WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemistry magnetic interaction

  1. Electron spin interactions in chemistry and biology fundamentals, methods, reactions mechanisms, magnetic phenomena, structure investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the versatile and pivotal role of electron spin interactions in nature. It provides the background, methodologies and tools for basic areas related to spin interactions, such as spin chemistry and biology, electron transfer, light energy conversion, photochemistry, radical reactions, magneto-chemistry and magneto-biology. The book also includes an overview of designing advanced magnetic materials, optical and spintronic devices and photo catalysts. This monograph appeals to scientists and graduate students working in the areas related to spin interactions physics, biophysics, chemistry and chemical engineering.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  3. Quark interactions and colour chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Mo, C.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between quarks, according to the current theory of quantum chromodynamics, is similar to the electromagnetic interaction between electrons and nucleons, both being governed by locally gauge-invariant field theories. It is tempting therefore to discuss the spectroscopy of hadrons, which are quark composites bound by colour forces, in the same language as the spectroscopy of atoms and molecules which are bound states of electrons and nucleons held together by e.m. forces. Because of the difference in gauge groups, however, the dynamics are very different. Nonetheless, it appears likely that metastable multiquark hadron states can exist which are analogous to atoms and molecules in QED. In these lectures, tentative steps are taken in developing the rudiments of a new colour chemistry' of these 'atoms' and 'molecules'. (author)

  4. Magnetic interactions between nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2010-01-01

    We present a short overview of the influence of inter-particle interactions on the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. Strong magnetic dipole interactions between ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic particles, that would be superparamagnetic if isolated, can result in a collective state...... of nanoparticles. This collective state has many similarities to spin-glasses. In samples of aggregated magnetic nanoparticles, exchange interactions are often important and this can also lead to a strong suppression of superparamagnetic relaxation. The temperature dependence of the order parameter in samples...... of strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles or goethite grains is well described by a simple mean field model. Exchange interactions between nanoparticles with different orientations of the easy axes can also result in a rotation of the sub-lattice magnetization directions....

  5. Muons as hyperfine interaction probes in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@triumf.ca; MacLean, Amy [Mount Allison University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Spin polarized positive muons injected in matter serve as magnetic probes for the investigation of physical and chemical properties of free radicals, mechanisms of free radical reactions and their formations, and radiation effects. All muon techniques rely on the evolution of spin polarization (of the muon) and in that respect are similar to conventional magnetic resonance techniques. The applications of the muon as a hyperfine probe in several fields in chemistry are described.

  6. Muons as hyperfine interaction probes in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandi, Khashayar; MacLean, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Spin polarized positive muons injected in matter serve as magnetic probes for the investigation of physical and chemical properties of free radicals, mechanisms of free radical reactions and their formations, and radiation effects. All muon techniques rely on the evolution of spin polarization (of the muon) and in that respect are similar to conventional magnetic resonance techniques. The applications of the muon as a hyperfine probe in several fields in chemistry are described

  7. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni

    2014-01-01

    support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes......The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...

  8. Super magnets for interaction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biallas, G.; Fowler, W.; Diebold, R.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using superconducting magnets in the beam interaction regions of particle accelerators is discussed. These higher field magnets can be shorter, leaving more room for detectors, but also must have a large aperture and magnetic shielding. The ''kissing geometry'' was investigated, and design and scaling considerations are given. A rough estimate of the cost of such superconducting magnets is given as an aid to the selection of interaction geometry

  9. Crystal chemistry and magnetic properties of ternary rare earth sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug, C.M.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1977-01-01

    The results of magnetic measurements on two groups of ternary rare earth sulphides are described, the MLnS 2 (M=Li, Na, K) type of compounds and the series Ln 2 ZrS 5 , where Ln denotes one of the rare earths. None of these compounds is metallic, excluding the possibility of RKKY-interaction. In chapter II a survey of the relevant theory on magnetic properties and crystal field splitting is given. In spite of the similarity in chemical properties of the rare earths, the crystal chemistry of their compounds is rather complex. This is due to the lanthanide contraction. The third chapter deals with the description and classification of the numerous crystal structures of both ternary and binary rare earth sulphides that have been observed. Rather simple relations between various structures are presented using a new method of structure classification. The magnetic interactions expected to be based on superexchange via the anions, which is usually very structure dependent. Experiments to study the crystallographic ordering, applying both X-ray and electron diffraction methods and the results of the magnetic measurements on the compounds MLnS 2 are reported in chapter IV. The compounds Ln 2 ZrS 5 are candidates for a systematic study of the variation of the magnetic properties along the rare earth series. The results of magnetic measurements on these compounds are presented in chapter V, combined with the results of specific heat measurements. Also the magnetic structure of two representatives, Tb 2 ZrS 5 and Dy 2 ZrS 5 , determined by neutron diffraction experiments below the ordering temperature, is reported

  10. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  11. Emission Data For Climate-Chemistry Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Data on anthropogenic and natural emissions of reactive species are a critical input for studies of atmospheric chemistry and climate. The availability and characteristics of anthropogenic emissions data that can be used for such studies are reviewed and pathways for future work discuss Global and regional datasets for historical and future emissions are available, but their characteristics and applicability for specific studies differ. For the first time, a coordinated set of historical emissions (Lamarque et al 2010) and the future projections (van Vuurren et al. 2011) have been developed for use in the CMIP5 and ACCMIP long-term simulation comparison projects. These data have decadal resolution and were designed for long-term, global simulations. These data, however, lack finer-scale spatial and temporal detail that might be needed for some studies. Robust and timely updates of emissions data is generally lacking, although recent updates will be presented. While historical emission data is often treated as known, emissions are uncertain, even though this uncertainty is rarely quantified. Uncertainty varies by species and location. Inverse modeling is starting to indicate where emission data may be uncertain, which opens the way to improving these data overall. Further interaction between the chemistry modeling and inventory development communities are needed. Future projections are intrinsically uncertain, and while institutions and processes are in place to develop and review long-term century-scale scenarios, a need has remained for a wider range in shorter-term (e.g., several decade) projections. Emissions and scenario development communities have been working to fill this need. Communication across disciplines of the assumptions embedded in emissions projections remains a challenge. Atmospheric chemistry models are a central tool needed for studying chemistry-climate interactions. Simpler models, however, are also needed in order to examine interactions

  12. Magnetic separation: its application in mining, waste purification, medicine, biochemistry and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, M; Hulliger, J

    2017-10-02

    The use of strong magnetic field gradients and high magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets or superconducting coils has found applications in many fields such as mining, solid state chemistry, biochemistry and medical research. Lab scale or industrial implementations involve separation of macro- and nanoparticles, cells, proteins, and macromolecules down to small molecules and ions. Most promising are those attempts where the object to be separated is attached to a strong magnetic nanoparticle. Here, all kinds of specific affinity interactions are used to attach magnetic carrier particles to mainly objects of biological interest. Other attempts use a strong paramagnetic suspension for the separation of purely diamagnetic objects, such as bio-macromolecules or heavy metals. The application of magnetic separation to superconducting inorganic phases is of particular interest in combination with ceramic combinatorial chemistry to generate a library of e.g. cuprate superconductors.

  13. Atmospheric Composition Change: Climate-Chemistry Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, I.S.A.; Granier, C.; Myhre, G.; Bernsten, T. K.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Gauss, S.; Klimont, Z.; Benestad, R.; Bousquet, P.; Collins, W.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds such as methane (CH4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds such as ozone (O3), sulfate and organic aerosols, formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate-chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate-chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds such as O3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and future changes. Reported results include new estimates of radiative forcing based on extensive model studies of chemically active climate compounds such as O3, and of particles inducing both direct and indirect effects. Through EU projects such as ACCENT, QUANTIFY, and the AEROCOM project, extensive studies on regional and sector-wise differences in the impact on atmospheric distribution are performed. Studies have shown that land-based emissions have a different effect on climate than ship and aircraft emissions, and different measures are needed to reduce the climate impact. Several areas where climate change can affect the tropospheric oxidation process and the chemical composition are identified. This can take place through enhanced stratospheric-tropospheric exchange of ozone, more frequent periods with stable conditions favouring pollution build up over industrial areas, enhanced temperature-induced biogenic emissions, methane releases from permafrost thawing, and enhanced

  14. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  15. Magnetic relaxation in analytical, coordination and bioinorganic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, O.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is a special type of nuclear magnetic resonance in which the rate is measured of energy transfer between the excited nuclei and their molecular medium (spin-lattice relaxation) or the whole nuclear spin system (spin-spin relaxation). Nuclear magnetic relaxation relates to nuclei with a spin of 1/2, primarily H 1 1 , and is mainly measured in water solutions. It is suitable for (1) analytical chemistry because the relaxation time rapidly reduces in the presence of paramagnetic ions, (2) the study of complex compounds, (3) the study of biochemical reactions in the presence of different metal ions. It is also suitable for testing the composition of a flowing liquid. Its disadvantage is that it requires complex and expensive equipment. (Ha)

  16. Atmospheric Boundary Layer, Integrating Air Chemistry and Land Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Stratum, van B.J.H.; Dries, van den C.L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to the interactions between the atmosphere and the land for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and a reference text for researchers in atmospheric physics and chemistry, hydrology, and plant physiology. The combination of the book, which provides the

  17. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  18. Magnetic behaviour of interacting antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovich, V; Jung, G; Gorodetsky, G; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Skourski, Y; Mogilyanski, D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic properties of interacting La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 nanoparticles have been investigated. The field-induced transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) state in the La 0.2 Ca 0.8 MnO 3 bulk has been observed at exceptionally high magnetic fields. For large particles, the field-induced transition widens while magnetization progressively decreases. In small particles the transition is almost fully suppressed. The thermoremanence and isothermoremanence curves constitute fingerprints of irreversible magnetization originating from nanoparticle shells. We have ascribed the magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles to a core-shell scenario with two main magnetic contributions; one attributed to the formation of a collective state formed by FM clusters in frustrated coordination at the surfaces of interacting AFM nanoparticles and the other associated with inner core behaviour as a two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet. (paper)

  19. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincendon, Marc

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author) [fr

  20. Interaction effects in magnetic oxide nanoparticle systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction effects in magnetic nanoparticle system were studied through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results of simulations were compared with two different magnetic systems, namely, iron oxide polymer nanocomposites prepared by polymerization over core and nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite thin films prepared by ...

  1. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0277 Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High- Reynolds -Number Turbulent Partially Premixed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE [U] Experimental investigation of turbulence-chemistry interaction in high- Reynolds -number 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER turbulent...for public release Final Report: Experimental investigation of turbulence-chemistry interaction in high- Reynolds -number turbulent partially premixed

  2. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  3. Reactor water chemistry relevant to coolant-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The report is a summary of the work performed in a frame of a Coordinated Research Program organized by the IAEA and carried out from 1981 till 1986. It consists of a survey on our knowledge on coolant-cladding interaction: the basic phenomena, the relevant parameters, their control and the modelling techniques implemented for their assessment. Based upon the results of this Coordinated Research Program, the following topics are reviewed on the report: role of water chemistry in reliable operation of nuclear power plants; water chemistry specifications and their control; behaviour of fuel cladding materials; corrosion product behaviour and crud build-up in reactor circuits; modelling of corrosion product behaviour. This report should be of interest to water chemistry supervisors at the power plants, to experts in utility engineering departments, to fuel designers, to R and D institutes active in the field and to the consultants of these organizations. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 3 papers included in the Annex of this document. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Dynamic-chemistry-aerosol modelling interaction: the ESCOMPTE 2001 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousin, F.

    2004-09-01

    After most pollution studies independently devoted to gases and aerosols, there now appears an urgent need to consider their interactions. In this view, an aerosol module has been implemented in the Meso-NH-C model to simulate two IOPs documented during the ESCOMPTE campaign which took place in the Marseille/Fos-Berre region in June-July 2001. First, modelled dynamic parameters (winds, temperatures, boundary layer thickness) and gaseous chemistry have been validated with measurements issued from the exhaustive ESCOMPTE database. Sensitivity analysis have also been performed using different gaseous emission inventories at various resolution. These simulations have illustrated the deep impact of both synoptic and local dynamics on observed ozone concentrations on June 24 (IOP2b) in the ESCOMPTE domain. Afterwards, the ORISAM aerosol module has been introduced into the Meso-NH-C model. Dynamics, gaseous chemistry and aerosol processes have thus been coupled on-line. The particulate pollution episode on June 24 (IOP2b) has been characterised through a satisfactory comparison, specially from sub-micron particles, between modelling and measurements at different representative stations in the domain. This study, with validation of the particulate emission inventory has also highlighted the need for future improvements, such as further characterisation of organic and inorganic aerosol species and consideration of coarse particles. Aerosol impact on gaseous chemistry has been preliminary approached in view of future development and modification to be given to the Meso-NH-C model. (author)

  5. Magnetic interactions in iron (III) porphyrin chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, J.; Subramanian, Japyesan; Fuhrhop, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Intermolecular exchange interactions in iron(III) porphyrin chlorides (porphyrin = OEP, proto, TPP) have been studied by X-ray structure, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies. The crystal structure of Fe(III)OEP-Cl was found to be different from that of the other two. Different types of exchange broadened EPR-spectra are obtained which are attributable to the arrangement in the crystals. The EPR results correlate well with magnetic susceptibility data. (orig.) [de

  6. Strongly interacting matter in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl; Schmitt, Andreas; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2013-01-01

    The physics of strongly interacting matter in an external magnetic field is presently emerging as a topic of great cross-disciplinary interest for particle, nuclear, astro- and condensed matter physicists. It is known that strong magnetic fields are created in heavy ion collisions, an insight that has made it possible to study a variety of surprising and intriguing phenomena that emerge from the interplay of quantum anomalies, the topology of non-Abelian gauge fields, and the magnetic field. In particular, the non-trivial topological configurations of the gluon field induce a non-dissipative electric current in the presence of a magnetic field. These phenomena have led to an extended formulation of relativistic hydrodynamics, called chiral magnetohydrodynamics. Hitherto unexpected applications in condensed matter physics include graphene and topological insulators. Other fields of application include astrophysics, where strong magnetic fields exist in magnetars and pulsars. Last but not least, an important ne...

  7. MFM study of magnetic interaction between recording and soft magnetic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yukio; Tanahashi, Kiwamu; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Kikukawa, Atsushi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to study the magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers in double-layer perpendicular media by observing the magnetization structure from the soft magnetic layer side. There was a strong magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers. Introducing a thin nonmagnetic intermediate layer between the two layers greatly reduced the magnetic interaction and drastically reduced the medium noise

  8. Magnetic moments and the Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E; Stringari, S; Traini, M [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartmento di Matematica e Fisica

    1977-12-12

    The magnetic properties of the Skyrme interaction have been studied by performing a restricted Hartree-Fock calculation in order to evaluate the magnetic polarizability and the corrections to the Schmidt moments in nuclei with closed jj shells plus or minus one nucleon. Different corrections to the Schmidt values have been evaluated and discussed: the M1 core polarization and the renormalization of the gyromagnetic factors due to exchange and spin-orbit forces. Several variants of the Skyrme interaction have been studied and discussed in detail.

  9. Role of Magnetic Interaction in Dense Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasiparticle excitations and associated phenomena of energy and momentum transfer rates have been calculated in terms of the drag and the diffusion coefficients exposing clearly the dominance of the magnetic interaction over its electric counterpart. The results have been compared with the finite temperature results highlighting the similarities and dissimilarities in the two extreme regimes of temperature and density. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior of various physical quantities like neutrino mean free path and thermal relaxation time due to the inclusion of magnetic interaction has clearly been revealed. All the results presented in the current review are pertinent to the degenerate and ultradegenerate plasma.

  10. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  11. Laser-plasma interactions in magnetized environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2018-05-01

    Propagation and scattering of lasers present new phenomena and applications when the plasma medium becomes strongly magnetized. With mega-Gauss magnetic fields, scattering of optical lasers already becomes manifestly anisotropic. Special angles exist where coherent laser scattering is either enhanced or suppressed, as we demonstrate using a cold-fluid model. Consequently, by aiming laser beams at special angles, one may be able to optimize laser-plasma coupling in magnetized implosion experiments. In addition, magnetized scattering can be exploited to improve the performance of plasma-based laser pulse amplifiers. Using the magnetic field as an extra control variable, it is possible to produce optical pulses of higher intensity, as well as compress UV and soft x-ray pulses beyond the reach of other methods. In even stronger giga-Gauss magnetic fields, laser-plasma interaction enters a relativistic-quantum regime. Using quantum electrodynamics, we compute a modified wave dispersion relation, which enables correct interpretation of Faraday rotation measurements of strong magnetic fields.

  12. Ground water chemistry and water-rock interaction at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Front, K.

    1992-02-01

    Bedrock investigations for the final repository for low- and intermediate level wastes (VLJ repository) generated at the Olkiluoto (TVO-I and TVO-II) nuclear power plant, stareted in 1980. Since 1988 the area has been investigated for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In the report the geochemistry at the nuclear waste investigation site, Olkiluoto, is evaluated. The hydrogeological data are collected from boreholes drilled down to 1000-m depth into Proterozoic crystalline bedrock. The interpretation is based on groundwater chemistry and isotope data, mineralogical data, and the structure and hydrology of the bedrock, using correlation diagrams and thermodynamic calculations (PHREEQE). The hydrogeochemistry and major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry are discussed. The groundwater types are characterized by water-rock interaction but they also show features of other origins. The fresh and brackish waters are contaminated by varying amounts of young meteoric water and brackish seawater. The saline water contains residues of possibly ancient hydrothermal waters, imprints of which are occasionally seen in the rock itself. Different mixing phenomenas are indicated by the isotope contents (O-l8/H-2, H-3) and the Ca/Cl, Na/Cl, HCO 3 /Cl, SO 4 /Cl, Br/Cl, SI(calcite)/SI(dolomite) ratios. The interaction between bedrock and groundwater is reflected by the behaviour of pH, Eh, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, HCO 3 and S0 4 . Dissolution and precipitation of calcite and pyrite, and aluminosilicate hydrolysis play the major role in defining the groundwater composition of the above components

  13. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions in Missile Exhaust Plume Signature Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W

    2002-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulence chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  14. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  15. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-01

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  16. Dynamic interaction between rotor and axially-magnetized passive magnetic bearing considering magnetic eccentricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar

    2014-01-01

    with a multibody system composed of rigid rotor and flexible foundation. The magnetic eccentricities of the shaft magnets are modelled using the distances (amplitudes) and directions (phase angles) between the shaft axis and the centre of the magnetic fields generated. A perturbation method, i.e. harmonic......-linear stiffness. In this investigation passive magnetic bearings using axially- aligned neodymium cylinder magnets are investigated. The cylinder magnets are axially magnetised for rotor as well as bearings. Compared to bearings with radial magnetisation, the magnetic stiffness of axially-aligned bearings...... is considerably lower, nevertheless they allow for asymmetric stiffness mounting, and it could be beneficial for rotor stabilization. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the non-linear rotor-bearing dynamics. It takes into account non-linear behaviour of the magnetic forces and their interaction...

  17. Shaping distinct magnetic interactions in molecular compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filoti, George; Bartolome, Juan; Palade, Petru; Prisecaru, Ion; Valsangiacom, Cristina; Kuncser, Victor; Mindru, Ioana; Patron, Luminita

    2011-01-01

    Oxalates containing various 3d transitional elements and positive NH 4 or negative OH groups were newly synthesized. Each above-mentioned component has directly influenced the structure, the electronic or interaction properties, while some unexpected behaviors were revealed by various magnetic and Moessbauer measurements. The main magnetic parameters, the long-range anti-ferromagnetic couplings observed at very low temperature and, particularly the uncompensated moment are discussed in detail. The induced lower spin states for bivalent ions and especially the anti-parallel arrangement of the spins belonging to trivalent and bivalent iron inside the molecule are also emphasized. - Research highlights: → Nine new oxalates, with 3d elements, showing interesting characteristics were synthesized. →The oxalate units and the positive or negative groups have induced various magnetic properties. → The Moessbauer data revealed two different positions for each valence state of iron in molecule. → There is a competition of anti-ferromagnetic couplings inside the magnetic units and between them. → An overall ferri-magnetic long range ordering was demonstrated unambiguously.

  18. Microscopic origin of magnetism and magnetic interactions in ferropnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, M. D.; Mazin, I. I.

    2009-06-01

    One year after their initial discovery, two schools of thought have crystallized regarding the electronic structure and magnetic properties of ferropnictide systems. One postulates that these are itinerant weakly correlated metallic systems that become magnetic by virtue of spin-Peierls-type transition due to near nesting between the hole and the electron Fermi-surface pockets. The other argues that these materials are strongly or at least moderately correlated and the electrons are considerably localized and close to a Mott-Hubbard transition, with the local magnetic moments interacting via short-range superexchange. In this Rapid Communication we argue that neither picture is fully correct. The systems are moderately correlated but with correlations driven by Hund’s rule coupling rather than by the on-site Hubbard repulsion. The iron moments are largely local, driven by Hund’s intra-atomic exchange. Superexchange is not operative, and the interactions between the Fe moments are considerably long range and driven mostly by one-electron energies of all occupied states.

  19. Magnetic impurity coupled to interacting conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, T.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a magnetic impurity which interacts by hybridization with a system of weakly correlated electrons and determine the energy of the ground state by means of a 1/N f expansion. The correlations among the conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard Hamiltonian and are treated to the lowest order in the interaction strength. We find that their effect on the Kondo temperature, T K , in the Kondo limit is twofold: first, the position of the impurity level is shifted due to the reduction of charge fluctuations, which reduces T K . Secondly, the bare Kondo exchange coupling is enhanced as spin fluctuations are enlarged. In total, T K increases. Both corrections require intermediate states beyond the standard Varma-Yafet ansatz. This shows that the Hubbard interaction does not just provide quasiparticles, which hybridize with the impurity, but also renormalizes the Kondo coupling. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. PhET Interactive Simulations: Transformative Tools for Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Emily B.; Chamberlain, Julia M.; Parson, Robert; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Developing fluency across symbolic-, macroscopic-, and particulate-level representations is central to learning chemistry. Within the chemistry education community, animations and simulations that support multi-representational fluency are considered critical. With advances in the accessibility and sophistication of technology,…

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in organic chemistry. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschunke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are discussed only briefly. The emphasis is laid on developing reader's ability to evaluate resonance spectra. The following topics are covered: principles of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; chemical shift and indirect nuclear spin coupling constants and their relation to the molecular structure; analysis of spectra; and uses for structural analysis and solution of kinetic problems, mainly with regard to organic compounds. Of interest to chemists and graduate students who want to make themselves acquainted with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  2. Interactive Computer Visualization in the Introductory Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Victoria M.

    1996-08-01

    related applications such as one on VSEPR. Computer-fitting of smooth curves to experimental data was a new experience for many students. In the second semester general chemistry course, students determined the equivalence points from the first derivative of a curve fit to their experimental measurements. Points of inflection, maxima, minima, and other mathematical parameters now had a real meaning in terms of observable properties of the physical systems being studied, and many students voiced satisfaction in applying what they had learned in mathematics classes to analyzing data collected in the science laboratory. A commercial spreadsheet with a scripting language is used for data analysis. Students enter their experimental data and calculated results. The script indicates if their result is correct within reasonable limits of error but does not perform the calculations for them. Most students opt to use this application even though it is not required. A bulletin board system (ChemistryBBS) with a graphical user interface has been created in which students post questions on course material and other students or faculty post answers or suggestions. ChemistryBBS encourages participation by those who do not speak up in class as well as by those whose spoken English is imperfect. Students use e-mail to hand in homework and laboratory reports. They particularly enjoy the ease with which graphics can be incorporated into text documents, and many students produce professional looking reports. Other courseware in various stages of development include Dimensions (dimensional analysis), MindYourSigFigs (use of significant figures in measurements), What'sInAName (inorganic nomenclature), PeriodicTable (an interactive handbook of periodic properties of the elements), RedoxReactions, ElectrochemicalCells, and Carbon-13NMR. A commercial application that captures screen images and sound is used to develop custom lesson modules adapted to the learning styles of individual students and

  3. Ground water chemistry and water-rock interaction at Kivetty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Leino-Forsman, H.

    1992-10-01

    The geochemistry of the groundwater at one of the investigation areas for nuclear waste, Kivetty (Kongingas) in central Finland is evaluated. The hydrogeological data is collected from boreholes drilled down to 1000-m depth into crystalline bedrock. The interpretation is based on groundwater chemistry and isotope data, mineralogical data and the structure and hydrology of the bedrock, using correlation diagrams and thermodynamic calculations (PHREEQE). The hydrogeochemistry and major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry are discussed

  4. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  5. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Bruno S. [UNR; Fuelling, Stephan [UNR

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  6. Collisionless reconnection: magnetic field line interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field lines are quantum objects carrying one quantum Φ0 = 2πh/e of magnetic flux and have finite radius λm. Here we argue that they possess a very specific dynamical interaction. Parallel field lines reject each other. When confined to a certain area they form two-dimensional lattices of hexagonal structure. We estimate the filling factor of such an area. Anti-parallel field lines, on the other hand, attract each other. We identify the physical mechanism as being due to the action of the gauge potential field, which we determine quantum mechanically for two parallel and two anti-parallel field lines. The distortion of the quantum electrodynamic vacuum causes a cloud of virtual pairs. We calculate the virtual pair production rate from quantum electrodynamics and estimate the virtual pair cloud density, pair current and Lorentz force density acting on the field lines via the pair cloud. These properties of field line dynamics become important in collisionless reconnection, consistently explaining why and how reconnection can spontaneously set on in the field-free centre of a current sheet below the electron-inertial scale.

  7. 3D Analytical Calculation of the Interactions between Permanent Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Allag , Hicham; Yonnet , Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Up to now, the analytical calculation has been made only when the magnets own parallel magnetization directions. We have succeeded in two new results of first importance for the analytical calculation: the torque between two magnets, and the force components and torque when the magnetization directions are perpendicular. The last result allows the analytical calculation of the interactions when the magnetizations are in all the directions. The 3D analytical expressions...

  8. Interactions of Chemistry Teachers with Gifted Students in a Regular High-School Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benny, Naama; Blonder, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Regular high-school chemistry teachers view gifted students as one of several types of students in a regular (mixed-ability) classroom. Gifted students have a range of unique abilities that characterize their learning process: mostly they differ in three key learning aspects: their faster learning pace, increased depth of understanding, and…

  9. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  10. How does Interactive Chemistry Influence the Representation of Stratosphere-Troposphere Coupling in a Climate Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S.; Matthes, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Changes in stratospheric ozone can trigger tropospheric circulation changes. In the Southern hemisphere (SH), the observed shift of the Southern Annular Mode was attributed to the observed trend in lower stratospheric ozone. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), a recent study showed that extremely low stratospheric ozone conditions during spring produce robust anomalies in the troposphere (zonal wind, temperature and precipitation). This could only be reproduced in a coupled chemistry climate model indicating that chemical-dynamical feedbacks are also important on the NH. To further investigate the importance of interactive chemistry for surface climate, we conducted a set of experiments using NCAR's Community Earth System Model (CESM1) with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) as the atmosphere component. WACCM contains a fully interactive stratospheric chemistry module in its standard configuration. It also allows for an alternative configuration, referred to as SC-WACCM, in which the chemistry (O3, NO, O, O2, CO2 and chemical and shortwave heating rates) is specified as a 2D field in the radiation code. A comparison of the interactive vs. the specified chemistry version enables us to evaluate the relative importance of interactive chemistry by systematically inhibiting the feedbacks between chemistry and dynamics. To diminish the effect of temporal interpolation when prescribing ozone, we use daily resolved zonal mean ozone fields for the specified chemistry run. Here, we investigate the differences in stratosphere-troposphere coupling between the interactive and specified chemistry simulations for the mainly chemically driven SH as well as for the mainly dynamically driven NH. We will especially consider years that are characterized by extremely low stratospheric ozone on the one hand and by large dynamical disturbances, i.e. Sudden Stratospheric Warmings, on the other hand.

  11. The magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seong, Y.; Kang, T.G.; Hulsen, M.A.; den Toonder, J.M.J.; Anderson, P.D.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and non-magnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is

  12. Spin and time-resolved magnetic resonance in radiation chemistry. Recent developments and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR and ODMR in studies on early events in radiation chemistry are examined. It is concluded that these techniques yield valuable and diverse information about chemical reactions in spurs, despite the fact that the spur reactions occur on a time scale that is much shorter than the time resolution of these methods. Several recent examples include EPR of H/D atoms in vitreous silica and cryogenic liquids and ODMR of doped alkane solids and amorphous semiconductors. It is argued that a wider use of time-resolved magnetic resonance methods would benefit the studies on radiation chemistry of disordered solids, simple liquids, and polymers. (author)

  13. Modeling UTLS water vapor: Transport/Chemistry interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulstad, Line

    2005-01-01

    This thesis was initially meant to be a study on the impact on chemistry and climate from UTLS water vapor. However, the complexity of the UTLS water vapor and its recent changes turned out to be a challenge by it self. In the light of this, the overall motivation for the thesis became to study the processes controlling UTLS water vapor and its changes. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, involved in important climate feedback loops. Thus, a good understanding of the chemical and dynamical behavior of water vapor in the atmosphere is crucial for understanding the climate changes in the last century. Additionally, parts of the work was motivated by the development of a coupled climate chemistry model based on the CAM3 model coupled with the Chemical Transport Model Oslo CTM2. The future work will be concentrated on the UTLS water vapor impact on chemistry and climate. We are currently studying long term trends in UTLS water vapor, focusing on identification of the different processes involved in the determination of such trends. The study is based on natural as well as anthropogenic climate forcings. The ongoing work on the development of a coupled climate chemistry model will continue within our group, in collaboration with Prof. Wei-Chyung Wang at the State University of New York, Albany. Valuable contacts with observational groups are established during the work on this thesis. These collaborations will be continued focusing on continuous model validation, as well as identification of trends and new features in UTLS water vapor, and other tracers in this region. (Author)

  14. Study of the magnetic interaction in nanocrystalline Pr–Fe–Co–Nb–B permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dospial, M.; Plusa, D.; Ślusarek, B.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of an isotropic, epoxy resin bonded magnets made from Pr–Fe–Co–Nb–B powder were investigated. The magnetization reversal process and magnetic parameters were examined by measurements of the initial magnetization curve, major and minor hysteresis loops and sets of recoil curves. From the initial magnetization curve and the field dependencies of the reversible and irreversible magnetization components derived from the recoil loops it was found that the magnetization reversal process is the combination of the nucleation of reversed domains and pinning of domain walls at the grain boundaries and the reversible rotation of magnetization vector in single domain grains. The interactions between grains were studied by means of δM plots. The nonlinear behavior of δM curve approve that the short range intergrain exchange coupling interactions are dominant in a field up to the sample coercivity. The interaction domains and fine magnetic structure were revealed as the evidence of exchange coupling between soft α-Fe and hard magnetic Nd 2 Fe 14 B grains. - Highlights: ► Coercivity of the Pr–Fe–Co–Nb–B magnet is determined by the pinning of domain walls at the grain boundaries. ► Rotation of magnetization vector and domain walls bowing also give the contribution to the initial and demagnetization process. ► δM behavior shows that the dominant interaction is the short range exchange one among soft magnetic α-Fe and hard magnetic Pr 2 Fe 14 B grains.

  15. Interaction of Mutually Perpendicular Magnetic Fields in HTSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev Aleksandr Fedorovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article a problem of interaction of the crossed magnetic fields in superconductors is considered. Superconducting materials have nonlinear magnetic properties. It allows using a non-linear magnetic susceptibility for measurement of feeble magnetic fields. We place a wire of superconducting material in a constant parallel uniform magnetic field. Then we let through a wire the alternating current leak. Interaction of mutual and perpendicular variation magnetic fields, with adequate accuracy is described by Ginzburg-Landau's equations. Approximate solution of the written equations is received. The component of a magnetic field parallel to a wire contains a variable component. Frequency of a variable component of the magnetic field is equal to the doubled current frequency. Amplitude of the variable component of the magnetic field is proportional to strength of the constant magnetic field. The experimental installation for research of interaction of mutually perpendicular magnetic fields is created. The cylinder from HTSC of ceramics of the YBa2Cu3O7-x was used as a sensor. Dependence of amplitude of the second harmonica of a variation magnetic field on strength of a constant magnetic field is received.

  16. The Effects of Interactive Stratospheric Chemistry on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Climate Change in an AOGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Newman, Paul; Pawson, Steven; Waugh, Darryn

    2014-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion has played a dominant role in driving Antarctic climate change in the last decades. In order to capture the stratospheric ozone forcing, many coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) prescribe the Antarctic ozone hole using monthly and zonally averaged ozone field. However, the prescribed ozone hole has a high ozone bias and lacks zonal asymmetry. The impacts of these biases on model simulations, particularly on Southern Ocean and the Antarctic sea ice, are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of using interactive stratospheric chemistry instead of prescribed ozone on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate change in an AOGCM. We compare two sets of ensemble simulations for the 1960-2010 period using different versions of the Goddard Earth Observing System 5 - AOGCM: one with interactive stratospheric chemistry, and the other with prescribed monthly and zonally averaged ozone and 6 other stratospheric radiative species calculated from the interactive chemistry simulations. Consistent with previous studies using prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations, the interactive chemistry runs simulate a deeper Antarctic ozone hole and consistently larger changes in surface pressure and winds than the prescribed ozone runs. The use of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model in this study enables us to determine the impact of these surface changes on Southern Ocean circulation and Antarctic sea ice. The larger surface wind trends in the interactive chemistry case lead to larger Southern Ocean circulation trends with stronger changes in northerly and westerly surface flow near the Antarctica continent and stronger upwelling near 60S. Using interactive chemistry also simulates a larger decrease of sea ice concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of using interactive chemistry in order to correctly capture the influences of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate

  17. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  18. Interaction of bootstrap-current-driven magnetic islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The formation and interaction of fluctuating neoclassical pressure gradient driven magnetic islands is examined. The interaction of magnetic islands produces a stochastic region around the separatrices of the islands. This interaction causes the island pressure profile to be broadened, reducing the island bootstrap current and drive for the magnetic island. A model is presented that describes the magnetic topology as a bath of interacting magnetic islands with low to medium poloidal mode number (m congruent 3-30). The islands grow by the bootstrap current effect and damp due to the flattening of the pressure profile near the island separatrix caused by the interaction of the magnetic islands. The effect of this sporadic growth and decay of the islands (''magnetic bubbling'') is not normally addressed in theories of plasma transport due to magnetic fluctuations. The nature of the transport differs from statistical approaches to magnetic turbulence since the radial step size of the plasma transport is now given by the characteristic island width. This model suggests that tokamak experiments have relatively short-lived, coherent, long wavelength magnetic oscillations present in the steep pressure-gradient regions of the plasma. 42 refs

  19. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  20. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  1. Magnetization reversal processes of isotropic permanent magnets with various inter-grain exchange interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsukahara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed a large-scale micromagnetics simulation on a supercomputing system to investigate the properties of isotropic nanocrystalline permanent magnets consisting of cubic grains. In the simulation, we solved the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation under a periodic boundary condition for accurate calculation of the magnetization dynamics inside the nanocrystalline isotropic magnet. We reduced the inter-grain exchange interaction perpendicular and parallel to the external field independently. Propagation of the magnetization reversal process is inhibited by reducing the inter-grain exchange interaction perpendicular to the external field, and the coercivity is enhanced by this restraint. In contrast, when we reduce the inter-grain exchange interaction parallel to the external field, the coercivity decreases because the magnetization reversal process propagates owing to dipole interaction. These behaviors show that the coercivity of an isotropic permanent magnet depends on the direction of the inter-grain exchange interaction.

  2. Biological interactions and human health effects of static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems will be described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecular structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary will also be presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields studied in the laboratory and in natural settings. One aspect of magnetic field effects that merits special concern is their influence on implanted medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers. Several extensive studies have demonstrated closure of the reed switch in pacemakers exposed to relatively weak static magnetic fields, thereby causing them to revert to an asynchronous mode of operation that is potentially hazardous. Recommendations for human exposure limits are provided

  3. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions and adiabatic magnetization dynamics in molecular magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Miyashita, S; Michielsen, K; Machida, M

    A microscopic model of the molecular magnet V-15 is used to study mechanisms for the adiabatic change of the magnetization in time-dependent magnetic fields. The effects of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the most plausible source for the energy-level repulsions that lead to adiabatic changes

  4. Interactive Simulations to Support Quantum Mechanics Instruction for Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnle, Antje; Benfield, Cory; Hahner, Georg; Paetkau, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The QuVis Quantum Mechanics Visualization Project provides freely available research-based interactive simulations with accompanying activities for the teaching and learning of quantum mechanics across a wide range of topics and levels. This article gives an overview of some of the simulations and describes their use in an introductory physical…

  5. Kinetic models in spin chemistry. 1. The hyperfine interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, M.; Pedersen, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic models for quantum systems are quite popular due to their simplicity, although they are difficult to justify. We show that the transformation from quantum to kinetic description can be done exactly for the hyperfine interaction of one nuclei with arbitrary spin; more spins are described w...... induced enhancement of the reaction yield. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF 4 --H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF 4 for Te

  7. Single-atom gating and magnetic interactions in quantum corrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Anh T.; Kim, Eugene H.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2017-04-01

    Single-atom gating, achieved by manipulation of adatoms on a surface, has been shown in experiments to allow precise control over superposition of electronic states in quantum corrals. Using a Green's function approach, we demonstrate theoretically that such atom gating can also be used to control the coupling between magnetic degrees of freedom in these systems. Atomic gating enables control not only on the direct interaction between magnetic adatoms, but also over superpositions of many-body states which can then control long distance interactions. We illustrate this effect by considering the competition between direct exchange between magnetic impurities and the Kondo screening mediated by the host electrons, and how this is affected by gating. These results suggest that both magnetic and nonmagnetic single-atom gating may be used to investigate magnetic impurity systems with tailored interactions, and may allow the control of entanglement of different spin states.

  8. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropies in Uranium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandratskii, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first-principles study of complex noncollinear magnetic structures in Uranium compounds. We contrast two cases. The first is the periodic magnetic structure of U2Pd2In with exactly orthogonal atomic moments, the second is an incommensurate plane spiral structure of UPtGe where the angle between atomic moments of nearest neighbors is also close to 90°. We demonstrate that the hierarchy of magnetic interactions leading to the formation of the magnetic structure is opposite in the two cases. In U2Pd2In, the magnetic anisotropy plays the leading role, followed by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) interaction specifying the chirality of the structure. Here, the interatomic exchange interaction does not play important role. In UPtGe the hierarchy of the interactions is opposite. The leading interaction is the interatomic exchange interaction responsible for the formation of the incommensurate spiral structure followed by the DMI responsible for the selected chirality of the helix. The magnetic anisotropy is very weak that is a prerequisite for keeping the distortion of the helical structure weak.

  9. Exchange interactions, spin waves, and transition temperatures in itinerant magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Bruno, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 59 (2003), s. 112-147 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943; GA AV ČR IAA1010203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : exchange interactions * itinerant magnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://psi-k.dl.ac.uk/psi-k/newsletters.html

  10. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  11. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  12. Effect of the Level of Inquiry on Student Interactions in Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haozhi; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    The central goal of our exploratory study was to investigate differences in college chemistry students' interactions during lab experiments with different levels of inquiry. This analysis was approached from three major analytic dimensions: (i) functional analysis; (ii) cognitive processing; and (iii) social processing. According to our results,…

  13. Are Noncovalent Interactions an Achilles Heel in Chemistry Education? A Comparison of Instructional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leah C.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular forces (IMFs), or more broadly, noncovalent interactions either within or between molecules, are central to an understanding of a wide range of chemical and biological phenomena. In this study, we present a multiyear, multi-institutional, longitudinal comparison of how students enrolled in traditional general chemistry courses and…

  14. Principles of interaction of ionizing radiation with matter and basic radiation chemistry processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santar, I.; Bednar, J.

    1976-01-01

    The basic principles are given of the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter and the main trends are pointed out in radiation chemistry. A brief characteristics is given of the basic radiation chemical processes in gases and in the condensed phase, namely in water and in organic substances. (B.S.)

  15. Interaction-Strength Interpolation Method for Main-Group Chemistry : Benchmarking, Limitations, and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabiano, E.; Gori-Giorgi, P.; Seidl, M.W.J.; Della Sala, F.

    2016-01-01

    We have tested the original interaction-strength-interpolation (ISI) exchange-correlation functional for main group chemistry. The ISI functional is based on an interpolation between the weak and strong coupling limits and includes exact-exchange as well as the Görling–Levy second-order energy. We

  16. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  17. Study of the magnetic interaction in nanocrystalline Pr-Fe-Co-Nb-B permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dospial, M.; Plusa, D.; Ślusarek, B.

    2012-03-01

    The magnetic properties of an isotropic, epoxy resin bonded magnets made from Pr-Fe-Co-Nb-B powder were investigated. The magnetization reversal process and magnetic parameters were examined by measurements of the initial magnetization curve, major and minor hysteresis loops and sets of recoil curves. From the initial magnetization curve and the field dependencies of the reversible and irreversible magnetization components derived from the recoil loops it was found that the magnetization reversal process is the combination of the nucleation of reversed domains and pinning of domain walls at the grain boundaries and the reversible rotation of magnetization vector in single domain grains. The interactions between grains were studied by means of δM plots. The nonlinear behavior of δM curve approve that the short range intergrain exchange coupling interactions are dominant in a field up to the sample coercivity. The interaction domains and fine magnetic structure were revealed as the evidence of exchange coupling between soft α-Fe and hard magnetic Nd2Fe14B grains.

  18. Investigation of magnetic interactions in sulfides by means of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, G. van.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations have been designed to gather more information about magnetic pair interactions in sulfides by isomorphic substitution of the magnetic ions in suitable chosen diamagnetic host lattices and measurement of electron spin resonance of coupled pairs and of electron spin resonance or electron nuclear double resonance of the hyperfine interaction due to the nuclei of diamagnetic cations. The greater part of this thesis is devoted to preliminaries of magnetic resonance interpretation and sample selection and preparation. The measurements on the magnetically diluted compounds, which are described, only have an exploratory nature. (Auth.)

  19. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10 5 cm –3 for magnetic models and 10 6 cm –3 in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of –0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate ζ and the temperature T as (ζT) 1/2 . The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H + 3 ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  20. Surface-Chemistry-Mediated Control of Individual Magnetic Helical Microswimmers in a Swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopu; Hu, Chengzhi; Schurz, Lukas; De Marco, Carmela; Chen, Xiangzhong; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2018-05-31

    Magnetic helical microswimmers, also known as artificial bacterial flagella (ABFs), perform 3D navigation in various liquids under low-strength rotating magnetic fields by converting rotational motion to translational motion. ABFs have been widely studied as carriers for targeted delivery and release of drugs and cells. For in vivo/ in vitro therapeutic applications, control over individual groups of swimmers within a swarm is necessary for several biomedical applications such as drug delivery or small-scale surgery. In this work, we present the selective control of individual swimmers in a swarm of geometrically and magnetically identical ABFs by modifying their surface chemistry. We confirm experimentally and analytically that the forward/rotational velocity ratio of ABFs is independent of their surface coatings when the swimmers are operated below their step-out frequency (the frequency requiring the entire available magnetic torque to maintain synchronous rotation). We also show that ABFs with hydrophobic surfaces exhibit larger step-out frequencies and higher maximum forward velocities compared to their hydrophilic counterparts. Thus, selective control of a group of swimmers within a swarm of ABFs can be achieved by operating the selected ABFs at a frequency that is below their step-out frequencies but higher than the step-out frequencies of unselected ABFs. The feasibility of this method is investigated in water and in biologically relevant solutions. Selective control is also demonstrated inside a Y-shaped microfluidic channel. Our results present a systematic approach for realizing selective control within a swarm of magnetic helical microswimmers.

  1. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  2. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance with...... down by interparticle interactions and a magnetically split spectrum is retained at room temperature. The temperature variation or the magnetic hyperfine field, corresponding to different quantiles in the hyperfine field distribution, can be consistently described by a mean field model...... for "superferromagnetism" in which the magnetic anisotropy is included. The coupling between the particles is due to exchange interactions and the interaction strength can be accounted for by just a few exchange bridges between surface atoms in neighboring crystallites....

  3. Entanglement and Zeeman interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichri, A.; Jaziri, S.

    2004-01-01

    We present theoretically the Zeeman coupling and exchange-induced swap action in spin-based quantum dot quantum computer models in the presence of magnetic field. We study the valence and conduction band states in a double quantum dots made in diluted magnetic semiconductor. The latter have been proven to be very useful in building an all-semiconductor platform for spintronics. Due to a strong p-d exchange interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductor (Cd 0.57 Mn 0.43 Te), the relative contribution of this component is strongly affected by an external magnetic field, a feature that is absent in nonmagnetic double quantum dots. We determine the energy spectrum as a function of magnetic field within the Hund-Mulliken molecular-orbit approach and by including the Coulomb interaction. Since we show that the ground state of the two carriers confined in a vertically coupled quantum dots provide a possible realization for a gate of a quantum computer, the crossing between the lowest states, caused by the giant spin splitting, can be observed as a pronounced jump in the magnetization of small magnetic field amplitude. Finally, we determine the swap time as a function of magnetic field and the inter dot distance. We estimate quantitatively swap errors caused by the field, establishing that error correction would, in principle, be possible in the presence of nonuniform magnetic field in realistic structures

  4. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  5. Interaction between Electron Holes in a Strongly Magnetized Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between electron holes in a strongly magnetized, plasma-filled waveguide is investigated by means of computer simulation. Two holes may or may not coalesce, depending on their amplitudes and velocities. The interaction between holes and Trivelpiece-Gould solitons is demonstrated...

  6. Analytical calculation of magnet interactions in 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Yonnet , Jean-Paul; Allag , Hicham

    2009-01-01

    International audience; A synthesis of all the analytical expressions of the interaction energy, force components and torque components is presented. It allows the analytical calculation of all the interactions when the magnetizations are in any direction. The 3D analytical expressions are difficult to obtain, but the torque and force expressions are very simple to use.

