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Sample records for chemistry influence cancer

  1. Defined nanoscale chemistry influences delivery of peptido-toxins for cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Misra

    Full Text Available We present an in-silico-to-in-vitro approach to develop well-defined, self-assembled, rigid-cored polymeric (Polybee nano-architecture for controlled delivery of a key component of bee venom, melittin. A competitive formulation with lipid-encapsulated (Lipobee rigid cored micelle is also synthesized. In a series of sequential experiments, we show how nanoscale chemistry influences the delivery of venom toxins for cancer regression and help evade systemic disintegrity and cellular noxiousness. A relatively weaker association of melittin in the case of lipid-based nanoparticles is compared to the polymeric particles revealed by energy minimization and docking studies, which are supported by biophysical studies. For the first time, the authors' experiment results indicate that melittin can play a significant role in DNA association-dissociation processes, which may be a plausible route for their anticancer activity.

  2. Influence of plasma chemistry on oxygen triplets

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; Ellingboe, Albert; Daniels, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The plasma chemistry of fluorocarbon-oxygen-argon discharges and its influence on prominent oxygen triplets are studied. The oxygen 777 triplet is very important for the measurement of atomic oxygen in low pressure plasmas, since the 777.417 nm spectral line is frequently used for actinometry. In this paper we identify changes in the individual 777 triplet lines arising from cascade effects from higher energy levels of oxygen, and from resonant energy transfer from energetic carbon...

  3. Influencing College Chemistry Success through High School Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Loehr, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The connection between high school chemistry pedagogical experiences and introductory college chemistry performance has been a topic researched in published science education literature since the 1920s. However, analysis techniques have limited the generalizability of these results. This review discusses the findings of a large-scale,…

  4. Influence of Chemistry on source term assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major goal of a phenomenology analysis of containment during a severe accident situation can be splitedd into the following ones: to know the containment response to the different loads and to predict accurately the fission product and aerosol behavior. In this report, the main results coming from the study of a hypothetical accident scenario, based on LA-4 experiment of LACE project, are presented. In order to do it, several codes have been coupled: CONTEMPT4/MOD5 (thermalhydraulics), NAUA/MOD5 (aerosol physics) and IODE (iodine chemistry). 12 refs. It has been demonstrated the impossibility of assessing with confidence the Source Term if the chemical conduct of some radionuclides is not taken into account. In particular, the influence on the iodine retention efficiency of the sump of variables such as pH has been proven. (Author). 12 refs

  5. Factors influencing success in introductory college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Loehr, John F.

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has found a wide range of predictors of student performance in introductory college chemistry. These predictors are associated with both the students' backgrounds and their high school learning experiences. The purpose of this research study was to examine the link between high school chemistry pedagogical experiences and performance in introductory college chemistry while accounting for individual educational and demographic differences. The researchers surveyed 1531 students enrolled in first-semester introductory college chemistry courses for science and engineering majors at 12 different U.S. colleges and universities. Using multiple regression analysis, the researchers uncovered several interesting high school pedagogical experiences that appeared to be linked with varying levels of performance in college chemistry. Most notably, the researchers found that repeating chemistry labs for understanding was associated with higher student grades, whereas overemphasis on lab procedure in high school chemistry was associated with lower grades in college. These results suggest that high school teachers' pedagogical choices may have a link to future student performance.

  6. Using College Chemistry to Influence Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Brenda W.

    1976-01-01

    After receiving creativity instruction in how to approach laboratory problems, a group of college chemistry students made significant improvements in both laboratory technique and creativity as shown on an instrument designed for this study. (MLH)

  7. From combinatorial chemistry to cancer targeting nanotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Li, Yuanpei; Xiao, Wenwu; Lee, Joyce S.; Gonik, Abby M.; Lam, Kit S.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a number of amphiphilic polymers, comprised of a cluster of cholic acids (4 to 10) linked by a series of lysines and attached to one end of a linear polyethylene glycol chain (PEG, 2000-5000 Dalton). Under aqueous condition, such telodendrimers can self-assemble together with hydrophobic payloads to form highly stable micelles (15-150 nm diameter, size tunable). We used near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) optical imaging technique to study the in vivo passive accumulation of our nanocarriers (via EPR effect) in different types and stages of tumors. The results demonstrated that the micelle could preferentially accumulate in many types of tumor xenografts or synografts implanted in mice. Nanoparticle uptake in solid tumors was found to be much higher than that of lymphoma, which could be attributed to the relatively low microvascular density in the latter. We have also demonstrated that micelles smaller than 64 nm preferentially targeted xenografts with high efficiency and with low liver and lung uptake, whereas those micelles at 154 nm targeted the tumor poorly but with very high liver and lung uptake. Telodendrimers decorated with oligolysine or oligoaspartic acid resulted in high uptake of the nanoparticles into the liver. When decorated with cancer targeting ligands identified from the one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial library methods, the drug-loaded nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by the target cultured tumor cells causing cell death. In vivo near infra-red optical imaging studies with hydrophobic fluorescent dye demonstrated that xenograft uptake of the micelles was greatly enhanced by the cancer targeting peptide.

  8. Influence of iodine chemistry on source term assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major goal of a phenomenology analysis of containment during a severe accident situation can be spitted into the following ones: to know the containment response to the different loads and to predict accurately the fission product and aerosol behavior. In this report, the main results coming from the study of a hypothetical accident scenario, based on LA-4 experiment of LACE project, are presented. In order to do it, several codes have been coupled: CONTEMPT4/MOD5 (thermohydraulics), NAUA/MOD5 (aerosol physics) and IODE (iodine chemistry). It has been demonstrated the impossibility of assessing with confidence the Source Term if the chemical conduct of some radionuclides is not taken into account. In particular, the influence on the iodine retention efficiency of the sump of variables such as pH has been proven. (Author)12 refs

  9. Environmental Factors Influencing Arctic Halogen Chemistry During Late Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, J.; Nghiem, S. V.; Simpson, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive halogen radicals (e.g. Br, Cl atoms and their oxides, BrO, ClO) are important oxidizers in the troposphere that decrease atmospheric pollutants and deplete tropospheric ozone, affecting the abundance of other oxidizers such as the hydroxyl radical. During Arctic springtime, the heterogeneous chemical cycles (often called the "bromine explosion") produce high levels of bromine monoxide (BrO), through reactions on saline snow, ice, and/or aerosol surfaces. Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measured BrO at Barrow, AK, from 2008-2009 and 2012-2015, as well at various locations above the frozen Arctic Ocean with O-Buoys in 2008 and 2011-2015. Observed BrO levels drop suddenly during late spring (May-June) and generally do not recover, which indicates the bromine explosion cycle can no longer produce significant amounts of BrO. We have established, through an objective algorithm, the local day of year of this drop in BrO as the "seasonal end." Additionally, in about half of the years, "recurrence" events were observed where BrO levels recover for at least a day. This study investigates the environmental factors influencing seasonal end and recurrence events including: temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and snowmelt. Analysis of BrO and air temperature revealed the temperature reaches 0°C within five days of the seasonal end event; however, temperatures drop below freezing during a recurrence event. In addition, there are periods where the temperature remains below freezing, but no recurrence event is observed. This BrO and temperature analysis indicates above-freezing air temperature prevents reactive bromine release; however, it is not the only environmental factor influencing this heterogeneous recycling. Further analysis of additional environmental influences on the bromine explosion cycle could help to better understand and model bromine chemistry in the Arctic.

  10. The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles on cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on p53 mediated cell death was evaluated using human dermal fibroblast (HDF) and lung cancer (A549) cells. The citrate reduced AgNPs (C-AgNPs) were modified with either lactose (L-AgNPs) or a 12-base long oligonucleotide (O-AgNPs). Both unmodified and modified AgNPs showed increased concentration and time dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity causing an increased p53 up-regulation within 6 h and led to apoptotic or necrotic cell deaths. The C-AgNPs induced more cytotoxicity and cellular DNA damage than the surface modified AgNPs. Modifying the C-AgNPs with lactose or the oligonucleotide reduced both necrotic and apoptotic cell deaths in the HDF cells. The C-AgNPs caused an insignificant necrosis in A549 cells whereas the modified AgNPs caused necrosis and apoptosis in both cell types. Compared to the O-AgNPs, the L-AgNPs triggered more cellular DNA damage, which led to up-regulation of p53 gene inducing apoptosis in A549 cells compared to HDF cells. This suggests that the different surface chemistries of the AgNPs cause different cellular responses that may be important not only for their use in medicine but also for reducing their toxicity. (paper)

  11. Influence of a Regular, Standardized Meal on Clinical Chemistry Analytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Danese, Elisa; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Background Preanalytical variability, including biological variability and patient preparation, is an important source of variability in laboratory testing. In this study, we assessed whether a regular light meal might bias the results of routine clinical chemistry testing. Methods We studied 17 healthy volunteers who consumed light meals containing a standardized amount of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. We collected blood for routine clinical chemistry tests before the meal and 1, 2, and 4 hr thereafter. Results One hour after the meal, triglycerides (TG), albumin (ALB), uric acid (UA), phosphatase (ALP), Ca, Fe, and Na levels significantly increased, whereas blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and P levels decreased. TG, ALB, Ca, Na, P, and total protein (TP) levels varied significantly. Two hours after the meal, TG, ALB, Ca, Fe, and Na levels remained significantly high, whereas BUN, P, UA, and total bilirubin (BT) levels decreased. Clinically significant variations were recorded for TG, ALB, ALT, Ca, Fe, Na, P, BT, and direct bilirubin (BD) levels. Four hours after the meal, TG, ALB, Ca, Fe, Na, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), P, Mg, and K levels significantly increased, whereas UA and BT levels decreased. Clinically significant variations were observed for TG, ALB, ALT, Ca, Na, Mg, K, C-reactive protein (CRP), AST, UA, and BT levels. Conclusions A significant variation in the clinical chemistry parameters after a regular meal shows that fasting time needs to be carefully considered when performing tests to prevent spurious results and reduce laboratory errors, especially in an emergency setting. PMID:22779065

  12. Influence of surface chemistry on inkjet printed carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube ink chemistry and the proper formulation are crucial for direct-write printing of nanotubes. Moreover, the correct surface chemistry of the self-assembled monolayers that assist the direct deposition of carbon nanotubes onto the substrate is equally important to preserve orientation of the printed carbon nanotubes. We report that the successful formulation of two single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) inks yields a consistent, homogenous printing pattern possessing the requisite viscosities needed for flow through the microcapillary nozzles of the inkjet printer with fairly modest drying times. The addition of an aqueous sodium silicate allows for a reliable method for forming a uniform carbon nanotube network deposited directly onto unfunctionalized surfaces such as glass or quartz via inkjet deposition. Furthermore, this sodium silicate ingredient helps preserve applied orientation to the printed SWNT solution. Sheet resistivity of this carbon nanotube ink formula printed on quartz decreases as a function of passes and is independent of the substrate. SWNTs were successfully patterned on Au. This amine-based surface chemistry dramatically helps improve the isolation stabilization of the printed SWNTs as seen in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image. Lastly, using our optimized SWNT ink formula and waveform parameters in the Fuji materials printer, we are able to directly write/print SWNTs into 2D patterns. Dried ink pattern expose and help orient roped carbon nanotubes that are suspended in ordered arrays across the cracks.

  13. Blood Type Influences Pancreatic Cancer Risk | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation in the gene that determines ABO blood type influences the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) for this highly lethal disease. The genetic variation, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), was discovered in a region of chromosome 9 that harbors the gene that determines blood type, the researchers reported August 2 online in Nature Genetics. |

  14. The influence of desulfovibrio desulfuricans on neptunium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of biotic Np(V) reduction is studied in light of its potential role in the environmental immobilization of this hazardous radionuclide. The speciation of Np in Desulfovibrio desulfuricans cultures is compared with Np speciation in the spent medium and in the uninoculated medium. Precipitates formed in all three samples. Optical spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to determine that Np(V) is almost quantitatively reduced in all three samples and that the precipitate is an amorphous Np(IV) species. These results demonstrate that the reduction of Np is independent of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The underlying chemistry associated with these results is discussed

  15. How chemistry influences cloud structure, star formation, and the IMF

    CERN Document Server

    Hocuk, S; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    In the earliest phases of star-forming clouds, stable molecular species, such as CO, are important coolants in the gas phase. Depletion of these molecules on dust surfaces affects the thermal balance of molecular clouds and with that their whole evolution. For the first time, we study the effect of grain surface chemistry (GSC) on star formation and its impact on the initial mass function (IMF). We follow a contracting translucent cloud in which we treat the gas-grain chemical interplay in detail, including the process of freeze-out. We perform 3d hydrodynamical simulations under three different conditions, a pure gas-phase model, a freeze-out model, and a complete chemistry model. The models display different thermal evolution during cloud collapse. The equation of state (EOS) of the gas becomes softer with CO freeze-out and the results show that at the onset of star formation, the cloud retains its evolution history such that the number of formed stars differ (by 7%) between the three models. While the stel...

  16. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF3 and dissolved UF4, and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC2. Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U4+/U3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  17. Physicians’ influence on breast cancer patient compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates. PMID:24454275

  18. An examination of past and present influences on university chemistry education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, William Atef

    This study examined the historical influences that have contributed to past and present-day university level chemistry education. The study was organized into three sections: First, by analyzing the academic genealogy, education origins of prominent chemists, Nobel Prize winners in chemistry and scientific patents awarded by countries; the major historical contributors to chemical education during the 19th century were identified; Secondly, by analyzing the educational backgrounds of current chemistry professors (n=12,120) in 407 universities in 40 countries around the world and six chemical education indicators for 25 countries; and finally the relationship, if any, between a country's chemical, biotechnology, defense, and petroleum industries to its level of chemistry education was investigated utilizing a multiple regression analysis between the monetary value of the industries and the extent of chemical education within each country. The findings indicated that the U.S., Britain, Germany, and France were major influencers of 19th century chemical education while the major present-day influencers of university chemical education are the U.S., Germany, Britain, France, Italy, and Japan. Pearson correlation coefficients indicated that the value of the chemical industry for a country was significantly related to (a) the number of chemistry doctorates awarded (p=.05), (b) chemistry Nobel awards (p=.001), (c) the number of chemistry publications (p=.001), and (d) prominence of the country in the chemical literature (p=.05). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the value of the biotechnology industry was significantly related to the number of Nobel awards (p=.007) and the number of chemistry publications (p=.001). The value of the defense industry was significantly related to chemistry doctorates (p=.002), chemistry Nobel awards (p=.001), the number of chemistry publications (p=.001), and prominence in the literature (p=.001). The value of the petroleum

  19. Discovering Factors that Influence the Decision to Pursue a Chemistry-Related Career: A Comparative Analysis of the Experiences of Non Scientist Adults and Chemistry Teachers in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salta, Katerina; Gekos, Michael; Petsimeri, Irene; Koulougliotis, Dionysios

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at identifying factors that influence students' choice not to pursue a chemistry-related career by analyzing the experiences of secondary education chemistry teachers in Greece and of Greek adults who have not pursued studies related to science. Data collection was done with the method of individual structured interviews. The…

  20. How chemistry influences cloud structure, star formation, and the IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the earliest phases of star-forming clouds, stable molecular species, such as CO, are important coolants in the gas phase. Depletion of these molecules on dust surfaces affects the thermal balance of molecular clouds and with that their whole evolution. For the first time, we study the effect of grain surface chemistry (GSC) on star formation and its impact on the initial mass function (IMF). We follow a contracting translucent cloud in which we treat the gas-grain chemical interplay in detail, including the process of freeze-out. We perform 3D hydrodynamical simulations under three different conditions, a pure gas-phase model, a freeze-out model, and a complete chemistry model. The models display different thermal evolution during cloud collapse as also indicated in Hocuk, Cazaux & Spaans, but to a lesser degree because of a different dust temperature treatment, which is more accurate for cloud cores. The equation of state (EOS) of the gas becomes softer with CO freeze-out and the results show that at the onset of star formation, the cloud retains its evolution history such that the number of formed stars differ (by 7 per cent) between the three models. While the stellar mass distribution results in a different IMF when we consider pure freeze-out, with the complete treatment of the GSC, the divergence from a pure gas-phase model is minimal. We find that the impact of freeze-out is balanced by the non-thermal processes; chemical and photodesorption. We also find an average filament width of 0.12 pc (±0.03 pc), and speculate that this may be a result from the changes in the EOS caused by the gas-dust thermal coupling. We conclude that GSC plays a big role in the chemical composition of molecular clouds and that surface processes are needed to accurately interpret observations, however, that GSC does not have a significant impact as far as star formation and the IMF is concerned.

  1. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  2. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF4--H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF2--ThF4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF4 for Te

  3. Influence of surface chemistry on the electronic properties of graphene related carbon materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chutia, Arunabhirm; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Miyamotob, Akira

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study on the influence of organic functional groups on the electronic properties of graphene related carbon materials was carried out. Here we report, using density functional theory and tight-binding approach, that the best candidates for conducting supramolecular devices can be obtained by engineering the surface chemistry and stacking conformation of these materials.

  4. Radiation Physics and Chemistry in Heavy-ion Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ions, such as carbon and oxygen ions, are classified as high-LET radiations, and produce a characteristic dose-depth distribution different from that of low-LET radiations such as γ-rays, xrays and electrons. Heavy ions lose less energy at the entrance to an irradiated biological system up to some depth than the low-LET radiations, while they deposit a large amount of dose within a very narrow range at a certain depth, producing the characteristic sharp peak called the Bragg peak. Therefore, by controlling the Bragg peak, it becomes possible to irradiate only the tumor region in a pin-point manner, while avoiding irradiation of the normal tissue, thus making heavyion therapy ideal for deep-seated tumor treatment. Clinical results on more than 2400 patients are very encouraging. However, very little is known about what is going on in terms of physics and chemistry inside the Bragg peak. In this paper the current status of our understanding of heavy-ion interactions and remaining problems of physics and chemistry for the heavy-ion treatment are explored, particularly in the Bragg peak region. Specially, the survey of the basic physical quantity, the mean energy required to form an ion pair (Wvalue for heavy ions of interest for radiotherapy is presented. Finally, the current clinical status of heavy-ion therapy is presented.

  5. Study on the influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour of LWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the results of the study on the influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour, which has been performed for more than ten years on BWRs and PWRs in Japan. The post irradiation examination (P.I.E.) program of commercial reactor fuel assembly which was explained at Tokyo meeting in 1981 includes an investigation of the characteristics and build-up conditions of crud deposited on mainly BWR fuel cladding. This article also provides a summary of the results of the investigation and shows how the results are utilized for establishing effective water chemistry measures

  6. Factors influencing the prognosis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the categories T1, T2 and T3NxM0 bladder cancer, with a diameter not exceeding 5 cm, the treatment in the Rotterdam Radio-Therapy Institute consists of interstitial irradiation with needles containing radioactive material. The results of treatment and the role of additional external irradiation are discussed. Category T3NxM0 tumors with a diameter exceeding 5 cm are treated by external irradiation followed by cystectomy; the results are presented here. Factors influencing prognosis appeared to be the degree of differentiation, number of transurethral resections (TURs) prior to definitive treatment, intravenous pyelography (IVP), vascular invasion, T category after preoperative irradiation, and postsurgical histopathologically-assessed T category (pT)

  7. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na3CrF6 and Na5Cr3F14, were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li2BeF4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe2+ and Cr3+ and the determination of the U3+/U4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF4--NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF4--NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  8. AXL Inhibitors in Cancer: A Medicinal Chemistry Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Samuel H; Brunton, Valerie G; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2016-04-28

    Dysregulation of the AXL receptor tyrosine kinase has been associated with many types of cancer. It has not been until recently, however, that targeting AXL has come under the spotlight because of ever accumulating evidence of its strong correlation with poor prognosis and drug resistance. The entry of the first AXL-branded inhibitor in clinical trials in 2013 marked an important milestone for the clinical validation of AXL as an anticancer target. Nevertheless, to weigh the current contribution and potential future impact of AXL inhibition in the clinic, it is fundamental to recognize that several kinase inhibitors approved or in clinical development have AXL as either a prominent secondary or even the primary target. Through this review, the chemical and biological properties of the main inhibitors targeting AXL (either intentionally or unintentionally) will be discussed, along with the prospects and challenges to translate AXL inhibitors into a bona fide therapeutic option. PMID:26555154

  9. Underscoring the influence of inorganic chemistry on nuclear imaging with radiometals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglis, Brian M; Houghton, Jacob L; Evans, Michael J; Viola-Villegas, Nerissa; Lewis, Jason S

    2014-02-17

    Over the past several decades, radionuclides have matured from largely esoteric and experimental technologies to indispensible components of medical diagnostics. Driving this transition, in part, have been mutually necessary advances in biomedical engineering, nuclear medicine, and cancer biology. Somewhat unsung has been the seminal role of inorganic chemistry in fostering the development of new radiotracers. In this regard, the purpose of this Forum Article is to more visibly highlight the significant contributions of inorganic chemistry to nuclear imaging by detailing the development of five metal-based imaging agents: (64)Cu-ATSM, (68)Ga-DOTATOC, (89)Zr-transferrin, (99m)Tc-sestamibi, and (99m)Tc-colloids. In a concluding section, several unmet needs both in and out of the laboratory will be discussed to stimulate conversation between inorganic chemists and the imaging community. PMID:24313747

  10. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  11. Factors Influencing Selection of Treatment for Colorectal Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalli-Björkman, Nina

    2012-01-01

    In Sweden and elsewhere there is evidence of poorer cancer survival for patients of low socioeconomic status (SES), and in some settings differences in treatment by SES have been shown. The aim of this thesis was to explore factors which influence cancer treatment decisions, such as knowledge reaped from clinical trials, patient-related factors, and physician-related factors. In a register study of colorectal cancer, all stages, patients were stratified for SES-factors. Differences were seen ...

  12. Chemistry-turbulence interactions and mesoscale variability influence the cleansing efficiency of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Yuan, B.; Mauldin, R. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Patton, E. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knote, C.; Orlando, J.; Emmons, L.; Apel, E.; Hornbrook, R.; Shertz, S.; Ullmann, K.; Hall, S.; Graus, M.; Gouw, J.; Zhou, X.; Ye, C.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere and the primary sink for isoprene, the dominant volatile organic compound emitted by vegetation. Recent research on the atmospheric oxidation capacity in isoprene-dominated environments has suggested missing radical sources leading to significant overestimation of the lifetime of isoprene. Here we report, for the first time, a comprehensive experimental budget of isoprene in the planetary boundary layer based on airborne flux measurements along with in situ OH observations in the Southeast and Central U.S. Our findings show that surface heterogeneity of isoprene emissions lead to a physical separation of isoprene and OH resulting in an effective slowdown in the chemistry. Depending on surface heterogeneity, the intensity of segregation (Is) could locally slow down isoprene chemistry up to 30%. The effect of segregated reactants in the planetary boundary layer on average has an influence on modeled OH radicals that is comparable to that of recently proposed radical recycling mechanisms.

