of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on Colistin Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wentao; Li, Yanjun; Guan, Jie; Zhao, Jin; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-05-01

    We tested the effects of various putative efflux pump inhibitors on colistin resistance in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Addition of 10 mg/liter cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to the test medium could significantly decrease the MICs of colistin-resistant strains. Time-kill assays showed CCCP could reverse colistin resistance and inhibit the regrowth of the resistant subpopulation, especially in Acinetobacter baumannii and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia These results suggest colistin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria can be suppressed and reversed by CCCP. PMID:26953203

  13. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  14. Isolation of human mdr DNA sequences amplified in multidrug-resistant KB carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Roninson, I B; Chin, J E; Choi, K. G.; Gros, P.; Housman, D.E.; Fojo, A; Shen, D. W.; Gottesman, M M; Pastan, I

    1986-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to develop simultaneous resistance to structurally different cytotoxic drugs constitutes a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. It was previously demonstrated that multidrug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines contain an amplified, transcriptionally active DNA sequence designated mdr. This report presents evidence that multidrug-resistant sublines of human KB carcinoma cells, selected for resistance to either colchicine, vinblastine, or Adriamycin (doxorubicin), d...

  15. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  16. Susceptibility of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Urine Isolates to Oral Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Elizabeth B; Zucchi, Paola C; Chen, Alice; Raux, Brian R; Kirby, James E; McCoy, Christopher; Eliopoulos, George M

    2016-05-01

    Increasing resistance among Gram-negative uropathogens limits treatment options, and susceptibility data for multidrug-resistant isolates are limited. We assessed the activity of five oral agents against 91 multidrug-resistant Gram-negative urine isolates that were collected from emergency department/hospitalized patients. Fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin were most active (>75% susceptibility). Susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were ≤40%; empirical use of these agents likely provides inadequate coverage in areas with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant uropathogens. PMID:26883704

  17. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim: Plasmid characterization has particular clinical importance because genes encoding significant traits including antimicrobial resistance are frequently carried on plasmids. The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli in relation ...

  18. Imaging multidrug resistance with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoropaclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, Karen A. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: kurdziel@vcu.edu; Kalen, Joseph D. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: jdkalen@vcu.edu; Hirsch, Jerry I. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: jihirsch@vcu.edu; Wilson, John D. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: wilsonjd@hsc.vcu.edu; Agarwal, Rakesh [Surgical Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: dbarrett@vcu.edu; Barrett, Daniel [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: ragarwal@vcu.edu; Bear, Harry D. [Surgical Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: 9jmccumi@mail2.vcu.edu; McCumiskey, James F. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: hbear@hsc.vcu.edu

    2007-10-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cause of treatment failure in many cancer patients. MDR refers to a phenotype whereby a tumor is resistant to a large number of natural chemotherapeutic drugs. Having prior knowledge of the presence of such resistance would decrease morbidity from unsuccessful therapy and allow for the selection of individuals who may benefit from the coadministration of MDR-inhibiting drugs. The Tc-99m-labeled single-photon-emitting radiotracers sestamibi and tetrofosmin have shown some predictive value. However, positron-emitting radiotracers, which allow for dynamic quantitative imaging, hold promise for a more accurate and specific identification of MDRtumors.MDR-expressing tumors are resistant to paclitaxel, which is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent. 4-[{sup 18}F]Fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC) is a PET-radiolabeled analogue of paclitaxel. Preclinical studies have shown the uptake of FPAC to be inversely proportional to tumor MDR expression. FPAC PET imaging in normal volunteers shows biodistribution to be similar to that in nonhuman primates. Imaging in a breast cancer patient showed FPAC localization in a primary tumor that responded to chemotherapy, while failure to localize in mediastinal disease corresponded with only partial response.FPAC PET imaging shows promise for the noninvasive pretreatment identification of MDR-expressing tumors. While much additional work is needed, this work represents a step toward image-guided personalized medicine.

  19. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. PMID:26827688

  20. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliaz, Sinem; Caglar, Emel; Koksalan, Orhan Kaya; Chousein, Efsun Gonca Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem and it may be complicated by multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Wide transmission among immunocompetent contacts of the index case is possible. If you detect tuberculosis in two contacts of the index case, it is called an outbreak. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the characteristics of a MDR-TB outbreak affecting 7 people in a family treated during 2012-2014 in Istanbul Yedikule Training and Research Hospital for Chest Disease and Thoracic Surgery, Turkey. The cultures, spoligotyping, and DNA fingerprinting revealed the same Mycobacterium tuberculosis species as T1 genotype and ST53 subtype. All patients were negative for human immunodeficiency virus and free of other underlying diseases. PMID:27451825

  1. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Research Center, New York, NY (USA)); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  2. Preparation of silver nanoparticles fabrics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; An, Pham Ngoc; Loan, Truong Thi Kieu; Hoa, Phan Thi

    2016-04-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/peco fabrics were prepared by immobilization of AgNPs on fabrics in which AgNPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation of the 10 mM AgNO3 chitosan solution at the dose of 17.6 kGy. The AgNPs size has been estimated to be about 11 nm from TEM image. The AgNPs content onto peco fabrics was of 143±6 mg/kg at the initial AgNPs concentration of 100 ppm. The AgNPs colloidal solution was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM image. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs/peco fabrics after 60 washings against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was found to be over 99%. Effects of AgNPs fabics on multidrug-resistant pathogens from the clinical specimens were also tested.

  3. Emergence of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of Salmonella typhi: Watch on multidrug-resistant isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, SC

    2010-01-01

    Subhash C Arya, Nirmala Agarwal, Shekhar Agarwal, Dolly WadhwaSant Parmanand Hospital, Delhi, IndiaEmergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi has been responsible for clinical challenges for clinicians. Recently, frequent isolation and dissemination of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of S. enterica in Surabaya, Indonesia was in the news. Subsequently, Yangai and colleagues1 recommended regular communications between laboratory professionals and clinicians. Collaboration between labo...

  4. Detection of multidrug resistance using molecular nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the outcome of cancer patients after cytotoxic chemotherapy is related diverse mechanisms, multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs due to cellular P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) is most important factor in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. A large number of pharmacologic compounds, including verapamil, quinidine, tamoxifen, cyclosporin A and quinolone derivatives have been reported to overcome MDR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transporter. 99m-Tc-MIBI and other 99m-Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies for tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with 11C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-(11C)acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. SPECT and PET pharmaceuticals have successfully used to evaluate pharmacologic effects of MDR modulators. Imaging of MDR and reversal of MDR with bioluminescence in a living animal is also evaluated for future clinical trial. We have described recent advances in molecular imaging of MDR and reviewed recent publications regarding feasibility of SPECT and PET imaging to study the functionality of MDR transporters in vivo

  5. Detection of multidrug resistance using molecular nuclear technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Although the outcome of cancer patients after cytotoxic chemotherapy is related diverse mechanisms, multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs due to cellular P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) is most important factor in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. A large number of pharmacologic compounds, including verapamil, quinidine, tamoxifen, cyclosporin A and quinolone derivatives have been reported to overcome MDR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transporter. {sup 99}m-Tc-MIBI and other {sup 99}m-Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies for tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-({sup 11}C)acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. SPECT and PET pharmaceuticals have successfully used to evaluate pharmacologic effects of MDR modulators. Imaging of MDR and reversal of MDR with bioluminescence in a living animal is also evaluated for future clinical trial. We have described recent advances in molecular imaging of MDR and reviewed recent publications regarding feasibility of SPECT and PET imaging to study the functionality of MDR transporters in vivo.

  6. The radiological spectrum of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: in HIV-Negative patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a major worldwide health problem. In countries where tuberculosis is of moderate to high prevalence, the issue of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis carries significant importance. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, similar to drug-sensitive tuberculosis, is contagious. Meanwhile its treatment is not only more difficult but also more expensive with lower success rates. Regarding clinical findings, there is no significant difference between Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Therefore determination of characteristic radiological findings in cases of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis might be of help in early detection, and hence appropriate management of this disease condition. Objective: To explain the radiological spectrum of pulmonary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the radiographic images of 35 patients with clinically-and microbiologically- proven Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis admitted to our tertiary-care tuberculosis unit over a period of 13 months. The latest chest x-ray of all patients and the conventional chest CT scan without contrast of 15 patients were reviewed by three expert radiologists who rendered consensus opinion. Results: Of the 35 patients with imaging studies, 23 (66%) were male and 12 (34%) were female. The mean±SD age of participants was 38.2±17.3 (range: 16-20) years. 33 patients were known as secondary and only 2 had primary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Chest radiography revealed cavitary lesion in 80% pulmonary infiltration in 89% and nodules in 80% of the cases. Pleurisy was the rarest finding observed in only 5 (14%) patients. All of 15 chest CT scans revealed cavitation, 93% of which were bilateral and multiple. Pleural involvement was seen in 93% of patients. Conclusion: Presence of multiple cavities, especially in both lungs, nodular and infiltrative lesions, and pleural effusion are main features

  7. Risk factors for acquired multidrug-resistant tuberculosis Fatores de risco para tuberculose multirresistente adquirida

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Clara Barroso; Rosa Maria Salani Mota; Raimunda Oliveira Santos; Ana Lúcia Oliveira Sousa; Joana Brasileiro Barroso; Jorge Luís Nobre Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a severe and feared problem, that is difficult to control and has shown a tendency to increase worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the risk factors for acquired MDR-TB. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: A retrospective population-based case-control study was conducted. A bacillus was considered multidrug-resistant whenever it was resistant at least to rifampin (RFP) + isoniazid (INH), and a case was considered as sensitive tuberculosis (TB) if it had undergone t...

  8. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Multidrug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from a University Teaching Hospital, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jikun Du; Peipei Li; Helu Liu; Dongyue Lü; Hong Liang; Yuhong Dou

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug-resistant rate of Klebsiella pneumoniae has risen rapidly worldwide. To better understand the multidrug resistance situation and molecular characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a total of 153 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were collected, and drug susceptibility test was performed to detect its susceptibility patterns to 13 kinds of antibiotics. Phenotypic tests for carbapenemases ESBLs and AmpC enzyme-producing strains were performed to detect the resistance phenotype of t...

  9. Sensitive, resistant and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii at Saudi Arabia hospital eastern region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Farooq, Reshma; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Ahmed, Motasim; Yiannakou, Nearchos; Sayeed, Fatima; Sayed, Ali Rifat; Lutfullah, Sualiha

    2015-05-01

    Since the Physicians start use of antibiotics long ago with un-notice drug resistance. However actual problem was recognized about 85 years ago. Antibiotic resistant and Multi-drug resistant bacterial strains are at rise throughout the world. It is physicians and researchers to take scientific research based appropriate action to overcome this ever-spreading problem. This study is designed to find out sensitive (S), resistant (R) and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumanii strain along with other isolates in the resident patients of Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is excluded from other gram-negative organisms isolated from different sites as it will be dealt separately. This study is based in was retrospective observations designed to collect data of different stains of Acinetobacter baumanii with reference to their Sensitivity (S), Resistance (R), Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) along with other Gram negative isolated from different sites (from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2011) at King Abdulaziz Hospital located Eastern Region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). All necessary techniques were used to culture and perform sensitivity of these isolates. There were 4532 isolates out of which 3018 (67%) were from patients. Out of Acinetobacter baumanii infected were 906 (20%) while other 3626 (80%) isolates were miscellaneous. Numbers of patients or cases were 480 (53%) out of 906 isolates and numbers of patients or cases in other organisms were 2538 (70%) out of 3626 isolates. Acinetobacter baumanii infected patients 221 (46%) were male and 259 (54%) were female and the male and female ratio of 1:1.2. In other organisms this male female ratio was almost same. There was steady rise in number of patients and the hence the isolates from 2004 to 2011. Majority of the bacterial strains were isolated as single organism but some were isolated as double or triple or quadruple or more organisms from different sites. Sensitive, Resistant and

  10. Nanodrugs: optimism for emerging trend of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan AU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Asad U KhanMedical Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, IndiaThis is with reference to an article published recently in your journal regarding the antibiotic activity of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles.1 This is an inspiring move towards control of infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria which has become a serious problem for clinicians and physicians worldwide.2 At the moment, carbapenems are being used as the drugs of choice to combat infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has changed current remedial approaches in the management of serious infections. One of the latest enzymes, NDM-1 (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1, first identified in a Swedish patient of Indian origin in 2008,3 has been key in the development of resistance to almost all antibiotics. Infection caused by NDM-1 producers is widespread on the Indian subcontinent,4 and is now emerging in the US and other countries throughout the world.5View original paper by Jena and colleagues.

  11. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected. PMID:26289547

  12. Reversal effect of Dioscin on multidrug resistance in human hepatoma HepG2/adriamycin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bu Tong; Zheng, Li Hua; Bao, Yong Li; Yu, Chun Lei; Wu, Yin; Meng, Xiang Ying; Li, Yu Xin

    2011-03-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious obstacle encountered in cancer treatment. Since drug resistance in human cancer is mainly associated with overexpression of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), the promoter of the human MDR1 gene may be a target for multidrug resistance reversion drug screening. In the present study, HEK293T cells were transfected with pGL3 reporter plasmids containing the 2kb of MDR1 promoter, and the transfected cells were used as models to screen for candidate multidrug resistance inhibitors from over 300 purified naturally occurring compounds extracted from plants and animals. Dioscin was found to have an inhibiting effect on MDR1 promoter activity. The resistant HepG2 cell line (HepG2/adriamycin) was used to validate the activity of multidrug resistance reversal by Dioscin. Results showed that Dioscin could decrease the resistance degree of HepG2/adriamycin cells, and significantly inhibit P-glycoprotein expression, as well as increase the accumulation of adriamycin in HepG2/adriamycin cells as measured by Flow Cytometric analysis. These results suggest that Dioscin is a potent multidrug resistance reversal agent and may be a potential adjunctive agent for tumor chemotherapy. PMID:21195709

  13. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  14. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hua Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38 and class II integrons (10/38. All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX’ and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through blaSHV (22/38, blaTEM (10/38, and blaCTX-M (7/38. The highly conserved blaKPC-2 (37/38 and blaOXA-23(1/38 alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38 and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38 were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  15. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiang-hua; Song, Xiu-yu; Ma, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Shi-yang; Zhang, Jia-qin

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38) and class II integrons (10/38). All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX' and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through bla SHV (22/38), bla TEM (10/38), and bla CTX-M (7/38). The highly conserved bla KPC-2 (37/38) and bla OXA-23(1/38) alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38) and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38) were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  16. Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shete Vishal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP due to a multi-drug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter is one of the most dreadful complications, which occurs in the critical care setting. Aims and objectives: To find out the incidence of Acinetobacter infection in VAP cases, to determine various risk factors responsible for acquisition of Acinetobacter infection and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 endotracheal aspirate specimens from intubated patients diagnosed clinically and microscopically as VAP were studied bacteriologically. All clinical details and prior exposure to antibiotics were recorded. Results: An incidence of 11.6% of Acinetobacter VAP cases was recorded. Various underlying conditions like head injury, cerebral hemorrhage and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were found to be associated with Acinetobacter VAP. Acinetobacter strains exhibited MDR pattern. Conclusion: Strict infection control measures, judicious prescribing of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance surveillance programs and antibiotic cycling should be adopted to control infections due to these bacteria in patients admitted to intensive care units.

  17. Additional Drug Resistance of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Patients in 9 Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina V.; Dalton, Tracy; Ershova, Julia; Tupasi, Thelma; Caoili, Janice Campos; van der Walt, Martie; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Yagui, Martin; Bayona, Jaime; Contreras, Carmen; Leimane, Vaira; Via, Laura E.; Kim, HeeJin; Akksilp, Somsak; Kazennyy, Boris Y.

    2015-01-01

    Data from a large multicenter observational study of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) were analyzed to simulate the possible use of 2 new approaches to treatment of MDR TB: a short (9-month) regimen and a bedaquiline-containing regimen. Of 1,254 patients, 952 (75.9%) had no resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs and thus would qualify as candidates for the 9-month regimen; 302 (24.1%) patients with resistance to a fluoroquinolone or second-line ...

  18. [New Drugs for the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, T; Otto-Knapp, R; Bauer, T

    2015-05-01

    This article summarizes the state of development of new drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We focused on delamanid, bedaquiline, pretomanid, SQ 109 and sutezolid. PMID:25970122

  19. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain). All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros). In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively). Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact. PMID:22621745

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko Miyasaki; John D Rabenstein; Joshua Rhea; Marie-Laure Crouch; Mocek, Ulla M.; Patricia Emmett Kittell; Morgan, Margie A.; Wesley Stephen Nichols; M M Van Benschoten; William David Hardy; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrob...

  1. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Carroll, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN), including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters), have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. Methods We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to “MDRGN definition” combin...

  2. Regulation and expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) transcripts in the intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, M.; Hurren, R; Zastawny, R. L.; Ling, V; Buick, R. N.

    1999-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the regulation of gene expression in the undifferentiated intestine. The intestinal epithelium is one of the few normal tissues expressing the multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that confer the multidrug resistant phenotype to a variety of tumours. Expression of mdr1a has been observed in the primitive rat intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18. It is hypothesized that characterization of MDR gene expression in IEC-18 cells will provide insight into gene regu...

  3. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep's blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present stud...

  4. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Mycobacteria growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livani S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Identification and monitoring ofmultidrugresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains (MDR ishighlighted by the high risk of their spreading in different areas.Prevalence of these strains was evaluated in Golestan province innortheast of Iran.Material and Methods: Drug susceptibility testing to Isoniazid andrifampin was carried out for 148 clinical samples that had grown inMycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT system, according to themanufacturer's instructions (Becton-Dickinson, USA. The associationof drug resistance frequency with demographic characteristics andgrowth time were investigated. The appropriate statistical tests, X2 andstudent Ttest were performed for comparison of these variants. A pvalue>0.05 was considered significant in all cases.Results: The turnaround time required for growth of Mycobacteriumtuberculosis in MGIT system was between 2 to 55 days (mean16.3±10.4 days. Of all samples studied, 17.6% and 3.4% wereresistant to Isoniazid and rifampin, respectively, and 3.4% (5 sampleswere MDR (CI 95%; 1- 6%. The turnaround time required fordetermining MDR cases was 9.6 days. No statistically significantassociation was found between the resistance to the drugs and none ofthe factors including sex, age, type of clinical sample, and positivity ofthe smear.Conclusion: The prevalence of MDR in the studied region wasdetermined to be 3.4% which is similar to the country-wideevaluations. The turnaround time for Mycobacterium growth and antidrug susceptibility result can be shortened by MGIT method.Key words: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium GrowthIndicator Tube, Multidrug Resistant

  5. Cellular functions of vaults and their involvement in multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, E; Holzmann, K; Elbling, L; Micksche, M; Berger, W

    2006-08-01

    Vaults are evolutionary highly conserved ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with a hollow barrel-like structure. They are 41 x 73 nm in size and are composed of multiple copies of three proteins and small untranslated RNA (vRNA). The main component of vaults represents the 110 kDa major vault protein (MVP), whereas the two minor vault proteins comprise the 193 kDa vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and the 240 kDa telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP1). Vaults are abundantly present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and they were found to be associated with cytoskeletal elements as well as occasionally with the nuclear envelope. Vaults and MVP have been associated with several cellular processes which are also involved in cancer development like cell motility and differentiation. Due to the over-expression of MVP (also termed lung resistance-related protein or LRP) in several P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-negative chemoresistant cancer cell lines, vaults have been linked to multidrug resistance (MDR). Accordingly, high levels of MVP were found in tissues chronically exposed to xenobiotics. In addition, the expression of MVP correlated with the degree of malignancy in certain cancer types, suggesting a direct involvement in tumor development and/or progression. Based on the finding that MVP binds several phosphatases and kinases including PTEN, SHP-2 as well as Erk, evidence is accumulating that MVP might be involved in the regulation of important cell signalling pathways including the PI3K/Akt and the MAPK pathways. In this review we summarize the current knowledge concerning the vault particle and discuss its possible cellular functions, focusing on the role of vaults in chemotherapy resistance. PMID:16918321

  6. Multidrug resistance of DNA-mediated transformants is linked to transfer of the human mdr1 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, D. W.; Fojo, A; Roninson, I B; Chin, J E; Soffir, R; Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M

    1986-01-01

    Mouse NIH 3T3 cells were transformed to multidrug resistance with high-molecular-weight DNA from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells. The patterns of cross resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin; Adria Laboratories Inc.) of the human donor cell line and mouse recipients were similar. The multidrug-resistant human donor cell line contains amplified sequences of the mdr1 gene which are expressed at high levels. Both primary and secondary NIH 3T...

  7. Bloodstream infections caused by multi-drug resistant Proteus mirabilis: Epidemiology, risk factors and impact of multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytny, Alexander; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Fransisc; Borer, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Background The prevalence of antimicrobial co-resistance among ESBL-producing Enterobactereaceae is extremely high in Israel. Multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strains (MDR-PM), resistant to almost all antibiotic classes have been described. The aim was to determine the risk factors for bloodstream infections caused by MDR-PM and clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective case-control study. Adult patients with PM bacteremia during 7 years were identified retrospectively and their files reviewed for demographics, underlying diseases, Charlson Comorbidity Index, treatment and outcome. Results One hundred and eighty patients with PM-bloodstream infection (BSI) were included; 90 cases with MDR-PM and 90 controls with sensitive PM (S-PM). Compared to controls, cases more frequently were from nursing homes, had recurrent hospital admissions in the past year and received antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months, were bedridden and suffered from peripheral vascular disease and peptic ulcer disease (p < 0.001). Two-thirds of the MDR-PM isolates were ESBL-producers vs 4.4% of S-PM isolates (p < 0.001, OR = 47.6, 95% CI = 15.9-142.6). In-hospital crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was 37.7% vs 23.3% in those with S-PM BSI (p = 0.0359, OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.81). Conclusions PM bacteremia in elderly and functionally-dependent patients is likely to be caused by nearly pan-resistant PM strains in the institution; 51.8% of the patients received inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. The crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was significantly higher than that of patients with S-PM BSI. PMID:26763474

  8. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  9. Gatifloxacin for short, effective treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C-Y; Van Deun, A; Rieder, H L

    2016-09-01

    The 9-month regimen for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) piloted in Bangladesh and used, with modifications, in Cameroon and Niger, has achieved treatment success in a very large proportion of patients; gatifloxacin (GFX) is likely to have played a critical role in this success. Two months after the publication of a study reporting that GFX and not moxifloxacin (MFX) was associated with dysglycaemia, the manufacturer announced the withdrawal of GFX from the market. The findings of that study may have less significance for the majority of MDR-TB patients living in high-incidence countries who are much younger, have a lower risk of dysglycaemia and suffer from a highly fatal condition. The problem of dysglycaemia is not limited to GFX use and may occur with other fluoroquinolones; furthermore, GFX-associated dysglycemia was manageable among those MDR-TB patients in Bangladesh and Niger in whom it occurred. GFX has now become unavailable in Bangladesh, Cameroon, Niger and other countries piloting the shorter MDR-TB regimens, depriving resource-poor countries of an efficacious, effective and inexpensive drug with a demonstrated good safety profile for the given indication. There is little reason not to make GFX available for MDR-TB treatment as long as the superiority of non-GFX-based MDR-TB regimens is not demonstrated. PMID:27510237

  10. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  11. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  12. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  13. Detection of Multi-drug Resistant Acinetobacter Lwoffii Isolated from Soil of Mink Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Wen, Yong Jun; Zhang, Shu Qin; Zhu, Hong Wei; Guo, Li; Wang, Feng Xue; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Hong Xia; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2016-07-01

    There were 4 Acinetobacter lwoffii obtained from soil samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains to 16 antimicrobial agents was investigated using K-B method. Three isolates showed the multi-drug resistance. The presence of resistance genes and integrons was determined using PCR. The aadA1, aac(3')-IIc, aph(3')-VII, aac(6')-Ib, sul2, cat2, floR, and tet(K) genes were detected, respectively. Three class 1 integrons were obtained. The arr-3-aacA4 and blaPSE-1 gene cassette, which cause resistance to aminoglycoside and beta-lactamase antibiotics. Our results reported the detection of multi-drug resistant and carried resistant genes Acinetobacter lwoffii from soil. The findings suggested that we should pay close attention to the prevalence of multi-drug resistant bacterial species of environment. PMID:27554122

  14. Emergence of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of Salmonella typhi: Watch on multidrug-resistant isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Arya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Subhash C Arya, Nirmala Agarwal, Shekhar Agarwal, Dolly WadhwaSant Parmanand Hospital, Delhi, IndiaEmergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi has been responsible for clinical challenges for clinicians. Recently, frequent isolation and dissemination of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of S. enterica in Surabaya, Indonesia was in the news. Subsequently, Yangai and colleagues1 recommended regular communications between laboratory professionals and clinicians. Collaboration between laboratory personnel and clinicians would be essential to offer a rational empiric antibiotic recipe while awaiting antibiotic susceptibility test results (AST for any patient.

  15. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  16. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Huiqin Guo; Zhe-Sheng Chen; Khalid El Sayed; Ioana Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp), ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be block...

  17. Comparison of the kinetics of active efflux of Tc-99m-MIBI in cells with P-glycoprotein-mediated and multidrug-resistance protein-associated multidrug-resistance phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergote, J; Moretti, JL; De Vries, EGE; Garnier-Suillerot, A

    1998-01-01

    The overexpression of two membrane glycoproteins, P-glycoprotein and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP1) is a major cause of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of human cancers. Both proteins confer a similar multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. Tc-99m-MIBI, a myocardial imaging

  18. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Guo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be blocked by various drugs such as verapamil (calcium channel blocker and cyclosporin A (immunosuppressive agent, etc. These compounds are called MDR modulators or reversals. This review highlights several marine natural products with reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer, including agosterol A, ecteinascidin 743, sipholane triterpenoids, bryostatin 1, and welwitindolinones.

  19. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashidhar Vishwanath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections are among important causes of morbidity and mortality for all age groups. The emergence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli is an issue of increasing concern.A retrospective study including respiratory specimens (sputum and BAL was conducted in our tertiary care centre. Samples were processed for microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing following standard methods. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli causing lower respiratory tract infections were studied for their causation of disease. The effect of appropriate treatment on clinical outcome was observed.A total of 472 Gram-negative pathogens were isolated from sputum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid specimens during the study period. Among these Gram-negative pathogens 175 (37% were found to be multidrug resistant. Klebsiella pneumoniae 85 (48.6% and Acinetobacter spp. 59 (33.7% were the predominant multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolated. Based on clinico-microbiological correlation, 138 (78.9% multidrug resistant isolates were found to be pathogenic and the rest 37 (21.1% were considered as colonizers. After initiating appropriate antibiotic therapy, clinical improvement was seen in 110 (79.7% patients. In the patients who showed improvement, amikacin (34.3% and cefoperazone-sulbactum (21.8% were found to be the most effective drugs.A large majority of the isolated multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli were found to be pathogenic. Regular surveillance which directs appropriate empirical therapy; and good clinic-microbiological workup of each case of lower respiratory tract infection can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multidrug resistant organisms.

  20. Tamoxifen can reverse multidrug resistance of colorectal carcinoma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Zong Shen; Yi-Bing Hua; Xue-Ming Yu; Qing Xu; Tao Chen; Jian-Hua Wang; Wen-Xi Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tamoxifen (TAM) on multidrug resistance (MDR) of colorectal carcinoma in vivo and its relationship with estrogen receptor (ER).METHODS: Multidrug resistance was determined by means of semi-quantitative retro-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to test mdr1 gene mRNA and ER expression was studied by immunohistochemistry. Tumor tissues from three cases of human colon carcinoma, which had mdr1( + )/ER(+ ), mdr1( + )/ER(-), mdr1(-) expressions,were planted subcutaneously in the neck of nude mice to establish three xenograft models. These models were subdivided into four subgroups randomly: Doxorubicin(DOX)-treated group, TAN-treated group, DOX and TAM group and control group. The dimensions of these xenografts were measured after each course of treatment and the xenografts were removed at the end of the experiments for measurements of weight and the variation of mdr1 mRNA level with RT-PCR. In each course, TAM[15 mg/(kg/d)] was administrated orally per day in the first seven days and DOX (3.6 mg/kg) was injected peritoneally on the first day. Data was evaluated by q and ttests.RESULTS: In the animal models with mdr1(-) tumor, the weights and volumes of the planted tumor in DOX group[(39.1±2.29) mg, (31.44±1.61) mm3] and TAM and DOX group [(38.72±2.56) mg, (31.31±1.74) mm3], which were lesser than that of control group [(45.48±3.92) mg,(36.42±2.77) mm3, P = 0.037, P = 0.016 respectively]significantly. In the animal models with mdr1(+)/ER(+)tumor, the weights and volumes of planted tumor were not affected by DOX or TAM treatment; however, in TAM and DOX group [(425.5±28.58) mg, (340.35±22.28) mm3],they were significantly less than that of control group[(634.23±119.41) mg, (507.45±93.34) mm3, P = 0.022,P = 0.045 respectively], which are similar to that in the models with mdr1(+)/ER(-) tumor. No significant changes were found in the expressive level of mdr1 mRNA following these treatments.CONCLUSION: The expression

  1. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia;

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with...... effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be...... methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio...