  7. Ion Motion in a Plasma Interacting with Strong Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, A.; Grabowski, C.; Chakrabarti, N.; Maron, Y.; Fruchtmant, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a plasma with strong magnetic fields takes place in many laboratory experiments and astrophysical plasmas. Applying a strong magnetic field to the plasma may result in plasma displacement, magnetization, or the formation of instabilities. Important phenomena in plasma, such as the energy transport and the momentum balance, take a different form in each case. We study this interaction in a plasma that carries a short-duration (80-ns) current pulse, generating a magnetic field of up to 17 kG. The evolution of the magnetic field, plasma density, ion velocities, and electric fields are determined before and during the current pulse. The dependence of the plasma limiting current on the plasma density and composition are studied and compared to theoretical models based on the different phenomena. When the plasma collisionality is low, three typical velocities should be taken into consideration: the proton and heavier-ion Alfven velocities (v A p and v A h , respectively) and the EMHD magnetic-field penetration velocity into the plasma (v EMHD ). If both Alfven velocities are larger than v EMHD the plasma is pushed ahead of the magnetic piston and the magnetic field energy is dissipated into ion kinetic energy. If v EMHD is the largest of three velocities, the plasma become magnetized and the ions acquire a small axial momentum only. Different ion species may drift in different directions along the current lines. In this case, the magnetic field energy is probably dissipated into electron thermal energy. When vs > V EMHD > vi, as in the case of one of our experiments, ion mass separation occurs. The protons are pushed ahead of the piston while the heavier-ions become magnetized. Since the plasma electrons are unmagnetized they cannot cross the piston, and the heavy ions are probably charge-neutralized by electrons originating from the cathode that are 'born' magnetized

  8. Magnetic interactions in anisotropic Nd-Dy-Fe-Co-B/α-Fe multilayer magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z. M.; Liu, W.; Zhao, X. T.; Han, Z.; Kim, D.; Choi, C. J.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic properties and the possible interaction mechanisms of anisotropic soft- and hard-magnetic multilayers have been investigated by altering the thickness of different kinds of spacer layers. The metal Ta and the insulating oxides MgO, Cr2O3 have been chosen as spacer layers to investigate the characteristics of the interactions between soft- and hard-magnetic layers in the anisotropic Nd-Dy-Fe-Co-B/α-Fe multilayer system. The dipolar and exchange interaction between hard and soft phases are evaluated with the help of the first order reversal curve method. The onset of the nucleation field and the magnetization reversal by domain wall movement are also evident from the first-order-reversal-curve measurements. Reversible/irreversible distributions reveal the natures of the soft- and hard-magnetic components. Incoherent switching fields are observed and the calculations show the semiquantitative contributions of hard and soft components to the system. An antiferromagnetic spacer layer will weaken the interaction between ferromagnetic layers and the effective interaction length decreases. As a consequence, the dipolar magnetostatic interaction may play an important role in the long-range interaction in anisotropic multilayer magnets.

  9. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te 2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF 4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na 3 CrF 6 and Na 5 Cr 3 F 14 , were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li 2 BeF 4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe 2+ and Cr 3+ and the determination of the U 3+ /U 4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF 4 --NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF 4 --NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  10. Non-equilibrium magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, A., E-mail: a.secchi@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brener, S.; Lichtenstein, A.I. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universitat Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Katsnelson, M.I. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We formulate a low-energy theory for the magnetic interactions between electrons in the multi-band Hubbard model under non-equilibrium conditions determined by an external time-dependent electric field which simulates laser-induced spin dynamics. We derive expressions for dynamical exchange parameters in terms of non-equilibrium electronic Green functions and self-energies, which can be computed, e.g., with the methods of time-dependent dynamical mean-field theory. Moreover, we find that a correct description of the system requires, in addition to exchange, a new kind of magnetic interaction, that we name twist exchange, which formally resembles Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya coupling, but is not due to spin–orbit, and is actually due to an effective three-spin interaction. Our theory allows the evaluation of the related time-dependent parameters as well. -- Highlights: •We develop a theory for magnetism of strongly correlated systems out of equilibrium. •Our theory is suitable for laser-induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics. •We write time-dependent exchange parameters in terms of electronic Green functions. •We find a new magnetic interaction, a “twist exchange”. •We give general expressions for magnetic noise in itinerant-electron systems.

  11. Semicalssical quantization of interacting anyons in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levit, S.; Sivan, N.

    1992-01-01

    We represent a semiclassical theory of charged interacting anyons in strong magnetic fields. We apply this theory to a number of few anyons systems including two interacting anyons in the presence of an impurity and three interacting anyons. We discuss the dependence of their energy levels on the statistical parameter and find regions in which this dependence follows very different patterns. The semiclassical arguments allow to correlate these patterns with the change in the character of the classical motion of the system. (author)

  12. Visualization of magnetic dipolar interaction based on scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Hiroyuki; Iwano, Kaoru; Takeichi, Yasuo; Ono, Kanta; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Yano, Masao; Kato, Akira; Miyamoto, Noritaka; Shoji, Tetsuya; Manabe, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), in this report we visualized the magnetic dipolar interactions in nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets and imaged their magnetization distributions at various applied fields. We calculated the magnetic dipolar interaction by analyzing the interaction between the magnetization at each point and those at the other points on the STXM image.

  13. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  14. Role of magnetic interactions in neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhya Souvik Priyam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a calculation of the non-Fermi liquid correction to the specific heat of magnetized degenerate quark matter present at the core of the neutron star. The role of non-Fermi liquid corrections to the neutrino emissivity has been calculated beyond leading order. We extend our result to the evaluation of the pulsar kick velocity and cooling of the star due to such anomalous corrections and present a comparison with the simple Fermi liquid case.

  15. Interaction of Individual Skyrmions in a Nanostructured Cubic Chiral Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haifeng; Zhao, Xuebing; Rybakov, Filipp N.; Borisov, Aleksandr B.; Wang, Shasha; Tang, Jin; Jin, Chiming; Wang, Chao; Wei, Wensheng; Kiselev, Nikolai S.; Zhang, Yuheng; Che, Renchao; Blügel, Stefan; Tian, Mingliang

    2018-05-01

    We report direct evidence of the field-dependent character of the interaction between individual magnetic skyrmions as well as between skyrmions and edges in B 20 -type FeGe nanostripes observed by means of high-resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that above certain critical values of an external magnetic field the character of such long-range skyrmion interactions changes from attraction to repulsion. Experimentally measured equilibrium inter-skyrmion and skyrmion-edge distances as a function of the applied magnetic field shows quantitative agreement with the results of micromagnetic simulations. The important role of demagnetizing fields and the internal symmetry of three-dimensional magnetic skyrmions are discussed in detail.

  16. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    seeks to implement and assess existing reconstruction algorithms using multi-processors of modern graphics cards and many-core computer processors and to cover some of the potential clinical applications which might benefit from using an interactive real-time MRI system. First an off...

  17. Stellar magnetic activity – Star-Planet Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stellar magnetic activity is an important factor in the formation and evolution of exoplanets. Magnetic phenomena like stellar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high-energy emission affect the exoplanetary atmosphere and its mass loss over time. One major question is whether the magnetic evolution of exoplanet host stars is the same as for stars without planets; tidal and magnetic interactions of a star and its close-in planets may play a role in this. Stellar magnetic activity also shapes our ability to detect exoplanets with different methods in the first place, and therefore we need to understand it properly to derive an accurate estimate of the existing exoplanet population. I will review recent theoretical and observational results, as well as outline some avenues for future progress.

  18. Inter-particle and interfacial interaction of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Che Jin; Hwang, Yosun; Park, Jongnam; An, Kwangjin; Lee, Youjin; Lee, Jinwoo; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Park, J.-G.

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand inter-particle as well as interfacial interaction of magnetic nanoparticles, we have prepared several Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in the ranges from 3 to 50 nm. These nanoparticles are particularly well characterized in terms of size distribution with a standard deviation (σ) in size less than 0.4 nm. We investigated the inter-particle interaction by measuring the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles while controlling inter-particle distances by diluting the samples with solvents. According to this study, blocking temperatures dropped by 8-17 K with increasing the inter-particle distances from a few nm to 140 nm while the overall shape and qualitative behavior of the magnetization remain unchanged. It implies that most features observed in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are due to the intrinsic properties of the nanoparticles, not due to the inter-particle interaction. We then examined possible interfacial magnetic interaction in the core-shell structure of our Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles

  19. Chemistry of nepheline syenites interaction with calcium chloride at their joint baking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, O.Kh.; Ruzieva, D.D.; Nazarov, Sh.B.; Safiev, Kh.; Mirsaidov, U.

    2001-01-01

    This work dedicated to determination of chemistry of leaking processes at nepheline syenites interaction with calcium chloride on baking stage. The main point of chemical conversion at baking of Turpe deposit nepheline with calcium chloride concluding in decomposition of acid insoluble raw materials minerals with formation of soluble in mineral acid minerals, that is take place the substitution ions of Na +, K +o f initial ore on Ca 2 + .

  20. Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes Approach and Emulation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the time-filtered Navier-Stokes approach capable of capturing unsteady flow structures important for turbulent mixing and an accompanying subgrid model directly accounting for the major processes in turbulence-chemistry interaction. They have been applied to the computation of two-phase turbulent combustion occurring in a single-element lean-direct-injection combustor. Some of the preliminary results from this computational effort are presented in this paper.

  1. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    tunneling microscope (STM). Especially at low temperatures the Kondo resonance is used to probe magnetic interaction with ferromagnetic islands and between two atoms. The latter showing a crossover between Kondo screened atoms and antiferromagnetically coupled atoms close to the quantum critical point....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...

  2. Magnetic interactions, bonding, and motion of positive muons in magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive-muon behavior in magnetite is investigated by the muon-spin-rotation technique. The observed muon relaxation rate in zero applied field, in conjunction with the measured local field, allows us to separate muon-motion effects from phase transitions associated with magnetite. The local magnetic field is observed to be 4.02 kOe directed along the axis, the easy axis of magnetization. Possible origins of this field are discussed in terms which include local muon diffusion and a supertransfer hyperfine interaction resulting from muon-oxygen bonding. An anomaly in the muon hyperfine interactions is observed at 247 K

  3. The surface chemistry determines the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics of quantum dots in atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Bernd; Hirn, Stephanie; Mildner, Karina; Coletti, Raffaele; Massberg, Steffen; Reichel, Christoph A; Rehberg, Markus; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Krombach, Fritz

    2018-03-01

    To optimize the design of nanoparticles for diagnosis or therapy of vascular diseases, it is mandatory to characterize the determinants of nano-bio interactions in vascular lesions. Using ex vivo and in vivo microscopy, we analyzed the interactive behavior of quantum dots with different surface functionalizations in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice. We demonstrate that quantum dots with different surface functionalizations exhibit specific interactive behaviors with distinct molecular and cellular components of the injured vessel wall. Moreover, we show a role for fibrinogen in the regulation of the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics in atherosclerotic lesions. Our findings emphasize the relevance of surface chemistry-driven nano-bio interactions on the differential in vivo behavior of nanoparticles in diseased tissue.

  4. Competing magnetic interactions and low temperature magnetic phase transitions in composite multiferroics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, V N; Kumar, Ashok; Choudhary, R J; Tomar, M; Gupta, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Novel magnetic properties and magnetic interactions in composite multiferroic oxides Pb[(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 ) 0.60 (Fe 0.67 W 0.33 ) .40 ]O 3 ] 0.80 –[CoFe 2 O 4 ] 0.20 (PZTFW–CFO) have been studied from 50 to 1000 Oe field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled (ZFC) probing conditions, and over a wide range of temperatures (4–350 K). Crystal structure analysis, surface morphology, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed the presence of two distinct phases, where micro- and nano-size spinel CFO were embedded in tetragonal PZTFW matrix and applied a significant built-in compressive strain (∼0.4–0.8%). Three distinct magnetic phase transitions were observed with the subtle effect of CFO magnetic phase on PZTFW magnetic phase transitions below the blocking temperature (T B ). Temperature dependence magnetic property m(T) shows a clear evidence of spin freezing in magnetic order with lowering in thermal vibration. Chemical inhomogeneity and confinement of nanoscale ferrimagnetic phase in paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic matrix restrict the long range interaction of spin which in turn develop a giant spin frustration. A large divergence in the FC and ZFC data and broad hump in ZFC data near 200 (±10) K were observed which suggests that large magnetic anisotropy and short range order magnetic dipoles lead to the development of superparamagnetic states in composite. (paper)

  5. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena; Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi; Cerdan, Sebastian; Ballesteros, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH e ) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH e , independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange

  6. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  7. Magnetic monopoles and dyons interacting with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracci, L.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief, critical review of the Drell et al. method, we propose an alternative approach suitable for the study of dyon and dyon-negative-electron (Dy-e) system interactions with hydrogen and helium. This method, called the impact parameter method (IPM), has been used already in atomic collisions and allows the calculation of energy losses in H and He. We report these quantities and comment on their behaviour versus the relative velocities between Dy or Dy-e and atoms; we compare them to the monopole results. Conclusions in relation to planned experiments are outlined. (orig.)

  8. Interaction of the geomagnetic field with northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Shree Krishna

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetic field causes the transfer of momentum and energy from the solar wind to geospace. The study of this interaction is gaining significance as our society is becoming more and more space based, due to which, predicting space weather has become more important. The solar wind interacts with the geomagnetic field primarily via two processes: viscous interaction and the magnetic reconnection. Both of these interactions result in the generation of an electric field in Earth's ionosphere. The overall topology and dynamics of the magnetosphere, as well as the electric field imposed on the ionosphere, vary with speed, density, and magnetic field orientation of the solar wind as well as the conductivity of the ionosphere. In this dissertation, I will examine the role of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and discuss the global topology of the magnetosphere and the interaction with the ionosphere using results obtained from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) simulation. The electric potentials imposed on the ionosphere due to viscous interaction and magnetic reconnection are called the viscous and the reconnection potentials, respectively. A proxy to measure the overall effect of these potentials is to measure the cross polar potential (CPP). The CPP is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum of the potential in a given polar ionosphere. I will show results from the LFM simulation showing saturation of the CPP during periods with purely northward IMF of sufficiently large magnitude. I will further show that the viscous potential, which was assumed to be independent of IMF orientation until this work, is reduced during periods of northward IMF. Furthermore, I will also discuss the implications of these results for a simulation of an entire solar rotation.

  9. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  10. On the importance and origin of aromatic interactions in chemistry and biodisciplines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2013), s. 927-936 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pi-pi interactions * potential-energy surface * ab-initio calculation * benzene dimer * intermolecular interaction * protein rubredoxin Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 24.348, year: 2013

  11. Critical dynamics of an interacting magnetic nanoparticle system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jonsson, P.E.; Nordblad, P.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of dipole-dipole interactions on the magnetic relaxation have been investigated for three Fe-C nanoparticle samples with volume concentrations of 0.06, 5 and 17 vol%. While both the 5 and 17 vol% samples exhibit collective behaviour due to dipolar interactions, only the 17 vol% sample dis...... displays critical behaviour close to its transition temperature. The behaviour of the 5 vol% sample can be attributed to a mixture of collective and single-particle dynamics....

  12. Magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems: Spin and orbital contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secchi, A., E-mail: a.secchi@science.ru.nl [Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lichtenstein, A.I. [Universitat Hamburg, Institut für Theoretische Physik, Jungiusstraße 9, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Katsnelson, M.I. [Radboud University, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles, when the electronic system is in a symmetry-broken phase. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green’s functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic field, spin–orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole–dipole interaction). The expressions of all these magnetic interactions are determined in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green’s functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin–orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin–orbital contributions to magnetism, providing expressions that can be computed within a tight-binding Dynamical Mean Field Theory.

  13. Magnetization reversal in magnetic dot arrays: Nearest-neighbor interactions and global configurational anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiele, Ben [Department of Electrical Energy, Systems and Automation, Ghent University, Technologiepark 913, B-9052 Ghent-Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Fin, Samuele [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Pancaldi, Matteo [CIC nanoGUNE, E-20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Vavassori, Paolo [CIC nanoGUNE, E-20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Sarella, Anandakumar [Physics Department, Mount Holyoke College, 211 Kendade, 50 College St., South Hadley, Massachusetts 01075 (United States); Bisero, Diego [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); CNISM, Unità di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-05-28

    Various proposals for future magnetic memories, data processing devices, and sensors rely on a precise control of the magnetization ground state and magnetization reversal process in periodically patterned media. In finite dot arrays, such control is hampered by the magnetostatic interactions between the nanomagnets, leading to the non-uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the sample while reversing. In this paper, we evidence how during reversal typical geometric arrangements of dots in an identical magnetization state appear that originate in the dominance of either Global Configurational Anisotropy or Nearest-Neighbor Magnetostatic interactions, which depends on the fields at which the magnetization reversal sets in. Based on our findings, we propose design rules to obtain the uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the array, and also suggest future research directions to achieve non-uniform state distributions of interest, e.g., when aiming at guiding spin wave edge-modes through dot arrays. Our insights are based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect and Magnetic Force Microscopy measurements as well as the extensive micromagnetic simulations.

  14. Anisotropic exchange interaction for magnetic ion pairs in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passeggi, M.C.G.

    1975-12-01

    The sources of possible contributions to the magnetic anisotropy for a pair of orbitally non degenerate magnetic ions are investigated. The problem being formulated with the help of the operator form of perturbation theory and irreducible tensor operators. Apart from the usual dipole-dipole effective interaction, mainly induced by the electronic spin-spin dipole coupling corrected by covalency, other mechanisms mediated by the spin-orbit coupling appear. These are a consequence of an appropriate description of the spin-orbit operators for a system which allows for delocalization of the magnetic electrons. A process similar to that known as pseudodipolar appears from contributions in which spin orbit combined with the Coulomb repulsion and with one-electron interactions (acting analogously as for the ''kinetic exchange'') produce compensating effects in third and fourth order, respectively. However, this effect does not appear to be describable in terms of the phenomenological exchange, as is usually assumed. (Passeggi, M.C.G.)

  15. RKKY interaction between extended magnetic defect lines in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, P. D.; Duffy, J. M.; Power, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    referred to as the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. Recent theoretical studies on the RKKY in graphene have been motivated by possible spintronic applications of magnetically doped graphene systems. In this paper a combination of analytic and numerical techniques are used to examine...

  16. SNS Resonance Control Cooling Systems and Quadrupole Magnet Cooling Systems DIW Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magda, Karoly [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    This report focuses on control of the water chemistry for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS)/Quadrupole Magnet Cooling System (QMCS) deionized water (DIW) cooling loops. Data collected from spring 2013 through spring 2016 are discussed, and an operations regime is recommended.It was found that the RCCS operates with an average pH of 7.24 for all lines (from 7.0 to 7.5, slightly alkaline), the average low dissolved oxygen is in the area of < 36 ppb, and the main loop average resistivity of is > 14 MΩ-cm. The QMCS was found to be operating in a similar regime, with a slightly alkaline pH of 7.5 , low dissolved oxygen in the area of < 45 ppb, and main loop resistivity of 10 to 15 MΩ-cm. During data reading, operational corrections were done on the polishing loops to improve the water chemistry regime. Therefore some trends changed over time.It is recommended that the cooling loops operate in a regime in which the water has a resistivity that is as high as achievable, a dissolved oxygen concentration that is as low as achievable, and a neutral or slightly alkaline pH.

  17. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  18. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Jaafar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  19. Magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors and their interaction with high energy permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwala, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic properties of sintered samples of YBCO ceramic superconductors at various temperatures were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Also, measurements of forces experienced by a well characterized rare earth-transition metal (RE-TM) permanent magnet (PM) interacting with the superconducting YBCO sample cooled in liquid nitrogen, were performed. Based upon the observed hysteretic magnetization properties of these high temperature superconductors (HTS), the HTS-PM interaction force at liquid nitrogen temperature was calculated from first principle, and finally correlated to the force measurement results. With this analysis, magnetic forces between the same HTS and PM system including the levitation as well as suspension effects at liquid-helium temperature are predicted

  20. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  1. Magnetic dipolar interaction in two-dimensional complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, J D; Kalman, G J; Rosenberg, M

    2006-01-01

    Various interactions can play a role between the mesoscopic dust grains of a complex plasma. We study a system composed of dust grains that have both an electric charge and a permanent magnetic dipole moment. It is assumed that the grains occupy lattice sites, as dictated by their Coulomb interaction. In addition, they possess a spin degree of freedom (orientation of magnetic dipole moment) that is not constrained by the Coulomb interaction, thus allowing for the possibility of equilibrium orientational ordering and 'wobbling' about the equilibrium orientations. As a result, collective modes develop. We identify in-plane and out-of-plane wobbling modes and discuss their dispersion characteristics both in the ferromagnetic and in the anti-ferromagnetic ground state

  2. Numerical evaluation of energy barriers and magnetic relaxation in interacting nanostructured magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana A.; Chantrell, Roy W.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a model to quantify long-time thermally induced magnetization reversal in magnetic systems with distributed properties. Two algorithms, based on kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo are introduced. While the former requires the constant recalculation of all energy barriers and is useful when the interactions are weak, the latter uses the Metropolis Monte Carlo to estimate the magnetization trajectory and, consequently, only the most probable transition rates are evaluated. The ridge optimization method is used to evaluate the energy barriers in a multidimensional energy landscape. The algorithms are applied to a granular system modeled by means of Voronoi polyhedra and having random in-plane anisotropy

  3. Synthesis, properties, and application in peptide chemistry of a magnetically separable and reusable biocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liria, Cleber W.; Ungaro, Vitor A.; Fernandes, Raphaella M.; Costa, Natália J. S.; Marana, Sandro R.; Rossi, Liane M.; Machini, M. Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed chemical processes are selective, very productive, and generate little waste. Nevertheless, they may be optimized using enzymes bound to solid supports, which are particularly important for protease-mediated reactions since proteases undergo fast autolysis in solution. Magnetic nanoparticles are suitable supports for this purpose owing to their high specific surface area and to be easily separated from reaction media. Here we describe the immobilization of bovine α-chymotrypsin (αCT) on silica-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@silica) and the characterization of the enzyme-nanoparticle hybrid (Fe3O4@silica-αCT) in terms of protein content, properties, recovery from reaction media, application, and reuse in enzyme-catalyzed peptide synthesis. The results revealed that (i) full acid hydrolysis of the immobilized protease followed by amino acid analysis of the hydrolyzate is a reliable method to determine immobilization yield; (ii) despite showing lower amidase activity and a lower K cat/ K m value for a specific substrate than free αCT, the immobilized enzyme is chemically and thermally more stable, magnetically recoverable from reaction media, and can be consecutively reused for ten cycles to catalyze the amide bond hydrolysis and ester hydrolysis of the protected dipeptide Z-Ala-Phe-OMe. Altogether, these properties indicate the potential of Fe3O4@silica-αCT to act as an efficient, suitably stable, and reusable catalyst in amino acid, peptide, and protein chemistry as well as in proteomic studies.

  4. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (σ) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  5. Dynamic interaction between localized magnetic moments in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A T; Muniz, R B; Ferreira, M S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moments dilutely dispersed in a metallic host tend to be coupled through the conduction electrons of the metal. This indirect exchange coupling (IEC), known to occur for a variety of magnetic materials embedded in several different metallic structures, is of rather long range, especially for low-dimensional structures like carbon nanotubes. Motivated by recent claims that the indirect coupling between magnetic moments in precessional motion has a much longer range than its static counterpart, we consider here how magnetic atoms adsorbed to the walls of a metallic nanotube respond to a time-dependent perturbation that induces their magnetic moments to precess. By calculating the frequency-dependent spin susceptibility, we are able to identify resonant peaks whose respective widths provide information about the dynamic aspect of the IEC. We show that by departing from a purely static representation to another in which the moments are allowed to precess, we change from what is already considered a long-range interaction to another whose range is far superior. In other words, localized magnetic moments embedded in a metallic structure can feel each other's presence more easily when they are set in precessional motion. We argue that such an effect can have useful applications leading to large-scale spintronics devices

  6. Controlling Short-Range Interactions by Tuning Surface Chemistry in HDPE/Graphene Nanoribbon Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Soheil; Zehtab Yazdi, Alireza; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2015-09-03

    Unique dispersion states of nanoparticles in polymeric matrices have the potential to create composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. The present work aims to determine the state of dispersion from the melt-state rheological behavior of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon (GNR) nanomaterials. GNRs were synthesized from nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via a chemical route using potassium permanganate and some second acids. High-density polyethylene (HDPE)/GNR nanocomposite samples were then prepared through a solution mixing procedure. Different nanocomposite dispersion states were achieved using different GNR synthesis methods providing different surface chemistry, interparticle interactions, and internal compartments. Prolonged relaxation of flow induced molecular orientation was observed due to the presence of both carbon nanotubes and GNRs. Based on the results of this work, due to relatively weak interactions between the polymer and the nanofillers, it is expected that short-range interactions between nanofillers play the key role in the final dispersion state.

  7. Magnetic hyaluronic acid nanospheres via aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry to deliver dexamethasone for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yang; Fan, Ming; Chen, Huinan; Miao, Yuting; Xing, Lian; Jiang, Bohong; Cheng, Qifan; Liu, Dongwei; Bao, Weikang; Qian, Bin; Wang, Jionglu; Xing, Xiaodong; Tan, Huaping; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Biopolymer-based nanospheres have great potential in the field of drug delivery and tissue regenerative medicine. In this work, we present a flexible way to conjugate a magnetic hyaluronic acid (HA) nanosphere system that are capable of vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor, e.g. dexamethasone, for adipose tissue engineering. Conjugation of nanospheres was established by aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry between furan and maleimide of HA derivatives. Simultaneously, a furan functionalized dexamethasone peptide, GQPGK, was synthesized and covalently immobilized into the nanospheres. The magnetic HA nanospheres were fabricated by encapsulating super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which exhibited quick magnetic sensitivity. The aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry made nanospheres high binding efficiency of dexamethasone, and the vectoring delivery of dexamethasone could be easily controlled by a external magnetic field. The potential application of the magnetic HA nanospheres on vectoring delivery of adipogenic factor was confirmed by co-culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). In vitro cytotoxicity tests demonstrated that incorporation of dexamethasone into magnetic HA nanospheres showed high efficiency to promote ASCs viabilities, in particular under a magnetic field, which suggested a promising future for adipose regeneration applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of plasma with magnetic fields in coaxial discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M. (National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that, in normal mode of focus operation (67 KJ-20 KV) i.e. without external magnetic fields, the focus exhibits instability growths as revealed by the time integrated X-ray pinhole photographs. A magnetic field which is trapped ahead of the current sheath will reduce the high ejection rate of plasma which occurs during the (r,z) collapse stage. This reduction should lead to a more uniform plasma of larger dimension. If an externally excited axial magnetic field of (10[sup 2]-10[sup 3] G) is introduced at the end of the central electrode of coaxial discharge with 45 [mu]f capacitor bank, U[sub ch]=13-17 KV, peak current [approx]0.5 MA, the decay rate of the current sheath is slowed down and the minimum radius of the column remains large enough. Experiment investigation of the X-ray emission in axial direction from a (12 KJ/20 KV, 480 KA), Mather type focus, showed that the X-ray intensity changes drastically, by superimposing an axial magnetic field of 55 G on the focus. By introducing an external axial magnetic field of intensity 2.4 KG along the coaxial electrodes, this magnetic field has a radial component at distances approach to muzzle of coaxial discharge with charging voltage 10 KV and peak discharge current 100 KA. Presence of these magnetic fields, will cause an increase in intensity of soft X-ray emission. The main purpose of this work is to study the interactions of axial and transverse magnetic fields with plasma sheath during the axial interelectrode propagation, and its effects on the X-ray emission from plasma focus. (author) 4 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Interaction of plasma with magnetic fields in coaxial discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, H.M.; Masoud, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that, in normal mode of focus operation (67 KJ-20 KV) i.e. without external magnetic fields, the focus exhibits instability growths as revealed by the time integrated X-ray pinhole photographs. A magnetic field which is trapped ahead of the current sheath will reduce the high ejection rate of plasma which occurs during the (r,z) collapse stage. This reduction should lead to a more uniform plasma of larger dimension. If an externally excited axial magnetic field of (10 2 -10 3 G) is introduced at the end of the central electrode of coaxial discharge with 45 μf capacitor bank, U ch =13-17 KV, peak current ∼0.5 MA, the decay rate of the current sheath is slowed down and the minimum radius of the column remains large enough. Experiment investigation of the X-ray emission in axial direction from a (12 KJ/20 KV, 480 KA), Mather type focus, showed that the X-ray intensity changes drastically, by superimposing an axial magnetic field of 55 G on the focus. By introducing an external axial magnetic field of intensity 2.4 KG along the coaxial electrodes, this magnetic field has a radial component at distances approach to muzzle of coaxial discharge with charging voltage 10 KV and peak discharge current 100 KA. Presence of these magnetic fields, will cause an increase in intensity of soft X-ray emission. The main purpose of this work is to study the interactions of axial and transverse magnetic fields with plasma sheath during the axial interelectrode propagation, and its effects on the X-ray emission from plasma focus. (author) 4 refs., 7 figs

  10. Energy released by the interaction of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons between coronal spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms are presented to support the idea that as coronal magnetic fields interact, a process of field line reconnection usually takes place as a natural way of preventing magnetic stresses from building up in the lower corona. This suggests that the energy which would have been stored in stressed fields in continuously released as kinetic energy of material being driven aside to make way for the reconnecting fields. However, this kinetic energy is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the coronal plasma. Therefore, it appears that these slow adjustments of coronal magnetic fields cannot account for even the normal heating of the corona, much less the energetic events associated with solar flares. (Auth.)

  11. The interaction of vacuum arcs with magnetic fields and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.G.; Kimblin, C.W.; Slade, P.G.; Voshall, R.E.; Wien, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Vacuum arc/magnetic field interactions are reviewed and extended. An axial magnetic field (parallel to current flow) produces a stable and diffuse vacuum arc. These properties have been used to build a reliable dc switch for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Princeton. The switching duty for this Ohmic Heating Interrupter involves repetitive interruption of 24kA dc against a 27kV recovery voltage. A transverse magnetic field (perpendicular to current flow) produces an unstable arc with an ensuing high arc voltage. This property has been used to complete a metallic return transfer breaker for the Pacific HVDC Intertie, here the switching duty involves interruption of currents up to 2200A dc against an 80kV recovery voltage

  12. A theory for the anisotropic interaction between two substitutional magnetic impurities and the magnetic anisotropic effect in dilute magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satter, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    In this paper, a formalism for studying the anisotropic interaction between two substitutional magnetic impurities and the magnetic anisotropic effect in a dilute noble metal- transition metal magnetic alloy has been developed from relativistic scattering theory. The theoretical development and the computational techniques of this formalism are based on relativistic spin-polarized scattering theory and relativistic band structure frameworks. For studying the magnetic anisotropic effect a convenient ''working'' frame of reference with its axes oriented along the fcc crystal axes is set up. This formalism is applied to study the situation for two Fe impurities in paramagnetic Au hosts. For AuFe dilute alloy, the two impurity site interaction as a function of separation is not oscillatory and the anisotropic effect is found to be less than the two site interaction itself only by an order of magnitude. Apart from the anisotropic coupling of the two impurity spins to the separation vector, for the first time, another weak anisotropic coupling to the crystal axes is also contained in the two site interaction. These anisotropic effects are the results of the relativistic spin-orbit interaction which are incorporated into the formalism. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  13. Spin interactions in Graphene-Single Molecule Magnets Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Aña; Luis, Fernando; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Dressel, Martin; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is a potential component of novel spintronics devices owing to its long spin diffusion length. Besides its use as spin-transport channel, graphene can be employed for the detection and manipulation of molecular spins. This requires an appropriate coupling between the sheets and the single molecular magnets (SMM). Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of graphene-Fe4 SMM hybrids. The Fe4 clusters are anchored non-covalently to the graphene following a diffusion-limited assembly and can reorganize into random networks when subjected to slightly elevated temperature. Molecules anchored on graphene sheets show unaltered static magnetic properties, whilst the quantum dynamics is profoundly modulated. Interaction with Dirac fermions becomes the dominant spin-relaxation channel, with observable effects produced by graphene phonons and reduced dipolar interactions. Coupling to graphene drives the spins over Villain's threshold, allowing the first observation of strongly-perturbative tunneling processes. Preliminary spin-transport experiments at low-temperature are further presented.

  14. Multi-scale interaction between magnetic islands and microturbulence in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraglia, M.

    2009-10-01

    In a tokamak, it exists many kinds of instability at the origin of a damage of the confinement and worst of a lost of a confinement. This work presents a study of the dynamics of a magnetic island in presence of turbulence in magnetized plasmas. More precisely, the goal is to understand the multi-scales interaction between turbulence, generated by a pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature, and a magnetic island formed thanks to a tearing mode. Thanks to the derivation of a 2-dimensional slab model taking into account both tearing and interchange instabilities, theoretical and numerical linear studies show the pressure effect on the magnetic island linear formation and show interchange modes are stabilized in presence of a strong magnetic field. Then, a numerical nonlinear study is presented in order to understand how the interchange mechanism affects the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetic island. It is shown that the pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature affect strongly the nonlinear evolution of a magnetic island through dynamics bifurcations. The nature of these bifurcations should be characterized in function of the linear situation. Finally, the last part of this work is devoted to the study of the origin of the nonlinear poloidal rotation of the magnetic island. A model giving the different contributions to the rotation is derived. It is shown, thanks to the model and to the numerical studies, that the nonlinear rotation of the island is mainly governed by the ExB poloidal flow and/or by the nonlinear diamagnetic drift. (author)

  15. Interactive web site and app for early magnetic resonance education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and understanding basic Magnetic Resonance (MR) is a challenge. This is clear from the educational literature that often repeats misinterpretations of quantum mechanics reminiscent of its earliest formulations (see www.drcmr.dk/MR that also links to the developed software). Modern quantu...... formulations of MR are much closer to classical descriptions than to typical quantum inspired myths frequent in literature. This opens for intuitive educational computer simulation using modern web technologies offering excellent interactive possibilities for experimentation....

  16. Student Perceptions of Chemistry Laboratory Learning Environments, Student-Teacher Interactions and Attitudes in Secondary School Gifted Education Classes in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Quek Choon; Wong, Angela F. L.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the chemistry laboratory classroom environment, teacher-student interactions and student attitudes towards chemistry among 497 gifted and non-gifted secondary-school students in Singapore. The data were collected using the 35-item Chemistry Laboratory Environment Inventory (CLEI), the 48-item Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) and the 30-item Questionnaire on Chemistry-Related Attitudes (QOCRA). Results supported the validity and reliability of the CLEI and QTI for this sample. Stream (gifted versus non-gifted) and gender differences were found in actual and preferred chemistry laboratory classroom environments and teacher-student interactions. Some statistically significant associations of modest magnitude were found between students' attitudes towards chemistry and both the laboratory classroom environment and the interpersonal behaviour of chemistry teachers. Suggestions for improving chemistry laboratory classroom environments and the teacher-student interactions for gifted students are provided.

  17. Intergrain exchange interaction estimation from the remanence magnetization analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolyachkin, Anton S.; Volegov, Aleksey S.; Kudrevatykh, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of δm(H)=[M d (H)−M r (∞)+2M r (H)]/M r (∞) curves constructed from dc demagnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization (M d (H) and M r (H) respectively) is important for characterization of the interactions in ferromagnets. Up to now, it has been mainly used for qualitative deductions about them. In this work, the novel functional relation between the maximum of the δm(H) plot and the microscopic parameters of the weakly coupled Stoner–Wohlfarth ensemble with the isotropic distribution of easy magnetization axes was established using computer modeling. It allows quantitative analysis in the frame of the model to be performed. Finally, a new method of estimating the intergrain exchange interaction constant for nanostructured high anisotropy magnets could be formulated taking into account the results of the modeling. - Highlights: • Computer modelling of the weakly coupled Stoner–Wohlfarth like ensemble was performed. • The novel functional relation for maxima of the Kelly plots is established. • Method of the estimation of intergrain exchange interaction constant is formulated

  18. Anomalous transport of magnetized electrons interacting with EC waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsironis, C; Vlahos, L [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear interaction of magnetized electrons with an oblique narrow-band electromagnetic wave-packet. The interaction is analysed over and near the local threshold to chaos. The statistical character of the forcing that controls the trajectories of the particles is also studied. We focus our analysis on issues related to energy and spatial diffusion across the magnetic field by following the evolution of the ensemble mean squares (({gamma} - {gamma}{sub 0}){sup 2}) and ((r{sub perpendicular}-r{sub perpendicular0}){sup 2}) for various values of the wave amplitude and angle of wave propagation. We study, in particular, the interaction of magnetized electrons with waves having strong and moderate amplitudes, near the transition to chaos, where the dynamics is complex and a mixture of periodic and stochastic orbits coexist. The electron diffusions in real and energy spaces are found to obey simple power laws in time, and the scaling exponents are indicative of sub-diffusion. This is a direct consequence of the effect of the resonant phase-space islands in the particle motion.

  19. Water-rock interaction and chemistry of groundwaters from the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frape, S.K.; Fritz, P.; McNutt, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of groundwaters in the crystalline rocks of the Canadian Shield reflect different degrees of rock-water interactions. The chemistry of the shallow, geochemically immature ground waters and especially of the major cations is controlled by local rock compositions, whereby dissolution reactions dominate. Conservative constituents, such as chloride and bromide, however, are not entirely a result of such reactions but appear to be readily added from leachable salts during the initial stages of the geochemical evolution of these waters. Their concentration changes little as major cations increase, until concentrations of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) reach 3000 to 5000 mg l -1 . The isotopic composition of these shallow waters reflects local, present day precipitations. In contrast to the shallow groundwaters, the isotopic and chemical compositions of the deep, saline waters and brines are determined by extensive, low-temperature rock-water interactions. This is documented in major ion chemistries, 18 O contents and strontium isotopic compositions. These data indicate that the deep brines have been contained in hydrologically isolated pockets. The almost total loss of primary compositions make discussions on the origin of these brines very speculative. However, all brines from across the Canadian Shield have a very similar chemical composition, which probably reflects a common geochemical history. (author)

  20. Magnetic interactions in martensitic Ni-Mn based Heusler systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Seda

    2010-04-22

    In this work, magnetic, magnetocaloric and structural properties are investigated in Ni-Mn-based martensitic Heusler alloys with the aim to tailor these properties as well as to understand in detail the magnetic interactions in the various crystallographic states of these alloys. We choose Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} as a prototype which undergoes a martensitic transformation and exhibits field-induced strain and the inverse magnetocaloric effect. Using the structural phase diagram of martensitic Ni-Mn-based Heusler alloys, we substitute gallium and tin for indium to carry these effects systematically closer to room temperature by shifting the martensitic transformation. A magneto-calorimeter is designed and built to measure adiabatically the magnetocaloric effect in these alloys. The temperature dependence of strain under an external magnetic field is studied in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 50-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga, Sn, In and Sb) and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga and Sn). An argument based on the effect of the applied magnetic field on martensite nucleation is adopted to extract information on the direction of the magnetization easy axis in the martensitic unit cell in Heusler alloys. Parallel to these studies, the structure in the presence of an external field is also studied by powder neutron diffraction. It is demonstrated that martensite nucleation is influenced by cooling the sample under a magnetic field such that the austenite phase is arrested within the martensitic state. The magnetic interactions in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 40}Sb{sub 10} are characterized by using neutron polarization analysis. Below the martensitic transformation temperature, M{sub s}, an antiferromagnetically correlated state is found. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments are carried out on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} to gain more detailed information on the nature of the magnetic interactions. The experimental

  1. Alignment of SWNTs by protein-ligand interaction of functionalized magnetic particles under low magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil; Lee, Seok Jae; Jung, Dae-Hwan; Ko, Young Koan; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention for applications using their superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. A simple method to controllably align single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) by using magnetic particles embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide as an accelerator under the magnetic field was developed. The functionalization of SWNTs using biotin, interacted with streptavidin-coupled magnetic particles (micro-to-nano in diameter), and layer-by-layer assembly were performed for the alignment of a particular direction onto the clean silicon and the gold substrate at very low magnetic forces (0.02-0.89 T) at room temperature. The successful alignment of the SWNTs with multi-layer film was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By changing the orientation and location of the substrates, crossed-networks of SWNTs-magnetic particle complex could easily be fabricated. We suggest that this approach, which consists of a combination of biological interaction among streptavidin-biotin and magnetite particles, should be useful for lateral orientation of individual SWNTs with controllable direction.

  2. Content-related interactions and methods of reasoning within self-initiated organic chemistry study groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of content processing, and types of reasoning processes used by students within their groups. Our analysis showed that groups engaged in predominantly three types of interactions when discussing chemistry content: co-construction, teaching, and tutoring. Although each group engaged in each of these types of interactions at some point, their prevalence varied between groups and group members. Our analysis suggests that the types of interactions that were most common depended on the relative content knowledge of the group members as well as on the difficulty of the tasks in which they were engaged. Additionally, we were interested in characterizing the reasoning methods used by students within their study groups. We found that students used a combination of three content-relevant methods of reasoning: model-based reasoning, case-based reasoning, or rule-based reasoning, in conjunction with one chemically-irrelevant method of reasoning: symbol-based reasoning. The most common way for groups to reason was to use rules, whereas the least common way was for students to work from a model. In general, student reasoning correlated strongly to the subject matter to which students were paying attention, and was only weakly related to student interactions. Overall, results from this study may help instructors to construct appropriate tasks to guide what and how students study outside of the classroom. We found that students had a decidedly strategic approach in their study groups, relying heavily on material provided by their instructors, and using the reasoning strategies that resulted in the lowest levels of content processing. We suggest

  3. Effect of Synthesis Parameters on the Structure and Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Manganese Ferrite/Silver Composite Nanoparticles Synthesized by Wet Chemistry Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huy, L.T.; Tam, L.T.; Phan, V.N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, magnetic manganese ferrite/silver (MnFe2O4-Ag) composite nanoparticles were synthesized by wet chemistry method. This synthesis process consists of two steps: first, the seed of manganese ferrite nanoparticles (MnFe2O4 NPs) was prepared by a coprecipitationmethod; second......, growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the MnFe2O4 seed by modified photochemical reaction. We have conducted systematically the effects of synthesis parameters such as pH value, synthesis time, precursor salts concentration, mass ratio and stabilizing agents on the structure and magnetic properties......-prepared MnFe2O4-Ag magnetic nanocomposites display excellent properties of high crystallinity, long-term aggregation stability in aqueous medium, large saturation magnetization in the range of 15-20 emu/g, and small sizes of Ag-NPs similar to 20 nm. These exhibited properties made the MnFe2O4-Ag...

  4. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Dave, Himanshu L.; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  5. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  6. A report on workshops: General circulation model study of climate- chemistry interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei-Chyung, Wang; Isaksen, I.S.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussion on General Circulation Model Study of Climate-Chemistry Interaction from two workshops, the first held 19--21 August 1992 at Oslo, Norway and the second 26--27 May 1993 at Albany, New York, USA. The workshops are the IAMAP activities under the Trace Constituent Working Group. The main objective of the two workshops was to recommend specific general circulation model (GCM) studies of the ozone distribution and the climatic effect of its changes. The workshops also discussed the climatic implications of increasing sulfate aerosols because of its importance to regional climate. The workshops were organized into four working groups: observation of atmospheric O 3 ; modeling of atmospheric chemical composition; modeling of sulfate aerosols; and aspects of climate modeling

  7. Magnetic interactions and electronic structure of Ni–Mn–In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, Sunil Wilfred [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Chakrabarti, Aparna [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Barman, Sudipta Roy, E-mail: barmansr@gmail.com [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The ground state of Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}In{sub 0.6} is ferromagnetic. • The magnetic moments of Ni–Mn–In are in good agreement with the magnetization measurements. • Exchange coupling parameters exhibit a strong competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations. • Jahn–Teller splitting of the Ni 3d e{sub g} states drives the martensite transformation. - Abstract: The electronic structure and magnetic properties of a magnetic shape memory alloy Ni–Mn–In have been studied using spin polarized fully relativistic Korringa–Kohn–Rostoker (SPRKKR) method. The total energy calculations with different starting magnetic spin configurations show that the ground state of Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}In{sub 0.6} is ferromagnetic. The spin and orbital magnetic moments of Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}In{sub 0.6} and Ni{sub 2}MnIn are in good agreement with the magnetization measurements. The exchange coupling parameters of the different sublattice interactions exhibit a strong competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations, due to the substitution of excess Mn atoms at the In site in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}In{sub 0.6}. The Curie temperature of Ni{sub 2}MnIn, calculated under a mean field approximation, is found to be in relatively good agreement with the experimental values. While Ni{sub 2}MnIn does not undergo martensite transition, it is shown that a Jahn–Teller splitting of the Ni 3d e{sub g} states plays an important role in driving the martensite transformation in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.4}In{sub 0.6}. We find that both the calculated ultra-violet photoemission spectra and the inverse photoemission spectra are in good agreement with the existing experimental data.

  8. Aircraft-based investigation of Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in Southern West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, Cyrille

    2017-04-01

    The EU-funded project DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa, http://www.dacciwa.eu) is investigating the relationship between weather, climate and air pollution in southern West Africa. The air over the coastal region of West Africa is a unique mixture of natural and anthropogenic gases, liquids and particles, emitted in an environment, in which multi-layer cloud decks frequently form. These exert a large influence on the local weather and climate, mainly due to their impact on radiation, the surface energy balance and thus the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective for the aircraft detachment was to build robust statistics of cloud properties in southern West Africa in different chemical landscapes to investigate the physical processes involved in their life cycle in such a complex chemical environment. As part of the DACCIWA field campaigns, three European aircraft (the German DLR Falcon 20, the French SAFIRE ATR 42 and the British BAS Twin Otter) conducted a total of 50 research flights across Ivory Coast, Ghana, Togo, and Benin from 27 June to 16 July 2016 for a total of 155 flight hours, including hours sponsored through 3 EUFAR projects. The aircraft were used in different ways based on their strengths, but all three had comparable instrumentation with the the capability to do gas-phase chemistry, aerosol and clouds, thereby generating a rich dataset of atmospheric conditions across the region. Eight types of flight objectives were conducted to achieve the goals of the DACCIWA: (i) Stratus clouds, (ii) Land-sea breeze clouds, (iii) Mid-level clouds, (iv) Biogenic emission, (v) City emissions, (vi) Flaring and ship emissions, (vii) Dust and biomass burning aerosols, and (viii) air-sea interactions. An overview of the DACCIWA aircraft campaign as well as first highlights from the airborne observations will be presented.