  13. Influence of chloride ions on actinide chemistry. Effects of radiolysis and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis addresses the chemistry of radionuclides in natural waters, an issue which is related to the management of long life radioactive wastes. Chloride ions are the most concentrated ions but their weak complexing power explains the fact that they are often neglected in speciation calculations. The objective of this research is to identify the influence of chloride ions on transuranium elements (Np, Pu and Am). Their influence is investigated with respect to chemical conditions close to that of underground waters and for concentrated media related to storage conditions in saline media. The author discusses media-related corrections applied to thermodynamic functions, reports a bibliographic study on the stability of actinide chloride complexes, reports a spectrophotometric investigation of complexation by chlorides, and reports the study of the influence of chlorides in a carbonate medium (solubility of americium at different temperatures, and notably at room temperature)

  14. Influence of changing carbonate chemistry on morphology and weight of coccoliths formed by Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi is a marine phytoplankton species capable of forming small calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths which cover the organic part of the cell. Calcification rates of E. huxleyi are known to be sensitive to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. It has, however, not yet been clearly determined how these changes are reflected in size and weight of individual coccoliths and which specific parameter(s of the carbonate system drive morphological modifications. Here, we compare data on coccolith size, weight, and malformation from a set of five experiments with a large diversity of carbonate chemistry conditions. This diversity allows distinguishing the influence of individual carbonate chemistry parameters such as carbon dioxide (CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, carbonate ion (CO32−, and protons (H+ on the measured parameters. Measurements of fine-scale morphological structures reveal an increase of coccolith malformation with decreasing pH suggesting that H+ is the major factor causing malformations. Coccolith distal shield area varies from about 5 to 11 μm2. Changes in size seem to be mainly induced by varying [HCO3−] and [H+] although influence of [CO32−] cannot be entirely ruled out. Changes in coccolith weight were proportional to changes in size. Increasing CaCO3 production rates are reflected in an increase in coccolith weight and an increase of the number of coccoliths formed per unit time. The combined investigation of morphological features and coccolith production rates presented in this study may help to interpret data derived from sediment cores, where coccolith morphology is used to reconstruct calcification rates in the water column.

  15. Influence of changing carbonate chemistry on morphology and weight of coccoliths formed by Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Schulz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi is a marine phytoplankton species capable of forming small calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths which cover the organic part of the cell. Calcification rates of E. huxleyi are known to be sensitive to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. It is, however, not yet understood how these changes are reflected in the morphology of coccoliths. Here, we compare data on coccolith size, weight, and malformation from a~set of five experiments with a large diversity of carbonate chemistry conditions. This diversity allows distinguishing the influence of individual carbonate chemistry parameters such as carbon dioxide (CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3−, carbonate (CO32−, and protons (H+ on the measured parameters. Measurements of fine-scale morphological structures reveal an increase of coccolith malformation with decreasing pH suggesting that H+ is the major factor causing malformations. Coccolith distal shield area varies from about 5 to 11 μm2. Changes in size seem to be mainly induced by varying [HCO3−] and [H+] although influence of [CO32−] cannot be entirely ruled out. Changes in coccolith weight were proportional to changes in size. Increasing CaCO3 production rates are reflected in an increase in coccolith weight and an increase of the number of coccoliths formed per unit time. The combined investigation of morphological features and coccolith production rates presented in this study may help to interpret data derived from sediment cores, where coccolith morphology is used to reconstruct calcification rates in the water column.

  16. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were followed 1995-2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression analyses with 5-year age bands included hormone exposures as time-dependent covariates. Use of estrogen-only therapy and combined therapy were associated with decreased risks of colon cancer (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.86 and 0.88, 0.80-0.96) and rectal cancer (0.83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone users were at lower risk of advanced stage of colorectal cancer, which seems supportive for a causal association between hormone therapy and colorectal cancer. PMID:26758900

  17. Triterpenes in cancer: significance and their influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Balraj Singh; Kumar, Sanjeev; Navgeet

    2016-09-01

    Natural products are enriched with numerous compounds with a broad spectrum of therapeutics indication suggesting the role of functional moieties as a core pharmacophore. This review highlights the role of triterpene in targeting signaling pathways in cancer. Advancement in cellular, biochemical, experimental, and computational approaches provides new insights into various pathways in cancer. In signaling network, triterpenes primarily target membrane receptors which control and modulates expression level of the biological responses. Triterpenes are immunomodulatory targeting nuclear factor kappa B, toll-like receptors, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. Triterpenes isolated from plants and fungus mainly focus on the process of apoptosis while other signaling areas in the cancer are still shrouded. Some of the triterpenes have already passed the clinical trial, whereas many more have been proven to yield effective results. This review would help the researchers to study the role of triterpenes in cancer, thus, helping them to discover and design efficacious therapeutics agents. PMID:27344437

  18. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Keiding, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    .83, 0.72-0.96 and 0.89, 0.80-1.00), compared to never users. Transdermal estrogen-only therapy implied more protection than oral administration, while no significant influence was found of regimen, progestin type, nor of tibolone. The benefit of HT was stronger for long-term hormone users; and hormone......Exogenous sex hormones seem to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Little is known about the influence of different types or durations of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on colorectal cancer risk. A nationwide cohort of women 50-79 years old without previous cancer (n = 1,006,219) were...

  19. [Influences of uncommon isoenzymes on determination of alkaline phosphatase activity by dry-chemistry analyzers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozawa, T; Hashimoto, M

    2001-04-01

    Dry-chemistry(DC) analysis may be influenced by some matrix effects for measuring uncommon isoenzyme forms. Placental and intestinal alkaline phosphatase(AP) are overestimated by the VITROS DC, compared with results obtained with the wet-chemistry(WC) method of Bretaudiere, et al. using 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) buffer, however, no such discrepancy between AP results in any DC method and that with a routine WC method recommended by Japanese Society of Clinical Chemistry in that 2-ethylaminoethanol(EAE) buffer is used, has been demonstrated. The type of buffer used affects differently the rates of AP isoenzymes activities. We therefore examined whether the presence of uncommon AP isoenzyme forms in serum caused aberrant DC results for AP in comparison with a routine WC method using EAE buffer. Here, serum samples with only liver AP and bone AP(n : 32); high-molecular-mass AP(n : 11); placental AP(n : 12); intestinal AP(n : 13) and immunoglobulin (Ig) bound AP(n : 12) were analyzed for total AP activity on three different DC analyzers: VITROS 700XR, FUJIDRYCHEM 5000, SPOTCHEM 4410 and a WC analyzer: HITACHI 7350. Values obtained in all of the DCs for sera containing only liver/bone AP agreed with those with the WC method. For sera containing placental AP, the VITROS values were higher than those with the WC method, while the FUJIDRYCHEM values and the SPOTCHEM values were lower. The VITROS values and the FUJIDRYCHEM values for sera containing intestinal AP were lower than those with the WC method, while the SPOTCHEM values were higher. All of the DCs did not affect high-molecular-mass AP and Ig bound liver/bone AP types of macro AP, but underestimated Ig bound intestinal type. Ig bound intestinal AP may be sieved by DC multilayer elements. PMID:11391954

  20. Evaluation of factors influencing the groundwater chemistry in a small tropical island of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Nura Umar; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Sulaiman, Wan Nur Azmin; Ibrahim, Shaharin; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Mustapha, Adamu

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater chemistry of small tropical islands is influenced by many factors, such as recharge, weathering and seawater intrusion, among others, which interact with each other in a very complex way. In this work, multivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the factors controlling the groundwater chemistry of Kapas Island (Malaysia). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to 17 hydrochemical parameters from 108 groundwater samples obtained from 18 sampling sites. PCA extracted four PCs, namely seawater intrusion, redox reaction, anthropogenic pollution and weather factors, which collectively were responsible for more than 87% of the total variance of the island's hydrochemistry. The cluster analysis indicated that three factors (weather, redox reaction and seawater intrusion) controlled the hydrochemistry of the area, and the variables were allocated to three groups based on similarity. A Piper diagram classified the island's water types into Ca-HCO3 water type, Na-HCO3 water type, Na-SO4-Cl water type and Na-Cl water type, indicating recharge, mixed, weathering and leached from sewage and seawater intrusion, respectively. This work will provide policy makers and land managers with knowledge of the precise water quality problems affecting the island and can also serve as a guide for hydrochemistry assessments of other islands that share similar characteristics with the island in question. PMID:23648442

  1. Evaluation of Factors Influencing the Groundwater Chemistry in a Small Tropical Island of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nura Umar Kura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater chemistry of small tropical islands is influenced by many factors, such as recharge, weathering and seawater intrusion, among others, which interact with each other in a very complex way. In this work, multivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the factors controlling the groundwater chemistry of Kapas Island (Malaysia. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to 17 hydrochemical parameters from 108 groundwater samples obtained from 18 sampling sites. PCA extracted four PCs, namely seawater intrusion, redox reaction, anthropogenic pollution and weather factors, which collectively were responsible for more than 87% of the total variance of the island’s hydrochemistry. The cluster analysis indicated that three factors (weather, redox reaction and seawater intrusion controlled the hydrochemistry of the area, and the variables were allocated to three groups based on similarity. A Piper diagram classified the island’s water types into Ca-HCO3 water type, Na-HCO3 water type, Na-SO4-Cl water type and Na-Cl water type, indicating recharge, mixed, weathering and leached from sewage and seawater intrusion, respectively. This work will provide policy makers and land managers with knowledge of the precise water quality problems affecting the island and can also serve as a guide for hydrochemistry assessments of other islands that share similar characteristics with the island in question.

  2. The influence of carbon surface chemistry on supported palladium nanoparticles in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuxiao; Zhang, Liyun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Feng, Zhenbao; Shi, Wen; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2016-10-15

    The surface chemistry of nanocarbon support can tailor chemical properties of precious metal nanoparticle/nanocarbon hybrid catalyst in heterogeneous reactions. We report on modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) support with ionic liquid-derived carbonaceous surface for palladium nanoparticle (Pd NPs) decoration and their actions in different heterogeneous reactions. The surface chemistry of support materials was characterized in detail, and the influence of which on the formation and distribution of metal particles was further investigated. Three different types of reactions including Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, CO oxidation and phenol reduction were examined in terms of reactivity and selectivity. The roles of substituted nitrogen in graphitic lattice and grafted groups on the carbon surface were exploited. Nitrogen-doping can give rise to changes in electronic properties of supported metals, and the Lewis basicity of the doped nitrogen atoms can favor the adsorption of acidic reactants in phenol reduction. The grafted groups derived a negative impact to the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, due to the involvement of larger reactant molecules, despite that they could prevent significant sintering of Pd NPs in the CO oxidation. PMID:27442144

  3. QBO Influence on Polar Stratospheric Variability in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Slong, I.-S.; Newman, P. A.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation modulates the strength of both the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheric vortices. Model and observational studies have found that the phase and characteristics of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) contribute to the high degree of variability in the Arctic stratosphere in winter. While the Antarctic stratosphere is less variable, recent work has shown that Southern Hemisphere planetary wave driving increases in response to "warm pool" El Nino events that are coincident with the easterly phase of the QBO. These events hasten the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) is now capable of generating a realistic QBO, due a new parameterization of gravity wave drag. In this presentation, we will use this new model capability to assess the influence of the QBO on polar stratospheric variability. Using simulations of the recent past, we will compare the modeled relationship between QBO phase and mid-winter vortex strength with the observed Holton-Tan relation, in both hemispheres. We will use simulations of the 21 St century to estimate future trends in the relationship between QBO phase and vortex strength. In addition, we will evaluate the combined influence of the QBO and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the timing of the breakup of the polar stratospheric vortices in the GEOS CCM. We will compare the influence of these two natural phenomena with trends in the vortex breakup associated with ozone recovery and increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  4. Influence of the earthworms on the characteristic chemistries of compost, vermicompost and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinete Maria de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present work to evaluate it influences of the earthworms on the characteristics chemistries of the compost, vermicompost and fertilized soil. In that research the following treatments were used: T1 - compost of garbage homemade (50 kg; T2 – compost of garbage homemade and culture rest (25 + 25 kg; T3 - compost of garbage homemade, culture rest and manure (35 + 10 + 5 kg; T4 - compost of garbage homemade with manure biodigested (35 + 10 + 5 kg; T5 - compost of garbage homemade, culture rest and manure biodigested (35 + 10 + 5kg; T6 - humus of bovine manure (50kg; T7 - soil (test. The results showed that the compost and vermicompost presented satisfactory value of pH, S and CTC, constitute alternative sources of organic matter for the soil and of nutrients for the plants.

  5. Mercury biomagnification in three geothermally-influenced lakes differing in chemistry and algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Piet, E-mail: piet.verburg@niwa.co.nz; Hickey, Christopher W.; Phillips, Ngaire

    2014-09-15

    Accumulation of Hg in aquatic organisms is influenced not only by the contaminant load but also by various environmental variables. We compared biomagnification of Hg in aquatic organisms, i.e., the rate at which Hg accumulates with increasing trophic position, in three lakes differing in trophic state. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in food webs were compared in an oligotrophic, a mesotrophic and a eutrophic lake with naturally elevated levels of Hg associated with geothermal water inputs. We explored relationships of physico-chemistry attributes of lakes with Hg concentrations in fish and biomagnification in the food web. Trophic positions of biota and food chain length were distinguished by stable isotope {sup 15}N. As expected, THg in phytoplankton decreased with increasing eutrophication, suggesting the effect of biomass dilution. In contrast, THg biomagnification and THg concentrations in trout were controlled by environmental physico-chemistry and were highest in the eutrophic lake. In the more eutrophic lake frequent anoxia occurred, resulting in favorable conditions for Hg transfer into and up the food chain. The average concentration of THg in the top predator (rainbow trout) exceeded the maximum recommended level for consumption by up to 440%. While there were differences between lakes in food chain length between plankton and trout, THg concentration in trout did not increase with food chain length, suggesting other factors were more important. Differences between the lakes in biomagnification and THg concentration in trout correlated as expected from previous studies with eight physicochemical variables, resulting in enhanced biomagnification of THg in the eutrophic lake. - Highlights: • Relationships between Hg biomagnification and 11 variables in 3 lakes. • Hg in trout too high for consumption in two geothermally-influenced lakes. • Hg biomagnification was highest in the most eutrophic lake. • First study to compare Hg biomagnification in

  6. Mercury biomagnification in three geothermally-influenced lakes differing in chemistry and algal biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of Hg in aquatic organisms is influenced not only by the contaminant load but also by various environmental variables. We compared biomagnification of Hg in aquatic organisms, i.e., the rate at which Hg accumulates with increasing trophic position, in three lakes differing in trophic state. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in food webs were compared in an oligotrophic, a mesotrophic and a eutrophic lake with naturally elevated levels of Hg associated with geothermal water inputs. We explored relationships of physico-chemistry attributes of lakes with Hg concentrations in fish and biomagnification in the food web. Trophic positions of biota and food chain length were distinguished by stable isotope 15N. As expected, THg in phytoplankton decreased with increasing eutrophication, suggesting the effect of biomass dilution. In contrast, THg biomagnification and THg concentrations in trout were controlled by environmental physico-chemistry and were highest in the eutrophic lake. In the more eutrophic lake frequent anoxia occurred, resulting in favorable conditions for Hg transfer into and up the food chain. The average concentration of THg in the top predator (rainbow trout) exceeded the maximum recommended level for consumption by up to 440%. While there were differences between lakes in food chain length between plankton and trout, THg concentration in trout did not increase with food chain length, suggesting other factors were more important. Differences between the lakes in biomagnification and THg concentration in trout correlated as expected from previous studies with eight physicochemical variables, resulting in enhanced biomagnification of THg in the eutrophic lake. - Highlights: • Relationships between Hg biomagnification and 11 variables in 3 lakes. • Hg in trout too high for consumption in two geothermally-influenced lakes. • Hg biomagnification was highest in the most eutrophic lake. • First study to compare Hg biomagnification in lakes

  7. [Influences and psychological structures in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, R; Rodovalho, J C; Ferreira, T C

    1986-12-01

    A sample of 16 patients with malignant breast tumors were examined by means of an interview, a questionnaire, and the Szondi Test together with a comparison group of 56 patients with benign breast tumors. The patients were divided into two age groups, those below and above 40 years of age. In this way studies done in other countries to investigate the personality structure of cancer patients were replicated. Emphasis was given to the following issues: self-destructive and/or masochistic tendencies, attitudes of depressive resignation, and conflicts with respect to femininity and motherhood. The results showed several significant differences by which benign tumor patients can be better characterized. These patients presented symptoms, experiences and structures of the neurotic type. The cancer patients presented structures closer to the psychosomatic type, with rigid negation of conflicts (in relation to sex, identification, violence and aggression), and with an unreal insertion in the world. Their somatizations are not conversive; they are interpreted as effects of the destructive and violent tendencies which, without release for the lack of adequate contacts with objects, are directed toward themselves. However, this cannot properly be called a masochistic structure because the destructive tendencies do not have a sexual origin, rather they are part of a vehement negation of others and of life itself, in the sense of a primary death drive. It is impossible to tell, however, to what point these characteristics are already the effects of the breast problems, or whether they have more causal relevance as certain previous personal experiences indicate. PMID:3591399

  8. Influence of biomass burning plumes on HONO chemistry in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W.; Ding, A. J.; Xie, Y. N.; Xu, Z.; Mao, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Zheng, L. F.; Qi, X. M.; Huang, X.; Yang, X.-Q.; Sun, J. N.; Herrmann, E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays a key role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the budget of hydroxyl radical (OH). In this study, a two-month measurement of HONO and related quantities were analyzed during a biomass burning season in 2012 at a suburban site in the western Yangtze River delta, eastern China. An overall high HONO concentration with the mean value of 0.76 ppbv (0.01 ppbv to 5.95 ppbv) was observed. During biomass burning (BB) periods, both HONO concentration and HONO/NO2 ratio were enhanced significantly (more than a factor of 2, p air masses was lower than that of non-BB air masses, these results suggest BB aerosols have higher NO2 conversion potentials to form HONO than non-BB aerosols. A further analysis based on comparing the surface area at similar particle mass levels and HONO/NO2 ratios at similar surface area levels suggested larger specific surface areas and higher NO2 conversion efficiencies of BB aerosols. A mixed plume of BB and anthropogenic fossil fuel (FF) emissions was observed on 10 June with even higher HONO concentrations and HONO/NO2 ratios. The strong HONO production potential (high HONO/NO2 to PM2.5 ratio) was accompanied with a high sulfate concentration in this plume, suggesting a promotion of mixed aerosols to the HONO formation. In summary, our study suggests an important role of BB in atmospheric chemistry by affecting the HONO budget. This can be especially important in eastern China, where agricultural burning plumes are inevitably mixed with urban and industrial pollution.

  9. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  10. Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of the meeting water chemistry included the actual practice, the water chemistry monitoring and the on-going research. Corrosion included also hydriding, recent observations made in reactors, modelling and the recent research carried out. Fifty seven participants representing twenty countries attended the thirty formal presentations and the subsequent discussions. The thirty papers presented were split into five sessions covering, Reactor experience, Mechanism and Modelling, Oxidation and hydriding, On-line monitoring of water chemistry and the review of existing and advanced water chemistries. Four panel discussions including ''Corrosion mechanism and Modelling'', ''Corrosion and Hydriding'', ''Plant Experience and Loop Experiments'', Water Chemistry, Current Practice and Emerging Solutions'' and ''On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion'' were organized. The main points of discussion focussed on the optimization of water chemistry, the compatibility of potassium water chemistry with the utilization of Zircaloy 4 or the utilization of zirconium niobium cladding with lithium water chemistry. The effect of the fabrication route and of the cladding composition (Sn content) on the corrosion kinetics, the state of the art and the correlative gaps in cladding corrosion modelling and the recent developments of on-line monitoring of water chemistry together with examination of suitable developments, were also discussed. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. The Inuit cancer pattern--the influence of migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, T.; Friborg, J.; Andersen, Allan; Poulsen, G.N.; Wohlfahrt, J.; Melbye, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Inuit cancer pattern is characterized by high frequencies of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-associated carcinomas of the nasopharynx and salivary glands. The reasons are unknown, but genetic and environmental factors are believed to be involved. Using data from the well-defined Inuit population in...... [31.7 (CI 22.0-45.5)] and salivary glands [3.1 (CI 1.4-6.9)] observed among Inuit migrating to Denmark were comparable to those observed among Inuit never living in Denmark. Significant higher risk of cancer of the bladder, breast, prostate gland, skin, brain and stomach was observed among Inuit...... Greenland we investigated whether migration to Denmark influenced their risk of cancer. Greenland is part of the Danish Kingdom, and population-based registries cover both countries. Using rates for Denmark as reference, sex-specific standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for Inuit who never...

  12. Distribution and turnover of 137Cs in birch forest ecosystems: influence of precipitation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present work was to study radioactive caesium in soil and plants from birch forests subject to different chemical climate. Four areas and three types of precipitation regimes were considered, representing a natural climatic range found in Norway: (A) acidic precipitation (southernmost part of the country); (B) precipitation rich in “sea salts”/marine cations (coastal areas); and (C) + (D) low concentrations of sea salts (inland areas). The results showed significant regional differences in plant uptake between the investigated areas. For instance the aggregated soil-to-plant transfer coefficients (Tag) were generally up to 7–8 times higher for the area receiving acid rain. Differences in caesium speciation partly explained the regional variability - e.g. the exchangeable fraction ranged from 1 to 40% (with the largest fraction of exchangeable caesium found in southernmost Norway). Transfer coefficients estimated on the basis of exchangeable fractions showed no significant differences between the areas of highest (A) and lowest (C) Tags. However, exchangeable fractions taken into consideration, the uptake of 137Cs in plants in the acid rain-influenced area is still about twice that in the sea salt influenced area B. A significantly lower concentration of soluble base cations and a higher share of acid components in soils in area A is a likely explanation for this observation. - Highlights: ► Precipitation quality affects soil chemistry and plant uptake of Cs. ► Soil-to-plant transfer of Cs was highest in a coastal area receiving acid rain. ► Differences in Cs speciation partly explained regional transfer variability.

  13. Tantalum Clusters Supported on Silica-Alumina: Influence of Support Composition and Chemistry on Cluster Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small cationic tantalum clusters were prepared on the surfaces of SiO2, silica-aluminas, and ?-Al2O3 supports by treating physisorbed pentabenzyltantalum at 523 K for 24 h in flowing H2. The rate of decomposition and the products formed in the decomposition of pentabenzyltantalum are dependent on the support composition. When the support was SiO2, the evolved products were mainly biphenyl and a small amount of toluene, indicating that the Ta-C bond in pentabenzyltantalum was activated. As the alumina content of the support increased, diphenylmethane, benzene, and ethylene were increasingly formed, and these products show that the activation of the C-C bonds linking the C atoms of methyl groups to the aromatic rings of the benzyl ligands was facilitated. Infrared spectra of the surface species and mass spectra of the effluents formed during the treatment show that the composition of the support had significant influence on the decomposition of pentabenzyltantalum, and the chemistry is inferred to be related to the electron-donor properties of the supports. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra recorded at the Ta LIII edge indicate the formation of clusters with a Ta-Ta first-shell coordination number of 3, and images obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) confirm the presence of such small clusters. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) data indicate that the formal oxidation state of the tantalum in the clusters decreased from 3.0 to 2.6 as the support was changed from SiO2 to silica-aluminas to ?-Al2O3. The data suggest that the tantalum clusters were anchored to the supports via bridging O atoms. The EXAFS data show that the support composition had little influence on the cluster structure.

  14. Surface chemistry and size influence the release of model therapeutic nanoparticles from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles have emerged as promising therapeutic and diagnostic tools, due to their unique physicochemical properties. The specific core and surface chemistries, as well as nanoparticle size, play critical roles in particle transport and interaction with biological tissue. Localized delivery of therapeutics from hydrogels is well established, but these systems generally release molecules with hydrodynamic radii less than ∼5 nm. Here, model nanoparticles with biologically relevant surface chemistries and diameters between 10 and 35 nm are analyzed for their release from well-characterized hydrogels. Functionalized gold nanoparticles or quantum dots were encapsulated in three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with varying mesh size. Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry, and hydrogel mesh size all influenced the release of particles from the hydrogel matrix. Size influenced nanoparticle release as expected, with larger particles releasing at a slower rate. However, citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were not released from hydrogels. Negatively charged carboxyl or positively charged amine-functionalized quantum dots were released from hydrogels at slower rates than neutrally charged PEGylated nanoparticles of similar size. Transmission electron microscopy images of gold nanoparticles embedded within hydrogel sections demonstrated uniform particle distribution and negligible aggregation, independent of surface chemistry. The nanoparticle-hydrogel interactions observed in this work will aid in the development of localized nanoparticle delivery systems.