  2. Conservation of the multidrug resistance efflux gene oprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    BIANCO, N.; Neshat, S; Poole, K

    1997-01-01

    An intragenic probe derived from the multidrug resistance gene oprM hybridized with genomic DNA from all 20 serotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and from all 34 environmental and clinical isolates tested, indicating that the MexA-MexB-OprM multidrug efflux system is highly conserved in this organism. The oprM probe also hybridized with genomic DNA from Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Pseudomonas chlororaphis, Pseudomonas syringae, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Pseudomonas putida, suggesting that ef...

  3. Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Multidrug Resistance. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One focus area of DOE Office of Science was the Imaging of Gene Expression in Health and Disease in real time in tissue culture, whole animals and ultimately patients. Investigators of the Molecular Imaging Group, Washington University Medical School, ascribed to this objective and a major focus of this group directly tied into the DOE program through their efforts targeting the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). Our plans for continuation of the program were to extend and build on this line of investigation, incorporating new molecular tools into our methodology to selectively inhibit MDR1 gene expression with novel modulation strategies. Two approaches were to be pursued: (1) high throughput screening of compounds that disrupted mutant p53 transactivation of the MDR1 promoter, and (2) knockdown of MDR1 messenger RNA with retroviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA constructs. These would be combined with our continuing effort to synthesize ligands and examine structure-activity relationships of bis-salicylaldehydes labeled with gallium-68 to generate PET agents for imaging MDR1 P-glycoprotein function. We would be uniquely positioned to correlate therapeutic modulation of MDR1 gene expression and protein function in the same systems in vivo using PET and bioluminescence reporters. Use of animal models such as the mdr1a/1b(-/-) gene deleted mice would also have enabled refined analysis of modulation and tracer pharmacokinetics in vivo. Overall, this DOE program and resultant tools would enable direct monitoring of novel therapeutic strategies and the MDR phenotype in relation to gene expression and protein function in vivo.

  4. [Adverse drug reactions in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Domingo; Cruz, Víctor; Museli, Tomás; Pavlovsky, Hernán; Fernández, Juan; Waisman, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) poses difficulties in diagnosis and treatment, including increased frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs (ADRAs), which compromise the effectiveness of treatment. This is specially complicated in the treatment of patients co-infected with HIV which includes the antiretroviral therapy plus the treatment of eventual comorbidities. A total of 121 MDRTB patients, 87 HIV-negative and 34 HIV positive, assisted in the Hospital F. J. Muñiz, Buenos Aires, during the period 2003-2007 were retrospectively studied. The incidence of ADRAs among the two groups of patients was compared. All the patients with adherence to treatment (no more than one abandon, recovered) were included in the study. Antituberculosis drugs used were: ethambutol, pyrazinamide, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, cycloserine, ethionamide, PAS, streptomycin, kanamycin, amikacin and linezolid. The emergence of ADRAs and the proportion of severe reactions attributed to antituberculosis drugs were similar in both groups: 44.8% in HIV negative and 44.1% in HIV positive, but it was observed an additional 23.5% of adverse reactions to antiretroviral therapy in the second group. There were differences in the type of reactions and time of occurrence between the two groups. One HIV positive patient died of epidermolysis. The proportion of adverse reactions in HIV/AIDS patients increased 50% when those attributed to antiretroviral treatment were included. We conclude that the studied population showed a frequency of ADRAs higher than it would be expected in the treatment of susceptible TB, but there was no difference in its frequency among HIV-negative and positive patients. PMID:20920959

  5. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa P. Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047. A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009, whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094. In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010. However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  6. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhou, Xianguang [National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wang, Jiandong [Department of Pathology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Longjiang [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Teng, Zhaogang, E-mail: tzg@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Guangming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles are synthesized. • The mechanism of CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles is revealed. • This new delivery system increased the drug accumulation in vitro and in vivo. • This new delivery system offers an effective approach to treat multidrug resistance. - Abstract: Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  7. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles are synthesized. • The mechanism of CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles is revealed. • This new delivery system increased the drug accumulation in vitro and in vivo. • This new delivery system offers an effective approach to treat multidrug resistance. - Abstract: Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer

  8. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  9. A simple, rapid and economic method for detecting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction as a rapid molecular tool for detecting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. METHODS: Based on drug susceptibility testing, 103 isolates were multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and 45 isolates were sensitive to isonicotinylhydrazine and rifampin. Primers were designed to target five mutations hotspots that confer resistance to the first-line drugs isoniazid and rifampin, and multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction was performed. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed drug resistance mutations identified by multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: DNA sequencing revealed that 68.9% of multidrug-resistant strains have point mutations at codon 315 of the katG gene, 19.8% within the mabA-inhA promoter, and 98.0% at three hotspots within rpoB. Multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction detected each of these five mutations, yielding 82.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity for isoniazid resistance, and 97.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity for rifampin resistance as compared to drug susceptibility testing. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction is an inexpensive and practical method for rapid detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in developing countries.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sunita; Siegfried, Justin; Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Rahimian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin. PMID:27418986

  11. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  12. Molecular characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from Gomel region, Belarus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapalski, D.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hasman, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    infection outside hospitals in the Gomel region of Belarus. Thirty-one isolates were highly similar according to PFGE and MLVA typing, were multidrug-resistant, including resistance to ceftiofur, and harboured the bla(CTX-M-5) gene. These results indicate that a common source may have been responsible for...

  13. Dynamics of multidrug resistance : P-glycoprotein analyses with positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH; Vaalburg, W

    2002-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is characterized by the occurrence of cross-resistance to a broad range of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR. One of the most well-known mechanisms is the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded by the MDR1 gene

  14. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990’s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasm...

  15. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we...

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  17. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from healthy Ghanaian preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayie, Nicholas Tete Kwaku Dzifa; Arhin, Reuben E.; Newman, Mercy J.;

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the cause of high mortality among children worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment and vaccination are used to control pneumococcal infections. In Ghana, data on antimicrobial resistance and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones are scarce; hence, the ai...

  18. Genome Sequence of Riemerella anatipestifer Strain RCAD0122, a Multidrug-Resistant Isolate from Ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Heng; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Cheng, An-Chun; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is an important pathogenic bacterium in waterfowl and other avian species. We present here the genome sequence of R. anatipestifer RCAD0122, a multidrug-resistant strain isolated from infected ducks. The isolate contains at least nine types of antibiotic resistance-associated genes. PMID:27151800

  19. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 1, breast cancer resistance protein and lung resistance related protein in locally advanced bladder cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: biological and clinical implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diestra, JE; Condom, E; Muro, XG Del; Scheffer, G.L.; Perez, J; Zurita, AJ; Munoz-Segui, J; Vigues, F; Scheper, R.J.; Capella, G; Germa-Lluch, JR; Izquierdo, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle to overcome in the conservative treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer (LABC). We investigated the predictive value of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and prognosis of the expression of multidrug resistance (

  20. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed...

  1. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L. [Nuclear Medicine Research Lab., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Extensive Drug Resistance Acquired During Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegielski, J. Peter; Dalton, Tracy; Yagui, Martin; Wattanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Via, Laura E.; Van Der Walt, Martie; Tupasi, Thelma; Smith, Sarah E.; Odendaal, Ronel; Leimane, Vaira; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Kummik, Tiina; Kuksa, Liga; Kliiman, Kai; Kiryanova, Elena V.; Kim, HeeJin; Kim, Chang-ki; Kazennyy, Boris Y.; Jou, Ruwen; Huang, Wei-Lun; Ershova, Julia; Erokhin, Vladislav V.; Diem, Lois; Contreras, Carmen; Cho, Sang Nae; Chernousova, Larisa N.; Chen, Michael P.; Caoili, Janice Campos; Bayona, Jaime; Akksilp, Somsak; Calahuanca, Gloria Yale; Wolfgang, Melanie; Viiklepp, Piret; Vasilieva, Irina A.; Taylor, Allison; Tan, Kathrine; Suarez, Carmen; Sture, Ingrida; Somova, Tatiana; Smirnova, Tatyana G.; Sigman, Erika; Skenders, Girts; Sitti, Wanlaya; Shamputa, Isdore C.; Riekstina, Vija; Pua, Kristine Rose; Therese, M.; Perez, C.; Park, Seungkyu; Norvaisha, Inga; Nemtsova, Evgenia S.; Min, Seonyeong; Metchock, Beverly; Levina, Klavdia; Lei, Yung-Chao; Lee, Jongseok; Larionova, Elena E.; Lancaster, Joey; Jeon, Doosoo; Jave, Oswaldo; Khorosheva, Tatiana; Hwang, Soo Hee; Huang, Angela Song-En; Gler, M. Tarcela; Dravniece, Gunta; Eum, Seokyong; Demikhova, Olga V.; Degtyareva, Irina; Danilovits, Manfred; Cirula, Anda; Cho, Eunjin; Cai, Ying; Brand, Jeanette; Bonilla, Cesar; Barry, Clifton E.; Asencios, Luis; Andreevskaya, Sofia N.; Akksilp, Rattanawadee

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing access to drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is crucial but could lead to increasing resistance to these same drugs. In 2000, the international Green Light Committee (GLC) initiative began to increase access while attempting to prevent acquired resistance. Methods. To assess the GLC's impact, we followed adults with pulmonary MDR tuberculosis from the start to the end of treatment with monthly sputum cultures, drug susceptibility testing, and genotyping. We compared the frequency and predictors of acquired resistance to second-line drugs (SLDs) in 9 countries that volunteered to participate, 5 countries that met GLC criteria, and 4 countries that did not apply to the GLC. Results. In total, 832 subjects were enrolled. Of those without baseline resistance to specific SLDs, 68 (8.9%) acquired extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis, 79 (11.2%) acquired fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance, and 56 (7.8%) acquired resistance to second-line injectable drugs (SLIs). The relative risk (95% confidence interval [CI]) of acquired resistance was lower at GLC-approved sites: 0.27 (.16–.47) for XDR tuberculosis, 0.28 (.17–.45) for FQ, and 0.15 (.06–.39) to 0.60 (.34–1.05) for 3 different SLIs. The risk increased as the number of potentially effective drugs decreased. Controlling for baseline drug resistance and differences between sites, the odds ratios (95% CIs) were 0.21 (.07–.62) for acquired XDR tuberculosis and 0.23 (.09–.59) for acquired FQ resistance. Conclusions. Treatment of MDR tuberculosis involves substantial risk of acquired resistance to SLDs, increasing as baseline drug resistance increases. The risk was significantly lower in programs documented by the GLC to meet specific standards. PMID:25057101

  3. Multidrug Resistant Salmonella typhi in Asymptomatic Typhoid Carriers among Food Handlers in Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to screen Salmonella typhi in asymptomatic typhoid carriers and to find out drug resistance and ability of the strains to transmit drug resistance to other bacteria. Methods: Cultural characters, biochemical tests, antibiotic sensitivity test (disc diffusion, agarose gel electrophoresis, and conjugation protocols were done. Thirty five stool samples were collected from the suspected food handlers for the study. Results: Among 35 samples, (17.14% yielded a positive result. Out of these 4 (20.0% were women and 2 (13.33% were men. The isolates were tested with a number of conventional antibiotics viz, amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, co-trimaxazole, rifampicin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin and tetracycline. Five isolates were having the multidrug resistant character. Four (66.66% multidrug resistant isolates were found to have plasmids, while one (16.66% multidrug resistant isolate had no plasmid and the chromosome encoded the resistance. Only one strain (16.66% showed single antibiotic resistance in the study and had no plasmid DNA. The molecular weights of the plasmids were determined and found to be 120 kb.The mechanism of spreading of drug resistance through conjugation process was analyzed. In the conjugation studies, the isolates having R+ factor showed the transfer of drug resistance through conjugation, which was determined by the development of antibiotic resistance in the recipients. Conclusion: This study shows that drug resistant strains are able to transfer genes encoding drug resistance.

  4. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar;

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this...... study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug......-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874...

  5. Applications of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for the reversal of multidrug resistance in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUANG, YINGHONG; COLE, SUSAN P.C.; CAI, TIANGE; CAI, YU

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy presents a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients, which directly affects the clinical success rate of cancer therapy. Current research aims to improve the efficiency of chemotherapy, whilst reducing toxicity to prolong the lives of cancer patients. As with good biocompatibility, high stability and drug release targeting properties, nanodrug delivery systems alter the mechanism by which drugs function to reverse MDR, via passive or active targeting, increasing drug accumulation in the tumor tissue or reducing drug elimination. Given the potential role of nanodrug delivery systems used in multidrug resistance, the present study summarizes the current knowledge on the properties of liposomes, lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and mesoporous silica nanoparticles, together with their underlying mechanisms. The current review aims to provide a reliable basis and useful information for the development of new treatment strategies of multidrug resistance reversal using nanodrug delivery systems. PMID:27347092

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Enterobacteriaceae isolates to fosfomycin

    OpenAIRE

    Falagas, Matthew E.; Maraki, Sofia; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos E.; Kastoris, Antonia C.; Mavromanolakis, Emmanuel; Samonis, George

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The advancing antimicrobial drug resistance among Enterobacteriaceae renders the evaluation of potential novel therapeutic options necessary. We sought to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of fosfomycin against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility to fosfomycin and 12 additional antibiotics of MDR Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected between November 2007 and April 2009 at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Cret...

  7. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Tuberculosis Patients at High Risk for Multidrug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras; Triwahju Astuti; Iin Noor Chozin

    2012-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been shown to be a strong prognostic biomarker for tuberculosis (TB). In the present study, the profiles of plasma suPAR levels in pulmonary TB patients at high risk for multidrug resistance were analyzed and compared with those in multidrug resistant (MDR)-TB patients. Forty patients were prospectively included, consisting of 10 MDR-TB patients and 30 TB patients at high risk for MDR, underwent clinical assesment. Plasma suPAR ...

  8. MRP1 and glucosylceramide are coordinately over expressed and enriched in rafts during multidrug resistance acquisition in colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klappe, K; Hinrichs, JWJ; Kroesen, BJ; Sietsma, H; Kok, JW

    2004-01-01

    Previously we have described a novel multidrug-resistant cell line, HT29(col), which displayed over expression of the multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and an altered sphingolipid composition, including enhanced levels of glucosylceramide (GlcCer; Kok JW, Veldman RJ, Klappe K, Koning H, Filipean

  9. [Prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus spp. strains in clinical specimens and their susceptibility to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reśliński, Adrian; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Mikucka, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Proteus sp. are opportunistic microorganisms which cause urinary tract and wounds infections, bacteriaemia and sepsis. The aim of this study was analysis of prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. strains in clinical specimens and evaluation of their susceptibility to selected antibiotics. The study was carried out of 1499 Proteus sp. strains were isolated in 2000-2003 from patients of departments and dispensaries of the University Hospital CM in Bydgoszcz UMK in Torun. The strains were identified on the basis of appearance of bacterial colonies on bloody and McConkey's agars, movement ability, indole and urease production and in questionable cases biochemical profile in ID GN or ID E (bio-Mérieux) tests was also included. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disk diffusion method. Isolated strains were regarded as multidrug-resistant when they were resistant to three kinds of antibiotics at least. Received Proteus sp. the most frequently belonged to P. mirabilis species (92.3%). Most of these bacteria were isolated from urine from patients of Rehabilitation Clinic. All of multidrug-resistant strains were resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins, 98.9% to co-trimoxazole, 77.7% to quinolones, 63.8% to tetracyclines, 38.5% to aminoglycosides, 19.3% to monobactams and 3.4% to carbapenems. Almost 25% multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. produced ESBL. PMID:16134389

  10. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; de Almeida Nogueira Pinto, José Paes; dos Santos Bersot, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp. PMID:26887244

  11. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a descriptive study in a city hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Siddharth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk factors for MRAB in a city hospital patient population. Methods This study is a retrospective review of a city hospital epidemiology data base and includes 247 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (AB from 164 patients. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was defined as resistance to more than three classes of antibiotics. Using the non-MRAB isolates as the control group, the risk factors for the acquisition of MRAB were determined. Results Of the 247 AB isolates 72% (177 were multidrug resistant. Fifty-eight percent (143/247 of isolates were highly resistant (resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. Of the 37 patients who died with Acinetobacter colonization/infection, 32 (86% patients had the organism recovered from the respiratory tract. The factors which were found to be significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05 with multidrug resistance include the recovery of AB from multiple sites, mechanical ventilation, previous antibiotic exposure, and the presence of neurologic impairment. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter was associated with significant mortality when compared with sensitive strains (p ≤ 0.01. When surgical patients (N = 75 were considered separately, mechanical ventilation and multiple isolates remained the factors significantly associated with the development of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Among surgical patients 46/75 (61% grew a multidrug resistant strain of AB and 37/75 (40% were resistant to all commonly used antibiotics including aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, carbepenems, extended spectrum penicillins, and quinolones. Thirty-five percent of the surgical patients had AB cultured from multiple sites and 57% of the Acinetobacter isolates were associated with a co-infecting organism, usually a Staphylococcus or Pseudomonas. As

  12. Low-level quinolone-resistance in multi-drug resistant typhoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find out the frequency of low-level quinolone-resistance in Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) typhoid using nalidixic acid screening disc. Blood was obtained from suspected cases of typhoid fever and cultured in to BacT/ALERT. The positive blood cultures bottles were subcultured. The isolates were identified by colony morphology and biochemical tests using API-20E galleries. Susceptibility testing of isolates was done by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method on Muellar Hinton Agar. For the isolates, which were resistant to nalidixic acid by disc diffusion method, Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were determined by using the E-test strips. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests and MICs were interpreted according to the guidelines provided by National Committee for Control Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). A total of 21(65.5%) out of 32 isolates of Salmonellae were nalidixic acid-resistant by disk diffusion method. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates by disc diffusion method were confirmed by MICs for both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.25-1 microg/ml (reduced susceptibility) and nalidixic acid MICs > 32 microg (resistant). Out of all Salmonella isolates, 24 (75%) were found to be MDR, and all were S. typbi. Low-level quinolone-resistance in typhoid was high in this small series. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance with a 30 microg nalidixic acid disk is a reliable and cost-effective method to detect low-level fluoroquinolone resistance, especially in the developing countries. (author)

  13. The Reversal Effects of 3-Bromopyruvate on Multidrug Resistance In Vitro and In Vivo Derived from Human Breast MCF-7/ADR Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Long Wu; Jun Xu; Weiqi Yuan; Baojian Wu; Hao Wang; Guangquan Liu; Xiaoxiong Wang; Jun Du; Shaohui Cai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein mediated efflux is one of the main mechanisms for multidrug resistance in cancers, and 3-Bromopyruvate acts as a promising multidrug resistance reversal compound in our study. To test the ability of 3-Bromopyruvate to overcome P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance and to explore its mechanisms of multidrug resistance reversal in MCF-7/ADR cells, we evaluate the in vitro and in vivo modulatory activity of this compound. Methods The in vitro and in vivo activity wa...

  14. Priorities in the prevention and control of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A S

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDE) are a major public health threat due to international spread and few options for treatment. Furthermore, unlike meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), MDE encompass several genera and multiple resistance mechanisms, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and carbapenemases, which complicate detection in the routine diagnostic laboratory. Current measures to contain spread in many hospitals are somewhat ad hoc as there are no formal national or international guidelines.

  15. Prevalence of multidrug resistant pathogens in children with urinary tract infection: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan S, Madhusudhan NS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the commonest medical problems in children. It can distress the child and may cause kidney damage. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment can prevent complications in the child. But treatment of UTI in children has now become a challenge due to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Aims & Objectives: To know the bacteriological profile and susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infections in children and to know the prevalence of multidrug resistant uropathogens. Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis was done on all paediatric urine samples for a period of one year. A total of 1581 samples were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done on samples showing significant growth by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical analysis: Prevalence and pattern were analyzed using proportions and percentages. Results: E.coli was the most predominant organism (56% causing UTI in children followed by Klebsiella sp (17%. Fifty three percent of gram negative organisms isolated from children were found to be multidrug resistant. Majority of E. coli isolates were found to be highly resistant to Ampicillin (91% and Cotrimoxazole (82% and highly sensitive to Imipenem (99% and Amikacin (93%. Conclusion: Paediatric UTI was common in children less than 5 years of age. Gram negative bacteria (E. coli and Klebsiella sp were more common than gram positive bacteria. Our study revealed that multidrug resistance was higher in E.coli.

  16. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect. PMID:21413423

  17. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. of food origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    Shigella spp. are the causative agents of food-borne shigellosis, an acute enteric infection. The emergence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Shigella presents an increasing challenge for clinicians in the treatment of shigellosis. Several studies worldwide have characterized the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance in clinical Shigella isolates of human origin, however, to date, no such characterization has been reported for Shigella spp. of food origin. In this study, we characterized the genetic basis of multidrug resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets, and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Twenty-four out of 27 Shigella isolates (88.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. were as follows: Shigella flexneri (66.7%), Shigella sonnei (18.5%), and Shigella dysenteriae (3.7%). The highest resistance was to streptomycin (100.0%), then to kanamycin (95.8%), nalidixic acid (95.8%), tetracycline (95.8%), spectinomycin (93.6%), ampicillin (87.5%), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (87.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. Our results indicated that 11.1% and 74.1% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Beta-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 77.8% of isolates, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 44.4% of isolates. These data provide useful information to better understand the molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella spp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from food. PMID:25485847

  18. Influence of multidrug resistance on 18F-FCH cellular uptake in a glioblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance, aggressiveness and accelerated choline metabolism are hallmarks of malignancy and have motivated the development of new PET tracers like 18F-FCH, an analogue of choline. Our aim was to study the relationship of multidrug resistance of cultured glioma cell lines and 18F-FCH tracer uptake. We used an in vitro multidrug-resistant (MDR) glioma model composed of sensitive parental U87MG and derived resistant cells U87MG-CIS and U87MG-DOX. Aggressiveness, choline metabolism and transport were studied, particularly the expression of choline kinase (CK) and high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). FCH transport studies were assessed in our glioblastoma model. As expected, the resistant cell lines express P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein isoform 1 (MRP1) and elevated glutathione (GSH) content and are also more mobile and more invasive than the sensitive U87MG cells. Our results show an overexpression of CK and CHT1 in the resistant cell lines compared to the sensitive cell lines. We found an increased uptake of FCH (in % of uptake per 200,000 cells) in the resistant cells compared to the sensitive ones (U87MG: 0.89±0.14; U87MG-CIS: 1.27±0.18; U87MG-DOX: 1.33±0.13) in line with accelerated choline metabolism and aggressive phenotype. FCH uptake is not influenced by the two ATP-dependant efflux pumps: Pgp and MRP1. FCH would be an interesting probe for glioma imaging which would not be effluxed from the resistant cells by the classic MDR ABC transporters. Our results clearly show that FCH uptake reflects accelerated choline metabolism and is related to tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance. (orig.)

  19. Influence of multidrug resistance on {sup 18}F-FCH cellular uptake in a glioblastoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanpouille, Claire; Jeune, Nathalie le; Clotagatide, Anthony; Dubois, Francis [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet-Cancer Research Group IFRESIS 143, Saint-Etienne (France); Kryza, David; Janier, Marc [Hospice Civils de Lyon, Quai Des Celestins, CREATIS, UMR CNRS, Lyon (France); Perek, Nathalie [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet-Cancer Research Group IFRESIS 143, Saint-Etienne (France); Laboratoire de Biophysique, Faculte de Medecine, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-08-15

    Multidrug resistance, aggressiveness and accelerated choline metabolism are hallmarks of malignancy and have motivated the development of new PET tracers like {sup 18}F-FCH, an analogue of choline. Our aim was to study the relationship of multidrug resistance of cultured glioma cell lines and {sup 18}F-FCH tracer uptake. We used an in vitro multidrug-resistant (MDR) glioma model composed of sensitive parental U87MG and derived resistant cells U87MG-CIS and U87MG-DOX. Aggressiveness, choline metabolism and transport were studied, particularly the expression of choline kinase (CK) and high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). FCH transport studies were assessed in our glioblastoma model. As expected, the resistant cell lines express P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein isoform 1 (MRP1) and elevated glutathione (GSH) content and are also more mobile and more invasive than the sensitive U87MG cells. Our results show an overexpression of CK and CHT1 in the resistant cell lines compared to the sensitive cell lines. We found an increased uptake of FCH (in % of uptake per 200,000 cells) in the resistant cells compared to the sensitive ones (U87MG: 0.89{+-}0.14; U87MG-CIS: 1.27{+-}0.18; U87MG-DOX: 1.33{+-}0.13) in line with accelerated choline metabolism and aggressive phenotype. FCH uptake is not influenced by the two ATP-dependant efflux pumps: Pgp and MRP1. FCH would be an interesting probe for glioma imaging which would not be effluxed from the resistant cells by the classic MDR ABC transporters. Our results clearly show that FCH uptake reflects accelerated choline metabolism and is related to tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance. (orig.)

  20. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  1. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavaram Padmavathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for blaCTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs, fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2% of the ESBL producers harbored blaCTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIPRSXTRGENR was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%. However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS.

  2. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Padma, Krishnan; Rajasekaran, Sikhamani

    2016-01-01

    Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for bla CTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs), fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2%) of the ESBL producers harbored bla CTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIP(R)SXT(R)GEN(R)) was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%). However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27123344

  3. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Padma, Krishnan; Rajasekaran, Sikhamani

    2016-01-01

    Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for blaCTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs), fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2%) of the ESBL producers harbored blaCTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIPRSXTRGENR) was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%). However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27123344

  4. Antibiotic exposure can induce various bacterial virulence phenotypes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella is one of the most prevalent bacterial foodborne diseases in the United States and causes an estimated 1 million human cases every year. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has emerged as a public health issue as it has been associated with increased morbidity in humans and mortality in...

  5. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  6. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  7. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: treatment outcome in Denmark, 1992-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Didi; Lillebaek, Troels; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard;

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective nationwide study including all culture-verified multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) cases was performed in Denmark. The aim was to examine the long-term treatment outcome of MDR-TB, to assess if MDR-TB transmission occurs, and to evaluate a rapid mutation analysis detecting...

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Moxifloxacin in Children With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Thee, Stephanie; Anthony J Garcia-Prats; Draper, Heather R.; McIlleron, Helen M.; Wiesner, Lubbe; Castel, Sandra; Schaaf, H Simon; Hesseling, Anneke C

    2014-01-01

    Moxifloxacin serum concentrations in children receiving multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment following an oral dose of 10 mg/kg were low. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was associated with lower moxifloxacin exposure. Moxifloxacin was generally well tolerated when taken for several months.

  9. [Coxitis due to multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a HIV negative patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, D J; Simboli, N; Alberti, F A; Francos, J L; Güemes Gurtubay, J L; Ochoa, E J; Cardozo, L; Waisman, J L

    2000-01-01

    A case of an HIV negative female patient with coxofemoral arthritis of tuberculous etiology, multidrug-resistant strain, and connective tissue disease associated to glucocorticoid therapy is reported. The patient was treated with cycloserine, ethambutol, p-aminosalicylic acid and ofloxacin, with improvement of the joint lesions. Previous publications on this subject are reviewed. PMID:11050817

  10. Colistin Methanesulfonate against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeger, Lisa A.; Hovde, Laurie B.; Mitropoulos, Isaac F.; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  11. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic treatmen

  12. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  13. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Inhibits Multidrug-Resistant Gut Pathogens: Preliminary Report Performed in an Immunocompromised Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biliński, Jarosław; Grzesiowski, Paweł; Muszyński, Jacek; Wróblewska, Marta; Mądry, Krzysztof; Robak, Katarzyna; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Basak, Grzegorz W

    2016-06-01

    Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria is a consequence of gut dysbiosis. We describe the successful utilization of fecal microbiota transplantation to inhibit Klebsiella pneumoniae MBL(+) and Escherichia coli ESBL(+) gut colonization in the immunocompromised host as a novel tool in the battle against MDR microorganisms. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02461199. PMID:26960790

  14. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    OpenAIRE

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi; Abbasali Karimi; Maryam Sotoudeh Anvari; Mohammad Ali Boroumand; Hossein Ahmadi

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  15. Increased Risk for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Migratory Workers, Armenia

    OpenAIRE

    Truzyan, Nune; Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB.

  16. Increased risk for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in migratory workers, Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzyan, Nune; Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-03-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:25695488

  17. High risk and rapid appearance of multidrug resistance during tuberculosis treatment in Moldova

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Helen E.; Crudu, Valeriu; Soltan, Viorel; Ciobanu, Ana; Domente, Liliana; Cohen, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a serious problem in the former Soviet Union and may appear during TB treatment. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of, timing of and factors associated with MDR-TB diagnosis during TB treatment in Moldova, which was part of the former Soviet Union.

  18. Hospital acquired urinary tract infection by multidrug-resistant Brevundimonas vesicularis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Puneet K; Suma B Appannanavar; Harsimran Kaur; Vikas Gupta; Balvinder Mohan; Neelam Taneja

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis, a nonfermenting Gram-negative bacterium, are very rare. Here, we report the first case of multidrug-resistant hospital acquired urinary tract infection by B. vesicularis. Patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy with piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin.