  9. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  10. Probing beer aging chemistry by nuclear magnetic resonance and multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, J.A.; Barros, A.S.; Carvalho, B.; Brandao, T.; Gil, Ana M.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days) is described. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and an aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration revealed the importance of well known markers (e.g. 5-HMF) as well as of other compounds: amino acids, higher alcohols, organic acids, dextrins and some still unassigned spin systems. 2D correlation analysis enabled relevant compound variations to be confirmed and inter-compound correlations to be assessed, thus offering improved insight into the chemical aspects of beer aging. Highlights: · Use of NMR metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging. · Compositional variations evaluated by principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis. · Results reveal importance of known markers and other compounds: amino and organic acids, higher alcohols, dextrins. · 2D correlation analysis reveals inter-compound relationships, offering insight into beer aging chemistry. - Abstract: This paper describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in tandem with multivariate analysis (MVA), for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days). To evaluate the resulting compositional variations, both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and a clear aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration enabled the changing compounds to be identified, revealing the importance of well known markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5

  11. Probing beer aging chemistry by nuclear magnetic resonance and multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J.A. [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Barros, A.S. [QOPNA-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Carvalho, B.; Brandao, T. [UNICER, Bebidas de Portugal, Leca do Balio, 4466-955, S. Mamede de Infesta (Portugal); Gil, Ana M., E-mail: agil@ua.pt [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-09-30

    Graphical abstract: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days) is described. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and an aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration revealed the importance of well known markers (e.g. 5-HMF) as well as of other compounds: amino acids, higher alcohols, organic acids, dextrins and some still unassigned spin systems. 2D correlation analysis enabled relevant compound variations to be confirmed and inter-compound correlations to be assessed, thus offering improved insight into the chemical aspects of beer aging. Highlights: {center_dot} Use of NMR metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging. {center_dot} Compositional variations evaluated by principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis. {center_dot} Results reveal importance of known markers and other compounds: amino and organic acids, higher alcohols, dextrins. {center_dot} 2D correlation analysis reveals inter-compound relationships, offering insight into beer aging chemistry. - Abstract: This paper describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in tandem with multivariate analysis (MVA), for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days). To evaluate the resulting compositional variations, both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and a clear aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration enabled the changing compounds to be identified, revealing the importance of well known

  12. The FCC-ee Interaction Region Magnet Design

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, Michael; Blondel, Alain; Bogomyagkov, Anton; Holzer, Bernhard; Oide, Katsunobu; Sinyatkin, Sergey; Zimmermann, Frank; van Nugteren, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The design of the region close to the interaction point of the FCC-ee experiments is especially challenging. The beams collide at an angle (+-15 mrad) in the high-field region of the detector solenoid. Moreover, the very low vertical beta_y* of the machine necessitates that the final focusing quadrupoles have a distance from the IP (L*) of around 2 m and therefore are inside the main detector solenoid. The beams should be screened from the effect of the detector magnetic field, and the emittance blow-up due to vertical dispersion in the interaction region should be minimized, while leaving enough space for detector components. Crosstalk between the two final focus quadrupoles, only about 6 cm apart at the tip, should also be minimized.

  13. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M 0 = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10 16 -GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M 0 + 1/4nM 0 ... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0 + (0 -+ ) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0 -+ . The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown

  14. Effects of Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction on magnetism in nanodisks from a self-consistent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaosen, E-mail: liuzhsnj@yahoo.com [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (China); Ian, Hou, E-mail: houian@umac.mo [University of Macau, Institute of Applied Physics and Materials Engineering, FST (China)

    2016-01-15

    We give a theoretical study on the magnetic properties of monolayer nanodisks with both Heisenberg exchange and Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya (DM) interactions. In particular, we survey the magnetic effects caused by anisotropy, external magnetic field, and disk size when DM interaction is present by means of a new quantum simulation method facilitated by a self-consistent algorithm based on mean field theory. This computational approach finds that uniaxial anisotropy and transversal magnetic field enhance the net magnetization as well as increase the transition temperature of the vortical phase while preserving the chiralities of the swirly magnetic structures, whereas when the strength of DM interaction is sufficiently strong for a given disk size, magnetic domains appear within the circularly bounded region, which vanish and give in to a single vortex when a transversal magnetic field is applied. The latter confirms the magnetic skyrmions induced by the magnetic field as observed in the experiments.

  15. TmCd quadrupolar ordering and magnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleonard, R.; Morin, P.

    1979-01-01

    The paramagnetic compound TmCd crystallizes with the CsCl-type structure. Its Jahn-Teller behavior was first observed by Luethi and coworkers. We analyze here various physical properties with a pure-harmonic-elasticity model. The structural transition between cubic and tetragonal phases is now fully described (first-order character and temperature of occurrence) as well as the magnetic susceptibility, magnetization process, specific-heat, elastic-constant, and strain data. The relevant Hamiltonian takes into account the second-order magnetoelastic coupling and the quadrupolar exchange in addition to the cubic crystal field and the Heisenberg bilinear interactions. TmCd appears to be closely related to isomorphous TmZn and completes the illustration of the competition between bilinear and quadrupolar interactions occurring in some rare-earth intermetallics. In these two compounds, the quadrupolar exchange is many times stronger than the magnetoelastic coupling and the quadrupolar ordering then drives the structural transition. This situation is opposite to that occurring in (actual) Jahn-Teller compounds

  16. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-01-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse…

  17. Magnetism of Nanographene-Based Microporous Carbon and Its Applications: Interplay of Edge Geometry and Chemistry Details in the Edge State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. Nanographenes have important edge geometry dependence in their electronic structures. In armchair edges, electron wave interference works to contribute to energetic stability. Meanwhile, zigzag edges possess an edge-localized and spin-polarized nonbonding edge state, which causes electronic, magnetic, and chemical activities. In addition to the geometry dependence, the electronic structures are seriously affected by edge chemistry details. The edge chemistry dependence together with edge geometries on the electronic structures are discussed with samples of randomly networked nanographenes (microporous activated carbon fibers) in pristine state and under high-temperature annealing. In the pristine sample with the edges oxidized in ambient atmospheric conditions, the edge state, which is otherwise unstable, can be stabilized because of the charge transfer from nanographene to terminating oxygen. Nanographene, whose edges consist of a combination of magnetic zigzag edges and nonmagnetic armchair edges, is found to be ferrimagnetic with a nonzero net magnetic moment created under the interplay between a strong intrazigzag-edge ferromagnetic interaction and intermediate-strength interzigzag-edge antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic interaction. At heat-treatment temperatures just below the fusion start (approximately 1500 K), the edge-terminating structure is changed from oxygen-containing groups to hydrogen in the nanographene network. Additionally, hydrogen-terminated zigzag edges, which are present as the majority and chemically unstable, play a triggering role in fusion above 1500 K. The fusion start brings about an insulator-to-metal transition at TI -M˜1500 K . Local fusions taking place percolatively between nanographenes work to expand the π -bond network, eventually resulting in the development of antiferromagnetic short-range order toward spin glass in the

  18. Effect of Dipolar Interactions on the Magnetization of Single-Molecule Magnets in a cubic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2005-03-01

    Since the one-body tunnel picture of single-molecule magnets (SMM) is not always sufficient to explain the fine structure of experimental hysteresis loops, the effect of intermolecular dipolar interactions has been investigated on an ensemble of 100 3D-systems of 5X5X4 particles, each with spin S = 5, arranged in a cubic lattice. We have solved the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for several values of the damping constant, the field sweep rate and the lattice constant. We find that the smaller the damping constant is, the stronger the maximum field needs to be to produce hysteresis. Furthermore, the shape of the hysteresis loops also depends on the damping constant. We also find that the system magnetizes and demagnetizes faster with decreasing sweep rates, resulting in smaller hysteresis loops. Variations of the lattice constant within realistic values (1.5nm and 2.5nm) show that the dipolar interaction plays an important role in magnetic hysteresis by controlling the relaxation process. Examination of temperature dependencies (0.1K and 0.7K) of the above will be presented and compared with recent experimental data on SMM.

  19. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, An Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Zuo, Tingting [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Deptarment of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Zhang, Yong [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Deptarment of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

    2016-05-09

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  20. Magnetostatic interactions and forces between cylindrical permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, Marco; Heller, Ludek; Sittner, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Permanent magnets of various shapes are often utilized in magnetic actuators, sensors or releasable magnetic fasteners. Knowledge of the magnetic force is required to control devices reliably. Here, we introduce an analytical expression for calculating the attraction force between two cylindrical permanent magnets on the assumption of uniform magnetization. Although the assumption is not fulfilled exactly in cylindrical magnets, we obtain a very good agreement between the calculated and measured forces between two identical cylindrical magnets and within an array of NdFeB cylindrical magnets.

  1. Suppression of Magnetic Quantum Tunneling in a Chiral Single-Molecule Magnet by Ferromagnetic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Kai-Alexander; Mukherjee, Chandan; Broschinski, Jan-Philipp; Lippert, Yvonne; Walleck, Stephan; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Schnack, Jürgen; Glaser, Thorsten

    2017-12-18

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) retain a magnetization without applied magnetic field for a decent time due to an energy barrier U for spin-reversal. Despite the success to increase U, the difficult to control magnetic quantum tunneling often leads to a decreased effective barrier U eff and a fast relaxation. Here, we demonstrate the influence of the exchange coupling on the tunneling probability in two heptanuclear SMMs hosting the same spin-system with the same high spin ground state S t = 21/2. A chirality-induced symmetry reduction leads to a switch of the Mn III -Mn III exchange from antiferromagnetic in the achiral SMM [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ to ferromagnetic in the new chiral SMM RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ . Multispin Hamiltonian analysis by full-matrix diagonalization demonstrates that the ferromagnetic interactions in RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ enforce a well-defined S t = 21/2 ground state with substantially less mixing of M S substates in contrast to [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ and no tunneling pathways below the top of the energy barrier. This is experimentally verified as U eff is smaller than the calculated energy barrier U in [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ due to tunneling pathways, whereas U eff equals U in RR [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ demonstrating the absence of quantum tunneling.

  2. Use of a PhET Interactive Simulation in General Chemistry Laboratory: Models of the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Chamberlain, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    An activity supporting the PhET interactive simulation, Models of the Hydrogen Atom, has been designed and used in the laboratory portion of a general chemistry course. This article describes the framework used to successfully accomplish implementation on a large scale. The activity guides students through a comparison and analysis of the six…

  3. Magnetic field of a dipole and the dipole-dipole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    With a data-acquisition system and sensors commercially available, it is easy to determine magnetic fields produced by permanent magnets and to study the dipole-dipole interaction for different separations and angular positions of the magnets. For sufficiently large distances, the results confirm the 1/R 3 law for the magnetic field and the 1/R 4 law for the interaction force between two dipoles, as well as their angular dependences

  4. Impact of nucleic acid self-alignment in a strong magnetic field on the interpretation of indirect spin-spin interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavrinská, A.; Zelinka, J.; Šebera, Jakub; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Fiala, R.; Boelens, R.; Sklenář, V.; Trantírek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2016), s. 53-62 ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-27676S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * DFT calculations * spin-spin interactions * magnetic field Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10858-015-0005-x

  5. Cytotoxicity of magnetic nanoparticles derived from green chemistry against human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumandla, Pranitha

    The core-shelled Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been extensively investigated by the researchers due to their diversified applications. Recently, the study on the toxicity of nanomaterials has been drawn increasing attention to reduce or mitigate the environmental hazards and health risk. The objectives of this thesis are three fold: 1) prepare series functionalized Fe3O4 MNPs and optimize the synthesis variables of; 2) characterize their nanostructures using the state-of-the-art instrumental techniques; and 3) evaluate their cytotoxicity by measurement of nitrogen monoxide (NO) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and single oxygen species (SOS) generation. In order to prepare the crystalline Fe3O4 MNPs, a cost-effective and user-friendly wet chemistry (Sol-Gel) method was used. Two Indian medicinal plants were extracted to derive the active chemicals, which were used to functionalize the Fe3O 4 MNPs. The results indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs were well-indexed with the standard inverse spinel structure (PDF 65-3107, a=8.3905A, α = 90°). The particle's sizes varied from 6-10 nm with the Fe3O 4 MNPs acting as cores and medicinal extracts as shell. The active chemical components extracted from two Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum are fatty acid, Saponins, sterols, carbohydrates and amino acids, which are in agreement with the reported data. Toxicological evaluations of MNPs indicated that the Fe3O4 MNPs functionalized with Hygrophila auriculata/ Chlorophytum borivilianum extract prepared at room temperature were toxic to the cells when compared to the control, and act in a mechanism similar to the actions of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These functionalized MNPs, which were prepared at 100 ° C, displayed similar mechanism of action to the anticancer drug (SN-38). It was also found that the MNPs prepared at lower temperatures are less toxic and showed similar mechanism of action as the sodium nitrite (NaNO 2).

  6. Interactive ozone and methane chemistry in GISS-E2 historical and future climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The new generation GISS climate model includes fully interactive chemistry related to ozone in historical and future simulations, and interactive methane in future simulations. Evaluation of ozone, its tropospheric precursors, and methane shows that the model captures much of the large-scale spatial structure seen in recent observations. While the model is much improved compared with the previous chemistry-climate model, especially for ozone seasonality in the stratosphere, there is still slightly too rapid stratospheric circulation, too little stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux in the Southern Hemisphere and an Antarctic ozone hole that is too large and persists too long. Quantitative metrics of spatial and temporal correlations with satellite datasets as well as spatial autocorrelation to examine transport and mixing are presented to document improvements in model skill and provide a benchmark for future evaluations. The difference in radiative forcing (RF calculated using modeled tropospheric ozone versus tropospheric ozone observed by TES is only 0.016 W m−2. Historical 20th Century simulations show a steady increase in whole atmosphere ozone RF through 1970 after which there is a decrease through 2000 due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Ozone forcing increases throughout the 21st century under RCP8.5 owing to a projected recovery of stratospheric ozone depletion and increases in methane, but decreases under RCP4.5 and 2.6 due to reductions in emissions of other ozone precursors. RF from methane is 0.05 to 0.18 W m−2 higher in our model calculations than in the RCP RF estimates. The surface temperature response to ozone through 1970 follows the increase in forcing due to tropospheric ozone. After that time, surface temperatures decrease as ozone RF declines due to stratospheric depletion. The stratospheric ozone depletion also induces substantial changes in surface winds and the Southern Ocean circulation, which may play a role in

  7. Interactions of Cells with Magnetic Nanowires and Micro Needles

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2017-12-01

    The use of nanowires, nano and micro needles in biomedical applications has markedly increased in the past years, mainly due to attractive properties such as biocompatibility and simple fabrication. Specifically, these structures have shown promise in applications including cell separation, tumor cell capture, intracellular delivery, cell therapy, cancer treatment and as cell growth scaffolds. The work proposed here aims to study two platforms for different applications: a vertical magnetic nanowire array for mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and a micro needle platform for intracellular delivery. First, a thorough evaluation of the cytotoxicity of nanowires was done in order to understand how a biological system interacts with high aspect ratio structures. Nanowires were fabricated through pulsed electrodeposition and characterized by electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Studies of biocompatibility, cell death, cell membrane integrity, nanowire internalization and intracellular dissolution were all performed in order to characterize the cell response. Results showed a variable biocompatibility depending on nanowire concentration and incubation time, with cell death resulting from an apoptotic pathway arising after internalization. A vertical array of nanowires was then used as a scaffold for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy, the interactions between the dense array of nanowires and the cells were analyzed, as well as the biocompatibility of the array and its effects on cell differentiation. A magnetic field was additionally applied on the substrate to observe a possible differentiation. Stem cells grown on this scaffold showed a cytoskeleton and focal adhesion reorganization, and later expressed the osteogenic marker osteopontin. The application of a magnetic field counteracted this outcome. Lastly, a micro needle platform was fabricated

  8. Magnetic properties in kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63, 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic properties of the kagomé lattice have been studied with Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida (RKKY) exchange interactions in a spin-7/2 Ising model using Monte Carlo simulations. The RKKY interaction between the two magnetic layers is considered for different distances. The magnetizations and magnetic susceptibilities of this lattice are given for different triquadratic interactions around each triangular face. The critical temperature is obtained for a fixed size. The magnetic hysteresis cycle of kagomé lattice with RKKY interactions is obtained for different temperatures and for different crystal field with a fixed size of nonmagnetic layer. - Highlights: • We study the RKKY interaction in kagomé lattice using the Monte Carlo simulations. • The transition temperature is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction. • The coercive field is obtained for kagomé lattice with RKKY interaction.

  9. Many particle magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions in magnetizable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cregg, P.J.; Murphy, Kieran; Mardinoglu, Adil; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2010-01-01

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Aviles, Ebner and Ritter is considered both experimentally (in vitro) and theoretically. The results of a 2D mathematical model are compared with 3D experimental results for a magnetizable wire stent. In this experiment a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of particles which consist of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius ∼10nm). In order to model the agglomeration of particles known to occur in this system, the magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included. Simulations based on this mathematical model were performed using open source C++ code. Different initial positions are considered and the system performance is assessed in terms of collection efficiency. The results of this model show closer agreement with the measured in vitro experimental results and with the literature. The implications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine are based on the prediction of the particle efficiency, in conjunction with the magnetizable stent, for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Interactions between sediment chemistry and frenulate pogonophores (Annelida) in the north-east Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. R.; Southward, A. J.; Southward, E. C.; Lamont, P.; Harvey, R.

    2008-08-01

    The small frenulate pogonophores (Annelida: Pogonophora a.k.a. Siboglinidae) typically inhabit muddy sediments on the continental slope, although a few species occur near hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. We present data on the distribution and habitat characteristics of several species on the European continental shelf and slope from 48°N to 75°N and show how the animals interact with the chemistry of the sediments. The environments inhabited include: shallow (30 m), organic-rich, fjord sediments; slope sediments (1000-2200 m) and methane seeps at 330 m depth. All the species studied obtain nutrition from endosymbiotic bacteria. They take up reduced sulphur species, or in one case, methane, through the posterior parts of their tubes buried in the anoxic sediment. We conclude that most species undertake sulphide 'mining', a mechanism previously demonstrated in the bivalves Lucinoma borealis and Thyasira sarsi. These pogonophores participate in the sulphur cycle and effectively lower the sulphide content of the sediments. Our results show that the abundance of frenulate pogonophores increases with increasing sedimentation and with decreasing abundance of other benthos, particularly bioturbating organisms. The maximum sustainable carrying capacity of non-seep sediments for frenulate pogonophores is limited by the rate of sulphate reduction.

  11. CHEMIFOGV - A Model to Simulate Radiation Fogs and their Interaction with Vegetation and Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterrath, Tanja; Bott, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Radiation fog is an important modifier of atmospheric compounds in the planetary boundary layer. In vegetated areas effects are especially pronounced due to the enlarged surface area. Besides affecting the lower boundary of atmospheric models fog acts as a multi-phase reaction chamber leading to acid deposition. Here we present the 1-dimensional radiation fog modelCHEMIFOG V to simulate regional radiation fog events. The key feature of the fog model is the detailed microphysics, where the aerosol/droplet spectrum is described with a joint 2-dimensional distribution, but also the dynamics, thermodynamics, and radiative transfer are calculated. To investigate the interaction between fog and the biosphere a multi-layer vegetation module, including a soil module as well as a dry deposition module were coupled. Vegetation influences the dynamics, thermodynamics, and the radiation field of the lowest atmospheric layers. With CHEMIFOG V , numerical case studies on dry and moist deposition processes on vegetation surfaces were performed. Hereby multi-phase chemistry and the processing of aerosols were considered. The results show that the chemical composition of the deposited fog droplets is mainly determined by the aerosol composition. Dry deposition fluxes are dependent on the incoming radiation and the leaves' surface conditions with respect to water coverage.Due to chemical aerosol processing and deposition, the aerosol spectrum is significantly modified in the planetary boundary layer

  12. A study of interaction effect theoretical with combination size grain on magnetics in of permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarihoran, Doansi; Manaf, Azwar

    2002-01-01

    Stoner-Wohlfarth theory, SW shows a deviation around 30-40% to the measurement result of a permanent magnetic material with nanometer-sized grains. This is caused by this theory neglecting the interacting grain factor. This research modifies SW theory by calculating the grain interacting effect. The modification is made by assuming the interacting energy of a mono-domain grain has ellipsoidal shaped focused at the edge of the grain. SW grain in this calculation model is a box-shaped in a grain with edges of the box placed in the skin's grain. The result shows that interacting effect make remanent polarization increasing drastically and coercive field value decreasing when grain's size reaches 20% of size of the first mono-domain grain. For material with ND 2 Fe 14 B phase, the optimum coercive field value and remanent polarization that producing maximum product energy, (BH) m ax obtained in a material with 5 nanometer-size grains. Qualitatively there is as appropriate result between the calculation and measurement

  13. The Interaction Effects of Gender and Grade Level on Secondary School Students' Attitude towards Learning Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Chua Kah; Karpudewan, Mageswary

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative study reports the effects of gender and grade level on secondary students' attitude towards chemistry lessons. For this purpose, the Attitude towards Chemistry Lessons Scale (ATCLS) was administered to 446 secondary school students between 16-19 years old. The ATCLS consists of four different subscales: liking for chemistry…

  14. The impact of Future Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Atmospheric Chemistry-Climate Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Bouwman, L.

    2010-01-01

    To demonstrate potential future consequences of land cover and land use changes beyond those for physical climate and the carbon cycle, we present an analysis of large-scale impacts of land cover and land use changes on atmospheric chemistry using the chemistry-climate model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy

  15. The DACCIWA project: Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippertz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This contribution provides an overview of the EU-funded DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa) project. DACCIWA consists of 16 European and African research organisations and has strong links to universities, weather services and government organisations across West Africa. The project runs from 2010 to 2018 and is built around a major international field campaign in 2016. A key motivation for DACCIWA is the expected tripling of anthropogenic emissions in southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, whose impacts on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An integrated assessment of this problem, which is mostly due to massive economic and population growth and urbanization, is challenging due to (a) a superposition of regional effects with global climate change, (b) a strong dependence on the variable West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations, and (d) a lack of observations. DACCIWA combines measurements in the field in SWA with extensive modelling activities and work on satellite data. In particular during the main DACCIWA field campaign in June-July 2016 high-quality observations of emissions, atmospheric composition and meteorological parameters were sampled. The campaign involved three research aircraft, three ground-based supersites, enhanced radiosonde launches, and intensive measurements at urban sites in Abidjan and Cotonou. These data have already been quality-controlled and will be freely available to the research community through a database at http://baobab.sedoo.fr/DACCIWA/ after the end of the project. The resulting benchmark dataset is currently combined with a wide range of modelling and satellite-based research activities that will ultimately allow (a) an assessment of the roles of relevant physical, chemical and biological processes, (b) an improvement

  16. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  17. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-08-01

    Cr-doped core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles (NPs) containing 0, 2, 5, and 8 at.% of Cr dopant were synthesized via a nanocluster deposition system and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. We observed the formation of a σ-FeCr phase in 2 at.% of Cr doping in core-shell NPs. This is unique since it was reported in the past that the σ-phase forms above 20 at.% of Cr. The large coercive field and exchange bias are ascribed to the antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 layer formed with the Fe-oxide shell, which also acts as a passivation layer to decrease the Fe-oxide shell thickness. The additional σ-phase in the core and/or Cr2O3 in the shell cause the hysteresis loop to appear tight waisted near the zero-field axis. The exchange interaction competes with the dipolar interaction with the increase of σ-FeCr grains in the Fe-core. The interaction reversal has been observed in 8 at.% of Cr. The observed reversal mechanism is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M value, and is supported by a theoretical watermelon model based on the core-shell nanostructure system.

  18. Synthesis, growth, and studies (crystal chemistry, magnetic chemistry) of actinide-based intermetallic compounds and alloys with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kergadallan, Yann

    1993-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis reports the study of the synthesis and reactivity of intermetallic compounds with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry. It presents the thermal properties of 1.1.1 compounds: general presentation of physical transitions, and of solid solutions and formation heat, application to actinides (reactivity analysis from phase diagrams, techniques of crystal synthesis and crystal growth. It describes experimental techniques: synthesis, determination of fusion temperature by dilatometry, methods used for crystal growth, characterisation techniques (metallography, X ray diffraction on powders, dilatometry). It discusses the obtained results in terms of characterisation of synthesised samples, of crystal growth, and of measurements of fusion temperature. The second part addresses crystal chemistry studies: structure of compounds with a 1.1.1 stoichiometry (Laves structures, Zr, Ti and Pu compounds), techniques of analysis by X-ray diffraction (on powders and on single crystals), result interpretation (UNiX compounds, AnTAl compounds with T being a metal from group VIII, AnTGa compounds, AnNiGe compounds, distance comparison, structure modifications under pressure). The third part concerns physical issues. The author addresses the following topics: physical properties of intermetallic 1.1.1 compounds (magnetism of yttrium phases, behaviour of uranium-based Laves phases, analysis of pseudo-binary diagrams, physical characteristics of uranium-based 1.1.1 compounds, predictions of physical measurements), analysis techniques (Moessbauer spectroscopy, SQUID for Superconducting Quantum Interference Device), and result interpretation

  19. Potential changes in atmospheric chemistry in the decades ahead: Climate and biosphere interactions and feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1991-10-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is a challenging area of research where much knowledge is needed if we are to continue to survive as a species. This paper outlines research needs in the decades ahead in this key area of scientific endeavor. Highlighted are areas of research that are likely to lead to climatic and biospheric impacts and have been given little attention in the past. In particular, the possible organic transformation chemistries that may lead to chemical and physical changes in tropospheric cloud chemistries are highlighted and emphasized as an area where research is needed in the future. 22 refs.

  20. Fuel chemistry and pellet-clad interaction related to high burnup fuel. Proceedings of the technical committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review new developments in clad failures. Major findings regarding the causes of clad failures are presented in this publication, with the main topics being fuel chemistry and fission product behaviour, swelling and pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, cladding failure mechanism at high burnup, thermal properties and fuel behaviour in off-normal conditions. This publication contains 17 individual presentations delivered at the meeting; each of them was indexed separately

  1. Magnetization processes in quantum spin chains with regularly alternating intersite interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derzhko, O.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the dependence of magnetization on field at zero temperature for spin-1/2 chains in which intersite interactions regularly vary from site to site with period p. In the limiting case, where the smallest value of the intersite interactions tends to zero, the chain splits into noninteracting identical fragments of p sites and the dependence of magnetization on field can be examined rigorously. We comment on the influence of an anisotropy in the inter spin interaction on the magnetization profiles. Finally, we show how the case of a nonzero smallest value of the intersite interactions can be considered

  2. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  3. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  4. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  5. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  6. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  7. Relativistic stability of interacting Fermi gas in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lilin; Tian Jincheng; Men Fudian; Zhang Yipeng

    2013-01-01

    By means of the single particle energy spectrum of weak interaction between fermions and Poisson formula, the thermodynamic potential function of relativistic Fermi gas in a strong magnetic field is derived. Based on this, we obtained the criterion of stability for the system. The results show that the mechanics stability of a Fermi gas with weak interacting is influenced by the interacting. While the magnetic field is able to regulate the influence and the relativistic effect has almost no effect on it. (authors)

  8. Effect of magnetic field on nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic and surface waves in a plasma layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Sh.M.; El-Sherif, N.; El-Siragy, N.M.; Tanta Univ.; El-Naggar, I.A.; Alexandria Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation is made for nonlinear interaction between incident radiation and a surface wave in a magnetized plasma layer. Both interacting waves are of P polarization. The generated currents and fields at combination frequencies are obtained analytically. Unlike the S-polarized interacting waves, the magnetic field affects the fundamental waves and leads to an amplification of generated waves when their frequencies approach the cyclotron frequency. (author)

  9. Comparison between simulation and experimentally observed interactions between two magnetic beads in a fluidic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oduwole, Olayinka, E-mail: olayinka.oduwole@eng.ox.ac.uk; Grob, David Tim, E-mail: tim.grob@eng.ox.ac.uk; Sheard, Steve, E-mail: steve.sheard@eng.ox.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Continuous flow separation of magnetic particles within a microfluidic device could lead to improved performance of magnetic bead-based assays but the undesirable formation of bead clusters reduces its efficiency; this efficiency refers to the ability to separate bound magnetic beads from a mixture of particles. Such agglomerates are formed due to magnetic binding forces while hydrodynamic interactions strongly influence the particles' movement. This paper presents a model for interactions between a pair of equal sized super-paramagnetic beads suspended in water within a uniform magnetic field. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a comparison between simulated trajectories and the beads' movement captured on video; the beads were suspended in a stationary fluid placed within a uniform magnetic field. In conclusion, the model is a good approximation for beads interacting with their nearest neighbours and is able to predict the trajectory pattern of these particles in a magnetic bead-based assay. Predicting the magnetically induced interaction of nearby beads will help in determining the density of beads in an assay and in avoiding agglomeration over a fixed time duration. - Highlights: • We modelled the interactions between a pair of super-paramagnetic beads suspended in water within a uniform magnetic field. • We tracked the movement of the bead pair and captured it on video. • We compared the numerical results with the video data and achieved a good agreement. • We predicted the agglomeration time as a function of the separation distance.

  10. Influence of surface chemistry of carbon materials on their interactions with inorganic nitrogen contaminants in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaraj; Padhye, Lokesh P

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic nitrogen contaminants (INC) (NH 4 + , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , NH 3 , NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O) pose a growing risk to the environment, and their remediation methods are highly sought after. Application of carbon materials (CM), such as biochar and activated carbon, to remediate INC from agricultural fields and wastewater treatment plants has gained a significant interest since past few years. Understanding the role of surface chemistry of CM in adsorption of various INC is highly critical to increase adsorption efficiency as well as to assess the long term impact of using these highly recalcitrant CM for remediation of INC. Critical reviews of adsorption studies related to INC have revealed that carbon surface chemistry (surface functional groups, pH, Eh, elemental composition, and mineral content) has significant influence on adsorption of INC. Compared to basic functional groups, oxygen containing surface functional groups have been found to be more influential for adsorption of INC. However, basic sites on carbon materials still play an important role in chemisorption of anionic INC. Apart from surface functional groups, pH, Eh and pH zpc of CM and elemental and mineral composition of its surface are important properties capable of altering INC interactions with CM. This review summarizes our current understanding of INC interactions with CM's surface through the known chemisorption mechanisms: electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, electron donor-acceptor mechanism, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interaction, chemisorption aided by minerals, and interactions influenced by pH and elemental composition. Change in surface chemistry of CM in soil during aging is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of the saturation magnetization, anisotropy field, mean field interaction, and switching field distribution for nanocrystalline hard magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallum, R. William

    2005-01-01

    For a uniaxial nanocrystalline magnetic material, the determination of the saturation magnetization, M s , requires measurements of the magnetization at fields which exceed the anisotropy field. For a typical RE-Tm compound, where RE=rare earth and Tm=transition metal, this may require fields above 7 T if the approach to saturation law is used. However for an isotropic material composed of a random distribution of non-interacting uniaxial grains, both M s and the anisotropy filed, H a , may be determined by fitting the Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model (Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. 240 (1948) 599) to the reversible part of the demagnetization curve in the first quadrant. Furthermore, using the mean field interaction model of Callen, Liu and Cullen [2], a quantitative measure of the interaction strength for interacting particles may be determined. In conjunction with an analytical fit to the first quadrant demagnetization curve of the SW model, this allows M s , H a and the mean field interaction constant of a nanocrystalline magnet to be determined from measurements below 5 T. Furthermore, comparison of the model solution for the reversible magnetization with experimental data in the 2nd and 3rd quadrants allows the accurate determination of the switching field distribution. In many cases the hysteresis loop may be accurately described by a normal distribution of switching fields

  12. Equilibrium magnetization and microstructure of the system of superparamagnetic interacting particles: numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pshenichnikov, A F

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to study the equilibrium magnetization of a 3D system of superparamagnetic particles taking into account the steric and dipole-dipole interparticle interactions. Two types of systems are considered: magnetic fluids and solidified ferrocolloids containing randomly spatially distributed particles with negligible energy of magnetic anisotropy. The results of numerical simulations confirm the universality of Langevin susceptibility as a main dimensionless parameter determining the influence of interparticle interactions on the magnetization of the system for moderate values of the aggregation parameter. The obtained results are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. At large values of the aggregation parameter, the clustering of particles in magnetic fluids is observed resulting in a reduction of their magnetization as compared to solidified systems. It is shown that the magnetization of solidified systems can be well described by the modified effective field appr...

  13. Equilibrium magnetization and microstructure of the system of superparamagnetic interacting particles: numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, A.F.; Mekhonoshin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to study the equilibrium magnetization of a 3D system of superparamagnetic particles taking into account the steric and dipole-dipole interparticle interactions. Two types of systems are considered: magnetic fluids and solidified ferrocolloids containing randomly spatially distributed particles with negligible energy of magnetic anisotropy. The results of numerical simulations confirm the universality of Langevin susceptibility as a main dimensionless parameter determining the influence of interparticle interactions on the magnetization of the system for moderate values of the aggregation parameter. The obtained results are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. At large values of the aggregation parameter, the clustering of particles in magnetic fluids is observed resulting in a reduction of their magnetization as compared to solidified systems. It is shown that the magnetization of solidified systems can be well described by the modified effective field approximation within the whole investigated range of parameters

  14. First highlights of the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liousse, C.; Knippertz, P.; Flamant, C.; Adon, J.; Akpo, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Assamoi, E.; Baeza, A.; Julien, B.; Bedou, M.; Brooks, B. J.; Chiu, J. Y. C.; Chiron, C.; Coe, H.; Danuor, S.; Djossou, J.; Evans, M. J.; Fayomi, B.; Fink, A. H.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Gardrat, E.; Jegede, O.; Kalthoff, N.; Kedote, M.; Keita, S.; Kouame, K.; Konare, A.; Leon, J. F.; Mari, C. H.; Lohou, F.; Roblou, L.; Schlager, H.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Toure, E. N.; Veronique, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The EU-funded project DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa) is investigating the relationship between weather, climate, air pollution and health in southern West Africa. The air over the coastal region of West Africa is a unique mixture of natural and anthropogenic gases, liquids and particles, emitted in an environment, in which multi-layer cloud decks frequently form. These exert a large influence on the local weather and climate, which has never been studied in detail over West Africa: this information is currently not included in the majority of weather and climate models. For the first time, the entire chain of impacts of natural and manmade emissions on the West African atmosphere was investigated in a coordinated field campaign. As part of this campaign, three research aircraft (Falcon 20, Twin Otter and ATR) based in Lomé (Togo) flew targeted 50 missions over West Africa from 27 June to 16 July 2016. In that campaign also, three highly instrumented measuring sites inland were set up with weather balloons launched several times a day across the region. The main objective was to build robust statistics of cloud properties in southern West Africa in different chemical landscapes (background state, ship/flaring emissions, polluted megacities, agricultural and forest areas, dust from the Sahel/Sahara). In addition, DACCIWA scientists working on measurements of urban emissions, air pollution, and health have set up four urban sites in Abidjan (Cote d'Ivoire) and Cotonou (Benin) focusing on main specific regional combustion sources (domestic fires, traffic and waste burning). Long-term measurements of gases and particles and census of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases were started in January 2015 and will continue until March 2017 to determine the links between human health and air pollution. Intensive measurement periods took place in July 2015, January 2016, and July 2016 (a final one is planned for January 2017) in

  15. The Use of Magnetic Orientation as a Pinning Modality for Investigation of Photon-Magnon Interactions in Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, Giap Van; Su, Luong Van; Tue, Nguyen Anh; Khanh, Hoang Quoc; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2018-06-01

    In this work, an experimental setup to study the dependence of a visible-light transmission through a magnetic granular film on the magnetic field direction was presented. The results measured the transmission (T) of the visible light, with the wavelengths λ were in the range from 560 to 695 nm, by the magnetic nanogranular films Cox-(Al2O3)100-x system, with Co compositions are x = 10 ÷ 45 at.%, as a function of the magnetic field direction were reported. These investigations were carried out under an external magnetic field of H = 400 Oe, which directs to the normal of the sample surface by an angle varied in the range of φ = 0° ÷ 45°, to magnetize the magnetization direction of all the Co particles following this direction. Consequently, the angle φ between the magnetization direction with the incident-light direction, which sets as the optical axis of the system and always keeps fixedly to the normal of the sample surface, is established. The experimental results showed the different dependencies of T on the angle φ, the magnetic field H, the Co composition x, and the wavelength λ. These dependencies attributed to a behavior that relates to so-called photon-magnon interaction.

  16. Interaction between current imbalance and magnetization in LHC cables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, M.; Kuijper, A.; Kuijper, A.; den Ouden, A.; ten Haken, Bernard; Bottura, L.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2001-01-01

    The quality of the magnetic field in superconducting accelerator magnets is associated with the properties of the superconducting cable. Current imbalances due to coupling currents ¿I, as large as 100 A, are induced by spatial variations of the field sweep rate and contact resistances. During

  17. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.) [es

  18. Dimensional dependence of exchange interactions at high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, U.; Kuhn-Heinrich, B.; Ossau, W.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G.; Cheng, H.H.; Nicholas, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the contribution of the breaking of the antiferromagnetically coupled spin clusters to the total magnetization in thin (CdMn)Te layers as a function of the layer thickness by reflectivity spectroscopy in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental results show that the contribution of the breaking of antiferromagnetically coupled spin clusters is reduced by decreasing layer thickness. (author)

  19. Magnetostatic interactions and forces between cylindrical permanent magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, M.; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 22 (2009), s. 3758-3763 ISSN 0304-8853 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 46559 - CERINKA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : cylinder * force measurement * magnetostatic * permanent magnet Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2009

  20. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-06-17

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors.

  1. Disruptive effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic memory cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, J.; Cubukcu, M.; Cros, V.; Reyren, N., E-mail: nicolas.reyren@thalesgroup.com [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS, Thales, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91767, Palaiseau (France); Khvalkovskiy, A. V. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, State University, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Kuteifan, M.; Lomakin, V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); Apalkov, D. [Samsung Electronics, Semiconductor R& D Center (Grandis), San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    In order to increase the thermal stability of a magnetic random access memory cell, materials with high spin-orbit interaction are often introduced in the storage layer. As a side effect, a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) may arise in such systems. Here, we investigate the impact of DMI on the magnetic cell performance, using micromagnetic simulations. We find that DMI strongly promotes non-uniform magnetization states and non-uniform switching modes of the magnetic layer. It appears to be detrimental for both the thermal stability of the cell and its switching current, leading to considerable deterioration of the cell performance even for a moderate DMI amplitude.

  2. Interaction of a supersonic plasma jet with a coaxial dipole magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landes, K.

    1975-01-01

    A low pressure plasma jet of considerable conductivity can be influenced by a magnetic field. On the other hand the influencing magnetic field is changed by currents induced in the plasma jet. New astrophysical examples of suchlike interaction have been found in the investigation of the moon, where the partially not currentfree solar wind is influenced by locally confined magnetic fields. In the experiment reported, the interaction of a supersonic plasma jet with a coaxial, dipole-shaped magnetic field is investigated. A current is superimposed to the plasma jet. (Auth.)

  3. Color interaction of quarks and magnetic moments of baryons in the bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to saccount for the quark interaction in the bag model by calculating corrections to the baryon magnetic moments related to the colour interaction of quarks. The quark-in-bag wave function to that holds the confinement linear boundary condition has been found in the first order for the external magnetic field. Corrections to the baryon magnetic moments are calculated. They are related to energy variations of colour electric and colour magnetic fields. Numerical data are presented and the structure of corrections in the SU-3 group approximation is discussed. The results are compared with the potential model and the experiment

  4. The effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on diuron sorption across a diverse range of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of non-ionic organic compounds to soil is usually expressed as the carbon-normalized partition coefficient (KOC), because it is assumed that the main factor that influences the amount sorbed is the organic carbon content of the soil. However, KOC can vary by a factor of at least ten across a range of soils. We investigated two potential causes of variation in diuron KOC - organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry - for a diverse set of 34 soils from Sri Lanka, representing a wide range of soil types. Treatment with hydrofluoric acid (HF-treatment) was used to concentrate soil organic matter. HF-treatment increased KOC for the majority of soils (average factor 2.4). We attribute this increase to the blocking of organic matter sorption sites in the whole soils by minerals. There was no significant correlation between KOC for the whole soils and KOC for the HF-treated soils, indicating that the importance of organic matter-mineral interactions varied greatly amongst these soils. There was as much variation in KOC across the HF-treated soils as there was across the whole soils, indicating that the nature of soil organic matter is also an important contributor to KOC variability. Organic matter chemistry, determined by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was correlated with KOC for the HF-treated soils. In particular, KOC increased with the aromatic C content (R=0.64, p=1×10(-6)), and decreased with O-alkyl C (R=-0.32, p=0.03) and alkyl C (R=-0.41, p=0.004) content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Interaction of Magnetizations with an External Electromagnetic Field and a Time-Dependent Magnetic Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.; Stepanovskij, Yu.P.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of the magnetization distribution inside the sample affects its interaction with the external electromagnetic field. The strong selectivity to the time dependence of the external electromagnetic field arises for the particular magnetizations. This can be used for the storage and ciphering of information. We propose a time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm-like experiment in which the phase of the wave function is changed by the time-dependent vector magnetic potential. The arising time-dependent interference picture may be viewed as a new channel for the information transfer. 15 refs., 4 figs

  6. Controllable magnetic thermal rectification in a SMM dimmer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-Hua; Liu, Juan; Luo, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Using the quantum master equation, we studied the thermally driven magnonic spin current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) dimer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Due to the asymmetric DMI, one can observe the thermal rectifying effect in the case of the spatial symmetry coupling with the thermal reservoirs. The properties of the thermal rectification can be controlled by tuning the angle and intensity of the magnetic field. Specially, when the DM vector and magnetic field point at the specific angles, the thermal rectifying effect disappears. And this phenomenon does not depend on the intensities of DMI and magnetic field, the temperature bias and the magnetic anisotropies of the SMM.

  7. Envelope detection using temporal magnetization dynamics of resonantly interacting spin-torque oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Osawa, H.; Okamoto, Y.; Kanao, T.; Sato, R.

    2018-05-01

    In this article, we propose the detection method of the recorded data pattern by the envelope of the temporal magnetization dynamics of resonantly interacting spin-torque oscillator on the microwave assisted magnetic recording for three-dimensional magnetic recording. We simulate the envelope of the waveform from recorded dots with the staggered magnetization configuration, which are calculated by using a micromagnetic simulation. We study the data detection methods for the envelope and propose a soft-output Viterbi algorithm (SOVA) for partial response (PR) system as a signal processing system for three dimensional magnetic recording.

  8. Magnetic field manipulation of spin current in a single-molecule magnet tunnel junction with two-electron Coulomb interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Yao, Hui; Nie, Yi-Hang; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Niu, Peng-Bin

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we study the generation of spin-current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) tunnel junction with Coulomb interaction of transport electrons and external magnetic field. In the absence of field the spin-up and -down currents are symmetric with respect to the initial polarizations of molecule. The existence of magnetic field breaks the time-reversal symmetry, which leads to unsymmetrical spin currents of parallel and antiparallel polarizations. Both the amplitude and polarization direction of spin current can be controlled by the applied magnetic field. Particularly when the magnetic field increases to a certain value the spin-current with antiparallel polarization is reversed along with the magnetization reversal of the SMM. The two-electron occupation indeed enhances the transport current compared with the single-electron process. However the increase of Coulomb interaction results in the suppression of spin-current amplitude at the electron-hole symmetry point. We propose a scheme to compensate the suppression with the magnetic field.

  9. Finite element modeling of nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvesters with magnetic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadrashta, Deepesh; Yang, Yaowen

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting from ambient vibrations is a potential technology for powering wireless sensors and low power electronic devices. The conventional linear harvesters suffer from narrow operational bandwidth. Many attempts have been made especially using the magnetic interaction to broaden the bandwidth of harvesters. The finite element (FE) modeling has been used only for analyzing the linear harvesters in the literature. The main difficulties in extending the FE modeling to analyze the nonlinear harvesters involving magnetic interaction are developing the mesh needed for magnetic interaction in dynamic problems and the high demand on computational resource needed for solving the coupled electrical–mechanical–magnetic problem. In this paper, an innovative method is proposed to model the magnetic interaction without inclusion of the magnetic module. The magnetic force is modeled using the nonlinear spring element available in ANSYS finite element analysis (FEA) package, thus simplifying the simulation of nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvesters as an electromechanically coupled problem. Firstly, an FE model of a monostable nonlinear harvester with cantilever configuration is developed and the results are validated with predictions from the theoretical model. Later, the proposed technique of FE modeling is extended to a complex 2-degree of freedom nonlinear energy harvester for which an accurate analytical model is difficult to derive. The performance predictions from FEA are compared with the experimental results. It is concluded that the proposed modeling technique is able to accurately analyze the behavior of nonlinear harvesters with magnetic interaction. (paper)

  10. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-19

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two (88)Sr(+) ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d(-3.0(4)) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  11. Interaction between teachers and teaching materials : on the implementation of context-based chemistry education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Problem definition and research question The research in this dissertation focuses on the implementation of innovative context-based teaching materials in classroom practice by chemistry teachers who are not familiar with context-based education. This implementation is studied with two perspectives:

  12. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  13. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: surface chemistry effects on the cellular uptake of biocompatible block copolymer assemblies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Castro, C. E.; Ribeiro, C. A. S.; Alavarse, A. C.; Albuquerque, L. J. C.; da Silva, M. C. C.; Jäger, Eliezer; Surman, František; Schmidt, V.; Giacomelli, C.; Giacomelli, F. C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2018), s. 2180-2188 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-09998S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : biocompatibility * block copolymers * controlled drug delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.833, year: 2016

  14. Dramatic effect of fluid chemistry on cornstarch suspensions : Linking particle interactions to macroscopic rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyarte Galvez, Loreto; de Beer, Sissi; van der Meer, Devaraj; Pons, Adeline

    2017-01-01

    Suspensions of cornstarch in water exhibit strong dynamic shear-thickening. We show that partly replacing water by ethanol strongly alters the suspension rheology. We perform steady and non-steady rheology measurements combined with atomic force microscopy to investigate the role of fluid chemistry

  15. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy of Spermine-DNA Interactions - Nanostructure and Physical Supramolecular Chemistry of DNA Condensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Langner, M.; Hof, Martin; Adjimatera, N.; Blagbrough, I. S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 98, Supplement (2004), s22-s23 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : fluorescence * nanostructure * DNA condensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.348, year: 2004

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  17. Winds of Massive Magnetic Stars: Interacting Fields and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Yates, S.; Stevens, I. R.

    2018-01-01

    We present results of 3D numerical simulations of magnetically confined, radiatively driven stellar winds of massive stars, conducted using the astrophysical MHD code Pluto, with a focus on understanding the rotational variability of radio and sub-mm emission. Radiative driving is implemented according to the Castor, Abbott and Klein theory of radiatively driven winds. Many magnetic massive stars posses a magnetic axis which is inclined with respect to the rotational axis. This misalignment leads to a complex wind structure as magnetic confinement, centrifugal acceleration and radiative driving act to channel the circumstellar plasma into a warped disk whose observable properties should be apparent in multiple wavelengths. This structure is analysed to calculate free-free thermal radio emission and determine the characteristic intensity maps and radio light curves.