  15. The discovery of J.J. Thomson and its influence in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of electrons one century ago was of outstanding importance in Chemistry. In this paper the consequences of this discovery in some of the most relevant aspects of the fundamental Chemistry, ranging from the theory of chemical bond the understanding of chemical reactivity are briefly reviewed at a divulgative level. (Author) 10 refs

  16. Factors Influencing Student Prerequisite Preparation for and Subsequent Performance in College Chemistry Two: A Statistical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, David C.

    2010-01-01

    For students entering Chemistry Two following a Chemistry One course, an assessment exam was given and the results were evaluated in combination with other variables to develop a predictive model that forecasts student achievement in the course. Variables considered in the analysis included student major, GPA, classification (student standing:…

  17. Influence of Biological Macromolecules and Aquatic Chemistries on the Inhibition of Nitrifying Bacteria by Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radniecki, T. S.; Anderson, J. W.; Schneider, M. C.; Stankus, D. P.; Nason, J. A.; Semprini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) as a broad spectrum biocide in a wide range of consumer goods has grown exponentially since 2006 (1), which may result in an increased release of Ag-NP into wastewater streams and ultimately the receiving bodies of water. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play a critical role in the global nitrogen cycle through the oxidation of ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2-) and are widely considered to be the most sensitive microbial fauna in the environment being readily inhibited by contaminants, including Ag-NP (2). This research used physiological techniques in combination with physical/chemical assays to characterize the inhibition of Nitrosomonas europaea, the model AOB, by silver ions (Ag+), 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP under a variety of aqueous chemistries. In addition, the stability of Ag-NP suspensions was examined under a variety of aqueous chemistries including in the presences of divalent cations, chloride anions, natural organic matter (NOM), proteins (BSA) and lipopolysaccharides (alginate). Using the stable Ag-NP/test media suspensions, N. europaea was found to be extremely sensitive to Ag+, 3-5 nm Ag-NP, 20 nm Ag-NP and 80 nm Ag-NP with concentrations of 0.1, 0.12, 0.5 and 1.5 ppm, respectively, resulting in a 50% decrease in nitrification rates. The inhibition was correlated with the amount of Ag+ released into solution. It is suspected that the inhibition observed from Ag-NP exposure is caused by the liberated Ag+. The aquatic chemistry of the test media was found to have a profound influence on the stability of Ag-NP suspensions. The presence of Ag ligands (e.g. EDTA and Cl-) reduced toxicity of Ag-NP through the formation of Ag-ligand complexes with the liberated Ag+. The presence of divalent cations (e.g. Ca2+ or Mg2+) resulted in the rapid aggregation of Ag-NP leading to a decrease in Ag+ liberation and thus a decrease in N. europaea inhibition. The presence of 5 ppm NOM resulted in a highly stable Ag

  18. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  19. Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol - Worldwide modeling integrating coupled climate-chemistry models with a risk model for UV

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk van, Arjan; Slaper, Harry; Outer den, Peter; Morgenstern, Olaf; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John; Garny, Hella; Stenke, Andrea; Dameris, Martin; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis

    2013-01-01

    The assessment model for ultraviolet radiation and risk “AMOUR” is applied to output from two chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Results from the UK Chemistry and Aerosols CCM are used to quantify the worldwide skin cancer risk avoided by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments: by the year 2030, two million cases of skin cancer have been prevented yearly, which is 14% fewer skin cancer cases per year. In the “World Avoided,” excess skin cancer incidence will continue to grow dramatically afte...

  20. Influence of Macromer Molecular Weight and Chemistry on Poly(β-amino ester) Network Properties and Initial Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Brey, Darren M.; Erickson, Isaac; Burdick, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    A library of photocrosslinkable poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) was recently synthesized to expand the number of degradable polymers that can be screened and developed for a variety of biological applications. In this work, the influence of variations in macromer chemistry and macromer molecular weight (MMW) on network reaction behavior, overall bulk properties, and cell interactions were investigated. The MMW was controlled through alterations in the initial diacrylate to amine ratio (≥1) durin...

  1. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics: revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the influence of a major solar proton event (SPE) similar to the Carrington event of 1–2 September 1859 by means of the 3D chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL v2.0. Ionization rates were parameterized according to CRAC:CRII (Cosmic Ray-induced Atmospheric Cascade: Application for Cosmic Ray Induced Ionization), a detailed state-of-the-art model describing the effects of SPEs in the entire altitude range of the CCM from 0 to 80 km. This is the first study of the atmospheric effect of such an extreme event that considers all the effects of energetic particles, including the variability of galactic cosmic rays, in the entire atmosphere. We assumed two scenarios for the event, namely with a hard (as for the SPE of February 1956) and soft (as for the SPE of August 1972) spectrum of solar particles. We have placed such an event in the year 2020 in order to analyze the impact on a near future atmosphere. We find statistically significant effects on NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. The results show an increase of NOx of up to 80 ppb in the northern polar region and an increase of up to 70 ppb in the southern polar region. HOx shows an increase of up to 4000%. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60% in the mesosphere and by up to 20% in the stratosphere for several weeks after the event started. Total ozone shows a decrease of more than 20 DU in the northern hemisphere and up to 20 DU in the southern hemisphere. The model also identifies SPE induced statistically significant changes in the surface air temperature, with warming in the eastern part of Europe and Russia of up to 7 K for January. (letter)

  2. Influence of biomass burning plumes on HONO chemistry in eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous acid (HONO plays a key role in atmospheric chemistry via influencing the budget of hydroxyl radical (OH. In this study, a two-month measurement period of HONO and related quantities were analyzed during a biomass burning season in 2012 at a suburban site in the western Yangtze River delta, eastern China. An overall high HONO concentration with the mean value of 1.1 ppbv was observed. During biomass burning (BB periods, both HONO concentration and HONO / NO2 ratio were enhanced significantly compared with non-biomass burning periods. A correlation analysis showed that the HONO concentration was not associated potassium (a tracer of BB in BB plumes, but showed a high correlation with the NO2 concentration, suggesting a principle role of secondary production rather than direct emissions in elevated HONO concentrations. A further analysis based on comparing the surface area at similar PM levels and HONO / NO2 ratios at similar surface area levels suggested larger specific surface areas and higher NO2 conversion efficiencies of BB aerosols. A mixed plume of BB and anthropogenic fossil fuel (FF emissions was observed on 10 June with even higher HONO concentrations and HONO / NO2 ratios. The strong HONO production potential (high HONO / NO2 to PM2.5 ratio was accompanied with a high sulfate concentration in this plume, suggesting a promotion of mixed aerosols to HONO formation. In summary, our study suggests an important role of BB in atmospheric oxidation capacity by affecting the HONO budget. This can be especially important in eastern China, where agricultural burning plumes are inevitably mixed with urban pollutions.

  3. Influence of macromer molecular weight and chemistry on poly(beta-amino ester) network properties and initial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, Darren M; Erickson, Isaac; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-06-01

    A library of photocrosslinkable poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs) was recently synthesized to expand the number of degradable polymers that can be screened and developed for a variety of biological applications. In this work, the influence of variations in macromer chemistry and macromer molecular weight (MMW) on network reaction behavior, overall bulk properties, and cell interactions were investigated. The MMW was controlled through alterations in the initial diacrylate to amine ratio (> or =1) during synthesis and decreased with an increase in this ratio. Lower MMWs reacted more quickly and to higher double bond conversions than higher MMWs, potentially due to the higher concentration of reactive groups. Additionally, the lower MMWs led to networks with higher compressive and tensile moduli that degraded slower than networks formed from higher MMWs because of an increase in the crosslinking density and decrease in the number of degradable units per crosslink. The adhesion and spreading of osteoblast-like cells on polymer films was found to be dependent on both the macromer chemistry and the MMW. In general, the number of cells was similar on networks formed from a range of MMWs, but the spreading was dramatically influenced by MMW (higher spreading with lower MMWs). These results illustrate further diversity in photocrosslinkable PBAE properties and that the chemistry and macromer structure must be carefully selected for the desired application. PMID:17896761

  4. Exploring Important Influences on the Healthfulness of Prostate Cancer Survivors’ Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Coa, Kisha I.; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Klassen, Ann C.; Thorpe, Roland J, Jr; Caulfield, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    A cancer diagnosis is often conceptualized as a teachable moment when individuals might be motivated to make lifestyle changes. Many prostate cancer survivors, however, do not adhere to dietary guidelines. In this article, we explore how cancer impacted prostate cancer survivors’ diets and identify important influences on diet. Twenty prostate cancer survivors completed three 24-hour dietary recalls and an in-depth dietary interview. We analyzed interviews using a constant comparison approach...

  5. Knowledge, beliefs, and performance of new high school chemistry teachers: A study of teachers' characteristics and teacher preparation program influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshannag, Qasim Mohammad

    This study investigated the influence of teachers' characteristics and secondary science teacher preparation programs on new high school chemistry teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and performance. "New high school chemistry teacher" refers to any teacher who during their first three years of teaching, has a major/minor in chemistry and/or any teacher who teaches chemistry for high school students. This research focused on four new high school chemistry teachers in their second year of teaching who were part of the Salish I Research Project. These four teachers graduated from two different teacher preparation programs, at major research universities. The focus of this study was on teachers who demonstrated one or more of the following teaching styles: teacher-centered, conceptual, and student-centered. A cross case analysis was done among these four teachers to explore the linkages among teachers' characteristics, secondary science teacher preparation program features, and new high school chemistry teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and performance. Data included interviews with university faculty in education and in science, analysis of course syllabi and program descriptions, interviews with the new teachers, analysis video portfolios of the classroom teaching, and other data collected as part of the Salish I Project. The key findings of the in-depth study included: (1) The course objectives in the teacher education courses at both institutions were more diverse and more comprehensive than science disciplinary course objectives. (2) All four of the new teachers and most of the faculty interviewed confirmed that the connections between prospective science teachers' learning and real world applications were not clearly addressed as a major goal in science courses at either institution. (3) Prospective science teachers did not experience cooperative learning in their science courses, but did so in education courses. (4) All new secondary science teachers reported that they

  6. On Dark Chemistry: What’s Dark Matter and How Mind Influences Brain Through Proactive Spin

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Huping; Wu, Maoxin

    2007-01-01

    Benjamin has written an article entitled “Dark Chemistry or Psychic Spin Pixel?” which promotes a “dark chemistry” model of mind and discuss the spin-mediated theory. This hypothetical chemistry is based on the hypothetical axion dark matter. Although Benjamin is commendable for boldly going where no one has gone before, he may find himself still in the “bright” territory instead of the “dark” side, if he is willing to use Occam’s razor to cut out “dark” things and replace them with non-local...

  7. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  8. A simplistic view of the iodine chemistry influence on source term assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic characteristics of iodine make it a relevant concern as to its potential radiobiological impact in case of a hypothetical severe accident in nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes the major results drawn from a very simple but illustrative calculation exercise aimed at weighing how significant could be taking iodine chemistry in containment into account for source term assessments in case of a postulated severe reactor accident. The scenario chosen as representative of expected conditions in containment was LA-4 test of LACE programme. Several approximations and hypothesis concerning the scenario were necessary. Iodine chemistry analyses were performed with IODE code, as long as thermalhydraulic and aerosol behaviour analyses, providing initial and boundary conditions for iodine calculations, were carried out with CONTEMPT4/MOD5 and NAUA/MOD5 codes, respectively. In general, the results obtained agreed qualitatively with the current knowledge on the area; from a quantitative point of view, one of the major results was that iodine chemistry on acidic conditions could provide a substantial increase in the leaked mass from containment under the postulated circumstances. Hence, this study underlines the need of including iodine chemistry in source tenn assessments. (author)

  9. Influence of low molecular weight heparin on cancer patients’ survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an evidence of interaction between the hemostasis system and tumor progression factors. It is known that in addition to the fibrin formation and platelets activation, thrombin can influence many cells function interacting with protease-activating receptors including tumor cells. These receptors are involved in the malignant cell phenotype formation (adhesion, proliferation, proteolysis. Thrombin can also affect angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells penetration through basal membrane and its migration with new vessels formation. Furthermore, it can cause the release of main neoangiogenesis promoter – vascular endothelial growth factor. All of the above and many other linkages of coagulation and tumor create a theoretical background of possible affecting tumor by regulation of the coagulation activity. Thepromise of this approach is controversial, but there is some clinical and experimental evidence of their effectiveness. The most used group ofdrugs for this purpose was heparins. Several retrospective studies have shown a benefit of low molecular weight heparins (LMWH over unfractionated heparin in cancer patient survival. The appearance of a new heparins group – ultra LMWH are of interest from this point ofview and their possible use in cancer patients. To date bemiparin and semuloparin are used in clinic. Both (bemiparin about 3600 kDa,semuloparin 3000 kDa have substancially reduced molecular weight as compared with the smallest of LMWH – enoxaparin (4600 kDa.Use of bemiparin in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy resulted in increased of 2-year survival rate compared to the control group (68.6 % vs. 29.4 %, p = 0.0042.

  10. Influence of Family History of Cancer on Engagement in Protective Health Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuta, Ann O.; Barry, Adam E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 1580 people die from cancer each day. Family history is highlighted as an especially important indicator of cancer risk. Purpose: To determine whether having a family member with cancer influences preventive behaviors (e.g., smoking, physical activity, and screenings). Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis…

  11. Pediatric cancer epigenome and the influence of folate

    OpenAIRE

    Yiu, Teresa T; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvement in clinical treatment of childhood cancer, it remains the leading cause of disease-related mortality in children with survivors often suffering from treatment-related toxicity and premature death. Because childhood cancer is vastly different from cancer in adults, a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms specific to childhood cancer is essential. Although childhood cancer contains much fewer mutations, a subset of cancer subtypes has a higher frequen...

  12. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  13. Pneumonitis after radiotherapy of lung cancer - incidence and influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The most important side effect in radiotherapy of lung cancer is pneumonitis. The incidence of pneumotitis was evaluated in a retrospective study in the patient collective of the University of Heidelberg. Therapy related and therapy independent factors have been evaluated. Results: Regarding the treatment prior to irradiation patients with primary irradiation were affected in 26.5% (17% slight, 9.5% severe), with postoperative irradiation in 14% (9.3% slight, 4.7% severe), with radiochemotherapy of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 15.4% (12% slight, 3.4% severe) by this side effect. These differences were not significant (p=0.32). The median onset of pneumonitis was 31 days after end of irradiation (severe 23 days, slight 44 days, p=0.026). By a univariate analysis the total dose at the prescription point was the most important factor (30 to 50.5 Gy 11%, 52 to 59 Gy 15%, 60 to 74 Gy 26%, p=0.007). High single doses (2.5 Gy) were only applied within a study of radiochemotherapy with a randomised sequential and alternating schedule. So that the increased rate of pneumonitis (42%) is not clearly separable from other influencing variables. A correlation between the applied techniques and the irradiated volume (measured by planimetric methods) was not demonstrable. Regarding the independent factors a high age, female sex and a low FeV1 were unfavourable. However, age and sex corrected FeV1 was not predictive. (orig./AJ)

  14. Solar influence on the MLT region: NOx production during solar proton events and ion chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region is always driven by forcing from solar radiation and energetic particles. The resulting ionisation, dissociation and excitation of the constituents lead to production of reactive species such as NOx(N,NO,NO2) and HOx(H,OH,HO2), both directly from dissociation as well as indirectly from subsequent ion chemistry reactions. While the ions and HOx are short lived and disappear when the forcing is over, NOx is transported downwards and contributes to ozone depletion. Approximately, the production rate of NOx is proportional to the ionisation rate, while the loss primarily results from the photolytic dissociation of NO. High ionisation rates usually occur during Solar Proton Events (SPEs) and geomagnetic storms (aurora and radiation belt particles) where energetic electrons and protons penetrate the earth's atmosphere in polar latitudes. The production rates of NOx are modeled using an ion chemistry model and their dependency on various parameters such as altitude and ionisation rate is discussed.

  15. How do patient and hospital features influence outcomes in small-cell lung cancer in England?

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, A L; Tata, L J; Free, C M; Stanley, R. A.; Peake, M D; Baldwin, D. R.; Hubbard , R B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to systematically determine how features of patients and hospitals influence access to chemotherapy and survival for people with small-cell lung cancer in England. Methods: We linked the National Lung Cancer Audit and Hospital Episode Statistics and used multiple logistic and Cox regression analyses to assess the influence of patient and hospital features on small-cell lung cancer outcomes. Results: There were 7845 patients with histologically proven small-cell lung ca...

  16. Influence of Liaison Psychiatric Approach on Quality of Life in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Anton, Sanda; Mrđenović, Slobodan; Gugić, Damir; Tomanović, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Having breast cancer represents traumatic stress event that can influence development of psychiatric disorders during psychological adjustment. The aim of research was to investigate influence of liaison psychiatric approach on quality of life in patients with breast cancer. Sample consisted of 120 women with breast cancer treated on Department for Oncology in University Hospital Osijek. Patients were in liaison psychiatric treatment for two months. They were estimated on the firs...

  17. Inherited susceptibility to cancer and other factors influencing occurrence of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of defects and polymorphisms leading to hereditary susceptibility to cancer include proneness to increased DNA damage, recessive syndromes of faulty DNA repair and differentiation, as well as dominant mutations of cell cycle and control proliferation. The cancer susceptibility syndromes inherited in a dominant fashion are caused by mutations in tumor suppressor genes. These genes are recessive in relation to wild type alleles. In two syndromes of hereditary mutations in tumor suppressor genes (Rb and WT2), their expression 'in vivo' may be influenced by the sex of the transmitting parent, what points to modulation by imprinting. Genetic heterogeneity of the population in susceptibility to genotoxic agents is related to the individual variation in acceptable levels of exposure to agents and factors, such as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), UV ('xeroderma pigmentosum') and ionizing radiation ('ataxia telangiectasia'). DNA damage and adducts are considered to be indicative of genotoxic exposure and its effect as well as modulation of carcinogenic damage by genetic polymorphisms. Gene and protein polymorphisms are considered as markers of increased individual risk. Since environmental factors are considered to be able to control, the individual susceptibility to enhanced DNA damage and environmentally induced cancers could be counteracted by decreasing the levels of contamination or exposure. This explains the wide interest in markers of this individual sensitivity. Most of the postulated markers of sensitivity to PIV do not, however, prove to be generally applicable in that sense. Their prognostic value is limited either by low amplitude of the effect, or by their character specific either to the population or to the cancer type. The polymorphisms most relevant to cancers induced by PIC exposures may be those of inductibility of benzopyrene hydroxylase, and some other DNA polymorphisms concerning the CYP1A1 gene. (author). 24 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  18. Coping with early stage breast cancer: examining the influence of personality traits and interpersonal closeness

    OpenAIRE

    Saita, Emanuela; Acquati, Chiara; Kayser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the influence of personality traits and close relationships on the coping style of women with breast cancer. A sample of 72 Italian patients receiving treatment for early stage breast cancer was recruited. Participants completed questionnaires measuring personality traits (Interpersonal Adaptation Questionnaire), interpersonal closeness (Inclusion of the Other in the Self Scale), and adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale). We hypothesized that diverse...

  19. Turning Tumor-Promoting Copper into an Anti-Cancer Weapon via High-Throughput Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, F.; Jiao, P.; Qi, M; Frezza, M; Dou, Q P; Yan, B.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules in...

  20. The influence of growth chemistry on the MOVPE growth of GaAs and Al(x)Ga(1-x)As layers and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuech, T. F.; Veuhoff, E.; Kuan, T. S.; Deline, V.; Potemski, R.

    1986-09-01

    Various combinations of triethylgallium, triethylaluminum, trimethylgallium, and trimethylaluminum have been used during the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) growth of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As in order to ascertain the influence of their growth chemistry on the properties of the resulting semiconductor layers and quantum well structures. Substantial reductions in carbon incorporation can be achieved using the ethyl-based growth chemistry. Narrow quantum well structures were demonstrated using both ethyl- and methyl-based precursors.

  1. Artificial enzymes,cancer chemotherapy,conjugation and nanoelectronics,and prebiotic chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BRESLOW Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This is a summary,with extensive references,of several areas of chemistry in which the Breslow lab has been involved,leading to work still underway in several of them.The principal conclusions are described,but it will be necessary to consult the references for details of the work involved.

  2. Update of the water chemistry effect on the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel: influence of hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the water chemistry on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) affecting carbon steel components has been studied for many years and is relatively well known and taken into account by the models. Nonetheless, experimental studies were conducted in the last few years at EDF on the CIROCO loop in order to check the influence of the water chemistry parameters (hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine) on the FAC rate of carbon steel in one phase flow conditions. The hydrazine impact on the FAC rate was shown to be minor in EDF's chemistry recommendation range, compared to other parameters' effects such as the pH effect. The presence of boric acid in the nominal secondary circuit conditions was negligible. Finally, as expected, the nature of the chemical conditioning (ammonia, morpholine or ethanolamine) did not modify the FAC rate, the influencing chemical variable being the at-temperature pH in one-phase flow conditions. (author)

  3. Green chemistry approach for the synthesis and stabilization of biocompatible gold nanoparticles and their potential applications in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological approach to synthesis of AuNPs is eco-friendly and an ideal method to develop environmentally sustainable nanoparticles alternative to existing methods. We have developed a simple, fast, clean, efficient, low-cost and eco-friendly single-step green chemistry approach for the synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) using a water extract of Eclipta Alba leaves at room temperature. The AuNPs using Eclipta extract have been formed in very short time, even in less than 10 min. The as-synthesized AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by several physico-chemical techniques. The in vitro stability of as-synthesized AuNPs was studied in different buffer solutions. A plausible mechanism for the synthesis of AuNPs by Eclipta extract has been discussed. The biocompatibility of AuNPs was observed by in vitro cell culture assays. Finally, we have designed and developed a AuNPs-based drug delivery system (DDS) (Au-DOX) containing doxorubicin (DOX), a FDA approved anticancer drug. Administration of this DDS to breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) shows significant inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation compared to pristine doxorubicin. Therefore we strongly believe that the use of Eclipta Alba offers large-scale production of biocompatible AuNPs that can be used as a delivery vehicle for the treatment of cancer diseases. (paper)

  4. Green chemistry approach for the synthesis and stabilization of biocompatible gold nanoparticles and their potential applications in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Sushma, V.; Patra, Sujata; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Pal Bhadra, Manika; Sreedhar, Bojja; Ranjan Patra, Chitta

    2012-11-01

    The biological approach to synthesis of AuNPs is eco-friendly and an ideal method to develop environmentally sustainable nanoparticles alternative to existing methods. We have developed a simple, fast, clean, efficient, low-cost and eco-friendly single-step green chemistry approach for the synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) using a water extract of Eclipta Alba leaves at room temperature. The AuNPs using Eclipta extract have been formed in very short time, even in less than 10 min. The as-synthesized AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by several physico-chemical techniques. The in vitro stability of as-synthesized AuNPs was studied in different buffer solutions. A plausible mechanism for the synthesis of AuNPs by Eclipta extract has been discussed. The biocompatibility of AuNPs was observed by in vitro cell culture assays. Finally, we have designed and developed a AuNPs-based drug delivery system (DDS) (Au-DOX) containing doxorubicin (DOX), a FDA approved anticancer drug. Administration of this DDS to breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) shows significant inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation compared to pristine doxorubicin. Therefore we strongly believe that the use of Eclipta Alba offers large-scale production of biocompatible AuNPs that can be used as a delivery vehicle for the treatment of cancer diseases.