  19. The Growing Problem of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in North Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kwonjune J Seung; Linton, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Kwonjune Seung and Stephen Linton from the non-governmental organization EugeneBell discuss the worryingly high levels of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis they have observed in North Korea's tuberculosis sanatoria. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  20. A cohort study on the outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝晓晖

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical curative effect and outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis(MDRTB)in elderly patients.Methods Fifty-nine elderly patients with MDR-TB were enrolled from Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital from January 2007 to January 2010,and80 younger patients with MDR-TB during the same period served as the control group.Clinical characteristics,out-

  1. Multidrug resistant bacteria in companion animals: impact on animal health and zoonotic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro

    The role of companion animals as a source of antibiotic resistant bacteria has historically been given little emphasis when compared with that of food animals. However, various resistant bacteria may cause serious treatment problems in companion animal medicine. Some of the most important multidrug......-resistant bacteria include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria will be described with focus on their prevalence across Europe, their impact on animal...

  2. Acquired and Transmitted Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis: The Role of Social Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odone, Anna; Calderon, Roger; Becerra, Mercedes C; Zhang, Zibiao; Contreras, Carmen C; Yataco, Rosa; Galea, Jerome; Lecca, Leonid; Bonds, Matthew H; Mitnick, Carole D; Murray, Megan B

    2016-01-01

    Although risk factors for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis are known, few studies have differentiated between acquired and transmitted resistance. It is important to identify factors associated with these different mechanisms to optimize control measures. We conducted a prospective cohort study of index TB patients and their household contacts in Lima, Peru to identify risk factors associated with acquired and transmitted resistance, respectively. Patients with higher socioeconomic status (SES) had a 3-fold increased risk of transmitted resistance compared to those with lower SES when acquired resistance served as the baseline. Quality of housing mediated most of the impact of SES. PMID:26765328

  3. Management of multidrug-resistant TB: novel treatments and their expansion to low resource settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, Derek James; Lewis, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite overall progress in global TB control, the rising burden of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) threatens to undermine efforts to end the worldwide epidemic. Of the 27 countries classified as high burden for MDR-TB, 17 are in ‘low’ or ‘low–middle’ income countries. Shorter, all oral and less toxic multidrug combinations are required to improve treatment outcomes in these settings. Suitability for safe co-administration with HIV drugs is also desirable. A range of strategies and several ne...

  4. Evaluation of multidrug resistance-1 gene C>T polymorphism frequency in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction. Genetic and oxidative stress factors, in addition to pulmonary and systemic inflammatory processes, play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The products of the multidrug resistance-1 gene protect lung tissue from oxidative stress. Here, we aimed to evaluate the association between the multidrug resistance-1 gene C>T polymorphism and asthma with regard to oxidative stress-related parameters of asthmatic patients.METHODS:Forty-five patients with asthma and 27 healthy age-matched controls were included in this study. Blood samples were collected in tubes with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. DNA was extracted from the blood samples. The multidrug resistance-1 gene polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction and a subsequent enzyme digestion technique. The serum levels of total oxidant status and total antioxidant status were determined by the colorimetric measurement method.RESULTS:The heterozygous polymorphic genotype was the most frequent in both groups. A significant difference in the multidrug resistance-1 genotype frequencies between groups indicated an association of asthma with the TT genotype. A significant difference between groups was found for wild type homozygous participants and carriers of polymorphic allele participants. The frequency of the T allele was significantly higher in asthmatic patients. The increase in the oxidative stress index parameter was significant in the asthma group compared with the control group.CONCLUSIONS:The multidrug resistance-1 gene C/T polymorphism may be an underlying genetic risk factor for the development of asthma via oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, leading to increased oxidative stress.

  5. Novel type of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing multidrug-resistant acute otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingfu; Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R; Zeng, Mingtao

    2009-04-01

    After our recent discovery of a Streptococcus pneumoniae 19A "superbug" (Legacy strain) that is resistant to all Food and Drug Administration-approved antimicrobial drugs for treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) in children, other S. pneumoniae isolates from children with AOM were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among 40 isolates studied, 16 (40%) were serotype 19A, and 9 (23%) were resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. Two others had unreported sequence types (STs) that expressed the 19A capsule, and 8 (88%) of the 9 multidrug-resistant strains were serotype 19A, including the Legacy strain with the new ST-2722. In genetic relatedness, ST-2722 belonged to a cluster of reported strains of S. pneumoniae in which all strains had 6 of the same alleles as ST-156. The multidrug-resistant strains related to ST-156 expressed different capsular serotypes: 9V, 14, 11A, 15C, and 19F. PMID:19331730

  6. Plasmid profiling of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Khadgi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction- Urinary tract infection is a common community-acquired bacterial disease. Escherichia coli is reported to be the major cause of urinary tract infection. Aim & Objective- The study was conducted with the aim of determining the antibiotic resistance pattern and plasmid profile of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from Urinary Tract Infection patients. Materials and Method- Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed against E. coli following the protocol for the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Plasmid DNA was isolated following the protocol of Kado and Liu. Results- Multidrug resistant isolates exhibited high resistance to drugs like Amoxicillin, Cefixime, Ciprofloxacin, Cotrimethoxazole, Norfloxacin and Ofloxacin. The plasmid profiling showed that all, except one, isolate contained at least one plasmid. A band of approximately 23 kb was seen in most of the isolates.

  7. Antimicrobial Organometallic Dendrimers with Tunable Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola; Overy, David P; Lanteigne, Martin; McQuillan, Katherine; Kerr, Russell G

    2015-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant pathogens are an increasing threat to public health. In an effort to curb the virulence of these pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are sought. Here we report a new class of antimicrobial organometallic dendrimers with tunable activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria that included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Mechanistically, these redox-active, cationic organometallic dendrimers induced oxidative stress on bacteria and also disrupted the microbial cell membrane. The minimum inhibitory concentrations, which provide a quantitative measure of the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers, were in the low micromolar range. AlamarBlue cell viability assay also confirms the antimicrobial activity of these dendrimers. Interestingly, these dendrimers were noncytotoxic to epidermal cell lines and to mammalian red blood cells, making them potential antimicrobial platforms for topical applications. PMID:26452022

  8. ABCC3 as a marker for multidrug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yanbin Zhao; Hailing Lu; An Yan; Yanmei Yang; Qingwei Meng; Lichun Sun; Hui Pang; Chunhong Li; Xiaoqun Dong; Li Cai

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) contributes to the failure of chemotherapy and high mortality in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aim to identify MDR genes that predict tumor response to chemotherapy. 199 NSCLC fresh tissue samples were tested for chemosensitivity by MTT assay. cDNA microarray was done with 5 samples with highest resistance and 6 samples with highest sensitivity. Expression of ABCC3 mRNA and protein was detected by real-time PCR and immunohistochemisty, respectively. The ass...

  9. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kesavaram Padmavathy; Krishnan Padma; Sikhamani Rajasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients fro...

  10. Fallopia japonica, a Natural Modulator, Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Safaa Yehia Eid; Mahmoud Zaki El-Readi; Mohamed Lotfy Ashour; Michael Wink

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy is controlled by the decrease of intracellular drug accumulation, increase of detoxification, and diminished propensity of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters with intracellular metabolic enzymes contribute to the complex and unresolved phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). Natural products as alternative medicine have great potential to discover new MDR inhibitors with diverse modes of action. In t...

  11. Chemotherapeutic Activities of Carthami Flos and Its Reversal Effect on Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jimmy Yiu-Cheong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun; Shi, Yi-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) represents a major cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. The need for a reduction in MDR by natural-product-based drugs of low toxicity led to the current investigation of applying medicinal herbs in future cancer adjuvant therapy. Carthami Flos (CF), the dried flower of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicinal herbs used to alleviate pain, increase circulation, and reduce blood-stasis syndrome. The drug resist...

  12. Burn Patients Infected With Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Japoni, Aziz; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Abbasi, Pejman; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the burn patients is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and remains a serious health concern among the clinicians. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients and determine multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and respective resistance patterns. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 270 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients ...

  13. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of re...

  14. Profile of delamanid for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Szumowski JD; Lynch JB

    2015-01-01

    John D Szumowski,1,2 John B Lynch11Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Division of AIDS Medicine, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA, USA Abstract: New approaches to the treatment of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are badly needed. Not only is the success rate of current treatment regimens suboptimal but existing regimens require multiple drugs and lengthy courses ...

  15. Global Progress and Challenges in Implementing New Medications for Treating Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Furin, Jennifer; Brigden, Grania; Lessem, Erica; Rich, Michael; Vaughan, Laura; Lynch, Sharonann

    2016-01-01

    Two new drugs—bedaquiline and delamanid—have recently been approved by stringent regulatory authorities to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and recommended by the World Health Organization for use under defined programmatic conditions. Introducing the medications in TB programs worldwide has not kept pace with the need for these drugs. In response, the DR-TB STAT (Drug-Resistant TB Scale-up Treatment Action Team) task force was formed in April 2015 to monitor progress and help over...

  16. Bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: great promise or disappointment?

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) may result in treatment failure and death. Bedaquiline was recently approved for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). This report examines the available data on this novel drug for the treatment of MDR-TB. PubMed searches, last updated 18 February 2015, using the terms bedaquiline, TMC 207 and R207910 identified pertinent English citations. Citation reference lists were reviewed to identify other relevant repo...

  17. Ecotope-Based Entomological Surveillance and Molecular Xenomonitoring of Multidrug Resistant Malaria Parasites in Anopheles Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Prapa Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp; Adisak Bhumiratana

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug resistant (MDR) malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax have become increasingly important in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). MDR malaria is the heritable and hypermutable property of human malarial parasite populations that can decrease in vitro and in vivo susceptibility to proven antimalarial drugs as they exhibit dose-dependent drug resistance and delayed parasite clearance time in treated patients. MDR malaria risk situations ...

  18. Plasmid profiling of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sabin Khadgi; Uddhav Timilsina; Basudha Shrestha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction- Urinary tract infection is a common community-acquired bacterial disease. Escherichia coli is reported to be the major cause of urinary tract infection. Aim & Objective- The study was conducted with the aim of determining the antibiotic resistance pattern and plasmid profile of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from Urinary Tract Infection patients. Materials and Method- Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed against E. coli following the protocol for the Kir...

  19. Antibiogram Typing of Biofield Treated Multidrug Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi; Gopal Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue in the developing countries. This study was carried out to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on multidrug resistant (MDR) clinical lab isolates (LSs) of Staphylococcus species viz. Staphylococcus haemolyticus (LS 18), Staphylococcus epidermidis (LS 21), and Staphylococcus aureus (LS 30). Each strain was divided into the two groups i.e. control and treated. The control and treated groups were analyzed for the ...

  20. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Adar, Y.; M. ; Stark; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P.; Bergh, van den, H.; Szewczyk, G.; Sarna, T.; Skladanowski, A.; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y.G.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes beca...

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Transporter Mdr1p-Mediated Uptake of a Novel Antifungal Compound

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Nuo; Li, Dongmei; Fonzi, William; Xin LI; Zhang, Lixin; Calderone, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The activity of many anti-infectious drugs has been compromised by the evolution of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. For life-threatening fungal infections, such as those caused by Candida albicans, overexpression of MDR1, which encodes an MDR efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), often confers resistance to chemically unrelated substances, including the most commonly used azole antifungals. As the development of new and efficacious antifungals has lagged far behind the ...

  2. Inhibition of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance by Celecoxib, a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kalle, Arunasree M.; Rizvi, Arshad

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor celecoxib would not only inhibit COX-2 but also help in the reversal of drug resistance in cancers by inhibiting the MDR1 efflux pump. Here, we demonstrate that celecoxib increases the sensitivity of bacteria to the antibiotics ampicillin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin by accumulating the drugs ins...

  3. Incidence and Diversity of Antimicrobial Multidrug Resistance Profiles of Uropathogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Inês Linhares; Teresa Raposo; António Rodrigues; Adelaide Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the most frequent multidrug resistant (MDR) profiles of the main bacteria implicated in community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI). Only the MDR profiles observed in, at least, 5% of the MDR isolates were considered. A quarter of the bacteria were MDR and the most common MDR profile, including resistance to penicillins, quinolones, and sulfonamides (antibiotics with different mechanisms of action, all mainly recommended by the European Association of...

  4. Transmission Dynamics of a Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Outbreak in a Dairy Farm

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzas, Cristina; Warnick, Lorin D.; James, Karen L.; Wright, Emily M.; Wiedmann, Martin; Gröhn, Yrjo T.

    2010-01-01

    Cattle are recognized as an important source of foodborne Salmonella causing human illness, particularly for antimicrobial-resistant strains. The transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella after the onset of a clinical outbreak in a dairy farm has been rarely monitored. The early transmission of a pathogen influences the outbreak size and persistence of the pathogen at the farm level and, therefore, how long the herd represents a risk for Salmonella zoonotic transmission. T...

  5. Virtual screening of ABCC1 transporter nucleotidebinding domains as a therapeutic target in multidrug resistant cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rungsardthong, Kanin; Mares- Sámano, Sergio; Penny, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    ABCC1 is a member of the ATP-binding Cassette super family of transporters, actively effluxes xenobiotics from cells. Clinically, ABCC1 expression is linked to cancer multidrug resistance. Substrate efflux is energised by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and inhibition of these events may help combat drug resistance. The aim of this study is to identify potential inhibitors of ABCC1 through virtual screening of National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds. A th...

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Poland: Identification of Emerging Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Overweg, Karin; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Sluijter, Marcel; De Groot, Ronald; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    1999-01-01

    Penicillin resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates has rapidly emerged in Poland during the last decade and has reached prevalence levels of up to 14.4% in 1997. In order to investigate the nature of this increase, a molecular epidemiological analysis of non-penicillin-susceptible multidrug-resistant pneumococci isolated in 1995 and 1996 was conducted. Thirty-seven patients who suffered mainly from upper respiratory tract infections and pneumococcal pneumonia were enrolled in this ...

  7. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Poland: identification of emerging clones

    OpenAIRE

    Overweg, Karin; Hermans, Peter; Trzcinski, K.; Sluijter, Marcel; Hryniewicz, W.

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPenicillin resistance among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates has rapidly emerged in Poland during the last decade and has reached prevalence levels of up to 14.4% in 1997. In order to investigate the nature of this increase, a molecular epidemiological analysis of non-penicillin-susceptible multidrug-resistant pneumococci isolated in 1995 and 1996 was conducted. Thirty-seven patients who suffered mainly from upper respiratory tract infections and pneumococcal pneumonia were enrol...

  8. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as...

  9. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin...

  10. Immunization against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Effectively Protects Mice in both Pneumonia and Sepsis Models

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Long, Qiong; Yang, Xu; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Jin, Xiaomei; LI Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Chen, Bin; Ma, Yanbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. Methods Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia a...

  11. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected in vivo for resistance to etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J;

    2000-01-01

    -extractable immunoreactive topoisomerase IIalpha and beta in EHR2/VP16 was reduced by 30-40% relative to that in EHR2. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) mRNA was increased 20-fold in EHR2/VP16 as compared with EHR2, whereas the expression of P-glycoprotein was unchanged. In EHR2/VP16, the steady......M. ATPase activity was slightly stimulated by daunorubicin, whereas vinblastine, verapamil, and cyclosporin A had no effect. In conclusion, development of resistance to VP16 in EHR2 is accompanied by a significant reduction in topoisomerase II (alpha and beta) and by increased expression of MRP mRNA (20......-fold). MRP displays several points of resemblance to P-glycoprotein in its mode of action: 1) like P-glycoprotein, MRP causes resistance to a range of hydrophobic drugs; 2) MRP decreases drug accumulation in the cells and this decrease is abolished by omission of energy; and 3) MRP increases efflux of...

  12. Additional drug resistance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in patients in 9 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina V; Dalton, Tracy; Ershova, Julia; Tupasi, Thelma; Caoili, Janice Campos; Van Der Walt, Martie; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Yagui, Martin; Bayona, Jaime; Contreras, Carmen; Leimane, Vaira; Via, Laura E; Kim, HeeJin; Akksilp, Somsak; Kazennyy, Boris Y; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Jou, Ruwen; Kliiman, Kai; Demikhova, Olga V; Cegielski, J Peter

    2015-06-01

    Data from a large multicenter observational study of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) were analyzed to simulate the possible use of 2 new approaches to treatment of MDR TB: a short (9-month) regimen and a bedaquiline-containing regimen. Of 1,254 patients, 952 (75.9%) had no resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs and thus would qualify as candidates for the 9-month regimen; 302 (24.1%) patients with resistance to a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable drug would qualify as candidates for a bedaquiline-containing regimen in accordance with published guidelines. Among candidates for the 9-month regimen, standardized drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 5 (interquartile range 5-6) drugs. Among candidates for bedaquiline, drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 3 (interquartile range 2-4) drugs; 26% retained susceptibility to <2 drugs. These data may assist national TB programs in planning to implement new drugs and drug regimens. PMID:25988299

  13. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from imported flamingos in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto Yukio; Watanabe Hitoshi; Noda Ayako; Ahmed Ashraf M; Sato Maiko; Shimamoto Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Imported animals, especially those from developing countries, may constitute a potential hazard to native animals and to public health. In this study, a new flock of lesser flamingos imported from Tanzania to Hiroshima Zoological Park were screened for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes. Thirty-seven Gram-negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the flamingos. Seven isolates (18.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, th...

  14. Intraventricular ciprofloxacin usage in treatment of multidrug-resistant central nervous system infections: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Karaaslan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, multidrug-resistant microorganisms appear as important nosocomial pathogens which treatment is quite difficult. As sufficient drug levels could not be achieved in cerebrospinal fluid during intravenous antibiotic therapy for central nervous system infections and due to multidrug-resistance treatment alternatives are limited. In this study, four cases of central nervous system infections due to multidrug-resistant microorganisms who were successfully treated with removal of the devices and intraventricular ciprofloxacin are presented. In conclusion, intraventricular ciprofloxacin can be used for treatment of central nervous system infections if the causative microorganism is sensitive to the drug and no other alternative therapy is available.

  15. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb. PMID:25896692

  16. Transmission of extensively drug-resistant and multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in families identified by genotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li-ping; QIN Lian-hua; ZHANG Qing; SUN Hua; HAN Min; XIAO He-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and appropriate treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) remain major challenges.We sought to elucidate that persons who share a household with drug resistance tuberculosis patients are at high risk for primary drug resistance tuberculosis and how to prevent these outbreaks.Methods We used 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit and 7-locus variable-number tandem repeat to identify household transmission of extensively drug resistant and multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in three families admitted in Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital affiliated with Tongji University.Drug susceptibility tests were done by the modified proportion method in the MGIT 960 system in the same time.Clinical data were also obtained from the subjects' medical records.Results All of the six strains were defined as Beijing genotype by the deletion-targeted multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) identification on the genomic deletion RD105.Strains from family-1 had the same minisatellite interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) pattem (232225172531) and the same MIRU pattern (3677235).Strains from family-2 had the same MIRU pattern (2212261553323) and the same MIRU pattern (3685134).Strains from family-3 did not have the same MIRU pattern and they differed at only one locus (223326173533,223325173533),and did not have the same VNTR pattern with two locus differed (3667233,3677234).Conclusions Household transmission exists in the three families.A clear chain of tuberculosis transmission within family exists.Tuberculosis susceptibility should be considered when there is more than one tuberculosis patients in a family.Household tuberculosis transmission could be prevented with adequate treatment of source patients.

  17. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  18. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  19. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    and population sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS......Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling...

  20. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions...

  1. Self-assembled micelles of amphiphilic PEGylated rapamycin for loading paclitaxel and resisting multidrug resistance cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    W. Tian; Liu, J; Guo, Y; Shen, Y.; D. Zhou; Guo, S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled micelles of amphiphilic PEG–rapamycin conjugates loaded with paclitaxel have been developed for co-delivery and simultaneous intracellular release of paclitaxel and rapamycin, bypassing the cancer cell drug resistant mechanism and maximising the synergy of dual-drug combinational therapy. This novel nanomedicine offers 20-fold improved potency over free paclitaxel against a model multidrug resistant human breast cancer cell.

  2. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo, M. A.; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M.J.; Giaccone, G.; Broxterman, H. J.; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively,...

  3. Moxifloxacin Improves Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Ofloxacin-Resistant Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jung-Yien; Chien, Shun-Tien; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Yu, Chong-Jen; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear whether the use of moxifloxacin (MFX), a newer synthetic fluoroquinolone, results in better outcomes in patients with ofloxacin (OFX)-resistant multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). During the period from April 2006 to December 2013, a total of 2,511 patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) were treated at a TB referral hospital in southern Taiwan. Of the 2,511 patients, 325 (12.9%) had MDR-TB, and of those 325 patients, 81 (24.9%) had OFX-resistant MDR-TB and were included in the study. Among the 81 patients with OFX-resistant MDR-TB, 50 (61.7%) were successfully treated and 31 (38.3%) had unfavorable outcomes, including treatment failure (n = 25; 30.9%), loss to follow-up (n = 2; 2.5%), and death (n = 4; 4.9%). Patients treated with MFX had a significantly higher rate of treatment success (77.3% versus 43.2%; odds ratio [OR] = 4.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.710 to 11.646, P = 0.002) than patients not treated with MFX, especially among those infected with MFX-susceptible isolates (40.7%) or isolates with low-level resistance to MFX (28.4%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that treatment with MFX (adjusted odds ratio = 6.54, 95% CI = 1.44 to 29.59, P = 0.015) was the only independent factor associated with treatment success. Mutation at codon 94 in the gyrA gene was the most frequent mutation (68.0%) associated with high-level MFX resistance. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that treatment with MFX was also an independent factor associated with early culture conversion (hazard ratio = 3.12, 95% CI = 1.48 to 6.54, P = 0.003). Our results show that a significant proportion of OFX-resistant MDR-TB isolates were susceptible or had low-level resistance to MFX, indicating that patients with OFX-resistant MDR-TB benefit from treatment with MFX. PMID:27216062

  4. Mechanism of multidrug resistance of human small cell lung cancer cell line H446/VP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-ling; YAN Yun-li; ZHOU Na-jing; HAN Shuo; ZHAO Jun-xia; CAO Cui-li; Lü Yu-hong

    2010-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of human small cell lung cancer cell line resistance to etoposide (VP-16), H446/VP.Methods The cell viability was measured by M∏ assay. Immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting methods were used to detect the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), bcl-2, bax and the topoisomerase Ⅱ (Topo Ⅱ) expressions in H446 and H446/VP cells after treated with or without VP-16.Results The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of VP-16 on H446 cells was 49 mg/L, and 836 mg/L was for H446/VP cells. The expressions of MDR1 and bcl-2 were up-regulated, while the amounts of bax and Topo Ⅱ were reduced in H446/VP cells. After treated with 49 mg/L of VP-16, it showed that the drug could significantly inhibit bcl-2 and Topo Ⅱ expressions, and increase bax expression in H446 cells compared with that of H446/VP cells.Conclusions The H446/VP cell was stably resistant to VP-16. The decreased expression of Topo Ⅱ was correlated with the H446/VP multidrug resistance. The elevated expressions of MDR1, and the altered apoptotic pathways also played an important role in VP-16 induced multidrug resistance of SCLC.

  5. Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsions for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nannan; Gao, Yanan; Ji, Hongyu; Wu, Linhua; Qi, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaona; Tang, Jingling

    2016-08-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR), including intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance, is a major problem in tumor chemotherapy. Here, we proposed a strategy for modulating intrinsic and/or acquired multidrug resistance by altering the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting the transport function of P-gp, increasing the intracellular concentration of its substrate anticancer drugs. Vitamin E derivative-based nanoemulsions containing paclitaxel (MNEs-PTX) were fabricated in this study, and in vitro anticancer efficacy of the nanoemulsion system was evaluated in the paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780/Taxol. The MNEs-PTX exhibited a remarkably enhanced antiproliferation effect on A2780/Taxol cells than free paclitaxel (PTX) (p Vitamin E derivative-based multifunctional nanoemulsion (MNEs) obviously increased intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate). Overexpression of Bcl-2 is generally associated with tumor drug resistance, we found that MNEs could reduce Bcl-2 protein level and increase Bax protein level. Taken together, our findings suggest that anticancer drugs associated with MNEs could play a role in the development of MDR in cancers. PMID:26710274

  6. Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Fish and Fish Handlers in Maiduguri, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsat Ali Grema

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistant bacteria were isolated from fresh fish and fish handlers using conventional methods of bacterial isolation such as colonial morphology, gram staining and biochemical tests. The bacteria isolated include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp, E. coli, Klebsiella sp, Proteus sp. and Brucella sp. bacterial isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing using disc diffusion technique against ten antimicrobial agents. S. aureus isolates showed resistance to gentamycin, tetracycline, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin and cefoxitin while Streptococcus sp were resistant to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and clindamycin. All the bacterial isolates were resistant to tetracycline while susceptible to cefoxitin, cephazolin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The multi drug resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolates showed resistance to three and more antimicrobial agents while none was resistant to 10 antimicrobial agents. All other isolates were resistant to four and more different antimicrobial agents while no isolates was resistant to one and ten antimicrobial agents. Therefore the continuous monitoring and surveillance of multi-drug resistant bacteria in fish and fish handlers will not only reduce the risk of disease to the fishes but public health hazard to fish handlers and consumers in general.

  7. In vitro Antibacterial Activity of Aqueous and Ethanol Extracts of Aristolochia indica and Toddalia asiatica Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatadri, B; Arunagirinathan, N; Rameshkumar, M R; Ramesh, Latha; Dhanasezhian, A; Agastian, P

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have developed multidrug resistance against available antimicrobial agents. Infectious diseases caused by these multidrug-resistant bacteria are major causes of morbidity and mortality in human beings. Synthetic drugs are expensive and inadequate for the treatment of diseases, causing side effects and ineffective against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The medicinal plants are promising to have effective antimicrobial property due to presence of phytochemical compounds like alkaloids, flavanoids, tannins and phenolic compounds. The present study aimed to find the antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were identified by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Production of β-lactamases (extended spectrum β-lactamases, metallo β-lactamase and AmpC β-lactamase) were identified by combination disc method. Antibacterial activity of aqueous and ethanol extract of Aristolochia indica and Toddalia asiatica were detected by agar well diffusion assay and minimum inhibitory concentration. All bacteria used in this study showed antibiotic resistance to ≥3 antibiotics. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Vibrio cholerae were found to be positive for β-lactamase production. Ethanol extract of Aristolochia indica showed more significant antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria than Toddalia asiatica. Ethanol extracts of Aristolochia indica and Toddalia asiatica showed minimum inhibitory concentration values of 50-100 μg/ml and 100-200 μg/ml, respectively against multidrug-resistant bacteria. From this study, it was concluded that Aristolochia indica has more potential to treat multidrug-resistant bacteria than Toddalia asiatica. PMID:26997710

  8. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Babapour; Azam Haddadi; Reza Mirnejad; Seyed-Abdolhamid Angaji; Nour Amirmozafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To check biofilm formation by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates and show their susceptibility to different antibiotics and investigate a possible link between establishment of biofilm and multidrug resistance. Methods: This study was performed on clinical samples collected from patients with nosocomial infections in three hospitals of Tehran. Samples were initially screened by culture and biochemical tests for the presence of different species of Acinetobacter. Iden-tifications were further confirmed by PCR assays. Their susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics of different classes were determined by disc diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The ability to produce biofilm was investigated using methods:culture on Congo red agar, microtiter plate, and test tube method. Results: From the overall clinical samples, 156 specimens were confirmed to contain A. baumannii. The bacteria were highly resistant to most antibiotics except polymyxin B. Of these isolates, 10.26% were able to produce biofilms as shown on Congo red agar. However, the percentage of bacteria with positive biofilm in test tube, standard microtiter plate, and modified microtiter plate assays were 48.72%, 66.66%, and 73.72%, respec-tively. At least 92%of the biofilm forming isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain A026, a Clinical Multidrug-Resistant Isolate Carrying Tn2010

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Zhihai; Zhou, Wenqing; Yao, Kaihu; Liu, Li; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Yonghong; Feng, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a primary cause of bacterial infection in humans. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of S. pneumoniae strain A026, which is a multidrug-resistant strain isolated from cerebrospinal fluid.

  10. Global Introduction of New Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Drugs—Balancing Regulation with Urgent Patient Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Timothy; Ben Amor, Yanis

    2016-01-01

    New treatments for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are urgently needed. Two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have recently been released, and several new drugs and treatment regimens are in the pipeline. Misuse of TB drugs is a principal cause of drug resistance. As new drugs and regimens reach the market, the need to make them available to patients must be balanced with regulation of their use so that resistance to the new drugs can be prevented. To foster the rational use of ...

  11. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, K E; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T A; Chin, J E; Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L.; Gazdar, A F; Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B.; Von Hoff, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in vitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severa...

  12. Characterization of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lianwei; Li, Ruichao; Lin, Dachuan; Zhou, Yuanjie; Fu, Aisi; Ding, Qiong; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio alginolyticus was first isolated from food products, with β-lactamases encoded by blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaCMY-2 being the major mechanisms mediating their cephalosporin resistance. The complete sequence of a multidrug resistance plasmid, pVAS3-1, harboring the blaCMY-2 and qnrVC4 genes was decoded in this study. Its backbone exhibited genetic homology to known IncA/C plasmids recoverable from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting its possible origin in Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:26976864

  13. Establishment of a human hepatoma multidrug resistant cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To establish a multidrug-resistant hepatoma cell line(SK-Hep-1),and to investigate its biological characteristics.METHODS:A highly invasive SK-Hep-1 cell line of human hepatocellular carcinoma,also known as malignant hepatoma was incubated with a high concentration of cisplatin(CDDP) to establish a CDDP-resistant cell subline(SK-Hep-1/CDDP).The 50% inhibitory dose(IC50) values and the resistance indexes [(IC50 SK-Hep-1/CDDP)/(IC50 SK-Hep-1)] for other chemotherapeutic agents and the growth curve of cell...