  18. Reversible control of magnetic interactions by electric field in a single-phase material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P J; Kim, J-W; Birol, T; Thompson, P; Lee, J-H; Ke, X; Normile, P S; Karapetrova, E; Schiffer, P; Brown, S D; Fennie, C J; Schlom, D G

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetoelectric coupling describes the interaction between magnetic and electric polarization through an inherent microscopic mechanism in a single-phase material. This phenomenon has the potential to control the magnetic state of a material with an electric field, an enticing prospect for device engineering. Here, we demonstrate 'giant' magnetoelectric cross-field control in a tetravalent titanate film. In bulk form, EuTiO(3), is antiferromagnetic. However, both anti and ferromagnetic interactions coexist between different nearest europium neighbours. In thin epitaxial films, strain was used to alter the relative strength of the magnetic exchange constants. We not only show that moderate biaxial compression precipitates local magnetic competition, but also demonstrate that the application of an electric field at this strain condition switches the magnetic ground state. Using first-principles density functional theory, we resolve the underlying microscopic mechanism resulting in G-type magnetic order and illustrate how it is responsible for the 'giant' magnetoelectric effect.

  19. Dimensional dependence of exchange interactions at high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, U.; Kuhn-Heinrich, B.; Ossau, W.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Cheng, H.H.; Nicholas, R.J. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We studied the contribution of the breaking of the antiferromagnetically coupled spin clusters to the total magnetization in thin (CdMn)Te layers as a function of the layer thickness by reflectivity spectroscopy in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental results show that the contribution of the breaking of antiferromagnetically coupled spin clusters is reduced by decreasing layer thickness. (author) 6 refs, 2 refs

  20. Soliton–antisoliton interaction in a parametrically driven easy-plane magnetic wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urzagasti, D., E-mail: deterlino@yahoo.com [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas, UMSA, P.O. Box 8635, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Aramayo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas, UMSA, P.O. Box 8635, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, 55021 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-11

    In the present work we study the soliton–antisoliton interaction in an anisotropic easy-plane magnetic wire forced by a transverse uniform and oscillatory magnetic field. This system is described in the continuous framework by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. We find numerically that the spatio-temporal magnetization field exhibits both annihilative and repulsive soliton–antisoliton interactions. We also describe this system with the aim of the associated Parametrically Driven and Damped Nonlinear Schrödinger amplitude equation and give an approximate analytical solution that roughly describes the repulsive interaction. - Highlights: • We study the interactions of solitons with opposite polarity with the LLG equation. • We found that there exists both annihilative and repulsive interactions. • Similar results we found for the Parametrically Driven and Damped NLS equation. • We obtain an approximate analytical solution for the repulsive interaction.

  1. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  2. Interaction of counter-streaming plasma flows in dipole magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikhislamov, I F; Posukh, V G; Melekhov, A V; Prokopov, P A; Boyarintsev, E L; Zakharov, Yu P; Ponomarenko, A G

    2017-01-01

    Transient interaction of counter-streaming super-sonic plasma flows in dipole magnetic dipole is studied in laboratory experiment. First quasi-stationary flow is produced by teta-pinch and forms a magnetosphere around the magnetic dipole while laser beams focused at the surface of the dipole cover launch second explosive plasma expanding from inner dipole region outward. Laser plasma is energetic enough to disrupt magnetic field and to sweep through the background plasma for large distances. ...

  3. Separating the effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on the sorption of diuron and phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangar, Ahmad Gholamalizadeh; Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S; Chittleborough, David J

    2008-06-01

    Even though it is well established that soil C content is the primary determinant of the sorption affinity of soils for non-ionic compounds, it is also clear that organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(OC)) vary considerably between soils. Two factors that may contribute to K(OC) variability are variations in organic matter chemistry between soils and interactions between organic matter and soil minerals. Here, we quantify these effects for two non-ionic sorbates-diuron and phenanthrene. The effect of organic matter-mineral interactions were evaluated by comparing K(OC) for demineralized (HF-treated) soils, with K(OC) for the corresponding whole soils. For diuron and phenanthrene, average ratios of K(OC) of the HF-treated soils to K(OC) of the whole soils were 2.5 and 2.3, respectively, indicating a substantial depression of K(OC) due to the presence of minerals in the whole soils. The effect of organic matter chemistry was determined by correlating K(OC) against distributions of C types determined using solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. For diuron, K(OC) was positively correlated with aryl C and negatively correlated with O-alkyl C, for both whole and HF-treated soils, whereas for phenanthrene, these correlations were only present for the HF-treated soils. We suggest that the lack of a clear effect of organic matter chemistry on whole soil K(OC) for phenanthrene is due to an over-riding influence of organic matter-mineral interactions in this case. This hypothesis is supported by a correlation between the increase in K(OC) on HF-treatment and the soil clay content for phenanthrene, but not for diuron.

  4. Changing Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions Impact Stream Chemistry and Ecology at the Arctic-Boreal Transition in Western Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J. C.; Carey, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Sjoberg, Y.; Zimmerman, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The arctic-boreal transition zone of Alaska is experiencing rapid change related to unprecedented warming and subsequent loss of permafrost. These changes in turn may affect groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interactions, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem processes. While recent field and modeling studies have improved our understanding of hydrology in watersheds underlain by thawing permafrost, little is known about how these hydrologic shifts will impact bottom-up controls on stream food webs. To address this uncertainty, we are using an integrative experimental design to link GW-SW interactions to stream biogeochemistry and biota in 10 first-order streams in northwest Alaska. These study streams drain watersheds that span several gradients, including elevation, aspect, and vegetation (tundra vs. forest). We have developed a robust, multi-disciplinary data set to characterize GW-SW interactions and to mechanistically link GW-SW dynamics to water quality and the stream ecosystem. Data includes soil hydrology and chemistry; stream discharge, temperature, and inflow rates; water chemistry (including water isotopes, major ions, carbon concentration and isotopes, nutrients and chlorophyll-a), and invertebrate and fish communities. Stream recession curves indicate a decreasing rate later in the summer in some streams, consistent with seasonal thaw in lower elevation and south-facing catchments. Base cation and water isotope chemistry display similar impacts of seasonal thaw and also suggest the dominance of groundwater in many streams. Coupled with estimates of GW-SW exchange at point, reach, and catchment scales, these results will be used to predict how hydrology and water quality are likely to impact fish habitat and growth given continued warming at the arctic-boreal transition.

  5. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoyu, E-mail: xiaoyu.yang@wdc.com; Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu [Western Digital Corporation, 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ρ, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ρ and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2 nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6 nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  6. Logic of quench protection assembly for BEPC II interaction region superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fusan; Cheng Jian

    2006-01-01

    Two superconducting magnet complexes are used in BEPC II interaction region. The corresponding quench protection system divides all related faults into two classes and takes different protection actions according to the urgency degree. Since BEPC II has two operating modes and the superconducting magnets use different power supplies in different operating modes, the quench protection system must take the mode switching into consideration. (authors)

  7. On the resonant state of magnetization in array of interacting nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P. D.; Orlov, V. A.; Rudenko, R. Yu.; Prokopenko, V. S.; Orlova, I. N.; Kobyakov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Development of the interpretation of the phenomenon of the lift of the magnetic resonance frequencies degeneracy caused by the magnetostatic interaction in assemblies of nanodisks has been done. The difference of the resonance behavior of magnetic vortexes in a round and rectangular nanodots has been studied experimentally and explained.

  8. Spin-glass-like ordering of the magnetic moments of interacting nanosized maghemite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    1995-01-01

    Samples of interacting nanosized maghemite particles have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. The apparent blocking temperatures obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy and zero-field-cooled magnetization curves are nearly identical, but the values obtained from...

  9. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  10. Effects of second neighbor interactions on skyrmion lattices in chiral magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, E A S; Silva, R L; Silva, R C; Pereira, A R

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influences of the second neighbor interactions on a skyrmion lattice in two-dimensional chiral magnets. Such a system contains the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya for the spin interactions and therefore, we analyse three situations: firstly, the second neighbor interaction is present only in the exchange coupling; secondly, it is present only in the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya coupling. Finally, the second neighbor interactions are present in both exchange and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya couplings. We show that such effects cause important modifications to the helical and skyrmion phases when an external magnetic field is applied. (paper)

  11. Magnetic behavior of Van Vleck ions and an electron gas interacting by exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.; Silva, X.A. da.

    1980-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of a model in which Van Vleck ions, under the action of a crystal field, interacting by exchange with an electron gas is investigated. The condition of onset of ferromagnetism and the behavior of the critical temperature, band and ionic magnetizations (and susceptibilities) versus temperature, as a function of the band width, exchange interaction and the crystal field splitting energy parameters are obtained within an approximation equivalent to a molecular field formulation. (Author) [pt

  12. Effect of pb on the magnetic interactions of the M-type hexaferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, A.L., E-mail: azdlobo@gmail.com [Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón No. 64, Col. Centro, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78000, México (Mexico); Mirabal-García, M. [Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón No. 64, Col. Centro, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78000, México (Mexico); Palomares-Sánchez, S.A.; Martínez, J.R. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón No. 64, Col. Centro, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78000, México (Mexico)

    2016-02-01

    This work reports the magnetic interactions of M-type lead hexaferrites. The samples were prepared using the solid state reaction method varying the lead concentration and compensating its lost by thermal treatment in order to obtain pure phases. The structural characterization was made through X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld refinement method. The morphology and grain-growth analysis were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic interactions were studied through isothermal remanence (IRM) and DC demagnetization (DCD) remanence curves and through the construction of Henkel plots. By analyzing deviations from the Stoner–Wohlfarth model for non-interacting particles, it was determined the way in which lead modifies the interaction state in the hexaferrites. The experimental results show that the demagnetizing interactions prevail in systems with high lead content, and as lead concentration diminishes the intensity of magnetic interactions also decreases giving rise to magnetizing interactions - Highlights: • Construction of Henkel Plots of substituted hexaferrites. • Evaluation of magnetostatic and exchange interactions. • Effect of lead substitution on magnetic properties of the hexaferrites.

  13. Interaction of gravitational waves with magnetic and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of large-scale magnetic fields in the universe has led to the observation that if gravitational waves propagating in a cosmological environment encounter even a small magnetic field then electromagnetic radiation is produced. To study this phenomenon in more detail we take it out of the cosmological context and at the same time simplify the gravitational radiation to impulsive waves. Specifically, to illustrate our findings, we describe the following three physical situations: (1) a cylindrical impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a magnetic field, (2) an axially symmetric impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with an electric field and (3) a 'spherical' impulsive gravitational wave propagating into a universe with a small magnetic field. In cases (1) and (3) electromagnetic radiation is produced behind the gravitational wave. In case (2) no electromagnetic radiation appears after the wave unless a current is established behind the wave breaking the Maxwell vacuum. In all three cases the presence of the magnetic or electric fields results in a modification of the amplitude of the incoming gravitational wave which is explicitly calculated using the Einstein-Maxwell vacuum field equations.

  14. Influence of magnetostatic interactions on the magnetization reversal of patterned magnetic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xioalu; Liou, S. H.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Jain, S.; Han Baoshan

    2011-01-01

    The magnetization reversal in patterned thin-film arrays of elliptical submicron permalloy elements has been investigated by magnetic-force microscopy and micro-magneto-optic Kerr effect. Three different spatial arrangements of chains are considered, namely chains aligned parallel to the long axis of the ellipse, chains aligned parallel to the short axis of the ellipse, and arrays with roughly equal element-to-element spacings in both directions. Comparison of the hysteresis loops in an in-plane field perpendicular to the ellipses' long axes shows that the magnetization reversibility is highest for chains along the long axis. This is due to the nearly coherent magnetization rotation in the applied magnetic field and to the formation of a head-to-tail domain arrangement. Other arrangements, such as chains of ellipses aligned parallel to short axis, yield flux-closure domains as the applied magnetic field is changed.

  15. Magnetic properties of magnetic liquids with iron-oxide particles - the influence of anisotropy and interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, C.; Hanson, M.; Pedersen, Michael Stanley

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic liquids containing iron-oxide particles were investigated by magnetization and Mossbauer measurements. The particles were shown to be maghemite with a spontanious saturation magentization Ms = 320 kA m-1 at 200 K and a normalized high-field susceptibility x/M0 = 5.1x10-6 mkA-1, practically...... independent of temperature. Ms increases with decreasing temperature according to an effective Bloch law with an exponent larger than 1.5, as expected for fine magnetic particles. The model of magnetic particles with uniaxial anisotropy and the actual size distribution gives a consistent description...... of independent measurements of the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field and the isothermal magnetization versus field. From this an effective anisotropy constant of about 4.5x10 4 J m-3 is estimated for a particle with diameter 7.5 nm. The magnetic relaxation, as observed in zero...

  16. Dynamic-chemistry-aerosol modelling interaction: the ESCOMPTE 2001 experiment; Modelisation de l'interaction dynamique- chimie - aerosol: campagne ESCOMPTE 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousin, F

    2004-09-01

    After most pollution studies independently devoted to gases and aerosols, there now appears an urgent need to consider their interactions. In this view, an aerosol module has been implemented in the Meso-NH-C model to simulate two IOPs documented during the ESCOMPTE campaign which took place in the Marseille/Fos-Berre region in June-July 2001. First, modelled dynamic parameters (winds, temperatures, boundary layer thickness) and gaseous chemistry have been validated with measurements issued from the exhaustive ESCOMPTE database. Sensitivity analysis have also been performed using different gaseous emission inventories at various resolution. These simulations have illustrated the deep impact of both synoptic and local dynamics on observed ozone concentrations on June 24 (IOP2b) in the ESCOMPTE domain. Afterwards, the ORISAM aerosol module has been introduced into the Meso-NH-C model. Dynamics, gaseous chemistry and aerosol processes have thus been coupled on-line. The particulate pollution episode on June 24 (IOP2b) has been characterised through a satisfactory comparison, specially from sub-micron particles, between modelling and measurements at different representative stations in the domain. This study, with validation of the particulate emission inventory has also highlighted the need for future improvements, such as further characterisation of organic and inorganic aerosol species and consideration of coarse particles. Aerosol impact on gaseous chemistry has been preliminary approached in view of future development and modification to be given to the Meso-NH-C model. (author)

  17. A Web-Based Interactive Homework Quiz and Tutorial Package To Motivate Undergraduate Chemistry Students and Improve Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freasier, Ben; Collins, Grant; Newitt, Paula

    2003-11-01

    This study presents a Web-based interactive homework quiz and tutorial package that we have devised to improve the learning of first-year undergraduate chemistry students. We developed this automated scheme, based on WWWAssign, to produce randomly generated quizzes from a large database of questions, instantaneously grade that homework, give a fully-worked solution, and provide individually targeted tutorial assistance. Success in these quizzes was a necessary requirement before taking supervised tests. We found a positive correlation at the p= 0.1 level (90%) between voluntary extra use of the quizzes in the interactive package and the final course grade. All students undertook more quizzes than the base course requirement even though the quiz grades did not contribute to the total course grades. We suggest that students were motivated to pursue additional practice with the quizzes and associated tutorial information, as they perceived some benefit in this student-centered study tool and could access it at any time.

  18. Creation and Annihilation of Skyrmions in the Frustrated Magnets with Competing Exchange Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Chi, Xiaodan; Li, Xuesi; Liu, Yan; Du, An

    2017-11-22

    In triangular-lattice magnets, the coexistence of third-neighbor antiferromagnetic and nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange interactions can induce rich magnetic phases including noncoplanar skyrmion crystals. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we studied the dependence of magnetic phase transition on exchange interaction strength. Under the consideration of uniaxial anisotropy and magnetic field both perpendicular to the film plane, a large antiferromagnetic exchange interaction induces a high frustration. When the value of antiferromagnetic exchange interaction is one and a half times larger than the ferromagnetic one, a magnetic phase composed of canting spin stripes, never observed in the chiral magnets, forms. Interestingly, different canting spin stripes along three 120 degree propagation directions may coexist randomly in a magnetic phase, attesting that the canting spin stripes are three-fold degenerate states akin to helices and the multiple state of canting spin stripes is a circular configuration with zero skyrmion charge number. Moreover, skyrmions and antiskyrmions can be observed simultaneously in the configuration at the low temperature nearly close to 0 K, and their configuration and diameter properties are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms of skyrmion creation and annihilation are properly interpreted by comparing exchange and Zeeman energy terms.

  19. Crystal field symmetry and magnetic interactions in rare earth-silver amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappa, Catherine.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made of the following rare earth based amorphous alloys: Ndsub(x)Agsub(100-x), Prsub(x)Agsub(100-x), Gdsub(x)Agsub(100-x), Tlsub(x)Agsub(100-x). In rare earth based amorphous alloys, the symmetrical distribution of the crystal field is very wide and hence not very sensitive to the content of the alloys. The existence of preponderant negative magnetic interactions leads to an upset magnetic order, the magnetization of a small volume not being nil. The magnetic behaviour of alloys with a small concentration of rare earths is governed by the existence of clusters of statistical origin, within which a rare earth ion has at least one other rare earth ion in the position of first neighbour. The presence of a high anisotropy at low temperatures make the magnetic interactions between clusters inoperative [fr

  20. Interactions between charged particles in a magnetic field a theoretical approach to lon stopping in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nersisyan, Hrachya; Zwicknagel, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This monograph focusses on the influence of a strong magnetic field on the interactions between charged particles in a many-body system. Two complementary approaches, the binary collision model and the dielectric theory are investigated in both analytical and numerical frameworks. In the binary collision model, the Coulomb interaction between the test and the target particles is screened because of the polarization of the target. In the continuum dielectric theory one considers the interactions between the test particle and its polarization cloud. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, there exists no suitable parameter of smallness. Linearized and perturbative treatments are not more valid and must be replaced by numerical grid or particle methods. Applications include the electron cooling of ion beams in storage rings and the final deceleration of antiprotons and heavy ion beams in traps.

  1. Magnetic-superexchange interactions of uranium(IV) chloride-addition complexes with amides, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Chie; Hinatsu, Yukio; Imoto, Shosuke

    1983-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibilities of five cyclic amide (lactam)-addition complexes of uranium(IV) chloride were measured between room temperature and 2 K. Magnetic-exchange interaction was found only for N-methyl-substituted amide complexes, and a dimer structure was assumed for them on the basis of their chemical properties. Treating interdimer interaction with a molecular-field approximation, the magnetic susceptibilities were calculated to be in good agreement with the experimental results in the temperature region of the maxima in chi sub(A). The transmission of antiparallel spin coupling via the π orbitals of the bridging amide ligands is proposed to explain the strong intradimer superexchange interaction for the uranium(IV) chloride-amide complexes with the magnetic-susceptibility maximum. (author)

  2. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  3. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  4. Searching for resonances in the helicity conversion of neutrinos interacting with rotating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellandi, Jose; Guzzo, Marcelo M.; Hollanda, Pedro C. de

    1997-01-01

    Assuming that neutrino magnetic moment is not null, we study the evolution of neutrinos submitted to rotating magnetic fields, and the way the evolution can convert 'left' helicity neutrinos (actives) into 'right' neutrinos (sterile). We use the fact that the 'right' neutrinos do not interact with the detectors to obtain information on the neutrino magnetic field magnitude. For solving the neutrino evolution equation, the expansion method was combined with steady phase approximation used for the expansion integrals solution. The possibility of 'left' conversion into 'right' neutrinos has been calculated as function of the evolution matrix parameters (neutrino magnetic moment, electron density of the medium, the magnetic field magnitude and phase, etc). We made an attempt to obtain fitting of the parameter conditions in order to occur resonances in the neutrino transition probability, and therefore to obtain information on the limits for neutrino magnetic moments from the controlled beam helicity

  5. Anisotropic Exchange Interaction in the Conical Magnetic Phase of Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1974-01-01

    From a general two ion spin Hamiltonian, an expression is deduced for the energies of spin waves propagating in a hexagonal solid in which the magnetic moments are ordered in a conical or helical structure. The spin wave dispersion relation in the c direction of Er in its conical magnetic phase...... at 4.5K, which has been studied by Nicklow et al (1971) is reanalysed. In this analysis an alternative kind of anisotropic coupling between the total angular moments (Ji and Jj) on the sites i and j is introduced which is proportional to the following combination of Racah operators: O2, -2(Ji), O2, -2......(Jj), expressed with respect to a coordinate system with the z axis along the c direction. The resulting anisotropy (both the constant and the q dependent part) is reduced by an order of magnitude in comparison with that deduced by Nicklow et al (1971). The constant anisotropy is found to be equal...

  6. Ab initio theory of magnetic interactions at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, C; Graaf, C de; Lopez, N; Harrison, N M; Illas, F

    2004-01-01

    The low to high spin energy transition of Ni adsorbed on regular and defective sites of MgO(100) and the relative strengths of bulk and surface magnetic coupling constants of first row transition metal oxides (MnO, FeO, CoO, NiO and CuO) are taken as examples to illustrate some deficiencies of density functional theory (DFT). For these ionic systems a cluster/periodic comparison within the same computational method (either DFT or Hartree-Fock) is used to establish that embedded cluster models provide an adequate representation. The cluster model approach is then used to obtain accurate values for the magnetic properties of interest by using explicitly correlated wavefunction methods which handle the electronic open shell rigorously as spin eigenfunctions

  7. Ab initio theory of magnetic interactions at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, C [Departament de Quimica Fisica i Centre de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Universitat de Barcelona i Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/ MartI i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Graaf, C de [Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, P. Imperial Tarraco 1, E-43005 Tarragona (Spain); Lopez, N [Departament de Quimica Fisica i Centre de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Universitat de Barcelona i Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Harrison, N M [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Illas, F [Departament de Quimica Fisica i Centre de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Universitat de Barcelona i Parc Cientific de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-07-07

    The low to high spin energy transition of Ni adsorbed on regular and defective sites of MgO(100) and the relative strengths of bulk and surface magnetic coupling constants of first row transition metal oxides (MnO, FeO, CoO, NiO and CuO) are taken as examples to illustrate some deficiencies of density functional theory (DFT). For these ionic systems a cluster/periodic comparison within the same computational method (either DFT or Hartree-Fock) is used to establish that embedded cluster models provide an adequate representation. The cluster model approach is then used to obtain accurate values for the magnetic properties of interest by using explicitly correlated wavefunction methods which handle the electronic open shell rigorously as spin eigenfunctions.

  8. Dipolar interaction in arrays of magnetic nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velázquez-Galván, Y; Martínez-Huerta, J M; Encinas, A; De La Torre Medina, J; Danlée, Y; Piraux, L

    2014-01-01

    The dipolar interaction field in arrays of nickel nanotubes has been investigated on the basis of expressions derived from the effective demagnetizing field of the assembly as well as magnetometry measurements. The model incorporates explicitly the wall thickness and aspect ratio, as well as the spatial order of the nanotubes. The model and experiment show that the interaction field in nanotubes is smaller than that in solid nanowires due to the packing fraction reduction in tubes related to their inner cavity. Finally, good agreement between the model and experiment is found for the variation of the interaction field as a function of the tube wall thickness. (paper)

  9. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K., E-mail: kjkumar-gri@rediffmail.com [Nanostructure Lab, Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram-624302 (India); Reuben, Jasper D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering, Saveetha University, Thandalam, Chennai- 600104 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  10. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Reuben, Jasper D.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.

    2015-06-01

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd1-xMnxTe / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  11. Evolution of magnetic properties and exchange interactions in Ru doped YbCrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Biswajit; Sarkar, Babusona; De, S K; Dev Ashok, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic properties of YbCr 1−x Ru x O 3 as a function of temperature and magnetic field have been investigated to explore the intriguing magnetic phenomena in rare-earth orthochromites. A quantitative analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the mixed valence state (Yb 3+  and Yb 2+ ) of Yb ions for the highest doped sample. Field-cooled magnetization reveals a broad peak around 75 K and then becomes zero at about 20–24 K, due to the antiparallel coupling between Cr 3+ and Yb 3+ moments. An increase of the Ru 4+ ion concentration leads to a slight increase of compensation temperature T comp from 20 to 24 K, but the Néel temperature remains constant. A larger value of the magnetic moment of Yb ions gives rise to negative magnetization at low temperature. An external magnetic field significantly modifies the temperature dependent magnetization. Simulation of temperature dependent magnetization data, below T N , based on the three (two) magnetic sub-lattice model predicts stronger intra-sublattice exchange interaction than that of inter-sublattice. Thermal hysteresis and Arrot plots suggest first order magnetic phase transition. Random substitution of Ru 4+ ion reduces the magnetic relaxation time. Weak ferromagnetic component in canted antiferromagnetic system and negative internal magnetic field cause zero-field-cooled exchange bias effect. Large magnetocrystalline anisotropy associated with Ru creates high coercivity in the Ru doped sample. A maximum value of magnetocaloric effect is found around the antiferromagnetic ordering of Yb 3+ ions. Antiferromagnetic transition at about 120 K and temperature induced magnetization reversal lead to normal and inverse magnetocaloric effects in the same material. (paper)

  12. Role of particle masses in the magnetic field generation driven by the parity violating interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim, E-mail: maxdvo@izmiran.ru [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Avenue, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); II. Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 149 Luruper Chaussee, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-10

    Recently the new model for the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in neutron stars, driven by the parity violating interaction, was proposed. In this model, the magnetic field instability results from the modification of the chiral magnetic effect in presence of the electroweak interaction between ultrarelativistic electrons and nucleons. In the present work we study how a nonzero mass of charged particles, which are degenerate relativistic electrons and nonrelativistic protons, influences the generation of the magnetic field in frames of this approach. For this purpose we calculate the induced electric current of these charged particles, electroweakly interacting with background neutrons and an external magnetic field, exactly accounting for the particle mass. This current is calculated by two methods: using the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a charged particle in external fields and computing the polarization operator of a photon in matter composed of background neutrons. We show that the induced current is vanishing in both approaches leading to the zero contribution of massive particles to the generated magnetic field. We discuss the implication of our results for the problem of the magnetic field generation in compact stars.

  13. Nonlinear localized excitations in magnets with a weak exchange interaction as a soliton problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvozdikova, M.V.; Kovalev, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The spin dynamics of soliton-like localized excitations in a discrete ferromagnet chain with an easy axis anisotropy and a weak exchange interaction is studied. The connection of these excitations with longwave magnetic solitons is discussed. The localized excitation frequency dependence on exchange interaction is found for a fixed number of spin deviation. It is shown that this dependence modifies essentially when the exchange interaction becomes comparable with an anisotropy value

  14. Electrochemical analysis of gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting immunological interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Thao Thi-Hien; Sim, Sang Jun

    2010-01-01

    An electrochemical impedance immunosensor was developed for detecting the immunological interaction between human immunoglobulin (IgG) and protein A from Staphylococcus aureus based on the immobilization of human IgG on the surface of modified gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with an Au shell and Fe oxide cores were functionalized by a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. The electrochemical analysis was conducted on the modified magnetic carbon paste electrodes with the nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles were attached to the surface of the magnetic carbon paste electrodes via magnetic force. The cyclic voltammetry technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of the magnetic carbon paste electrodes coated with magnetic nanoparticles-human IgG complex showed changes in its alternating current (AC) response both after the modification of the surface of the electrode and the addition of protein A. The immunological interaction between human IgG on the surface of the modified magnetic carbon paste electrodes and protein A in the solution could be successfully monitored.

  15. Effect of CDW and magnetic interactions on the eg electrons of the manganite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G.C.; Panda, S.; Behera, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    We address a model study which includes the co-existence of the charge density wave (CDW) and ferromagnetic interactions in order to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in manganites. The Hamiltonian consists of the ferromagnetic Hund's rule exchange interaction between e g and t 2g spins, Heisenberg core spin interactions and the CDW interaction present in the e g band electrons. The core electron magnetization, induced e g electron magnetization and the CDW gap are calculated using Zubarev's Green's function technique and determined self-consistently. The effect of core electron magnetization and the CDW interaction on the induced magnetization as well as on the occupation number in the different spin states of the e g band electrons are investigated by varying the model parameters of the system like the CDW coupling, the exchange coupling, the Heisenberg coupling and the external field. It is observed that the induced magnetization exhibits re-entrant behaviour and exists within a narrow temperature range just below the Curie temperature. This unusual behaviour of the e g band electrons will throw some new insights on the physical properties of the manganite systems.

  16. Magnetic impurity in a system of interacting electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh Thanh Duc; Nguyen Toan Thang

    1999-04-01

    The Kondo effect of the Anderson impurity in a correlated conduction electron system is studied within the slave boson mean-field theory. The interacting conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard model with an interaction of strength U. It is shown that the Kondo temperature T K decreases with an increase of U. In the intermediate regime at half-filling the exponential scale of the Kondo temperature T K is lost already at the saddle-point level of slave boson formulation. (author)

  17. A facile way to realize exchange coupling interaction in hard/soft magnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongyun, E-mail: lidongyun@cjlu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wang, Fan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xia, Ailin, E-mail: alxia@126.com [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243032 (China); Zhang, Lijiao [School of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Li, Tingting; Jin, Chuangui; Liu, Xianguo [Anhui Key Laboratory of Metal Materials and Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243032 (China)

    2016-11-01

    SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/Fe–B hard/soft magnetic composites were obtained by using powders synthesized via a hydrothermal and a molten salt method, respectively. The exchange coupling interaction was found to exist in the composites after a facile grinding according to the results of magnetic hysteresis loops and irreversible sloping recoil loops. It can be found that different grinding time affects their magnetic properties slightly. Our study proves that the conditions of realizing exchange coupling interaction may not be so stringent. - Highlights: • SrM/CFO and SrM/Fe–B with exchange coupling were obtained via a grinding way. • Different grinding time affects their magnetic properties slightly. • The conditions of realizing exchange coupling may not be so stringent.

  18. Magnetic fields in the solar system planets, moons and solar wind interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wicht, Johannes; Gilder, Stuart; Holschneider, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    This book addresses and reviews many of the still little understood questions related to the processes underlying planetary magnetic fields and their interaction with the solar wind. With focus on research carried out within the German Priority Program ”PlanetMag”, it also provides an overview of the most recent research in the field. Magnetic fields play an important role in making a planet habitable by protecting the environment from the solar wind. Without the geomagnetic field, for example, life on Earth as we know it would not be possible. And results from recent space missions to Mars and Venus strongly indicate that planetary magnetic fields play a vital role in preventing atmospheric erosion by the solar wind. However, very little is known about the underlying interaction between the solar wind and a planet’s magnetic field. The book takes a synergistic interdisciplinary approach that combines newly developed tools for data acquisition and analysis, computer simulations of planetary interiors an...

  19. Magnetism of singlet - singlet ions interacting with an electron gas: application to PrAl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various magnetic quantities are investigated for a system consisting of singlet-singlet ions interacting with an electron gas. In obtaining the magnetic state equations, the molecular field approximation is used. At T=0, an onset magnetic order condition in function of crystal field and exchange parameters and eletronic density of states at Fermi level is derived. A parametric study of the model is performed numerically. Main results are shown on diagrams. From the experimental data existent in the literature for magnetisation, susceptibility and magnetic specific heat of the PrAl 2 , a fitting with the model predictions is obtained using the following parameters: exchange interaction: 611meV; crystal field parameters: 2,5 meV; band with: 10 eV (of a rectangular density of states with 0,8 el/atom). (author) [pt

  20. Effects of external magnetic field on harmonics generated in laser interaction with underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi-Nik, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.; Shokri, B.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Generation of harmonic radiation is an important subject of laser plasma interaction and attracts great attention due to a wide range of applications. It has been seen that intense electromagnetic and quasi-static transverse magnetic fields are generated in laser plasma interaction. An extremely intense magnetic field (up to hundreds of MG) has been observed by experimental measurements in interaction of short laser pulses with plasma. These self-generated or applied magnetic fields affect the propagation of the laser pulses. In most laser interactions with homogeneous plasma, odd harmonics of laser frequency are generated. In this paper, we point out the possibility of even harmonics generation when a linearly polarized laser beam propagates in homogeneous plasma in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. It is shown that applying external field induces a transverse current density oscillating twice of the laser field which leds to generation of second harmonic radiation. This current density is derived using the perturbation method, and the steady state amplitude of the second harmonic obtained by solution of the wave equation. By the same procedure the current density and then the steady state amplitude of higher order harmonics are calculated. The efficiency of harmonic generation (the ratio of harmonic power to incident power) is a drastically function of the strength of external magnetic field. It is found that the efficiency of even harmonics is zero in the absence of magnetic field and increases as the magnetic field is increased. For odd harmonics, applying the external magnetic field enhances the generated harmonics as well. The conversion efficiency also increases with increase in plasma density and intensity of the laser beam.

  1. Magnetic Exchange Interactions and Estimation of TN in CsNiF3 from first principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legut, Dominik; Rusz, Ján

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2008), s. 503-506 ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG'07. Košice, 09.07.2007-12.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : exchange interactions * magnetism * Heisenberg model * 1D ferromagnet * Neel temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.321, year: 2008

  2. Psi4NumPy: An Interactive Quantum Chemistry Programming Environment for Reference Implementations and Rapid Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel G A; Burns, Lori A; Sirianni, Dominic A; Nascimento, Daniel R; Kumar, Ashutosh; James, Andrew M; Schriber, Jeffrey B; Zhang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Boyi; Abbott, Adam S; Berquist, Eric J; Lechner, Marvin H; Cunha, Leonardo A; Heide, Alexander G; Waldrop, Jonathan M; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Alenaizan, Asem; Neuhauser, Daniel; King, Rollin A; Simmonett, Andrew C; Turney, Justin M; Schaefer, Henry F; Evangelista, Francesco A; DePrince, A Eugene; Crawford, T Daniel; Patkowski, Konrad; Sherrill, C David

    2018-06-11

    Psi4NumPy demonstrates the use of efficient computational kernels from the open-source Psi4 program through the popular NumPy library for linear algebra in Python to facilitate the rapid development of clear, understandable Python computer code for new quantum chemical methods, while maintaining a relatively low execution time. Using these tools, reference implementations have been created for a number of methods, including self-consistent field (SCF), SCF response, many-body perturbation theory, coupled-cluster theory, configuration interaction, and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. Furthermore, several reference codes have been integrated into Jupyter notebooks, allowing background, underlying theory, and formula information to be associated with the implementation. Psi4NumPy tools and associated reference implementations can lower the barrier for future development of quantum chemistry methods. These implementations also demonstrate the power of the hybrid C++/Python programming approach employed by the Psi4 program.

  3. Tidal and magnetic interactions in close binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.G.

    1983-03-01

    The thesis investigates the nature of non-synchronous motions in members of close binary stars under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields existing in these systems, and the evolution of such motions in different classes of binaries. Largely convective stars are considered and a solution is found for the fluid flow associated with the non-synchronous rotation of such a secondary in a close binary system, taking tidal and rotational forces into account. The tidal velocity field is calculated for a low mass white dwarf secondary star in a twin - degenerate binary. It is found that the synchronisation times can be comparable to the lifetime of the binary so that some asynchronism may remain present. (U.K.)

  4. Interaction of the electromagnetic waves and non-magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Aiping; Qiu Xiaoming; Dong Yuying; Li Liqiong

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves with 0.5 - 10 GHz in a non-magnetized collisional plasma slab is studied numerically. The change in the absorbed power, reflected power and transmitted power of the electromagnetic wave with collisional frequency of electrons and neutral atoms in plasma from 0.1 - 10 GHz, is calculated, in the condition of the uniform plasma with density of 10 10 or 10 11 cm -3 and depth of 10 cm, and the non-uniform plasma with density distribution of n = n 0 exp[2(z/d-1)] and depth of 10 cm, respectively. The results show that the absorbed power in either uniform or non-uniform plasma is large when the plasma density is large and collision frequency is high, and the peak value is 90%

  5. Neutron scattering study of magnetic and crystalline electirc field interactions in RCrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamir, N.

    1978-05-01

    Magnetic and crystalline electric field interactions in the compounds RCrO 3 (R-rare earth) , were studied by neutron scattering. Elastic neutron scattering was utilized in the study of the temperature dependence of the Cr 3+ and Ho 3+ magnetic reflections in Lu CrO 3 and HoCrO 3 , respectively. Analysis of this temperature dependence yielde constant canting angles for the Cr 3+ and Ho 3+ magnetic moments. Molecular magnetic field constants and crystalline electric field splitting were also calculated from the temperature dependence of the Ho 3+ magnetic reflection. These parameters were obtained directly by inelastic neutron scattering measurement. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements of crystlline electric field transitions of R 3+ (R=Pr, Nd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) in RCrO 3 , formed the basis for the calculation of the common crystalline electirc field parameters of the heavy R 3+ ions. (author)

  6. AC susceptibility as a tool to probe the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, Gabriel T., E-mail: gtlandi@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Arantes, Fabiana R. [Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André (Brazil); Cornejo, Daniel R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bakuzis, Andris F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74690-900 Goiânia-GO (Brazil); Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    The dipolar interaction is known to substantially affect the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. This is particularly important when the particles are kept in a fluid suspension or packed within nano-carriers. In addition to its usual long-range nature, in these cases the dipolar interaction may also induce the formation of clusters of particles, thereby strongly modifying their magnetic anisotropies. In this paper we show how AC susceptibility may be used to obtain information regarding the influence of the dipolar interaction in a sample. We develop a model which includes both aspects of the dipolar interaction and may be fitted directly to the susceptibility data. The usual long-range nature of the interaction is implemented using a mean-field approximation, whereas the particle-particle aggregation is modeled using a distribution of anisotropy constants. The model is then applied to two samples studied at different concentrations. One consists of spherical magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in oil and the other of cubic magnetite nanoparticles embedded on polymeric nanospheres. We also introduce a simple technique to address the presence of the dipolar interaction in a given sample, based on the height of the AC susceptibility peaks for different driving frequencies. - Highlights: We discuss the importance of the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticle samples. It is shown that AC susceptibility may be used to estimate the extent of this interaction. We develop a model that accounts for particle aggregation. The theoretical model is then fitted to distinct magnetite samples.

  7. Aspects of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction in Two Dimensional Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Anirban

    Research on topologically protected chiral magnetic structures such as magnetic domain walls (DWs) and skyrmions, have gained extensive interest because of their possible applications in magnetic data storage industries. The recently observed chiral DW structures in ultrathin ferromagnetic lms with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been attributed to the presence of a strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). In this thesis, the DMI mediated by the conduction electrons in two dimensional magnetic systems such as magnetic thin lms or at the interfaces between two magnetic materials has been studied. I calculate the Ruderman-Kittel- Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type indirect exchange coupling between two magnetic moments at nite temperature using the free electron band. At high temperature, the coupling strength decays with distance faster than the coupling at zero temperature but the period of oscillation remains same. However, the free electron band alone could not produce DMI. In the next step, I show addition of Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) with the spin-polarized conduction electron band produces the DMI between two magnetic ions. The essential feature of this DMI is: the coupling strength increases with the strength of RSOC, but decreases signi cantly with the Heisenberg exchange coupling. The DMI calculated with this model well explains the possibility of preferred Neel or Bloch DW structures with specifc chirality. In addition: I study switching of magnetization with ultrafast laser pulse by inverse Faraday e ect (IFE) where an optically induced non-equilibrium orbital momentum generates an e ective magnetic eld via spin-orbit coupling for magnetization switching. I calculate the magnitude of induced orbital moment for the generic itinerant band and show that magnitude is not large enough to make the switching by a single pulse, however, switching could be possible if multiple pulses are applied to the material.

  8. Interaction between propulsion and levitation system in the HTSC-permanent magnet conveyance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, S.; Nishio, R.; Hashikawa, T.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetically levitated conveyance system has been developed. Pinning force of high temperature bulk superconductors (HTSC) are used for the levitation and the guidance of the carrier. The magnetic rail is set on the ground, and flux from the magnetic rail is pinned by HTSCs on the carrier body. To increase the load weight, the repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced. The hybrid levitation system is composed. The repulsive force by the permanent magnet between the load stage on the carrier and the magnetic rail on the ground is used to support the load weight. As the load stage is connected to the carrier body by the linear sliders, the mass of the load weight does not act on the carrier body. The interaction between the electromagnet and the permanent magnet under the load stage generates the propulsion force. The electromagnet is constructed by the air core coils, and excited only when the load stage passes. The interaction between the propulsion and the levitation system is investigated. Disturbance of the propulsion system on the levitation and the guidance force is measured. The results show the influence of the propulsion electromagnet on the pinning force is little, and this propulsion system works effectively.

  9. Interaction between propulsion and levitation system in the HTSC-permanent magnet conveyance system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, S., E-mail: ohashi@ipcku.kanasi-u.ac.j [Kansai University 3-3-35, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Nishio, R.; Hashikawa, T. [Kansai University 3-3-35, Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    The magnetically levitated conveyance system has been developed. Pinning force of high temperature bulk superconductors (HTSC) are used for the levitation and the guidance of the carrier. The magnetic rail is set on the ground, and flux from the magnetic rail is pinned by HTSCs on the carrier body. To increase the load weight, the repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced. The hybrid levitation system is composed. The repulsive force by the permanent magnet between the load stage on the carrier and the magnetic rail on the ground is used to support the load weight. As the load stage is connected to the carrier body by the linear sliders, the mass of the load weight does not act on the carrier body. The interaction between the electromagnet and the permanent magnet under the load stage generates the propulsion force. The electromagnet is constructed by the air core coils, and excited only when the load stage passes. The interaction between the propulsion and the levitation system is investigated. Disturbance of the propulsion system on the levitation and the guidance force is measured. The results show the influence of the propulsion electromagnet on the pinning force is little, and this propulsion system works effectively.

  10. Probing the mechanical properties, conformational changes, and interactions of nucleic acids with magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are central to the storage and transmission of genetic information. Mechanical properties, along with their sequence, both enable and fundamentally constrain the biological functions of DNA and RNA. For small deformations from the equilibrium conformations, nucleic acids are well described by an isotropic elastic rod model. However, external forces and torsional strains can induce conformational changes, giving rise to a complex force-torque phase diagram. This review focuses on magnetic tweezers as a powerful tool to precisely determine both the elastic parameters and conformational transitions of nucleic acids under external forces and torques at the single-molecule level. We review several variations of magnetic tweezers, in particular conventional magnetic tweezers, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, and discuss their characteristic capabilities. We then describe the elastic rod model for DNA and RNA and discuss conformational changes induced by mechanical stress. The focus lies on the responses to torque and twist, which are crucial in the mechanics and interactions of nucleic acids and can directly be measured using magnetic tweezers. We conclude by highlighting several recent studies of nucleic acid-protein and nucleic acid-small-molecule interactions as further applications of magnetic tweezers and give an outlook of some exciting developments to come. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Field driven magnetic racetrack memory accompanied with the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June-Seo; Lee, Hyeon-Jun; Hong, Jung-Il; You, Chun-Yeol

    2018-06-01

    The in-plane magnetic field pulse driven domain wall motion on a perpendicularly magnetized nanowire is numerically investigated by performing micromagnetic simulations and magnetic domain wall dynamics are evaluated analytically with one-dimensional collective coordinate models including the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. With the action of the precession torque, the chirality and the magnetic field direction dependent displacements of the magnetic domain walls are clearly observed. In order to move Bloch type and Neel type domain walls, a longitudinal and a transverse in-plane magnetic field pulse are required, respectively. The domain wall type (Bloch or Neel) can easily be determined by the dynamic motion of the domain walls under the applied pulse fields. By applying a temporally asymmetric in-plane field pulse and successive notches in the perpendicularly magnetized nanowire strip line with a proper interval, the concept of racetrack memory based on the synchronous displacements of the chirality dependent multiple domain walls is verified to be feasible. Requirement of multiple domain walls with homogeneous chirality is achieved with the help of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

  12. Role of Magnetic Exchange Interactions in the Magnetization Relaxation of {3d-4f} Single-Molecule Magnets: A Theoretical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Beg, Mohammad Faizan; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-11

    Combined density functional and ab initio calculations are performed on two isomorphous tetranuclear {Ni3 (III) Ln(III) } star-type complexes [Ln=Gd (1), Dy (2)] to shed light on the mechanism of magnetic exchange in 1 and the origin of the slow magnetization relaxation in complex 2. DFT calculations correctly reproduce the sign and magnitude of the J values compared to the experiments for complex 1. Acute ∢Ni-O-Gd bond angles present in 1 instigate a significant interaction between the 4fxyz orbital of the Gd(III) ion and 3d${{_{x{^{2}}- y{^{2}}}}}$ orbital of the Ni(II) ions, leading to rare and strong antiferromagnetic Ni⋅⋅⋅Gd interactions. Calculations reveal the presence of a strong next-nearest-neighbour Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni antiferromagnetic interaction in complex 1 leading to spin frustration behavior. CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations performed on complex 2 suggest that the octahedral environment around the Dy(III) ion is neither strong enough to stabilize the mJ |±15/2〉 as the ground state nor able to achieve a large ground-state-first-excited-state gap. The ground-state Kramers doublet for the Dy(III) ion is found to be the mJ |±13/2〉 state with a significant transverse anisotropy, leading to very strong quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). Using the POLY_ANISO program, we have extracted the JNiDy interaction as -1.45 cm(-1) . The strong Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and next-nearest-neighbour Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions are found to quench the QTM to a certain extent, resulting in zero-field SMM behavior for complex 2. The absence of any ac signals at zero field for the structurally similar [Dy(AlMe4 )3 ] highlights the importance of both the Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and the Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions in the magnetization relaxation of complex 2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the roles of both the Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions in magnetization relaxation of a {3d-4f} molecular magnet have been established. © 2016

  13. Interactions of Native Cyclodextrins with Metal Ions and Inorganic Nanoparticles: Fertile Landscape for Chemistry and Materials Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochowicz, Daniel; Kornowicz, Arkadiusz; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-11-22

    Readily available cyclodextrins (CDs) with an inherent hydrophobic internal cavity and hydrophilic external surface are macrocyclic entities that display a combination of molecular recognition and complexation properties with vital implications for host-guest supramolecular chemistry. While the host-guest chemistry of CDs has been widely recognized and led to their exploitation in a variety of important functions over the last five decades, these naturally occurring macrocyclic systems have emerged only recently as promising macrocyclic molecules to fabricate environmentally benign functional nanomaterials. This review surveys the development in the field paying special attention to the synthesis and emerging uses of various unmodified CD-metal complexes and CD-inorganic nanoparticle systems and identifies possible future directions. The association of a hydrophobic cavity of CDs with metal ions or various inorganic nanoparticles is a very appealing strategy for controlling the inorganic subunits properties in the very competitive water environment. In this review we provide the most prominent examples of unmodified CDs' inclusion complexes with organometallic guests and update the research in this field from the past decade. We discuss also the coordination flexibility of native CDs to metal ions in CD-based metal complexes and summarize the progress in the synthesis and characterization of CD-metal complexes and their use in catalysis and sensing as well as construction of molecular magnets. Then we provide a comprehensive overview of emerging applications of native CDs in materials science and nanotechnology. Remarkably, in the past few years CDs have appeared as attractive building units for the synthesis of carbohydrate metal-organic frameworks (CD-MOFs) in a combination of alkali-metal cations. The preparation of this new class of highly porous materials and their applications in the separation of small molecules, the loading of drug molecules, as well as

  14. Multivalent Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions: How Synthetic Chemistry Enables Insights into Nanometric Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Roy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycan recognition by sugar receptors (lectins is intimately involved in many aspects of cell physiology. However, the factors explaining the exquisite selectivity of their functional pairing are not yet fully understood. Studies toward this aim will also help appraise the potential for lectin-directed drug design. With the network of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins as therapeutic targets, the strategy to recruit synthetic chemistry to systematically elucidate structure-activity relationships is outlined, from monovalent compounds to glyco-clusters and glycodendrimers to biomimetic surfaces. The versatility of the synthetic procedures enables to take examining structural and spatial parameters, alone and in combination, to its limits, for example with the aim to produce inhibitors for distinct galectin(s that exhibit minimal reactivity to other members of this group. Shaping spatial architectures similar to glycoconjugate aggregates, microdomains or vesicles provides attractive tools to disclose the often still hidden significance of nanometric aspects of the different modes of lectin design (sequence divergence at the lectin site, differences of spatial type of lectin-site presentation. Of note, testing the effectors alone or in combination simulating (pathophysiological conditions, is sure to bring about new insights into the cooperation between lectins and the regulation of their activity.