  5. Seasonal and spatial variabilities in the water chemistry of prairie pothole wetlands influence the photoproduction of reactive intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Andrew J; Arnold, William A

    2016-07-01

    The hydrology and water chemistry of prairie pothole wetlands vary spatially and temporally, on annual and decadal timescales. Pesticide contamination of wetlands arising from agricultural activities is a foremost concern. Photochemical reactions are important in the natural attenuation of pesticides and may be important in limiting ecological and human exposure. Little is known, however, about the variable influence of wetland water chemistry on indirect photochemistry. In this study, seasonal water samples were collected from seven sites throughout the prairie pothole region over three years to understand the spatiotemporal dynamics of reactive intermediate photoproduction. Samples were classified by the season in which they were collected (spring, summer, or fall) and the typical hydroperiod of the wetland surface water (temporary or semi-permanent). Under photostable conditions, steady-state concentrations and apparent quantum yields or quantum yield coefficients were measured for triplet excited states of dissolved organic matter, singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, and carbonate radical under simulated sunlight. Steady-state concentrations and quantum yields increased on average by 15% and 40% from spring to fall, respectively. Temporary wetlands had 40% higher steady-state concentrations of reactive intermediates than semi-permanent wetlands, but 50% lower quantum yields. Computed quantum yields for reactive intermediate formation were used to predict the indirect photochemical half-lives of seven pesticides in average temporary and semi-permanent prairie pothole wetlands. As a first approximation, the predictions agree to within two orders of magnitude of previously reported half-lives. PMID:27174849

  6. The possible influences of fuel crud build-up and water chemistry on waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of fuel crud build-up and water chemistry on waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys have drawn a certain attention in fuel integrity evaluation programs. This article is an attempt to explore the possible causes for such effects, based on the presumption that diffusion of oxygen vacancies in the oxide barrier layer is the rate limiting process for corrosion in reactor water environments. It is shown that fuel crud build-up and water chemistry may influence corrosion through changing the chemical reactivity at the metal/oxide and oxide/water interfaces, the oxygen vacancy concentration and the diffusivity through the oxide layer. In particular, crud build-up may increase corrosion by enhancing, for example, the oxygen content of reactor water by radiolysis at the crud/water interface and the cladding surface temperature. The presence of fuel crud may also affect ZrO2 grain growth and its phase transformation, which are also closely related to the corrosion kinetics. (author)

  7. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  8. Influence of iodine chemistry on source term assessment; Influencia de la quimica del yodo en la estimacion del termino fuente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz Puebla, L. E.; Lopez Diez, I.; Rodriguez Maroto, J. J.; Martinez Lopez-Alcorocho, A.

    1991-07-01

    The major goal of a phenomenology analysis of containment during a severe accident situation can be spitted into the following ones: to know the containment response to the different loads and to predict accurately the fission product and aerosol behavior. In this report, the main results coming from the study of a hypothetical accident scenario, based on LA-4 experiment of LACE project, are presented. In order to do it, several codes have been coupled: CONTEMPT4/MOD5 (thermohydraulics), NAUA/MOD5 (aerosol physics) and IODE (iodine chemistry). It has been demonstrated the impossibility of assessing with confidence the Source Term if the chemical conduct of some radionuclides is not taken into account. In particular, the influence on the iodine retention efficiency of the sump of variables such as pH has been proven. (Author)12 refs.

  9. Noninvasive brain cancer imaging with a bispecific antibody fragment, generated via click chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Haiming; Hernandez, Reinier; Hong, Hao; Graves, Stephen A.; Yang, Yunan; England, Christopher G.; Theuer, Charles P.; Robert J. Nickles; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Given the success of combination therapies for the treatment of cancer, the use of bispecific antibodies targeting multiple cancerous molecular pathways is an attractive strategy to enhance the efficacy of current therapeutic paradigms. However, parallel development of companion diagnostic tools is essential for patient identification, stratification, and the early assessment of treatment efficacies. Herein, we describe the generation of a bispecific construct for noninvasive PET imaging of g...

  10. Participation in bowel cancer screening: a qualitative exploration of the factors influencing participation and uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Azodo, Ijeoma

    2013-01-01

    Bowel cancer is major global public health problem. In the United Kingdom, it is the third most common cancer in men and women and second major cause of cancer deaths. It has been suggested that the risk of bowel cancer deaths can be reduced by 16% through regular bowel screening. However, screening uptake remains low. This research explored factors influencing participation in the NHS bowel cancer screening programme, specifically ‘the faecal occult blood test (FOBt)’ in the North East, York...

  11. Exploring important influences on the healthfulness of prostate cancer survivors' diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coa, Kisha I; Smith, Katherine C; Klassen, Ann C; Thorpe, Roland J; Caulfield, Laura E

    2015-06-01

    A cancer diagnosis is often conceptualized as a teachable moment when individuals might be motivated to make lifestyle changes. Many prostate cancer survivors, however, do not adhere to dietary guidelines. In this article, we explore how cancer affected prostate cancer survivors' diets and identify important influences on diet. Twenty prostate cancer survivors completed three 24-hour dietary recalls and an in-depth dietary interview. We analyzed interviews using a constant comparison approach, and dietary recall data quantitatively to assess quality and qualitatively to identify food choice patterns. Most men reported not making dietary changes following their cancer diagnosis but did express an interest in healthy eating, primarily to facilitate weight loss. Men portrayed barriers to healthy eating that often outweighed their motivation to eat healthy. Public health programs should consider alternative ways of framing healthy eating programs for prostate cancer survivors that might be more effective than a cancer-specific focus. PMID:25857653

  12. Urban and Suburban Influences on Water Chemistry in Washington DC: Impervious Surfaces and Urban Stream Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Petersen, E.

    2015-12-01

    Among the challenges facing urban rivers are water stormwater runoff problems and changing water chemistry, not only from air and water pollution sources, but also from altered geology with the development of "urban karst". Seventy five percent of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. is urban or impervious. The Anacostia River experiences environmental challenges similar to those of other urban industrial rivers (heavy metal, PCB and PAH contamination). It also has Ca/Sr ratios above 200, and Na concentrations higher than Ca, and elevated ionic strength, all associated with extended chemical interaction with concrete. While these chemical characteristics have been documented in the urban areas within DC, they have not been examined in the largely suburban/mixed development tributaries of the Anacostia. Here we examine the base-flow geochemistry of the Anacostia River and its suburban tributaries (6 locations) over a year (November 2014- August 2015), concentrating on the following water chemistry variables: pH, hardness, SAR, alkalinity, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Mn, Zn, Al, Ba, Ni, total P, S, Sr, NO3-, NH4+, PO43-. NO3- and NH4+ were generally lowest in at all sites in January, but rose to between 0.5 and 2.4 mg/L in June, with highest NO3- concentrations in suburban areas. Na and Cl concentrations were 5x higher in suburban areas than urban areas during the winter months. Ca/Sr concentration ratios, were between 120 and 200 for suburban sites but increased as the sites became more urban (to a high of 240 for the most urban site). These trends have been observed in other urban streams, and correlate with percent impervious area. The data follow patterns expected for "urban stream syndrome" and dissolution of concrete. Suburban areas, with their relatively small streams, show greater winter salting effects than more urban areas down stream. Suburban areas also show higher NO3- (and occasionally higher NH4+) than urban areas except in winter. The data presented here

  13. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  14. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  15. Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, G.A.

    2006-08-11

    The objectives of the study are to: (1) determine the degree to which physical and chemical wood properties vary in association with environmental and silvicultural practices in Populus and loblolly pine and (2) develop and verify species-specific empirical models in an effort to create a framework for understanding environmental influences on wood quality.

  16. Sensory and Flavor Chemistry Characteristics of Australian Beef: Influence of Intramuscular Fat, Feed, and Breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Damian; Ball, Alex; Hughes, Joanne; Krishnamurthy, Raju; Piyasiri, Udayasika; Stark, Janet; Watkins, Peter; Warner, Robyn

    2016-06-01

    The sensory attributes and flavor chemistry of grilled beef striploins (M. longissimus lumborum, n = 42) varying widely in marbling from commercial production types typical for Southern Australia were extensively characterized. Striploins from Angus grass-fed yearlings (5.2-9.9% intramuscular fat), Angus grain-finished steers (10.2-14.9%), and Wagyu grass-fed heifers (7.8-17.5%) were evaluated. Inherent differences between samples from grass- and grain-fed Angus cattle were minimal when the intramuscular fat content was above ∼5%. After adjusting for intramuscular fat, Wagyu samples had more intense flavor and higher tenderness and juiciness compared to Angus grass-fed samples. Grilled beef flavor, dairy fat, and sweetness increased with the marbling level, and sourness and astringency decreased. Tenderness and juiciness increased with the marbling level and were correlated with Warner-Bratzler peak force measurements. Trained panel sensory differences in flavor corresponded with increases in aroma volatiles and changes in nonvolatile flavor compounds. Unsaturated fatty acids with potential health benefits (vaccenic, oleic, and rumenic acids) increased with the level of marbling. PMID:27118482

  17. Net Influence of an Internally Generated Guasi-biennial Oscillation on Modelled Stratospheric Climate and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke David; Newman, Paul A.; Song, InSun

    2013-01-01

    A Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM) simulation with strong tropical non-orographic gravity wave drag (GWD) is compared to an otherwise identical simulation with near-zero tropical non-orographic GWD. The GEOSCCM generates a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) zonal wind signal in response to a tropical peak in GWD that resembles the zonal and climatological mean precipitation field. The modelled QBO has a frequency and amplitude that closely resembles observations. As expected, the modelled QBO improves the simulation of tropical zonal winds and enhances tropical and subtropical stratospheric variability. Also, inclusion of the QBO slows the meridional overturning circulation, resulting in a generally older stratospheric mean age of air. Slowing of the overturning circulation, changes in stratospheric temperature and enhanced subtropical mixing all affect the annual mean distributions of ozone, methane and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, the modelled QBO enhances polar stratospheric variability in winter. Because tropical zonal winds are easterly in the simulation without a QBO, there is a relative increase in tropical zonal winds in the simulation with a QBO. Extratropical differences between the simulations with and without a QBO thus reflect the westerly shift in tropical zonal winds: a relative strengthening of the polar stratospheric jet, polar stratospheric cooling and a weak reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  18. The puzzling chemical composition of GJ 436b's atmosphere: influence of tidal heating on the chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, Marcelino; Venot, Olivia; Selsis, Franck; Iro, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The dissipation of the tidal energy deposited on eccentric planets may induce a heating of the planet that affects its atmospheric thermal structure. Here we study the influence of tidal heating on the atmospheric composition of the eccentric (e = 0.16) "hot Neptune" GJ 436b, for which inconclusive chemical abundances are retrieved from multiwavelength photometric observations carried out during primary transit and secondary eclipse. We build up a one-dimensional model of GJ 436b's atmosphere...

  19. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Sundquist Jan; Thomsen Hauke; Weires Marianne; Bevier Melanie; Hemminki Kari

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. Methods We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeco...

  20. Influence of chemistry and climate on large induced large scale stresses in anisotropically fractured carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, R.; Cornet, F.

    2012-04-01

    We will explore a simple model coupling for carbonate rocks the fracture density and orientation, the water chemistry and transport, the dissolution reactions and the expected irreversible rock deformation. Adding elasticity and boundary conditions, plus an estimation of the water source composition in the formation, we will estimate orders of magnitudes of the stress changes that can be expected from these processes in sedimentary basins over long times. We will in particular examine whether such intrinsic deformation mechanism can give a hint to explain the observed anisotropic stresses, in orientation and magnitude, in zones above the C.O.X. argillite formation in the Paris Basin, where the horizontal stress anisotropy has been shown to be important, whereas stress decoupling from the deep crustal roots should be effective, and no strong anisotropy would be expected in the absence of active deformation mechanism. In the Paris basin, the analysis of log cores shows that fractures and joints, up to meter-long ones, are common anisotropic features present in the carbonate rocks. Dissolution of calcite along these oriented features removes material with an a priori oriented flux reflecting this structural anisotropy, resulting in a non-isotropic deformation associated to this dissolution. We will present a simple model where dissolution and transport of dissolved calcite is associated with the deformation of the carbonate rock. Estimating the reaction constants, the chemical composition variation of the meteoric water, the rock permeability and the fracture density from observations around the Bure underground laboratory, we will estimate the order of magnitude of the deformations expected from these types of mechanisms. Such estimates have already been performed for dissolution along stylolites, e.g. by Clark, 1966; Renard et al., 2004; Schmittbuhl et al., 2004; Koehn et al., 2007. We will adapt these to reflect the anisotropic feature of the fractures present in

  1. Influence of pore fluid chemistry on the complex conductivity and induced polarization responses of Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmes, David P.; Frye, Kevin M.

    2001-01-01

    The spectral induced-polarization (IP) response of rocks and soils is a complex function of pore solution chemistry, sample microgeometry, and surface chemical properties. We measure the complex conductivity and the time domain IP responses of Berea sandstone as a function of pore fluid ionic strength and pH. Complex conductivity is measured over the frequency range 10-3 to 106 Hz, and chargeability is computed using a time window of 0.16 to 1.74 s. The field IP parameters: phase, percent frequency effect, and chargeability are functions of both the surface and bulk electrical properties of the sample and are observed to decrease with increasing solution conductivity. Dividing these parameters by the sample resistivity yields normalized IP parameters (quadrature conductivity, metal factor, normalized chargeability) that are proportional to the imaginary component of the complex surface conductivity. Normalized IP parameters increase with ionic strength up to concentrations of 10-1 M NaCl and show a reduced response at pH 3, the point of zero charge for quartz-dominated systems. For concentrations >10-1 M NaCl, the normalized parameters decrease with increasing concentration. This decrease in surface polarization may indicate a decrease in the effective mobility of polarizing charges at high solution concentration. Our data indicate that normalized IP parameters are directly related to the physiochemical parameters that control the surface conductivity responses of rocks and soils. Normalization of IP measurements in environmental investigations should increase the effectiveness of IP surveys, especially in high-conductivity environments.

  2. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  3. Influence of Obesity on Anastomotic Leakage After Anterior Rectal Resectionperformed Due to Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piecuch Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anterior resection for rectal cancer carries the risk of serious complications, especially fistulas at the site of anastomosis. Numerous factors have been shown to impact anastomotic leakage. The results of studies on the influence of obesity on the frequency of anastomotic leakage after rectal resection performed due to cancer have been contradictory.

  4. Socio-cultural influences on the help-seeking behavior of patients with cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Corner, Jessica L; Brindle, Lucy A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract ABSTRACT This paper sets out to review the influence of social processes on the timing of diagnosis of cancer and to explore the potential for promoting earlier diagnosis by addressing social factors which influence symptom recognition and the diagnostic process. Social processes refer to the means by which culture and social organisation may impact on timely cancer diagnosis. The paper calls for concerted action around an important and developing research agenda that...

  5. The influences of iron characteristics, operating conditions and solution chemistry on contaminants removal by zero-valent iron: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuankui; Li, Jinxiang; Huang, Tinglin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    For successful application of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) system, of particular interest is the performance of ZVI under various conditions. The current review comprehensively summarizes the potential effects of the major influencing factors, such as iron intrinsic characteristics (e.g., surface area, iron impurities and oxide films), operating conditions (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen, iron dosage, iron pretreatment, mixing conditions and temperature) and solution chemistry (e.g., anions, cations and natural organic matter) on the performance of ZVI reported in literature. It was demonstrated that all of the factors could exert significant effects on the ZVI performance toward contaminants removal, negatively or positively. Depending on the removal mechanisms of the respective contaminants and other environmental conditions, an individual variable may exhibit different effects. On the other hand, many of these influences have not been well understood or cannot be individually isolated in experimental or natural systems. Thus, more research is required in order to elucidate the exact roles and mechanisms of each factor in affecting the performance of ZVI. Furthermore, based on these understandings, future research may attempt to establish some feasible strategies to minimize the deteriorating effects and utilize the positive effects so as to improve the performance of ZVI. PMID:27206056

  6. Influence of chemistry and hot rolling conditions on high permeability non-grain oriented silicon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the influence of chemical composition on the final electromagnetic properties in higher permeability material. Furthermore, the effect of the hot rolling practice and the end of austenite transformation temperature range on the hot band microstructure is described. The magnetic polarization J 5000 better than 1.7 T, using hot rolling conditions 40 mm transfer bar thickness, finish mill entry temperature 1000 deg. C, and finishing temperature 800-840 deg. C and after decarburization heat treatment and grain growth treatment, was obtained

  7. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  8. Influence of soil chemistry on metal and bioessential element concentrations in nymphal and adult periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.R., Jr.; Sibrell, P.L.; Boughton, C.J.; Yang, L.H.

    2007-01-01

    Metal and bioessential element concentrations were measured in three species of 17-year periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) to determine how cicada tissue chemistry is affected by soil chemistry, measure the bioavailability of metals from both uncontaminated and lead-arsenate-pesticide contaminated soils, and assess the potential risks of observed metal contamination for wildlife. Periodical cicada nymphs feed on root xylem fluids for 13 or 17??years of underground development. The nymphs then emerge synchronously at high densities, before leaving their nymphal keratin exoskeleton and molting into their adult form. Cicadas are an important food source for birds and animals during emergence events, and influence nutrient cycles in woodland ecosystems. Nymphal exoskeletons and whole adult cicadas were sampled in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia during the Brood X emergence in May and June, 2004. Elements, such as Al, Fe, and Pb, are strongly enriched in the nymphal exoskeleton relative to the adult body; Cu and Zn are enriched in bodies. Concentrations of Fe and Pb, when normalized to relatively inert soil constituents such as Al and Ce, are similar in both the molt exoskeleton and their host soil, implying that passive assimilation through prolonged soil contact (adhesion or adsorption) might control these metal concentrations. Normalized concentrations of bioessential elements, such as S, P, K, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Mo, and chalcophile (sulfur-loving) elements, such as As, Se, and Au, indicate strong enrichment in cicada tissues relative to soil, implying selective absorption and retention by xylem fluids, the cicada nymphs themselves, or both. Element enrichment patterns in cicada tissues are similar to enrichment patterns observed in xylem fluids from tree roots. Chalcophile elements and heavy metals accumulate in keratin-rich tissues and may bind to sulfhydryl groups. Metal concentrations in the nymphal

  9. Influence of Structure and Surface Chemistry of Porous Carbon Electrodes on Supercapacitor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors, which rely on electrosorption of ions in nanostructured carbon electrodes, can supplement or even replace traditional batteries in energy harvesting and storage applications. While supercapacitors offer > 10 kW/kg power densities, their ~5 Wh/kg energy densities are insufficient for many automotive and grid storage applications. Most prior efforts have focused on novel high-performing ionic liquid electrolytes and porous carbons with tunable pore diameters and high specific surface areas. However, existing research lacks fundamental understanding of the influence of surface heterogeneity and disorder, such as graphitic defects and functional groups, on key electrosorption properties at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. These interactions significantly impact charge accumulation densities, ion transport mechanisms, and electrolyte breakdown processes. Subsequently, they must be investigated to optimize ion screening, charge mobilities, and operating voltage windows of the devices. The research in this dissertation examined the influence of surface functional groups and structural ordering on capacitance, electrosorption dynamics, and electrochemical stability of external and internal surface of carbon electrodes. High-temperature vacuum annealing, air oxidation, hydrogenation, and amination were used to tune pore surface compositions and decouple key structural and chemical properties of carbide-derived carbons. The approach combined materials characterization by a variety of techniques, neutron scattering studies of ion dynamics, electrochemical testing, and MD simulations to investigate the fundamental intermolecular interactions and dynamics of ions electrosorption in different pore architectures and on planar graphene surfaces. Contrary to expected results and existing theories, defect removal via defunctionalization and graphitization decreased capacitance. Hydrogenated surfaces benefitted electrosorption, while oxygen

  10. The puzzling chemical composition of GJ 436b's atmosphere: influence of tidal heating on the chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Selsis, F; Iro, N

    2013-01-01

    The dissipation of the tidal energy deposited on eccentric planets may induce a heating of the planet that affects its atmospheric thermal structure. Here we study the influence of tidal heating on the atmospheric composition of the eccentric (e = 0.16) "hot Neptune" GJ 436b, for which inconclusive chemical abundances are retrieved from multiwavelength photometric observations carried out during primary transit and secondary eclipse. We build up a one-dimensional model of GJ 436b's atmosphere in the vertical direction and compute the pressure-temperature and molecular abundances profiles for various plausible internal temperatures of the planet (up to 560 K) and metallicities (from solar to 100 times solar), using a radiative-convective model and a chemical model which includes thermochemical kinetics, vertical mixing, and photochemistry. We find that the CO/CH4 abundance ratio increases with metallicity and tidal heating, and ranges from 1/20 to 1000 within the ranges of metallicity and internal temperature ...

  11. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds. PMID:26318068

  12. Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol--worldwide modeling integrating coupled climate-chemistry models with a risk model for UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Arjan; Slaper, Harry; den Outer, Peter N; Morgenstern, Olaf; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John A; Garny, Hella; Stenke, Andrea; Dameris, Martin; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2013-01-01

    The assessment model for ultraviolet radiation and risk "AMOUR" is applied to output from two chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Results from the UK Chemistry and Aerosols CCM are used to quantify the worldwide skin cancer risk avoided by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments: by the year 2030, two million cases of skin cancer have been prevented yearly, which is 14% fewer skin cancer cases per year. In the "World Avoided," excess skin cancer incidence will continue to grow dramatically after 2030. Results from the CCM E39C-A are used to estimate skin cancer risk that had already been inevitably committed once ozone depletion was recognized: excess incidence will peak mid 21st century and then recover or even super-recover at the end of the century. When compared with a "No Depletion" scenario, with ozone undepleted and cloud characteristics as in the 1960s throughout, excess incidence (extra yearly cases skin cancer per million people) of the "Full Compliance with Montreal Protocol" scenario is in the ranges: New Zealand: 100-150, Congo: -10-0, Patagonia: 20-50, Western Europe: 30-40, China: 90-120, South-West USA: 80-110, Mediterranean: 90-100 and North-East Australia: 170-200. This is up to 4% of total local incidence in the Full Compliance scenario in the peak year. PMID:22924540

  13. Mobility of radiocaesium in boreal forest ecosystems: Influence of precipitation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinnes, E. [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway); Gjelsvik, R.; Skuterud, L.; Thoerring, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Mobility and plant uptake of Cs in soils is generally limited by the presence of clay minerals in the soil. However, cations supplied by precipitation may substantially influence the mobility of radiocaesium in natural surface soil and subsequent transfer to food chains. The chemical composition of precipitation shows substantial variation among different areas in Norway for two main reasons. At sites close to the coast the atmospheric supply of marine cations and anions is many-fold greater than in regions shielded from marine influence by mountains. The southernmost part of the country has been, and still is, substantially affected by soil acidification due to long-range atmospheric transport of acidifying substances from areas elsewhere in Europe. This may explain a much higher greater uptake of {sup 137}Cs from the Chernobyl accident in moose in this region than elsewhere (Steinnes et al., 2009), in spite of the fact that some areas farther north received substantially greater fallout. Similarly a much greater transfer of {sup 137}Cs to natural birch forest vegetation is evident from the more acidified soils in the south than in comparable ecosystems elsewhere in the country (Thoerring et al., 2012). Repeated recordings of activity levels in natural surface soils showed faster leaching of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs relative to inland areas not only in the south but also in coastal areas farther north (Gjelsvik and Steinnes, 2013), indicating that the amounts of marine cations in precipitation also has an appreciable effect on the Cs leaching. The geographical leaching differences still became less prominent with time. Recent lysimeter experiments with undisturbed soil columns obtained from an area receiving high radiocaesium deposition from the Chernobyl accident, applying precipitation with ionic composition characteristic of the different regions mentioned above, did not change the current depth distribution of {sup 137}Cs. However, acidic precipitation increased

  14. Mobility of radiocaesium in boreal forest ecosystems: Influence of precipitation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobility and plant uptake of Cs in soils is generally limited by the presence of clay minerals in the soil. However, cations supplied by precipitation may substantially influence the mobility of radiocaesium in natural surface soil and subsequent transfer to food chains. The chemical composition of precipitation shows substantial variation among different areas in Norway for two main reasons. At sites close to the coast the atmospheric supply of marine cations and anions is many-fold greater than in regions shielded from marine influence by mountains. The southernmost part of the country has been, and still is, substantially affected by soil acidification due to long-range atmospheric transport of acidifying substances from areas elsewhere in Europe. This may explain a much higher greater uptake of 137Cs from the Chernobyl accident in moose in this region than elsewhere (Steinnes et al., 2009), in spite of the fact that some areas farther north received substantially greater fallout. Similarly a much greater transfer of 137Cs to natural birch forest vegetation is evident from the more acidified soils in the south than in comparable ecosystems elsewhere in the country (Thoerring et al., 2012). Repeated recordings of activity levels in natural surface soils showed faster leaching of Chernobyl 137Cs relative to inland areas not only in the south but also in coastal areas farther north (Gjelsvik and Steinnes, 2013), indicating that the amounts of marine cations in precipitation also has an appreciable effect on the Cs leaching. The geographical leaching differences still became less prominent with time. Recent lysimeter experiments with undisturbed soil columns obtained from an area receiving high radiocaesium deposition from the Chernobyl accident, applying precipitation with ionic composition characteristic of the different regions mentioned above, did not change the current depth distribution of 137Cs. However, acidic precipitation increased the mobility of Cs added

  15. Physics and chemistry of the influence of excited molecules on combustion enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starik, A M; Loukhovitski, B I; Sharipov, A S; Titova, N S

    2015-08-13

    The paper addresses detailed analysis of kinetic processes in the H(2)-O(2), CO-O(2) and CH(4)-O(2)-reactive systems upon the presence of singlet oxygen molecules O(2)(a(1)Δg) and [Formula: see text] and the influence of the activation of oxygen molecules in electric discharge on the acceleration of ignition in the H(2)-O(2) and CH(4)-O(2) mixtures. The possibility of the intensification of CO oxidation due to excitation of O(2) and N(2) molecule vibrations and generation of singlet oxygen molecules is also considered. It is shown that the effect of accelerating the ignition strongly depends on the reduced electric field and, as a consequence, on the composition of discharge plasma as well as on the features of chain mechanism development in oxy-fuel systems. It is revealed that the most effective approach for the intensification of CO oxidation both in the moist air and in the products of hydrocarbon combustion in air is the generation of O(2)(a(1)Δg) molecules by electric discharge. Computations showed that the presence of 1% O(2)(a(1)Δg) in the total oxygen allowed one to convert CO to CO(2) even at the temperature T=850-900 K in the time of 10(-2) s. The excitation of O(2) and N(2) molecule vibrations is less effective for such a conversion. PMID:26170425

  16. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with......Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their...... studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6h $+-1$/ particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2$mu@m size-range peaked 1.2h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7$mu@m diameter range. At higher air exchange rates...