  14. The role of half-transporters in multidrug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, S E; Robey, R; Miyake, K;

    2001-01-01

    role of drug transporters in clinical drug resistance. These newly identified transporters include additional members of the MRP family, ABC2, and a new half-transporter, MXR/BCRP/ABCP1. This half-transporter confers high levels of resistance to mitoxantrone, anthracyclines, and the camptothecins SN-38...

  15. INVITRO AND INVIVO MODULATION OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE WITH AMIODARONE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGRAAF, WTA; DEVRIES, EGE; UGES, DRA; NANNINGA, AG; MEIJER, C; VELLENGA, E; MULDER, POM; MULDER, NH

    1991-01-01

    The modulating effect on drug resistance of amiodarone (AM) and its metabolite desethylamiodarone (DEA) was studied in a P-glycoprotein-positive human colon carcinoma cell line COLO 320, and a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line GLC4 and its adriamycin (Adr)-resistant subline GLC4-Adr (both P-

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Isolates from Swine in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwu, Chinwe Juliana; Iweriebor, Benson Chuks; Obi, Larry Chikwelu; Basson, Albertus Kotze; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2016-07-01

    The exposure of farm animals to antimicrobials for treatment, prophylaxis, or growth promotion can select for resistant bacteria that can be transmitted to humans, and Salmonella as an important zoonotic pathogen can act as a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance determinants. We assessed the antibiogram profiles of Salmonella species isolated from pig herds in two commercial farms in South Africa. Two hundred fifty-eight presumptive Salmonella isolates were recovered from the fecal samples of 500 adult pigs. Specific primers targeting Salmonella serogroups A, B, C1, C2, and D were used to determine the prevalence of different serogroups. Only serogroup A (n = 48) was detected, while others were not. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the confirmed Salmonella serogroup A isolates was performed by using the disk diffusion method against a panel of 18 antibiotics. All the 48 isolates were resistant to tetracycline and oxytetracycline, while 75% were resistant to ampicillin, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, and streptomycin. All the isolates exhibited multidrug resistance, with the predominant phenotype being against 11 antibiotics, and multiple antibiotic resistance index ranged between 0.3 and 0.6. The incidence of genes encoding resistance against ampicillin (ampC), tetracycline (tetA), and streptomycin (strA) were 54, 61, and 44%, respectively. We conclude that healthy pigs are potential reservoirs of multidrug-resistant Salmonella that could be transmitted to humans through the food chain and, hence, a significant public health threat. PMID:27357044

  17. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  18. Outbreak of mastitis in sheep caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus faecalis in Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanciu, G; Marogna, G; Paglietti, B; Cappuccinelli, P; Leori, G; Rappelli, P

    2013-03-01

    An outbreak of infective mastitis due to Enterococcus faecalis occurred in an intensive sheep farm in north Sardinia (Italy). E. faecalis, which is only rarely isolated from sheep milk, was unexpectedly found in 22·3% of positive samples at microbiological examination. Forty-five out of the 48 E. faecalis isolates showed the same multi-drug resistance pattern (cloxacillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, clindamycin, oxytetracycline). E. faecalis isolates were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and all 45 multi-drug resistant strains showed an indistinguishable macrorestiction profile, indicating their clonal origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of mastitis in sheep caused by E. faecalis. PMID:22595402

  19. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr324 in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated

  20. Colistin Therapy in a 23-Week Gestational-Age Neonate with Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Lulic-Botica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant pathogens are becoming more difficult to treat with significantly increasing infection rates. The lack of new antibiotics to combat these strains has led to the resurgence of older antibiotics. This case highlights the first reported use of colistimethate sodium treatment in a 23-week gestational-age neonate with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia who developed acute renal failure and seizures shortly after initiation of treatment.

  1. An Evaluation of Biofield Treatment on Susceptibility Pattern of Multidrug Resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: An Emerging Global Opportunistic Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a Gram-negative bacillus, an opportunistic pathogen, particularly among nosocomial infections. Multi-drug resistant strains are associated with very high rate of morbidity and mortality in severely immunocompromised patients. Present study was designed to evaluate the effect of biofield treatment against multidrug resistant S. maltophilia. Clinical sample of S. maltophilia was collected and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield trea...

  2. An Evaluation of Biofield Treatment on Susceptibility Pattern of Multidrug Resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: An Emerging Global Opportunistic Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ( S. maltophilia ) is a Gram-negative bacillus, an opportunistic pathogen, particularly among nosocomial infections. Multi-drug resistant strains are associated with very high rate of morbidity and mortality in severely immunocompromised patients. Present study was designed to evaluate the effect of biofield treatment against multidrug resistant S. maltophilia . Clinical sample of S. maltophilia was collected and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield t...

  3. Combination of essential oils and antibiotics reduce antibiotic resistance in plasmid-conferred multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Hu, Cai Ping; Yiap, Beow Chin

    2013-06-15

    In this study we investigated the relationship between several selected commercially available essential oils and beta-lactam antibiotics on their antibacterial effect against multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibacterial activity of essential oils and antibiotics was assessed using broth microdilution. The combined effects between essential oils of cinnamon bark, lavender, marjoram, tea tree, peppermint and ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, carbenicillin, ceftazidime, meropenem, were evaluated by means of the checkerboard method against beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interaction between the combinations. Substantial susceptibility of the bacteria toward natural antibiotics and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibiotics were noted in some paired combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Out of 35 antibiotic-essential oil pairs tested, four of them showed synergistic effect (FIC≤0.5) and 31 pairs showed no interaction (FIC>0.5-4.0). The preliminary results obtained highlighted the occurrence of a pronounced synergistic relationship between piperacillin/cinnamon bark oil, piperacillin/lavender oil, piperacillin/peppermint oil as well as meropenem/peppermint oil against two of the three bacteria under study with a FIC index in the range 0.26-0.5. The finding highlighted the potential of peppermint, cinnamon bark and lavender essential oils being as antibiotic resistance modifying agent. Reduced usage of antibiotics could be employed as a treatment strategy to decrease the adverse effects and possibly to reverse the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance. PMID:23537749

  4. Effect of curcumin on multidrug resistance in resistant human gastric carcinoma cell line SGC7901/VCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qing TANG; Hu BI; Jian-qiang FENG; Jian-guo CAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the reversal effects of curcumin on multidrug resistance (MDR)in a resistant human gastric carcinoma cell line. Methods: The cytotoxic effect of vincristine (VCR) was evaluated by MTT assay. The cell apoptosis induced by VCR was determined by propidium iodide (PI)-stained flow cytometry (FCM) and a morphological assay using acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) dual staining. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function was demonstrated by the accumulation and efflux of rhodamine123 (Rh123) using FCM. The expression of P-gp and the activation of caspase-3 were measured by FCM using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-P-gp and anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibodies, respectively.Results: Curcumin, at concentrations of 5 μmol/L, 10 μmol/L, or 20 μmol/L, had no cytotoxic effect on a parent human gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC7901) or its VCR-resistant variant cell line (SGC7901/VCR). The VCR-IC50 value of the SGC7901/VCR cells was 45 times more than that of the SGC7901cells and the SGC7901/VCR cells showed apoptotic resistance to VCR. SGC7901/VCR cells treated with 5μmol/L, 10 μmol/L, or 20 μmol/L curcumin decreased the IC50 value of VCR and promoted VCR-mediated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin (10μmol/L) increased Rh 123 accumulation and inhibited the efflux of Rh 123 in S GC7901/VCR cells, but did not change the accumulation and efflux of Rh123 in SGC7901cells. P-gp was overexpressed in SGC7901/VCR cells, whereas it was downregulated after a 24-h treatment with curcumin (10 μmol/L). Resistant cells treated with 1μmol/L VCR alone showed 77% lower levels of caspase-3 activation relative to SGC7901 cells, but the activation of caspase-3 in the resistant cell line increased by 44% when cells were treated with VCR in combination with curcumin.Conclusion: Curcumin can reverse the MDR of the human gastric carcinoma SGC7901/VCR cell line. This might be associated with decreased P-gp function and expression, and the promotion of

  5. Rapid Emergence of Multidrug Resistant, H58-Lineage Salmonella Typhi in Blantyre, Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Gaskell, Katherine; Wong, Vanessa; Msefula, Chisomo; Selemani, George; Kumwenda, Save; Allain, Theresa J; Mallewa, Jane; Kennedy, Neil; Bennett, Aisleen; Nyirongo, Joram O.; Nyondo, Patience A.; Zulu, Madalitso D.; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Between 1998 and 2010, S. Typhi was an uncommon cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) in Blantyre, Malawi and it was usually susceptible to first-line antimicrobial therapy. In 2011 an increase in a multidrug resistant (MDR) strain was detected through routine bacteriological surveillance conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH). Methods Longitudinal trends in culture-confirmed Typhoid admissions at QECH were described between 1998–2014. A retrospective review of patie...

  6. Effects of Rifampin and Multidrug Resistance Gene Polymorphism on Concentrations of Moxifloxacin▿

    OpenAIRE

    Weiner, Marc; Burman, William; Luo, Chi-Cheng; Peloquin, Charles A.; Engle, Melissa; Goldberg, Stefan; Agarwal, Vipin; Vernon, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Treatment regimens combining moxifloxacin and rifampin for drug-susceptible tuberculosis are being studied intensively. However, rifampin induces enzymes that transport and metabolize moxifloxacin. We evaluated the effect of rifampin and the human multidrug resistance gene (MDR1) C3435T polymorphisms (P-glycoprotein) on moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. This was a single-center, sequential design study with 16 volunteers in which sampling was performed after four daily oral doses of mo...

  7. Assessing the impact of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in children: an exploratory qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Franck, C.; Seddon, JA; Hesseling, AC; Schaaf, HS; Skinner, D.; Reynolds, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background While the prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is high among children in the Western Cape of South Africa, the psychosocial implications of treatment for children with MDR-TB remain poorly understood. We sought to explore how MDR-TB and its treatment impact children on an individual, familial, and social level. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 children and caregivers purposively sampled from a prospective clinical cohort of children. Th...

  8. Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter ventilator-associated pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Shete Vishal; Ghadage Dnyaneshwari; Muley Vrishali; Bhore Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) due to a multi-drug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter is one of the most dreadful complications, which occurs in the critical care setting. Aims and objectives: To find out the incidence of Acinetobacter infection in VAP cases, to determine various risk factors responsible for acquisition of Acinetobacter infection and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 endotracheal aspirate...

  9. Retrospective Comparison of Levofloxacin and Moxifloxacin on Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yoon, Ho Il; Kim, Jae Yeol; Lee, Sang-Min; Yang, Seok-Chul; Lee, Jae Ho; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Lee, Choon-Taek; Chung, Hee Soon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims To compare the effect of levofloxacin and moxifloxacin on treatment outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Methods A retrospective analysis of 171 patients with MDR-TB receiving either levofloxacin or moxifloxacin was performed. Treatment responses were categorized into treatment success (cured and treatment completed) or adverse treatment outcome (death, failure, and relapsed). Results The median age of the patients was 42.0 years. Approximate...

  10. Modulation of function of multidrug resistance associated-proteins by Kaempferia parviflora extracts and their components

    OpenAIRE

    Patanasethanont, Denpong; Nagai, Junya; Matsuura, Chie; Fukui, Kyoko; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-Orn; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora on multidrug resistance associated-proteins (MRP)-mediated transport in A549 cells were examined. The cells employed express MRP1 and MRP2, but not P-glycoprotein. The cellular accumulation of calcein, an MRP substrate, was significantly increased by various MRP inhibitors without being affected by verapamil, a typical P-glycoprotein inhibitor. Ethanol and aqueous extracts from Kaempferia ...

  11. The Outcomes of Using Colistin for Treating Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Species Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Seung-Kwan; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Seong-Ho; Choi, Jae-Phil; Kim, Sung-Han; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo

    2011-01-01

    Despite the identification of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates that demonstrate susceptibility to only colistin, this antimicrobial agent was not available in Korea until 2006. The present study examined the outcomes of patients with multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter species bloodstream infection and who were treated with or without colistin as part of their regimen. The colistin group was given colistin as part of therapy once colistin became available in 2006. The non-colistin group w...

  12. Utilization of Colistin for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Sabuda, Deana M; Kevin Laupland; Johann Pitout; Bruce Dalton; Harvey Rabin; Thomas Louie; John Conly

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colistin is uncommonly used in clinical practice; however, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms has rekindled interest in this potentially toxic therapeutic option. The present study describes the authors’ experience with colistin in the management of patients who were infected with metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL)-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa within the Calgary Health Region (Calgary, Alberta).METHOD: Adult patients who received colistimethate sodium (colistin) between ...

  13. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E;

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  14. Treatment outcomes for multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients under DOTS-Plus : a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Shuo; 冯硕

    2013-01-01

    Objective The consistent emerging of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases are increasingly becoming a major threat and challenge in global TB control, especially in some resource-limited settings like India, China, South Africa. Currently there is no widely acknowledged treatment strategy for MDR-TB. Effectiveness and of current DOTS-Plus strategy is remaining controversial. This systematic review aims to investigate treatment outcomes for MDR-TB under DOTS-Plus and potential f...

  15. Plasma Drug Activity in Patients on Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mpagama, Stellah G.; Ndusilo, Norah; Stroup, Suzanne; Kumburu, Happiness; Peloquin, Charles A; Gratz, Jean; Houpt, Eric R.; Kibiki, Gibson S; Scott K. Heysell

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about plasma drug concentrations relative to quantitative susceptibility in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We previously described a TB drug activity (TDA) assay that determines the ratio of the time to detection of plasma-cocultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis versus control growth in a Bactec MGIT system. Here, we assess the activity of individual drugs in a typical MDR-TB regimen using the TDA assay. We also examined the relationship of the TDA to t...

  16. HIV, multidrug-resistant TB and depressive symptoms: when three conditions collide

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kumar, Ajay MV; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Valikayath, Asmaa; Jha, Santosh; Jadhav, Bindoo; Ladomirska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Management of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly challenging. Such patients are subject to long and potentially toxic treatments and may develop a number of different psychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depressive disorders. A mental health assessment before MDR-TB treatment initiation may assist in early diagnosis and better management of psychiatric illnesses in patients already having two stigmatising and...

  17. Rapid emergence of multidrug resistant, H58-lineage Salmonella typhi in Blantyre, Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Katherine Gaskell; Vanessa Wong; Chisomo Msefula; George Selemani; Save Kumwenda; Allain, Theresa J.; Jane Mallewa; Neil Kennedy; Aisleen Bennett; Joram O Nyirongo; Nyondo, Patience A.; Zulu, Madalitso D.; Julian Parkhill; Gordon Dougan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Between 1998 and 2010, S. Typhi was an uncommon cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) in Blantyre, Malawi and it was usually susceptible to first-line antimicrobial therapy. In 2011 an increase in a multidrug resistant (MDR) strain was detected through routine bacteriological surveillance conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH).METHODS: Longitudinal trends in culture-confirmed Typhoid admissions at QECH were described between 1998-2014. A retrospective review of pati...

  18. Genome of Multidrug-Resistant Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NA114 from India ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Avasthi, Tiruvayipati Suma; Kumar, Narender; Baddam, Ramani; Hussain, Arif; Nandanwar, Nishant; Jadhav, Savita; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2011-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) causes serious infections in people at risk and has a significant environmental prevalence due to contamination by human and animal excreta. In developing countries, UPEC assumes importance in certain dwellings because of poor community/personal hygiene and exposure to contaminated water or soil. We report the complete genome sequence of E. coli strain NA114 from India, a UPEC strain with a multidrug resistance phenotype and the capacity to produce extend...

  19. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aynur Camkıran; Aycan Kundakcı; Coşkun Araz; Arash Pirat; Pınar Zeyneloğlu; Hande Arslan; Gülnaz Arslan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as fo...

  20. A case of acute postoperative keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by multidrug resistant Klebsiella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Bajracharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy lady of 42 years underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for granular dystrophy. The very next day, it was complicated by development of infectious keratitis. The organism was identified as multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Donor corneal button may be implicated in the transmission of infection in an otherwise uneventful surgery and follow-up. Nosocomial infections are usually severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to treat. Finally, the lady had to undergo therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for complete resolution of infection.

  1. Synthesis of multidrug resistance modulator LY335979 labeled with deuterium and tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeskis, B.A. [Eli Lilly and Co., Lilly Research Labs., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    DIDEUTERO AND DITRITIOISOTOPOMERS OF THE MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE MODULATOR LY335979 WERE PREPARED BY INITIAL BROMINATION OF 5-HYDROXYQUINOLINE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS FOLLOWED BY MITSUNOBU COUPLING OF 6,8-DIBROMO-5-HYDROXYQUINOLINE WITH (S)-GLYCIDOL. OPENING OF THE RESULTING EPOXIDE WITH DIBENZOSUBERYLPIPERAZINE LY335995 RESULTED IN DIBROMOANALOG OF LY335979, WHICH WAS FINALLY REDUCTIVELY DEBROMINATED WITH DEUTERIUM OR TRITIUM IN THE PRESENCE OF PALLADIUM ON CARBON. (AUTHOR).

  2. Short-course treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the STREAM trials

    OpenAIRE

    Riya Moodley; Thomas R. Godec

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a threat to global TB control, as suboptimal and poorly tolerated treatment options have resulted in largely unfavourable outcomes for these patients. The last of six cohort studies conducted in Bangladesh which assessed a new shorter regimen using currently available TB drugs showed promising results and offered the possibility of a more acceptable and more effective regimen than the one recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The ai...

  3. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ramar Perumal Samy; Jayapal Manikandan; Mohammed Al Qahtani

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100  μ g of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphyloc...

  4. Assessment of Antibiogram of Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Enterobacter aerogenes after Biofield Energy Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi; Gopal Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes (E. aerogenes) has been reported as the versatile opportunistic pathogen associated with the hospital infections worldwide. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on multidrug resistant clinical lab isolates (LSs) of E. aerogenes. The MDR isolates of E. aerogenes (i.e., LS 45 and LS 54) were divided into two groups, i.e., control and treated. Samples were analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, minimu...

  5. Overcoming multidrug resistance by polymer inhibitors of ABC transporter MDR1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cuchalová, Lucie; Šubr, Vladimír; Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Eckschlager, T.; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel

    Vancouver: Keystone Symposia, 2015. 78 /J1-1035/. [Integrating Metabolism and Tumor Biology , PI 3-Kinase Signaling Pathways in Disease. 13.01.2015-18.01.2015, Vancouver] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/12/1254 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : multidrug resistance * drug delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  6. An Effect of Biofield Treatment on Multidrug-resistant Burkholderia cepacia: A Multihost Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) is an opportunistic, Gram negative pathogen which causes infection mainly in immunocompromised population and associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of biofield treatment on multidrug resistant B. cepacia. Clinical sample of B. cepacia was divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. The analysis was done after 10 days of treatment and compared with con...

  7. Characterization of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profile of Biofield Treated Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella are opportunistic pathogens that cause a wide spectrum of severe diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of biofield treatment on multidrug resistant strain of K. oxytoca with respect to antibiogram pattern along with biochemical study and biotype number. Clinical lab isolate of K. oxytoca was divided into two groups i.e. control and treated. Control group remain untreated and treated group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield. The analysis was...

  8. Biofield Treatment: An Alternative Approach to Combat Multidrug-Resistant Susceptibility Pattern of Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, a Gram-negative encapsulated aerobic bacillus associated with bacteremia and urinary tract infections. As biofield therapy is increasingly popular in biomedical heath care, so present study aimed to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on antimicrobial sensitivity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), biochemical study, and biotype number of multidrug resistant strain of R. ornithinolytica. ...

  9. Biofield Treatment: An Alternative Approach to Combat Multidrug-Resistant Susceptibility Pattern of Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, a Gram-negative encapsulated aerobic bacillus associated with bacteremia and urinary tract infections. As biofield therapy is increasingly popular in biomedical heath care, so present study aimed to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on antimicrobial sensitivity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), biochemical study, and biotype number of multidrug resistant strain of R. ornithinolytica. Clinic...

  10. Redox Control of Multidrug Resistance and Its Possible Modulation by Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Aysegul Cort; Tomris Ozben; Luciano Saso; Chiara De Luca; Liudmila Korkina

    2016-01-01

    Clinical efficacy of anticancer chemotherapies is dramatically hampered by multidrug resistance (MDR) dependent on inherited traits, acquired defence against toxins, and adaptive mechanisms mounting in tumours. There is overwhelming evidence that molecular events leading to MDR are regulated by redox mechanisms. For example, chemotherapeutics which overrun the first obstacle of redox-regulated cellular uptake channels (MDR1, MDR2, and MDR3) induce a concerted action of phase I/II metabolic en...

  11. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Stella; To, Kenneth KW; Lin, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studie...

  12. Association between Genetic Polymorphism of Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene and Sasang Constitutions

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun-Ju Kim; Seung Yeon Hwang; Ju-Ho Kim; Hye-Jung Park; Sang-Gyu Lee; Si-Woo Lee; Jong-Cheon Joo; Yun-Kyung Kim

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) is a gene that expresses P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug transporter protein. Genetic polymorphisms of MDR1 can be associated with Sasang constitutions because Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM) prescribes different drugs according to different constitutions. A Questionnaire for Sasang Constitution Classification II (QSCC II) was used to diagnose Sasang constitutions. Two hundred and seven healthy people whose Sasang constitutions had been identified were tested....

  13. Deficiency of multidrug resistance 2 contributes to cell transformation through oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tebbi, Ali; Levillayer, Florence; Jouvion, Grégory; Fiette, Laurence; Soubigou, Guillaume; Varet, Hugo; Boudjadja, Nesrine; Cairo, Stefano; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Carninci, Piero; Carissimo, Annamaria; di Bernardo, Diego; Wei, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 2 (Mdr2), also called adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette B4 (ABCB4), is the transporter of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the canalicular membrane of mouse hepatocytes, which plays an essential role for bile formation. Mutations in human homologue MDR3 are associated with several liver diseases. Knockout of Mdr2 results in hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whereas the pathogenesis in Mdr2 −/− mice has been largely attributed to the...

  14. African Flora Has the Potential to Fight Multidrug Resistance of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Kuete; Thomas Efferth

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continuous efforts from scientists of diverse fields are necessary not only to better understand the mechanism by which multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells occur, but also to boost the discovery of new cytotoxic compounds to fight MDR phenotypes. Objectives. The present review reports on the contribution of African flora in the discovery of potential cytotoxic phytochemicals against MDR cancer cells. Methodology. Scientific databases such as PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Googl...

  15. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  16. Viral Escape in the Central Nervous System with Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1

    OpenAIRE

    Béguelin, Charles Antoine; Vázquez, Miriam; Bertschi, Manuel; Yerly, S; de Jong, Denise; Gutbrod, Klemens; Rauch, Andri; Cusini, Alexia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 who developed ataxia and neurocognitive impairment due to viral escape within the central nervous system (CNS) with a multidrug-resistant HIV-1 despite long-term viral suppression in plasma. Antiretroviral therapy optimization with drugs with high CNS penetration led to viral suppression in the CSF, regression of ataxia, and improvement of neurocognitive symptoms.

  17. Viral Escape in the Central Nervous System with Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguelin, C; Vázquez, M; Bertschi, M; Yerly, S; de Jong, D; Gutbrod, K; Rauch, A; Cusini, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 who developed ataxia and neurocognitive impairment due to viral escape within the central nervous system (CNS) with a multidrug-resistant HIV-1 despite long-term viral suppression in plasma. Antiretroviral therapy optimization with drugs with high CNS penetration led to viral suppression in the CSF, regression of ataxia, and improvement of neurocognitive symptoms. PMID:26885540

  18. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Bidart Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB using sodium nitrate (NaNO3 in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3 as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  19. Role of serum interleukin-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant oral lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Sinny; Marwah, Akanksha; Kaushik, Smita; Garg, Vijay K; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell mediated immune response. T cells locally present in the involved tissues release cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), which contributes to pathogenesis of OLP. Also IL-6 has been associated with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression by keratinocytes. Correspondingly, upregulation of MRP was found in OLP. We conducted this study to evaluate the effects of various drugs on serum IL-6 in OLP; and correlation of these effects with the natur...

  20. In Vitro Activity of Rifampicin and Verapamil Combination in Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Demitto, Fernanda de Oliveira; do Amaral, Renata Claro Ribeiro; Maltempe, Flaviane Granero; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Scodro, Regiane Bertin de Lima; Lopes, Mariana Aparecida; Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany R.; Canezin, Pedro Henrique; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the combination of rifampicin (RIF) and verapamil (VP) against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv reference strain and six multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis clinical isolates by determining Time-Kill Curves and the ability to efflux drug by fluorometry. The RIF+VP combination showed synergism in one MDR clinical isolate. For the other five MDR clinical isolates, the drug combination showed no interaction. The MDR clinical is...

  1. Omega 3 fatty acids chemosensitize multidrug resistant colon cancer cells by down-regulating cholesterol synthesis and altering detergent resistant membranes composition

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, Giada; Corsetto, Paola A.; Campia, Ivana; Montorfano, Gigliola; Kopecka, Joanna; Castella, Barbara; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Rizzo, Angela M; Riganti, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), two membrane transporters involved in multidrug resistance of colon cancer, is increased by high amounts of cholesterol in plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). It has never been investigated whether omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which modulate cholesterol homeostasis in dyslipidemic syndromes and have chemopreventive effects in colon cancer, may affect the respo...

  2. Rapid and Economical Detection of Multidrug Resistant (MDR) Tuberculosis: Can Rifampicin Resistance (RMPr) be a Surrogate Marker for MDR-TB ?

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Kembhavi; Sarala Menon; Nilma Hirani; Vaishali Wabale; Ameeta Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) relies on prompt laboratory detection of drug resistance. The study was aimed to investigate utility of GenoType MTBDRplus (Line probe assay: Genotypic) as rapid method for MDR-TB detection and for rapid economical detection of MDR-TB, Direct Sensitivity Test (Phenotypic-Direct) was evaluated. Further an attempt also made to investigate the importance of Rifampicin resistance (RMPr) as a surrogate marker for multidrug resistanc...

  3. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:27296960

  4. Expression of protein kinase C in multidrug resistant cells of colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) in multidrug resistant cells of colorectal carcinoma after ionizing irradiation and observe the effect of PKC on occurrence and development of the multidrug resistant. Methods: The effect of PKC on multidrug resistant HCG-8 cells of colorectal carcinoma after treated with X-ray was detected by indirect immunofluorescence technique and flow cytometry. Results: Compared with sham- irradiation group, the positive percentage of PKC was increased significantly (P<0.05) after HCT-8 cells were treated with 2 Gy X-ray, the positive percentages of PKC were increased insignificantly after HCT-8 cells were treated with low dose (50, 100 mGy) before high dose of irradiation, the increasing of positive percentage of PKC in the group of 200 mGy + 2 Gy was significant (P<0.05). Compared with the group only treated with high dose of irradiation, the positive percentage of PKC in the group of 100 mGy + 2 Gy was decreased significantly (P< 0.05). Conclusion: High dose of ionizing irradiation can increase the expression of PKC in colorectal carcinoma significantly, reversely when HCT-8 cells are pretreated with low dose before high dose there is no additional increase of PKC expression. (authors)

  5. High heterogeneity of plasma membrane microfluidity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Céline; Roche, Yann; Millot, Christine; Deturche, Régis; Royer, Pascal; Manfait, Michel; Plain, Jérôme; Jeannesson, Pierre; Millot, Jean-Marc; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2009-05-01

    Diffusion-time distribution analysis (DDA) has been used to explore the plasma membrane fluidity of multidrug-resistant cancer cells (LR73 carcinoma cells) and also to characterize the influence of various membrane agents present in the extracellular medium. DDA is a recent single-molecule technique, based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), well suited to retrieve local organization of cell membrane. The method was conducted on a large number of living cells, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of plasma membrane microviscosity, and plasma membrane micro-organization, between the cells of the same line. Thus, we clearly reveal the higher heterogeneity of plasma membrane in multidrug-resistant cancer cells in comparison with the nonresistant ones (denoted sensitive cells). We also display distinct modifications related to a membrane fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol, and two revertants of multidrug resistance, verapamil and cyclosporin-A. A relation between the distribution of the diffusion-time values and the modification of membrane lateral heterogeneities is proposed.

  6. Multidrug Resistance of a Porin Deletion Mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, Joachim; Mailaender, Claudia; Etienne, Gilles; Daffé, Mamadou; Niederweis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane of unusually low permeability which contributes to their intrinsic resistance to many agents. It is assumed that small and hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane via porins, whereas hydrophobic antibiotics may diffuse through the membrane directly. A mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis lacking the major porin MspA was used to examine the role of the porin pathway in antibiotic sensitivity. Deletion of the mspA gene caused high-level resistance of...