  15. Electron-electron interactions in graphene field-induced quantum dots in a high magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlof, A.; Shylau, Artsem; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of electron-electron interaction in graphene quantum dots defined by an external electrostatic potential and a high magnetic field. To account for the electron-electron interaction, we use the Thomas-Fermi approximation and find that electron screening causes the formation...... of compressible strips in the potential profile and the electron density. We numerically solve the Dirac equations describing the electron dynamics in quantum dots, and we demonstrate that compressible strips lead to the appearance of plateaus in the electron energies as a function of the magnetic field. Finally...

  16. Structural and magnetic studies on copper succinate dihydrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P BINITHA

    2017-08-21

    Aug 21, 2017 ... rials chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, gas storage, polymer magnets, etc. ... super exchange interactions among copper atoms through bridging .... Thus, these two water molecules in the structure of copper succinate are.

  17. Impacts of Interactive Stratospheric Chemistry on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Climate Change in the Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Vikhliaev, Yury V.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Perlwitz, Judith; Waugh, Darryn W.; Douglass, Anne R.

    2016-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion plays a major role in driving climate change in the Southern Hemisphere. To date, many climate models prescribe the stratospheric ozone layer's evolution using monthly and zonally averaged ozone fields. However, the prescribed ozone underestimates Antarctic ozone depletion and lacks zonal asymmetries. In this study we investigate the impact of using interactive stratospheric chemistry instead of prescribed ozone on climate change simulations of the Antarctic and Southern Ocean. Two sets of 1960-2010 ensemble transient simulations are conducted with the coupled ocean version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5: one with interactive stratospheric chemistry and the other with prescribed ozone derived from the same interactive simulations. The model's climatology is evaluated using observations and reanalysis. Comparison of the 1979-2010 climate trends between these two simulations reveals that interactive chemistry has important effects on climate change not only in the Antarctic stratosphere, troposphere, and surface, but also in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice. Interactive chemistry causes stronger Antarctic lower stratosphere cooling and circumpolar westerly acceleration during November-December-January. It enhances stratosphere-troposphere coupling and leads to significantly larger tropospheric and surface westerly changes. The significantly stronger surface wind stress trends cause larger increases of the Southern Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation, leading to year-round stronger ocean warming near the surface and enhanced Antarctic sea ice decrease.

  18. Interaction between granulation and small-scale magnetic flux observed by Hinode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong; Jin Chunlan

    2009-01-01

    With the polarimetric observations obtained by the Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode, we study the relationship between granular development and magnetic field evolution in the quiet Sun. Six typical cases are displayed to exhibit interaction between granules and magnetic elements, and we have obtained the following results. (1) A granule develops centrosymmetrically when no magnetic flux emerges within the granular cell. (2) A granule develops and splits noncentrosymmetrically while flux emerges at an outer part of the granular cell. (3) Magnetic flux emergence in a cluster of mixed polarities is detected at the position of a granule as soon as the granule breaks up. (4) A dipole emerges accompanied by the development of a granule, and the two elements of the dipole are rooted in the adjacent intergranular lanes and face each other across the granule. Advected by the horizontal granular motion, the positive element of the dipole then cancels with the pre-existing negative flux. (5) Flux cancellation also takes place between a positive element, which is advected by granular flow, and its surrounding negative flux. (6) While magnetic flux cancellation takes place in a granular cell, the granule shrinks and then disappears. (7) Horizontal magnetic fields are enhanced at the places where dipoles emerge and where opposite polarities cancel each other, but only the horizontal fields between the dipolar elements point in an orderly way from the positive elements to the negative ones. Our results reveal that granules and small-scale magnetic fluxes influence each other. Granular flow advects magnetic flux, and magnetic flux evolution suppresses granular development. There exist extremely large Doppler blue-shifts at the site of one canceling magnetic element. This phenomenon may be caused by the upward flow produced by magnetic reconnection below the photosphere. (research papers)

  19. Interaction of aromatic amines with iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Singh, Gurinder; Kamaluddin

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of aromatic amines (aniline, p-chloroaniline, p-toludine and p-anisidine) with iron oxides (goethite, akaganeite and hematite) has been studied. Maximum uptake of amines was observed around pH 7. The adsorption data obtained at neutral pH were found to follow Langmuir adsorption. Anisidine was found to be a better adsorbate probably due to its higher basicity. In alkaline medium (pH > 8), amines reacted on goethite and akaganeite to give colored products. Analysis of the products by GC-MS showed benzoquinone and azobenzene as the reaction products of aniline while p-anisidine afforded a dimer. IR analysis of the amine-iron oxide hydroxide adduct suggests that the surface acidity of iron oxide hydroxides is responsible for the interaction. The present study suggests that iron oxide hydroxides might have played a role in the stabilization of organic molecules through their surface activity and in prebiotic condensation reactions.

  20. Surface Chemistry Interactions of Cationorm with Films by Human Meibum and Tear Film Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi As. Georgiev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationorm® (CN cationic nanoemulsion was demonstrated to enhance tear film (TF stability in vivo possibly via effects on tear film lipid layer (TFLL. Therefore the interactions of CN with human meibum (MGS and TFLL in vitro and in vivo deserve special study. MGS and CN were spread at the air/water interface of a Langmuir surface balance to ensure a range of MGS/CN oil phase ratios: 20/1, 10/1, 5/1, 3/1, 2/1 and 1/1. The films capability to reorganize during dynamic area changes was evaluated via the surface pressure-area compression isotherms and step/relaxation dilatational rheology studies. Films structure was monitored with Brewster angle microscopy. CN/TFLL interactions at the ocular surface were monitored with non-contact specular microscopy. The in vitro studies of MGS/CN layers showed that (i CN inclusion (at fixed MGS content increased film elasticity and thickness and that (ii CN can compensate for moderate meibum deficiency in MGS/CN films. In vivo CN mixed with TFLL in a manner similar to CN/MGS interactions in vitro, and resulted in enhanced thickness of TFLL. In vitro and in vivo data complement each other and facilitated the study of the composition-structure-function relationship that determines the impact of cationic nanoemulsions on TF.

  1. Laboratory experiments on the magnetic field and neutral density limits on CIV interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported which determine the magnetic field and neutral density limit for Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) interaction in the impact configuration. A combination of microwave interferometry and spectroscopy has been used to measure how the electron energy distribution varies with the neutral density and the magnetic field strength. The efficiency of the CIV process is evaluated in terms of the efficiency factor η of energy transfer to the electron. This efficiency is studied as function of the ratio V A /V 0 between the Alfven velocity and the plasma stream velocity and the ratio ν i /ω gi between the ionization frequency and the ion gyro frequency. With other parameters kept constant, V A /V 0 is proportional to the square root of the magnetic field, while ν i /ω gi is proportional to the neutral density. We have found that these two dimensionless parameters are coupled in such a fashion that a stronger magnetic field can compensate for a lower neutral density. For our strongest magnetic field, corresponding to V A /V 0 = 4, CIV interaction is found to occur for a comparatively low value ν i /ω gi ∼ 0.1. For V A /V 0 = 1, we found a clear absence of CIV interaction even for ν i /ω gi approaching unity. (authors)

  2. Dependence of magnetization on crystal fields and exchange interactions in magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouaissa, Mohamed, E-mail: m.ouaissa@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Génie Physique et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofail, Campus Universitaire BP 133, Kénitra 14000 (Morocco); Benyoussef, Abdelilah [Laboratory of Magnetism and Physics of High Energy, Faculty of Science, Mohammed V-Agdal University, Rabat (Morocco); Abo, Gavin S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and MINT Center, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Ouaissa, Samia; Hafid, Mustapha [Laboratoire de Génie Physique et Environnement, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofail, Campus Universitaire BP 133, Kénitra 14000 (Morocco); Belaiche, Mohammed [Laboratoire de Magnétisme, Matériaux Magnétiques, Microonde et Céramique, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, B.P. 9235, Océan, Rabat (Morocco)

    2015-11-15

    In this work, we study the magnetization of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with different exchange interactions and crystal fields using variational method based on the Bogoliubov inequality for the Gibbs free energy within the mean field theory. The magnetic behavior was investigated in the absence and presence of crystal fields. The investigations also revealed that the transition temperature depends on the crystal fields of the octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Magnetite exhibits ferrimagnetic phase with second order transition to paramagnetic phase at 850 K. This result is confirmed using the mean field theory within the Heisenberg model. Important factors that can affect the magnetic behavior of the system are exchange interactions and crystal field. Indeed, a new magnetic behavior was observed depending on these parameters. A first order phase transition from ferrimagnetic to ferromagnetic was found at low temperature, and a second order transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic was observed at high temperature. - Highlights: • Magnetization of magnetite versus temperature was studied by mean field theory. • The critical temperature of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was approximately obtained. • Effect of sublattice crystal fields on the magnetization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated.

  3. Plasma behavior and plasma-wall interaction in magnetic fusion divices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Hideo

    1984-10-01

    To study the fundamental behavior of plasma in magnetic field is the main subject in the early stage of the magnetic fusion research. At the next stage, it is necessary to overcome some actual problems in order to attain reactor grade plasmas. One of them is to control impurities in the plasma. In these points of view, we carried out several experiments or theoretical analyses. Firstly, anomalous loss mechanisms in magnetic field were investigated in a toroidal multipole device JFT-1 and the role of motions of charged particles in the magnetic field was exhibited. Various measurements of plasma in the scrape-off layer were made in a divertor tokamak JFT-2a and in an ordinary tokamak JFT-2. The former study demonstrated the first successful divertor operation of the tokamak device and the latter one clarified the mechanism of arcing on the tokamak first wall. As to arcing, a new theory which describes the retrograde motion, the well known strange motion of arcs in a magnetic field, was proposed. Good agreement with the experimental results was shown. Finally, by considering a zero-dimensional sputtering model a self-consistent relation between light and metal impurities in tokamak plasmas was obtained. It was shown that the relation well describes some fundamental aspects of the plasma-wall interaction. As a conclusion, the importance of simple behavior of charged particles in magnetic fields was pointed out not only for the plasma confinement but also for the plasma-wall interaction. (author)

  4. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C; Kremer, H [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P; Hupa, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1998-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  5. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  6. Interaction of poly-L-lysine coating and heparan sulfate proteoglycan on magnetic nanoparticle uptake by tumor cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siow, W. X.; Chang, Y.-T.; Babič, Michal; Lu, Y.-C.; Horák, Daniel; Ma, Y.-H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, 20 March (2018), s. 1693-1706 E-ISSN 1178-2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC16-01128J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * poly-L-lysine * tea catechin Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  7. Evaluating the Impact of the "Teaching as a Chemistry Laboratory Graduate Teaching Assistant" Program on Cognitive and Psychomotor Verbal Interactions in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, A.; O'Dwyer, A.; Mannix-McNamara, P.; Leahy, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    Designing and evaluating teacher development programs for graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) who teach in the laboratory is a prominent feature of chemistry education research. However, few studies have investigated the impact of a GTA teacher development program on the verbal interactions between participating GTAs and students in the…

  8. Increasing High School Students' Chemistry Performance and Reducing Cognitive Load through an Instructional Strategy Based on the Interaction of Multiple Levels of Knowledge Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic´, Dus?ica D.; Segedinac, Mirjana D.; Hrin, Tamara N.

    2014-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to examine the extent to which a teaching approach focused on the interaction between macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic levels of chemistry representations could affect high school students' performance in the field of inorganic reactions, as well as to examine how the applied instruction influences…

  9. Nature of magnetization and lateral spin–orbit interaction in gated semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, H.; Yakimenko, I. I.; Berggren, K.-F.

    2018-05-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are interesting candidates for realization of spintronics devices. In this paper we study electronic states and effects of lateral spin–orbit coupling (LSOC) in a one-dimensional asymmetrically biased nanowire using the Hartree–Fock method with Dirac interaction. We have shown that spin polarization can be triggered by LSOC at finite source-drain bias,as a result of numerical noise representing a random magnetic field due to wiring or a random background magnetic field by Earth magnetic field, for instance. The electrons spontaneously arrange into spin rows in the wire due to electron interactions leading to a finite spin polarization. The direction of polarization is, however, random at zero source-drain bias. We have found that LSOC has an effect on orientation of spin rows only in the case when source-drain bias is applied.

  10. Magnetization reversal through soliton flip in biquadratic ferromagnet with varying exchange interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, M

    2002-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of magnetization reversal in the form of a soliton flip in a biquadratic ferromagnetic spin chain induced by varying bilinear and biquadratic exchange interactions. This is carried out by analysing the evolution of the velocity and amplitude of the soliton using a perturbation analysis.

  11. Nonlinear interaction of s-polarized surface waves at the boundary of a semibounded magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amein, W.H.; El-Siragy, N.M.; Nagy, O.Z.; Sayed, Y.A.

    1981-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction of S-Polarized surface waves at the boundary of a semibounded magnetized plasma is investigated. The expressions of the amplitudes of the generated waves are found. It is shown that, the generated waves with combined frequencies are equally radiated from the transient layer into plasma and vacuum

  12. Lie symmetries for the electric charge-magnetic monopole interaction problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, I.C.; Ritter, O.M.; Santos, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    The symmetries of the equation of motion for an electric charge interacting with a magnetic monopole are analyzed. Two methods, starting from the knowledge of the Lie symmetries, are discussed and employed in this case. This procedure is also compared with the hamiltonians methods. (ltonians methods. (Author) [pt

  13. The electro-magnetic transition properties in the microscopic SDG interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Guangze; Liu Yong; Sang Jianping

    1996-01-01

    A bosonic method and the corresponding fermionic one for studying the electro-magnetic transition properties of nucleus are presented in the microscopic sdg interacting boson model. The methods are applied to the nucleus 60 Ni. Detailed discussions are made with the calculated results

  14. Magnetic Interactions and the Method of Images: A Wealth of Educational Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, A.; Camarca, M.; Sapia, P.

    2011-01-01

    Under some conditions, the method of images (well known in electrostatics) may be implemented in magnetostatic problems too, giving an excellent example of the usefulness of formal analogies in the description of physical systems. In this paper, we develop a quantitative model for the magnetic interactions underlying the so-called Geomag[TM]…

  15. Interaction of transcranial magnetic stimulation and electrical transmastoid stimulation in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Janet L; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Butler, Jane E

    2002-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation activates corticospinal neurones directly and transsynaptically and hence, activates motoneurones and results in a response in the muscle. Transmastoid stimulation results in a similar muscle response through activation of axons in the spinal cord. This study...... was designed to determine whether the two stimuli activate the same descending axons. Responses to transcranial magnetic stimuli paired with electrical transmastoid stimuli were examined in biceps brachii in human subjects. Twelve interstimulus intervals (ISIs) from -6 ms (magnet before transmastoid) to 5 ms......-wave, facilitation still occurred at ISIs of -6 and -5 ms and depression of the paired response at ISIs of 0, 1, 4 and 5 ms. The interaction of the response to transmastoid stimulation with the multiple descending volleys elicited by magnetic stimulation of the cortex is complex. However, depression of the response...

  16. The exchange interaction effects on magnetic properties of the nanostructured CoPt particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komogortsev, S. V.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Filatov, E. Yu.; Korenev, S. V.; Shubin, Yu. V.; Chizhik, N. A.; Yurkin, G. Yu.; Eremin, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    Various manifestations of the exchange interaction effects in magnetization curves of the CoPt nanostructured particles are demonstrated and discussed. The inter-grain exchange constant A in the sponge-like agglomerates of crystallites is estimated as A=(7±1) pJ/m from the approach magnetization to saturation curves that is in good agreement with A=(6.6±0.5) pJ/m obtained from Bloch T 3/2 law. The fractal dimensionality of the exchange coupled crystallite system in the porous media of the disordered CoPt alloy d=(2.60±0.18) was estimated from the approach magnetization to saturation curve. Coercive force decreases with temperature as Hc T 3/2 which is assumed to be a consequence of the magnetic anisotropy energy reduction due to the thermal spin wave excitations in the investigated CoPt particles.

  17. Chiral magnetic effect in the presence of electroweak interactions as a quasiclassical phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2018-03-01

    We elaborate the quasiclassical approach to obtain the modified chiral magnetic effect (CME) in the case when the massless charged fermions interact with electromagnetic fields and the background matter by the electroweak forces. The derivation of the anomalous current along the external magnetic field involves the study of the energy density evolution of chiral particles in parallel electric and magnetic fields. We consider both the particle acceleration by the external electric field and the contribution of the Adler anomaly. The condition of the validity of this method for the derivation of the CME is formulated. We obtain the expression for the electric current along the external magnetic field, which appears to coincide with our previous results based on the purely quantum approach. Our results are compared with the findings of other authors.

  18. Applications, dosimetry and biological interactions of static and time-varying magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1988-08-01

    The primary topics of this presentation include: (1) the applications of magnetic fields in research, industry, and medical technologies; (2) mechanisms of interaction of static and time-varying magnetic fields with living systems; (3) human health effects of exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields in occupational, medical, and residential settings; and (4) recent advances in the dosimetry of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields. The discussion of these topics is centered about two issues of considerable contemporary interest: (1) potential health effects of the fields used in magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy, and (2) the controversial issue of whether exposure to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields in the home and workplace leads to an elevated risk of cancer. 11 refs

  19. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  20. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  1. Fake Magnets, Real Physics: Using touch tables with fiducials to create interactive experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J. B.; Dusenbery, P.

    2011-12-01

    The National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute has been producing space weather related activities for both museums and online for over a decade (see, for instance, www.spaceweathercenter.org). Recently we have begun exploring the possibilities of augmented reality as a mechanism for letting visitors explore magnetic fields, charged particle motion, and related space weather topics. Using a Microsoft Surface touch table, NCIL@SSI has developed several activities that incorporate magnet "fiducials"... objects shaped like recognizable magnets (bar, horseshoe, etc.) that when placed on the table are recognized by the computer. In this way visitors can place a magnet, then see the associated magnetic field drawn out on the table. And given a magnet (which could be the Earth) and a field, they can touch the screen to launch charged particles in to the field. We believe that this combination of physical objects and simulated physics provides a compelling new opportunity for topics such as space weather, where the necessary prior knowledge (e.g., the behavior of magnetic fields and charged particles) are not well understood, or even easily accessible, for the average visitor. We will be reporting both on the software and educational strategies reflected in it, as well as testing which is being performed at the NCAR visitor center in Boulder Colorado and the Hatfield Visitor Center in Oregon by NCIL's Director of Learning Research and Evaluation. This work is funded by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Oxygen-enabled control of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction in ultra-thin magnetic films

    KAUST Repository

    Belabbes, Abderrezak

    2016-04-22

    The search for chiral magnetic textures in systems lacking spatial inversion symmetry has attracted a massive amount of interest in the recent years with the real space observation of novel exotic magnetic phases such as skyrmions lattices, but also domain walls and spin spirals with a defined chirality. The electrical control of these textures offers thrilling perspectives in terms of fast and robust ultrahigh density data manipulation. A powerful ingredient commonly used to stabilize chiral magnetic states is the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) arising from spin-orbit coupling in inversion asymmetric magnets. Such a large antisymmetric exchange has been obtained at interfaces between heavy metals and transition metal ferromagnets, resulting in spin spirals and nanoskyrmion lattices. Here, using relativistic first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that the magnitude and sign of DMI can be entirely controlled by tuning the oxygen coverage of the magnetic film, therefore enabling the smart design of chiral magnetism in ultra-thin films. We anticipate that these results extend to other electronegative ions and suggest the possibility of electrical tuning of exotic magnetic phases.

  3. Uranium chemistry: significant advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, M.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews recent progress in uranium chemistry achieved in CEA laboratories. Like its neighbors in the Mendeleev chart uranium undergoes hydrolysis, oxidation and disproportionation reactions which make the chemistry of these species in water highly complex. The study of the chemistry of uranium in an anhydrous medium has led to correlate the structural and electronic differences observed in the interaction of uranium(III) and the lanthanides(III) with nitrogen or sulfur molecules and the effectiveness of these molecules in An(III)/Ln(III) separation via liquid-liquid extraction. Recent work on the redox reactivity of trivalent uranium U(III) in an organic medium with molecules such as water or an azide ion (N 3 - ) in stoichiometric quantities, led to extremely interesting uranium aggregates particular those involved in actinide migration in the environment or in aggregation problems in the fuel processing cycle. Another significant advance was the discovery of a compound containing the uranyl ion with a degree of oxidation (V) UO 2 + , obtained by oxidation of uranium(III). Recently chemists have succeeded in blocking the disproportionation reaction of uranyl(V) and in stabilizing polymetallic complexes of uranyl(V), opening the way to to a systematic study of the reactivity and the electronic and magnetic properties of uranyl(V) compounds. (A.C.)

  4. Fundamental hydrogen interactions with beryllium : a magnetic fusion perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Felter, Thomas E.; Whaley, Josh A.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2012-03-01

    Increasingly, basic models such as density functional theory and molecular dynamics are being used to simulate different aspects of hydrogen recycling from plasma facing materials. These models provide valuable insight into hydrogen diffusion, trapping, and recombination from surfaces, but their validation relies on knowledge of the detailed behavior of hydrogen at an atomic scale. Despite being the first wall material for ITER, basic single crystal beryllium surfaces have been studied only sparsely from an experimental standpoint. In prior cases researchers used electron spectroscopy to examine surface reconstruction or adsorption kinetics during exposure to a hydrogen atmosphere. While valuable, these approaches lack the ability to directly detect the positioning of hydrogen on the surface. Ion beam techniques, such as low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), are two of the only experimental approaches capable of providing this information. In this study, we applied both LEIS and DRS to examine how hydrogen binds to the Be(0001) surface. Our measurements were performed using an angle-resolved ion energy spectrometer (ARIES) to probe the surface with low energy ions (500 eV - 3 keV He{sup +} and Ne{sup +}). We were able to obtain a 'scattering maps' of the crystal surface, providing insight on how low energy ions are focused along open surface channels. Once we completed a characterization of the clean surface, we dosed the sample with atomic hydrogen using a heated tungsten capillary. A distinct signal associated with adsorbed hydrogen emerged that was consistent with hydrogen residing between atom rows. To aid in the interpretation of the experimental results, we developed a computational model to simulate ion scattering at grazing incidence. For this purpose, we incorporated a simplified surface model into the Kalypso molecular dynamics code. This approach allowed us to understand how the incident ions interacted with the

  5. Nanoscale multireference quantum chemistry: full configuration interaction on graphical processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fales, B Scott; Levine, Benjamin G

    2015-10-13

    Methods based on a full configuration interaction (FCI) expansion in an active space of orbitals are widely used for modeling chemical phenomena such as bond breaking, multiply excited states, and conical intersections in small-to-medium-sized molecules, but these phenomena occur in systems of all sizes. To scale such calculations up to the nanoscale, we have developed an implementation of FCI in which electron repulsion integral transformation and several of the more expensive steps in σ vector formation are performed on graphical processing unit (GPU) hardware. When applied to a 1.7 × 1.4 × 1.4 nm silicon nanoparticle (Si72H64) described with the polarized, all-electron 6-31G** basis set, our implementation can solve for the ground state of the 16-active-electron/16-active-orbital CASCI Hamiltonian (more than 100,000,000 configurations) in 39 min on a single NVidia K40 GPU.

  6. Dynamic effects of dipolar interactions on the magnetic behavior of magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allia, Paolo; Tiberto, Paola

    2011-12-01

    Isothermal magnetization and initial dc susceptibility of spheroidal, nearly monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles (typical diameter: 8 nm) prepared by a standard thermo-chemical route have been measured between 10 and 300 K. The samples contained magnetite nanoparticles in the form of either a dried powder (each nanoparticle being surrounded by a stable oleic acid shell as a result of the preparation procedure) or a solid dispersion in PEGDA-600 polymer; different nanoparticle (NP) concentrations in the polymer were studied. In all samples the NPs were not tightly agglomerated nor their ferromagnetic cores were directly touching. The high-temperature inverse magnetic susceptibility is always found to follow a linear law as a function of T, crossing the horizontal axis at negative temperatures ranging from 175 to about 1,000 K. The deviation from the standard superparamagnetic behavior is related to dipolar interaction among NPs; however, a careful analysis makes it hard to conclude that such a behavior originates from a dominant antiferromagnetic character of the interaction. The results are well explained considering that the studied samples are in the interacting superparamagnetic (ISP) regime. The ISP model is basically a mean field theory which allows one to straightforwardly account for the role of magnetic dipolar interaction in a NP system. The model predicts the existence of specific scaling laws for the reduced magnetization which have been confirmed in all studied samples. The interaction of each magnetic dipole moment with the local, random dipolar field produced by the other dipoles results in the presence of a large fluctuating energy term whose magnitude is comparable to the static barrier for magnetization reversal/rotation related to magnetic anisotropy. On the basis of the existing theories on thermal crossing of a barrier whose height randomly fluctuates in time it is predicted that the rate of barrier crossing is substantially driven by the rate

  7. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr ( 2 O 3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs

  8. Magnetization of a parabolic quantum dot in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com; Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, DVR College of Engineering and Technology, Kashipur, Sangareddy Mandal, Hyderabad 502 285 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The magnetization of a parabolic quantum dot has been studied as a function of temperature and external magnetic field in the presence of Rashba, Dresselhaus Spin Orbit Interactions (SOI) and the electron-electron interactions. By the introduction of a simple and physically reasonable model potential, the problem has been solved exactly up to second order in both the SOI terms. Both the SOI found to be showing considerable effects on the magnetization of the quantum dot. The effect of electron-electron interaction on the magnetization also has been studied.

  9. Magnetization of a parabolic quantum dot in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Chatterjee, Ashok; Mukhopadhyay, Soma

    2015-01-01

    The magnetization of a parabolic quantum dot has been studied as a function of temperature and external magnetic field in the presence of Rashba, Dresselhaus Spin Orbit Interactions (SOI) and the electron-electron interactions. By the introduction of a simple and physically reasonable model potential, the problem has been solved exactly up to second order in both the SOI terms. Both the SOI found to be showing considerable effects on the magnetization of the quantum dot. The effect of electron-electron interaction on the magnetization also has been studied

  10. Emergence and frustration of magnetism with variable-range interactions in a quantum simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R; Senko, C; Campbell, W C; Korenblit, S; Smith, J; Lee, A; Edwards, E E; Wang, C-C J; Freericks, J K; Monroe, C

    2013-05-03

    Frustration, or the competition between interacting components of a network, is often responsible for the emergent complexity of many-body systems. For instance, frustrated magnetism is a hallmark of poorly understood systems such as quantum spin liquids, spin glasses, and spin ices, whose ground states can be massively degenerate and carry high degrees of quantum entanglement. Here, we engineer frustrated antiferromagnetic interactions between spins stored in a crystal of up to 16 trapped (171)Yb(+) atoms. We control the amount of frustration by continuously tuning the range of interaction and directly measure spin correlation functions and their coherent dynamics. This prototypical quantum simulation points the way toward a new probe of frustrated quantum magnetism and perhaps the design of new quantum materials.

  11. Quantum theory for magnons and phonons interactions under time-varying magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreiro, S.C.

    1971-01-01

    The magnon-fonon interaction in a ferromagnetic material submited to a time-varying magnetic field is studied by quantum methods. This problem has already been solved by semi-classical methods, and one of its results is that under certain conditions a state of lattice vibrations may be completely converted into spin oscillations. The main proporties of magnetoelastic waves in static magnetic fields and extend the quantum treatment for the time varying magnetic field case is revised. Field operators whose equations of motion are analogous to the classical ones are introduced. Their equations, which appear as a linear system of first order coupled equations, are converted into equations for complex functions by an expansion of the field operators in a time t as linear combinations of the same operators in a time t 0 prior to the variation of the magnetic field. The quantity g vector obtained from the classical solution is quantized and shown to be the linear momentum density of the magnetoelastic system, the quantum field spin density operator is deduced for the two interacting fields, and finally the results are used to study the magnetization and lattice displacement vector fields in the case of a system described by a coherent state of one of its normal modes

  12. Instabilities of bellows: Dependence on internal pressure, end supports, and interactions in accelerator magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    For superconducting magnets, one needs many bellows for connection of various helium cooling transfer lines in addition to beam tube bellows. There could be approximately 10,000 magnet interconnection bellows in the SSC exposed to an internal pressure. When axially compressed or internally pressurized, bellows can become unstable, leading to gross distortion or complete failure. If several bellows are contained in an assembly, failure modes might interact. If designed properly, large bellows can be a very feasible possibility for connecting the large tubular shells that support the magnet iron yokes and superconducting coils and contain supercritical helium for magnet cooling. We present here (1) a spring-supported bellows model, in order to develop necessary design features for bellows and end supports so that instabilities will not occur in the bellows pressure operating region, including some margin, (2) a model of three superconducting accelerator magnets connected by two large bellows, in order to ascertain that support requirements are satisfied and in order to study interaction effects between the two bellows. Reliability of bellows for our application will be stressed. 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Superconducting magnets, cryostats, and cryogenics for the interaction region of the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Abramovich, S.; Zhmad, A.

    1993-10-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has two counterrotating 20-TeV proton beams that will be made to collide at specific interaction points to carry out high energy physics experiments. The Collider ring has two sites, West and East, for such Interaction Regions (IRs), and the conceptual design of the East Interaction Region is underway. The East IR, in the present stage of design, has two interaction points, the requirements for which have been specified in terms of distance L* to the nearest magnet and the beam luminosity. Based on these requirements, the optics for transition from arc regions or utility regions to the IR and for focusing the beams have been obtained. The optical arrangement consists of a tuning section of quadrupoles, the strength of which is adjusted to obtain the required beta squeeze; a pair of bending dipoles to reduce the beam separation from the nominal 900 mm to 450 mm; an achromat section of quadrupoles, which consist of two cold masses in one cryostnother pair of dipoles to bring the beams together at the required crossing angle; and a set of final focus quads facing the interaction point. The optics is symmetric about the interaction point, and the two interaction points are separated by a hinge region consisting of superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles similar to the arc region. In the regions where the beams are vertically bent and straightened out by dipoles, the beam traverses warm regions provided for placing beam collimators. The superconducting magnets, including the final focus quadrupoles, operate with supercritical He at 4 atm and a nominal temperature of 4.15 K. In this paper, descriptions of the magnets, the cryostats, and cryo bypasses around the warm region and interaction points are provided. Also discussed are the cooling requirements and design for the final focus quadrupole, which receives significant heat load from beam radiation

  14. Tuning dipolar magnetic interactions by controlling individual silica coating of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Rojas, P. C.; Tancredi, P.; Moscoso Londoño, O.; Knobel, M.; Socolovsky, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Single and fixed size core, core-shell nanoparticles of iron oxides coated with a silica layer of tunable thickness were prepared by chemical routes, aiming to generate a frame of study of magnetic nanoparticles with controlled dipolar interactions. The batch of iron oxides nanoparticles of 4.5 nm radii, were employed as cores for all the coated samples. The latter was obtained via thermal decomposition of organic precursors, resulting on nanoparticles covered with an organic layer that was subsequently used to promote the ligand exchange in the inverse microemulsion process, employed to coat each nanoparticle with silica. The amount of precursor and times of reaction was varied to obtain different silica shell thicknesses, ranging from 0.5 nm to 19 nm. The formation of the desired structures was corroborated by TEM and SAXS measurements, the core single-phase spinel structure was confirmed by XRD, and superparamagnetic features with gradual change related to dipolar interaction effects were obtained by the study of the applied field and temperature dependence of the magnetization. To illustrate that dipolar interactions are consistently controlled, the main magnetic properties are presented and analyzed as a function of center to center minimum distance between the magnetic cores.

  15. Electron gas interacting in a metal, submitted to a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, Francisco Castilho

    1977-01-01

    Using the propagator's technique in the grand ensemble developed by Montroll and Ward we investigate the magnetic properties of an interacting electron gas in a strong magnetic field. The free propagator properly constructed shows that the spin paramagnetism does not have a term with strong temperature dependence, contrary to the result of Isihara. Considering the electron density to be constant, the dHVA oscillations in the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity, considering the effects of first exchange interactions, show only one phase in agreement with experimental result, while Ichimura and Isihara obtained two phases differing by π/2. The effects of first order exchange interactions in the dHVA oscillations of the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity give rise to an exponential factor in the amplitudes of oscillator (Dingle factor), being the Dingle temperature linearly dependent of the Fermi velocity. The calculations of the ring diagram contribution to the grand partition function, show that the approximation used by Isihara for this calculations is not good and the dHVA oscillations of the contributions from the ring diagrams for the grand partition function have a phase differing by π/2 from that obtained by Isihara. (author)

  16. Apoc Social: A Mobile Interactive and Social Learning Platform for Collaborative Solving of Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievertsen, Niels; Carreira, Erick M

    2018-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are carried in the pockets of university students around the globe and are increasingly cheap to come by. These portable devices have evolved into powerful and interconnected handheld computers, which, among other applications, can be used as advanced learning tools and providers of targeted, curated content. Herein, we describe Apoc Social (Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry Social), a mobile application that assists both learning and teaching college-level organic chemistry both in the classroom and on the go. With more than 750 chemistry exercises available, Apoc Social facilitates collaborative learning through discussion boards and fosters enthusiasm for complex organic chemistry.

  17. Quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor Bose systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, A. G.; Lindgren, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    -range inter-species interactions much larger than their intra-species interactions and show that they have novel energetic and magnetic properties. In the strongly interacting regime, these systems have energies that are fractions of the basic harmonic oscillator trap quantum and have spatially separated......Strongly interacting one-dimensional quantum systems often behave in a manner that is distinctly different from their higher-dimensional counterparts. When a particle attempts to move in a one-dimensional environment it will unavoidably have to interact and 'push' other particles in order...... ground states with manifestly ferromagnetic wave functions. Furthermore, we predict excited states that have perfect antiferromagnetic ordering. This holds for both balanced and imbalanced systems, and we show that it is a generic feature as one crosses from few- to many-body systems....

  18. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  19. Magnetic moments in calcium isotopes via a surface-interaction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niv, Y.; Hass, M.; Zemel, A.; Goldring, G.

    1979-01-01

    A rotation of the angular correlation of de-excitation γ-rays from 40 Ca and 44 Ca was observed in a tilted foil geometry. The signs and magnitudes of the magnetic moments of the 2 1 + of 44 Ca and of the 3 1 - level of 40 Ca were determined to be g = -0.28+-0.11 and g = +0.52+-0.18, respectively. This experiment provides further information regarding the polarization of deeply bound electronic configurations produced by a surface-interaction mechanism and demonstrates the feasibility of the present technique for measuring signs and magnitudes of magnetic moments of picosecond nuclear levels. (author)

  20. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  1. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr2O3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (rv25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of r-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect,1,2 where an antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling exists between two ferromagnetic (FM) layers separated by a certain type of magnetic or non-magnetic spacer,3 has significant potential for application in the magnetic recording industry. Soon after the discovery of the GMR, the magnetic properties of multilayer systems (FeCr) became a subject of intensive study. The application of bulk iron-chromium (Fe-Cr) alloys has been of great interest, as these alloys exhibit favorable prop- erties including corrosion resistance, high strength, hardness, low oxidation rate, and strength retention at elevated temper- ature. However, the structural and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters (NCs) have not been investigated in-depth. Of all NCs, Fe-based clusters have unique magnetic properties as well as favorable catalytic characteristics in reactivity, selectivity, and durability.4 The incorporation of dopant of varied type and concentration in Fe can modify its chemical ordering, thereby optimizing its electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and opening up many new applications. The substitution of an Fe atom (1.24 A°) by a Cr atom (1.25 A° ) can easily modify the magnetic properties, since (i) the curie temperature (Tc ) of Fe is 1043 K, while Cr is an itinerant AFM with a bulk Neel temperature TN =311 K, and (ii) Fe

  2. Covalent magnetism, exchange interactions and anisotropy of the high temperature layered antiferromagnet MnB₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelevskyi, S; Mohn, P

    2012-01-11

    The investigation of the electronic structure and magnetism for the compound MnB(2) with crystal structure type AlB(2) has been revisited to resolve contradictions between various experimental and theoretical results present in the literature. We find that MnB(2) exhibits an interesting example of a Kübler's covalent magnetism (Williams et al 1981 J. Appl. Phys. 52 2069). The covalent magnetism also appears to be the source of some disagreement between the calculated values of the magnetic moments and those given by neutron diffraction experiments. We show that this shortcoming is due to the atomic sphere approximation applied in earlier calculations. The application of the disordered local moment approach and the calculation of the inter-atomic exchange interactions within the Liechtenstein formalism reveal strong local moment antiferromagnetism with a high Néel temperature predicted from Monte Carlo simulations. A fully relativistic band structure calculation and then the application of the torque method yields a strong in-plane anisotropy of the Mn magnetic moments. The agreement of these results with neutron diffraction studies rules out any possible weak itinerant electron magnetism scenarios as proposed earlier for MnB(2).

  3. Throughfall chemistry and canopy interactions in a Sitka spruce plantation sprayed with six different simulated polluted mist treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiwa, M.; Crossley, A.; Sheppard, L.J.; Sakugawa, H.; Cape, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    Throughfall chemistry was studied in a mature Sitka spruce plantation in order to investigate canopy interactions, such as nitrogen absorption, cation leaching, and neutralization of rainfall passing through the canopy. The plantation had been exposed to six different simulated mist treatments including N (NH 4 NO 3 ) and S (H 2 SO 4 at pH 2.5) in four replicated blocks since 1996. Throughfall and rainfall were collected from May to September 2000. The results showed that 30-35% of the applied N was retained by the canopy. There were linear relationships between the loss of H + and increased K + , Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ deposition through the canopy. However these increases in K + , Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ deposition accounted for only about 50% of total neutralization of the acidity. The relationship between the anion deficits in throughfall and the loss of H + implied that weak organic acid anions were involved in the neutralization of the acidity in throughfall. - Weak organic acids may be involved in neutralizing acidity of throughfall

  4. Rock-fluid chemical interactions at reservoir conditions: The influence of brine chemistry and extent of reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabaraonye, B. U.; Crawshaw, J.; Trusler, J. P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Following carbon dioxide injection in deep saline aquifers, CO2 dissolves in the formation brines forming acidic solutions that can subsequently react with host reservoir minerals, altering both porosity and permeability. The direction and rates of these reactions are influenced by several factors including properties that are associated with the brine system. Consequently, understanding and quantifying the impacts of the chemical and physical properties of the reacting fluids on overall reaction kinetics is fundamental to predicting the fate of the injected CO2. In this work, we present a comprehensive experimental study of the kinetics of carbonate-mineral dissolution in different brine systems including sodium chloride, sodium sulphate and sodium bicarbonate of varying ionic strengths. The impacts of the brine chemistry on rock-fluid chemical reactions at different extent of reactions are also investigated. Using a rotating disk technique, we have investigated the chemical interactions between the CO2-saturated brines and carbonate minerals at conditions of pressure (up to 10 MPa) and temperature (up to 373 K) pertinent to carbon storage. The changes in surface textures due to dissolution reaction were studied by means of optical microscopy and vertical scanning interferometry. Experimental results are compared to previously derived models.

  5. Thermodynamic modelling of bentonite-groundwater interaction and implications for near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.; Wersin, P.; Sierro, N.

    1992-11-01

    Predictions of near field geochemistry are made using a thermodynamic model for bentonite/ground interaction. This model is a refinement and extension of the model developed by the senior author. It is based on recent experiments performed at high solid/water ratio and adapted to the Swedish type of HLW repository design. Thus, from the obtained experimental results on solution composition, the model includes chemical reactions resulting from both the impurities and the main clay fraction within the bentonite. Ion exchange reactions are treated both with and without the contribution of edge sites. Due to its thermodynamic basis, the model exhibits prediction capability over a wide range of conditions in terms of solid/water ratio. The modelling of repository conditions implies, due to the lack of experimental information, simplifications with regard to thermodynamic properties of the bentonite. This mainly involves the non-consideration of the temperature effects and of the acid/base properties of the solid. Nevertheless, our results yield insight into important processes affecting porewater chemistry. Thus, the model suggests that proton exchange reactions may exert a strong control on calcite dissolution within highly compacted bentonite. Estimations of chemical changes over time in the bentonite were done in the basis of a mixing tank model. These results indicate transformation of Na-bentonite to Ca-bentonite over time. The extent of this process, however, critically depends on the amount of carbonate present in the bentonite. (authors) (34 refs.)

  6. Atmospheric chemistry and climate

    OpenAIRE

    Satheesh, SK

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is a branch of atmospheric science where major focus is the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Knowledge of atmospheric composition is essential due to its interaction with (solar and terrestrial) radiation and interactions of atmospheric species (gaseous and particulate matter) with living organisms. Since atmospheric chemistry covers a vast range of topics, in this article the focus is on the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols with special emphasis on the Indian reg...

  7. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  8. Dilution effects on combined magnetic and electric dipole interactions: A study of ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles with tuneable interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, M.; Dobroserdova, A.; Samin, S.; Dobbrow, C.; Schmidt, A. M.; Gottlieb, M.; Kantorovich, S.

    2017-08-01

    Improved understanding of complex interactions between nanoparticles will facilitate the control over the ensuing self-assembled structures. In this work, we consider the dynamic changes occurring upon dilution in the self-assembly of a system of ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles that combine magnetic, electric, and steric interactions. The systems examined here vary in the strength of the magnetic dipole interactions and the amount of point charges per particle. Scattering techniques are employed for the characterization of the self-assembly aggregates, and zeta-potential measurements are employed for the estimation of surface charges. Our experiments show that for particles with relatively small initial number of surface electric dipoles, an increase in particle concentration results in an increase in diffusion coefficients; whereas for particles with relatively high number of surface dipoles, no effect is observed upon concentration changes. We attribute these changes to a shift in the adsorption/desorption equilibrium of the tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) molecules on the particle surface. We put forward an explanation, based on the combination of two theoretical models. One predicts that the growing concentration of electric dipoles, stemming from the addition of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-surfactant during particle synthesis, on the surface of the particles results in the overall repulsive interaction. Secondly, using density functional theory, we explain that the observed behaviour of the diffusion coefficient can be treated as a result of the concentration dependent nanoparticle self-assembly: additional repulsion leads to the reduction in self-assembled aggregate size despite the shorter average interparticle distances, and as such provides the growth of the diffusion coefficient.

  9. Beam interaction of a pulsed, nonlinear in-vacuum injection magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Theme of this thesis is the study of the interaction of the injection magnet designed for BESSY II with the electron beam. The main topic of this thesis lies in the numerical and measurement-technical study of the loss factor, the wake potential, and the wake impedance of the nonlinear kicker magnet with the aim of an optimization of the magnet design, so that a stable operation of the kicker in the BESSY II storage ring is made possible. A further main topic of this thesis is a study on the matching of the injection scheme with a single kicker to the conditions of the DELTA storage ring, which is operated by the TU Dortmund.

  10. Magnetic ordering in TCNQ-based metal–organic frameworks with host–guest interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan; Saber, Mohamed R.; Prosvirin, Andrey P.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.; Sun, Lei; Ballesteros-Rivas, Maria; Zhao, Hanhua; Dunbar, Kim R. (MIT); (TAM)

    2015-09-03

    Host–guest interactions between the aromatic molecules benzene, toluene, aniline and nitrobenzene and the redox-active TCNQ-based metal–organic framework (MOF), Fe(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (1) (TCNQ = 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane), have been found to modulate spontaneous magnetization behaviours at low temperatures. An analogous MOF, Mn(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (2) with isotropic Mn(II) ions as well as the two-dimensional compound Fe(TCNQ)(DMF)2·2DMF (3·2DMF), were also prepared as models for studying the effects of single-ion magnetic anisotropy and structural distortion on spin canting. The results indicate guest-dependent long range magnetic ordering occurs at low temperatures, which correlates with the electrostatic and steric effects of the incorporated aromatic guests.

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Plasma Energization and Particle Acceleration in Interacting Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S.; Guo, F.; Zank, G. P.; Li, X.; Stanier, A.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction between magnetic flux ropes has been suggested as a process that leads to efficient plasma energization and particle acceleration (e.g., Drake et al. 2013; Zank et al. 2014). However, the underlying plasma dynamics and acceleration mechanisms are subject to examination of numerical simulations. As a first step of this effort, we carry out 2D fully kinetic simulations using the VPIC code to study the plasma energization and particle acceleration during coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes. Our analysis shows that the reconnection electric field and compression effect are important in plasma energization. The results may help understand the energization process associated with magnetic flux ropes frequently observed in the solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet.

  12. Splitter target for controlling magnetic reconnection in relativistic laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Bulanov, S. S.; Korn, G.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of a conical target irradiated by a high power laser is proposed to study fast magnetic reconnection in relativistic plasma interactions. Such target, placed in front of the near critical density gas jet, splits the laser pulse, forming two parallel laser pulses in the 2D case and a donut shaped pulse in the 3D case. The magnetic annihilation and reconnection occur in the density downramp region of the subsequent gas jet. The magnetic field energy is converted into the particle kinetic energy. As a result, a backward accelerated electron beam is obtained as a signature of reconnection. The above mechanisms are demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulations in both 2D and 3D cases. Facilitating the synchronization of two laser beams, the proposed approach can be used in designing the corresponding experiments on studying fundamental problems of relativistic plasma physics.

  13. Self-generated magnetic fields and energy transport by ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudurexiti, A.; Tuniyazi, P.; Wang Qian

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic instability (Weibel instability) and its mechanism in ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions are studied by using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The transport of energy in electron thermal conduction is analyzed by the Spitzer-Harm theory, and the election's vertical pyrogenation phenomenon that resulted from anisotropic heating of laser is observed. The results indicate that the strong magnetic field excited by Weibel instability makes the electron beam deposit its energy within a very short distance, and it restrains the electron thermal flux formed when the laser ponderomotive force bursts through the electron. With the increase of the self-generated magnetic field, the electron will be seized by the wave of magnetic field, and the transport of heat will be restricted. (authors)

  14. Integration of prognostic aerosol-cloud interactions in a chemistry transport model coupled offline to a regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. A.; Kahnert, M.; Andersson, C.; Kokkola, H.; Hansson, U.; Jones, C.; Langner, J.; Devasthale, A.