  17. Influences of humic and fulvic acids and organic matter on leachate chemistry from acid coal spoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Column-leaching experiments were conducted on an acid pyritic coal spoil to determine the influence of acid rain, humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and undecomposed organic matter (OM) on pH and Al, Fe, Mn, and SO4 concentrations in the spoil leachate and on the spoil. Simulated acid rain of pH 4.0 was applied for 50 weeks under laboratory conditions to spoil columns modified with 0.5% FA or HA, or 2.0% OM from four forest trees and two herbs. Quality-control methods were used to evaluate treatment effects. Addition of HA and tall fescue leaf material to a Lily, KY, spoil created a greater and longer lasting desirable effect on leachate pH and Al, Fe, Mn, and SO4 than additions of FA or OM of five other species. Results suggest that revegetation resulting in rapid production of matured soil OM may reduce the amount of some ions commonly leached from acid mine spoils

  18. Exosomes in Tumor Microenvironment Influence Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlert, Christoph; Kalluri, Raghu

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin with a size of 50 – 100 nm. They can contain microRNAs, mRNAs, DNA fragments and proteins, which are shuttled from a donar cell to recipient cells. Many different cell types including immune cells, mesenchymal cells and cancer cells release exosomes. There is emerging evidence that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with tumor environment. Here, we discuss different mechani...

  19. Influence of steering magnetic field on the time-resolved plasma chemistry in cathodic arc discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh; New, R.; Valter, J.

    2004-08-01

    External magnetic fields are used extensively to steer the cathode spot of arc discharges in order to improve target utilization and minimize droplet generation. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and electrostatic probe measurements in a Cr arc discharge were used to characterize the effect of the external magnetic field on the ion flux to the substrates and on the composition and time evolution of the plasma. A combination of a permanent magnet array and an electromagnetic coil was used to vary the shape and strength of the magnetic field on the cathode surface. Finite element modelling of the magnetic field distribution identified two types of geometry—through-field, with lines normal to the cathode surface, and arched-field, with lines forming a magnetic 'tunnel'. The magnetic flux densities measured with a Hall probe were in the range from -15 to +15 mT. The particular shape and strength of the magnetic field determined the specific confinement regions and diffusion pathways for the plasma. The total ion saturation current density at the substrate position was in the range between 2 and 11.5 mA cm-2 depending on the magnetic field shape. The magnetic field strongly influenced the relative optical emission from Cr0, Cr1+ and Cr2+ metal species, and the resulting charge state distribution. Time-resolved OES and probe measurements of a particular position on the arc cathode revealed that an Ar plasma is trapped near the cathode and is sustained even when the cathode spot is a significant distance from the observation volume. The importance of this 'residual' Ar plasma for the charge state distribution of metal ions is discussed.

  20. Influence of steering magnetic field on the time-resolved plasma chemistry in cathodic arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehiasarian, A P [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Hovsepian, P Eh [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); New, R [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Valter, J [HVM Plasma Ltd, Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, 158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2004-08-07

    External magnetic fields are used extensively to steer the cathode spot of arc discharges in order to improve target utilization and minimize droplet generation. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and electrostatic probe measurements in a Cr arc discharge were used to characterize the effect of the external magnetic field on the ion flux to the substrates and on the composition and time evolution of the plasma. A combination of a permanent magnet array and an electromagnetic coil was used to vary the shape and strength of the magnetic field on the cathode surface. Finite element modelling of the magnetic field distribution identified two types of geometry-through-field, with lines normal to the cathode surface, and arched-field, with lines forming a magnetic 'tunnel'. The magnetic flux densities measured with a Hall probe were in the range from -15 to +15 mT. The particular shape and strength of the magnetic field determined the specific confinement regions and diffusion pathways for the plasma. The total ion saturation current density at the substrate position was in the range between 2 and 11.5 mA cm{sup -2} depending on the magnetic field shape. The magnetic field strongly influenced the relative optical emission from Cr{sup 0}, Cr{sup 1+} and Cr{sup 2+} metal species, and the resulting charge state distribution. Time-resolved OES and probe measurements of a particular position on the arc cathode revealed that an Ar plasma is trapped near the cathode and is sustained even when the cathode spot is a significant distance from the observation volume. The importance of this 'residual' Ar plasma for the charge state distribution of metal ions is discussed.

  1. The chemistry, physiology and pathology of pH in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Swietach, Pawel; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Harris, Adrian L.; Hulikova, Alzbeta

    2014-01-01

    Cell survival is conditional on the maintenance of a favourable acid–base balance (pH). Owing to intensive respiratory CO2 and lactic acid production, cancer cells are exposed continuously to large acid–base fluxes, which would disturb pH if uncorrected. The large cellular reservoir of H+-binding sites can buffer pH changes but, on its own, is inadequate to regulate intracellular pH. To stabilize intracellular pH at a favourable level, cells control trans-membrane traffic of H+-ions (or their...

  2. The influence of mountain meteorology on precipitation chemistry at low and high elevations of the Colorado Front Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, A. Scott

    1993-01-01

    We explored the seasonal characteristics in wet deposition chemistry for two sites located at different elevations along the east slope of the Colorado Front Range in Rocky Mountain National Park. Seasonally separated precipitation was stratified into highly concentrated (high salt), dilute (low salt), or acid-dominated precipitation groups. These groups and unstratified precipitation data were related to mean easterly or westerly zonal winds to determine direction of local transport. Strong acid anion associations were also determined for the stratified and unstratified precipitation data sets. We found that strong acid anions, acidity, ammonium, and high salt concentrations originate to the east of Rocky Mountain National Park, and are transported via up-valley funneling winds or convective instability from differential heating of the mountains and the plains to the east. These influence the composition of precipitation at Beaver Meadows, the low elevation site, throughout the year, while their effect on precipitation at Loch Vale, the high elevation site, is felt most strongly during the summer. During the winter, Loch Vale precipitation is very dilute, and occurs in conjunction with westerly winds resulting from the southerly location of the jet stream.

  3. The influence of water chemistry and biocide additions on the response of an on-line biofilm monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a significant cause of degradation of piping and heat transfer surfaces in cooling water systems. The interaction between the metabolic processes of microorganisms attached to metallic surfaces and corrosion processes can lead to localized corrosion and rapid penetration of piping and heat exchanger tubes. On-line Monitoring of biofilm formation on Metallic Surfaces is a key both for automatic control equipment and for system operators so that mitigation activities can be initiated well before the structural integrity of piping or components is jeopardized. In addition, tracking of biofilm activity on line provides feedback useful for evaluating the effectiveness of biocide additions and optimizing the concentrations and addition schedules of biocides and other control chemicals. A probe has been developed to provide a method for determining the onset of biofilm formation on metal surfaces and tracking biofilm activity on line in a power plant or industrial environment; in fresh water and seawater environments. Experience with the system in a variety of water chemistries, and system responses to biofilm growth and subsequent destruction by biocide additions are described

  4. Quantum science in secondary chemistry: Influence of teachers' beliefs and knowledge on the use of interactive computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robblee, Karen M.

    Current science education reform efforts promote inquiry-based learning, a goal that requires appropriate tools and instructional approaches. This study investigated the influence of the beliefs and knowledge of four experienced secondary chemistry teachers in their use of new instructional software that generates models of atoms and molecules based on quantum mechanics. The software, which was developed through a National Science Foundation funded project, Quantum Science Across Disciplines (QSAD), was designed to promote inquiry learning. Qualitative research methods were used for this multiple case study. Data from surveys, interviews, and extended classroom observations revealed a close correlation between a teacher's model of the learner and his or her model of teaching. Combined models of learner and teacher had the greatest influence on their decisions about implementing QSAD software. Teachers who espoused a constructivist model of learning and related models of teaching used the software to promote student investigations and inductive approaches to learning. Other factors that appeared to support the use of inquiry methods included sufficient time for students to investigate phenomena, the extent of the teacher's pedagogical content knowledge, and the amount of training using QSAD software. The Views-On-Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS) instrument was used to compare the informants' beliefs about the epistemology of science to their classroom practices. Data related to the role of teachers' beliefs about scientific knowledge were inconclusive, and VOSTS results were inconsistent with the informants' stated beliefs. All four cases revealed that the teachers acted as agents of the school culture. In schools that promoted development of critical thinking, questioning, and self-direction in students, teachers were more likely to use a variety of instructional methods and emphasize construction of knowledge. These findings suggest that educational reform

  5. Noninvasive brain cancer imaging with a bispecific antibody fragment, generated via click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiming; Hernandez, Reinier; Hong, Hao; Graves, Stephen A; Yang, Yunan; England, Christopher G; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2015-10-13

    Early diagnosis remains a task of upmost importance for reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. Successful development of highly specific companion diagnostics targeting aberrant molecular pathways of cancer is needed for sensitive detection, accurate diagnosis, and opportune therapeutic intervention. Herein, we generated a bispecific immunoconjugate [denoted as Bs-F(ab)2] by linking two antibody Fab fragments, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Fab and an anti-CD105 Fab, via bioorthogonal "click" ligation of trans-cyclooctene and tetrazine. PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG (EGFR/CD105(+/+)) tumors with (64)Cu-labeled Bs-F(ab)2 revealed a significantly enhanced tumor uptake [42.9 ± 9.5 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g); n = 4] and tumor-to-background ratio (tumor/muscle ratio of 120.2 ± 44.4 at 36 h postinjection; n = 4) compared with each monospecific Fab tracer. Thus, we demonstrated that dual targeting of EGFR and CD105 provides a synergistic improvement on both affinity and specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-Bs-F(ab)2. (64)Cu-NOTA-Bs-F(ab)2 was able to visualize small U87MG tumor nodules (<5 mm in diameter), owing to high tumor uptake (31.4 ± 10.8%ID/g at 36 h postinjection) and a tumor/muscle ratio of 76.4 ± 52.3, which provided excellent sensitivity for early detection. Finally, we successfully confirmed the feasibility of a ZW800-1-labeled Bs-F(ab)2 for near-infrared fluorescence imaging and image-guided surgical resection of U87MG tumors. More importantly, our rationale can be used in the construction of other disease-targeting bispecific antibody fragments for early detection and diagnosis of small malignant lesions. PMID:26417085

  6. Factors influencing cosmetic results after conservation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Host, tumor, and treatment-related factors influencing cosmetic outcome are analyzed for patients receiving breast conservation treatment. Methods and Materials: Four-hundred and fifty-eight patients with evaluable records for cosmesis evaluation, a subset of 701 patients treated for invasive breast cancer with conservation technique between 1969 and 1990, were prospectively analyzed. In 243 patients, cosmetic evaluation was not adequately recorded. Cosmesis evaluation was carried out from 3.7 months to 22.3 years, median of 4.4 years. By pathologic stage, tumors were 62% T1N0, 14% T1N1, 15% T2N0, and 9% T2N1. The majority of patients were treated with 4-6 MV photons. Cosmetic evaluation was rated by both patient and physician every 4-6 months. A logistic regression analysis was completed using a stepwise logistic regression. P-values of 0.05 or less were considered significant. Excellent cosmetic scores were used in all statistical analyses unless otherwise specified. Results: At most recent follow-up, 87% of patients and 81% of physicians scored their cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. Eighty-two percent of physician and patient evaluations agreed with excellent-good vs. fair-poor rating categories. Analysis demonstrated a lower proportion of excellent cosmetic scores when related to patient age > 60 years (p = 0.001), postmenopausal status (p = 0.02), black race (p = 0.0034), and T2 tumor size (p = 0.05). Surgical factors of importance were: volume of resection > 100 cm3 (p = 0.0001), scar orientation compliance with the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project (NSABP) guidelines (p = 0.0034), and > 20 cm2 skin resected (p = 0.0452). Extent of axillary surgery did not significantly affect breast cosmesis. Radiation factors affecting cosmesis included treatment volume (tangential breast fields only vs. three or more fields) (p = 0.034), whole breast dose in excess of 50 Gy (p = 0.0243), and total dose to tumor site > 65 Gy (p = 0.06), as well as

  7. The influence of family ties on men's prostate cancer screening, biopsy, and treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K; Scott, John G; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2013-11-01

    Extensive research has focused on understanding family dynamics of men with prostate cancer. However, little qualitative work has examined the role of family ties on men's prostate cancer decisions across the spectrum of screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Using data from a larger study, we qualitatively explored the influence of family ties on men's prostate cancer decisions. Semistructured interviews were conducted with men ages ≥50 (N = 64), and data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and a series of immersion/crystallization cycles. Three major themes of spousal/family member influence were identified: (a) spousal/family member alliance marked by open communication and shared decision making, (b) men who actively opposed spouse/family member pressure and made final decisions themselves, and (c) men who yielded to spouse/family member pressure. Our findings provide insights into men's relational dynamics that are important to consider for the shared decision-making process across the prostate cancer spectrum. PMID:23459024

  8. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  9. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate c

  10. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Rui-Qing; Dan-dan LI; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Wu, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT) expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50) of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemot...

  11. Influences on pre-hospital delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, N C; MacDonald, S; Macleod, U; Mitchell, E D; Weller, D.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem, with survival varying according to stage at diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis can result from patient, practitioner or hospital delay. This paper reports the results of a review of the factors influencing pre-hospital delay – the time between a patient first noticing a cancer symptom and presenting to primary care or between first presentation and referral to secondary care. A systematic methodology was applied, including extensive searches of th...

  12. PS3-16: The Influence of Travel Time on Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Onega, Tracy; Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Buist, Diana; Tuzzio, Leah

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Longer travel time to health care services has been shown to be associated with more advanced stage at diagnosis and differences in surgical care for women with breast cancer. The influence of travel time on other disease characteristics at diagnosis and on use of other breast cancer treatments is not known. We examined travel time in relation to stage, nodal involvement, tumor size, primary and adjuvant treatments, and receipt of surveillance mammography to provide a mor...

  13. The Local Influence of Pioneer Investigators on Technology Adoption: Evidence from New Cancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Agha; David Molitor

    2015-01-01

    Local opinion leaders may play a key role in easing information frictions associated with technology adoption. This paper analyzes the influence of physician investigators who lead pivotal clinical trials for new cancer drugs. By comparing diffusion patterns across many drugs, we separate correlated regional demand for new technology from information spillovers. Using original data on clinical trial study authors for 21 new cancer drugs along with Medicare claims data from 1998-2008, we find ...

  14. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundquist Jan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. Methods We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Results Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer.

  15. Influence of family size and birth order on risk of cancer: a population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Family size and birth order are known to influence the risk of some cancers. However, it is still unknown whether these effects change from early to later adulthood. We used the data of the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to further analyze these effects. We selected over 5.7 million offspring with identified parents but no parental cancer. We estimated the effect of birth order and family size by Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, period, region and socioeconomic status. We divided the age at diagnosis in two groups, below and over 50 years, to identify the effect of family size and birth order for different age periods. Negative associations for increasing birth order were found for endometrial, testicular, skin, thyroid and connective tissue cancers and melanoma. In contrast, we observed positive association between birth order and lung, male and female genital cancers. Family size was associated with decreasing risk for endometrial and testicular cancers, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma; risk was increased for leukemia and nervous system cancer. The effect of birth order decreased for lung and endometrial cancer from age at diagnosis below to over 50 years. Combined effects for birth order and family size were marginally significant for thyroid gland tumors. Especially, the relative risk for follicular thyroid gland tumors was significantly decreased for increasing birth order. Our findings suggest that the effect of birth order decreases from early to late adulthood for lung and endometrial cancer

  16. Factors Influencing Cancer Risk Perception in High Risk Populations: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilburt Jon C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients at higher than average risk of heritable cancer may process risk information differently than the general population. However, little is known about clinical, demographic, or psychosocial predictors that may impact risk perception in these groups. The objective of this study was to characterize factors associated with perceived risk of developing cancer in groups at high risk for cancer based on genetics or family history. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycInfo, and Scopus from inception through April 2009 for English-language, original investigations in humans using core concepts of "risk" and "cancer." We abstracted key information and then further restricted articles dealing with perceived risk of developing cancer due to inherited risk. Results Of 1028 titles identified, 53 articles met our criteria. Most (92% used an observational design and focused on women (70% with a family history of or contemplating genetic testing for breast cancer. Of the 53 studies, 36 focused on patients who had not had genetic testing for cancer risk, 17 included studies of patients who had undergone genetic testing for cancer risk. Family history of cancer, previous prophylactic tests and treatments, and younger age were associated with cancer risk perception. In addition, beliefs about the preventability and severity of cancer, personality factors such as "monitoring" personality, the ability to process numerical information, as well as distress/worry also were associated with cancer risk perception. Few studies addressed non-breast cancer or risk perception in specific demographic groups (e.g. elderly or minority groups and few employed theory-driven analytic strategies to decipher interrelationships of factors. Conclusions Several factors influence cancer risk perception in patients at elevated risk for cancer. The science of characterizing and improving risk perception in cancer for high risk groups, although

  17. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physico-chemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air quality models. nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA; O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 28 % of total OA; O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OAs (BBOA1; 13 % of total OA; O / C = 0.33 and BBOA2; 20 % of total OA; O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63) and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a~previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010), most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The

  18. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Young

    2015-12-01

    -volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63 and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90 formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013 and a previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 to 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemistry might also be higher in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.

  19. Influence of late side-effects upon daily life after radiotherapy of laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence on daily life from long-term side-effects was studied in patients treated more than 5 years ago with radiotherapy for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancer. Forty-six patients were asked to participate in telephone interviews and 44 participated. Only a minority (10%) states serious problems related to the treatment. Problems related to the voice and severe xerostomia were especially mentioned. Half of the patients treated for pharyngeal cancer, complained of xerostomia and had occasionally a feeling of being handicapped. Social relations were impaired in 10% of the patients and 10% had retired due to their cancer or therapy related side-effects. It is concluded that radiotherapy seems to be a well tolerated treatment with relatively little impairment of the daily life in patients with laryngeal cancer. In patients with pharyngeal cancer, xerostomia is a major problem, which often persists more than 5 years after treatment. (orig.)

  20. RETENTION OF HUMIC ACID FROM WATER BY NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANE AND INFLUENCE OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY ON MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zazouli, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi, M. Gholami, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Younesian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to investigate the rejection efficiency of salt and hydrophobic fraction of natural organic matter, to study the flux decline behavior with a spiral wound nanofiltration membrane, and also to survey the influence of water chemistry on membrane performance. Experiments were conducted using a cross flow pilot-scale membrane unit with a full circulation mode. Humic acid was used as hydrophobic organic matter and NaCl as background electrolyte. Results showed that flux reduction increased with increasing ionic strength and humic acid concentration, and with lower pH. The rejection efficiency of organic and salt decreased with the decrease in pH and increase in ionic strength, because of osmotic pressure increase, leading to permeate flux decline and decrease in salt rejection. In addition, the improved salt rejection was likely due to Donnan exclusion by humic material close to membrane surfaces. The average rejection efficiency of humic acid and salt ranged between 91.2%-95.25% and 63.6%-80%, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon concentration was less than 0.57mg/L in permeate for all experiments. With increasing organic concentration, the charge of the membrane surface has become more negative due to the adsorption of organic foulants on the membrane surface, and thus increased the electrostatic repulsion. However, the increasing surface charge had the potential to result in a larger molecular weight cut-off of a fouled membrane due to membrane swelling which can lead to lower rejection solutes. Therefore, results of this study indicated that membrane fouling may significantly affect the rejection of organic and ion solute.

  1. Study of factors influencing dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the factors which influence the dose distribution of brachytherapy in cervical cancer.Methods Ninety-five patients with cervical cancer Ⅱ-Ⅲb received fundamental radiation therapy including brachytherapy in our department from Aug.2004 to Nov.2005.The deviation of isodose curve of brachytherapy was based on A-B reference system,and the deviation of dose was defined by measuring in a practical standard body model.Results The factors influencing isodose offset significantly were parametrial...

  2. Can cancer influence the pain agenda in Oncology Outpatient Consultations?

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, MS. Tood, C.

    2010-01-01

    Pain in cancer patients is common, yet it is often inadequately managed. Although poor assessment has been implicated, how patients contribute to this process has not been explicated. This study aims to uncover patients' contributions to discussions about pain during oncology outpatient consultations. Seventy-four medical encounters were observed and audiotaped. Verbatim transcriptions of pain talk were examined using conversational analysis. Thirty-nine of 74 patients talked about pain with ...

  3. The influence of metformin in the etiology of selected cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Pawałowska, Monika; Markowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Obesity, hypertension and glucose tolerance disorders have become a growing concern in recent years. It is estimated that over 220 million people suffer from diabetes. It is a condition conducive to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy but also to the development of many types of cancer. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia lead to increased concentration of insulin-like growth factors, activation of IGF-R receptors, activation of PI3K and Ras-Raf pathways and r...