  7. Genotyping and serotyping of macrolide and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from carrier children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S F Swedan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Streptococcus pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen commonly carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of children, is associated with increasing rates of treatment failures due to a worldwide increase in drug resistance. We investigated the carriage of S. pneumoniae in children 5 years or younger, the identity of prevalent serotypes, the rates of resistance to macrolides and other antimicrobial agents and the genotypes responsible for macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 157 children under 5 years for cultural isolation of S. pneumoniae. Antibiogram of isolates  was determined using the disk diffusion test, and the minimal inhibitory concentration to macrolides was determined using the E-test. Isolate serotypes and macrolide resistance genes, erm(B and mef(E, were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: S. pneumoniae was recovered from 33.8% of children; 41.9% among males and 21.9% among females (P = 0.009. The highest carriage rate occurred among age groups 7-12 months and 49-60 months. Most frequent serotypes were 19F, 6A/B, 11A, 19A, 14 and 15B/C.  Resistance to macrolides was 60.4%. Resistance to oxacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin was present among 90.6%, 54.7% and 32.1% of isolates, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Isolates resistant to one or more macrolide drugs were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Resistance to clindamycin or oxacillin coexisted with macrolide resistance. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B, mef(E and erm(B and mef(E genes were present at rates of 43.8%, 37.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Erm(B and mef(E were associated with very high level and moderate-to-high level resistance to macrolides, respectively. Conclusion: A significant proportion of children harboured macrolide and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  9. Utility of lytic bacteriophage in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the major cause of increase in morbidity and mortality in neonates. One thousand six hundred forty-seven suspected septicemic neonates were subjected for microbiological analysis over a period of 5 years. Forty-two P. aeruginosa were isolated and the antibiogram revealed that 28 P. aeruginosa were resistant to almost all the common drugs used (multidrug-resistant. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is one of the most critical problems of modern medicine. As a result, a novel and most effective approaches for treating infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are urgently required. In this context, one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages (viruses that kill bacteria in the treatment of infection caused by drug-resistant bacteria. In the present study, the utility of lytic bacteriophages to rescue septicemic mice with multidrug-resistant (MDR P. aeruginosa infection was evaluated. MDR P. aeruginosa was used to induce septicemia in mice by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of 10 7 CFU. The resulting bacteremia was fatal within 48 hrs. The phage strain used in this study had lytic activity against a wide range of clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa. A single i.p. injection of 3 x 10 9 PFU of the phage strain, administered 45 min after the bacterial challenge, was sufficient to rescue 100% of the animals. Even when treatment was delayed to the point where all animals were moribund, approximately 50% of them were rescued by a single injection of this phage preparation. The ability of this phage to rescue septicemic mice was demonstrated to be due to the functional capabilities of the phage and not to a nonspecific immune effect. The rescue of septicemic mice could be affected only by phage strains able to grow in vitro on the bacterial host used to infect the animals and when such strains are heat-inactivated, they lose their ability to rescue the infected mice. Multidrug-resistant bacteria have

  10. Occurrence of Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zunita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 22 Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 50 samples from 8 stable horses. They are positive in the catalase and coagulase tests. Upon testing the cultures with SLIDEX test kit all formed agglutination within a few seconds, confirming they are of S. aureus. When cultured onto MSA, all isolates formed yellow colonies. However, none of the isolates produced blue colonies on ORSAB indicating that there were no MRSA among the S. aureus. There were 13 isolates which were multiresistant. Eleven are resistant to eight out of ten antibiotics tested. All these isolates were found to originate from stable G. One isolate is resistant to 5 antibiotics while another one isolate is resistant to 3 antibiotics. The rest of the isolates are not multiresistant to the antibiotics tested. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(6.000: 165-167

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from imported flamingos in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumoto Yukio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imported animals, especially those from developing countries, may constitute a potential hazard to native animals and to public health. In this study, a new flock of lesser flamingos imported from Tanzania to Hiroshima Zoological Park were screened for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes. Thirty-seven Gram-negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the flamingos. Seven isolates (18.9% showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, the most common being against: ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and nalidixic acid. Molecular analyses identified class 1 and class 2 integrons, β-lactamase-encoding genes, blaTEM-1 and blaCTX-M-2 and the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB. This study highlights the role of animal importation in the dissemination of multidrug-resistant bacteria, integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes from one country to another.

  12. Multidrug Resistance in Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Hospital Effluent and the Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Varela, Ana Rita; Pereira, Thamiris V.; Fochat, Romário C.; Manaia, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed to assess if hospital effluents represent an important supplier of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria that, being discharged in the municipal collector, may be disseminated in the environment and bypassed in water quality control systems. From a set of 101 non-Escherichia coli Gram-negative bacteria with reduced susceptibility to quinolones, was selected a group of isolates comprised by those with the highest indices of MDR (defined as nonsuscepti...

  13. Whole-genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Htin Lin; Tun, Thanda; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Köser, Claudio U; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Aung, Si Thu; Lwin, Thandar; Thinn, Kyi Kyi; Crump, John A; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Cook, Gregory M; Hill, Philip C

    2016-09-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health threat in Myanmar. An initial study was conducted to explore the potential utility of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) for the diagnosis and management of drug-resistant TB in Myanmar. Fourteen multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were sequenced. Known resistance genes for a total of nine antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in Myanmar were interrogated through WGS. All 14 isolates were MDR-TB, consistent with the results of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST), and the Beijing lineage predominated. Based on the results of WGS, 9 of the 14 isolates were potentially resistant to at least one of the drugs used in the standard MDR-TB regimen but for which phenotypic DST is not conducted in Myanmar. This study highlights a need for the introduction of second-line DST as part of routine TB diagnosis in Myanmar as well as new classes of TB drugs to construct effective regimens. PMID:27530852

  14. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  15. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  16. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more potent types used to treat MDR TB. Treatment for XDR TB is much more difficult, expensive, and lasts longer. ... of treatment; When healthcare providers prescribe the wrong treatment, the ... poor quality. Drug-resistant TB is more common in people who: Do not ...

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick; Fanning, Séamus

    2016-09-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1-positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  18. ALTERED MRP IS ASSOCIATED WITH MULTIDRUG-RESISTANCE AND REDUCED DRUG ACCUMULATION IN HUMAN SW-1573 CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EIJDEMS, EWHM; ZAMAN, GJR; DEHAAS, M; VERSANTVOORT, CHM; FLENS, MJ; SCHEPER, RJ; KAMST, E; BORST, P; BAAS, F

    1995-01-01

    We have analysed the contribution of several parameters, e.g. drug accumulation, MDR1 P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and topoisomerase (topo) II, to drug resistance in a large set of drug-resistant variants of the human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line SW-15

  19. Multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium from humans in France (1993 to 2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, François-Xavier; Guesnier, Françoise; Guibert, Véronique; Timinouni, Mohammed; Demartin, Marie; Polomack, Lucette; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes (R types), the phage types and XbaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types, the genes coding for resistance to beta-lactams and to quinolones, and the class 1 integrons among a representative sample of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates collected from humans in 2002 through the French National Reference Center for Salmonella (NRC-Salm) network. The trends in the evolution of antimicrobial resistance of serotype Typhimurium were reviewed by using NRC-Salm data from 1993, 1997, 2000, and 2003. In 2002, 3,998 isolates of serotype Typhimurium were registered at the NRC-Salm among 11,775 serotyped S. enterica isolates (34%). The most common multiple antibiotic resistance pattern was resistance to amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin and spectinomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline (ACSSpSuTe R type), with 156 isolates (48.8%). One isolate resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins due to the production of TEM-52 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase was detected (0.3%), and one multidrug-resistant isolate was highly resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC > 32 mg/liter). We found that 57.2% of the isolates tested belonged to the DT104 clone. The main resistance pattern of DT104 isolates was R type ACSSpSuTe (83.2%). However, evolutionary changes have occurred within DT104, involving both loss (variants of Salmonella genomic island 1) and acquisition of genes for drug resistance to trimethoprim or to quinolones. PFGE profile X1 was the most prevalent (74.5%) among DT104 isolates, indicating the need to use a more discriminatory subtyping method for such isolates. Global data from the NRC-Salm suggested that DT104 was the main cause of multidrug resistance in serotype Typhimurium from humans from at least 1997 to 2003, with a roughly stable prevalence during this period. PMID:16517842

  20. Role of Mitochondrial Translocation of Telomerase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with Multidrug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Xianlong; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT) in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells) with differential resistance index (RI) to cisplatin (CDDP) were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line) with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/C...

  1. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  2. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  3. Transmembrane transporters ABCC – structure, function and role in multidrug resistance of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dębska

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to cytotoxic drugs is a significant problem of systemic treatment of cancers. Apart from drug inactivation, changes in target enzymes and proteins, increased DNA repair and suppression of apoptosis, an important mechanism of resistance is an active drug efflux from cancer cells. Drug efflux across the cell membrane is caused by transport proteins such as ABC proteins (ATP-binding cassette. This review focuses on the ABCC protein subfamily, whose members are responsible for multidrug cross-resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. The authors discuss the structure of ABCC proteins, their physiological function and diseases provoked by mutations of respective genes, their expression in many different malignancies and its connection with resistance to anticancer drugs, as well as methods of reversion of such resistance.

  4. Impact of HIV co-infection on the evolution and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldholm, Vegard; Rieux, Adrien; Monteserin, Johana; Lopez, Julia Montana; Palmero, Domingo; Lopez, Beatriz; Ritacco, Viviana; Didelot, Xavier; Balloux, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is fueled by a parallel Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic, but it remains unclear to what extent the HIV epidemic has been a driver for drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we assess the impact of HIV co-infection on the emergence of resistance and transmission of Mtb in the largest outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in South America to date. By combining Bayesian evolutionary analyses and the reconstruction of transmission networks utilizing a new model optimized for TB, we find that HIV co-infection does not significantly affect the transmissibility or the mutation rate of Mtb within patients and was not associated with increased emergence of resistance within patients. Our results indicate that the HIV epidemic serves as an amplifier of TB outbreaks by providing a reservoir of susceptible hosts, but that HIV co-infection is not a direct driver for the emergence and transmission of resistant strains. PMID:27502557

  5. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants with multidrug resistance: history of origin, genetic and molecular mechanisms of resistance, and emerging challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, A A; Zaĭchikova, M V; Danilenko, V N

    2012-01-01

    The review summarizes the data on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations that lead to multidrug resistance (MDR) to various antibiotics. MDR strains arose over the past 30 years as a variety of antituberculosis drugs were introduced in medicine, and they largely discount the results of chemotherapy for tuberculosis. The most dangerous of them are strains with extensive drug resistance (XDR), which are resistant to four or five different drugs on average. The molecular mechanisms that make a strain resistant are considered. XDR and MDR strains result from successive and usually independent resistance mutations, which arise in various regions of the mycobacterial genome. In addition, the formation of resistant strains is affected by the phenomenon of tolerance and mycobacterial latency in infected tissues. PMID:22567849

  6. Management of multidrug-resistant TB: novel treatments and their expansion to low resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Derek J; Lewis, Joseph M

    2016-03-01

    Despite overall progress in global TB control, the rising burden of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) threatens to undermine efforts to end the worldwide epidemic. Of the 27 countries classified as high burden for MDR-TB, 17 are in 'low' or 'low-middle' income countries. Shorter, all oral and less toxic multidrug combinations are required to improve treatment outcomes in these settings. Suitability for safe co-administration with HIV drugs is also desirable. A range of strategies and several new drugs (including bedaquiline, delamanid and linezolid) are currently undergoing advanced clinical evaluations to define their roles in achieving these aims. However, several clinical questions and logistical challenges need to be overcome before these new MDR-TB treatments fulfil their potential. PMID:26884496

  7. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahat Ejaz; Usman A Ashfaq; Sobia Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S.aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk) were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S.aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration.Results:Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo) exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  8. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  9. Use of Ceftolozane/Tazobactam in the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in a Pediatric Leukemia Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Samuel L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; DePombo, April M; Bhatti, Micah M; Tverdek, Frank P; Gettys, Suzanne C; Nicolau, David P; Nunez, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of increasing concern in pediatric patients. Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combination with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas; however, no data exist on its use in children. This report summarizes the treatment of a multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection in a pediatric leukemia patient with ceftolozane/tazobactam and provides the first description of its pharmacokinetics in pediatrics. PMID:27254038

  10. The Transcription Factor Mrr1p Controls Expression of the MDR1 Efflux Pump and Mediates Multidrug Resistance in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Morschhäuser; Katherine S. Barker; Liu, Teresa T.; Julia BlaB-Warmuth; Ramin Homayouni; P David Rogers

    2007-01-01

    Constitutive overexpression of the MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, is a frequent cause of resistance to fluconazole and other toxic compounds in clinical Candida albicans strains, but the mechanism of MDR1 upregulation has not been resolved. By genome-wide gene expression analysis we have identified a zinc cluster transcription factor, designated as MRR1 (multidrug resistance regulator), that was coordinately upregu...

  11. Retroviral transfer of a murine cDNA for multidrug resistance confers pleiotropic drug resistance to cells without prior drug selection.

    OpenAIRE

    Guild, B C; Mulligan, R C; Gros, P.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have constructed a retrovirus expression vector that carries the murine mdr cDNA transcribed under the control of the human H4 histone promoter to examine the feasibility of efficiently transferring a multidrug resistance phenotype to cells without requiring drug selection. This approach will facilitate the transfer of mdr cDNA to hematopoietic progenitor cells for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo. The retrovirus vector pHmdr has been used for transmission and expression of the md...

  12. Threat of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, Dharm R.; Cavaco, Lina; Nath, Gopal;

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates from Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. MethodsThis study was conducted over a period of 11 months (September 2012–August 2013) at the Manipal...... using disc diffusion test by cefoxitin (30 μg) and oxacillin (1 μg) disc, further confirmation was done by detection of mecA gene using PCR. ResultsOut of 400 Staphylococcus aureus strains, 139 (34.75%) were found to be MRSA. Among the MRSA isolates, 74 (53.2%) were from inpatient departments, 58 (41...

  13. Inhibition of ABC transporters associated with multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first part of this dissertation (chapters 1 and 2) deals with the inhibition of the ABC transporters ABCB1 (p-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein). Less lipophilic and better water soluble analogues of the known ABCB1 inhibitor tariquidar were synthesized from one central building block via Cu(I)-catalyzed N/O-arylation reactions. These compounds were tested for their inhibitory activity against the ABCB1 transporter in a flow cytometric calcein-AM efflux assay and a...

  14. The Emerging Threat of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Organisms in Long-Term Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    O’Fallon, Erin; Pop-Vicas, Aurora; D’Agata, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Background Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCF) are among the main reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Multidrug-resistant gram-negative organisms (MDRGN) are emerging as important pathogens among LTCF residents. Data on the clinical epidemiology of MDRGN, esp...

  15. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  16. Role of Mitochondrial Translocation of Telomerase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlong Ling, Lei Wen, Yuan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells with differential resistance index (RI to cisplatin (CDDP were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells was 5.14, 8.66, and 14.25, respectively, and all the cell lines showed cross-resistance to Doxorubicin (DOX and 5-Fuorouracil (5-FU. The apoptosis rates in drug-resistant cells were significantly reduced. Cell cycle analysis revealed the ratio of drug-resistant cells in G2/M and S phases increased, while that in G1 phase decreased. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay demonstrated, with the gradual elevation in RI, increasing hTERT translocated from the nuclei to the mitochondria, while real-time PCR indicated the shortening of telomere length in drug-resistant cells under the chemotherapeutic stress and the reduction of damaged mtDNA with the increase in RI. Furthermore, JC-1 staining also indicated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential in drug-resistant cells. The mitochondrial translocation of hTERT increases in multidrug-resistant cells and exerts protective effect on mitochondrial function. Drug-resistant tumor cells escape from apoptosis through hTERT-mediated mitochondrial protection. Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may serve as an underlying mechanism of MDR.

  17. Role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xianlong; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle of cancer chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of mitochondrial translocation of telomerase (hTERT) in MDR of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In this study, three HCC cell lines (SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells) with differential resistance index (RI) to cisplatin (CDDP) were induced by pulse treatment of SK-Hep1 (human hepatocellular cell line) with CDDP in vitro. The RI of SK-Hep1/CDDP1 cells, SK-Hep1/CDDP2 cells and SK-Hep1/CDDP3 cells was 5.14, 8.66, and 14.25, respectively, and all the cell lines showed cross-resistance to Doxorubicin (DOX) and 5-Fuorouracil (5-FU). The apoptosis rates in drug-resistant cells were significantly reduced. Cell cycle analysis revealed the ratio of drug-resistant cells in G2/M and S phases increased, while that in G1 phase decreased. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot assay demonstrated, with the gradual elevation in RI, increasing hTERT translocated from the nuclei to the mitochondria, while real-time PCR indicated the shortening of telomere length in drug-resistant cells under the chemotherapeutic stress and the reduction of damaged mtDNA with the increase in RI. Furthermore, JC-1 staining also indicated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential in drug-resistant cells. The mitochondrial translocation of hTERT increases in multidrug-resistant cells and exerts protective effect on mitochondrial function. Drug-resistant tumor cells escape from apoptosis through hTERT-mediated mitochondrial protection. Mitochondrial translocation of hTERT may serve as an underlying mechanism of MDR. PMID:22991493

  18. High prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens from Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baral Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases and people of all age-groups and geographical locations are affected. The impact of disease is even worst in low-resource developing countries due to unaware of the UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens and the possibility of transfer of MDR traits between them. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of MDR bacterial isolates from UTI patients, the antibiotic resistance pattern and the conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance phenotypes in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Results Two hundred and nineteen bacterial isolates were recovered from 710 urine samples at Kathmandu Model hospital during the study period. All samples and isolates were investigated by standard laboratory procedures. Among the significant bacterial growth (30.8%, 219 isolates, 41.1% isolates were MDR. The most prevailing organism, E. coli (81.3%, 178 isolates was 38.2% MDR, whereas second most common organism, Citrobacter spp. (5%, 11 isolates was found 72.7% MDR. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production was detected in 55.2% of a subset of MDR E. coli isolates. Among the 29 MDR E. coli isolates, plasmids of size ranging 2-51 kb were obtained with different 15 profiles. The most common plasmid of size 32 kb was detected in all of the plasmid-harbored E. coli strains. The majority of E. coli isolates investigated for the multidrug resistance transfer were able to transfer plasmid-mediated MDR phenotypes along with ESBL pattern with a frequency ranging from 0.3 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 10-7 to an E. coli HB101 recipient strain by conjugation. Most of the donor and recipient strain showed high levels of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values for commonly-used antibiotics. Conclusions The high prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens was observed. Particularly, resistance patterns were alarmingly higher for amoxycillin, co

  19. Effect of methylxanthines derived from pentoxifylline on P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper study of multidrug resistance (MDR) antitumor agents - P-glycoprotein (PGP) is presented. The ability of pentoxifylline (PTX) to depress resistance mediated by overexpression of PGP in mouse leukemic cell line L 121 ONCR resistant to vincristine (VCR) was described earlier. PTX depressed the resistance of these cells in a dose and time dependent manner. This effect was accompanied by increased level of [3H]-vincristine accumulation by these cells. The methylxanthines with different length of this aliphatic side chain were synthesized and their capability to depress MDR was tested. The results indicated that the position of carbonyl group plays a crucial role for the ability of the derivative to depress MDR of L 121 ONCR cells. (authors)

  20. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: rapid detection of resistance to rifampin and high or low levels of isoniazid in clinical specimens and isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijdea, R.; Stegger, M.; Sosnovskaja, A.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new improved multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) hybridisation assay to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The assay, developed to detect rifampin (rpoB) and isoniazid (katG) gene mutations causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance, w...... tool to combat and prevent new cases of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11......The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new improved multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) hybridisation assay to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The assay, developed to detect rifampin (rpoB) and isoniazid (katG) gene mutations causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance, was...

  1. Profile of delamanid for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szumowski JD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available John D Szumowski,1,2 John B Lynch11Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Division of AIDS Medicine, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA, USA Abstract: New approaches to the treatment of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB are badly needed. Not only is the success rate of current treatment regimens suboptimal but existing regimens require multiple drugs and lengthy courses and may lead to significant toxicities. The treatment landscape is beginning to shift, however, with the recent approvals of the new TB drugs bedaquiline and delamanid. Delamanid, a dihydro-imidazooxazole, has been shown to have excellent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in both in vitro and in murine TB models. It has also recently been reported to improve rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant TB when added to an optimized background regimen. Although generally well tolerated, delamanid has been associated with QT prolongation, which may be of particular clinical concern when paired with other TB drugs that may also have this effect, most notably the fluoroquinolones. Ongoing studies will help to clarify delamanid’s role in the treatment of drug-resistant TB. Keywords: delamanid, OPC-67683, Deltyba, tuberculosis

  2. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  3. Anticancer effects of the organosilicon multidrug resistance modulator SILA 421.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Zeillinger, Robert; Kars, Meltem Demirel; Zalatnai, Attila; Molnar, Jozsef; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2012-07-01

    1,3-dimethyl-1,3-bis(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-bis{3-[1(4-butylpiperazinyl)]-propyl}-disiloxan-tetrahydrochlorid (SILA 421) is a compound that was developed as modulator of the ABC cassette transporter P-glycoprotein. Furthermore, it exerted antimicrobial toxicity, vascular effects, downregulation of chaperone induction and plasmid curing in bacterial cells. Here, this drug was found to possess cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines that do not overexpress P-gp, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging between 1.75±0.38 μM for GLC14 small cell lung cancer and 34.00±4.75 μM for PC-3 prostate cancer cells. HL-60 leukemia and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in response to SILA 421. Assessment of global gene expression of SILA 421-treated HL-60 cells was employed to identify cellular pathways affected by the compound and revealed disturbance of DNA replication, transcription and production of apparently misfolded proteins. Endoplasmatic reticulum stress and downregulation of cell cycle, cellular repair mechanisms and growth factor-related signaling cascades eventually resulted in induction of apoptosis in this cell line. In addition to the well established P-gp inhibitory effect of SILA compounds, reversal of resistance to taxanes, which had been reported for SILA 421 and the related molecule SILA 409, may be linked to downregulation of gene expression of kinesins. Interference with DNA replication and transcription seems to be the common denominator of antimicrobial activity and plasmid curing, as well as anticancer toxicity in human cell lines. Thus, in consideration of the full range of putative cellular targets found in the present work, the application of these SILA compounds for treatment of tumors should be further evaluated. PMID:22263791

  4. In vitro antimicrobial potential of Terminalia chebula fruit extracts against multidrug-resistant uropathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anwesa Bag; Subir Kumar Bhattacharyya; Nishith Kumar Pal; Rabi Ranjan Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Terminalia chebula Retz. (combretaceae) is called the “King of Medicine” in Tibet and is always listed at the top of the list of “Ayurvedic Materia Medica” because of its extraordinary power of healing. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible in vitro antibacterial potential of different solvent extracts of T. chebula fruit against multidrug-resistant uropathogens. Methods: A total of 52 multidrug-resistant uropathogenic bacteria were used in this study. Successive extractions of T. chebula fruits were performed with solvents of different polarities. Agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assay methods were used for antibacterial susceptibility testing. Kill-kinetics study was done to know the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Qualitative phytochemical screening was done to know the major phytoconstituents present in the plant material. Acute oral toxicity study in mice was performed to evaluate the toxic potential of the plant material, if any. Results:The ethanol extract of T. chebula fruits demonstrated a strong antimicrobial activity against all the test isolates and found to be most effective over others. Kill-kinetics study showed dose and time dependent antibacterial activity of ethanol extract. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of high concentration of phenolics and low concentration of flavonoids and terpenoids. In acute oral toxicity study, no gross behavioral changes were observed in mice at recommended dosage level and 24 h LD50 of ethanol extract was found to be >4 g/kg, p.o. in mice. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the use of Terminalia chebula fruit in folk medicine to treat various infectious diseases and could be useful for the development of alternative/ complementary medicine for multidrug-resistant uropathogens.

  5. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins: Export pumps for conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2003-01-01

    Many endogenous or xenobiotic lipophilic substances are eliminated from the cells by the sequence of oxidation, conjugation to an anionic group (glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate) and transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space. The latter step is mediated by integral membrane glycoproteins belonging to the superfamily of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters. A subfamily, referred as ABCC, includes the famous/infamous cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the sulfonylurea receptors (SUR 1 and 2), and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). The name of the MRPs refers to their potential role in clinical multidrug resistance, a phenomenon that hinders the effective chemotherapy of tumors. The MRPs that have been functionally characterized so far share the property of ATP-dependent export pumps for conjugates with glutathione (GSH), glucuronate or sulfate. MRP1 and MRP2 are also mediating the cotransport of unconjugated amphiphilic compounds together with free GSH. MRP3 preferentially transports glucuronides but not glutathione S-conjugates or free GSH. MRP1 and MRP2 also contribute to the control of the intracellular glutathione disulfide (GSSG) level. Although these proteins are low affinity GSSG transporters, they can play essential role in response to oxidative stress when the activity of GSSG reductase becomes rate limiting. The human MRP4, MRP5 and MRP6 have only partially been characterized. However, it has been revealed that MRP4 can function as an efflux pump for cyclic nucleotides and nucleoside analogues, used as anti-HIV drugs. MRP5 also transports GSH conjugates, nucleoside analogues, and possibly heavy metal complexes. Transport of glutathione S-conjugates mediated by MRP6, the mutation of which causes pseudoxantoma elasticum, has recently been shown. In summary, numerous members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein family serve as export pumps that prevent the accumulation of anionic conjugates

  6. The serum resistome of a globally disseminated multidrug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli clone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Duy Phan

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli ST131 is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with antibiotic resistance; however, this phenotype alone is unlikely to explain its dominance amongst multidrug resistant uropathogens circulating worldwide in hospitals and the community. Thus, a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the fitness of E. coli ST131 is required. In this study, we employed hyper-saturated transposon mutagenesis in combination with multiplexed transposon directed insertion-site sequencing to define the essential genes required for in vitro growth and the serum resistome (i.e. genes required for resistance to human serum of E. coli EC958, a representative of the predominant E. coli ST131 clonal lineage. We identified 315 essential genes in E. coli EC958, 231 (73% of which were also essential in E. coli K-12. The serum resistome comprised 56 genes, the majority of which encode membrane proteins or factors involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS biosynthesis. Targeted mutagenesis confirmed a role in serum resistance for 46 (82% of these genes. The murein lipoprotein Lpp, along with two lipid A-core biosynthesis enzymes WaaP and WaaG, were most strongly associated with serum resistance. While LPS was the main resistance mechanism defined for E. coli EC958 in serum, the enterobacterial common antigen and colanic acid also impacted on this phenotype. Our analysis also identified a novel function for two genes, hyxA and hyxR, as minor regulators of O-antigen chain length. This study offers novel insight into the genetic make-up of E. coli ST131, and provides a framework for future research on E. coli and other Gram-negative pathogens to define their essential gene repertoire and to dissect the molecular mechanisms that enable them to survive in the bloodstream and

  7. New drugs to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the case for bedaquiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibert E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eric Leibert, Mauricio Danckers, William N Rom Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis develops spontaneous resistance mutants to virtually every drug in use. Courses of therapy select for these mutants and drug-resistant organisms emerge. The development of drug-resistant organisms has reached the point that drug resistance now threatens to undermine global success against tuberculosis (TB. New drugs are needed. The last new class of drugs specifically developed for treatment of TB was the rifamycins over 40 years ago. New funding sources and the development of product development partnerships have energized the TB drug development effort. There are now more TB drugs in development than at any time in the past. The first of these drugs to be developed and marketed was bedaquiline. Bedaquiline has an entirely novel mechanism of action and so should be active against otherwise highly resistant organisms. It acts on the transmembrane component of adenosine triphosphate synthase and acts by preventing electron transport. This raises the exciting possibility that bedaquiline may be active against less metabolically active organisms. Drug–drug interactions between rifamycins and the cytochrome P450-3A system will limit bedaquiline's utility and create complexity in treatment regimens. In clinical trials, treatment with bedaquiline added to a background multidrug-resistant TB regimen was associated with earlier culture conversion and higher cure rates, but there were unexplained excess deaths in the bedaquiline arms of these trials. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. They required a black box warning about excess deaths and require that a phase III trial be completed. A planned Phase

  8. Probenecid-resistant J774 cell expression of enhanced organic anion transport by a mechanism distinct from multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C; Steinberg, T H; Neu, H C; Cohen, D; Horwitz, S B; Hickman, S; Silverstein, S C

    1993-08-01

    Macrophages possess organic anion transporters that carry membrane-impermeant fluorescent dyes, such as lucifer yellow (LY) and carboxy-fluorescein, from the cytoplasm into endosomes and out of the cells. Probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor, blocks these processes. Prolonged incubation of J774 cells in medium containing 2.5 mM probenecid eventually kills most of these cells. To identify J774 variants that express increased organic anion transport activity, we selected probenecid-resistant (PBR) J774 cells by growing them in medium containing increasing concentrations of probenecid. When PBR and unselected J774 cells were loaded with LY by ATP4- permeabilization, the amount of LY accumulated by the PBR cells was about half that in the unselected cells. This difference was abolished by adding 10 mM probenecid to the medium in which the cells were loaded, suggesting that the diminished LY accumulation in PBR cells was due to enhanced LY secretion and that the PBR cells expressed increased organic anion transport activity. Direct comparison of LY efflux from J774 and PBR J774 cells showed a faster initial rate of secretion of LY from PBR J774 cells than from unselected J774 cells. To determine whether LY efflux is mediated by P-glycoprotein, we compared LY efflux in unselected J774 cells, PBR J774 cells, and multidrug-resistant J774 cells (J7.C1). LY efflux from J7.C1 cells was not sensitive to verapamil, which inhibits multidrug-resistance transporters, and reverses the multidrug-resistant phenotype of J7.C1 cells. The rates of LY efflux from unselected J774 and J7.C1 cells were virtually identical.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7909709

  9. Prolonged exposure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) COL strain to increasing concentrations of oxacillin results in a multidrug-resistant phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Aagaard, Lone;

    2007-01-01

    increased efflux activity. Resistance to ERY was accompanied by resistance to kanamycin, amikacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. This is the first time that a multidrug-resistant phenotype has been experimentally produced as a consequence of exposure of the organism to an antibiotic...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae Isolate from a Clinical Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Andrew R.; Krapp, Fiorella; Henry, Christopher S.; Tyo, Keith E.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae, KP_Z4175. This strain, isolated as part of a hospital infection-control screening program, is resistant to multiple β-lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:27231362

  11. Place of Colistin-Rifampicin Association in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Meningitis: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahraoui Souhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is an important challenge due to the accumulation of resistance of this bacteria and low meningeal diffusion of several antimicrobial requiring use of an antimicrobial effective combination to eradicate these species. We report a case of Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant nosocomial meningitis which was successfully treated with intravenous and intrathecal colistin associated with rifampicin.