    2015-06-01

    To reduce uncertainties and hence to obtain a better estimate of aerosol (direct and indirect) radiative forcing, next generation climate models aim for a tighter coupling between chemistry transport models and regional climate models and a better representation of aerosol-cloud interactions. In this study, this coupling is done by first forcing the Rossby Center regional climate model (RCA4) with ERA-Interim lateral boundaries and sea surface temperature (SST) using the standard cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) formulation (hereafter, referred to as the "stand-alone RCA4 version" or "CTRL" simulation). In the stand-alone RCA4 version, CDNCs are constants distinguishing only between land and ocean surface. The meteorology from this simulation is then used to drive the chemistry transport model, Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), which is coupled online with the aerosol dynamics model, Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications (SALSA). CDNC fields obtained from MATCH-SALSA are then fed back into a new RCA4 simulation. In this new simulation (referred to as "MOD" simulation), all parameters remain the same as in the first run except for the CDNCs provided by MATCH-SALSA. Simulations are carried out with this model setup for the period 2005-2012 over Europe, and the differences in cloud microphysical properties and radiative fluxes as a result of local CDNC changes and possible model responses are analysed. Our study shows substantial improvements in cloud microphysical properties with the input of the MATCH-SALSA derived 3-D CDNCs compared to the stand-alone RCA4 version. This model setup improves the spatial, seasonal and vertical distribution of CDNCs with a higher concentration observed over central Europe during boreal summer (JJA) and over eastern Europe and Russia during winter (DJF). Realistic cloud droplet radii (CD radii) values have been simulated with the maxima reaching 13 μm, whereas in the stand

  15. The interaction of a very large interplanetary magnetic cloud with the magnetosphere and with cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepping, R.P.; Burlaga, L.F.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Lazarus, A.J.; Evans, D.S.; Klein, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    A large interplanetary magnetic cloud has been observed in the mid-December 1982 data from ISEE 3. It is estimated to have a heliocentric radial extent of approx-gt 0.4 AU, making it one of the largest magnetic clouds yet observed at 1 AU. The magnetic field measured throughout the main portion of the cloud was fairly tightly confined to a plane as it changed direction by 174 degree while varying only moderately in magnitude. Throughout nearly the entire duration of the cloud's passage, IMP 8 was located in the Earth's dawn magnetosheath providing observations of this cloud's interaction with the bow shock and magnetopause; the cloud is shown to maintain its solar wind characteristics during the interaction. Near the end of the cloud passage, at 0806 UT on December 17, ISEE 3 (and IMP 8 at nearly the same time) observed an oblique fast forward interplanetary shock closely coincident in time with a geomagnetic storm sudden commencement. The shock, moving much faster than the cloud (radial speeds of 700 and 390 km/s, respectively, on the average), was in the process of overtaking the cloud. The index Dst decreased monotonically by ∼ 130 nT during the 2-day cloud passage by the Earth and was well correlated with the B z component of the interplanetary magnetic field. There was no significant decrease in the cosmic ray intensity recorded by ground-based neutron monitors at this time of rather strong, smoothly changing fields. However, a Forbush decrease did occur immediately after the interplanetary shock, during a period of significant field turbulence. Thus a large, smooth, interplanetary helical magnetic field configuration engulfing the Earth does not necessarily deflect cosmic rays sufficiently to cause a Forbush decrease, but there is a suggestion that such a decrease may be caused by particle scattering by turbulent magnetic fields

  16. {pi}-{pi} Interactions and magnetic properties in a series of hybrid inorganic-organic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    The series of hybrid inorganic-organic solids T(Im){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}] with T=Fe, Co, Ni and Im=imidazole were prepared by soft chemical routes from aqueous solutions of the involved building units: imidazole, T{sup 2+} metal and the [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anionic block. The obtained samples were characterized from infrared and UV-vis spectroscopies, and thermogravimetric, X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements. Anhydrous solids which crystallize with a monoclinic unit cell, in the I2/a space group with four formula units per cell (Z=4) were obtained. Their crystal structure was solved ab initio from the recorded X-ray powder patterns and then refined by the Rietveld method. The metal T is found with octahedral coordination to four N ends of CN groups and two imidazole molecules while the inner Ni atom preserves its planar coordination. The system of layers remains stacked in an ordered 3D structure through dipole-dipole and {pi}-{pi} interactions between imidazole rings from neighboring layers. In this way, a pillared structure is achieved without requiring the coordination of both nitrogen atoms from imidazole ring. The recorded magnetic data indicate the occurrence of a predominant ferromagnetic interaction at low temperature for Co and Ni but not for Fe. Such magnetic ordering is more favorable for Ni with transition temperature of 14.67 K, which was ascribed to the relatively high polarizing power for this metal. Within the considered T metals, to nickel the highest electron-withdrawing ability corresponds and this leads to an increase for the metal-ligand electron clouds overlapping and to a stronger {pi}-{pi} attractive interaction, two factors that result into a higher magnetic ordering temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Magnetic ordering through the {pi}-{pi} interaction between the imidazole rings. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic solids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid inorganic-organic molecular based

  17. Chiral-model of weak-interaction form factors and magnetic moments of octet baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubodera, K.; Kohyama, Y.; Tsushima, K.; Yamaguchi, T.

    1989-01-01

    For baryon spectroscopy, magnetic moments and weak interaction form factors provide valuable information, and the impressive amount of available experimental data on these quantities for the octet baryons invites detailed investigations. The authors of this paper have made extensive studies of the weak-interaction form factors and magnetic moments of the octet baryons within the framework of the volume-type cloudy-bag model (v-type CBM). The clouds of all octet mesons have been included. Furthermore, we have taken into account in a unified framework various effects that were so far only individually discussed in the literature. Thus, the gluonic effects, center-of-mass (CM0 corrections, and recoil corrections have been included). In this talk, after giving a brief summary of some salient features of the results, we discuss a very interesting application of our model to the problem of the spin content of nucleons

  18. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J., E-mail: mscott@hao.ucar.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  19. Estimation of πd-Interactions in Organic Conductors Including Magnetic Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takehiko; Katsuhara, Mao

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic interactions in organic conductors including magnetic anions, such as λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 and κ-(BETS)2FeX4 [X = Cl and Br], are estimated from intermolecular overlap integrals; the overlaps between anions afford Jdd, and those between anions and donors give Jπ d. From this, the most stable spin alignments are decided, and such quantities as the Néel and Weiss temperatures, as well as the magnitude of spin polarization on the π-molecules are evaluated on the basis of the mean-field theory of πd-systems. The calculation is extended to several other πd-conductors, which are classified depending on the relative magnitudes of the direct dd- and indirect πd-interactions.

  20. Magnetic history dependence of metastable states in thin films with dipolar interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the ground state and magnetic relaxation of a model of a thin film consisting of a two-dimensional square lattice of Heisenberg spins with perpendicular anisotropy K, exchange J and long-range dipolar interactions g. We have studied the ground state configurations of this system for a wide range of the interaction parameters J/g, K/g by means of the simulated annealing procedure, showing that the model is able to reproduce the different magnetic configurations found in real samples. We have found the existence of a certain range of K/g, J/g values for which in-plane and out-of-plane configurations are quasi-degenerated in energy. We show that when a system in this region of parameters is perturbed by an external force that is subsequently removed, different kinds of ordering may be induced depending on the followed procedure. In particular, simulations of relaxations from saturation under an AC demagnetizing field or in zero field are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on epitaxial and granular alloy thin films, which show a wide variety of magnetic patterns depending on their magnetic history

  1. From hot atom chemistry to epithermal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, K.

    2004-01-01

    The rise and fall of hot atom chemistry (HAC) over the years from 1934 to 2004 is reviewed. Several applications are discussed, in particular to astrophysics and the interaction of energetic ions and atoms in space. Epithermal chemistry (ETC) is proposed to substitute the old name, since it better fits the energy range as well as the non-thermal and non-equilibrium character of the reactions. ETC also avoids the strong connexion of HAC to nuclear chemistry and stands for the opening of the field to physical chemistry and astrophysics. (orig.)

  2. Semiclassical quantization of integrable systems of few interacting anyons in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivan, N.; Levit, S.

    1992-01-01

    We present a semiclassical theory of charged interacting anyons in a strong magnetic field. We derive the appropriate generalization of the WKB quantization conditions and determine the corresponding wave functions for non separable integrable anyonic systems. This theory is applies to a system of two interacting anyons, two interacting anyons in the presence of an impurity and three interacting anyons. We calculate the dependence of the semiclassical energy levels on the statistical parameter and find regions in which dependence follows very different patterns. The semiclassical treatment allows to find the correlation between these patterns and the change in the character of the classical motion of the system. We also test the accuracy of the mean field approximation for low and high energy states of the three anyons. (author)

  3. Magnetic interactions and the method of images: a wealth of educational suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanno, A; Camarca, M; Sapia, P

    2011-01-01

    Under some conditions, the method of images (well known in electrostatics) may be implemented in magnetostatic problems too, giving an excellent example of the usefulness of formal analogies in the description of physical systems. In this paper, we develop a quantitative model for the magnetic interactions underlying the so-called Geomag(TM) paradox and describe a quantitative experimental investigation to validate the model. The validity ranges of some approximations involved in this problem are quantitatively discussed and the advantages of a dimensionless formulation of the interaction are pointed out. This work offers many educational suggestions suitable for university students.

  4. Influence of dilution and nature of the interaction on surface and interface magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1986-01-01

    The recent theoretical effort of the Rio de Janeiro/CBPF group on surface magnetism is tutorially reviewed. Within a real space renormalization group framework, we analyse the influence of factors such as the number of states per spin (q-state Potts model), the signs of the coupling constants (mixed ferro and antiferromagnetic interactions), the presence of a second semi-infinite bulk (interface case), the symmetry of the interaction (anisotropic Heisenberg model), and surface and/or bulk dilution (bond quenched model). A variety of interesting physical effects emerges. (Autor) [pt

  5. IEFIT - An Interactive Approach to High Temperature Fusion Plasma Magnetic Equilibrium Fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D.P.; Lao, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    An interactive IDL based wrapper, IEFIT, has been created for the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT written in FORTRAN. It allows high temperature fusion physicists to rapidly optimize a plasma equilibrium reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessarily repeated initialization in the conventional approach along with the immediate display of the fitting results of each input variation. It uses a new IDL based graphics package, GaPlotObj, developed in cooperation with Fanning Software Consulting, that provides a unified interface with great flexibility in presenting and analyzing scientific data. The overall interactivity reduces the process to minutes from the usual hours

  6. Features of electron-phonon interactions in nanotubes with chiral symmetry in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kibis, O V

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of the electrons with acoustic phonons in the nanotube with chiral symmetry by availability of the magnetic field, parallel to the nanotube axis, is considered. It is shown that the electron energy spectrum is asymmetric relative to the electron wave vector inversion and for that reason the electron-phonon interaction appears to be different for similar phonons with mutually contrary directions of the wave vector. This phenomenon leads to origination of the electromotive force by the spatially uniform electron gas heating and to appearance of the quadrupole component in the nanotube volt-ampere characteristics

  7. [Study of high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions with a Magnetic-Interferometric-Emulsion-Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Physics group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has been analyzing 200 GeV/n S + Pb collision events with a Magnetic-Interactive-Emulsion-Chamber (MAGIC). The objectives of the research are to learn the nature of nuclear matter at high density of particles and to develop an all-particle tracking system for very high particle densities. To advance the study further, the detector capability has been improved so as to allow the best utilization of all-particle measurements. A design study for Pb + Pb interactions at 160 GeV/n was made for planned experiments in 1993

  8. Relativistic two-fermion equations with form factors and anomalous magnetic moment interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.

    1977-04-01

    Relativistic equations for two-fermion systems are derived from quantum field theory taking into account the form factors of the particles. When the q 2 dependence of the form factors is disregarded, in the static approximation, the two-fermion equations with Coulomb and anomalous magnetic moment interactions are obtained. Separating the angular variables, a sixteen-component relativistic radial equation are finally given

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance response and magnetic interactions in ordered solid solutions of lithium nickel oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzoni, C.B. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' , Universita di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Paleari, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); Massarotti, V.; Capsoni, D. [Dipartimento di Chimica-Fisica, Universita di Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

    1996-09-23

    EPR data of ordered solid solutions of lithium nickel oxides are reported as a function of the lithium content. The features of the signal and the EPR centre density are analysed by a model of dynamical trapping of holes in [(Ni{sup 2+}-O-Ni{sup 2+})-h{sup +}] complexes. The possible origin of the interactions responsible for the magnetic ordering and some features of the transport properties are also discussed. (author)

  10. Studies of the interaction between a magnet and a High Tc Superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two parts. The last part is eight research papers which involve topics related to High T c superconductor (HTSC) studies. The main topic describes the interaction between a permanent magnet and a HTSC studied by a mechanical pendulum. The first part of the dissertation has two purposes. One is to give a brief introduction and background to the research papers, and the other is to outline the scientific findings from the HTSC studies. 94 refs., 2 figs

  11. Segmentation of tumors in magnetic resonance brain images using an interactive multiscale watershed algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letteboer, Marloes M J; Olsen, Ole F; Dam, Erik B

    2004-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: This article presents the evaluation of an interactive multiscale watershed segmentation algorithm for segmenting tumors in magnetic resonance brain images of patients scheduled for neuronavigational procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The watershed method is compared...... delineation shows that the two methods are interchangeable according to the Bland and Altman criterion, and thus equally accurate. The repeatability of the watershed method and the manual method are compared by looking at the similarity of the segmented volumes. The similarity for intraobserver...

  12. Interaction domains in die-upset NdFeB magnets in dependence on the degree of deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopkov, K.; Gutfleisch, O.; Schaefer, R.; Hinz, D.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetic domain structure of NdFeB magnets has been studied using high resolution, digitally enhanced Kerr-microscopy. Melt-spun NdFeB powder (MQU-F TM ) was hot pressed into fully dense samples and then hot deformed to axially textured magnets. Various degrees of deformation (height reduction) up to 76% have been realized. Pronounced interaction domains have been observed only in magnets, which were deformed to a degree of deformation of at least 52%. With increasing alignment of the grains the interaction domains become more and more visible and their size increases

  13. Magnetic properties of point defect interaction with impurity atoms in Fe-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Lavrentiev, M. Yu.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2009-04-01

    An integrated ab initio and statistical Monte Carlo investigation has been recently carried out to model the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Fe-Cr alloys. We found that the conventional Fe-Cr phase diagram is not adequate at low temperature region where the magnetic contribution to the free energy plays an important role in the prediction of an ordered Fe 15Cr phase and its negative enthalpy of formation. The origin of the anomalous thermodynamic and magnetic properties of Fe-Cr alloys can be understood using a tight-binding Stoner model combined with the charge neutrality condition. We investigate the environmental dependence of magnetic moment distributions for various self-interstitial atom dumbbells configurations using spin density maps found using density functional theory calculations. The mixed dumbbell Fe-Cr and Fe-Mn binding energies are found to be positive due to magnetic interactions. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the migration energy of vacancy in Fe-Cr alloys and magnetism at the saddle point configuration.

  14. The exchange interaction effects on magnetic properties of the nanostructured CoPt particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komogortsev, S.V., E-mail: komogor@iph.krasn.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Iskhakov, R.S. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Zimin, A.A. [Siberian Federal University, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Filatov, E.Yu.; Korenev, S.V.; Shubin, Yu.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Chizhik, N.A. [Siberian Federal University, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Yurkin, G.Yu.; Eremin, E.V. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-01

    Various manifestations of the exchange interaction effects in magnetization curves of the CoPt nanostructured particles are demonstrated and discussed. The inter-grain exchange constant A in the sponge-like agglomerates of crystallites is estimated as A=(7±1) pJ/m from the approach magnetization to saturation curves that is in good agreement with A=(6.6±0.5) pJ/m obtained from Bloch T {sup 3/2} law. The fractal dimensionality of the exchange coupled crystallite system in the porous media of the disordered CoPt alloy d=(2.60±0.18) was estimated from the approach magnetization to saturation curve. Coercive force decreases with temperature as H{sub c}~T {sup 3/2} which is assumed to be a consequence of the magnetic anisotropy energy reduction due to the thermal spin wave excitations in the investigated CoPt particles. - Highlights: • Nanostructured CoPt particles were synthesized and then annealed in He atmosphere. • The structure of the material and magnetization curves were studied. • The maximum on reduced coercivity vs grain size dependence was observed. • The dimensionality d of exchange coupled crystallite system was estimated. • Exchange stiffness constant A was estimated.

  15. Effect of the magnetic dipole interaction on a spin-1 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fangqi; Jia, Wei; Zhao, Qing

    2018-05-01

    We consider a hybrid system composed of a spin-1 triplet coupled to a nuclear spin. We study the effect of the axisymmetric and the quadrupole term of the magnetic dipole interaction between the two electrons forming the triplet on the energy spectrum in a static magnetic field. The energy spectrum obtained by directly diagonalizing the Hamiltonian of the system shows that these two terms not only remove the special crossings that appear in the absence of the magnetic dipole interaction, but also produce new (avoided) crossings by lifting the relevant levels. Specially, the gaps between the avoided crossing levels increase with the strength of the quadrupole term. In order to accurately illustrate these effects, we present the results for the discriminant and von Neumann entropy of one electron interacting with the rest of the whole system. Finally, by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equations of the system, we discover that the polarization oscillation of electron and nuclear spin is in-phase and the total average longitudinal spin is not conserved at location of avoided crossing, but the two results are opposite beyond that.

  16. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin–orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron–electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron–electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin–orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures. - Highlights: • Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime but reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. • Electron-electron interaction reduces magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic region. • Rashba spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields. • Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards lower magnetic fields. • Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  17. Computer simulation and experimental self-assembly of irradiated glycine amino acid under magnetic fields: Its possible significance in prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Alejandro; Colín-García, María; Puig, Teresa Pi I; Alba-Aldave, Leticia; Meléndez, Adriana; Cruz-Castañeda, Jorge A; Basiuk, Vladimir A; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio; Mendoza, Alicia Negrón

    2017-12-01

    Ionizing radiation may have played a relevant role in chemical reactions for prebiotic biomolecule formation on ancient Earth. Environmental conditions such as the presence of water and magnetic fields were possibly relevant in the formation of organic compounds such as amino acids. ATR-FTIR, Raman, EPR and X-ray spectroscopies provide valuable information about molecular organization of different glycine polymorphs under static magnetic fields. γ-glycine polymorph formation increases in irradiated samples interacting with static magnetic fields. The increase in γ-glycine polymorph agrees with the computer simulations. The AM1 semi-empirical simulations show a change in the catalyst behavior and dipole moment values in α and γ-glycine interaction with the static magnetic field. The simulated crystal lattice energy in α-glycine is also affected by the free radicals under the magnetic field, which decreases its stability. Therefore, solid α and γ-glycine containing free radicals under static magnetic fields might have affected the prebiotic scenario on ancient Earth by causing the oligomerization of glycine in prebiotic reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  19. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  20. Fine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszlo, P.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included [fr

  1. Fundamentals of nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, V.

    1982-01-01

    The author of the book has had 25 years of experience at the Nuclear Chemistry of Prague Technical University. In consequence, the book is intended as a basic textbook for students of this field. Its main objectives are an easily understandable presentation of the complex subject and in spite of the uncertainty which still characterizes the definition and subjects of nuclear chemistry - a systematic classification and logical structure. Contents: 1. Introduction (history and definition); 2. General nuclear chemistry (physical fundamentals, hot atom chemistry, interaction of nuclear radiation with matter, radioactive elements, isotope effects, isotope exchange, chemistry of radioactive trace elements); 3. Methods of nuclear chemistry of nuclear chemistry (radiochemical methods, activation, separation and enrichment chemistry); 4. Preparative nuclear chemistry (isotope production, labelled compounds); 5. Analytival nuclear chemistry; 6. Applied nuclear chemistry (isotope applications in general physical and analytical chemistry). The book is supplemented by an annex with tables, a name catalogue and a subject index which will facilitate access to important information. (RB) [de

  2. Interacting Electrons and Holes in Quasi-2D Quantum Dots in Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrylak, P.; Sheng, W.; Cheng, S.-J.

    2004-09-01

    Theory of optical properties of interacting electrons and holes in quasi-2D quantum dots in strong magnetic fields is discussed. In two dimensions and the lowest Landau level, hidden symmetries control the interaction of the interacting system with light. By confining electrons and holes into quantum dots hidden symmetries can be removed and the excitation spectrum of electrons and excitons can be observed. We discuss a theory electronic and of excitonic quantum Hall droplets at a filling factorν=2. For an excitonic quantum Hall droplet the characteristic emission spectra are predicted to be related to the total spin of electron and hole configurations. For the electronic droplet the excitation spectrum of the droplet can be mapped out by measuring the emission for increasing number of electrons.

  3. Interacting electrons and holes in quasi-2D quantum dots in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawrylak, P.; Sheng, W.; Cheng, S.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Theory of optical properties of interacting electrons and holes in quasi-2D quantum dots in strong magnetic fields is discussed. In two dimensions and the lowest Landau level, hidden symmetries control the interaction of the interacting system with light. By confining electrons and holes into quantum dots hidden symmetries can be removed and the excitation spectrum of electrons and excitons can be observed. We discuss a theory electronic and excitonic quantum Hall droplets at a filling factor υ = 2. For an excitonic quantum Hall droplet the characteristic emission spectra are predicted to be related to the total spin of electron and hole configurations. For the electronic droplet the excitation spectrum of the droplet can be mapped out by measuring the emission for increasing number of electrons. (author)

  4. Spin manipulation and spin-lattice interaction in magnetic colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2014-11-01

    We report on the spin-lattice interaction and coherent manipulation of electron spins in Mn-doped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) by electron spin resonance. We show that the phase memory time,TM , is limited by Mn-Mn dipolar interactions, hyperfine interactions of the protons (1H) on the QD capping ligands with Mn ions in their proximity (limit and at low temperature, we achieve a long phase memory time constant TM˜0.9 μ s , thus enabling the observation of Rabi oscillations. Our findings suggest routes to the rational design of magnetic colloidal QDs with phase memory times exceeding the current limits of relevance for the implementation of QDs as qubits in quantum information processing.

  5. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You, E-mail: youqiang@uidaho.edu [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs.

  6. Some device implications of voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy in Co/Gd2O3 thin films through REDOX chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guanhua; Noviasky, Nicholas; Cao, Shi; Sabirianov, Ildar; Yin, Yuewei; Ilie, Carolina C.; Kirianov, Eugene; Sharma, Nishtha; Sokolov, Andrei; Marshall, Andrew; Xu, Xiaoshan; Dowben, Peter A.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of intermediate interfacial oxidation on the in-plane magnetization of multilayer stack Pt/Co/Gd2O3, on a p-type silicon substrate, has been investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements, the anomalous Hall effect, and magnetoresistance measurements. While voltage controlled perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a metal/oxide heterostructure is known, this heterostructure displays an inverse relationship between voltage and coercivity. The anomalous Hall effect demonstrates a significant change in hysteresis, with the applied bias sign. There is a higher perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with positive bias exposure.

  7. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  8. Impacts of Coulomb Interactions on the Magnetic Responses of Excitonic Complexes in Single Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Ying-Jhe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the diamagnetic responses of different exciton complexes in single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs and quantum rings (QRs. For QDs, the imbalanced magnetic responses of inter-particle Coulomb interactions play a crucial role in the diamagnetic shifts of excitons (X, biexcitons (XX, and positive trions (X−. For negative trions (X− in QDs, anomalous magnetic responses are observed, which cannot be described by the conventional quadratic energy shift with the magnetic field. The anomalous behavior is attributed to the apparent change in the electron wave function extent after photon emission due to the strong Coulomb attraction by the hole in its initial state. In QRs, the diamagnetic responses of X and XX also show different behaviors. Unlike QDs, the diamagnetic shift of XX in QRs is considerably larger than that of X. The inherent structural asymmetry combined with the inter-particle Coulomb interactions makes the wave function distribution of XX very different from that of X in QRs. Our results suggest that the phase coherence of XX in QRs may survive from the wave function localization due to the structural asymmetry or imperfections.

  9. Hyperfine interaction mechanism of magnetic field effects in sequential fluorophore and exciplex fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, Dmitry V; Ivanov, Anatoly I; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2013-03-28

    The magnetic field effect on the fluorescence of the photoexcited electron acceptor, (1)A∗, and the exciplex, (1)[D(+δ)A(-δ)] formed at contact of (1)A∗ with an electron donor (1)D, is theoretically explored in the framework of Integral Encounter Theory. It is assumed that the excited fluorophore is equilibrated with the exciplex that reversibly dissociates into the radical-ion pair. The magnetic field sensitive stage is the spin conversion in the resulting geminate radical-ion pair, (1, 3)[D(+)...A(-)] that proceeds due to hyperfine interaction. We confirm our earlier conclusion (obtained with a rate description of spin conversion) that in the model with a single nucleus spin 1/2 the magnitude of the Magnetic Field Effect (MFE) also vanishes in the opposite limits of low and high dielectric permittivity of the solvent. Moreover, it is shown that MFE being positive at small hyperfine interaction A, first increases with A but approaching the maximum starts to decrease and even changes the sign.

  10. Magnetism of one-dimensional strongly repulsive spin-1 bosons with antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Guan, X. W.; Batchelor, M. T.; Lee, C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate magnetism and quantum phase transitions in a one-dimensional system of integrable spin-1 bosons with strongly repulsive density-density interaction and antiferromagnetic spin-exchange interaction via the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz method. At zero temperature, the system exhibits three quantum phases: (i) a singlet phase of boson pairs when the external magnetic field H is less than the lower critical field H c1 ; (ii) a ferromagnetic phase of atoms in the hyperfine state |F=1, m F =1> when the external magnetic field exceeds the upper critical field H c2 ; and (iii) a mixed phase of singlet pairs and unpaired atoms in the intermediate region H c1 c2 . At finite temperatures, the spin fluctuations affect the thermodynamics of the model through coupling the spin bound states to the dressed energy for the unpaired m F =1 bosons. However, such spin dynamics is suppressed by a sufficiently strong external field at low temperatures. Thus the singlet pairs and unpaired bosons may form a two-component Luttinger liquid in the strong coupling regime.

  11. Experimental studies and modelling of cation interactions with solid materials: application to the MIMICC project. (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, Emmanuelle

    1999-01-01

    The study of cation interactions with solid materials is useful in order to define the chemistry interaction component of the MIMICC project (Multidimensional Instrumented Module for Investigations on chemistry-transport Coupled Codes). This project will validate the chemistry-transport coupled codes. Database have to be supplied on the cesium or ytterbium interactions with solid materials in suspension. The solid materials are: a strong cation exchange resin, a natural sand which presents small impurities, and a zirconium phosphate. The cation exchange resin is useful to check that the surface complexation theory can be applied on a pure cation exchanger. The sand is a natural material, and its isotherms will be interpreted using pure oxide-cation system data, such as pure silica-cation data. Then the study on the zirconium phosphate salt is interesting because of the increasing complexity in the processes (dissolution, sorption and co-precipitation). These data will enable to approach natural systems, constituted by several complex solids which can interfere on each other. These data can also be used for chemistry-transport coupled codes. Potentiometric titration, sorption isotherms, sorption kinetics, cation surface saturation curves are made, in order to obtain the different parameters relevant to the cation sorption at the solid surface, for each solid-electrolyte-cation system. The influence of different parameters such as ionic strength, pH, and electrolyte is estimated. All the experimental curves are fitted with FITEQL code based on the surface complexation theory using the constant capacitance model, in order to give a mechanistic interpretation of the ion retention phenomenon at the solid surface. The speciation curves of all systems are plotted, using the FITEQL code too. Systems with an increasing complexity are studied: dissolution, sorption and coprecipitation coexist in the cation-salt systems. Then the data obtained on each single solid, considered

  12. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  13. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  14. Interaction of the solar wind with the planet Mars: Phobos 2 magnetic field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetometers on board the Phobos 2 spacecraft provided the opportunity to study the magnetic environment around Mars, including regions which have never been explored before, such as at low altitudes (down to 850 km above the surface of Mars) and in the tail. The data revealed a bow shock, characterized by a distinct jump in the magnetic field strength and a boundary denoted ''planetopause'', where the level of turbulence of the magnetic field changes. Inside the planetopause the field remains quiet. Some of the main characteristics of the bow shock and the magnetosheath can be reproduced by computer simulations within the framework of a gas-dynamic model using the observed planetopause as an obstacle for the incoming solar wind. In many spacecraft orbits around Mars, reversals of the B x -component were found which are typical for tail crossings. A first analysis of the tail data from the circular orbits at a distance of 2.8 Mars radii showed several cases where the reversal of the tail lobes was controlled by the IMF. This supports the idea of an induced character of the solar wind interaction with Mars outside a distance of about 2.8 Mars radii. However, there are certain features in the magnetic field data which could be interpreted as traces of a weak Martian intrinsic field. (author)

  15. Hyperfine interactions in ferromagnetic materials and magnetic properties of 1fsub(7/2) nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, E.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperfine interactions of light nuclei recoil-implanted into iron, nickel and cobalt were studied using the perturbed integral angular distribution IMPAD. Isomeric states of lifetimes within the nanosecond range were excited in the following reactions: 28 Si 14 N, xn, yp 37 Ar, 39 K, 40 K; 27 Al 16 O, xn, yp 41 K, 41 Ca. In all cases except implantation of potassium isotopes into nickel observed shifts of angular distribution were found much smaller than the ones calculated using the known values of g factors, livetimes and strengths of the hyperfine fields. This effect can be explained under the assumption that only a fraction of nuclei feel the full magnetic field. Different fractions obtained for 40 K and 41 K suggest a migration process on a ns time scale. The magnetic moments of isomeric nuclear states excited in reaction 27 Al 14 N, p 36 Cl, 24 Mg 19 F, 2pn 40 K and 48 Ca, 2n 50 Ti were measured using the perturbed integral angular distribution technique - IPAD in an external magnetic field. The g factors for the investigated states were interpreted on the base of the shell model, assuming the effective magnetic moments associated with shell model orbitals dsub(3/2) and fsub(7/2). (author)

  16. Toward Molecular Magnets of Organic Origin via Anion-π Interaction Involving m-Aminyl Diradical: A Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debojit; Shil, Suranjan; Misra, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Here we study a set of novel magnetic organic molecular species with different halide ions (fluoride, chloride, bromide) absorbed ∼2 Å above or below the center of an aromatic π-ring in an m-aminyl diradical. Focus is on the nature of anion-π interaction and its impact on magnetic properties, spe...

  17. Effect of magnetostatic interactions on twin boundary motion in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Vokoun, David; Kopecký, Vít; Beleggia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Jul (2015), s. 1000204 ISSN 1949-307X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00262S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetism in solids * demagnetization factors * magnetostatic interactions * shape memory alloys Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.978, year: 2015

  18. Magnetical and optical properties of nanodiamonds can be tuned by particles surface chemistry: theoretical and experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Šebera, Jakub; Ashcheulov, Petr; Golan, Martin; Ledvina, Miroslav; Mičová, Júlia; Mravec, F.; Kovalenko, A.; Zverev, D.; Yavkin, B.; Orlinskii, S.; Záliš, Stanislav; Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Šefc, L.; Turánek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 43 (2014), s. 25245-25252 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01011165; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanodiamond particles * NV luminescent centers * surface functionalization * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2014

  19. Static and quasi-elastic small angle neutron scattering on biocompatible ionic ferrofluids: magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of ionic magnetic fluids (MFs), based on ferrite nanoparticles, dispersed at pH approx 7 either in H sub 2 O or in D sub 2 O. Polarized and non-polarized static small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in zero magnetic field allow us to study both the magnetic and the nuclear contributions to the neutron scattering. The magnetic interparticle attraction is probed separately from the global thermodynamic repulsion and compares well to direct magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetic interparticle correlation is in these fluid samples independent of the probed spatial scale. In contrast, a spatial dependence of the interparticle correlation is evidenced at large PHI by the nuclear structure factor. A model of magnetic interaction quantitatively explains the under-field anisotropy of the SANS nuclear contribution. In a quasi-elastic neutron spin-echo experiment, we probe the Brownian dynamics of translation of the nanoparticles in the range 1.3 sup<=...

  20. The interaction between the permanent magnet and ceramic superconductor with organic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woźny, L; Kisiel, A; Garbera, A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the phenomenon of magnetic levitation for YBaCuO superconducting samples in pure form and with epoxy resin content of 40%. Samples of superconductors were prepared by the standard reaction in the solid state. The forces of interaction between the superconductor and neodymium permanent magnet were measured. Samples with epoxy resin fillers had significantly smaller levitation force than the sample of the sintered superconductors. This is due to a much lower content of pure superconducting material in the sample volume (about 60% of the YBaCuO). However, the obvious advantage of such samples is the possibility of preparation superconductors with complicated shapes, eg. for use in a superconducting bearings or other devices. (paper)

  1. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wire in external magnetic field: Froehlich interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Riera, Ri.; Nieto Jalil, J.M.; Betancourt-Riera, Re.; Riera, R.

    2009-01-01

    The differential cross-section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum wire in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of confinement regarding phonon-assisted transitions, is calculated. We assume single parabolic conduction band and present a description of the phonon modes of cylindrical structures embedded in another material using the Froehlich phonon interaction. To illustrate the theory we use a GaAs/Al 0.35 Ga 0.75 As system. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. The magnetic field distribution is considered constant with value B 0 inside of the wire, and zero outside.

  2. Numerical solutions to the critical state in a magnet-high temperature superconductor interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Alonso, D; Coombs, T A; Campbell, A M [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to simulate the electromagnetic behaviour of devices containing high temperature superconductors in axially symmetric problems. The numerical method is built within the finite element method. The electromagnetic properties of HTSCs are described through the critical-state model. Measurements of the axial force between a permanent magnet and a melt-textured YBCO puck are obtained in order to validate the method. This simple system is modelled so that the proposed method obtains the current distribution and electromagnetic fields in the HTSC. The forces in the interaction between the magnet and the HTSC puck can then be calculated. A comparison between experimental and simulation results shows good matching. The simplification of using the critical-state model and ignoring flux creep in this type of configuration is also explored.

  3. Influence of mechanical vibrations on the field quality measurements of LHC interaction region quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Di Marco, J; Schlabach, P; Sylvester, C D; Tompkins, J C; Krzywinski, J

    2000-01-01

    The high gradient quadrupole magnets being developed by the US-LHC Accelerator Project for the LHC Interaction Regions have stringent field quality requirements. The field quality of these magnets will be measured using a rotating coil system presently under development. Mechanical vibrations of the coil during field quality measurements are of concern because such vibrations can introduce systematic errors in measurement results. This paper presents calculations of the expected influence of vibrations on field quality measurements and a technique to measure vibrations present in data acquired with standard "tangential-style" probes. Measured vibrations are reported and compared to simulations. Limits on systematic errors in multipole measurements are discussed along with implications for probe and measurement system design. (3 refs).

  4. Emergent spin electromagnetism induced by magnetization textures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatara, Gen, E-mail: gen.tatara@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan); Nakabayashi, Noriyuki [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 Japan (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Emergent electromagnetic field which couples to electron's spin in ferromagnetic metals is theoretically studied. Rashba spin-orbit interaction induces spin electromagnetic field which is in the linear order in gradient of magnetization texture. The Rashba-induced effective electric and magnetic fields satisfy in the absence of spin relaxation the Maxwell's equations as in the charge-based electromagnetism. When spin relaxation is taken into account besides spin dynamics, a monopole current emerges generating spin motive force via the Faraday's induction law. The monopole is expected to play an important role in spin-charge conversion and in the integration of spintronics into electronics.

  5. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornacchia, M; Parzen, G

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors.

  6. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Parzen, G.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors

  7. Influence of the geometry on magnetic interactions in a retina fixator based on a magnetoactive elastomer seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzharyan, T. A.; Makarova, L. A.; Kazimirova, E. G.; Perov, N. S.; Kramarenko, E. Yu

    2018-03-01

    We study the effects the geometric configuration has on magnetic interactions between a magnetoactive elastomer (MAE) sample and various systems of permanent magnets for problems with both flat and curved geometry. MAEs consist of a silicone polymer matrix and iron filler microparticles embedded in it. Permanent magnets are cylindrical neodymium magnets arranged in a line on a flat or curved solid surfaces. We use computer simulations, namely the finite element method, in order to study the interaction force and magnetic pressure in a system with an MAE sample and permanent magnets. The model is based on classical Maxwell magnetostatics and two factors taking into account field dependence of MAE’s magnetic properties and inhomogeneities caused by local demagnetization. We calculate magnetic pressure dependences on various geometric parameters of the system, namely, the diameter and the height of permanent magnets, the distance between the magnets and dimensions of MAE samples. This research aims to create a set of guidelines for choosing the geometric configuration of a retina fixator based on MAE seals to be used in eye surgery for retinal detachment treatment.

  8. Magnetized Langmuir wave packets excited by a strong beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, G.; Sol, H.; Asseo, E.

    1988-01-01

    The physics of beam-plasma interaction, which has been investigated for a long time mostly in relation with solar bursts, is now more widely invoked in various astrophysical contexts such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, close binaries, cataclysmic variables, γ bursters, and so on. In these situations the interaction is more likely in the spirit of strong Langmuir turbulence rather than in the spirit of quasilinear theory. Many investigations have been done for two opposite extremes, namely, in very weak and in very strong magnetic fields. Very few properties of the strong Langmuir turbulence are known in the most usual astrophysical situation where the magnetic field plays a significant role but is not strong enough to force the electrons into one-dimensional motion. For this case, we analyze the dynamics of Langmuir wave packets and provide new results about the stability of the solitons against transverse perturbations. It turns out that both the averaged Lagrangian method and the adiabatic perturbation method derived from the inverse scattering transform give exactly the same results (which is not obvious in soliton perturbation theory). In particular, they predict the stability of the solitons as long as the electron gyrofrequency is greater than the plasma frequency (strong magnetic field) and their instability against transverse self-modulation in the opposite case (weak magnetic field); moreover, they allow one to deduce the self-similar collapsing oblate cavitons in the latter case. The laws governing the collapse of the wave packets determine the relaxation of the beam in the surrounding medium and we derive a useful formula giving the power loss of the beam. We outline the astrophysical consequences of this investigation

  9. Oblique Interaction of Dust-ion Acoustic Solitons with Superthermal Electrons in a Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shahida; Mahmood, Shahzad; Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa

    2018-01-01

    The oblique interaction between two dust-ion acoustic (DIA) solitons travelling in the opposite direction, in a collisionless magnetized plasma composed of dynamic ions, static dust (positive/negative) charged particles and interialess kappa distributed electrons is investigated. By employing extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method, Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations are derived for the right and left moving low amplitude DIA solitons. Their trajectories and corresponding phase shifts before and after their interaction are also obtained. It is found that in negatively charged dusty plasma above the critical dust charged to ion density ratio the positive polarity pulse is formed, while below the critical dust charged density ratio the negative polarity pulse of DIA soliton exist. However it is found that only positive polarity pulse of DIA solitons exist for the positively charged dust particles case in a magnetized nonthermal plasma. The nonlinearity coefficient in the KdV equation vanishes for the negatively charged dusty plasma case for a particular set of parameters. Therefore, at critical plasma density composition for negatively charged dust particles case, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations having cubic nonlinearity coefficient of the DIA solitons, and their corresponding phase shifts are derived for the left and right moving solitons. The effects of the system parameters including the obliqueness of solitons propagation with respect to magnetic field direction, superthermality of electrons and concentration of positively/negatively static dust charged particles on the phase shifts of the colliding solitons are also discussed and presented numerically. The results are applicable to space magnetized dusty plasma regimes.

  10. Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types

  11. Spin-interaction effects for ultralong-range Rydberg molecules in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Frederic; Fey, Christian; Schmelcher, Peter

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the fine and spin structure of ultralong-range Rydberg molecules exposed to a homogeneous magnetic field. Each molecule consists of a 87Rb Rydberg atom the outer electron of which interacts via spin-dependent s - and p -wave scattering with a polarizable 87Rb ground-state atom. Our model includes also the hyperfine structure of the ground-state atom as well as spin-orbit couplings of the Rydberg and ground-state atom. We focus on d -Rydberg states and principal quantum numbers n in the vicinity of 40. The electronic structure and vibrational states are determined in the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for varying field strengths ranging from a few up to hundred Gauss. The results show that the interplay between the scattering interactions and the spin couplings gives rise to a large variety of molecular states in different spin configurations as well as in different spatial arrangements that can be tuned by the magnetic field. This includes relatively regularly shaped energy surfaces in a regime where the Zeeman splitting is large compared to the scattering interaction but small compared to the Rydberg fine structure, as well as more complex structures for both weaker and stronger fields. We quantify the impact of spin couplings by comparing the extended theory to a spin-independent model.

  12. Prediction of d^0 magnetism in self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Pemmaraju, Chaitanya

    2010-03-01

    Over the past couple of years, the phenomenon of ``d^0 magnetism'' has greatly intrigued the magnetism community [1]. Unlike conventional magnetic materials, ``d^0 magnets'' lack any magnetic ions with open d or f shells but surprisingly, exhibit signatures of ferromagnetism often with a Curie temperature exceeding 300 K. Current research in the field is geared towards trying to understand the mechanism underlying this observed ferromagnetism which is difficult to explain within the conventional m-J paradigm [1]. The most widely studied class of d^0 materials are un-doped and light element doped wide gap Oxides such as HfO2, MgO, ZnO, TiO2 all of which have been put forward as possible d0 ferromagnets. General experimental trends suggest that the magnetism is a feature of highly defective samples leading to the expectation that the phenomenon must be defect related. In particular, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations acceptor defects formed from the O-2p states in these Oxides have been proposed as being responsible for the ferromagnetism [2,3]. However. predicting magnetism originating from 2p orbitals is a delicate problem, which depends on the subtle interplay between covalency and Hund's coupling. DFT calculations based on semi-local functionals such as the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) can lead to qualitative failures on several fronts. On one hand the excessive delocalization of spin-polarized holes leads to half-metallic ground states and the expectation of room-temperature ferromagnetism. On the other hand, in some cases a magnetic ground state may not be predicted at all as the Hund's coupling might be under estimated. Furthermore, polaronic distortions which are often a feature of acceptor defects in Oxides are not predicted [4,5]. In this presentation, we argue that the self interaction error (SIE) inherent to semi-local functionals is responsible for the failures of LSDA and demonstrate through various examples that beyond

  13. Spin texturing in quantum wires with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions and in-plane magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisi, B; Sakiroglu, S; Sokmen, İ

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of interplay of spin–orbit interaction and in-plane magnetic fields on the electronic structure and spin texturing of parabolically confined quantum wire. Numerical results reveal that the competing effects between Rashba and Dresselhaus spin–orbit interactions and the external magnetic field lead to a complicated energy spectrum. We find that the spin texturing owing to the coupling between subbands can be modified by the strength of spin–orbit couplings as well as the magnitude and the orientation angle of the external magnetic field. (paper)

  14. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  15. New aspects of π–d interactions in magnetic molecular conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Toyonari; Fujiwara, Hideki; Noguchi, Satoru; Murata, Keizo

    2009-01-01

    The 2 : 1 cation radical salts of bent donor molecules of ethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDT-TTFVO), ethylenedithio-diselenadithiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDT-DSDTFVO), ethylenedithio-diselenadithiafulvalenothioquinone-1,3-diselenolemethide (EDT-DSDTFVSDS), ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDO-TTFVO) and ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-diselenolemethide (EDO-TTFVODS) with FeX4− (X = Cl, Br) ions are prepared by electrocrystallization. The crystal structures of these salts are composed of alternately stacked donor molecule and magnetic anion layers. The band structures of the donor molecule layers are calculated using the overlap integrals between neighboring donor molecules and are compared with the observed electronic transport properties. The magnetic ordering of the Fe(III) d spins of FeX4− ions is determined from magnetization and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic ordering temperatures are estimated by considering a combination of a direct d–d interaction between the d spins and an indirect π–d interaction between the conduction π electron and the d spins, whose magnitudes are separately calculated from the crystal structures with an extended Hückel molecular orbital method. The occurrence of a π–d interaction is proved by the negative magnetoresistance, and the magnitude of magnetoresistance reflects the strength of the π–d interaction. The effect of pressure on the magnetoresistance is studied, and the result indicates that the magnitude of magnetoresistance increases, namely, the π–d interaction is enhanced with increasing pressure. From these experimental results it is shown that (EDT-TTFVO)2•FeBr4 is a ferromagnetic semiconductor, (EDT-DSDTFVO)2•FeX4 (X = Cl, Br) and (EDT-DSDTFVSDS)2•FeBr4 are metals exhibiting antiferromagnetic ordering of the d spins, and (EDO-TTFVO)2•FeCl4 and (EDO-TTFVODS)2•FeBr4•(DCE)0.5 (DCE =-dichloroethane) are

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: New aspects of π-d interactions in magnetic molecular conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Toyonari; Fujiwara, Hideki; Noguchi, Satoru; Murata, Keizo

    2009-04-01

    The 2 : 1 cation radical salts of bent donor molecules of ethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDT-TTFVO), ethylenedithio-diselenadithiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDT-DSDTFVO), ethylenedithio-diselenadithiafulvalenothioquinone-1,3-diselenolemethide (EDT-DSDTFVSDS), ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-dithiolemethide (EDO-TTFVO) and ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalenoquinone-1,3-diselenolemethide (EDO-TTFVODS) with FeX4- (X = Cl, Br) ions are prepared by electrocrystallization. The crystal structures of these salts are composed of alternately stacked donor molecule and magnetic anion layers. The band structures of the donor molecule layers are calculated using the overlap integrals between neighboring donor molecules and are compared with the observed electronic transport properties. The magnetic ordering of the Fe(III) d spins of FeX4- ions is determined from magnetization and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic ordering temperatures are estimated by considering a combination of a direct d-d interaction between the d spins and an indirect π-d interaction between the conduction π electron and the d spins, whose magnitudes are separately calculated from the crystal structures with an extended Hückel molecular orbital method. The occurrence of a π-d interaction is proved by the negative magnetoresistance, and the magnitude of magnetoresistance reflects the strength of the π-d interaction. The effect of pressure on the magnetoresistance is studied, and the result indicates that the magnitude of magnetoresistance increases, namely, the π-d interaction is enhanced with increasing pressure. From these experimental results it is shown that (EDT-TTFVO)2•FeBr4 is a ferromagnetic semiconductor, (EDT-DSDTFVO)2•FeX4 (X = Cl, Br) and (EDT-DSDTFVSDS)2•FeBr4 are metals exhibiting antiferromagnetic ordering of the d spins, and (EDO-TTFVO)2•FeCl4 and (EDO-TTFVODS)2•FeBr4•(DCE)0.5 (DCE =-dichloroethane) are genuine

  17. Interaction domains in permanent-magnetic rare-earth transition-metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielsch, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of this dissertation the phenomenon of the interaction domains was studied both experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulation. Object of the study were one-phase NdFeB magnets, which were fabricated from commercial MQU-F powders of the Magnequench Inc. company by hot pressing and subsequent warm deformation in the IWF Dresden. Additionally via the same fabrication way also composite samples of NdFeB and Fe with different original particle sizes ere obtained and studied. Supported wer the experimental works by simulations with the FEMME software package, which is based on a hybrid finite-element method/boundary-element method.