  4. Factors Influencing Chemotherapy Goal Perception in Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumusay, Ozge; Cetin, Bulent; Benekli, Mustafa; Gurcan, Gamze; Ilhan, Mustafa N; Bostankolu, Basak; Ozet, Ahmet; Uner, Aytug; Coskun, Ugur; Buyukberber, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    Cancer patients who start receiving chemotherapy have difficulty in understanding the state of their disease, the prognosis, and the purpose of treatment. We used a survey to evaluate the extent of perception of chemotherapy goal among cancer patients. Two hundred sixteen cancer patients who received chemotherapy for the first time participated in the study. The presence of depression and anxiety was assessed using the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" (HAD). The consistency between the patients' perception of the chemotherapy goal and the physician's perception was described as "right," and the inconsistency was described as "wrong." Among the patients who participated in the survey, 53.2 % (n = 115) were receiving adjuvant treatment and 46.8 % (n = 101) were receiving palliative treatment for metastatic disease. The rate of right and wrong perception of the chemotherapy goal was 51.9 % (n = 108) and 32.2 % (n = 67), respectively, and the rate of confused patients was 18.9 % (n = 41). The level of education was shown to be the only parameter involved in accurate perception of the treatment purpose (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.444, p = 0.025, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.219-0.903). In this study, there was a 51.9 % consistency between the physician's perception and that of the patient regarding the purpose of treatment. We demonstrated that the level of education was the unique factor in accurate perception of chemotherapy goal among cancer patients. PMID:25851203

  5. Gastrointestinal cancers: influence of gut microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Daniela Elena

    2014-04-10

    Cancers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract continue to represent a major health problem, despite progress in therapy. Gut microbiota is a key element related to the genesis of GI cancers, countless papers addressing this burning issue across the world. We provide an updated knowledge of the involvement of gut microbiota in GI tumorigenesis, including its underlying mechanisms. We present also a comprehensive review of the evidence from animal and clinical studies using probiotics and/or prebiotics in the prevention and/or therapy of GI tumours, of GI cancer therapy-related toxicity and of post-operative complications. We summarize the anticarcinogenic mechanisms of these biotherapeutics from in vitro, animal and clinical interventions. More research is required to reveal the interactions of microflora with genetic, epigenetic and immunologic factors, diet and age, before any firm conclusion be drawn. Well-designed, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled human studies using probiotics and/or prebiotics, with adequate follow-up are necessary in order to formulate directions for prevention and therapy. PMID:23981580

  6. Factors influencing consultation to discuss family history of cancer by asymptomatic patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jennifer N W; Hewison, Jenny; Chu, Carol E; Al-Habsi, Hamdan

    2011-03-01

    Patient self-initiated consultations to discuss family history of cancer in primary care and the factors leading to these consultations have not been investigated. Seventy-one out of 150 asymptomatic patients with a family history of cancer at the Yorkshire Cancer Genetics Service participated in this study. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered. The results show that (1) family cancer events, doctors' advice and reaching the age of cancer-affected relatives were more salient in raising awareness of the added cancer risk due to family history than media and publicity, and knowledge of the genetics services; (2) knowledge of family medical history and its clinical value is not easy to ascertain; (3) the inter-relationships with other causal beliefs are of interest and could provide insights to understand the factors motivating patients to discuss family history or cancer risk; (4) the belief that 'cancer runs in the family' or is 'a family thing' may not be sufficient to heighten perceived cancer risk and motivate patients to seek medical advice; and (5) understanding of the medical concept and clinical value of family history is poor even in this group of patients who initiated the GP consultations. In conclusion, because most primary care practitioners are likely to rely on patient initiated discussion to identify individuals at an increased risk of cancer because of their family history, these findings are therefore important to help doctors and health providers understand the reasons influencing asymptomatic patients to self-refer themselves in primary care and discuss cancer risk in order to provide appropriate care. PMID:22109720

  7. Influence of diagnostic radiography on the incidence of breast cancer and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little accurate information is available on the influence of diagnostic radiography on the incidence of cancer in the general population, largely because of a lack of knowledge of the numbers and the age distributions of patients undergoing radiographic examinations. We used such information from a closed population in Maine that was followed for a year, along with data from the literature on the absorbed dose from typical examinations and a mathematical model linking dose to the incidence rate of cancer, to estimate the numbers of cases of radiologically induced cancer of the bone marrow and breast. Our data indicate that about 1 percent of all cases of leukemia and less than 1 percent of all cases of breast cancer result from diagnostic radiography. In addition, such tumors generally occur late in life; the incidence of radiation-induced leukemia was highest at 69 years, and the incidence of radiation-induced breast cancer was highest at 76 years. Thus, diagnostic radiography has only a small influence on the occurrence of leukemia and breast cancer

  8. The Influence of Hormonal Factors on the Risk of Developing Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Esther; Travier, Noémie; Waterboer, Tim; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Pawlita, Michael; Pala, Valeria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Margall, Núria; Dillner, Joakim; Gram, Inger T; Tjønneland, Anne; Munk, Christian; Palli, Domenico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Mesrine, Sylvie; Fournier, Agnès; Fortner, Renée T; Ose, Jennifer; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Orfanos, Philippos; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Polidoro, Silvia; Mattiello, Amalia; Lund, Eiliv; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Quirós, J Ramón; Sánchez, María-José; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ekström, Johanna; Lindquist, David; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Riboli, Elio; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In addition to HPV, high parity and hormonal contraceptives have been associated with cervical cancer (CC). However, most of the evidence comes from retrospective case-control studies. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate associations between hormonal factors and risk of...... developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3)/carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC). METHODS AND FINDINGS: We followed a cohort of 308,036 women recruited in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study. At enrollment, participants.......7). CONCLUSIONS: Even though HPV is the necessary cause of CC, our results suggest that several hormonal factors are risk factors for cervical carcinogenesis. Adherence to current cervical cancer screening guidelines should minimize the increased risk of CC associated with these hormonal risk factors....

  9. Psychosocially Influenced Cancer: Diverse Early-Life Stress Experiences and Links to Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Linda A.; Auger, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    This perspective on Boyd et al. (beginning on page XXX in this issue of the journal) discusses recent published research examining the interplay between social stress and breast cancer. Cross-disciplinary studies using genetically defined mouse models and established neonatal and peripubertal paradigms of social stress are illuminating biological programming by diverse early-life experiences for the risk of breast cancer. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this programming can lead to id...

  10. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, KM; Ridgwell, A.; Payne, JL

    2016-01-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quan...

  11. The influence of the CHIEF pathway on colorectal cancer-specific mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L Slattery

    Full Text Available Many components of the CHIEF (Convergence of Hormones, Inflammation, and Energy Related Factors pathway could influence survival given their involvement in cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and tumor invasion stimulation. We used ARTP (Adaptive Rank Truncation Product to test if genes in the pathway were associated with colorectal cancer-specific mortality. Colon cancer (n = 1555 and rectal cancer (n = 754 cases were followed over five years. Age, center, stage at diagnosis, and tumor molecular phenotype were considered when calculating ARTP p values. A polygenic risk score was used to summarize the magnitude of risk associated with this pathway. The JAK/STAT/SOC was significant for colon cancer survival (PARTP = 0.035. Fifteen genes (DUSP2, INFGR1, IL6, IRF2, JAK2, MAP3K10, MMP1, NFkB1A, NOS2A, PIK3CA, SEPX1, SMAD3, TLR2, TYK2, and VDR were associated with colon cancer mortality (PARTP < 0.05; JAK2 (PARTP  = 0.0086, PIK3CA (PARTP = 0.0098, and SMAD3 (PARTP = 0.0059 had the strongest associations. Over 40 SNPs were significantly associated with survival within the 15 significant genes (PARTP < 0.05. SMAD3 had the strongest association with survival (HRGG 2.46 95% CI 1.44,4.21 PTtrnd = 0.0002. Seven genes (IL2RA, IL8RA, IL8RB, IRF2, RAF1, RUNX3, and SEPX1 were significantly associated with rectal cancer (PARTP < 0.05. The HR for colorectal cancer-specific mortality among colon cancer cases in the upper at-risk alleles group was 11.81 (95% CI 7.07, 19. 74 and was 10.99 (95% CI 5.30, 22.78 for rectal cancer. These results suggest that several genes in the CHIEF pathway are important for colorectal cancer survival; the risk associated with the pathway merits validation in other studies.

  12. The influence of genetic variation in thirty selected genes on the clinical characteristics of early onset breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tapper, William; Hammond, Victoria; Gerty, Sue; Ennis, Sarah; Simmonds, Peter; Collins, Andrew; Eccles, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: common variants that alter breast cancer risk are being discovered. Here, we determine how these variants influence breast cancer prognosis, risk and tumour characteristics. Methods: we selected 1,001 women with early onset nonfamilial invasive breast cancer from the Prospective study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) cohort and genotyped 206 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across 30 candidate genes. After quality control, 899 cases and 13...

  13. A review of repeat prostate biopsies and the influence of technique on cancer detection: our experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinlan, M R

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Follow-up of patients with an initial negative prostate biopsy, but surrounding whom a suspicion of prostate cancer persists, is difficult. In addition, debate exists as to the optimal technique for repeat prostate biopsy. AIMS: To assess the cancer detection rate on repeat prostate biopsy. METHODS: We reviewed patients who underwent prostate biopsy in our department in 2005 who had >or=1 previous biopsy within the preceding 5 years. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy and the influence of the number of biopsy cores were recorded. RESULTS: Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy was 15.4%, with approximately 60% detected on the first repeat biopsy, but approximately 10% not confirmed until the fourth repeat biopsy. Gleason score was similar regardless of the time of diagnosis (6.1-6.5). Mean interval between first biopsy and cancer diagnosis (range 18-55 months) depended on the number of repeat procedures. There was an association between the number of biopsy cores and cancer detection. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the practice of increasing the number of cores taken on initial and first repeat biopsy to maximise prostate cancer detection and reduce the overall number of biopsies needed.

  14. Factors Influencing Early Detection of Oral Cancer by Primary Health-Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassona, Y; Scully, C; Shahin, A; Maayta, W; Sawair, F

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to determine early detection practices performed by primary healthcare professionals, to compare medical and dental sub-groups, and to identify factors that influence the ability of medical and dental practitioners to recognize precancerous changes and clinical signs of oral cancer. A 28-item survey instrument was used to interview a total of 330 Jordanian primary health-care professionals (165 dental and 165 medical). An oral cancer knowledge scale (0 to 31) was generated from correct responses on oral cancer general knowledge. An early detection practice scale (0 to 24) was generated from the reported usage and frequency of procedures in oral cancer examination. Also, a diagnostic ability scale (0 to 100) was generated from correct selections of suspicious oral lesions. Only 17.8 % of the participants reported that they routinely performed oral cancer screening in practices. Their oral cancer knowledge scores ranged from 3 to 31 with a mean of 15.6. The early detection practice scores ranged from 2 to 21 with a mean of 11.6. A significant positive correlation was found between knowledge scores and early detection practice scores (r = 0.22; p oral cancer and oral mucosal lesions are needed for primary health-care professionals. PMID:25851202

  15. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. ► Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. ► miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. ► miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs.

  16. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Karina J. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia); Tsykin, Anna [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Giles, Keith M. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Sladic, Rosemary T. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Epis, Michael R. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Ganss, Ruth [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine Angiogenesis Unit, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Goodall, Gregory J. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Leedman, Peter J., E-mail: peter.leedman@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a

  17. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dominique E.; Kim, Hwajin; Parworth, Caroline; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.; Seco, Roger; Kim, Saewung; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    -OOA; 16 % of total OA, O / C = 0.63) and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA, O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a previous campaign in winter 2010, most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly 3 times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 and 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemical reactions may have played a more important role in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.

  18. How do changes in the mtDNA and mitochondrial dysfunction influence cancer and cancer therapy? Challenges, opportunities and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gisbergen, M W; Voets, A M; Starmans, M H W; de Coo, I F M; Yadak, R; Hoffmann, R F; Boutros, P C; Smeets, H J M; Dubois, L; Lambin, P

    2015-01-01

    Several mutations in nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial components have been associated with an increased cancer risk or are even causative, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes) and iso-citrate dehydrogenase (IDH1 and IDH2 genes). Recently, studies have suggested an eminent role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the development of a wide variety of cancers. Various studies associated mtDNA abnormalities, including mutations, deletions, inversions and copy number alterations, with mitochondrial dysfunction. This might, explain the hampered cellular bioenergetics in many cancer cell types. Germline (e.g. m.10398A>G; m.6253T>C) and somatic mtDNA mutations as well as differences in mtDNA copy number seem to be associated with cancer risk. It seems that mtDNA can contribute as driver or as complementary gene mutation according to the multiple-hit model. This can enhance the mutagenic/clonogenic potential of the cell as observed for m.8993T>G or influences the metastatic potential in later stages of cancer progression. Alternatively, other mtDNA variations will be innocent passenger mutations in a tumor and therefore do not contribute to the tumorigenic or metastatic potential. In this review, we discuss how reported mtDNA variations interfere with cancer treatment and what implications this has on current successful pharmaceutical interventions. Mutations in MT-ND4 and mtDNA depletion have been reported to be involved in cisplatin resistance. Pharmaceutical impairment of OXPHOS by metformin can increase the efficiency of radiotherapy. To study mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer, different cellular models (like ρ(0) cells or cybrids), in vivo murine models (xenografts and specific mtDNA mouse models in combination with a spontaneous cancer mouse model) and small animal models (e.g. Danio rerio) could be potentially interesting to use. For future research, we foresee that unraveling mtDNA variations can contribute to personalized

  19. Risk factors influencing recurrence following resection of pancreatic head cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Qing Mu; Shu-You Peng; Guo-Feng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Whether operative procedure is a risk factor influencing recurrence following resection of carcinoma in the head ofpancreas or not remains controversies. In this text we compared the recurrence rate of two operative procedure: the Whipple procedure and extended radical operation, and inquired into the factors influencing recurrence after radical resection.METHODS: From January 1995 to December 1998, 35 cases of carcinoma of pancreas underwent the Whipple operadure, 21 patients received the Extended radical operation. All patients were followed up for more than 3 years. Prognostic factors included operative procedure, size of tumor, lymph node, interstitial invasion. RESULTS: Deaths duo to recurrence within 3 years after operation were studied. The death rate was 51.4% in the Whipple procedure and 42.9% in the Extended radical operative procedure. There was a significant difference between the two groups. Recurrence occurred in 75% patients with tumor large than 4 cm, in 87.5% patients with lymph node involvement, and in 50% patients with the presence of interstitial invasion. CONCLUSION: Tumor exceeding 4 cm, lymph node involvement, and presence of interstitial invasion are high risk factors of recurrence after Whipple's procedure and extended radical operation.

  20. Why do some students struggle while others succeed in chemistry? A study of the influence of undergraduate student beliefs, perceptions, and use of resources on performance in introductory chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapuelas, Michelle Leigh Shaver

    This dissertation explores how student beliefs about the nature of science learning, beliefs in their academic ability, perceptions of the classroom environment, perceptions of external support, and use of resources contribute to success in introductory chemistry as measured by midterm and final exam scores. These factors were selected for study because they are susceptible to instructional intervention. A beliefs and perceptions survey and use of resources framework were developed, tested, and utilized to find predictors for student grades. To measure beliefs and perceptions the Chemistry Beliefs and Perceptions Survey was developed and tested. A total of 428 introductory chemistry students responded to the survey measuring their beliefs and perceptions during Fall 2009. Factor analysis of student responses yielded four categories of beliefs and perceptions: nature of science learning, academic ability, classroom environment, and external support. A hierarchical linear model estimated the influence of student beliefs and perceptions on exam scores. There was a positive relationship between exam scores and (a) belief in academic ability and (b) belief that learning science involves understanding dynamic processes. There was a negative relationship between exam scores and perception of external support. Perceptions of the classroom environment were not strongly related to exam scores. These results were replicated with survey responses collected from students taking the course the following Fall (N=597). To characterize student use of resources, a subset of survey participants (N=61) were interviewed at three time-points spanning the Fall 2009 semester. Interview responses were used to create a Use of Resources Framework. This framework described students as memorizers, procedural thinkers, critical thinkers, or researchers. Students characterized as memorizers or procedural thinkers view outside sources of information as the "authority," while critical thinkers and

  1. Plasma chemistry during the deposition of a-C : H films and its influence on film properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benedikt, J.; Woen, RV.; van Mensfoort, SLM.; Peřina, Vratislav; Hong, J.; van de Sanden, MCM.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2003), s. 90-97. ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109; GA ČR GA104/03/0385 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : plasma chemistry * spectroscopic ellipsometry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2003

  2. The influence of global climate change on the scientific foundations and applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: Introduction to a SETAC international workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Ralph G., Jr.; Hooper, Michael J.; Balbus, John M.; Clements, William; Fritz, Alyce; Gouin, Todd; Helm, Roger; Hickey, Christopher; Landis, Wayne; Moe, S. Jannicke

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of seven papers resulting from a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) international workshop titled “The Influence of Global Climate Change on the Scientific Foundations and Applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.” The workshop involved 36 scientists from 11 countries and was designed to answer the following question: How will global climate change influence the environmental impacts of chemicals and other stressors and the way we assess and manage them in the environment? While more detail is found in the complete series of articles, some key consensus points are as follows: (1) human actions (including mitigation of and adaptation to impacts of global climate change [GCC]) may have as much influence on the fate and distribution of chemical contaminants as does GCC, and modeled predictions should be interpreted cautiously; (2) climate change can affect the toxicity of chemicals, but chemicals can also affect how organisms acclimate to climate change; (3) effects of GCC may be slow, variable, and difficult to detect, though some populations and communities of high vulnerability may exhibit responses sooner and more dramatically than others; (4) future approaches to human and ecological risk assessments will need to incorporate multiple stressors and cumulative risks considering the wide spectrum of potential impacts stemming from GCC; and (5) baseline/reference conditions for estimating resource injury and restoration/rehabilitation will continually shift due to GCC and represent significant challenges to practitioners.

  3. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV1 before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV1 at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV1, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume ≥20 cm3 (VC, P = 0.047; FEV1, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV1. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  4. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Akihiro, E-mail: tdakihiro@gmail.com; Hiraki, Takao [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Iguchi, Toshihiro [Fukuyama City Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Toyooka, Shinichi [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Cancer and Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Kiura, Katsuyuki [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Tsuda, Toshihide [Okayama University Graduate School, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Graduate School of Environmental Science (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Epidemiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  5. Non-surgical factors influencing lymph node yield in colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Patrick; Peirce, Colin; Mulsow, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous factors which can affect the lymph node (LN) yield in colon cancer specimens. The aim of this paper was to identify both modifiable and non-modifiable factors that have been demonstrated to affect colonic resection specimen LN yield and to summarise the pertinent literature on these topics. A literature review of PubMed was performed to identify the potential factors which may influence the LN yield in colon cancer resection specimens. The terms used for the search were: LN...

  6. bax, but not bcl-2, influences the prognosis of human pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Friess, H; Lu, Z; H. Graber; Zimmermann, A.; Adler, G.; Korc, M.; Schmid, R; Buchler, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—bcl-2 and bax belong to the bcl-2-related gene family, which marks a new class of genes that influence apoptosis. The bcl-2 oncogene acts as a broad antiapoptotic factor and extends both normal and tumour cell survival. In contrast, the bax gene is a promoter of apoptosis. 
Aims—To analyse the expression of bcl-2 and bax in pancreatic cancer and correlate the results with clinical parameters. 
Patients—Pancreatic cancer tissue samples were obtained fro...

  7. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  8. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dost, Rutger J.; Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Jong, Igle J. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Urology, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Recurrent prostate cancer is usually treated by combining radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy. To stage the cancer, choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT can be performed. It is generally thought that androgen deprivation therapy does not influence choline PET/CT. In this article we focus on the molecular backgrounds of choline and androgens, and the results of preclinical and clinical studies performed using PET/CT. Using PubMed, we looked for the relevant articles about androgen deprivation therapy and choline PET/CT. During ADT, a tendency of decreased uptake of choline in prostate cancer was observed, in particular in hormone-naive patients. We conclude that in order to prevent false-negative choline PET/CT scans androgen deprivation should be withheld prior to scanning, especially in hormone-naive patients. (orig.)

  9. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent prostate cancer is usually treated by combining radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy. To stage the cancer, choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT can be performed. It is generally thought that androgen deprivation therapy does not influence choline PET/CT. In this article we focus on the molecular backgrounds of choline and androgens, and the results of preclinical and clinical studies performed using PET/CT. Using PubMed, we looked for the relevant articles about androgen deprivation therapy and choline PET/CT. During ADT, a tendency of decreased uptake of choline in prostate cancer was observed, in particular in hormone-naive patients. We conclude that in order to prevent false-negative choline PET/CT scans androgen deprivation should be withheld prior to scanning, especially in hormone-naive patients. (orig.)

  10. The influence of small-scale variations in isoprene concentrations on atmospheric chemistry over a tropical rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Langford, B.; Nemitz, E.; Misztal, P. K.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2011-05-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) such as isoprene constitute a large proportion of the global atmospheric oxidant sink. Their reactions in the atmosphere contribute to processes such as ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. However, over the tropical rainforest, where 50 % of the global emissions of BVOCs are believed to occur, atmospheric chemistry models have been unable to simulate concurrently the measured daytime concentration of isoprene and that of its principal oxidant, hydroxyl (OH). One reason for this model-measurement discrepancy may be incomplete mixing of isoprene within the convective boundary layer, leading to patchiness or segregation in isoprene and OH mixing ratios and average concentrations that appear to be incompatible with each other. One way of capturing this effect in models of atmospheric chemistry is to use a reduced effective rate constant for their reaction. Recent studies comparing atmospheric chemistry global/box models with field measurements have suggested that this effective rate reduction may be as large as 50 %; which is at the upper limit of that calculated using large eddy simulation models. To date there has only been one field campaign worldwide that has reported co-located measurements of isoprene and OH at the necessary temporal resolution to calculate the segregation of these compounds. However many campaigns have recorded sufficiently high resolution isoprene measurements to capture the small-scale fluctuations in its concentration. Assuming uniform distributions of other OH production and loss processes, we use a box model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by the spectrum of isoprene concentrations measured, as a virtual instrument, to estimate the variability in OH at a point and hence, to estimate the segregation intensity of isoprene and OH from high-frequency isoprene time series. The method successfully reproduces the only directly observed segregation, using measurements made in a

  11. The influence of the limestone-quarry Čertovy schody on the precipitation chemistry and atmospheric deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špičková, Jitka; Dobešová, Irena; Vach, Marek; Skřivan, Petr; Burian, Miloš

    Prague: Ministry of the Environment CR ; Czech Hydrometeorological Institute; Charles University Environment Center; Czech Geological Survey, 2005 - (Hůnová, I.). s. 132-132 ISBN 80-86690-25-3. [ Acid Rain 2005. International Conference on Acid Deposition /7./. 12.06.2005-17.06.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/04/0060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : precipitation chemistry * Bohemian Karst * trace metals Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  12. Influence of dexamethasone on appetite and body weight in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarčev Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Anorexia and cachexia are the most common symptoms in cancer patients. They increase morbidity and mortality among cancer patients as well as complications of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The most common drugs for treatment of cancer cachexia are corticosteroids and megestrol acetate. Material and Methods The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of dexamethasone on appetite loss and weight loss in lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Group A (30 patients was treated with cisplatin, etoposide and standard supportive therapy, while group B (30 patients received, in addition to this treatment, dexamethasone in the dose of 8 mg intravenously per day (1-3 day of chemotherapy. Results There was a statistically significant difference in appetite loss between two groups after the second chemotherapy cycle favoring group A. The analysis of weight loss showed a statistically significant difference between two groups after both chemotherapy cycles, once again in favor of group A. Concerning the improvement of appetite and weight gain, there was no statistically significant difference between two groups after both chemotherapy cycles. Discussion Many double-blind randomized controlled studies showed beneficial symptomatic effect of corticosteroids in cancer cachexia, especially on the improvement of appetite, food intake and performance status. In most of the studies the weight gain was not recorded. The most effective type of corticosteroids, dose and route of administration have not been established. Conclusion Dexamethasone significantly decreases appetite loss and weight loss in lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, while it has no influence on appetite improvement and weight gain.