  12. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C.; Lancheros, Cesar A. C.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Celso V Nakamura; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Andrade, Célia G.T. de J.; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Renata K. T. Kobayashi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistanc...

  13. Population genetics of multi-drug resistant (MDR) IncA/C plasmid in Salmonella enterica isolated from animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food animals harboring Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica are a potential source for acquisition of zoonotic pathogens. Plasmids (small, self-replicating, extra-chromosomal DNA) are often associated with antimicrobial resistance and plasmids carrying MDR genes have been found to be a maj...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  15. Mice lacking multidrug resistance protein 1a show altered dopaminergic responses to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1a (MDR1a) potentiated methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced decreases of dopamine (DA) and dopamine transport protein in mouse brain one week after MDMA administration. In the present study, we examined if mdr1a wild-type (mdr1a +/+) and knock-out (mdr1a −/−) mice differentially handle the acute effects of MDMA on the nigrostriatal DA system 0–24 h following a single drug injection. 3-way ANOVA revealed significant 2-way interactions of strain X time (F5,1...

  16. Two pimarane diterpenoids from Ephemerantha lonchophylla and their evaluation as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, G X; Wang, T S; Yin, L; Pan, Y; Guo, Y L; LeBlanc, G A; Reinecke, M G; Watson, W H; Krawiec, M

    1998-01-01

    Two new pimarane diterpenoids, lonchophylloids A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the stems of Ephemerantha lonchophylla. The structures of 1 and 2 were established predominantly through the application of extensive 1H-and 13C-NMR, 1D- and 2D-homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation NMR experiments, and X-ray diffraction methods. Consistent with structure--activity predictions, both compounds were capable of sensitizing cells that expressed the multidrug resistance phenotype to the toxicity of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:9461658

  17. Spread of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsogiannou, Maria; Drougka, Eleanna; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Jelastopulu, Eleni; Petinaki, Efthimia; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Christofidou, Myrto

    2013-02-01

    An outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) infections in a university hospital is described. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of 240 isolates revealed that 152 patients, mainly in the intensive care unit (ICU), were colonized or infected with MDRPA, the majority with O11. All metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive isolates carried the bla(VIM-2) or bla(VIM-1) gene. One or more type III secretion system toxin genes were detected in most isolates. Five dominant pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types were characterized, associated with ST235, ST111, ST253, ST309, and ST639. PMID:23241381

  18. Multi-drug resistance 1 genetic polymorphism and prediction of chemotherapy response in Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Haddadin William J; Matalka Ismail I; Alzoubi Karem H; Khabour Omar F.; Alshogran Osama Y; Mhaidat Nizar M; Mahasneh Ibraheem O; Aldaher Ahmad N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The human multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1), which encodes the major trans-membrane transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), was found to be associated with susceptibility to cancer and response to chemotherapy. The C3435T Polymorphism of MDR1 gene was correlated with expression levels and functions of P-gp. Here, we studied the association between MDR1 C3435T polymorphism and susceptibility to Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and patient's response to ABVD chemotherapy regimen. Methods a ...

  19. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  20. HZ08 Reverse P-Glycoprotein Mediated Multidrug Resistance In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zheyi; Zhou, Zaigang; Hu, Yahui; Wu, Jinhui; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidrug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is highly expressed on membrane of tumor cells and is implicated in resistance to tumor chemotherapy. HZ08 is synthesized and studied in order to find a novel P-gp inhibitor. Methods MDCK-MDR1 monolayer transport, calcein-AM P-gp inhibition and P-gp ATPase assays were used to confirm the P-gp inhibition capability of HZ08. Furthermore, KB-WT and KB-VCR cells were used to evaluate the P-gp inhibitory activity of HZ08 both in vitro a...

  1. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  2. Combined drug medium with isoniazid and rifampicin for identification of multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost method of detecting multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB with the possibility of quick adoption in a resource limited setting is urgently required. We conducted a study combining isoniazid and rifampicin in a single LJ medium, to detect MDR-TB strains. Combined and individual drug media showed 100% concordance for the detection of MDR-TB and susceptible strains by proportion method. Considering the results, combined isoniazid and rifampicin containing medium could be considered for use in settings where the sole detection of MDR-TB strains is justified.

  3. Identification of selenocompounds with promising properties to reverse cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Álvarez, Enrique; Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Palop, Juan Antonio; Marć, Małgorzata Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Amaral, Leonard; Molnár, Joseph; Jacob, Claus; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Sanmartín, Carmen

    2016-06-15

    In previous studies, 56 novel selenoesters and one cyclic selenoanhydride with chemopreventive, antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity were described. Herein, the selenoanhydride and selected selenoesters were evaluated for their ability to reverse the cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) using the ABCB1 efflux pump inhibition assay in mouse MDR T-lymphoma cells. Results showed that the selenoanhydride (1) and the selenoesters with ketone terminal fragments (9-11) exerted (1.7-3.6)-fold stronger efflux pump inhibitory action than the reference verapamil. In addition, those four derivatives triggered apoptotic events in more than 80% of the examined MDR mouse cells. PMID:27156771

  4. Multidrug resistance 1 gene expression and AgNOR in childhood acute leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, S.; Sugapriya, D.; Shanthi, P.; Thilaka, V.; Venkatadesilalu, S.; Pushpa, V.; Madhavan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene product, P-glycoprotein (Pgp/p170) is a membrane protein, which acts as an ATP dependant efflux pump that expels a wide variety of organic compounds including chemotherapeutic agents from the cell. Pgp over expression has been demonstrated to be linked with poor treatment outcome and poor prognosis in a number of malignant tumors. AgNORs is a simple, reliable and inexpensive method of evaluating the proliferative activity of a tumor. We have studied MDR1...

  5. Antibiogram of Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa after Biofield Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, prevalence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) has been noticed with high morbidity and mortality. Aim of the present study was to determine the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on MDR clinical lab isolates (LS) of P. aeruginosa. Five MDR clinical lab isolates (LS 22, LS 23, LS 38, LS 47, and LS 58) of P. aeruginosa were taken and divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. Control and treated group were analy...

  6. Multidrug Transporter ABCG2/Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Secretes Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) into Milk▿

    OpenAIRE

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E.; Wagenaar, Els; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W.; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2006-01-01

    The multidrug transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. We here demonstrate that BCRP is responsible for pumping riboflavin (vitamin B2) into milk, thus supplying the young with this important nutrient. In Bcrp1−/− mice, milk secretion of riboflavin was reduced >60-fold compared to that in wild-type mice. Yet, under laboratory conditions, Bcrp1−/− pups showed no riboflavin deficiency due to concomitant mi...

  7. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB PR10 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zakihalani A. Halim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10 isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968.

  8. Genome-wide dissection of globally emergent multi-drug resistant serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Dylan R Pillai; Shahinas, Dea; Buzina, Alla; Pollock, Remy A; Lau, Rachel; Khairnar, Krishna; Wong, Andrew; Farrell, David J.; Green, Karen; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN) is well-documented but causal factors remain unclear. Canadian SPN isolates (1993-2008, n = 11,083) were serotyped and in vitro susceptibility tested. A subset of MDR 19A were multi-locus sequence typed (MLST) and representative isolates' whole genomes sequenced. Results MDR 19A increased in the post-PCV7 era while 19F, 6B, and 23F concurrently declined. MLST of MDR 19A (n = 97) revealed that sequen...

  9. Cell Type Dependent Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 Gene Expression by AML1-ETO

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Robert; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2007-01-01

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein is generated from the 8;21 chromosome translocation that is commonly identified in acute myeloid leukemia. AML1-ETO is a DNA binding transcription factor and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting leukemogenesis. Therefore, it is important to define the molecular mechanism of AML1-ETO in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of AML1-ETO on the promoter of multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, a known AML1-ETO target, i...

  10. Modulation of function of multidrug resistance associated-proteins by Kaempferia parviflora extracts and their components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanasethanont, Denpong; Nagai, Junya; Matsuura, Chie; Fukui, Kyoko; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn; Yumoto, Ryoko; Takano, Mikihisa

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the effects of extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora on multidrug resistance associated-proteins (MRP)-mediated transport in A549 cells were examined. The cells employed express MRP1 and MRP2, but not P-glycoprotein. The cellular accumulation of calcein, an MRP substrate, was significantly increased by various MRP inhibitors without being affected by verapamil, a typical P-glycoprotein inhibitor. Ethanol and aqueous extracts from K. parviflora rhizome increased the accumulation of calcein and doxorubicin in A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory potency of the ethanol extract for MRP function was greater than that of the aqueous extract. Among six flavone derivatives isolated from K. parviflora rhizome, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone exhibited a maximal stimulatory effect on the accumulation of doxorubicin in A549 cells. The accumulation of doxorubicin was increased by four flavone derivatives without 5-hydroxy group, but not by the other two flavone derivatives with 5-hydroxy group. In addition, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 3,5,7,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone decreased resistance to doxorubicin in A549 cells. These findings indicate that extracts and flavone derivatives from the rhizome of K. parviflora suppress MRP function, and therefore may be useful as modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:17481606

  11. Non-cytotoxic nanomaterials enhance antimicrobial activities of cefmetazole against multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  12. Non-cytotoxic nanomaterials enhance antimicrobial activities of cefmetazole against multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan-Hui; Yen, Muh-Yong; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Ping; Wang, Chien-Chun; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Chen, Pai-Shan; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Wan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226). Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm) showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml) and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:23705013

  13. In vitro activity of antimicrobial combinations against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denissani Aparecida Ferrari dos Santos Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates related to nosocomial infections are often resistant to multiple antibacterial agents. In this study, antimicrobial combinations were evaluated to detect in vitro synergy against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Methods Four clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were selected at random among other isolates from inpatients treated at the public University hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Two isolates were susceptible to imipenem (IPM-S and several other antimicrobials, while the other two isolates were imipenem and multidrug resistant (IPM-R. The checkerboard method was used to assess the interactions between antimicrobials. Results Combinations of imipenem or other anti-Pseudomonas drugs with complementary antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, fosfomycin and rifampin, reached synergy rates of 20.8%, 50%, 62.5% and 50% for the two IPM-S and two IPM-R Pseudomonas isolates, respectively. Imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and ceftazidime yielded a greater synergy rate than cefepime or ciprofloxacin. Synergist combinations were more commonly observed when the complementary drug was tobramycin (65% or fosfomycin (57%. Conclusions Some antibacterial combinations led to significant reductions of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of both drugs, suggesting that they could be clinically applied to control infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  14. Plasma membrane microorganization of LR73 multidrug-resistant cells revealed by FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe; Cailler, Aurélie; Morjani, Hamid; Jeannesson, Pierre; Deturche, Régis

    2011-03-01

    Tumoral cells could present a multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapeutic treatments. This drug resistance would be associated to biomechanisms occurring at the plasma membrane level, involving modification of membrane fluidity, drug permeability, presence of microdomains (rafts, caveolae...), and membrane proteins overexpression such as Pglycoprotein. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is the relevant method to investigate locally the fluidity of biological membranes through the lateral diffusion of a fluorescent membrane probe. Thus, we use FCS to monitor the plasma membrane local organization of LR73 carcinoma cells and three derived multidrug-resistant cancer cells lines. Measurements were conducted at the single cell level, which enabled us to get a detailed overview of the plasma membrane microviscosity distribution of each cell line studied. Moreover, we propose 2D diffusion simulation based on a Monte Carlo model to investigate the membrane organisation in terms of microdomains. This simulation allows us to relate the differences in the fluidity distributions with microorganization changes in plasma membrane of MDR cells.

  15. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis management: Evidences and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB has been an area of growing concern among clinicians, epidemiologists, and public health workers worldwide. Lack of controlled trials in M/XDR-TB patients hinders the optimal management of such patients, and guidelines that have been developed based largely on expert opinion are controversial. Lack of new effective drugs, improper regimens prescribed by poorly trained doctors and unreliable drug susceptibility testing add to the magnitude of the problem. M/XDR-TB is mostly a man made problem and its emergence can be checked by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first-line drugs in every new patient. DOTS-Plus proposed by World Health Organization (WHO has highlighted the comprehensive management strategy to control multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. Laboratory services must be strengthened for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan to stop TB 2011-2015. In MDR-TB patients with localized disease, surgery, as an adjunct to chemotherapy, can improve outcomes and should be considered when there is poor response to appropriate chemotherapy. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent emergence of XDR-TB.

  16. Specific myeloprotection via multidrug resistance 1 gene controlled by aminopeptidase N myeloid promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the treatment of tumor patients introduction of multidrug resistance genes into hematopoietic cells has been reported as an approach for reducing myelotoxicity created by antitumor drugs. However, the nonspecific expression of the genes can also increase the chemoresistance of the tumor cells invaded into bone marrow, which influences seriously the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this study, a new strategy is described for specific myeloprotection. The recombinant retroviral vector containing multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene regulated by aminopeptidase N (APN) myeloid promoter was constructed and then introduced into myeloblastic cells KG1a and tumor cell line BEL7402. The specific transcript of MDR1 was detected in KG1a cells transduced with MDR1 gene and rhodamine 123 was effectively extruded by Pgp, the protein of MDR1 gene. The resistance elevated markedly by 10.6, 10.4, 11.2, 4.2 and 14.2 folds in MDR1 gene-transduced KG1a cells to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cochicine, VP-16, vincristine, doxorubi- cin and paclitaxel, respectively. In contrast, the chemoresistance had no significant changes in BEL7402 cells transduced with MDR1 gene. Expression of MDR1 directed by APN myeloid promoter resulted in myelospecific protection during the killing of tumor cells treated with antitumor drugs. The study would provide a new mean for circumventing myelosuppression of tumor patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  17. Reversal of MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated multidrug resistance by tariquidar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently discovered member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family which are capable of conferring resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs, including taxanes and nucleoside analogs, in vivo. MRP7 is highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer cells, and Mrp7-KO mice are highly sensitive to paclitaxel, making MRP7 an attractive chemotherapeutic target of non-small cell lung cancer. However, only a few inhibitors of MRP7 are currently identified, with none of them having progressed to clinical trials. We used MRP7-expressing cells to investigate whether tariquidar, a third generation inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, could inhibit MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR. We found that tariquidar, at 0.1 and 0.3 µM, significantly potentiated the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to MRP7 substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel. We further demonstrated that tariquidar directly impaired paclitaxel efflux and could downregulate MRP7 protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner after prolonged treatment. Our findings suggest that tariquidar, at pharmacologically achievable concentrations, reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through inhibition of MRP7 protein expression and function, and thus represents a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  18. Whole genome sequencing of emerging multidrug resistant Candida auris isolates in India demonstrates low genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C; Kumar, N; Pandey, R; Meis, J F; Chowdhary, A

    2016-09-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug resistant yeast that causes nosocomial fungaemia and deep-seated infections. Notably, the emergence of this yeast is alarming as it exhibits resistance to azoles, amphotericin B and caspofungin, which may lead to clinical failure in patients. The multigene phylogeny and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing methods report the C. auris population as clonal. Here, using whole genome sequencing analysis, we decipher for the first time that C. auris strains from four Indian hospitals were highly related, suggesting clonal transmission. Further, all C. auris isolates originated from cases of fungaemia and were resistant to fluconazole (MIC >64 mg/L). PMID:27617098

  19. Multistrain models predict sequential multidrug treatment strategies to result in less antimicrobial resistance than combination treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Zachariasen, Camilla; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination treatment is increasingly used to fight infections caused by bacteria resistant to two or more antimicrobials. While multiple studies have evaluated treatment strategies to minimize the emergence of resistant strains for single antimicrobial treatment, fewer studies have...... sensitive fraction of the commensal flora.Growth parameters for competing bacterial strains were estimated from the combined in vitro pharmacodynamic effect of two antimicrobials using the relationship between concentration and net bacterial growth rate. Predictions of in vivo bacterial growth were...... frequency did not play a role in suppressing the growth of resistant strains, but the specific order of the two antimicrobials did. Predictions made from the study could be used to redesign multidrug treatment strategies not only for intramuscular treatment in pigs, but also for other dosing routes....

  20. Global Introduction of New Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Drugs—Balancing Regulation with Urgent Patient Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    New treatments for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are urgently needed. Two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have recently been released, and several new drugs and treatment regimens are in the pipeline. Misuse of TB drugs is a principal cause of drug resistance. As new drugs and regimens reach the market, the need to make them available to patients must be balanced with regulation of their use so that resistance to the new drugs can be prevented. To foster the rational use of new drugs, we propose 1) expanding/strengthening the capacity for drug susceptibility testing, beginning with countries with a high TB burden; 2) regulating prescribing practices by banning over-the-counter sale of TB drugs and enacting an accreditation system whereby providers must be certified to prescribe new drugs; and 3) decentralizing MDR TB care in rural communities by employing trained community health workers, using promising mobile technologies, and enlisting the aid of civil society organizations. PMID:26889711

  1. Surveillance of artemether-lumefantrine associated Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 gene polymorphisms in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Paulo, Petro; Kaaya, Robert D;

    2014-01-01

    recommended first-line drug in treatment of uncomplicated malaria. This study surveyed the distribution of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased parasite tolerance to ALu, in Tanzania. METHODS: A total of 687 Plasmodium......BACKGROUND: Resistance to anti-malarials is a major public health problem worldwide. After deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) there have been reports of reduced sensitivity to ACT by malarial parasites in South-East Asia. In Tanzania, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) is the...... in all regions, ranging from 17% - 26%. CONCLUSION: This is the first country-wide survey on Pfmdr1 mutations associated with ACT resistance. Distribution of individual Pfmdr1 mutations at codons 86, 184 and 1246 varies throughout Tanzanian regions. There is a general homogeneity in distribution of...

  2. Global Introduction of New Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Drugs-Balancing Regulation with Urgent Patient Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy; Ben Amor, Yanis

    2016-03-01

    New treatments for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are urgently needed. Two new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have recently been released, and several new drugs and treatment regimens are in the pipeline. Misuse of TB drugs is a principal cause of drug resistance. As new drugs and regimens reach the market, the need to make them available to patients must be balanced with regulation of their use so that resistance to the new drugs can be prevented. To foster the rational use of new drugs, we propose 1) expanding/strengthening the capacity for drug susceptibility testing, beginning with countries with a high TB burden; 2) regulating prescribing practices by banning over-the-counter sale of TB drugs and enacting an accreditation system whereby providers must be certified to prescribe new drugs; and 3) decentralizing MDR TB care in rural communities by employing trained community health workers, using promising mobile technologies, and enlisting the aid of civil society organizations. PMID:26889711

  3. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR),which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence,has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades.Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated.Well known Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure.Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic)strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits.In this review,we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  4. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: treatment outcome in Denmark, 1992-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Didi; Lillebaek, Troels; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard;

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective nationwide study including all culture-verified multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) cases was performed in Denmark. The aim was to examine the long-term treatment outcome of MDR-TB, to assess if MDR-TB transmission occurs, and to evaluate a rapid mutation analysis detecting...... rifampin and isoniazid resistance in this cohort. Clinical data were obtained from patient records. A restriction fragment length polymorphism genotype database of all TB cases was compared for identical strains indicating active transmission. Twenty-nine cases of MDR-TB were identified and the incidence...... was low at 0.5%. Acquired MDR-TB and active transmission was rare. Mutations in rifampin (rpoB) and isoniazid (katG, inhA) genes correctly determined resistance in 100% and 82% of all isolates tested, respectively. Initial treatment success was 89% for 27 MDR-TB patients with available outcome data...

  5. International spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Schwarzengrund in food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Lockett, Jana; Gay, Katie; Teates, Kathryn; McDermott, Patrick F.; White, David G.; Hasman, Henrik; Sørensen, Gitte; Bangtrakulnonth, Aroon; Pornreongwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Angulo, Frederick J.; Gerner-Smidt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We compared 581 Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund isolates from persons, food, and food animals in Denmark, Thailand, and the United States by antimicrobial drug susceptibility and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Resistance, including resistance to nalidixic acid, was...... frequent among isolates from persons and chickens in Thailand, persons in the United States, and food imported from Thailand to Denmark and the United States. A total of 183 PFGE patterns were observed, and 136 (23.4%) isolates had the 3 most common patterns. Seven of 14 isolates from persons in Denmark...... had patterns found in persons and chicken meat in Thailand; 22 of 390 human isolates from the United States had patterns found in Denmark and Thailand. This study suggests spread of multidrug-resistant S. Schwarzengrund from chickens to persons in Thailand, and from imported Thai food products to...

  6. Isolation and partial characterization of actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Smriti Singh; Pramod Kumar; N Gopalan; Bhuvnesh Shrivastava; RC Kuhad; Hotam Singh Chaudhary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To isolate strains of Actinomycetes from different locations of Gwalior to evaluate its antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant pathogenic strains. Method: Soil samples collected from different niche habitats of Gwalior were serially diluted and plated on selective media. Potential colonies were further purified and stored in agar slants and glycerol stocks. Isolates were biochemically characterized and purified isolates were test against pathogenic microorganisms for screening. Isolates with antagonistic properties were inoculated in production media and secondary metabolites or antimicrobial products were extracted. Result: The seven actinomycetes strains showing maximum antibacterial activity were isolated further characterized based on their colony characteristics and biochemical analyses. The isolates were screened for their secondary metabolites activity on three human pathogenic bacteria are Escherichia coli (E. coli), Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE). Discussion: The strain MITS 1005 was found to be more active against the test bacteria.

  7. Fatal septicemia by multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a case of exomphalos minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahantesh V Parande

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exomphalos minor is one among uncommon disorders of the umbilical region. Here, we report a fatal case of exomphalos minor with enterococcal septicemia. A male baby, born with exomphalos minor, developed clinical features of septicemia on the fourth postnatal day. Blood samples were collected by venepuncture from two sites for culture. Enterococcus faecium was isolated from both the blood samples. The swabs collected from the site of exomphalos also yielded growth of Enterococcus faecium, confirming the source of infection. The antibiogram with Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC for various antibiotics was done for isolates from all three sites, which was similar. The isolate was resistant to multiple antibiotics with high level aminoglycoside resistance. The baby was treated with antibiotics and other supportive measures. However, the baby succumbed to the septicemia. As per our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal septicemia by multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a case of exomphalos minor.

  8. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-15

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  9. Antimicrobial hydrogels: a new weapon in the arsenal against multidrug-resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor W L; Chan, Julian M W; Sardon, Haritz; Ono, Robert J; García, Jeannette M; Yang, Yi Yan; Hedrick, James L

    2014-11-30

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes is becoming an imminent global public health problem. Treatment with conventional antibiotics often leads to resistance development as the majority of these antibiotics act on intracellular targets, leaving the bacterial morphology intact. Thus, they are highly prone to develop resistance through mutation. Much effort has been made to develop macromolecular antimicrobial agents that are less susceptible to resistance as they function by microbial membrane disruption. Antimicrobial hydrogels constitute an important class of macromolecular antimicrobial agents, which have been shown to be effective in preventing and treating multidrug-resistant infections. Advances in synthetic chemistry have made it possible to tailor molecular structure and functionality to impart broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity as well as predictable mechanical and rheological properties. This has significantly broadened the scope of potential applications that range from medical device and implant coating, sterilization, wound dressing, to antimicrobial creams for the prevention and treatment of multidrug-resistant infections. In this review, advances in both chemically and physically cross-linked natural and synthetic hydrogels possessing intrinsic antimicrobial properties or loaded with antibiotics, antimicrobial polymers/peptides and metal nanoparticles are highlighted. Relationships between physicochemical properties and antimicrobial activity/selectivity, and possible antimicrobial mechanisms of the hydrogels are discussed. Approaches to mitigating toxicity of metal nanoparticles that are encapsulated in hydrogels are reviewed. In addition, challenges and future perspectives in the development of safe and effective antimicrobial hydrogel systems especially involving co-delivery of antimicrobial polymers/peptides and conventional antimicrobial agents for eventual clinical applications are presented. PMID:25450263

  10. Targeted Drug-Resistance Testing Strategy for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Detection, Lima, Peru, 2005–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez, Gustavo E.; Yagui, Martin; Cegielski, J. Peter; Asencios, Luis; Bayona, Jaime; Bonilla, Cesar; Jave, Hector O.; Yale, Gloria; Suárez, Carmen; Atwood, Sidney; Contreras, Carmen C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2011-01-01

    The Peruvian National Tuberculosis Control Program issued guidelines in 2006 specifying criteria for culture and drug-susceptibility testing (DST), including district-level rapid DST. All patients referred for culture and DST in 2 districts of Lima, Peru, during January 2005–November 2008 were monitored prospectively. Of 1,846 patients, 1,241 (67.2%) had complete DST results for isoniazid and rifampin; 419 (33.8%) patients had multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB at the time of referral. Among patien...

  11. The expression and significance of P-glycoprotein, lung resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To detect the expression of multidrug resistance molecules P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Lung resistnce protein (LRP and Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP and analyze the relationship between them and the clinico-pathological features. Methods The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 59 gastric cancer patients were determined by a labbelled Streptavidin-Peroxidase (SP immunohistochemical technique, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. None of these patients received chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results The positive rates of P-gp, LRP, MRP were 86.4%, 84.7% and 27.1%, respectively. The difference between the positive rate of P-gp and MRP was significant statistically, as well as the difference between the expression of MRP and LRP. No significant difference was observed between P-gp and LRP, but the positively correlation between the expression of P-gp and LRP had been found. No significant correlation between the expression of P-gp, LRP, MRP and the grade of differentiation were observed. The expression of P-gp was correlated with clinical stages positively (r = 0.742, but the difference with the expression of P-gp in different stages was not significant. Conclusion The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in patients with gastric cancer without prior chemotherapy are high, indicating that innate drug resistance may exist in gastric cancer.

  12. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles loading doxorubicin reverse multidrug resistance: performance and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianan; He, Qianjun; Gao, Yu; Shi, Jianlin; Li, Yaping

    2011-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles for successful chemotherapy in cancer. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, we first report that the performance and mechanism of an inorganic engineered delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loading doxorubicin (DMNs) to overcome the MDR of MCF-7/ADR (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The experimental results showed that DMNs could enhance the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells. The IC50 of DMNs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 8-fold lower than that of free DOX. However, an improved effect of DOX in DMNs against MCF-7 cells (a DOX-sensitive cancer cell line) was not found. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DMNs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and could result from the down-regulation of P-gp and bypassing the efflux action by MSNs themselves. The cellular uptake mechanism of DMNs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of DMNs by MCF-7/ADR cells. The in vivo biodistribution showed that DMNs induced a higher accumulation of DOX in drug resistant tumors than free DOX. These results suggested that MSNs could be an effective delivery system to overcome multidrug resistance.

  13. Uncovering Scaling Laws to Infer Multidrug Response of Resistant Microbes and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Wood

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance in bacterial infections and cancers constitutes a major threat to human health. Treatments often include several interacting drugs, but even potent therapies can become ineffective in resistant mutants. Here, we simplify the picture of drug resistance by identifying scaling laws that unify the multidrug responses of drug-sensitive and -resistant cells. On the basis of these scaling relationships, we are able to infer the two-drug response of resistant mutants in previously unsampled regions of dosage space in clinically relevant microbes such as E. coli, E. faecalis, S. aureus, and S. cerevisiae as well as human non-small-cell lung cancer, melanoma, and breast cancer stem cells. Importantly, we find that scaling relations also apply across evolutionarily close strains. Finally, scaling allows one to rapidly identify new drug combinations and predict potent dosage regimes for targeting resistant mutants without any prior mechanistic knowledge about the specific resistance mechanism.