  18. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with magnetically functionalized CNT nanocomposite in the subterahertz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atdaev, A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Labunov, V. A.; Prischepa, S. L., E-mail: prischepa@bsuir.by [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Nanotechnologies (Russian Federation); Basaev, A. S.; Shaman, Yu. P. [SMC Technological Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a magnetically functionalized nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is considered using the model of random distribution of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the carbon matrix characterized by the presence of resistive–inductive–capacitive coupling (contours). The model is based on the representation of the nanocomposite as a system consisting of the CNT matrix, ferromagnetic nanoparticles, and the interfaces between CNTs and nanoparticles. The wide range of possible resonant phenomena caused both by the presence of contours and the properties of the CNT nanocomposite is shown.

  19. Surface-wave endash particle interactions in a cylindrical plasma submitted to a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dengra, A.

    1997-01-01

    A new theoretical model for the study of the surface-wave endash particle interactions in a plasma column in the presence of a constant external magnetic field has been developed. The model is based on the linear resolution of the Vlasov equation by the method of characteristics, with the specular reflection hypothesis at the wall. The expression obtained for the rate of increase of kinetic energy per electron permits the analysis of the influence of the critical parameters in this transference process. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Coulomb interactions in dense two-dimensional electron systems in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Szucheng.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest model of a two-dimensional system ignores the Coulomb interactions between the electrons. In this approximation, the electrons occupy the Landau levels, broadened by impurities and irregularities in the lattice. This independent electron approximation has usually been used to discuss observations for electron densities ρ and magnetic fields B where bar ν > 1 (bar ν triple-bond the number of Landau levels occupied). The most famous example is the theory of the integral Quantum Hall effect. However, when bar ν 1, electron-electron interactions should become important through the mixing of Landau levels. This thesis describes calculations for bar ν > 1 on phenomena which should be sensitive to electron-electron interactions: Wigner crystallization, the stability of the Landau levels under electron-electron interactions, the existence of quasiparticles and quasiholes, and the densities of states. The main results obtained concern: (1) The values of ρ and B where crystallization should occur when bar ν > 1. (2) The effect of electron-electron interactions in broadening the individual Landau levels, and in distributing the amplitudes for the excitation of independent electrons over many Landau levels. (3) The existence of quasiparticles and quasiholes whose lifetime is infinite near the Fermi level

  1. Role of electron-electron interactions in the RKKY theory of magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, J.F.

    1978-10-01

    The theory of magnetism in heavy rare earth metals is based on the RKKY theory. In this formalism the indirect exchange interaction between the local 4f spins is mediated by the conduction electrons. When carried to second order in the 4f-conduction electron interaction, traditional perturbation theory leads to a Heisenberg-like interaction between the local spins which depends on the electronic energy bands and 4f-conduction electron exchange matrix elements. This derivation neglects the detailed behavior of electron-electron interaction within the conduction band, which is known to be important in metallic systems. By using an equation of motion method, an expression for the inelastic neutron scattering cross-section has been derived which includes, in an approximate way, this electron-electron interaction. The results of this calculation indicate that spin-wave peaks can be broadened and shifted if the spin-wave band lies near the conduction electron Stoner continuum. The origin of this effect is similar to that found in itinerant electron systems where the spin-wave band actually intersects the Stoner continuum, resulting in the disappearance of the spin-wave mode

  2. Role of electron-electron interactions in the RKKY theory of magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of magnetism in heavy rare earth metals is based on the RKKY theory. In this formalism the indirect exchange interaction between the local 4f spins is mediated by the conduction electrons. When carried to second order in the 4f-conduction electron interaction, traditional pertubation theory leads to a Heisenberg-like interaction between the local spins which depends on the electronic energy bands and 4f-conduction electron exchange matrix elements. This derivation neglects the detailed behavior of electron-electron interaction within the conduction band, which is known to be important in metallic systems. By using an equation of motion method, an expression for the inelastic neutron scattering cross-section has been derived which includes, in an approximate way, this electron-electron interaction. The results of this calculation indicate that spin-wave peaks can be broadened and shifted if the spin-wave band lies near the conduction electron Stoner continuum. The origin of this effect is similar to that found in itinerant electron systems where the spin-wave band actually intersects the Stoner continuum, resulting in the disappearance of the spin-wave mode

  3. Evidence of magnetic dipolar interaction in micrometric powders of the Fe50Mn10Al40 system: Melted alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Alcázar, G.A.; Zamora, L.E.; Tabares, J.A.; Piamba, J.F.; González, J.M.; Greneche, J.M.; Martinez, A.; Romero, J.J.; Marco, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Powders of melted disordered Fe 50 Mn 10 Al 40 alloy were separated at different mean particle sizes as well as magnetically and structurally characterized. All the samples are BCC and show the same nanostructure. Particles larger than 250 μm showed a lamellar shape compared to smaller particles, which exhibited a more regular form. All the samples are ferromagnetic at room temperature and showed reentrant spin-glass (RSG) and superparamagnetic (SP)-like behaviors between 30 and 60 K and 265 and > 280 K, respectively, as a function of frequency and particle size. The freezing temperature increases with increasing particle size while the blocking one decreases with particle size. The origin of these magnetic phenomena relies in the internal disordered character of samples and the competitive interaction of Fe and Mn atoms. The increase of their critical freezing temperature with increasing mean particle size is due to the increase of the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moment of each particle with the field produced by the other magnetic moments of their surrounding particles. - Highlights: ► The effect of particle size in microsized powders of Fe 50 Mn 10 Al 40 melted disordered alloy is studied. ► Dipolar magnetic interaction between particles exists and this changes with the particle size. ► For all the particle sizes the reentrant spin- glass and the superparamagnetic-like phases exist. ► RSG and SP critical temperatures increase with increasing the dipolar magnetic interaction (the mean particle size).

  4. Interaction between the magnetic moments of the 3d and the 4f electrons in manganite, probed by Ga substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Langsheng; Zhang Lei; Tong Wei; Qu Zhe; Pi Li; Zhang Yuheng

    2012-01-01

    The substitution of Ga for Mn in manganite Nd 0.6 Dy 0.1 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 with a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state has been performed to study the influence of the Mn-sublattice magnetic ordering on the magnetic rare-earth sublattice. It is found that the substitution of Mn 3+ with Ga 3+ ions results in a sharp decrease of T C , reflecting the reduction of the double-exchange interactions strength J Mn–Mn . At the same time, a depinning effect of the rare-earth magnetic moment has been observed. This behavior unambiguously proves that the exchange interaction between Mn and rare-earth ions J Mn–R strongly influences the rare-earth magnetic ordering at temperatures below T C and stabilizes the rare-earth magnetic ground state.

  5. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  6. On the influence of the hydrodynamic interactions on the aggregation rate of magnetic spheres in a dilute suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, F.R.; Couto, H.L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetostatic attraction may lead to formation of aggregates in stable colloidal magnetic suspensions and magneto-rheological suspensions. The aggregation problem of magnetic composites under differential sedimentation is a key problem in the control of the instability of non-Brownian suspensions. Against these attractive forces are the electrostatic repulsion and the hydrodynamic interactions acting as stabilizing effects to the suspension. This work concerns an investigation of the pairwise interaction of magnetic particles in a dilute sedimenting suspension. We focus attention on suspensions where the Peclet number is large (negligible Brownian motion) and where the Reynolds number (negligible inertia) is small. The suspension is composed of magnetic micro-spheres of different radius and density immersed in a Newtonian fluid moving under the action of gravity. The theoretical calculations are based on direct computations of the hydrodynamic and the magnetic interactions among the rigid spheres in the regime of low particle Reynolds number. From the limiting trajectory in which aggregation occurs, we calculate the collision efficiency, representing the dimensionless rate at which aggregates are formed. The numerical results show clear evidence that the hydrodynamic interactions are of fundamental relevance in the process of magnetic particle aggregation. We compare the stabilizing effects between electrostatic repulsion and hydrodynamic interactions.

  7. On the influence of the hydrodynamic interactions on the aggregation rate of magnetic spheres in a dilute suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, F.R., E-mail: frcunha@unb.b [Universidade de Brasilia, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Depto. de Engenharia Mecanica, Grupo de Mecanica dos Fluidos de Escoamentos Complexos - VORTEX, Campus Universitario Darcy Ribeiro, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Couto, H.L.G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Depto. de Engenharia Mecanica, Grupo de Mecanica dos Fluidos de Escoamentos Complexos - VORTEX, Campus Universitario Darcy Ribeiro, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Magnetostatic attraction may lead to formation of aggregates in stable colloidal magnetic suspensions and magneto-rheological suspensions. The aggregation problem of magnetic composites under differential sedimentation is a key problem in the control of the instability of non-Brownian suspensions. Against these attractive forces are the electrostatic repulsion and the hydrodynamic interactions acting as stabilizing effects to the suspension. This work concerns an investigation of the pairwise interaction of magnetic particles in a dilute sedimenting suspension. We focus attention on suspensions where the Peclet number is large (negligible Brownian motion) and where the Reynolds number (negligible inertia) is small. The suspension is composed of magnetic micro-spheres of different radius and density immersed in a Newtonian fluid moving under the action of gravity. The theoretical calculations are based on direct computations of the hydrodynamic and the magnetic interactions among the rigid spheres in the regime of low particle Reynolds number. From the limiting trajectory in which aggregation occurs, we calculate the collision efficiency, representing the dimensionless rate at which aggregates are formed. The numerical results show clear evidence that the hydrodynamic interactions are of fundamental relevance in the process of magnetic particle aggregation. We compare the stabilizing effects between electrostatic repulsion and hydrodynamic interactions.

  8. Study of ln s Physics in $\\bar{p}p$ Interactions at the Split Field Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment uses the Split Field Magnet detector to investigate the low p^t, ``ln~s'', type of interactions that dominate the @*p cross-section. Systematic comparisons will be made to pp interactions. \\\\ \\\\ Specific areas to be studied include elastic scattering in the regions 0.05 $<$ !t! $<$ 0.8 GeV|2 and 0.8 $<$ !t! $<$ 4.0 GeV|2, and the use of a minimum bias trigger to study topological cross-sections, inclusive spectra, and two-body correlations. Some specialized triggers, run simultaneously with the high t elastic scattering trigger, are being studied. Examples are a trigger requiring Cerenkov identification in a limited region of phase space, and a trigger to select diffractively produced events.

  9. Collisional effects on interaction potential in complex plasma in presence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezbaruah, Pratikshya, E-mail: pratphd@tezu.ernet.in; Das, Nilakshi [Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Interaction potential in complex plasma with streaming ions is derived analytically in presence of ion-neutral collision and magnetic field. The linear dielectric response function obtained describes the behavior of charged micron sized dust particles in strong collisional limit. A new type of repulsive potential is found to be operative among the dust grains apart from the normal Debye–Hückel potential. The amplitude and shielding length involved in the potential are substantially affected by the parameters describing ion cyclotron frequency, collision frequency among ions and neutrals, and ion streaming. It is also observed that the usual mechanism of ion focusing surrounding the grain is inhibited due to collision. As a result, the attractive wake potential structure is destroyed in the ion flow direction. The horizontal interaction involves only Debye–Hückel potential.

  10. Collisional effects on interaction potential in complex plasma in presence of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezbaruah, Pratikshya; Das, Nilakshi

    2016-01-01

    Interaction potential in complex plasma with streaming ions is derived analytically in presence of ion-neutral collision and magnetic field. The linear dielectric response function obtained describes the behavior of charged micron sized dust particles in strong collisional limit. A new type of repulsive potential is found to be operative among the dust grains apart from the normal Debye–Hückel potential. The amplitude and shielding length involved in the potential are substantially affected by the parameters describing ion cyclotron frequency, collision frequency among ions and neutrals, and ion streaming. It is also observed that the usual mechanism of ion focusing surrounding the grain is inhibited due to collision. As a result, the attractive wake potential structure is destroyed in the ion flow direction. The horizontal interaction involves only Debye–Hückel potential.

  11. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging to update interactive navigation in neurosurgery: method and preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, C R; Bonsanto, M M; Knauth, M; Tronnier, V M; Albert, F K; Staubert, A; Kunze, S

    1997-01-01

    We report on the first successful intraoperative update of interactive image guidance based on an intraoperatively acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) date set. To date, intraoperative imaging methods such as ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT), or MRI have not been successfully used to update interactive navigation. We developed a method of imaging patients intraoperatively with the surgical field exposed in an MRI scanner (Magnetom Open; Siemens Corp., Erlangen, Germany). In 12 patients, intraoperatively acquired 3D data sets were used for successful recalibration of neuronavigation, accounting for any anatomical changes caused by surgical manipulations. The MKM Microscope (Zeiss Corp., Oberkochen, Germany) was used as navigational system. With implantable fiducial markers, an accuracy of 0.84 +/- 0.4 mm for intraoperative reregistration was achieved. Residual tumor detected on MRI was consequently resected using navigation with the intraoperative data. No adverse effects were observed from intraoperative imaging or the use of navigation with intraoperative images, demonstrating the feasibility of recalibrating navigation with intraoperative MRI.

  12. Challenges in design of Kitaev materials: Magnetic interactions from competing energy scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stephen M.; Li, Ying; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we reanalyze the magnetic interactions in the Kitaev spin-liquid candidate materials Na2IrO3,α -RuCl3 , and α -Li2IrO3 using nonperturbative exact diagonalization methods. These methods are more appropriate given the relatively itinerant nature of the systems suggested in previous works. We treat all interactions up to third neighbors on equal footing. The computed terms reveal significant long-range coupling, bond anisotropy, and/or off-diagonal couplings which we argue naturally explain the observed ordered phases in these systems. Given these observations, the potential for realizing the spin-liquid state in real materials is analyzed, and synthetic challenges are defined and explained.

  13. Dimensionality and magnetic interactions in CaFe2As2: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompsett, D.A.; Lonzarich, G.G.

    2010-01-01

    We present detailed electronic structure calculations for CaFe 2 As 2 . We investigate in particular the 'collapsed' tetragonal and orthorhombic regions of the temperature-pressure phase diagram and find properties that distinguish CaFe 2 As 2 from other Fe-pnictide compounds. In contrast to the tetragonal phase of other Fe-pnictides the electronic structure in the 'collapsed' tetragonal phase of CaFe 2 As 2 is found to be strongly 3D. By an analysis of the non-interacting susceptibility, χ 0 (q), of CaFe 2 As 2 and LaFePO we discuss the role of magnetic interactions in iron-pnictides. From this we propose an intuitive explanation for the outstanding question relating to why the predicted antiferromagnetic moment depends strongly on coordinate relaxation and the choice of correlation functional.

  14. The Use and Evaluation of Scaffolding, Student Centered-Learning, Behaviorism, and Constructivism to Teach Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and IR Spectroscopy in a Two-Semester Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, Kimberly; Lewallen, Denver W.; Leatherman, Jennifer; Maxwell, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2002, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been introduced at the beginning of the first-semester organic chemistry lab course at this university. Starting in 2008, each individual student was given 20 unique homework problems that consisted of multiple-choice [superscript 1]H NMR and IR problems…

  15. Interactive chemistry in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique general circulation model: model description and impact analysis of biogenic hydrocarbons on tropospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Folberth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a description and evaluation of LMDz-INCA, a global three-dimensional chemistry-climate model, pertaining to its recently developed NMHC version. In this substantially extended version of the model a comprehensive representation of the photochemistry of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and volatile organic compounds (VOC from biogenic, anthropogenic, and biomass-burning sources has been included. The tropospheric annual mean methane (9.2 years and methylchloroform (5.5 years chemical lifetimes are well within the range of previous modelling studies and are in excellent agreement with estimates established by means of global observations. The model provides a reasonable simulation of the horizontal and vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of CO and key non-methane VOC, such as acetone, methanol, and formaldehyde as compared to observational data from several ground stations and aircraft campaigns. LMDz-INCA in the NMHC version reproduces tropospheric ozone concentrations fairly well throughout most of the troposphere. The model is applied in several sensitivity studies of the biosphere-atmosphere photochemical feedback. The impact of surface emissions of isoprene, acetone, and methanol is studied. These experiments show a substantial impact of isoprene on tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide concentrations revealing an increase in surface O3 and CO levels of up to 30 ppbv and 60 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene also appears to significantly impact the global OH distribution resulting in a decrease of the global mean tropospheric OH concentration by approximately 0.7×105 molecules cm-3 or roughly 8% and an increase in the global mean tropospheric methane lifetime by approximately seven months. A global mean ozone net radiative forcing due to the isoprene induced increase in the tropospheric ozone burden of 0.09 W m-2 is found. The key role of isoprene photooxidation in the global tropospheric redistribution of NOx is demonstrated. LMDz

  16. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  17. Probe manipulators for Wendelstein 7-X and their interaction with the magnetic topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, RACK; D, HÖSCHEN; D, REITER; B, UNTERBERG; J, W. COENEN; S, BREZINSEK; O, NEUBAUER; S, BOZHENKOV; G, CZYMEK; Y, LIANG; M, HUBENY; Ch, LINSMEIER; the Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2018-05-01

    Probe manipulators are a versatile addition to typical plasma edge diagnostics. Equipped with material samples they allow for detailed investigation of plasma–wall interaction processes, such as material erosion, deposition or impurity transport pathways. When combined with electrical probes, a study of scrape-off layer and plasma edge density, temperature and flow profiles as well as magnetic topologies is possible. A mid-plane manipulator is already in operation on Wendelstein 7-X. A system in the divertor region is currently under development. In the present paper we discuss the critical issue of heat and power loads, power redistribution and experimental access to the complex magnetic topology of Wendelstein 7-X. All the aforementioned aspects are of relevance for the design and operation of a probe manipulator in a device like Wendelstein 7-X. A focus is put on the topological region that is accessible for the different coil current configurations at Wendelstein 7-X and the power load on the manipulator with respect to the resulting different magnetic configurations. Qualitative analysis of power loads on plasma-facing components is performed using a numerical tracer particle diffusion tool provided via the Wendelstein 7-X Webservices.

  18. Plasma and neutral gas jet interactions in the exhaust of a magnetic confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, W.A.

    1990-06-01

    A general purpose 2-1/2 dimensional, multifluid, time dependent computer code has been developed. This flexible tool models the dynamic behavior of plasma/neutral gas interactions in the presence of a magnetic field. The simulation has been used to examine the formation of smoke ring structure in the plasma rocket exhaust by injection of an axial jet of neutral gas. Specifically, the code was applied to the special case of attempting to couple the neutral gas momentum to the plasma in such a manner that plasma smoke rings would form, disconnecting the plasma from the magnetic field. For this scenario several cases where run scanning a wide range of neutral gas input parameters. In all the cases it was found that after an initial transient phase, the plasma eroded the neutral gas and after that followed the original magnetic field. From these findings it is concluded that smoke rings do not form with axial injection of neutral gas. Several suggestions for alternative injection schemes are presented

  19. Radiation chemistry and bioradical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism results, at the cellular level, in the formation of superoxyde radical O 2 - · and probably also of hydroxyl radical OH·. Other radical species can be produced from exogenous or endogenous molecules and nearly all of them have the possibility to react with oxygen giving peroxyradicals. Some of these transients play a role in various biological processes such as phagocytosis, inflammation or ischemy although the mechanisms invoked are poorly understood. Radiation chemistry is an invaluable tool for obtaining a quantitative view of these mechanisms. A description is given of this interaction [fr

  20. Magnetic and electric order in the spin-1/2 XX model with three-spin interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Pradeep; Durganandini, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune - 411007 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We study the spin-1/2 XX model in the presence of three-spin interactions of the XZX+YZY and XZY-YZX types. We solve the problem exactly and show that there is both finite magnetization and electric polarization for low non-zero strengths of the three-spin interactions.

  1. Magnetic Interaction through Non-Conjugated Framework Observed in Back-to-Back Connected Triazinyl-Nitroxyl Biradical Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Matsuhashi, Ryo; Miura, Youhei; Yoshioka, Naoki

    2018-03-24

    Three hetero-biradical derivatives having a structure of a back-to-back connected benzotriazinyl and tetramethyl or tetraethylisoindoline N-oxyl sharing a common benzo ring, 1-tBu, 1-Ph, and 2-tBu were synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray analyses, variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies, and DFT calculations. Temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility of 1-tBu, 1-Ph, and 2-tBu exhibit broad maxima at 70, 71, and 43 K, respectively. Though these radical derivatives form a columnar or chained assembly in the solid state, magnetic measurement of the polymer diluted sample and computational results imply that the magnetic property of the polycrystalline sample can be explained by two-spin system with an intramolecular antiferromagnetic interaction. The magnetic behavior can be reproduced using the Bleaney-Bowers model with 2J = -80.0 cm-1 for 1-tBu and 2J = -77.1 cm-1 for 1-Ph, and 2J = -48.9 cm-1 for 2-tBu. The moderately strong intramolecular antiferromagnetic interaction can be interpreted by a through-bond interaction via the non-conjugated framework and/or through-space interaction based on the MO theory. The strong distance dependency between the N-O spin site and vinylic carbons indicates that the orbital interaction plays an important role in the intramolecular magnetic interaction. The reduced magnetic interaction in 2-tBu compared to that of 1-tBu and 1-Ph can be attributed to the restricted rotation of the tetraethyl group. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Spin-orbit interaction driven dimerization in one dimensional frustrated magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shang-Shun; Batista, Cristian D.

    Spin nematic ordering has been proposed to emerge near the saturation of field of a class of frustrated magnets. The experimental observation of this novel phase is challenging for the traditional experimental probes. Nematic spin ordering is expected to induce a local quadrupolar electric moment via the spin-orbit coupling. However, a finite spin-orbit interaction explicitly breaks the U(1) symmetry of global spin rotations down to Z2, which renders the traditional nematic order no longer well-defined. In this work we investigate the relevant effect of spin-orbit interaction on the 1D frustrated J1 -J2 model. The real and the imaginary parts of the nematic order parameter belong to different representations of the discrete symmetry group of the new Hamiltonian. We demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling stabilizes the real component and simultaneously induces bond dimerization in most of the phase diagram. Such a bond dimerization can be observed with X-rays or nuclear magnetic resonance. In addition, an incommensurate bond-density wave (ICBDW) appears for smaller values of J2 / |J1 | . The experimental fingerprint of the ICBDW is a double-horn shape of the the NMR line. These conclusions can shed light on the experimental search of this novel phase.

  3. Magnetic interactions as a stabilizing factor of semiquinone species of lawsone by metal complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle-Bourrouet, Grettel; Ugalde-Saldivar, Victor M.; Gomez, Martin; Ortiz-Frade, Luis A.; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Frontana, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Changes in electrochemical reactivity for lawsone anions (lawsone, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, HLw) being coordinated to a series of metallic ions in dimethylsulfoxide solution were evaluated. Upon performing cyclic voltammetry experiments for metal complexes of this quinone with pyridine (Py) - structural formula M(II)(Lw - ) 2 (Py) 2 ; M: Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) - it was found that the reduction of coordinated Lw - units occurs during the first and second electron uptake in the analyzed compounds. The stability of the electrogenerated intermediates for each complex depends on the d electron configuration in each metal center and is determined by magnetic interactions with the available spins considering an octahedral conformation for all the compounds. This was evidenced by in situ spectroelectrochemical-ESR measurements in the Zn(II) complex in which due to the lack of magnetic interaction owing to its electron configuration, the structure of the coordinated anion radical species was determined. Successive reduction of the associated Lw - units leads to partial dissociation of the complex, determined by the identification of free radical dianion structures in solution. These results show some insights on how metal-lawsone complexation can modify the solution reactivity and stability of the electrogenerated radical species.

  4. Magnetic interactions as a stabilizing factor of semiquinone species of lawsone by metal complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle-Bourrouet, Grettel [Universidad de Costa Rica, Escuela de Quimica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Ugalde-Saldivar, Victor M. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gomez, Martin [Departamento de Sistemas Biologicos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, C.P. 04960, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz-Frade, Luis A. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, 76703, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Apartado postal 55-534, 09340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Frontana, Carlos, E-mail: ultrabuho@yahoo.com.m [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508 Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-12-01

    Changes in electrochemical reactivity for lawsone anions (lawsone, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, HLw) being coordinated to a series of metallic ions in dimethylsulfoxide solution were evaluated. Upon performing cyclic voltammetry experiments for metal complexes of this quinone with pyridine (Py) - structural formula M(II)(Lw{sup -}){sub 2}(Py){sub 2}; M: Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) - it was found that the reduction of coordinated Lw{sup -} units occurs during the first and second electron uptake in the analyzed compounds. The stability of the electrogenerated intermediates for each complex depends on the d electron configuration in each metal center and is determined by magnetic interactions with the available spins considering an octahedral conformation for all the compounds. This was evidenced by in situ spectroelectrochemical-ESR measurements in the Zn(II) complex in which due to the lack of magnetic interaction owing to its electron configuration, the structure of the coordinated anion radical species was determined. Successive reduction of the associated Lw{sup -} units leads to partial dissociation of the complex, determined by the identification of free radical dianion structures in solution. These results show some insights on how metal-lawsone complexation can modify the solution reactivity and stability of the electrogenerated radical species.

  5. Remote Numerical Simulations of the Interaction of High Velocity Clouds with Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Alfredo; Hernandez--Cervantes, Liliana; Gonzalez--Ponce, Alejandro; Kim, Jongsoo

    The numerical simulations associated with the interaction of High Velocity Clouds (HVC) with the Magnetized Galactic Interstellar Medium (ISM) are a powerful tool to describe the evolution of the interaction of these objects in our Galaxy. In this work we present a new project referred to as Theoretical Virtual i Observatories. It is oriented toward to perform numerical simulations in real time through a Web page. This is a powerful astrophysical computational tool that consists of an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and a database produced by numerical calculations. In this Website the user can make use of the existing numerical simulations from the database or run a new simulation introducing initial conditions such as temperatures, densities, velocities, and magnetic field intensities for both the ISM and HVC. The prototype is programmed using Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP (LAMP), based on the open source philosophy. All simulations were performed with the MHD code ZEUS-3D, which solves the ideal MHD equations by finite differences on a fixed Eulerian mesh. Finally, we present typical results that can be obtained with this tool.

  6. Study of beam-plasma interactions in the presence of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etievant, C.

    1963-12-01

    The instabilities developing in a 'beam-plasma' system and in a 'double-beam' system in the presence of a magnetic field are discussed theoretically starting from the conductivity tensor expression for a multi-beam system. Oblique propagation is taken into account and this leads to the introduction of certain instability mechanisms which would not appear in the case of a propagation which is purely parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field. Two experiments are described: a) Study of the collision of two counterstreaming electron beams: An instability has been observed experimentally which leads to the generation of a stationary cyclotron wave having a frequency of ω ce /2. A description is given of the measurement of the interaction frequency, of the wavelength and of the build-up time of the wave. b) Study of a 'beam-plasma' system: A description is given of the measurement of the spectra of excited waves and of the perturbation of the beam velocity distribution at the plasma-exit. This perturbation is very pronounced when 'plasma-plasma' interaction appears in the system. A study into cyclotron oscillations produced in the plasma by excitation due to the passage of the beam is also described in this report. (author) [fr

  7. Analysis of plasma behavior and electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tomofumi

    1980-01-01

    A simulation program for the analysis of plasma behavior and the electromagnetic interaction between plasma and device has been developed. The program consists of a part for the analysis of plasma behavior (plasma system) and a part for the analysis of the electro-magnetic interaction between plasma and devices (circuit system). The parameters which connect the plasma system and the circuit system are the electric resistance of plasma, the internal inductance, and the plasma current. For the plasma system, the simultaneous equations which describe the density distribution of plasma particles, the temperature distribution of electrons and ions, and the space-time variation of current density distribution were derived. The one-dimensional plasma column in γ-direction was considered. The electric resistance and the internal inductance can be deduced. The circuit components are a current transformer, a vertical field coil, a quadrupole field coil, a vacuum chamber and others. An equation which describes plasma position and the shape of cross section is introduced. The plasma position can be known by solving the Mukhavatov's formula of equilibrium. By using this program, the build-up process of plasma current in JT-60 was analysed. It was found that the expansion of plasma sub radius and the control of current distribution by gas injection are the effective methods to obtain high temperature and high density plasma. The eddy current induced in a vacuum vessel shields 40 percent of magnetic field made in the plasma region by a vertical field coil. (Kato, T.)

  8. Properties of transit-time interactions in magnetized plasmas: Analytic and numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melatos, A.; Robinson, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The recently developed perturbation theory of transit-time interactions between particles and coherent wave packets in magnetized plasmas is applied to particular field structures. Limits of validity are determined by comparison with test-particle simulations, showing that the theory is accurate everywhere except near certain well-determined resonances, for wave fields exceeding a characteristic threshold, and for particles below a particular velocity. The properties of transit-time interactions in magnetized plasmas are investigated in detail to determine their dependence on the fields and parameters of the particle motion. Resonant particle scattering is found to occur at low particle velocities when the frequency of the coherent wave packet is an integer multiple of the gyrofrequency. Two different types of resonant transit-time dissipation are also observed: one arises from transient cyclotron acceleration in the localized wave packet, the other from beating between the gyration of the particles and the oscillation of the wave packet field. Both effects involve an interplay between the field geometry and resonant oscillations

  9. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  10. Role of Interaction between Magnetic Rossby Waves and Tachocline Differential Rotation in Producing Solar Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; McIntosh, Scott W.; Bothun, Gregory; Cally, Paul S.; Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Gilman, Peter A.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic shallow-water model for the solar tachocline (MHD-SWT) that generates quasi-periodic tachocline nonlinear oscillations (TNOs) that can be identified with the recently discovered solar “seasons.” We discuss the properties of the hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic Rossby waves that interact with the differential rotation and toroidal fields to sustain these oscillations, which occur due to back-and-forth energy exchanges among potential, kinetic, and magnetic energies. We perform model simulations for a few years, for selected example cases, in both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic regimes and show that the TNOs are robust features of the MHD-SWT model, occurring with periods of 2–20 months. We find that in certain cases multiple unstable shallow-water modes govern the dynamics, and TNO periods vary with time. In hydrodynamically governed TNOs, the energy exchange mechanism is simple, occurring between the Rossby waves and differential rotation. But in MHD cases, energy exchange becomes much more complex, involving energy flow among six energy reservoirs by means of eight different energy conversion processes. For toroidal magnetic bands of 5 and 35 kG peak amplitudes, both placed at 45° latitude and oppositely directed in north and south hemispheres, we show that the energy transfers responsible for TNO, as well as westward phase propagation, are evident in synoptic maps of the flow, magnetic field, and tachocline top-surface deformations. Nonlinear mode–mode interaction is particularly dramatic in the strong-field case. We also find that the TNO period increases with a decrease in rotation rate, implying that the younger Sun had more frequent seasons.

  11. Eyes in the sky. Interactions between asymptotic giant branch star winds and the interstellar magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, A. J.; Cox, N. L. J.; Decin, L.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The extended circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of evolved low-mass stars display a large variety of morphologies. Understanding the various mechanisms that give rise to these extended structures is important to trace their mass-loss history. Aims: Here, we aim to examine the role of the interstellar magnetic field in shaping the extended morphologies of slow dusty winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in an effort to pin-point the origin of so-called eye shaped CSEs of three carbon-rich AGB stars. In addition, we seek to understand if this pre-planetary nebula (PN) shaping can be responsible for asymmetries observed in PNe. Methods: Hydrodynamical simulations are used to study the effect of typical interstellar magnetic fields on the free-expanding spherical stellar winds as they sweep up the local interstellar medium (ISM). Results: The simulations show that typical Galactic interstellar magnetic fields of 5 to 10 μG are sufficient to alter the spherical expanding shells of AGB stars to appear as the characteristic eye shape revealed by far-infrared observations. The typical sizes of the simulated eyes are in accordance with the observed physical sizes. However, the eye shapes are transient in nature. Depending on the stellar and interstellar conditions, they develop after 20 000 to 200 000 yrs and last for about 50 000 to 500 000 yrs, assuming that the star is at rest relative to the local interstellar medium. Once formed, the eye shape develops lateral outflows parallel to the magnetic field. The explosion of a PN in the centre of the eye-shaped dust shell gives rise to an asymmetrical nebula with prominent inward pointing Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Conclusions: Interstellar magnetic fields can clearly affect the shaping of wind-ISM interaction shells. The occurrence of the eyes is most strongly influenced by stellar space motion and ISM density. Observability of this transient phase is favoured for lines-of-sight perpendicular to the

  12. Modeling interactive effects of Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Baotong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The capability of Pb impurity degrading the passivity of alloy 800 in high temperature water is much stronger than those of dissolved Ca/Mg salts. • The interactive effects of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity are likely a result competitive adsorption. • A phenomenological model to interpret the interactive effect of Pb-impurities and Ca/Mg salts on the passivity. - Abstract: A phenomenological model is postulated to interpret the interactive impacts of dissolved Pb contamination, Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ on passivity of Alloy 800 in simulated crevice chemistries at 300 °C. Passivity degradation is characterized by the retarded dehydration during passivation and increased donor density in passive film. Ca"2"+ and Mg"2"+ can cause the passivity degradation in the Pb-free chemistries but, if the Pb-contamination concentration exceeds a critical value, would reduce the detrimental effect of Pb-contamination. This behavior may be related to the extremely strong adsorption capacity of Pb contamination. Finally, the applications in the water management strategy of nuclear power plants are discussed.

  13. Interaction of supra-thermal ions with turbulence in a magnetized toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyushchev, G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the interaction of a supra-thermal ion beam with turbulence in the simple magnetized toroidal plasma of TORPEX. The first part of the Thesis deals with the ohmic assisted discharges on TORPEX. The aim of these discharges is the investigation of the open to closed magnetic field line transition. The relevant magnetic diagnostics were developed. Ohmic assisted discharges with a maximum plasma current up to 1 kA are routinely obtained. The equilibrium conditions on the vacuum magnetic field configuration were investigated. In the second part of the Thesis, the design of the fast ion source and detector are discussed. The accelerating electric field needed for the fast ion source was optimized. The fast ion source was constructed and commissioned. To detect the fast ions a specially designed gridded energy analyzer was used. The electron energy distribution function was obtained to demonstrate the efficiency of the detector. The experiments with the fast ion beam were conducted in different plasma regions of TORPEX. In the third part of the Thesis, numerical simulations are used to interpret the measured fast ion beam behavior. It is shown that a simple single particle equation of motion explains the beam behavior in the experiments in the absence of plasma. To explain the fast ion beam experiments with the plasma a turbulent electric field must be used. The model that takes into account this turbulent electrical field qualitatively explains the shape of the fast ion current density profile in the different plasma regions of TORPEX. The vertically elongated fast ion current density profiles are explained by a spread in the fast ion velocity distribution. The theoretically predicted radial fast ion beam spreading due to the turbulent electric field was observed in the experiment. (author)

  14. Role of dipolar interactions on morphologies and tunnel magnetoresistance in assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Manish; Carrey, Julian; Banerjee, Varsha

    2018-05-01

    We undertake comprehensive simulations of 2d arrays (Lx ×Ly) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with dipole-dipole interactions by solving LLG equations. Our primary interest is to understand the correspondence between equilibrium spin (ES) morphologies and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of Θ - the ratio of the dipolar to the anisotropy strength, sample size Lx , aspect ratio Ar =Ly /Lx and the direction of the applied field H → = HêH . The parameter Θ is varied by choosing three distinct particles: (i) α -Fe2O3 (Θ ≃ 0) , (ii) Co (Θ ≃ 0.37) and (iii) Fe3O4 (Θ ≃ 1.28) . Our main observations are as follows: (a) For weakly interacting spins (Θ ≃ 0) , the morphology has randomly oriented magnetic moments for all sample sizes and aspect ratios. The TMR exhibits a peak value of 50% at the coercive field Hc . It is robust with respect to Lx and Ar , and isotropic with respect to êH . (b) For strong interactions (Θ > 1) , the moments order in the plane of the sample. The ES morphology comprises of magnetically aligned regions interspersed with flux closure loops. For fields along x or y, the maximum TMR amplitude decrease to ∼30%. For êH = z ̂ , it drops to ∼3%. The TMR is robust with respect to Lx and Ar and isotropic in the x and y directions only. (c) In strongly interacting samples (Θ > 1) with Lx comparable to the size of a flux closure loop, increasing Ar creates ferromagnetic chains in the sample oriented along y or - y . Consequently, for êH = y ̂ , the TMR magnitude for Ar = 1 is ∼33% while that for Ar = 32 drops to ∼16%. For êH = x ̂ on the other hand, it is ∼30% and independent of Ar . The TMR of long ribbons of MNPs has a strong dependence on Ar and is anisotropic in all three directions.

  15. Influence of magnetic dipole and magnetoelastic interactions on the phase states of 2D non-Heisenberg ferromagnetic with complex exchange interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Yu.A.; Matunin, D.A.; Klevets, Ph.N.; Kosmachev, O.A.

    2009-01-01

    The phase states of the 2D non-Heisenberg ferromagnetic with anisotropic bilinear and biquadratic exchange interactions are investigated. The limiting cases of the system under consideration are the two-dimensional XY-model with biquadratic exchange interaction and the isotropic Heisenberg ferromagnetic. The account of the magnetic dipole interaction leads to the realization of spatially inhomogeneous quadrupolar phase. The stability regions of various phase transitions for different values of the material parameters are studied. The phase diagram is built. Besides, the temperature phase transitions are investigated. The influence of the magnetoelastic interaction on the formation of the long-range quadrupolar order is determined.

  16. Illustration of the Alliances platform chemistry/transport coupling capacities through the simulation of a cement/clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimier, A.; Michau, N.; Montarnal, Ph.; Corrihons, F.

    2003-01-01

    Safety studies in a subsurface environment and in an underground waste disposal necessitate numerical tools for reactive transport modelling. In these systems, hydrogeological and chemical processes are closely related and their interdependence must be analysed to study migration of species. We will illustrate here the capacities of the Alliances tool to simulate such a phenomenology by studying the evolution of a clay/cement interface over time. The goal being defined, the two main employed software to build up a multidimensional tool have been chosen, namely PhreeqC and Chess for chemistry. A common model has been developed whose aim is to allow models comparison while switching between the chemistry tools. For transport, Castem and Mt3d-99 have been introduced with the same philosophy of structure. It is worth noting that other tools could be introduced, the only requirement being to satisfy the specific data-model and building up the appropriate methods. Qualification cases have been built up to define the platform application field. It has been defined with one and two dimensional cases enabling a comparison with analytic solutions or an intercomparison with other reactive transport codes. To illustrate this in the chemistry coupling field, we focus on a clay cement interface with an ion exchange linked to the Ca-montmorillonite. This case has been defined at ANDRA to be used as a reference test case for chemistry coupling validation. Results show a good agreement between platform results and whose of PhreeqC with its own internal coupling. The clay/cement interface is reproduced with the same accuracy

  17. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G.; Schulze, D.; Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F z (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F rot was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. β was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F z exceeded gravitational force F g on the particular object [F z 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F z was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F g at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F rot on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths (≥ +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles rot was found to be ≥ +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, β was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F z . The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schulze, D. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthodontics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F{sub z} (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta} [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. {beta} was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F{sub z} exceeded gravitational force F{sub g} on the particular object [F{sub z} 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F{sub z} was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F{sub g} at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F{sub rot} on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths ({>=} +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles <45 , but F{sub rot} was found to be {>=} +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, {beta} was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F{sub z}. The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Structural chemistry and magnetic properties of Pr3-xSr1+xCrNiO8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, Sian E.; Bahout, Mona; Battle, Peter D.; Tonus, Florent; Demange, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the n=1 Ruddlesden-Popper system Pr 3-x Sr 1+x CrNiO 8 have been synthesized over the composition range 0.0 0.1 adopt the tetragonal space group I4/mmm; Pr 2.9 Sr 1.1 CrNiO 8 adopts the orthorhombic space group Fmmm. There is no evidence of Cr/Ni cation ordering in any composition. A maximum in the zero-field cooled magnetic susceptibility is observed at a temperature T f that decreases with increasing Sr content; 52≤T f (K)≤13. The frequency dependence of T f observed in a.c. susceptibility measurements, together with the analysis of neutron diffraction data, suggests that the atomic magnetic moments in these compositions adopt a spin-glass-like state below T f . - Graphical abstract: The n=1 Ruddlesden-Popper system Pr 3-x Sr 1+x CrNiO 8 (0.0< x≤1.0) has been characterized by diffraction methods and magnetometry. There is no evidence of Cr/Ni cation ordering in any composition. The atomic magnetic moments adopt a spin-glass-like state below a transition temperature that decreases from 52 K (x=0.1) to 13 K (x=1.0)

  20. Reversal mechanisms and interactions in magnetic systems: coercivity versus switching field and thermally assisted demagnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebollada, F.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a comparative analysis of the magnetic interactions and reversal mechanisms of two different systems: NdFeB-type alloys with grain sizes in the single domain range and Fe-SiO2 nanocomposites with Fe concentrations above and below the percolation threshold. We evidence that the use of the coercivity as the main parameter to analyse them might be misleading due to the convolution of both reversible and irreversible magnetization variations. We show that the switching field and thermally assisted demagnetization allow a better understanding of these mechanisms since they involve just irreversible magnetization changes. Specifically, the experimental analysis of the coercivity adquisition process for the NdFeB-type system suggests that the magnetization reversal is nucleated at the spin misalignments present due to intergranular exchange interactions. On the other hand, the study of the magnetic viscosity and of the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM and direct field demagnetization (DCD remanence curves indicates that the dipolar interactions are responsible for the propagation of the switching started at individual particles.

    En este artículo presentamos un análisis comparativo de la influencia de la microestructura a través de las interacciones magnéticas en los mecanismos de inversión de la magnetización en dos sistemas diferentes: aleaciones tipo NdFeB con tamaños de grano en el rango de monodominio y nanocompuestos de Fe-SiO2 con concentraciones de Fe tanto por encima como por debajo del umbral de percolación. Ponemos de manifiesto que el uso del campo coercitivo como parámetro de análisis puede llevar a equívocos debido a la coexistencia de variaciones reversibles e irreversibles de la magnetización. También mostramos que el campo de conmutación y la desimanación térmicamente asistida permiten una mejor comprensión de dichos mecanismos ya que reflejan exclusivamente cambios irreversibles de

  1. Influence of porous texture and surface chemistry on the CO₂ adsorption capacity of porous carbons: acidic and basic site interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Angela; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D

    2014-12-10

    Doped porous carbons exhibiting highly developed porosity and rich surface chemistry have been prepared and subsequently applied to clarify the influence of both factors on carbon dioxide capture. Nanocasting was selected as synthetic route, in which a polyaramide precursor (3-aminobenzoic acid) was thermally polymerized inside the porosity of an SBA-15 template in the presence of different H3PO4 concentrations. The surface chemistry and the porous texture of the carbons could be easily modulated by varying the H3PO4 concentration and carbonization temperature. Porous texture was found to be the determinant factor on carbon dioxide adsorption at 0 °C, while surface chemistry played an important role at higher adsorption temperatures. We proved that nitrogen functionalities acted as basic sites and oxygen and phosphorus groups as acidic ones toward adsorption of CO2 molecules. Among the nitrogen functional groups, pyrrolic groups exhibited the highest influence, while the positive effect of pyridinic and quaternary functionalities was smaller. Finally, some of these N-doped carbons exhibit CO2 heats of adsorption higher than 42 kJ/mol, which make them excellent candidates for CO2 capture.

  2. Effect of CDW and magnetic interactions on the e{sub g} electrons of the manganite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.i [Condensed Matter Physics Group, P. G. Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F. M. University, Balasore 756 019 (India); Panda, S. [Trident Academy of Technology, F2/A, Chandaka Industrial Estate, Bhubaneswar 751 024 (India); Behera, S.N. [Institute of Materials Science, Planetarium Building, Bhubaneswar 751 013 (India)

    2009-11-15

    We address a model study which includes the co-existence of the charge density wave (CDW) and ferromagnetic interactions in order to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in manganites. The Hamiltonian consists of the ferromagnetic Hund's rule exchange interaction between e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} spins, Heisenberg core spin interactions and the CDW interaction present in the e{sub g} band electrons. The core electron magnetization, induced e{sub g} electron magnetization and the CDW gap are calculated using Zubarev's Green's function technique and determined self-consistently. The effect of core electron magnetization and the CDW interaction on the induced magnetization as well as on the occupation number in the different spin states of the e{sub g} band electrons are investigated by varying the model parameters of the system like the CDW coupling, the exchange coupling, the Heisenberg coupling and the external field. It is observed that the induced magnetization exhibits re-entrant behaviour and exists within a narrow temperature range just below the Curie temperature. This unusual behaviour of the e{sub g} band electrons will throw some new insights on the physical properties of the manganite systems.