  13. The influence of vent fluid chemistry on trophic structure at two deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sarah; Van Dover, Cindy; Coleman, Max

    2014-05-01

    The two known deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields along the Mid-Cayman Rise are separated by a distance of only 21 km, yet their chemistry and faunal diversity are distinct. The deeper of the two vent fields, Piccard (with active venting from Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods and Beebe Sea), at 4980 m is basalt hosted. The shallower vent field, Von Damm, at 2300 m appears to have an ultramafic influence. The Von Damm vent field can be separated into two sites: The Spire and The Tubeworm Field. The dominant vent fluids at the Tubeworm Field are distinct from those at the Spire, as a result of fluid modification in the sub-surface. Von Damm and Piccard vent fields support abundant invertebrates, sharing the same biomass-dominant shrimp species, Rimicaris hybisae. Although there are some other shared species (squat lobsters (Munidopsis sp.) and gastropods (Provanna sp. and Iheyaspira sp.)) between the vent fields, they are much more abundant at one site than the other. In this study we have examined the bulk carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotope composition of microbes and fauna at each vent field. With these data we have deduced the trophic structure of the communities and the influence of vent fluid chemistry. From stable isotope data and end-member vent fluid chemistry, we infer that the basis of the trophic structure at Piccard is dominated by sulfur, iron, and hydrogen-oxidizing microbial communities. In comparison, the basis of the Von Damm trophic structure is dominated by microbial communities of sulfur and hydrogen oxidizers, sulfate reducers and methanotrophs. This microbial diversity at the base of the trophic structure is a result of chemical variations in vent fluids and processes in the sub-surface that alter the vent fluid chemistry. These differences influence higher trophic levels and can be used to explain some of the variability as well as similarity in fauna at the vent sites. Part of this work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  14. Influence of doxorubicin on apoptosis and oxidative stress in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilco-Ferreto, Nesstor; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among women worldwide due to aggressive behavior, early metastasis, resistance to existing chemotherapeutic agent and high mortality rate. Doxorubicin (Dox) is a powerful antitumoral drug. It is one of the most active agents for treatment of breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of Dox in apoptosis and oxidative stress in the breast cancer cell lines MCF-10F, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. These studies showed that Dox decreased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression and affected oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production and simultaneously decreasing NF-κB gene and protein expression in MCF-7, a tumorigenic triple-positive cell line. Results also indicated that Dox induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, caspase-8 and caspase-3 and downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. On the contrary, ROS damage decreased by increasing SOD2 gene and protein expression and hydrogen peroxide production with parallel NF-κB protein expression decrease in MDA-MB-231, a tumorigenic triple-negative breast cancer cell line. It can be concluded that Dox activated apoptosis by inducing proteolytic processing of Bcl-2 family, caspases and simultaneously decreased oxidative stress by influencing ROS damage in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:27278553

  15. The influence of tumour cell DNA content on survival in colorectal cancer: a detailed analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Armitage, N C; Ballantyne, K. C.; Evans, D F; Clarke, P; Sheffield, J.; Hardcastle, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of tumour cell DNA content (ploidy) on survival of 416 patients undergoing excisional surgery for colorectal cancer. Two hundred and eleven (51%) tumours had an abnormal DNA content (aneuploid or tetraploid). There was no correlation between ploidy status, sex, age and pathological stage, histological grade, tumour site, local tumour extension or assessment of curability. Patients with tumours with an abnormal DNA content had a poorer survival 68/211 (32%) t...

  16. Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Zamanzadeh; Maryam Rassouli; Abbas Abbaszadeh; Alireza Nikanfar; Hamid Alavi-Majd; Akram Ghahramanian

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the p...

  17. Can cancer patients influence the pain agenda in oncology outpatient consultations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Margaret S; Todd, Chris

    2010-02-01

    Pain in cancer patients is common, yet it is often inadequately managed. Although poor assessment has been implicated, how patients contribute to this process has not been explicated. This study aims to uncover patients' contributions to discussions about pain during oncology outpatient consultations. Seventy-four medical encounters were observed and audiotaped. Verbatim transcriptions of pain talk were examined using conversational analysis. Thirty-nine of 74 patients talked about pain with 15 different doctors during consultations for follow-up or active treatment. Patients' talk about pain varied consistently according to how pain talk was initiated. In 20 consultations where pain was put on the agenda by patients, they used communication tactics that emphasized their pain experiences, seemingly to attract and maintain their doctors' attention. These tactics appear necessary, as the cancer treatment agenda restricts opportunities for patients to have supportive care needs addressed. On the other hand, in 19 consultations where doctors elicited information about pain, patients used communication tactics that minimized their pain experiences, seemingly to conceal potential disease progression or recurrence, the very focus of these specialist consultations. Where cancer was implicated as the source of pain, chemotherapy or radiotherapy was offered, and where cancer was suspected, referrals for investigations were made. Two of the 20 patients appeared to influence the treatment-focused agenda and were given referrals to pain clinic rather than further cancer therapy as initially recommended. PMID:19963336

  18. Coping with Early Stage Breast Cancer:Examining the Influence of Personality Traits and Interpersonal Closeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eSaita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the influence of personality traits and close relationships on the coping style of women with breast cancer. A sample of seventy-two Italian patients receiving treatment for early stage breast cancer was recruited. Participants completed questionnaires measuring personality traits (Interpersonal Adaptation Questionnaire, interpersonal closeness (Inclusion of the Other in the Self Scale, and adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale. We hypothesized that diverse personality traits and degrees of closeness contribute to determine the coping styles shown by participants. Multiple regression analyses were conducted for each of the five coping styles (Helplessness/Hopelessness, Anxious Preoccupation, Avoidance, Fatalism, and Fighting Spirit using personality traits and interpersonal closeness variables (Strength of Support Relations, and Number of Support Relations as predictors. Women who rated high on assertiveness and social anxiety were more likely to utilize active coping strategies (Fighting Spirit. Perceived strength of relationships was predictive of using an active coping style while the number of supportive relationships did not correlate with any of the coping styles. Implications for assessment of breast cancer patients at risk for negative adaptation to the illness and the development of psychosocial interventions are discussed.

  19. Coping with early stage breast cancer: examining the influence of personality traits and interpersonal closeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Emanuela; Acquati, Chiara; Kayser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The study examines the influence of personality traits and close relationships on the coping style of women with breast cancer. A sample of 72 Italian patients receiving treatment for early stage breast cancer was recruited. Participants completed questionnaires measuring personality traits (Interpersonal Adaptation Questionnaire), interpersonal closeness (Inclusion of the Other in the Self Scale), and adjustment to cancer (Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale). We hypothesized that diverse personality traits and degrees of closeness contribute to determine the coping styles shown by participants. Multiple regression analyses were conducted for each of the five coping styles (Helplessness/Hopelessness, Anxious Preoccupation, Avoidance, Fatalism, and Fighting Spirit) using personality traits and interpersonal closeness variables (Strength of Support Relations, and Number of Support Relations) as predictors. Women who rated high on assertiveness and social anxiety were more likely to utilize active coping strategies (Fighting Spirit). Perceived strength of relationships was predictive of using an active coping style while the number of supportive relationships did not correlate with any of the coping styles. Implications for assessment of breast cancer patients at risk for negative adaptation to the illness and the development of psychosocial interventions are discussed. PMID:25699003

  20. Radiation-induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, latency period, age, and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and genetic predisposition. The amount of undesirable effects of screening with mammography was estimated from mortality studies after radiation exposure. Newer incidence studies demonstrate, however, an underestimation of the health detriment by mortality studies, in particular with increasing age at exposure, which amounts about five- to sixfold after an exposure in an age of 45-50y. The multidimensional analysis of the discrete values of incidence after radiation exposure respecting age at exposure, time since exposure and attained age instead of calculating a steady function simply depending from age at exposure results in an increasing relative and absolute risk of cancer incidence (and mortality) with growing age after an exposure at an age above 40y. Some genes seems to be correlated with an predisposition of breast cancer. In women carrying BRCA-1 the radiosensitivity for induction of breast cancer may exceed the risk in the normal population by about two orders of magnitude. The resulting doubling dose amounts in the order of the natural and medical radiation exposure. At least in part the genetic predisposition is associated with an early onset of the cancer after an additional radiation exposure. This kind of health detriment was not considered in the former discussion of radiation hazards. (orig.)

  1. Complex chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-15

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  2. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  3. Assessing the Influence of Health Literacy on HIV-Positive Women’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Knowledge and Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Bynum, Shalanda A.; Wigfall, Lisa T.; Brandt, Heather M.; Richter, Donna L.; Glover, Saundra H.; Hébert, James R

    2013-01-01

    Women living with HIV (WLH) bear a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer and may face challenges understanding health information. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of health literacy on WLH cervical cancer screening knowledge and behaviors. WLH were recruited from clinic- and community-based settings in the southeastern USA. The majority of women completing a questionnaire assessing factors related to cervical cancer were African American (90 %). About 38 % of women ...

  4. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  5. Influence of comorbidity on the effect of adjuvant treatment and age in patients with early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Land, L H; Dalton, S O; Jensen, M-B; Ewertz, M

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence of comorbidity at breast cancer diagnosis increases with age and is likely to influence the likelihood of receiving treatment according to guidelines. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of breast cancer treatment on mortality, taking age at diagnosis and comorbidity into...... account....

  6. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.;

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  7. The influence of small-scale variations in isoprene concentrations on atmospheric chemistry over a tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs such as isoprene constitute a large proportion of the global atmospheric oxidant sink. Their reactions in the atmosphere contribute to processes such as ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. However, over the tropical rainforest, where 50 % of the global emissions of BVOCs are believed to occur, atmospheric chemistry models have been unable to simulate concurrently the measured daytime concentration of isoprene and that of its principal oxidant, hydroxyl (OH. One reason for this model-measurement discrepancy may be incomplete mixing of isoprene within the convective boundary layer, leading to patchiness or segregation in isoprene and OH mixing ratios and average concentrations that appear to be incompatible with each other. One way of capturing this effect in models of atmospheric chemistry is to use a reduced effective rate constant for their reaction. Recent studies comparing atmospheric chemistry global/box models with field measurements have suggested that this effective rate reduction may be as large as 50 %; which is at the upper limit of that calculated using large eddy simulation models. To date there has only been one field campaign worldwide that has reported co-located measurements of isoprene and OH at the necessary temporal resolution to calculate the segregation of these compounds. However many campaigns have recorded sufficiently high resolution isoprene measurements to capture the small-scale fluctuations in its concentration. Assuming uniform distributions of other OH production and loss processes, we use a box model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by the spectrum of isoprene concentrations measured, as a virtual instrument, to estimate the variability in OH at a point and hence, to estimate the segregation intensity of isoprene and OH from high-frequency isoprene time series. The method successfully reproduces the only directly observed segregation, using

  8. The influence of small-scale variations in isoprene concentrations on atmospheric chemistry over a tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs such as isoprene constitute a large proportion of the global atmospheric oxidant sink. Their reactions in the atmosphere contribute to processes such as ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. However, over the tropical rainforest, where 50% of the global emissions of BVOCs are believed to occur, atmospheric chemistry models have been unable to simultaneously simulate the measured daytime concentration of isoprene and that of its principal oxidant, hydroxyl (OH. One reason for this model-measurement discrepancy may be incomplete mixing of isoprene within the convective boundary layer, leading to patchiness or segregation in isoprene and OH mixing ratios and average concentrations that appear to be incompatible with each other. One way of capturing this effect in models of atmospheric chemistry is to use a reduced effective rate constant for their reaction. Recent studies comparing atmospheric chemistry global/box models with field measurements have suggested that this effective rate reduction may be as large as 50%; which is at the upper limit of that calculated using large eddy simulation models. To date there has only been one field campaign worldwide that has reported co-located measurements of isoprene and OH at the necessary temporal resolution to calculate the segregation of these compounds. However many campaigns have recorded sufficiently high resolution isoprene measurements to capture the small-scale fluctuations in its concentration. We use a box model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by the spectrum of isoprene concentrations measured, to estimate segregation intensity of isoprene and OH from high-frequency isoprene time series. The method successfully reproduces the only directly observed segregation. The effective rate constant reduction for the reaction of isoprene and OH over a South-East Asian rainforest is calculated to be typically <15%. This estimate is not

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  11. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, K.; Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for {sup 60}Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.) 127 refs.

  12. Dose surgical sub-specialization influence survival in patients with colorectal cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cameron Platell; Daniel Lim; Nazreen Tajudeen; Ji-Li Tan; Karen Wong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To perform a review of patients with colorectal cancer to a community hospital and to compare the risk-adjusted survival between patients managed in general surgical units versus a colorectal unit.METHODS: The study evaluated all patients with colorectal cancer referred to either general surgical units or a colorectal unit from 1/1996 to 6/2001.These results were compared to a historical control group treated within general surgical units at the same hospital from 1/1989 to 12/1994. A KaplanMeier survival analysis compared the overall survivals (allcause mortality) between the groups. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the influence of a number of independent variables on survival. These variables included age, ASA score, disease stage, emergency surgery,adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, disease location, and surgical unit.RESULTS: There were 974 patients involved in this study.There were no significant differences in the demographic details for the three groups. Patients in the colorectal group were more likely to have rectal cancer and Stage T cancers,and less likely to have Stage Ⅱ cancers. Patients treated in the colorectal group had a significantly higher overall 5-year survival when compared with the general surgical group and the historical control group (56 % versus 45 % and 40 % respectively, P<0.01). Survival regression analysis identified age, ASA score, disease stage, adjuvant chemotherapy, and treatment in a colorectal unit (Hazards ratio: 0.67; 95 % CI: 0.53 to 0.84, P =0.0005), as significant independent predictors of survival.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there may be a survival advantage for patients with colon and rectal cancers being treated within a specialist colorectal surgical unit.

  13. Influence of Perioperative Blood Transfusion on Prognosis in Patients with Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Han; WANG Xiaona; WANG Baogui; PAN Yuan; LIU Ning; WANG Dianchang; HAO Xishan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of perioperative blood transfusion on the postoperative survival of patients with colon cancer. Methods: Univariate and multivariate retrospective analyses were performed on the survival in a total of 723 colon cancer patients which were treated surgically during a period of 10 years. Results: Kaplan-Meicr estimates showed that more than 800 mL perioperative blood transfusion was the survival predictor. Blood transfusion influenced significantly the prognosis of patients 40 years old and younger, those undergoing helicoloectomy left side, those with papillary adenocarcinoma,those with big tumors (diameter ≥8 em), those with stage I tumors, those with lymphatic node metastases and those without liver metastases. In multivariate analysis only the tumor location, radicality of operation, lymphatic invasion, liver metastasis, depth of tumor invasion and TNM stage retained their significance. Conclusion: Perioperative blood transfusion is the prognostic factor for patients with colon cancer to some extent. The indication of blood transfusion must be restricted strictly, specially in patients younger than 40 years old, with right side lesion, papillary adenocarcinoma, big tumors (diameter ≥8 em), stage I tumors and lymphatic node metastases or without liver metastases. But perioperative blood transfusion may not be deleterious for patients with staging Ⅳ disease and with distant metastases.

  14. All eyes on the patient: the influence of oncologists' nonverbal communication on breast cancer patients' trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, Marij A; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Bijker, Nina; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Vermeulen, Daniëlle M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2015-08-01

    Trust in the oncologist is crucial for breast cancer patients. It reduces worry, enhances decision making, and stimulates adherence. Optimal nonverbal communication by the oncologist, particularly eye contact, body posture, and smiling, presumably benefits patients' trust. We were the first to experimentally examine (1) how the oncologist's nonverbal behavior influences trust, and (2) individual differences in breast cancer patients' trust. Analogue patients (APs) viewed one out of eight versions of a video vignette displaying a consultation about chemotherapy treatment. All eight versions varied only in the oncologist's amount of eye contact (consistent vs. inconsistent), body posture (forward leaning vs. varying), and smiling (occasional smiling vs. no smiling). Primary outcome was trust in the observed oncologist (Trust in Oncologist Scale). 214 APs participated. Consistent eye contact led to stronger trust (β = -.13, p = .04). This effect was largely explained by lower educated patients, for whom the effect of consistent eye contact was stronger than for higher educated patients (β = .18, p = .01). A forward leaning body posture did not influence trust, nor did smiling. However, if the oncologist smiled more, he was perceived as more friendly (rs = .31, p nonverbal communication with breast cancer patients while simultaneously managing increased time pressure and computer use during the consultation. PMID:26227472

  15. Influence of Si substrate preparation on surface chemistry and morphology of L-CVD SnO2 thin films studied by XPS and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental studies of the influence of substrate preparation on the surface chemistry and surface morphology of the laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (L-CVD) SnO2 thin films are presented in this paper. The native Si(1 0 0) substrate cleaned by UHV thermal annealing (TA) as well as thermally oxidized Si(1 0 0) substrate cleaned by ion bombardment (IBA) have been used as the substrates. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been used for the control of surface chemistry of the substrates as well as of deposited films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to control the surface morphology of the L-CVD SnO2 thin films deposited on differently prepared substrates. Our XPS shows that the L-CVD SnO2 thin films deposited on thermally oxidized Si(1 0 0) substrate after cleaning with ion bombardment exhibit the same stoichiometry, i.e. ratio [O]/[Sn] = 1.30 as that of the layers deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrate previously cleaned by UHV prolonged heating. AFM shows that L-CVD SnO2 thin films deposited on thermally oxidized Si(1 0 0) substrate after cleaning with ion bombardment exhibit evidently increasing rough surface topography with respect to roughness, grain size range and maximum grain height as the L-CVD SnO2 thin films deposited on atomically clean Si substrate at the same surface chemistry (nonstoichiometry) reflect the higher substrate roughness after cleaning with ion bombardment.

  16. Influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Liu; Yu Wang; Guang-Yan Lei; Xiao-Hong Yan; Qiao Yang; Hai-Ping Zhu; Yi Geng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the influence of TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy on primary liver cancer patients’ malignant biological indicators.Methods:A total of 112 cases of primary liver cancer patients who received treatment in our hospital, Xijing Hospital and Tumor Hospital of Shaanxi Province were chosen as research subjects and divided into control group (TACE therapy alone) with 63 cases in it and observation group (TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy) with 49 cases according to different treatment, and then the levels of malignant biological indicators after 2 months of treatment were compared between two groups.Results:Serum VEGF, FGF and MMP levels of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group; serum AFP-L3, GP73, Sb7-H3, AFU and CatS levels were significantly lower than those of control group; serum ICAM-1, ESM-1 and uPA levels were lower than those of control group.Conclusion: TACE combined with radioactive seed radiotherapy can effectively reduce primary liver cancer patients’ serum malignant biological indicator levels, decrease the degree of malignancy of cancer cells and slow disease progression, and is an ideal treatment.

  17. Chemoresistance, Cancer Stem Cells, and miRNA Influences: The Case for Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Buhagiar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that develops most often in infants and children under the age of five years. Neuroblastoma originates within the peripheral sympathetic ganglia, with 30% of the cases developing within the adrenal medulla, although it can also occur within other regions of the body such as nerve tissue in the spinal cord, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate cellular pathways, differentiation, apoptosis, and stem cell maintenance. Such miRNAs regulate genes involved in cellular processes. Consequently, they are implicated in the regulation of a spectrum of signaling pathways within the cell. In essence, the role of miRNAs in the development of cancer is of utmost importance for the understanding of dysfunctional cellular pathways that lead to the conversion of normal cells into cancer cells. This review focuses on highlighting the recent, important implications of miRNAs within the context of neuroblastoma basic research efforts, particularly concerning miRNA influences on cancer stem cell pathology and chemoresistance pathology for this condition, together with development of translational medicine approaches for novel diagnostic tools and therapies for this neuroblastoma.

  18. Quality of life of cancer patients - definition, stages of survival and factors of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the review is to represent the state of assessment of quality of life of cancer patients in the investigation of different authors. It is important to know the basic ideas of quality of life during the complex treatment of cancer patients, in order to choose such methods that will lead to an improvement of their living. The definition of the concept 'quality of life', the stages that patients pass and the influencing factors should be familiar to the therapists. Today patients live longer after a complex treatment - it is important how and what challenges they are facing together with their relatives and the medical staff. The attempts to define and measure the quality of life of cancer patients date from the last ten years. This is a social demand to get such medical care, which should be at a certain level leading not only to a longer survival but this life to be of a higher quality. The patients' perceptions and preferences concerning quality of life must be given greater emphasis in cancer treatment decision making which will better his state after a competent explanation of therapists. A quality of life of every patient is as an individual problem as a part of the social health. A classification of the problem of quality of life will enlarge the oncological therapeutic concept

  19. The influence of smoking and other risk factors on the outcome after radiochemotherapy for anal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoking is an important risk factor for the development of cancer. Smoking during radiochemotherapy therapy may have a negative influence on prognosis. We evaluated the effect of smoking during radiochemotherapy on the outcome for patients with anal cancer. Sixty-eight patients (34 smokers, 34 non-smokers) treated by radiochemotherapy for anal cancer were analysed. The effect of smoking during radiochemotherapy and other risk factors (gender, T- and N category, tumor site, dose, therapy protocol) on disease-specific survival (DSS), local control (LC) and colostomy free survival (CFS) was evaluated. There was a significant difference in age and male:female ratio between the two groups. With a median follow up of 22 months (max. 119) DSS, LC, and CFS were 88%, 84% and 84%. A significant difference in local control between smokers (S) and non-smokers (NS) was found (S 74% vs. NS 94%, p = .03). For DSS and CFS a difference in terms of outcome between smokers and non-smokers was seen (DSS: S 82% vs. NS 96%, p = .19, CFS: S 75% vs. 91%, p = .15), which did not reach statistical significance. In multivariate analyses only gender had a significant association with LC and T category with CFS. The other risk factors did not reach statistical significance. Even though our evaluation reached statistical significance only in univariate analysis, we suggest, that the role of smoking during radiochemotherapy for anal cancer should not be ignored. The potential negative effect on prognosis should be explained to patients before therapy

  20. Influence of feed water distribution pipe replacement on the water chemistry in the steam generator at Loviisa NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imatran Voima Oy , (IVO) operates two Russian designed nuclear power plants of type VVER440/213. Unit 1 has been operating since 1977 and unit 2 since 1981. First damage of feed water distribution (FWD) pipes was observed in 1989. In closer examinations FWD-pipe T-connection and distribution nozzles suffered from severe erosion corrosion damage. Similar damages have been found also in other VVER-440 type NPPs. In 1994 the first FWD-pipe was replaced by a new design mounted over the tube bundle instead of the old FWD-pipe, which was located inside the tube bundle. The purpose of this paper is to describe the new FWD-pipe and discuss its effects on the steam generator chemistry. (author)

  1. Influence of strontium and the importance of glass chemistry and structure when designing bioactive glasses for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, M D; Hill, R G

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight some recent in vitro and in vivo studies of bioactive glasses containing strontium and to review selected literature on the in vitro and in vivo behaviour of bioactive glasses to relate this to the structure of the glass. The strontium-glass studies were performed well scientifically, but the results and conclusions could be misleading in terms of the effect of strontium, or more broadly glass chemistry, on the bioactivity and in vivo behaviour of bioactive glasses due to substitutions made on a weight basis. When strontium is substituted by weight for a lighter element such as calcium this will have a significant effect on structure and properties in particular biological response. PMID:20079468

  2. Influence of Operating and Water-Chemistry Parameters on Fuel Cladding Corrosion and Steel Corrosion Products Deposition on Cladding Surfaces (2nd RCM Abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposits of crud is to be proportional to the amount of corrosion products circulating in the circuit, therefore all models of mass transfer in the circuit include the change of corrosion products concentration and the corrosion rate in time, removing these products by filters and deposition. During decontamination of the circuit segments and equipment replacement local change of corrosion rate occurs which results in the increase of corrosion products concentration in the circuit and the increase of deposits on surfaces. If due to incorrect water chemistry conditions for corrosion products deposition in the core are created not only the activity of the coolant increases but the hydraulic resistance of the reactor also grows which results in the increase of the pressure drop at the reactor. The problem was studied on the example of WWER-440 units. The influence was established not only of water-chemistry parameters, but also of units characteristics such as pressure drop at the beginning of cycle, number of decontaminations, the age of fuel assemblies (FA) and their alignment. The mathematical model of rate rise of pressure drop through reactor (PDR) during cycle was made. (author)

  3. Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) Among Mexican Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Carvajal, Scott C; Robles-Garcia, Rebeca; Agraz, Francisco Páez; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Martinez, Maria Elena

    2015-08-01

    Lacking in the literature are data addressing the extent to which changes in reproductive and lifestyle factors predispose women in developing nations to higher breast cancer rates, and the degree to which these are due to globalization influences. This article describes the development and psychometric assessment of an instrument intended to measure global, predominantly U.S., influences on breast cancer risk profile among women residing in Mexico. Using investigator consensus and a focus group methodology, the Measure of Globalization Influence on Health Risk (MGIHR) was developed and completed by 341 women. Psychometric analysis support the use of an 11-item Consumerism and Modernity scale and 7-item Reproductive Control and Gender Role scale. The MGIHR is a valid and reliable instrument for understanding changing lifestyle and reproductive factors for breast cancer risk and may provide a more complete understanding of breast cancer development and needed interventions. PMID:24859806

  4. Cancer and aging: a multidisciplinary medicinal chemistry approach on relevant biological targets such as proteasome, sirtuins and interleukin 6

    OpenAIRE

    Parenti, Marco Daniele

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that ageing and cancer have common origins due to internal and environmental stress and share some common hallmarks such as genomic instability, epigenetic alteration, aberrant telomeres, inflammation and immune injury. Moreover, ageing is involved in a number of events responsible for carcinogenesis and cancer development at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Ageing could represent a “blockbuster” market because the target patient group includes potentially every...