  14. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha F. Mushi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed for carbapenem resistance genes. For each isolate, five different PCR assays were performed, allowing for the detection of the major carbapenemase genes, including those encoding the VIM-, IMP-, and NDM-type metallo-beta-lactamases, the class A KPC-type carbapenemases, and the class D OXA-48 enzyme. Of 227 isolates, 80 (35% were positive for one or more carbapenemase gene. IMP-types were the most predominant gene followed by VIM, in 49 (21.59% and 28 (12% isolates, respectively. Carbapenemase genes were most detected in K. pneumoniae 24 (11%, followed by P. aeruginosa 23 (10%, and E. coli with 19 isolates (8%. We have demonstrated for the first time a high prevalence of MDR-GNB clinical isolates having carbapenem resistance genes in Tanzania. We recommend routine testing for carbapenem resistance among the MDR-GNB particularly in systemic infections.

  15. Rapid detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the malachite green decolourisation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yilmaz Coban

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates allows for earlier and more effective treatment of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the malachite green decolourisation assay (MGDA in detecting isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF resistance in M. tuberculosis clinical isolates. Fifty M. tuberculosis isolates, including 19 multidrug-resistant, eight INH-resistant and 23 INH and RIF-susceptible samples, were tested. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and agreement of the assay for INH were 92.5%, 91.3%, 92.5%, 91.3% and 92%, respectively. Similarly, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and agreement of the assay for RIF were 94.7%, 100%, 100%, 96.8% and 98%, respectively. There was a major discrepancy in the tests of two isolates, as they were sensitive to INH by the MGDA test, but resistant by the reference method. There was a minor discrepancy in the tests of two additional isolates, as they were sensitive to INH by the reference method, but resistant by the MGDA test. The drug susceptibility test results were obtained within eight-nine days. In conclusion, the MGDA test is a reliable and accurate method for the rapid detection of INH and RIF resistance compared with the reference method and the MGDA test additionally requires less time to obtain results.

  16. Synergy between verapamil and other multidrug -resistance modulators in model membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madeleine Castaing; Alain Loiseau; Athel Cornish-Bowden

    2007-06-01

    Various cationic lipophilic compounds can reverse the multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Possible interaction between these compounds, which are known as modulators, has been assessed by measuring leakage of Sulphan blue from anionic liposomes, induced both by verapamil alone and by verapamil in combination with diltiazem, quinine, thioridazine or clomipramine. An equation was derived to quantify the permeation doses and Hill coefficients of the drugs and mixtures between them by simultaneous fitting of the experimental data. The interaction was tested by two methods, the competition plot and the isobole method; both showed synergy between verapamil and each of diltiazem, quinine and thioridazine. The dose factor of potentiation for verapamil determined within membranes was 4.0 ± 0.4 with diltiazem, 3.2 ± 0.4 with quinine and 2.4 ± 0.3 with thioridazine. The results suggest that the effectiveness of reversing multidrug resistance may be increased with modulators such as verapamil and diltiazem that have a much greater effect in combination than what would be expected from their effects when considered separately.

  17. Correlation between uptake of 99TcM-MIBI and multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the correlation between 99Tcm-MIBI uptake and the expression level of multidrug resistant proteins of breast cancer. Methods: Thirty patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma were enrolled in this study. 99Tcm-MIBI scintigraphy were performed at 15 min and 90 min after injecting the tracer. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI were evaluated as tumor over background ratio with region of interest technique. Such indexes as early uptake ratio (EUR), delay uptake ratio (DUR) and retention index (RI) were calculated respectively. P-gp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistant-associated protein) expression in surgically resected tumors were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry HPIAS-1000 image analysis system was used to determined the level of P-gp and MRP expression. The difference of P-gp and MRP level in the group with RI ≥ 0 and the group with RI99Tcm-MIBI on delayed scans in breast cancer. The uptake of 99Tcm-MIBI may be not related to the levels of MRP expression. Thus 99Tcm-MIBI scintigraphy may predict the MDR development which associated with P-gp expression in breast carcinoma. (authors)

  18. Expression of a multidrug-resistance gene in human tumors and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification and cloning of a segment of a human multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) was reported recently. To examine, the molecular basis of one type of multidrug resistance, the authors have prepared RNA from human tumors and normal tissues and measured their content of mdr1 RNA. They find that the mdr1 gene is expressed at a very high level in the adrenal gland; at a high level in the kidney; at intermediate levels in the lung, liver, lower jejunum, colon, and rectum; and at low levels in many other tissues. The mdr1 gene is also expressed in several human tumors, including many but not all tumors derived from the adrenal gland and the colon. In addition, increased expression was detected in a few tumors at the time of relapse following initial chemotherapy. Although controlled clinical studies will be required, the results suggest that measurement of mdr1 RNA may prove to be a valuable tool in the design of chemotherapy protocols

  19. Short-course treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the STREAM trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Riya; Godec, Thomas R

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is a threat to global TB control, as suboptimal and poorly tolerated treatment options have resulted in largely unfavourable outcomes for these patients. The last of six cohort studies conducted in Bangladesh which assessed a new shorter regimen using currently available TB drugs showed promising results and offered the possibility of a more acceptable and more effective regimen than the one recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The aims of stage 1 of the STREAM (Evaluation of a Standardised Treatment Regimen of Anti-tuberculosis Drugs for Patients with Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis) trial are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this regimen, compared to the current WHO-recommended standard of care. Stage 2 evaluates two new bedaquiline-containing regimens: one an all-oral regimen and the second a further shortened and simplified version of the stage 1 study regimen, comparing the efficacy and safety of each to that of the stage 1 study regimen and also to the WHO-recommended standard of care. Success of the stage 1 study regimen would in all probability provide a new standard of care for MDR-TB patients, while positive results from the bedaquiline-containing regimens in stage 2 may allow for even greater progress in the management of this difficult population. PMID:26929418

  20. Short-course treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the STREAM trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riya Moodley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR tuberculosis (TB is a threat to global TB control, as suboptimal and poorly tolerated treatment options have resulted in largely unfavourable outcomes for these patients. The last of six cohort studies conducted in Bangladesh which assessed a new shorter regimen using currently available TB drugs showed promising results and offered the possibility of a more acceptable and more effective regimen than the one recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO. The aims of stage 1 of the STREAM (Evaluation of a Standardised Treatment Regimen of Anti-tuberculosis Drugs for Patients with Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis trial are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this regimen, compared to the current WHO-recommended standard of care. Stage 2 evaluates two new bedaquiline-containing regimens: one an all-oral regimen and the second a further shortened and simplified version of the stage 1 study regimen, comparing the efficacy and safety of each to that of the stage 1 study regimen and also to the WHO-recommended standard of care. Success of the stage 1 study regimen would in all probability provide a new standard of care for MDR-TB patients, while positive results from the bedaquiline-containing regimens in stage 2 may allow for even greater progress in the management of this difficult population.

  1. A Potato cDNA Encoding a Homologue of Mammalian Multidrug Resistant P-Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A homologue of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene was obtained while screening a potato stolon tip cDNA expression library with S-15-labeled calmodulin. The mammalian MDR gene codes for a membrane-bound P-glycoprotein (170-180 kDa) which imparts multidrug resistance to cancerous cells. The potato cDNA (PMDR1) codes for a polypeptide of 1313 amino acid residues (ca. 144 kDa) and its structural features are very similar to the MDR P-glycoprotein. The N-terminal half of the PMDR1-encoded protein shares striking homology with its C-terminal half, and each half contains a conserved ATP-binding site and six putative transmembrane domains. Southern blot analysis indicated that potato has one or two MDR-like genes. PMDR1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in all organs studied with higher expression in the stem and stolon tip. The PMDR1 expression was highest during tuber initiation and decreased during tuber development.

  2. Inhibition of tumor cells multidrug resistance by cucumarioside A2-2, frondoside A and their complexes with cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S; Aminin, Dmitry L; Avilov, Sergey A; Silchenko, Aleksandra S; Andryjashchenko, Pelageya V; Kalinin, Vladimir I; Stonik, Valentin A

    2013-10-01

    In non-cytotoxic concentrations, frondoside A (1) from the sea cucumber Cucumaria okhotensis and cucumarioside A2-2 (2) from C. japonica, as well as their complexes with cholesterol block the activity of membrane transport P-glycoprotein in cells of the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma. They prevent in this way an efflux of fluorescent probe Calcein from the cells. Since the blocking of P-glycoprotein activity results in decrease of multidrug resistance, these glycosides and their complexes with cholesterol may be considered as potential inhibitors of multidrug resistance of tumor cells. PMID:24354179

  3. Downregulation of gene MDR1 by shRNA to reverse multidrug-resistance of ovarian cancer A2780 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyi Zhang; Jing Wang; Kai Cai; Longwei Jiang; Dandan Zhou; Cuiping Yang,; Junsong Chen,; Dengyu Chen,; Jun Dou

    2012-01-01

    Background: To explore the effects of downregulated multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1/ABCB1) and reversed multidrug-resistance in human A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Three shRNAs targeting the MDR1 gene were synthesized, and cloned into plasmid pSUPER-enhanced green fluorescent protein 1 (EGFP1). The formed pSUPER-EGFP1-MDR1-shRNAs were transfected into the A2780 cells, respectively, and the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and west...

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial to Determine the Impact of Probiotic Administration on Colonization With Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jennie H; Bommarito, Kerry M; Reske, Kimberly A; Seiler, Sondra M; Hink, Tiffany; Babcock, Hilary M; Kollef, Marin H; Fraser, Victoria J; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Dubberke, Erik R

    2015-12-01

    This was a randomized controlled pilot study of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG versus standard of care to prevent gastrointestinal multidrug-resistant organism colonization in intensive care unit patients. Among 70 subjects, there were no significant differences in acquisition or loss of any multidrug-resistant organisms (P>.05) and no probiotic-associated adverse events. PMID:26308946

  5. Antimicrobial activity of Nigella sativa L. seed oil against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeka, Lorina Badger; Emeka, Promise Madu; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2015-11-01

    Microbial resistance to existing antibiotics has led to an increase in the use of medicinal plants that show beneficial effects for various infectious diseases. The study evaluates the susceptibility of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Nigella sativa oil. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 34 diabetic patient's wounds attending the Renaissance hospital, Nsukka, Southeast Nigeria. The isolates were characterized and identified using standard microbiological techniques. Isolates were cultured and a comparative In vitro antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the disk diffusion method. Of the 34 samples collected, 19(56%) showed multidrug resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Nigella sativa oil was then studied for antibacterial activity against these multidrug resistant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in varying concentration by well diffusion method. The oil showed pronounced dose dependent antibacterial activity against the isolates. Out of 19 isolates, 8(42%) were sensitive to undiluted oil sample; 4(21%) of these showed sensitivity at 200 mg/ml, 400 mg/ml and 800 mg/ml respectively. Eleven (58%) of the isolates were completely resistant to all the oil concentrations. The present study, reports the isolation of multi-drug resistant S. aureus from diabetic wounds and that more than half of isolates were susceptible to different concentrations N. sativa oil. PMID:26639493

  6. Supramolecular Cationic Assemblies against Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms: Activity and Mechanism of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Dias de Melo Carrasco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The growing challenge of antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics requires novel synthetic drugs or new formulations for old drugs. Here, cationic nanostructured particles (NPs self-assembled from cationic bilayer fragments and polyelectrolytes are tested against four multidrug-resistant (MDR strains of clinical importance. The non-hemolytic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA polymer as the outer NP layer shows a remarkable activity against these organisms. The mechanism of cell death involves bacterial membrane lysis as determined from the leakage of inner phosphorylated compounds and possibly disassembly of the NP with the appearance of multilayered fibers made of the NP components and the biopolymers withdrawn from the cell wall. The NPs display broad-spectrum activity against MDR microorganisms, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and yeast.

  7. New strain multidrug resistant tuberculosis G24767 in Puerto Rico: Old disease a continuous threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Hiram José; Cruz, Michael; Nieves, Joel; Rivera, Kelvin; Fernández, Ricardo; Colón, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is defined as a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain resistant to two or more first-line anti-tuberculous drugs. Tuberculosis (TB) is a global threat to society despite improvement in therapy as it continues to be an economic burden especially in underdeveloped countries. The downfall of global economics and growing travel destinations in developing countries has escalade the exposure of organism not previously encountered in industrialized nations. Most cases of MDR-TB are reported on immunosuppressed patients with risk factors and from endemic areas. Nevertheless new strains with higher transmission degree are emerging as a threat in patients who have low risk factors for the development of MDR-TB. PMID:27547724

  8. ABCG2 Inhibition as a Therapeutic Approach for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Hosseini Hasanabady; Fatemeh Kalalinia

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR) / ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the intestine, as well as through the blood-brain barrier and placental. ABCG2 recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and new targeted small therapeutic molecules in clinical usage. Development of ABCG2 inhibitors for clinical usage may allow increased penetration of therapeutic agents into sanctuary sites and increased their intestinal absorption. In this report, we review the mechanisms that modulate MDR mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 in normal and cancer cells by different levels including, epigenetic modifications, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translation and posttranslational regulation. Some clinical applications of ABCG2 inhibitors, also is explained.

  9. Global Progress and Challenges in Implementing New Medications for Treating Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furin, Jennifer; Brigden, Grania; Lessem, Erica; Rich, Michael; Vaughan, Laura; Lynch, Sharonann

    2016-03-01

    Two new drugs-bedaquiline and delamanid-have recently been approved by stringent regulatory authorities to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and recommended by the World Health Organization for use under defined programmatic conditions. Introducing the medications in TB programs worldwide has not kept pace with the need for these drugs. In response, the DR-TB STAT (Drug-Resistant TB Scale-up Treatment Action Team) task force was formed in April 2015 to monitor progress and help overcome challenges. Information was collected from multiple sources and assessed monthly. Some progress has been made in introducing bedaquiline: as of October 2015, a total of 1,258 persons were on the medication under programmatic conditions. For delamanid, >100 patients, but few under programmatic conditions, have received the medication. Coordinated global action might help assist making these medications accessible for persons who need them most. PMID:26885674

  10. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Taxol Nanoparticles for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Lin; Du, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Zhang, Jia; Han, Tao; An, Linna; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-08-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the biggest challenge in treating cancers. Herein we propose the intracellular self-assembly of nanodrugs as a new strategy for overcoming MDR. By employing a biocompatible condensation reaction, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Ac-Arg-Val-Arg-Arg-Cys(StBu)-Lys(taxol)-2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT-Taxol) which could be subjected to furin-controlled condensation and self-assembly of taxol nanoparticles (Taxol-NPs). In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that, compared with taxol, CBT-Taxol showed a 4.5-fold or 1.5-fold increase in anti-MDR effects, respectively, on taxol-resistant HCT 116 cancer cells or tumors without being toxic to the cells or the mice. Our results demonstrate that structuring protease-susceptible agents and assembling them intracellularly into nanodrugs could be a new optimal strategy for overcoming MDR. PMID:26118539

  11. Erasing the World's Slow Stain: Strategies to Beat Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Christopher; Williams, Brian G.; Espinal, Marcos A.; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2002-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR) is perceived as a growing hazard to human health worldwide. Judgments about the true scale of the problem, and strategies for containing it, need to come from a balanced appraisal of the epidemiological evidence. We conclude in this review that MDR is, and will probably remain, a locally severe problem; that epidemics can be prevented by fully exploiting the potential of standard short-course chemotherapy (SCC) based on cheap and safe first-line drugs; and that best-practice SCC may even reduce the incidence of MDR where it has already become endemic. On the basis of the available, imperfect data, we recommend a three-part response to the threat of MDR: widespread implementation of SCC as the cornerstone of good tuberculosis control, improved resistance testing and surveillance, and the careful introduction of second-line drugs after a sound evaluation of cost, effectiveness, and feasibility.

  12. MspI/HpaII polymorphism in the human multidrug resistance gene I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, D.A.; Housman, D.E. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambrige (USA))

    1989-12-11

    A 2.1kb partial cDNA clone encoding the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (mdr 1) was isolated from drug-resistant cells. The probe used is a 850bp Bg1 II-Hind III fragment (nucleotides 1600-2450). Msp I/HpaII digestion identifies a three allele polymorphis with bands of 21kb (a), 17kb (b), and 1.5 kb (c). In addition, an invariant band at 4kb is noted. The mdr 1 gene has been mapped to human chromosome 7. Band localization has been reported as either 7q21 or 7q36. Co-dominant segregation was documented in one informative family.

  13. Successful treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis following drug-induced hepatic necrosis requiring liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, F; Cox, V C; FitzGerald, J M; Moadebi, S; Elwood, R K

    2004-07-01

    A 28-year-old female developed multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculous lymphadenitis following a trip to India. She was initially treated with a four-drug regimen of first-line anti-tuberculosis medications, but when sensitivities indicated resistance to isoniazid and rifampin, her regimen was altered to ciprofloxacin (CFX), pyrazinamide (PZA) and ethambutol. She subsequently developed a rash, flu-like symptoms and fever, which progressed to acute hepatic necrosis despite discontinuation of medication. The clinical presentation and subsequent investigations suggested a hypersensitivity reaction, possibly related to the quinolone. The patient subsequently had an orthoptic liver transplant; second-line anti-tuberculosis medications were restarted to which she responded clinically and radiologically. Our findings raise the possibility that the CFX and PZA combination was responsible for the hepatic necrosis. The patient also illustrates that active, even MDR tuberculosis is not a contraindication to hepatic transplant. PMID:15260286

  14. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-06-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol. PMID:25089285

  15. The Efflux Pump Inhibitor Reserpine Selects Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains That Overexpress the ABC Transporters PatA and PatB▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Mark I.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One way to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms is the use of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Spontaneous mutants resistant to the EPI reserpine selected from Streptococcus pneumoniae NCTC 7465 and R6 at a frequency suggestive of a single mutational event were also multidrug resistant. No mutations in pmrA (which encodes the efflux protein PmrA) were detected, and the expression of pmrA was unaltered in all mutants. In the reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant mutants, the overexpressio...

  16. The overexpression of MRP4 is related to multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Adriamycin, ADM is an antimitotic drug used in the treatment of a wide range of malignant tumors, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs are members of a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, which can transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between MRP4 and primary ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells. In this paper, we chose the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63, ADM resistant cell line MG63/DOX, and the patient′s primary cell GSF-0686. We checked the ADM sensitivity and cytotoxicity of all the three cells by cell proliferation assay. The intracellular drug concentrations were measured by using LC-MS/MS. We also examined MRP4 gene expression by RT-PCR and Western Blot. We found that the intracellular ADM concentration of the parent osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was higher than the ADM resistant osteosarcoma MG63/DOX cell line or the GSF-0686 cell after ADM treatment (P < 0.05. In addition, MRP4 mRNA and protein levels in ADM resistant osteosarcoma cells were higher than in MG63 cell (P < 0.05. Taking together, this work suggests that overexpression of MRP4 may confer ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells.

  17. A Computational Approach towards the Understanding of Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saumya K; George, Linz-Buoy; Prasanth Kumar, Sivakumar; Highland, Hyacinth N; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A; Desai, Ketaki R

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum tremendously affected the chemotherapy worldwide while the intense distribution of chloroquine-resistant strains in most of the endemic areas added more complications in the treatment of malaria. The situation has even worsened by the lack of molecular mechanism to understand the resistance conferred by Plasmodia species. Recent studies have suggested the association of antimalarial resistance with P. falciparum multidrug resistance protein 1 (PfMDR1), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and a homologue of human P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp1). The present study deals about the development of PfMDR1 computational model and the model of substrate transport across PfMDR1 with insights derived from conformations relative to inward- and outward-facing topologies that switch on/off the transportation system. Comparison of ATP docked positions and its structural motif binding properties were found to be similar among other ATPases, and thereby contributes to NBD domains dimerization, a unique structural agreement noticed in Mus musculus Pgp and Escherichia coli MDR transporter homolog (MsbA). The interaction of leading antimalarials and phytochemicals within the active pocket of both wild-type and mutant-type PfMDR1 demonstrated the mode of binding and provided insights of less binding affinity thereby contributing to parasite's resistance mechanism. PMID:25937947

  18. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of VIM-1-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacter cloacae EC_38VIM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Jennifer; Viedma, Esther; Otero, Joaquín R.

    2013-01-01

    The VIM-1-producing multidrug-resistant strain Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from blood culture. The strain showed multiple resistances to clinically used antibiotics, including all β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides. Sequence analysis showed the presence of 14 genes associated with resistance to antibiotics, including the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-1 gene, which was located in a class 1 integron. PMID:24009122

  19. Epidemic spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Ben J; Mlambo, Charmaine K; Rastogi, Nalin; Zozio, Thierry; Duse, Adriano G; Victor, Thomas C; Marais, Else; Warren, Robin M

    2013-06-01

    Numerous reports have documented isolated transmission events or clonal outbreaks of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, but knowledge of their epidemic spread remains limited. In this study, we evaluated drug resistance, strain diversity, and clustering rates in patients diagnosed with multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) at the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) Central TB Laboratory in Johannesburg, South Africa, between March 2004 and December 2007. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing was done using the indirect proportion method, while each isolate was genotyped using a combination of spoligotyping and 12-MIRU typing (12-locus multiple interspersed repetitive unit typing). Isolates from 434 MDR-TB patients were evaluated, of which 238 (54.8%) were resistant to four first-line drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and streptomycin). Spoligotyping identified 56 different strains and 28 clusters of variable size (2 to 71 cases per cluster) with a clustering rate of 87.1%. Ten clusters included 337 (77.6%) of all cases, with strains of the Beijing genotype being most prevalent (16.4%). Combined analysis of spoligotyping and 12-MIRU typing increased the discriminatory power (Hunter Gaston discriminatory index [HGDI] = 0.962) and reduced the clustering rate to 66.8%. Resolution of Beijing genotype strains was further enhanced with the 24-MIRU-VNTR (variable-number tandem repeat) typing method by identifying 15 subclusters and 19 unique strains from twelve 12-MIRU clusters. High levels of clustering among a variety of strains suggest a true epidemic spread of MDR-TB in the study setting, emphasizing the urgency of early diagnosis and effective treatment to reduce transmission within this community. PMID:23554196

  20. INFLUENCE OF NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL INFUSION CHEMOTHERAPY ON APOPTOSIS AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED GENES OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 张颖; 惠京; 王德华

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Through investigating the influence of neoadjuvant intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (NIAC) on the timing changes of apoptosis, PCNA and multiple drug resistance associated genes of endometrial cancer, to study the mechanism of chemotherapy and to define the best operation time. Methods: Twenty patients were subjected to neoadjuvant consecutive uterine arterial infusion with CDDP 100 mg and ADM 50 mg. The biopsy of endometrial tumor tissues was performed before, immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy. Apoptosis index (AI) was estimated by a combination of histologic and TUNEL assays. Proliferative index (PI) was examined by SABC immunohistochemical staining. Expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The AI of endometrial cancer cells immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, after chemotherapy were 3.03%, 3.47% and 5.04%, respectively, much higher than that before chemotherapy which was 2.31%. After chemotherapy, AI/PI gradually increased. It was highest in 2-2+3 w, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy the AI and AI/PI were both significantly lower than that before chemotherapy. The expression of MDR1, MRP and LRP all decreased temporarily after chemotherapy, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy they all increased to levels higher than that before chemotherapy, but the difference were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant consecutive intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via uterine artery can inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis effectively. To evaluate the response of intra-arterial chemotherapy the change of apoptosis index and cell proliferation should be analyzed. The most suitable time for the operation is 3 weeks after intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  1. Retroviral transfer of a murine cDNA for multidrug resistance confers pleiotropic drug resistance to cells without prior drug selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have constructed a retrovirus expression vector that carries the murine mdr cDNA transcribed under the control of the human H4 histone promoter to examine the feasibility of efficiently transferring a multidrug resistance phenotype to cells without requiring drug selection. This approach will facilitate the transfer of mdr cDNA to hematopoietic progenitor cells for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo. The retrovirus vector pHmdr has been used for transmission and expression of the mdr cDNA in initially drug-sensitive NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Selection of pHmdr infectants in the cytotoxic agents colchicine or doxorubicin gave rise to highly multidrug-resistant colonies containing a single gene copy of the vector. Moreover, in the analysis of 12 cloned unselected NIH 3T3 cell infectants, a multidrug resistance phenotype was conferred by as few as two copies of the pHmdr vector. Overexpression of the mdr cDNA in drug-selected and unselected pHmdr infectants was directly related to cell survival in three cytotoxic agents tested. These results hold significant implications for the study of multidrug resistance in vivo

  2. Using a Label Free Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Identify Changes in Protein Abundance in Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, Truong Quoc; Ha, Do Thi Thu; Volker, Uwe; Hammer, Elke

    2015-06-01

    Reports in recent years indicate that the increasing emergence of resistance to drugs be using to TB treatment. The resistance to them severely affects to options for effective treatment. The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has increased interest in understanding the mechanism of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis and the development of new therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines. In this study, a label-free quantitative proteomics approach has been used to analyze proteome of multidrug-resistant and susceptible clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and identify differences in protein abundance between the two groups. With this approach, we were able to identify a total of 1,583 proteins. The majority of identified proteins have predicted roles in lipid metabolism, intermediary metabolism, cell wall and cell processes. Comparative analysis revealed that 68 proteins identified by at least two peptides showed significant differences of at least twofolds in relative abundance between two groups. In all protein differences, the increase of some considering proteins such as NADH dehydrogenase, probable aldehyde dehydrogenase, cyclopropane mycolic acid synthase 3, probable arabinosyltransferase A, putative lipoprotein, uncharacterized oxidoreductase and six membrane proteins in resistant isolates might be involved in the drug resistance and to be potential diagnostic protein targets. The decrease in abundance of proteins related to secretion system and immunogenicity (ESAT-6-like proteins, ESX-1 secretion system associated proteins, O-antigen export system and MPT63) in the multidrug-resistant strains can be a defensive mechanism undertaken by the resistant cell. PMID:25805910

  3. New Ceftriaxone- and Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strain with a Novel Mosaic penA Gene Isolated in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shu-Ichi; Shimuta, Ken; Furubayashi, Kei-Ichi; Kawahata, Takuya; Unemo, Magnus; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We have characterized in detail a new ceftriaxone- and multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (FC428) isolated in Japan in 2015. FC428 differed from previous ceftriaxone-resistant strains and contained a novel mosaic penA allele encoding a new mosaic penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2). However, the resistance-determining 3'-terminal region of penA was almost identical to the regions of two previously reported ceftriaxone-resistant strains from Australia and Japan, indicating that both ceftriaxone-resistant strains and conserved ceftriaxone resistance-determining PBP 2 regions might spread. PMID:27067334

  4. Animal and Human Multidrug-Resistant, Cephalosporin-Resistant Salmonella Isolates Expressing a Plasmid-Mediated CMY-2 AmpC β-Lactamase

    OpenAIRE

    Winokur, P. L.; Brueggemann, A.; DeSalvo, D. L.; Hoffmann, L.; Apley, M. D.; Uhlenhopp, E. K.; Pfaller, M A; Doern, G. V.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are important food-borne pathogens that are demonstrating increasing antimicrobial resistance rates in isolates obtained from food animals and humans. In this study, 10 multidrug-resistant, cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella isolates from bovine, porcine, and human sources from a single geographic region were identified. All isolates demonstrated resistance to cephamycins and extended-spectrum cephalosporins as well as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and sulfisoxa...