  3. Ultrafast Magnetism of Multi-component Ferromagnets and Ferrimagnets on the Time Scale of the Exchange Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ilie

    2012-02-01

    Revealing the ultimate speed limit at which magnetic order can be controlled, is a fundamental challenge of modern magnetism having far reaching implications for the magnetic recording industry [1]. Exchange interaction is the strongest force in magnetism, being ultimately responsible for ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic spin order. How do spins react after being optically excited on a timescale of or even faster than the exchange interaction? Here, we demonstrate that femtosecond (fs) measurements of ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic alloys using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism provide revolutionary new insights into the problem of ultrafast magnetism on timescales pertinent to the exchange interaction. In particular, we show that upon fs optical excitation the ultrafast spin reversal of GdFeCo - a material with antiferromagnetic coupling of spins - occurs via a transient ferromagnetic state [2]. The latter emerges due to different dynamics of the Gd and Fe magnetic moments: Gd switches within 1.5 ps while it takes only 300 fs for Fe. Thus, by using a single fs laser pulse one can force the spin system to evolve via an energetically unfavorable way and temporarily switch from an antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic type of ordering. In order to understand whether the observation of this temporarily decoupled and element-specific dynamics is a general phenomenon or just something strictly related to the case of ferrimagnetic GdFeCo, we have investigated the demagnetization of the archetypal ferromagnetic NiFe alloys. Essentially, we observe the same distinct magnetization dynamics of the constituent magnetic moments: Ni demagnetizes within ˜300 fs being much faster than the demagnetization of Fe of ˜800 fs. This distinct demagnetization behavior leads to an apparent decoupling of the Fe and Ni magnetic moments on a few hundreds of fs time scale, despite the strong exchange interaction of 260meV (˜16 fs) that couples them. These observations supported by

  4. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  5. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  6. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  7. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  8. Molecular Studies of Complex Soil Organic Matter Interactions with Metal Ions and Mineral Surfaces using Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A.; Govind, N.; Laskin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral surfaces have been implicated as potential protectors of soil organic matter (SOM) against decomposition and ultimate mineralization to small molecules which can provide nutrients for plants and soil microbes and can also contribute to the Earth's elemental cycles. SOM is a complex mixture of organic molecules of biological origin at varying degrees of decomposition and can, itself, self-assemble in such a way as to expose some biomolecule types to biotic and abiotic attack while protecting other biomolecule types. The organization of SOM and SOM with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions is driven by an interplay of van der Waals and electrostatic interactions leading to partitioning of hydrophilic (e.g. sugars) and hydrophobic (e.g., lipids) SOM components that can be bridged with amphiphilic molecules (e.g., proteins). Classical molecular dynamics simulations can shed light on assemblies of organic molecules alone or complexation with mineral surfaces. The role of chemical reactions is also an important consideration in potential chemical changes of the organic species such as oxidation/reduction, degradation, chemisorption to mineral surfaces, and complexation with solvated metal ions to form organometallic systems. For the study of chemical reactivity, quantum chemistry methods can be employed and combined with structural insight provided by classical MD simulations. Moreover, quantum chemistry can also simulate spectroscopic signatures based on chemical structure and is a valuable tool in interpreting spectra from, notably, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). In this presentation, we will discuss our classical MD and quantum chemistry findings on a model SOM system interacting with mineral surfaces and solvated metal ions.

  9. Grain size dependent potential for self generation of magnetic anomalies on Mars via thermoremanent magnetic acquisition and magnetic interaction of hematite and magnetite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kletetschka, Günther; Ness, F. N.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 148, 2-4 (2005), s. 149-156 ISSN 0031-9201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : magnetic mineralogy * self-magnetization * blocking temperature * Martian crust Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.420, year: 2005

  10. Fe magnetic moment formation and exchange interaction in Fe{sub 2}P: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.B., E-mail: liuxubo@uta.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Ping Liu, J.; Zhang, Qiming [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Altounian, Z. [Center for the Physics of Materials and Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 2}P have been studied by a first-principles density functional theory calculation. The ground state is ferromagnetic and the calculated magnetic moments for Fe{sub 1} (3f) and Fe{sub 2} (3g) are 0.83 and 2.30μ{sub B}, respectively. The nearest neighbor inter-site magnetic exchange coupling parameter at the Fe{sub 1} layer (0.02 mRy) is much smaller than that at the Fe{sub 2} layer (1.29 mRy). The Fe moment at the 3f site is metastable and sensitive to the inter-site exchange interaction with its magnetic neighbors, which is responsible for the first order magnetic transition and large magneto-caloric effect around T{sub C}.

  11. A uranium-based UO_2"+-Mn"2"+ single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Magnani, Nicola; Geyer, Arnaud de

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]_n, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO_2(salen)py][Cp"*_2Co] (Cp"*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO_3)_2 or Mn(NO_3)_2 in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134±0.8 K (93±0.5 cm"-"1), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T<6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K.

  12. A uranium-based UO_2"+-Mn"2"+ single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Magnani, Nicola; Geyer, Arnaud de

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]_n, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO_2(salen)py][Cp*_2Co] (Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO_3)_2 or Mn(NO_3)_2 in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134 ±0.8 K (93 ±0.5 cm"-"1), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T <6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Electronic Structure and Magnetic Interactions in the Radical Salt [BEDT-TTF]2[CuCl4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzado, Carmen J; Rodríguez-García, Bárbara; Galán Mascarós, José Ramón; Hernández, Norge Cruz

    2018-06-07

    The magnetic behavior and electric properties of the hybrid radical salt [BEDT-TTF] 2 [CuCl 4 ] have been revisited through extended experimental analyses and DDCI and periodic DFT plane waves calculations. Single crystal X-ray diffraction data have been collected at different temperatures, discovering a phase transition occurring in the 250-300 K range. The calculations indicate the presence of intradimer, interdimer, and organic-inorganic π-d interactions in the crystal, a magnetic pattern much more complex than the Bleaney-Bowers model initially assigned to this material. Although this simple model was good enough to reproduce the magnetic susceptibility data, our calculations demonstrate that the actual magnetic structure is significantly more intricate, with alternating antiferromagnetic 1D chains of the organic BEDT-TTF + radical, connected through weak antiferromagnetic interactions with the CuCl 4 2- ions. Combination of experiment and theory allowed us to unambiguously determine and quantify the leading magnetic interactions in the system. The density-of-states curves confirm the semiconductor nature of the system and the dominant organic contribution of the valence and conduction band edges. This general and combined approach appears to be fundamental in order to properly understand the magnetic structure of these complex materials, where experimental data can actually be fitted from a variety of models and parameters.

  14. Evolution of the magnetic properties of Co10Cu90 nanoparticles prepared by wet chemistry with thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I; Echeberria, J; Kakazei, G N; Golub, V O; Saliuk, O Y; Ilyn, M; Guslienko, K Y; González, J M

    2012-09-01

    Nanoparticles of Co10Cu90 alloy have been prepared by sonochemical wet method. According to transmission electron microscopy, bimetallic particles with typical diameter of 50-100 nm consisting of nanocrystallites with average diameter of 15-20 nm were obtained. The samples were annealed at 300 degrees C and 450 degrees C. Zero field cooled and field cooled temperature dependences of magnetization in the temperature range of 5-400 K at 50 Oe, as well as magnetization hysteresis loops at 15, 100 and 305 K were measured by vibrating sample magnetometry. Presence of antiferromagnetic phase, most probably of the oxide Co3O4, was observed in as-prepared sample. The lowest coercivity was found for the CoCu sample annealed at-300 degrees C, whereas for as prepared sample and the one annealed at 450 degrees C it was significantly higher. The samples were additionally probed by continuous wave ferromagnetic resonance at room, temperature using a standard X-band electron spin resonance spectrometer. A good correspondence between evolution of the coercivity and the microwave resonance fields with annealing temperature was observed.

  15. Excange interactions and induced Eu3+ magnetic order in RMnO3 investigated using resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaugen, Arvid

    2015-03-01

    The so-called multiferroics, materials that concomitantly exhibit more than one ferroic order, have in recent years attracted much attention owing to their possible applications in high density data storage, high sensitivity ac magnetic field sensors and novel spintronic devices. In particular, multiferroics with strong magnetoelectric coupling are more attractive. Among such multiferroics, an interesting special class is the orthorhombic manganites with perovskite structure. In these compounds, frustration serves to destabilize ordinary ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic ordering, giving rise to rich phase diagrams due to several competing magnetic interactions. Interactions between strong rare earth magnetic moments and weaker transition metal moments add another level of complexity, as well as interest. The current dissertation presents results obtained investigating the magnetic structure responsible for ferroelectricity in a few selected multiferroic compounds, using x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS). In particular, single crystals of Eu 1-x Y x MnO 3 have been studied at low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. This series of compounds is similar in structure to the heavily studied RMnO 3 (R=Tb,Gd,Dy), only without rare earth magnetism. The novel technique of full polarization analysis has been used to determine the complicated cycloidal Mn magnetic ordering, and additional components due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions have been identified. In the compound Eu 0.8 Y 0.2 MnO 3 , two coexisting multiferroic phases were observed, and a magnetoelectric coupling between the two was established. Moreover, magnetic order of the formally non-magnetic rare earth ion Eu 3+ was observed in the same compound. It has been concluded to result from a Van Vleck type excitation of the J = 0 ground state due to the symmetry-breaking internal exchange field from the Mn magnetic moments. In addition, this dissertation reports on high field investigations

  16. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Interactions in Tb and Tb-10% Ho from Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1968-01-01

    The magnon dispersion relations and lifetimes have been measured in Tb and a Tb‐10% Ho alloy by inelastic neutron scattering, in regions of both ferromagnetic and spiral ordering. In the ferromagnetic phase, the magnon energy is generally finite at zero wavevector and rises quadratically at low q....... The magnon energies scale approximately with the magnetization. In the spiral phase the magnon energy rises linearly from zero at low q. The Fourier‐transformed exchange parameter J(q) has pronounced peaks in the c direction, which are ascribed to transitions between states close to the Fermi surface....... These peaks are less pronounced in the ferromagnetic phase. The primary mechanism limiting the magnon lifetimes appears to be interaction with the conduction electrons. In the alloy, the lifetime for magnons propagating in the c direction in the ferromagnetic phase falls abruptly at about q  =  0.35 Å−1...

  18. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...... interaction-induced binary chemical shift d, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor ?s, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis ?ll are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full...... is obtained for d and ?s in Xe2. For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other...

  19. Decoupling of the hyperfine interactions in /sup 12/B ions by the external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, K; Tanihata, I; Kogo, S; Tanaka, M [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1976-11-01

    It is known that product nuclei /sup 12/B (Isup(..pi..) = 1/sup +/, Tsub(1/2) = 20 ms) by the /sup 11/B(d,p)/sup 12/B reaction are sizably oriented if one selects recoil nuclei at the incident deuteron energy and the recoil angle thetasub(R). The hyperfine interactions in recoil ions in flight in free space affect the nuclear orientation. In this experiment, the nuclear orientation in the recoil ions implanted into a stopper were measured as a function of strength of a static magnetic field applied in normal to the reaction plane. A thin single crystal of magnesium was used as the recoil stopper, of which the hexagonal c-axis was set in parallel to the external field.

  20. Feasibility of interactive magnetic resonance imaging of moving anatomy for clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau; Sørensen, Thomas S; Berber, Yasmina

    2014-01-01

    of electrodes during neurosurgery, the diagnostic value of this method is relatively unexplored. Purpose: To test an interactive slice-positioning system with respect to real-time MRI reconstruction for imaging of moving anatomical structures on two different scanner brands by using inexpensive computer......Background: Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging with real-time reconstruction has been available for some time. The technique acquires and presents the MRI images to the operator the instant they are acquired. However, besides guiding purposes, like catheter tracking and placement...... hardware. Materials and methods: The MRI data were sampled using two acquisition schemes: a Cartesian sampling scheme and a radial sampling scheme based on the golden ratio. Four anatomical targets, which exhibit non-periodic movement, were identified and imaged: movement of the gastric ventricle emptying...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of conformations and molecular interactions in lyotropic mesophases - Applications to solubilization problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caniparoli, Jean-Philippe

    1988-01-01

    After having determined the structural properties of smectic liquid crystals made from double chain surfactants/water binary systems, residual anisotropic interactions and relaxation times measurements were used to investigate the molecular ordering. Phosphorus, deuterium and nitrogen NMR of the surfactant molecules evidenced their high degree of order and the strong anisotropy of their motions. Quantitative results depended on the surfactant polar head -phosphate or ammonium-, while they displayed little variations with the hydrocarbon tail size. The marked dependence of the order and dynamics of small solutes in a lamellar phase on their hydrophilic or hydrophobic behaviour was shown using the same methods. By means of para-magnetically induced relaxation, it was proved that the non-polar solute benzene is located in the organic domain of the liquid crystalline matrix. (author) [fr

  2. Relativistic magnetic reconnection driven by a moderately intense laser interacting with a micro-plasma-slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Longqing; Shen, Baifei; Pukhov, Alexander; Fülöp, Tünde

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) in the relativistic regime is generally thought to be responsible for powering rapid bursts of non-thermal radiation in astrophysical events. It is therefore of significant importance to study how the field energy is transferred to the plasma to power the observed emission. However, due to the difficulty in making direct measurements in astrophysical systems or achieving relativistic MR in laboratory environments, the particle acceleration is usually studied using fully kinetic PIC simulations. Here we present a numerical study of a readily available (TW-mJ-class) laser interacting with a micro-scale plasma slab. The simulations show when the electron beams excited on both sides of the slab approach the end of the plasma structure, ultrafast relativistic MR occurs. As the field topology changes, the explosive release of magnetic energy results in emission of relativistic electron jets with cut-off energy 12 MeV. The proposed novel scenario can be straightforwardly implemented in experiments, and might significantly improve the understanding of fundamental questions such as field dissipation and particle acceleration in relativistic MR. This work is supported by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the European Research Council (ERC-2014-CoG Grant 64712).

  3. Curvature-Induced Bunch Self-Interaction for an Energy-Chirped Bunch in Magnetic Bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Li

    2008-01-01

    Within the realm of classical electrodynamics, the curvature-induced bunch collective interaction in magnetic bends can be studied using effective forces in the canonical formulation of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect. As an application of this canonical formulation, in this paper, for an electron distribution moving ultrarelativistically in a bending system, the dynamics of the particles in the distribution is derived from the Hamiltonian of the particles in terms of the bunch internal coordinates. The consequent Vlasov equation manifests explicitly how the phase-space distribution is perturbed by the effective CSR forces. In particular, we study the impact of an initial linear energy chirp of the bunch on the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force, which arises due to the modification of the retardation relation as a result of the energy-chirping-induced longitudinal-horizontal correlation of the bunch distribution (bunch tilt) in dispersive regions. Our study demonstrates clearly the time delay (or retardation) of the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force on a bunch in responding to the change of the bunch length in a magnetic bend. Our result also shows that the effective longitudinal CSR force for a bunch under full compression can have sensitive dependence on the transverse position of the test particle in the bunch for certain parameter regimes

  4. Plasma turbulence resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction between the supersonic and super-Alfvenic solar wind plasma and the Earth's magnetic field leads to the formation of critical layers, such as the bow shock, the magnetopause, the polar cusp, and the inner and outer edge of the plasmasheet. The mean free path between binary colisions being much larger than the transverse scale of these layers, plasma turbulence must ensure the thermalization, the magnetic diffusion, the dissipation within these critical layers. We suggest the existence of small scale, presumably 2D structures, developing within these thin layers. The unambiguous characterization of these small-scale structures is, however, beyond the capabilities of existing spacecraft, which cannot spatially resolve them, nor disentangle spatial/temporal variations. We present a new mission concept: a cluster of four relatively simple spacecraft, which will make it possible (i) to disentangle spatial from temporal variations, (ii) to evaluate, by finite differences between spacecraft measurements, the gradients, divergences, curls of MHD parameters, and )iii) to characterize small-scale structures, via inter-spacecraft correlations. (author). 10 refs.; 10 figs

  5. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Andreas [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, CP 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Effenberger, Frederic [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrecht-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  6. Interaction of magnetized electrons with a boundary sheath: investigation of a specular reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2017-11-01

    This publication reports analytical and numerical results concerning the interaction of gyrating electrons with a plasma boundary sheath, with focus on partially magnetized technological plasmas. It is assumed that the electron Debye length {λ }{{D}} is much smaller than the electron gyroradius {r}{{L}}, and {r}{{L}} in turn much smaller than the mean free path λ and the gradient length L of the fields. Focusing on the scale of the gyroradius, the sheath is assumed as infinitesimally thin ({λ }{{D}}\\to 0), collisions are neglected (λ \\to ∞ ), the magnetic field is taken as homogeneous, and electric fields (=potential gradients) in the bulk are neglected (L\\to ∞ ). The interaction of an electron with the electric field of the plasma boundary sheath is represented by a specular reflection {v}\\to {v}-2{v}\\cdot {{e}}z {{e}}z of the velocity {v} at the plane z = 0 of a naturally oriented Cartesian coordinate system (x,y,z). The electron trajectory is then given as sequences of helical sections, with the kinetic energy ɛ and the canonical momenta p x and p y conserved, but not the position of the axis (base point {{R}}0), the slope (pitch angle χ), and the phase (gyrophase φ). A ‘virtual interaction’ which directly maps the incoming electrons to the outgoing ones is introduced and studied in dependence of the angle γ between the field and the sheath normal {{e}}z. The corresponding scattering operator is constructed, mathematically characterized, and given as an infinite matrix. An equivalent boundary condition for a transformed kinetic model is derived.

  7. Pairwise additivity in the nuclear magnetic resonance interactions of atomic xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2009-04-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of atomic (129/131)Xe is used as a versatile probe of the structure and dynamics of various host materials, due to the sensitivity of the Xe NMR parameters to intermolecular interactions. The principles governing this sensitivity can be investigated using the prototypic system of interacting Xe atoms. In the pairwise additive approximation (PAA), the binary NMR chemical shift, nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC), and spin-rotation (SR) curves for the xenon dimer are utilized for fast and efficient evaluation of the corresponding NMR tensors in small xenon clusters Xe(n) (n = 2-12). If accurate, the preparametrized PAA enables the analysis of the NMR properties of xenon clusters, condensed xenon phases, and xenon gas without having to resort to electronic structure calculations of instantaneous configurations for n > 2. The binary parameters for Xe(2) at different internuclear distances were obtained at the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock level of theory. Quantum-chemical (QC) calculations at the corresponding level were used to obtain the NMR parameters of the Xe(n) (n = 2-12) clusters at the equilibrium geometries. Comparison of PAA and QC data indicates that the direct use of the binary property curves of Xe(2) can be expected to be well-suited for the analysis of Xe NMR in the gaseous phase dominated by binary collisions. For use in condensed phases where many-body effects should be considered, effective binary property functions were fitted using the principal components of QC tensors from Xe(n) clusters. Particularly, the chemical shift in Xe(n) is strikingly well-described by the effective PAA. The coordination number Z of the Xe site is found to be the most important factor determining the chemical shift, with the largest shifts being found for high-symmetry sites with the largest Z. This is rationalized in terms of the density of virtual electronic states available for response to magnetic perturbations.

  8. The effects of Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions on the electron tunneling in a non-magnetic heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianduo; Li Jianwen

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron transport properties in a non-magnetic heterostructure with both Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions. The detailed-numerical results show that (1) the large spin polarization can be achieved due to Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit couplings induced splitting of the resonant level, although the magnetic field is zero in such a structure, (2) the Rashba spin-orbit coupling plays a greater role on the spin polarization than the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction does, and (3) the transmission probability and the spin polarization both periodically change with the increase of the well width.

  9. Mixed hyperfine interaction in amorphous Fe-Zr sputtered films in external magnetic field - a 57Fe Moessbauer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, S.M.; Crummenauer, J.; Wagner, H.-G.; Gonser, U.; Chien, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy provides only information about the magnitude of the splitting QS in the case of electric quadrupole hyperfine interaction, but not on the sign of the main component of the electric field gradient (EFG) or the asymmetry parameter which are sensitive to the local environment of the 57 Fe nuclei. This kind of information is obtained by measurements in external magnetic fields. In the case of amorphous Fe-Zr sputtered films mixed hyperfine interaction leads to a clear change in the behaviour of the Zr-rich and the Fe-rich alloys, indicating the existence of magnetic clusters in the Fe-rich samples. (Auth.)

  10. Magnetism and structural chemistry of the n=2 Ruddlesden-Popper phase La3LiMnO7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, Peter D.; Burley, Jonathan C.; Gallon, Daniel J.; Grey, Clare P.; Sloan, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of the n=2 Ruddlesden-Popper phase La 3 LiMnO 7 have been prepared and characterized. X-ray and neutron diffraction suggest that the structure is tetragonal with a disordered distribution of Li and Mn cations over the octahedral sites, but 6 Li MAS NMR shows that the Li and Mn are 1:1 ordered locally. Electron microscopy shows that the stacking of the cation-ordered, perovskite-like bilayers along the crystallographic z-axis is disordered on the distance scale sampled by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Magnetometry data and neutron diffraction data collected at 2 K together suggest that the Mn cations within each structural domain order antiferromagnetically at 14 K, but that the disorder along z prevents the establishment of long-range magnetic order

  11. Magnetic exchange interactions in Mn doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} chalcopyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhani-Benziane, H.; Sahnoun, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), University of Mascara (Algeria); Sahnoun, M., E-mail: sahnoun_cum@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Matière et Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), University of Mascara (Algeria); Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg (Switzerland); Driz, M. [Laboratoire de Sciences des Matériaux (LSM), University of Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria); Daul, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Accurate ab initio full-potential augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) electronic calculations within generalized gradient approximation have been performed for Mn doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} chalcopyrites, focusing on their electronic and magnetic properties as a function of the geometry related to low Mn-impurity concentration and the spin magnetic alignment (i.e., ferromagnetic vs antiferromagnetic). As expected, Mn is found to be a source of holes and localized magnetic moments of about 4 µ{sub B} per Mn atom are calculated which are sufficiently large. The defect calculations are firstly performed by replacing a single cation (namely Zn and Sn) with a single Mn atom in the pure chalcopyrite ZnSnAs{sub 2} supercell, and their corresponding formation energies show that the substitution of a Sn atom (rather than Zn) by Mn is strongly favored. Thereafter, a comparison of total energy differences between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) are given. Surprisingly, the exchange interaction between a Mn pairs is found to oscillate with the distance between them. Consequently, the AFM alignment is energetically favored in Mn-doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} compounds, except for low impurity concentration associated with lower distances between neighboring Mn impurities, in this case the stabilization of FM increases. Moreover, the ferromagnetic alignment in the Mn-doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} systems behaves half-metallic; the valence band for majority spin orientation is partially filled while there is a gap in the density of states for the minority spin orientation. This semiconducting gap of ~1 eV opened up in the minority channel and is due to the large bonding–antibonding splitting from the p–d hybridization. Our findings suggest that the Mn-doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} chalcopyrites could be a different class of ferromagnetic semiconductors. - Highlights: • ab initio calculations were performed on Mn doped ZnSnAs{sub 2} chalcopyrite. • Substitution of a Sn atom (rather than Zn) by Mn

  12. Influence of magnetoelastic coupling on the phase transitions in two-dimensional non-Heisenberg magnetics with biquadratic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, Yu.A.; Klevets, Ph.N.; Kozhemyako, O.V.

    2003-01-01

    Influence of magnetoelastic (ME) interaction on the phase transitions in two-dimensional non-Heisenberg ferromagnets is investigated. It is shown that if the constant of Heisenberg exchange interaction is large, the ferromagnetic phase is implemented in a system. When the value of biquadratic exchange interaction increases there is a phase transition to the quadrupolar phase characterized by the tensor order parameters. Thus, ME interaction plays an essential role, not only stabilizing the long-range magnetic order in the system, but also determining the order of the phase transition

  13. Stereotype threat's effect on women's achievement in chemistry: The interaction of achievement goal orientation for women in science majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway-Klaassen, Janice Marjorie

    "Stereotype threat is being at risk of confirming, as a self-characteristic, a negative stereotype about one's group" (C. M. Steele & Aronson, 1995, p. 797). A stereotype threat effect then is described as the detrimental impact on a person's performance or achievement measurements when they are placed in a stereotype threat environment. For women, the negative stereotype that exists in our culture states that women are typically not as capable as men in mathematics or science subjects. This study specifically explored the potential impact of stereotype threat on women who have chosen a science-based college major. They were tested in the domain of chemistry, which is related to mathematics and often involves high level of mathematics skills. I attempted to generate a stereotype threat in the participants through describing a chemistry challenge exam as either one that had consistently shown a gender bias against women and to create a nullification effect by describing the exam as one that had shown no gender bias in the past. In the third experimental condition acting as a control, participants received only generic instructions related to taking the test itself. The second part of this study investigated whether stereotype threat effects could impact women's achievement goal orientations. In previous studies performance avoidance goal orientations have been associated with individuals placed in a stereotype threat environment. The findings on the stereotype threat effect were not significant for the chemistry challenge test achievement scores. This may be due to several factors. One factor may be the design of the chemistry challenge test and the instructions for the test. The other factor may be the women in this study. As individuals who have chosen a science based major, they may have developed coping skills and strategies that reduced the impact of a stereotype threat. It is also possible that the testing environment itself generated an implicit stereotype

  14. Fundamental properties of molecules on surfaces. Molecular switching and interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatter, Nino

    2016-12-14

    In this thesis, we investigate individual molecular switches and metal-organic complexes on surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) at low temperatures. One focus addresses the switching ability and mechanism of diarylethene on Ag(111). The other focus lies on resolving and tuning magnetic interactions of individual molecules with superconductors. 4,4'-(4,4'-(perfluorocyclopent-1-ene-1,2-diyl)bis (5-methylthiophene-4,2-diyl)dip yridine (PDTE) is a prototypical photochromic switch. We can induce a structural change of individual PDTE molecules on Ag(111) with the STM tip. This change is accompanied by a reduction of the energy gap between the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the induced switching corresponds to a ring-closing reaction from an open isomer in a flat adsorption configuration to a ring-closed isomer with its methyl groups in a cis configuration. The final product is thermodynamically stabilized by strong dispersion interactions with the surface. A linear dependence of the switching threshold with the tip-sample distance with a minimal threshold of 1.4 V is found, which we assign to a combination of an electric-field induced process and a tunneling-electron contribution. DFT calculations suggest a large activation barrier for a ring-closing reaction from the open flat configuration into the closed cis configuration. The interaction of magnetic molecules with superconductors is studied on manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) adsorbed on Pb(111). We find triplets of Shiba states inside the superconducting gap. Different adsorption sites of MnPc provide a large variety of exchange coupling strengths, which lead to a collective energy shift of the Shiba triplets. We can assign the splitting of the Shiba states to be an effect of magnetic anisotropy in the system. A quantum phase transition from a ''Kondo screened'' to a &apos

  15. Multi-scale interaction between magnetic islands and microturbulence in magnetized plasmas; Modelisation et simulation de l'interaction multi-echelle entre ilots magnetiques et la microturbulence dans les plasmas de fusion magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraglia, M.

    2009-10-15

    In a tokamak, it exists many kinds of instability at the origin of a damage of the confinement and worst of a lost of a confinement. This work presents a study of the dynamics of a magnetic island in presence of turbulence in magnetized plasmas. More precisely, the goal is to understand the multi-scales interaction between turbulence, generated by a pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature, and a magnetic island formed thanks to a tearing mode. Thanks to the derivation of a 2-dimensional slab model taking into account both tearing and interchange instabilities, theoretical and numerical linear studies show the pressure effect on the magnetic island linear formation and show interchange modes are stabilized in presence of a strong magnetic field. Then, a numerical nonlinear study is presented in order to understand how the interchange mechanism affects the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetic island. It is shown that the pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature affect strongly the nonlinear evolution of a magnetic island through dynamics bifurcations. The nature of these bifurcations should be characterized in function of the linear situation. Finally, the last part of this work is devoted to the study of the origin of the nonlinear poloidal rotation of the magnetic island. A model giving the different contributions to the rotation is derived. It is shown, thanks to the model and to the numerical studies, that the nonlinear rotation of the island is mainly governed by the ExB poloidal flow and/or by the nonlinear diamagnetic drift. (author)

  16. Lifshitz transition with interactions in high magnetic fields: Application to CeIn3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Pedro

    2012-02-01

    The N'eel ordered state of CeIn3 is suppressed by a magnetic field of 61 T at ambient pressure. There is a second transition at ˜45 T, which has been associated with a Lifshitz transition [1,2]. Skin depth measurements [2] indicate that the transition is discontinuous as T ->0. Motivated by this transition we study the effects of Landau quantization and interaction among carriers on a Lifshitz transition. The Landau quantization leads to quasi-one-dimensional behavior for the direction parallel to the field. Repulsive Coulomb interactions give rise to a gas of strongly coupled carriers [3]. The density correlation function is calculated for a special long-ranged potential [4]. It is concluded that in CeIn3 a pocket is being emptied as a function of field in a discontinuous fashion in the ground state. This discontinuity is gradually smeared by the temperature [4] in agreement with the skin depth experiments [2]. 0.05in [1] S.E. Sebastian et al, PNAS 106, 7741 (2009). [2] K.M. Purcell et al, Phys. Rev. B 79, 214428 (2009). [3] P. Schlottmann and R. Gerhardts, Z. Phys. B 34, 363 (1979). [4] P. Schlottmann, Phys. Rev. B 83, 115133 (2011); J. Appl. Phys., in print.

  17. Interactive neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging using fruit juice as an oral contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J; Graves, Martin J; Edwards, Andrea D; Joubert, Ilse; Set, Pat AK; Lomas, David J

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the use of fruit juice with an interactive inversion recovery (IR) MR pulse sequence to visualise the gastrointestinal tract. We investigated the relaxation properties of 12 different natural fruit juices in vitro, to identify which could be used as oral contrast. We then describe our initial experience using an interactive MR pulse sequence to allow optimal visualisation after administering pineapple juice orally, and suppressing pre-existing bowel fluid contents, with variable TI in three adult and one child volunteer. Pineapple juice (PJ) had both the shortest T 1 (243 ms) and shortest T 2 (48 ms) of the fruit juices tested. Optimal signal differentiation between pre-existing bowel contents and oral PJ administration was obtained with TIs of between 900 and 1100 ms. The use of an inversion recovery preparation allowed long T 1 pre-existing bowel contents to be suppressed whilst the short T 1 of fruit juice acts as a positive contrast medium. Pineapple juice could be used as oral contrast agent for neonatal gastrointestinal magnetic resonance imaging

  18. Interactive thresholded volumetry of abdominal fat using breath-hold T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittsack, H.J.; Cohnen, M.; Jung, G.; Moedder, U.; Poll, L.; Kapitza, C.; Heinemann, L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: development of a feasible and reliable method for determining abdominal fat using breath-hold T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: the high image contrast of T1-weighted gradient echo MR sequences makes it possible to differentiate between abdominal fat and non-fat tissue. To obtain a high signal-to-noise ratio, the measurements are usually performed using phased array surface coils. Inhomogeneity of the coil sensitivity leads to inhomogeneity of the image intensities. Therefore, to examine the volume of abdominal fat, an automatic algorithm for intensity correction must be implemented. The analysis of the image histogram results in a threshold to separate fat from other tissue. Automatic segmentation using this threshold results directly in the fat volumes. The separation of intraabdominal and subcutaneous fat is performed by interactive selection in a last step. Results: the described correction of inhomogeneity allows for the segmentation of the images using a global threshold. The use of semiautomatic interactive volumetry makes the analysis more subjective. The variance of volumetry between observers was 4.6%. The mean time for image analysis of a T1-weighted investigation lasted less than 6 minutes. Conclusion: the described method facilitates reliable determination of abdominal fat within a reasonable period of time. Using breath-hold MR sequences, the time of examination is less than 5 minutes per patient. (orig.)

  19. An interacting instanton and anti-instanton system under external color magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakano, M.

    1980-01-01

    The equilibrium configurations for the instanton and anti-instanton system of the SU(2) gauge field under constant external color magnetic fields are studied by applying the statistical mechanics method. The vacuum has a stabel equilibrium state in the case where the interaction between pseudoparticles is partly considered through the local gauge field in determining the mean dipole moment of instantons. It is shown, however, that there exists no equilibrium state, either stable or unstable, when the dipolar interaction with a particular instanton-size-dependent cutoff is taken into account directly by the second virial coefficient. To analyze this discrepancy a more general cutoff is introduced and the density of instantons is determined for equilibrium states with vanishing external fields, when the cutoff parameter is varied. Above a certain cutoff length there exist two branches of equilibrium configurations with high or low instanton densities, while below it no equilibrium state is obtained. It is shown that we have a critical cutoff length near but slightly larger than the above value and that the equilibrium states on the lower density branch corresponding to cutoff lengths larger than this critical value are stable, while all remaining equilibrium states are unstable. (orig.)

  20. The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Margitan, J. J.; Douglass, A. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Hoppel, K.; Sen, B.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of the stratospheric ozone (O3) distribution at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) are examined for the late summer and fall seasons of 1999. This time period sets the O3 initial condition for the SOLVE/THESEO field mission performed during winter 1999-2000. In situ and satellite data are used along with a three-dimensional model of chemistry and transport (CTM) to determine the key processes that control the distribution of O3 in the lower-to-middle stratosphere. O3 in the vortex at the beginning of the winter season is found to be nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value at 3 ppmv +/- approx. 10%. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. The seasonal time series of data from POAM shows that relatively low O3 mixing ratios, which characterize the vortex in late fall, are already present at high latitudes at the end of summer before the vortex circulation sets up. Analysis of the CTM output shows that the minimum O3 and increase in variance in late summer are the result of: 1) stirring of polar concentric O3 gradients by nascent wave-driven transport, and 2) an acceleration of net photochemical loss with decreasing solar illumination. The segregation of low O3 mixing ratios into the vortex as the circulation strengthens through the fall suggests a possible feedback role between O3 chemistry and the vortex formation dynamics. Trajectory calculations from O3 sample points early in the fall, however, show only a weak correlation between initial O3 mixing ratio and potential vorticity later in the season consistent with order-of-magnitude calculations for the relative importance of O3 in the fall radiative balance at high latitudes. The possible connection between O3 chemistry and the dynamics of vortex formation does suggest that these feedbacks and sensitivities need to be better understood in order to make confident predictions of the recovery

  1. Preface to the Special Issue on Climate-Chemistry Interactions: Atmospheric Ozone, Aerosols, and Clouds over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chyung Wang and Jen-Ping Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric radiatively-important chemical constituents (e.g., O3 and aerosols are important to maintain the radiation balance of the Earth-atmosphere climate system, and changes in their concentration due to both natural causes and anthropogenic activities will induce climate changes. The distribution of these constituents is sensitive to the state of the climate (e.g., temperature, moisture, wind, and clouds. Therefore, rises in atmospheric temperature and water vapor, and changes in circulation and clouds in global warming can directly affect atmospheric chemistry with subsequent implications for these constituents. Although many coupling mechanisms are identified, the net effect of all these impacts on climate change is not well understood. In particular, changes in water vapor and clouds associated with the hydrologic cycle contain significant uncertainties.

  2. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and various irrigants: A nuclear magnetic resonance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhya, Nirmal; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian Saravana; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Abarajithan, Mohan; Nithyanandan, Sivasankaran

    2014-05-01

    Interaction between local anesthetic solution, lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline), and root canal irrigants such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), and chlorhexidine (CHX) has not been studied earlier. Hence, the purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the chemical interaction between 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and commonly used root canal irrigants, NaOCl, EDTA, and CHX. SAMPLES WERE DIVIDED INTO EIGHT EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS: Group I-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group II-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group III- Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/2% CHX, Group IV-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group V-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group VI-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/2% CHX, and two control groups: Group VII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/deionized water and Group VIII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/deionized water. The respective solutions of various groups were mixed in equal proportions (1 ml each) and observed for precipitate formation. Chemical composition of the formed precipitate was then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and confirmed with diazotation test. In groups I and IV, a white precipitate was observed in all the samples on mixing the respective solutions, which showed a color change to reddish brown after 15 minutes. This precipitate was then analysed by NMR spectroscopy and was observed to be 2,6-xylidine, a reported toxic compound. The experimental groups II, III, V, and VI and control groups VII and VIII showed no precipitate formation in any of the respective samples, until 2 hours. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and NaOCl showed precipitate formation containing 2,6-xylidine, a toxic compound.

  3. The BioFragment Database (BFDb): An open-data platform for computational chemistry analysis of noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lori A.; Faver, John C.; Zheng, Zheng; Marshall, Michael S.; Smith, Daniel G. A.; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Merz, Kenneth M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2017-10-01

    Accurate potential energy models are necessary for reliable atomistic simulations of chemical phenomena. In the realm of biomolecular modeling, large systems like proteins comprise very many noncovalent interactions (NCIs) that can contribute to the protein's stability and structure. This work presents two high-quality chemical databases of common fragment interactions in biomolecular systems as extracted from high-resolution Protein DataBank crystal structures: 3380 sidechain-sidechain interactions and 100 backbone-backbone interactions that inaugurate the BioFragment Database (BFDb). Absolute interaction energies are generated with a computationally tractable explicitly correlated coupled cluster with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)-F12] "silver standard" (0.05 kcal/mol average error) for NCI that demands only a fraction of the cost of the conventional "gold standard," CCSD(T) at the complete basis set limit. By sampling extensively from biological environments, BFDb spans the natural diversity of protein NCI motifs and orientations. In addition to supplying a thorough assessment for lower scaling force-field (2), semi-empirical (3), density functional (244), and wavefunction (45) methods (comprising >1M interaction energies), BFDb provides interactive tools for running and manipulating the resulting large datasets and offers a valuable resource for potential energy model development and validation.

  4. Optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on silicon nanospheres with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfeng; Panmai, Mingcheng; Peng, Yuanyuan; Lan, Sheng

    2017-05-29

    We investigated theoretically and numerically the optical pulling and pushing forces acting on silicon (Si) nanospheres (NSs) with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances. We examined the optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on Si NSs by two interfering waves and revealed the underlying physical mechanism from the viewpoint of electric- and magnetic-dipole manipulation. As compared with a polystyrene (PS) NS, it was found that the optical pulling force for a Si NS with the same size is enlarged by nearly two orders of magnitude. In addition to the optical pulling force appearing at the long-wavelength side of the magnetic dipole resonance, very large optical pushing force is observed at the magnetic quadrupole resonance. The correlation between the optical pulling/pushing force and the directional scattering characterized by the ratio of the forward to backward scattering was revealed. More interestingly, it was found that the high-order electric and magnetic resonances in large Si NSs play an important role in producing optical pulling force which can be generated by not only s-polarized wave but also p-polarized one. Our finding indicates that the strong coherent interaction between the electric and magnetic resonances existing in nanoparticles with large refractive indices can be exploited to manipulate the optical force acting on them and the correlation between the optical force and the directional scattering can be used as guidance. The engineering and manipulation of optical forces will find potential applications in the trapping, transport and sorting of nanoparticles.

  5. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  6. Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  7. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  8. Aquatic Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yeun; Kim, Oh Sik; Kim, Chang Guk; Park, Cheong Gil; Lee, Gwi Hyeon; Lee, Cheol Hui

    1987-07-01

    This book deals aquatic chemistry, which treats water and environment, chemical kinetics, chemical balance like dynamical characteristic, and thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry such as summary, definition, kinetics, and PH design for mixture of acid-base chemistry, complex chemistry with definition, and kinetics, precipitation and dissolution on summary, kinetics of precipitation and dissolution, and balance design oxidation and resolution with summary, balance of oxidation and resolution.

  9. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  11. Supramolecular systems chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattia, Elio; Otto, Sijbren

    The field of supramolecular chemistry focuses on the non-covalent interactions between molecules that give rise to molecular recognition and self-assembly processes. Since most non-covalent interactions are relatively weak and form and break without significant activation barriers, many

  12. Minute splitting of magnetic excitations in CsFeCl{sub 3} due to dipolar interaction observed by polarised neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Baehr, M [HMI, Berlin (Germany); Petitgrand, D [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) - Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    Using inelastic neutron scattering with polarisation analysis it was possible, for the first time, to observe simultaneously the two magnetic modes split due to dipolar interaction. This would not have been possible with energy resolution only. An analysis of eigenvectors was also performed. (author). 4 refs.

  13. Particle-in-cell analysis of beam-wave interaction in gyrotron cavity with tapered magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A., E-mail: anil.gyrotron@gmail.com [Gyrotron Lab., Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Inst. (CEERI, CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan (India); Banasthali Univ., Dept. of Physics, Banasthali, Rajasthan (India); Khatun, H.; Kumar, N.; Singh, U.; Sinha, A.K. [Gyrotron Lab., Microwave Tube Area, Central Electronics Engineering Research Inst. (CEERI, CSIR), Pilani, Rajasthan (India); Vyas, V. [Banasthali Univ., Dept. of Physics, Banasthali, Rajasthan (India)

    2010-11-15

    A commercially available electromagnetic simulator -- MAGIC, a particle-in-cell (PIC) code -- has been used to carry out a comparative study of the beam-wave interaction under uniform and tapered magnetic field profiles of a 42 GHz, 200kW gyrotron. The magnetic field profile across the resonant cavity varies by ±6.5% with a peak value of 1.615 T. The MAGIC simulation shows the desire performance of the gyrotron under both magnetic field conditions with an operating mode TE{sub 03} and a pitch factor of 1.26. The analysis of the simulated results show that stability in the power growth was reached more quickly and achieved higher output power in the case of a tapered magnetic field. (author)

  14. Experimental platform for investigations of high-intensity laser plasma interactions in the magnetic field of a pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Maximov, A. V.; Swanson, K. J.; Wong, N. L.; Sarkisov, G. S.; Wiewior, P. P.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Covington, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    An experimental platform for the studying of high-intensity laser plasma interactions in strong magnetic fields has been developed based on the 1 MA Zebra pulsed power generator coupled with the 50-TW Leopard laser. The Zebra generator produces 100-300 T longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields with different types of loads. The Leopard laser creates plasma at an intensity of 1019 W/cm2 in the magnetic field of coil loads. Focusing and targeting systems are integrated in the vacuum chamber of the pulsed power generator and protected from the plasma debris and strong mechanical shock. The first experiments with plasma at laser intensity >2 × 1018 W/cm2 demonstrated collimation of the laser produced plasma in the axial magnetic field strength >100 T.

  15. Spin canting in a Dy-based single-chain magnet with dominant next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, K.; Luzon, J.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Sessoli, R.; Bogani, L.; Vindigni, A.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the static magnetic properties of single crystals of the molecular-based single-chain magnet of formula [Dy(hfac)3NIT(C6H4OPh)]∞ comprising alternating Dy3+ and organic radicals. The magnetic molar susceptibility χM displays a strong angular variation for sample rotations around two directions perpendicular to the chain axis. A peculiar inversion between maxima and minima in the angular dependence of χM occurs on increasing temperature. Using information regarding the monomeric building block as well as an ab initio estimation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Dy3+ ion, this “anisotropy-inversion” phenomenon can be assigned to weak one-dimensional ferromagnetism along the chain axis. This indicates that antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor interactions between Dy3+ ions dominate, despite the large Dy-Dy separation, over the nearest-neighbor interactions between the radicals and the Dy3+ ions. Measurements of the field dependence of the magnetization, both along and perpendicularly to the chain, and of the angular dependence of χM in a strong magnetic field confirm such an interpretation. Transfer-matrix simulations of the experimental measurements are performed using a classical one-dimensional spin model with antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange interaction and noncollinear uniaxial single-ion anisotropies favoring a canted antiferromagnetic spin arrangement, with a net magnetic moment along the chain axis. The fine agreement obtained with experimental data provides estimates of the Hamiltonian parameters, essential for further study of the dynamics of rare-earth-based molecular chains.

  16. Interacting large-scale magnetic fields and ionized gas in the W50/SS433 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnes, J. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Purcell, C.; Sun, X. H.; Haverkorn, M.; Lenc, E.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; Akahori, T.

    2017-06-01

    The W50/SS433 system is an unusual Galactic outflow-driven object of debatable origin. We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to observe a new 198 pointing mosaic, covering 3° × 2°, and present the highest-sensitivity full-Stokes data of W50 to date using wide-field, wide-band imaging over a 2 GHz bandwidth centred at 2.1 GHz. We also present a complementary Hα mosaic created using the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The magnetic structure of W50 is consistent with the prevailing hypothesis that the nebula is a reanimated shell-like supernova remnant (SNR), which has been re-energized by the jets from SS433. We observe strong depolarization effects that correlate with diffuse Hα emission, likely due to spatially varying Faraday rotation measure (RM) fluctuations of ≥48-61 rad m-2 on scales ≤4.5-6 pc. We also report the discovery of numerous, faint, Hα filaments that are unambiguously associated with the central region of W50. These thin filaments are suggestive of an SNR's shock emission, and almost all have a radio counterpart. Furthermore, an RM-gradient is detected across the central region of W50, which we interpret as a loop magnetic field with a symmetry axis offset by ≈90° to the east-west jet-alignment axis, and implying that the evolutionary processes of both the jets and the SNR must be coupled. A separate RM-gradient is associated with the termination shock in the eastern ear, which we interpret as a ring-like field located where the shock of the jet interacts with the circumstellar medium. Future optical observations will be able to use the new Hα filaments to probe the kinematics of the shell of W50, potentially allowing for a definitive experiment on W50's formation history.

  17. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems

  18. 3d-4f magnetic interaction with density functional theory plus u approach: local Coulomb correlation and exchange pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yachao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-12

    The 3d-4f exchange interaction plays an important role in many lanthanide based molecular magnetic materials such as single-molecule magnets and magnetic refrigerants. In this work, we study the 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions in a series of Cu(II)-Gd(III) (3d(9)-4f(7)) dinuclear complexes based on the numerical atomic basis-norm-conserving pseudopotential method and density functional theory plus the Hubbard U correction approach (DFT+U). We obtain improved description of the 4f electrons by including the semicore 5s5p states in the valence part of the Gd-pseudopotential. The Hubbard U correction is employed to treat the strongly correlated Cu-3d and Gd-4f electrons, which significantly improve the agreement of the predicted exchange constants, J, with experiment, indicating the importance of accurate description of the local Coulomb correlation. The high efficiency of the DFT+U approach enables us to perform calculations with molecular crystals, which in general improve the agreement between theory and experiment, achieving a mean absolute error smaller than 2 cm(-1). In addition, through analyzing the physical effects of U, we identify two magnetic exchange pathways. One is ferromagnetic and involves an interaction between the Cu-3d, O-2p (bridge ligand), and the majority-spin Gd-5d orbitals. The other one is antiferromagnetic and involves Cu-3d, O-2p, and the empty minority-spin Gd-4f orbitals, which is suppressed by the planar Cu-O-O-Gd structure. This study demonstrates the accuracy of the DFT+U method for evaluating the 3d-4f exchange interactions, provides a better understanding of the exchange mechanism in the Cu(II)-Gd(III) complexes, and paves the way for exploiting the magnetic properties of the 3d-4f compounds containing lanthanides other than Gd.

  19. Forensic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  20. Real-Time Characterization of Aerosol Particle Composition above the Urban Canopy in Beijing: Insights into the Interactions between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Aerosol Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhenyi; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Gao, Zhiqiu; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-10-06

    Despite extensive efforts into the characterization of air pollution during the past decade, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition above the urban canopy in the megacity Beijing has never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous real-time measurements of aerosol composition at two different heights at the same location in urban Beijing from December 19, 2013 to January 2, 2014. The nonrefractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer at near-ground level and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor at 260 m on a 325 m meteorological tower in Beijing. Secondary aerosol showed similar temporal variations between ground level and 260 m, whereas much weaker correlations were found for the primary aerosol. The diurnal evolution of the ratios and correlations of aerosol species between 260 m and the ground level further illustrated a complex interaction between vertical mixing processes and local source emissions on aerosol chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer. As a result, the aerosol compositions at the two heights were substantially different. Organic aerosol (OA), mainly composed of primary OA (62%), at the ground level showed a higher contribution to NR-PM1 (65%) than at 260 m (54%), whereas a higher concentration and contribution (15%) of nitrate was observed at 260 m, probably due to the favorable gas-particle partitioning under lower temperature conditions. In addition, two different boundary layer structures were observed, each interacting differently with the evolution processes of aerosol chemistry.