  5. Crowdsourced Data Indicate Widespread Multidrug Resistance in Skin Flora of Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Scott; Okoroafor, Nnadozie O; Gast, Christopher M; Koval, Mikhail; Nowowiejski, David; O'Connor, Eileen; Harrington, Robert D; Parks, John W; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-03-01

    In a laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology majors, students plated bacteria from swabs of their facial skin under conditions that selected for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus; added disks containing the antibiotics penicillin, oxacillin, tetracycline, and erythromycin; and measured zones of inhibition. Students also recorded demographic and lifestyle variables and merged this information with similar data collected from 9,000 other students who had contributed to the database from 2003 to 2011. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing performed at the Harborview Medical Center Microbiology Laboratory (Seattle, WA) indicated a high degree of accuracy for student-generated data; species identification with a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) Biotyper revealed that over 88% of the cells analyzed by students were S. epidermidis or S. capitus. The overall frequency of resistant cells was high, ranging from 13.2% of sampled bacteria resistant to oxacillin to 61.7% resistant to penicillin. Stepwise logistic regressions suggested that recent antibiotic use was strongly associated with resistance to three of the four antibiotics tested (p = 0.0003 for penicillin, p antibacterial soaps, or makeup use were associated with resistance to at least one of the four antibiotics. Furthermore, drug resistance to one antibiotic was closely linked to resistance to the other three antibiotics in every case (all p values < 0.0001), suggesting the involvement of multidrug-resistant strains. The data reported here suggest that citizen science could not only provide an important educational experience for undergraduates, but potentially play a role in efforts to expand antibiotic resistance (ABR) surveillance. PMID:27047615

  6. Impact of HIV co-infection on the evolution and transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldholm, Vegard; Rieux, Adrien; Monteserin, Johana; Lopez, Julia Montana; Palmero, Domingo; Lopez, Beatriz; Ritacco, Viviana; Didelot, Xavier; Balloux, Francois

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is fueled by a parallel Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic, but it remains unclear to what extent the HIV epidemic has been a driver for drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here we assess the impact of HIV co-infection on the emergence of resistance and transmission of Mtb in the largest outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in South America to date. By combining Bayesian evolutionary analyses and the reconstruction of transmission networks utilizing a new model optimized for TB, we find that HIV co-infection does not significantly affect the transmissibility or the mutation rate of Mtb within patients and was not associated with increased emergence of resistance within patients. Our results indicate that the HIV epidemic serves as an amplifier of TB outbreaks by providing a reservoir of susceptible hosts, but that HIV co-infection is not a direct driver for the emergence and transmission of resistant strains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16644.001 PMID:27502557

  7. Combating multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria with structurally nanoengineered antimicrobial peptide polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shu J; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Pantarat, Namfon; Sulistio, Adrian; Wong, Edgar H H; Chen, Yu-Yen; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Blencowe, Anton; Reynolds, Eric C; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-01-01

    With the recent emergence of reports on resistant Gram-negative 'superbugs', infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria have been named as one of the most urgent global health threats due to the lack of effective and biocompatible drugs. Here, we show that a class of antimicrobial agents, termed 'structurally nanoengineered antimicrobial peptide polymers' (SNAPPs) exhibit sub-μM activity against all Gram-negative bacteria tested, including ESKAPE and colistin-resistant and MDR (CMDR) pathogens, while demonstrating low toxicity. SNAPPs are highly effective in combating CMDR Acinetobacter baumannii infections in vivo, the first example of a synthetic antimicrobial polymer with CMDR Gram-negative pathogen efficacy. Furthermore, we did not observe any resistance acquisition by A. baumannii (including the CMDR strain) to SNAPPs. Comprehensive analyses using a range of microscopy and (bio)assay techniques revealed that the antimicrobial activity of SNAPPs proceeds via a multimodal mechanism of bacterial cell death by outer membrane destabilization, unregulated ion movement across the cytoplasmic membrane and induction of the apoptotic-like death pathway, possibly accounting for why we did not observe resistance to SNAPPs in CMDR bacteria. Overall, SNAPPs show great promise as low-cost and effective antimicrobial agents and may represent a weapon in combating the growing threat of MDR Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27617798

  8. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine sample, University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Setegn Eshetie; Fentahun Tarekegn; Gemechu Kumera; Feleke Mekonnen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess multidrug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates from patients with urinary tract infection. Methods: From February to June 2014, a cross sectional study was conducted among urinary tract infection patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Culture and disk diffusion method were used for E. coli isolation and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. P Results: A total of 112 E. coli isolates were identified and the rate of isolation was higher among female participants (28.7%; P = 0.03). Of the isolates, 104 (92.9%) were MDR E. coli; and the isolates showed high resistance rates towards ampicillin (99%), cotrimoxazole (69%), chloramphenicol (58.7%), gentamycin (56.7%) and ceftazidime (55.8%). However, comparative isolates showed low resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (1%), cefepime (8.7%), and ceftriaxone (11.5%). Moreover, resistance rates of MDR E. coli isolates were significantly higher than non-MDR strains for ceftazidime (55.8% versus 12.5%; P = 0.015), and ampicillin (99% versus 87.5%; P = 0.018). Conclusions: High prevalence of MDR E. coli isolates was observed in this study. Regular monitoring of antibiotic resistance rates is necessarily required to improve and revise empirical antibiotic therapy protocols.

  9. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170), thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin) decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents

  10. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants used by aborigines of Kalahandi, Orissa, India against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debasmita Dubey; Mahesh C Sahu; Shakti Rath; Bimoch Projna Paty; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potency of 20 non-edible and/or poisonous plants used by an aborigine tribe (Kandha) of Kalahandi district for infectious diseases. Methods: Over a period of 5 months from two hospitals, 10 pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Acinetobacter sp., Citrobacter freundii (C. freundii), Chromobacterium violeceum (C. violeceum),Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella sp., Proteus sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) and Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) were isolated to pure axenic cultures from clinical samples. Water and ethanolic extracts of leaves and barks were concentrated before monitoring antimicrobial activity by agar-well diffusion method. Results: All bacterial strains isolated were multidrug resistant. Ethanolic extract of most plants had effective antimicrobial activity against all the isolated multidrug resistant bacteria. Plants, Anthocephalus cadamba (A. cadamba) and Pterocarpus santalinus (P. santalinus) had antibacterial effect on all used bacteria. Water extract of several plants too had effective antimicrobial activity for all bacteria used. Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp., C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa, the most potential urinary tract infection causing organisms by plant extracts of all major plant used herein is recorded. MDR C. violaceum isolated from skin lesions was found to be resistant to imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and amoxyclav and was found sensitive to 13 plant extracts. Conclusion: Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp.,C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa; enteropathogenic bacteria, E. coli, S. typhi, Klebsiella sp. and V. cholerae were found to be well controlled by all plant extracts used.

  11. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  12. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhasukh Duang

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170, thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. Methods In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Results Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. Conclusion These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents.

  13. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:25985578

  14. Immunization against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii effectively protects mice in both pneumonia and sepsis models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. METHODS: Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia and sepsis models were used to evaluate the efficacy of active and passive immunization with OMVs. The probable effective mechanisms and the protective potential of clonally distinct clinical isolates were investigated in vitro using an opsonophagocytic assay. RESULTS: Intramuscular immunization with OMVs rapidly produced high levels of OMV-specific IgG antibodies, and subsequent intranasal challenge with A. baumannii elicited mucosal IgA and IgG responses. Both active and passive immunization protected the mice from challenges with homologue bacteria in a sepsis model. Bacterial burden in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF, lung, and spleen, inflammatory cell infiltration in BALF and lung, and inflammatory cytokine accumulation in BALF was significantly suppressed in the pneumonia model by both active and passive immunization strategies. The antisera from immunized mice presented with significant opsonophagocytic activities in a dose-dependent manner against not only homologous strains but also five of the other six clonally distinct clinical isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Utilizing immunological characteristics of outer membrane proteins to elevate protective immunity and circumvent complex multidrug-resistance mechanisms might be a viable approach to effectively control A. baumannii infections.

  15. Fluoroquinolone resistance in non-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis—a surveillance study in New South Wales, Australia, and a review of global resistance rates

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Ho; Peter Jelfs; Vitali Sintchenko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are used for drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB) in patients unable to tolerate first-line agents. Current trials are also investigating these drugs in empiric first-line TB therapy, to improve outcomes and allow for shortened treatment regimens. Widespread FQ use in the community has resulted in FQ resistance in many microorganisms, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite this, FQ drug susceptibility testing (DST) is rarely performed in non-multidrug-r...

  16. Effect of mutated IκBα transfection on multidrug resistance in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Fu Chen; Zhi-Hua Li; Xian-He Kong; Ji-Sheng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression effect of mutated IκBαtransfection on multidrug resistance gene (MDR-1) in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells by inhibiting the activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB).METHODS: We used the mutated IκBα plasmid to transfect QBC939HCVC+ cells and QBC939 cells, and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) to detect the binding activity of NF-κB DNA and the effect of the transfrecting mutated IκBα plasmid on multidrug resistance gene (MDR-1) in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells and its expression protein (P-GP).RFSULTS: Plasmid DNA was digested by restriction enzymes Xbal and Hand Ⅲ, and its product after electrophoresis showed two bands with a big difference in molecular weight,with a size of 4.9 kb and 1.55 kb respectively, which indicated that the carrier was successfully constructed and digested with enzymes. The radioactivity accumulation of QBC939HCVC+and QBC939 cells transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid was significantly lower than that of the control group not transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid. Double densimeter scanning showed that the relative signal density between the tansfection group and non-transfection group was significantly different, which proved that the mutated IκBα plasmid could inhibit the binding activity of NF-κB DNA in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells. Compared to control group not transfected with m IκBα plasmid, the expression level of MDR-1mRNA in the QBC939 and QBC939HCVC+ cells transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid was lower. The expression intensity of P-GP protein in QBC939 and QBC939HCVC+ cells transfected with mutated IκBα was significantly lower than that of the control group not transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid.CONCLUSION: The mutated IκBα plasmid transfection can markedly reverse the multidrug resistance of hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells. Interruption of NF-κB activity may become a new target in gene therapy for hilar cholangiocarcinogenesic carcinoma.

  17. Multidrug-resistant organisms in refugees: prevalences and impact on infection control in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The refugee crisis is a great challenge to the social and healthcare system in European countries, especially in Germany. An abundance of data has been published on the refugees’ health problems (infections as well as physical diseases and psychiatric problems and their prevention (i.e., sanitary and vaccination programs. However, data on prevalences of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO in refugees are scarce, although it is known that most refugees are from or travelled through countries with high prevalences of MDRO. This paper presents current data on MDRO colonization of refugees admitted to hospitals, and the impact of screening upon admission and infection control in hospitals is discussed.Methods: Anonymous data obtained by screening upon hospital admission were reported by hospitals in the Rhine-Main region of Germany to the local public health department. Screening and microbiological analyses were performed from December 2015 to March 2016 according to standardized and validated methods.Results: 9.8% of the refugees screened (32/325 exhibited colonization with methicillin-resistant (MRSA, and 23.3% of the refugees (67/290 were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria with extended spectrum beta-lactamases, and/or enterobacteria with resistance against 3 or 4 groups of antibacterials, so-called 3MRGN (multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria with resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins and quinolones and 4MRGN (with additional resistance against carbapenems. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGN were detected in 2.1% (6/290 of the refugees.Conclusion: The data confirms the studies published between 2014 and 2016, encompassing refugees tested in Germany, the Netherlands and Israel, with prevalences of MRSA and CRGN up to 13.5% and 5.6%. The MDRO prevalences are higher than those of “risk groups” for MRSA, such as hemodialysis patients and patients depending on outpatient home-nursing care or

  18. Dual Agent Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Enhanced Antitumor Activity in a Multidrug-Resistant Breast Tumor Eenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant breast cancers have limited and ineffective clinical treatment options. This study aimed to develop PLGA nanoparticles containing a synergistic combination of vincristine and verapamil to achieve less toxicity and enhanced efficacy on multidrug-resistant breast cancers. The 1:250 molar ratio of VCR/VRP showed strong synergism with the reversal index of approximately 130 in the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells compared to drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells. The lyophilized nanoparticles could get dispersed quickly with the similar size distribution, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency to the pre-lyophilized nanoparticles suspension, and maintain the synergistic in vitro release ratio of drugs. The co-encapsulated nanoparticle formulation had lower toxicity than free vincristine/verapamil combinations according to the acute-toxicity test. Furthermore, the most effective tumor growth inhibition in the MCF-7/ADR human breast tumor xenograft was observed in the co-delivery nanoparticle formulation group in comparison with saline control, free vincristine, free vincristine/verapamil combinations and single-drug nanoparticle combinations. All the data demonstrated that PLGANPs simultaneously loaded with chemotherapeutic drug and chemosensitizer might be one of the most potential formulations in the treatment of multidrug-resistant breast cancer in clinic.

  19. Potential role of non-antibiotics (helper compounds) in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Dastidar, Sujata G; Fanning, Seamus;

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is now known to be primarily caused by overexpression of efflux pumps that extrude unrelated antibiotics from the periplasm or cytoplasm of the bacterium prior to their reaching their intended target. This review focuses on a variety of agents that h...

  20. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces generalized transducing phage in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  1. CLASSICAL AND NOVEL FORMS OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANCE AND THE PHYSIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF P-GLYCOPROTEINS IN MAMMALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BORST, P; SCHINKEL, AH; SMIT, JJM; WAGENAAR, E; VANDEEMTER, L; SMITH, AJ; EIJDEMS, EWHM; BAAS, F; ZAMAN, GJR

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review recent work on multidrug resistance (MDR) in Amsterdam. We have generated mice homozygous for a disruption of one of their P-glycoprotein (Pgp) genes. The mutations do not interfere with viability or fertility, showing that these Pgps have no indispensable role in early deve

  2. Multi-Drug Resistance Mediated by Class 1 Integrons in Aeromonas Isolated from Farmed Freshwater Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuting; Wu, Yali; Jiang, Lan; Tan, Aiping; Zhang, Ruiquan; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas is regarded as an important pathogen of freshwater animals but little is known about the genetics of its antimicrobial resistance in Chinese aquaculture. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of integrons and characterize multidrug resistant Aeromonas spp. isolated from diseased farmed freshwater animals. These animal samples included fish, ornamental fish, shrimp, turtles, and amphibians which were collected from 64 farms in Guangdong province of South China. One hundred and twelve Aeromonas spp. isolates were examined for antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and the presence of class 1 integron sequences. Twenty-two (19.6%) of these isolates carried a class 1 integron comprising six different gene insertion cassettes including drfA12-orfF-aadA2, drfA12-orfF, aac(6')-II-bla OXA-21 -cat3, catB3, arr-3, and dfrA17. Among these, drfA12-orfF-aadA2 was the dominant gene cassette array (63.6%, 14/22) and this is the first report of aac(6')-II-bla OXA-21 -cat3 in an Aeromonas hydrophila isolate from a Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus). All the integron-positive strains were resistant to more than five agents and 22 contained other resistance genes including bla CTX-M-3, bla TEM-1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and tetA. All integron-positive isolates also contained mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDR). Our investigation demonstrates that freshwater animals can serve as a reservoir for pathogenic Aeromonas strains containing multiple drug-resistance integrons. This data suggests that surveillance for antimicrobial resistance of animal origin and a prudent and responsible use of antimicrobials in aquaculture is necessary in these farms. PMID:27379065

  3. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falu Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC and defatted extract (PADF from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP; PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π, but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC. Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1; PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes.

  4. The Effects and Mechanisms of Periplaneta americana Extract Reversal of Multi-Drug Resistance in BEL-7402/5-FU Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Falu; Liu, Junyong; Qiao, Tingting; Li, Ting; Shen, Qi; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the reversing effects of extracts from P. americana on multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU cells, as well as a preliminary investigation on their mechanism of action. A methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method was applied to determine the multidrug resistance of BEL-7402/5-FU, while an intracellular drug accumulation assay was used to evaluate the effects of a column chromatography extract (PACC) and defatted extract (PADF) from P. americana on reversing multi-drug resistance. BEL-7402/5-FU reflected high resistance to 5-FU; PACC and PADF could promote drug accumulation in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, among which PADF was more effective than PACC. Moreover, results from the immunocytochemical method showed that PACC and PADF could downregulate the expression of drug resistance-associated proteins (P-gp, MRP, LRP); PACC and PADF had no effects on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (GST-π), but PACC could increase the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes (PKC). Results of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR revealed that PACC and PADF were able to markedly inhibit the expression of multidrug resistance-associated genes (MDR1, LRP and MRP1); PACC presented a significant impact on the gene expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes, which increased the gene expression of GST-π and PKC. However, PADF had little impact on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. These results demonstrated that PACC and PADF extracted from P. americana could effectively reverse MDR in BEL-7402/5-FU cells, whose mechanism was to inhibit the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP, and that PADF was more effective in the reversal of MDR than did PACC. In addition, some of extracts from P. americana altered (sometimes increasing) the expression of multidrug resistance-associated enzymes. PMID:27367657

  5. Development and characterization of multidrug resistant human hepatocarcinoma cell line in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Jin Zhai; Ze-Yong Shao; Chun-Liang Zhao; Kai Hu; Feng Wu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell subline from the human hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2)in nude mice.METHODS: HepG2 cell cultures were incubated with increasing concentrations of adriamycin (ADM) to develop an ADM-resistant cell subline (HepG2/ADM) with crossresistance to other chemotherapeutic agents. Twenty male athymic BALB/c-nu/nu mice were randomized into HepG2/nude and HepG2/ADM/nude groups (10 in each group). A cell suspension (either HepG2 or HepG2/ADM)was injected subcutaneously into mice in each group.Tumor growth was recorded, and animals were sacrificed 4-5 wk after cell implantation. Tumors were prepared for histology, and viable tumor was dispersed into a single-cell suspension. The IC50 values for a number of chemotherapeutic agents were determined by 2, 3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt (MTT) assay. Rhodamine-123retention/efflux and the level of resistance-associated proteins were determined by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of mdr1, mrp and Irp genes was detected using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in HepG2/nude and HepG2/ADM/nude groups.RESULTS: The appearances of HepG2/nude cells were slightly different from those of HepG2/ADM/nude cells.Similar tumor growth curves were determined in both groups. A cross-resistance to ADM, vincristine, cisplatin and 5-fiuorouracil was seen in HepG2/ADM/nude group.The levels of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistanceassociated proteins were significantly increased. The mRNA expression levels of mdr1, mrp and Irp were higher in HepG2/ADM/nude cells.CONCLUSION: ADM-resistant HepG2 subline in nude mice has a cross resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs.Tt may be used as an in vivo model to investigate the mechanisms of MDR, and explore the targeted approaches to overcoming MDR.

  6. Susceptibility of multidrug resistant enterotoxigenic escherichia coli to saponin extract from phyllanthus niruri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escherichia coli were isolated from 140 samples of blood, urine, stool and water made up of 15.7%, 42.9% and 30.0% and 25.7% respectively. From the samples, 71.9% enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), 14.3% enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), 7.1% enterohemorrhagic E. coil (EHEC) and 7.1% enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) occurred as diarrheagenic E. coli. Of the ETEC (240) isolates tested for susceptibility to eight conventional antibiotics. 110 (46.0%) showed resistance to all the tested antimicrobial agents. However, of the resistant strains; 24 (22.0%) were multidrug resistant. These were tested against 3.0 mg/mL of saponin extract from phyllanthus niruri and 13 (55.0%) of these were susceptible to the saponin. The antimicrobial activities of saponin from P. niruri are of interest since the crude extract was effective at concentration of 3.0 mg/ml to multiple resistant isolates of EEC. (author)

  7. Multidrug resistance phenotypes are widespread over different bacterial taxonomic groups thriving in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-09-01

    The environment is the original and most ancient source of the antibiotic resistance determinants that threat the human health nowadays. In the environment, water is a privileged habitat and mode of dissemination of bacteria of different origins. Freshwater bodies that cross urban areas are supposed to hold a complex mixture of both human/animal origin and strictly environmental bacteria. In this study, we were interested in unveiling the bacterial diversity in urban river transects and, simultaneously, investigate the occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, in particular the multidrug resistant (MDR). With this aim, water and sediments of two rivers were sampled from an urban transect and the bacterial diversity was assessed based on 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis and, simultaneously, total heterotrophic bacteria were isolated in the presence and in the absence of antibiotics. The three predominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, in water, or Acidobacteria, in sediments. MDR bacteria were observed to belong to the predominant phyla observed in water, mostly of the classes Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria (Proteobacteria) and Sphingobacteriia and Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) and belonged to genera of ubiquitous (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Stenotrophomonas) or mainly environmental (Chitinophaga, Chryseobacterium) bacteria. The observation that MDR bacteria are widespread in the environment and over distinct phylogenetic lineages has two relevant implications: i) the potential of environmental bacteria as source or facilitators for antibiotic resistance acquisition; ii) the need to complement culture-independent methods with culture-based approaches in order to identify major sources of MDR profiles. PMID:27131885

  8. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolain, J-M; Loucif, L; Al-Maslamani, M; Elmagboul, E; Al-Ansari, N; Taj-Aldeen, S; Shaukat, A; Ahmedullah, H; Hamed, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-58, bla NDM) was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and bla OXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for bla OXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar. PMID:27054039

  9. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospitals in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Ting Lim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of Escherichia coli that produce extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and are multidrug resistant (MDR poses antibiotic management problems. Forty-seven E. coli isolates from various public hospitals in Malaysia were studied. All isolates were sensitive to imipenem whereas 36 were MDR (resistant to 2 or more classes of antibiotics. PCR detection using gene-specific primers showed that 87.5% of the ESBL-producing E. coli harbored the blaTEM gene. Other ESBL-encoding genes detected were blaOXA, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M. Integron-encoded integrases were detected in 55.3% of isolates, with class 1 integron-encoded intI1 integrase being the majority. Amplification and sequence analysis of the 5′CS region of the integrons showed known antibiotic resistance-encoding gene cassettes of various sizes that were inserted within the respective integrons. Conjugation and transformation experiments indicated that some of the antibiotic resistance genes were likely plasmid-encoded and transmissible. All 47 isolates were subtyped by PFGE and PCR-based fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, repetitive extragenic palindromes (REPs, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC. These isolates were very diverse and heterogeneous. PFGE, ERIC, and REP-PCR methods were more discriminative than RAPD in subtyping the E. coli isolates.

  10. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. (Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Gazdar, A.F. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA)); Von Hoff, D.D. (Univ. of Texas, San Antonio (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  11. The role of nanotechnology in combating multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajni; Smitha, M S; Singh, Surinder P

    2014-07-01

    The development of antibiotics has played a significant role in combating the dreaded infectious disease such as tuberculosis, pneumonia, typhoid fever and meningitis in 20th century. However, the improper use of antibiotics led to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in microbial flora raising a global public health concern of 21st century. This unforeseen threat demands the development of new drugs and strategies for combating antibiotic resistance shown by many microbial species. Recent developments in nanotechnology to engineer nanoparticles with desired physicochemical properties have been projected as a new line of defense against MDR micro-organism. In this review, we summarized and discussed the recent development demonstrating the potential of nanomaterials to evade the MDR. Nanoparticles have shown effective antimicrobial activity against MDR bacteria, such as Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, vancomycin resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and others. Furthermore, new strategies like combination of radiation and drugs with nanoparticle that are being explored to potentiate the effectiveness against MDR bacteria have also been summarized. PMID:24757944

  12. Combination therapy with polymyxin B and netropsin against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joon-Hui; Bhat, Abhayprasad; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yong, Dongeun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Polymyxins are last-resort antibiotics for treating infections of Gram-negative bacteria. The recent emergence of polymyxin-resistant bacteria, however, urgently demands clinical optimisation of polymyxin use to minimise further evolution of resistance. In this study we developed a novel combination therapy using minimal concentrations of polymyxin B. After large-scale screening of Streptomyces secondary metabolites, we identified a reliable polymixin synergist and confirmed as netropsin using high-pressure liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry followed by in vitro assays using various Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of combining polymixin B and netropsin in vivo, we performed survival analysis on greater wax moth Galleria mellonella infected with colistin-resistant clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates as well as Escherichia coli, Shigella flexineri, Salmonella typhimuruim, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The survival of infected G. mellonella was significantly higher when treated with polymyxin B and netropsin in combination than when treated with polymyxin B or netropsin alone. We propose a netropsin combination therapy that minimises the use of polymyxin B when treating infections with multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27306928

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Nor Amilah, W A W; Masrah, M; Hasmah, A; Noor Izani, N J

    2014-12-01

    Antimicrobial activities of plants have long been evaluated for their promising use as antimicrobial agent and in minimizing the unwanted resistance effects of microorganisms. The study was conducted to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Quercus infectoria gall crude extracts against multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria in vitro. The screening test was determined by disc diffusion technique using sterile filter paper discs impregnated with 1 mg/ disc (50 mg/ml) aqueous and ethanol extracts of Q. infectoria galls tested on five selected MDR bacterial strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined using the twofold serial micro dilution technique at concentration ranging from 5.00 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was determined by sub culturing the microtitre wells showing no turbidity on the agar plate to obtain the MBC value. Both extracts showed substantial inhibitory effects against methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (MRCoNS) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A slightly reduced inhibitory zone diameter was observed with MDR Acinetobacter sp. while no inhibitory effect was displayed among the extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) K. pneumoniae and ESBL E. coli isolates. A significant difference in the zone sizes between both extracts was only observed in MRSA (p infectoria gall extracts have shown very promising in vitro antibacterial activities and may be considered as a potentially good source of antimicrobial agent especially against MDR Gram positive bacteria. PMID:25776593

  14. A Case of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis of the Lung and Breast Due to Intrafamilial Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Tözalgan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old primiparous mother with a chronic draining breast lesion was smear-positive for acid-fast bacilli in the sputum examination after learning that her husband was a patient noncompliant to treatment. Despite negative microbiological examination of the breast drainage, she was culture-positive for multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in her sputum culture. Because she was in the lactation period, with unilateral breast involvement, and accompanying culture-proven pulmonary tuberculosis, she was accepted as secondary breast tuberculosis. After therapy with a combination of ofloxacin, cycloserin, pyrazinamid, ethambuthol and amikacin, the breast lesion healed completely. As this case demonstrated that family screening is important for finding new patients, and tuberculous mastitis, albeit rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic breast infections with unproven etiology.

  15. Postcraniofacial trauma multidrug resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii infection treated with intravenous colistin: A rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial meningitis is a rare complication of combined craniofacial and neurosurgical procedures. The increase in meningitis caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii has resulted in a significant reduction in available treatment options. We report a case of 52-year-old man who sustained a complex craniofacial trauma, who developed nosocomial MDR infection caused by A. baumannii in the wound. Patient was at significant risk of developing meningitis but, he was successfully treated with intravenous colistin. To conclude, patients with complex maxillofacial trauma are at high risk of MDR A. baumannii meningitis, especially in craniofacial intensive care units, and adequate infection control measures with proper institution of antibiotics, should be used to reduce the risk of this infection

  16. Analysis of Plasmid and Chromosomal DNA of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi from Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, S.; Kariuki, S.; Mamun, K. Z.; Beeching, N. J.; Hart, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular analysis of chromosomal DNA from 193 multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from 1990 to 1995 from Pakistan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Bangladesh, and India produced a total of five major different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Even within a particular country MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi DNA was found to be in different PFGE groups. Similar self-transferable 98-MDa plasmids belonging to either incompatibility group incHI1 or incHI1/FIIA were implicated in the MDR phenotype in S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates from all the locations except Quetta, Pakistan, where the majority were of incFIA. A total of five different PFGE genotypes with six different plasmids, based on incompatibility and restriction endonuclease analysis groups, were found among these MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates. PMID:10747124

  17. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Lithuania - Still a long way ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musteikienė, Greta; Miliauskas, Skaidrius; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Vitkauskienė, Astra; Žemaitis, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the diagnosis of tuberculosis, treatment of the disease, for the most part, remains the same as it was half a century ago. In recent years only two new anti-tuberculosis drugs have been approved by the European Medicines Agency and Food and Drug Administration. Though the prevalence of this disease is slowly decreasing all over Europe, new challenges appear. One of them is multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). This problem is especially prominent in Lithuania, which is one of the 27 high MDR-TB burden countries in the world and falls behind neighboring countries in terms of the prevalence of the disease. The objective of this paper was to review the situation of tuberculosis and MDR-TB in Lithuania, and current available methods of treatment, control and diagnosis of this disease. PMID:27170479

  18. Indomethacin Analogues that Enhance Doxorubicin Cytotoxicity in Multidrug Resistant Cells without Cox Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Kasaya, Yayoi; Obata, Tohru; Sasaki, Takuma; Ito, Mika; Abe, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Akihito; Shuto, Satoshi

    2011-05-12

    Conformationally restricted indomethacin analogues were designed and prepared from the corresponding 2-substituted indoles, which were synthesized by a one-pot isomerization/enamide-ene metathesis as the key reaction. Conformational analysis by calculations, NMR studies, and X-ray crystallography suggested that these analogues were conformationally restricted in the s-cis or the s-trans form due to the 2-substituent as expected. Their biological activities on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibition, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition, and modulation of MRP-1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) are described. Some of these indomethacin analogues enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity, although they do not have any COX inhibitory activity, which suggests that the MDR-modulating effect of an NSAID can be unassociated with its COX-inhibitory activity. This may be an entry into the combination chemotherapy of doxorubicin with a MDR modulator. PMID:24900317

  19. Psychosocial support groups for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: five years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acha, J; Sweetland, A; Guerra, D; Chalco, K; Castillo, H; Palacios, E

    2007-01-01

    This detailed case history traces the first 5 years of a psychosocial support group intervention aimed to improve adherence to individualized drug regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Peru. A total of eight groups were established in metropolitan Lima and two provinces of Peru led by teams of psychiatrists and nurses. The intervention consisted of bi-monthly support groups, recreational excursions, symbolic celebrations, and periodic family workshops. Notably, of the 285 patients who participated in this intervention, only 3.5% defaulted from treatment. Details include the description of services, patient data, major psychosocial difficulties faced by this population, key challenges, and implications. Psychosocial support is a crucial component of treatment for MDR-TB in order to ensure completion of complicated treatment regimens and enable psychosocial rehabilitation after treatment. PMID:19283636

  20. Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Donor-Derived Infections in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jessica D; Sifri, Costi D

    2016-06-01

    Although rare, donor-derived infections (DDIs) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria can have devastating consequences for organ transplant recipients. Recognition of MDR bacterial DDIs can be challenging, as MDR bacteria are prevalent in most hospitals and distinguishing their transmission through transplantation from other, more typical routes of acquisition are difficult. New technologies such as whole genome sequencing have recently proven to be a powerful advance in the investigation of MDR bacterial DDIs. Once recognized, the optimal treatment of MDR bacterial DDIs is not clear. Herein, we review the clinical manifestations, outcomes, and management of MDR bacterial DDIs, and identify areas of uncertainty toward which the transplant community should direct further research efforts. PMID:27115701