  5. The Influence of Phorbol Ester on the Effect of Tamoxifen in Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the activity of kinases in the growth factor signal transduction pathway and the development of resistance of breast cancer to tamoxifen, reporter gene regulated by the regulating fragment of CCD1 was transfected into the MCF-7 cells, and the influence of tamoxifen on the reporter gene expression was examined under different conditions of TPA treatment. Our results showed that the reporter gene expression was inhibited by tamoxifen and promoted by TPA. Furthermore, tamoxifen exerts an agonist effect on the reporter gene expression when the cells was treated by TPA previously for 12 h. It is concluded that TPA could induce estrogen-like effect of tamoxifen on estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells and it may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the development of tamoxifen resistance.

  6. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) influences androgen receptor (AR) function in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), founding member of PKD protein family, is down-regulated in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrate that PKD1 and androgen receptor (AR) are present as a protein complex in PCa cells. PKD1 is associated with a transcriptional complex which contains AR and promoter sequence of the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) gene. Ectopic expression of wild type PKD1 and the kinase dead mutant PKD1 (K628W) attenuated the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR in prostate cancer cells and yeast cells indicating that PKD1 can affect AR transcription activity, whereas knocking down PKD1 enhanced the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR. Co-expression of kinase dead mutant with AR significantly inhibited androgen-mediated cell proliferation in both LNCaP and DU145 PC cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that PKD1 can influence AR function in PCa cells

  7. Concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the cancer pain experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Mih; Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; Pantilat, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe some of the concepts within the Chinese culture that influence the sociocultural dimension of the cancer pain experience. The major concepts that influence Chinese patients' perspectives on cancer pain and its management include Taoism/energy, Buddhism, and Confucianism. Within the beliefs of Taoism/energy, pain occurs if Qi, or blood circulation, is blocked. To relieve pain, the blockage of Qi/blood must be removed and the person needs to maintain harmony with the universe. Within the beliefs of Buddhism, pain/suffering is a power, unwanted but existent, that comes from a barrier in the last life; from the objective world; from a person's own sensation; or from other people, animals, and materials. Only by following the 8 right ways (ie, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration) can an individual end the path of pain/suffering. A Confucian believes that pain is an essential element of life, a "trial" or a "sacrifice." Therefore, when a person suffers with pain, he or she would rather endure the pain and not report it to a clinician until the pain becomes unbearable. Oncology nurses who care for Chinese patients need to understand the fundamental beliefs that influence the sociocultural dimension of the pain experience for these patients. This information will assist the oncology nurse in developing a more effective pain management plan. PMID:18490884

  8. Discovery of carboxyethylpyrroles (CEPs): critical insights into AMD, autism, cancer, and wound healing from basic research on the chemistry of oxidized phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Robert G; Hong, Li; Hollyfield, Joe G

    2011-11-21

    Basic research, exploring the hypothesis that 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) modifications of proteins are generated nonenzymatically in vivo is delivering a bonanza of molecular mechanistic insights into age-related macular degeneration, autism, cancer, and wound healing. CEPs are produced through covalent modification of protein lysyl ε-amino groups by γ-hydroxyalkenal phospholipids that are formed by oxidative cleavage of docosahexaenate-containing phospholipids. Chemical synthesis of CEP-modified proteins and the production of highly specific antibodies that recognize them preceded and facilitated their detection in vivo and enabled exploration of their biological occurrence and activities. This investigational approach, from the chemistry of biomolecules to disease phenotype, is proving to be remarkably productive. PMID:21875030

  9. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  10. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  11. Malignant bowel obstruction in advanced cancer patients: epidemiology, management, and factors influencing spontaneous resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuca A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Tuca1, Ernest Guell2, Emilio Martinez-Losada3, Nuria Codorniu41Cancer and Hematological Diseases Institute, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Palliative Care Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 3Palliative Care Unit, Institut Català Oncologia Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Department, Institut Català Oncologia L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO is a frequent complication in advanced cancer patients, especially in those with abdominal tumors. Clinical management of MBO requires a specific and individualized approach that is based on disease prognosis and the objectives of care. The global prevalence of MBO is estimated to be 3% to 15% of cancer patients. Surgery should always be considered for patients in the initial stages of the disease with a preserved general status and a single level of occlusion. Less invasive approaches such as duodenal or colonic stenting should be considered when surgery is contraindicated in obstructions at the single level. The priority of care for inoperable and consolidated MBO is to control symptoms and promote the maximum level of comfort possible. The spontaneous resolution of an inoperable obstructive process is observed in more than one third of patients. The mean survival is of no longer than 4–5 weeks in patients with consolidated MBO. Polymodal medical treatment based on a combination of glucocorticoids, strong opioids, antiemetics, and antisecretory drugs achieves very high symptomatic control. This review focuses on the epidemiological aspects, diagnosis, surgical criteria, medical management, and factors influencing the spontaneous resolution of MBO in advanced cancer patients.Keywords: malignant bowel obstruction, cancer, intestinal obstruction, bowel occlusion

  12. Influence of Diet and Tobacco Smoking on Pancreatic Cancer Incidence in Poland in 1960–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Jarosz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between pancreatic cancer incidence and selected dietary factors, alcohol consumption, and tobacco smoking in Poland in 1960–2008. Data on pancreatic cancer morbidity were derived from the National Cancer Registry and on food consumption from the national food balance sheets. In 1960–1989 correlations were found between pancreatic cancer incidence rates and energy (0.60 for males and 0.57 for females, cholesterol (0.87 and 0.80, fibre (−0.84 and −0.89 and folate (−0.45 and −0.49 intake, the consumption of total fats (0.94 and 0.91, animal fats (0,90 and 0,82, sugar (0.88 and 0.87, cereals (−0.93 and −0.91, and alcohol (0.86 and 0.82. In 1990–2008 morbidity correlated with the consumption of red meat (0.67 and 0.48, poultry (−0.88 and −0.57, and fruit (−0.62 and −0.50. Correlation with tobacco smoking was observed in the whole studied period (0.55 and 0.44. Increased incidence of pancreatic cancer in 1960–1995 was probably related to adverse dietary patterns up to 1989, especially high consumption of fats, sugar, and alcohol. Further positive changes in the diet such as lowering red meat consumption and increasing fruit consumption could influence incidence reduction in recent years. Also changes in tobacco smoking could affect the morbidity.

  13. Influence of operating and water-chemistry parameters on fuel cladding corrosion and deposition of corrosion products on cladding surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Rodionov, Y.A., E-mail: kritsky@givnipiet.spb.ru, E-mail: alemaskina@givnipiet.ru [Leading Inst. ' VNIPIET' , Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    A description of mass transfer mechanism of corrosion products in the primary coolant circuit is a complicated problem. The deposits of crud is to be proportional to the amount of corrosion products circulating in the primary coolant circuit, therefore all models of mass transfer in the circuit include the change of corrosion products concentration and the corrosion rate in time, removing these products by filters and deposition. Decontamination of the circuit equipment and replacement work needs lead to a local change of corrosion rate which results in the increase of corrosion products concentration in the circuit and the increase of deposits on surfaces. If due to incorrect water chemistry conditions for corrosion products deposition in the core are created not only the activity of the coolant increases but the hydraulic resistance of the reactor also grows which results in the increase of the pressure drop at the reactor. The phenomenon of 'pressure drop' which takes place in NPP with VVER reactors was considered. The reasons of this phenomenon are the following: the great removal of corrosion products (CP) from steam generator surfaces after decontamination, change of CP behavior and then consequent deposit of CP on the fuel element surfaces; and, sub-cooled boiling takes place on the some of fuel element and results in the acceleration of corrosion products deposit, the increase of nuclide activation period and coolant radioactivity. A model was developed to explain pressure drop rise in-core and deposits redistribution in the core and in the primary circuit of NPP with VVER-440. The physical-chemical basis of the model is the transport corrosion products dependence on temperature, pH{sub T} value of coolant, and correlation between rates of corrosion products (Fe) formation (after steam generators decontamination) and their removing from the circuit. The aim of our modeling is to predict the growth of pressure difference on the basis of regular

  14. Surface Chemistry of Polymers. The Influence of Thermal and Chemical Treatments on the Surface Properties of Polyvinylchloride

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanneret, C.; Stoeckli, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    The influence of thermal and chemical treatments (tetrahydrofuran and dioxane) on the adsorption properties of polyvinylchloride is investigated by gas chromatographic methods. It is shown, that heating to the glass-transition temperature has an erasing effect. Methanol was used as the main molecular probe.

  15. Influence of the pathological psychological state of cancer patients on their decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskó, A; Fleischmann, T; Molnár, Z; Schneider, T; Várady, E

    1996-01-01

    The diagnosis of cancer in many cases provokes a crisis, resulting in an increase of regression and defence mechanisms (splitting, projective identification, projection, denial, repression). This article reviews the increased sensitivity, the partial and temporary narrowing of consciousness, and the weakening of reality control. In many cases fluctuating depersonalisation and derealisation develop. At our Institute we performed a complex psychological examination of 41 patients, suffering from malignant lymphoma, immediately after informing them of the diagnosis but prior to their first treatment. The psychological examination of volunteering patients involved an initial interview, Rorschach and Szondi projective tests, a Wechsler intelligence test and a discussion of the results with the patient. The relatively frequent temporary pathological psychic conditions exert an influence on the decisions of patients make about their treatment and interventions, and may also influence the doctor patient relationship. PMID:8771295

  16. Influence of the carbon fiber surface microstructure on the surface chemistry generated by a thermo-chemical surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautard, F.; Ozcan, S.; Paulauskas, F.; Spruiell, J. E.; Meyer, H.; Lance, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    Carbon fibers made of textile and aerospace grade polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers were surface treated by a continuous gas phase thermochemical treatment. The surface chemistry generated by the surface treatment was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface and the average entire microstructure of the fibers were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Depending on the grade of the precursor, the final surface concentration of oxygen was comprised between 14% and 24%, whereas the typical commercial electrochemical surface treatments led to concentrations of around 8% with the same fibers. The final concentration of oxygen was directly correlated to the size of the crystallites which was a function of the grade of the polyacrylonitrile precursor and to the corresponding surface microstructure. The thermochemical surface treatment enabled a better control of the nature of the oxygen-containing functionalities as well. Whatever the grade of the precursor, desired hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid functionalities were preferably generated, which is observed to be difficult with electrochemical surface treatments.

  17. Soil moisture and chemistry influence diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associating with willow along an hydrologic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Sonya R; Savage, Jessica A; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine M; Peay, Kabir G

    2016-01-01

    Influences of soil environment and willow host species on ectomycorrhizal fungi communities was studied across an hydrologic gradient in temperate North America. Soil moisture, organic matter and pH strongly predicted changes in fungal community composition. In contrast, increased fungal richness strongly correlated with higher plant-available phosphorus. The 93 willow trees sampled for ectomycorrhizal fungi included seven willow species. Host identity did not influence fungal richness or community composition, nor was there strong evidence of willow host preference for fungal species. Network analysis suggests that these mutualist interaction networks are not significantly nested or modular. Across a strong environmental gradient, fungal abiotic niche determined the fungal species available to associate with host plants within a habitat. PMID:26622067

  18. Does amount or type of alcohol influence the risk of prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Katrine; Grønbaek, Morten; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2002-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men, and it is unknown whether alcohol is associated with the development of prostate cancer.......Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men, and it is unknown whether alcohol is associated with the development of prostate cancer....

  19. CYP2D6 polymorphisms influence the efficacy of adjuvant tamoxifen in Thai breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirachainan E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ekaphop Sirachainan,1 Sureerat Jaruhathai,1 Narumol Trachu,2 Ravat Panvichian,1 Thitiya Sirisinha,1 Touch Ativitavas,1 Vorachai Ratanatharathorn,1 Montri Chamnanphon,3 Chonlaphat Sukasem31Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Research Center, Division of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, 3Division of Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, ThailandAim: We evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of CYP2D6 to identify those that influence the efficiency of tamoxifen in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer through a matched case–control study.Methods: Peripheral blood DNA was collected from 20 patients with disease recurrence during adjuvant tamoxifen treatment and from 19 patients who had completed 5 years of tamoxifen therapy without recurrence of breast cancer. CYP2D6*4 (1846G > A; rs3892097, CYP2D6*10 (100C > T, rs1065852, and CYP2D6*5 (deletion were genotyped. The correlation between disease-free survival (DFS and genotype and clinical outcome were assessed using Kaplan–Meier analysis and a log-rank test.Results: We found the allelic frequency of CYP2D6*10 during this study. Patients with the CYP2D6*10 homozygous variant T/T genotype had a significantly shorter median of DFS than those with C/T (P = 0.036, but DFS was not significantly different from that of patients with the C/C genotype (P = 0.316. One patient who was a carrier both of CYP2D6 G/A (1846G > A and T/T (100C > T had DFS of 22.7 months.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that CYP2D6*10/*10 was significantly associated with shorter DFS in Thai breast cancer patients receiving tamoxifen. This was a pilot study investigating the correlation of CYP2D6 polymorphisms and their influence on clinical outcomes in Thai estrogen receptor

  20. The host microenvironment influences prostate cancer invasion, systemic spread, bone colonization, and osteoblastic metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourik S Ganguly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death in men worldwide. Most PCa patients die with osteoblastic bone metastases. What triggers PCa metastasis to the bone and what causes osteoblastic lesions remain unanswered. A major contributor to PCa metastasis is the host microenvironment. In this revew, we address how the primary tumor microenvironment influences PCa metastasis via integrins, extracellular proteases, and transient epithelia-mesenchymal transition (EMT to promote PCa progression, invasion, and metastasis. We discuss how the bone microenvironment influences metastasis; where chemotactic cytokines favor bone homing, adhesion molecules promote colonization, and bone-derived signals induce osteoblastic lesions. Animal models that fully recapitulate human PCa progression from primary tumor to bone metastasis are needed to understand the PCa pathophysiology that leads to bone metastasis. Better delineation of the specific processes involved in PCa bone metastasize is needed to prevent or treat metastatic PCa. Therapeutic regimens that focus on the tumor microenvironment could add to the PCa pharmacopeia.

  1. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Bird

    Full Text Available Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m; although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ∼2 to ∼5.5%, relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ∼35.5 to ∼43%. The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (∼100 m buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality.

  2. Spatial differences in East scotia ridge hydrothermal vent food webs: influences of chemistry, microbiology and predation on trophodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D K Reid

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal vents on the East Scotia Ridge are the first to be explored in the Antarctic and are dominated by large peltospiroid gastropods, stalked barnacles (Vulcanolepas sp. and anomuran crabs (Kiwa sp. but their food webs are unknown. Vent fluid and macroconsumer samples were collected at three vent sites (E2, E9N and E9S at distances of tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres apart with contrasting vent fluid chemistries to describe trophic interactions and identify potential carbon fixation pathways using stable isotopes. δ(13C of dissolved inorganic carbon from vent fluids ranged from -4.6‰ to 0.8‰ at E2 and from -4.4‰ to 1.5‰ at E9. The lowest macroconsumer δ(13C was observed in peltospiroid gastropods (-30.0‰ to -31.1‰ and indicated carbon fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle by endosymbiotic gamma-Proteobacteria. Highest δ(13C occurred in Kiwa sp. (-19.0‰ to -10.5‰, similar to that of the epibionts sampled from their ventral setae. Kiwa sp. δ(13C differed among sites, which were attributed to spatial differences in the epibiont community and the relative contribution of carbon fixed via the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA and CBB cycles assimilated by Kiwa sp. Site differences in carbon fixation pathways were traced into higher trophic levels e.g. a stichasterid asteroid that predates on Kiwa sp. Sponges and anemones at the periphery of E2 assimilated a proportion of epipelagic photosynthetic primary production but this was not observed at E9N. Differences in the δ(13C and δ(34S values of vent macroconsumers between E2 and E9 sites suggest the relative contributions of photosynthetic and chemoautotrophic carbon fixation (rTCA v CBB entering the hydrothermal vent food webs vary between the sites.

  3. External influences and priority-setting for anti-cancer agents: a case study of media coverage in adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fralick John

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Setting priorities for the funding of new anti-cancer agents is becoming increasingly complex. The funding of adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer has brought this dilemma to the fore. In this paper we review external factors that may influence decision-making bodies and present a case study of media response in Ontario, Canada to adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer. Methods A comprehensive search of the databases of Canadian national and local newspapers and television was performed. Articles pertaining to trastuzumab in adjuvant breast cancer as well as 17 other anti-cancer drugs and indications were retrieved. The search period was from the date when individual trial results were announced to the date funding was made available in Ontario. Results During the 2.6 months between the release of the trastuzumab results to funding approval in Ontario, we identified 51 episodes of media coverage. For the 17 other drugs/indications (7 breast and 10 non-breast, the median time to funding approval was 31 months (range 14–46. Other recent major advances in oncology such as adjuvant vinorelbine/cisplatin for resected NSCLC and docetaxel for advanced prostate cancer received considerably less media attention (17 media reports for each than trastuzumab. The median number of media reports for breast cancer drugs was 4.5 compared to 2.5 for non-breast cancer drugs (p = 0.56. Conclusion Priority-setting for novel anti-cancer agents is a complex process that tries to ensure fair use of constrained resources to fund therapies with the best evidence of clinical benefit. However, this process is subject to external factors including the influence of media, patient advocates, politicians, and industry. The data in this case study serve to illustrate the significant involvement one (or all of these external factors may play in the debate over priority-setting.

  4. Does diabetes mellitus influence the efficacy of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of cervical cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Ng, Koon-Kwan [Chang Gung University, Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan); See, Lai-Chu [Chang Gung University, Biostatistics Consulting Center/Department of Public Health, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh [Chang Gung University, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Ji-Hong [Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan); Hsueh, Swei [Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan)

    2005-06-01

    Compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) may have additional value in the assessment of primary and recurrent cervical cancer. However, the degree of tumour uptake of {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake is sometimes influenced by diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, we conducted this prospective study to compare the diagnostic ability of FDG-PET in patients with cervical cancer complicated by DM and those without DM. Patients with untreated locally advanced primary or clinically curable recurrent cervical carcinoma were enrolled. Both FDG-PET and MRI/CT scans were performed within 2 weeks. Patients were categorised into the following groups: hyperglycaemic DM (fasting blood sugar >126 mg/dl), euglycaemic DM and non-DM. The lesions were confirmed histologically or by clinical follow-up. The receiver operating characteristic curve method, with calculation of the area under the curve (AUC), was used to evaluate the discriminative power. From February 2001 to January 2003, 219 patients (75 with primary and 144 with recurrent cervical cancer) were eligible for analysis. Sixteen had hyperglycaemic DM, 12 had euglycaemic DM and 191 were in the non-DM group. The diagnostic power of PET in the hyperglycaemic DM, euglycaemic DM and non-DM groups did not differ significantly with regard to the identification of either metastatic lesions (AUC, 0.967/0.947/0.925, P>0.05) or primary tumours/local recurrence (AUC, 0.950/0.938/0.979, P>0.05). Considering all DM patients, PET showed a significantly higher detection power than MRI/CT scans in respect of metastatic lesions (AUC=0.956 vs 0.824, P=0.012). In comparison with its accuracy in non-DM patients, the accuracy of PET in cervical cancer patients with mild to moderate DM was not significantly reduced. (orig.)

  5. Influence of Spirituality and Modesty on Acceptance of Self-Sampling for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen O Dareng

    Full Text Available Whereas systematic screening programs have reduced the incidence of cervical cancer in developed countries, the incidence remains high in developing countries. Among several barriers to uptake of cervical cancer screening, the roles of religious and cultural factors such as modesty have been poorly studied. Knowledge about these factors is important because of the potential to overcome them using strategies such as self-collection of cervico-vaginal samples. In this study we evaluate the influence of spirituality and modesty on the acceptance of self-sampling for cervical cancer screening.We enrolled 600 participants in Nigeria between August and October 2014 and collected information on spirituality and modesty using two scales. We used principal component analysis to extract scores for spirituality and modesty and logistic regression models to evaluate the association between spirituality, modesty and preference for self-sampling. All analyses were performed using STATA 12 (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, USA.Some 581 (97% women had complete data for analysis. Most (69% were married, 50% were Christian and 44% were from the south western part of Nigeria. Overall, 19% (110/581 of the women preferred self-sampling to being sampled by a health care provider. Adjusting for age and socioeconomic status, spirituality, religious affiliation and geographic location were significantly associated with preference for self-sampling, while modesty was not significantly associated. The multivariable OR (95% CI, p-value for association with self-sampling were 0.88 (0.78-0.99, 0.03 for spirituality, 1.69 (1.09-2.64, 0.02 for religious affiliation and 0.96 (0.86-1.08, 0.51 for modesty.Our results show the importance of taking cultural and religious beliefs and practices into consideration in planning health interventions like cervical cancer screening. To succeed, public health interventions and the education to promote it must be related to the

  6. Does diabetes mellitus influence the efficacy of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of cervical cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) may have additional value in the assessment of primary and recurrent cervical cancer. However, the degree of tumour uptake of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake is sometimes influenced by diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, we conducted this prospective study to compare the diagnostic ability of FDG-PET in patients with cervical cancer complicated by DM and those without DM. Patients with untreated locally advanced primary or clinically curable recurrent cervical carcinoma were enrolled. Both FDG-PET and MRI/CT scans were performed within 2 weeks. Patients were categorised into the following groups: hyperglycaemic DM (fasting blood sugar >126 mg/dl), euglycaemic DM and non-DM. The lesions were confirmed histologically or by clinical follow-up. The receiver operating characteristic curve method, with calculation of the area under the curve (AUC), was used to evaluate the discriminative power. From February 2001 to January 2003, 219 patients (75 with primary and 144 with recurrent cervical cancer) were eligible for analysis. Sixteen had hyperglycaemic DM, 12 had euglycaemic DM and 191 were in the non-DM group. The diagnostic power of PET in the hyperglycaemic DM, euglycaemic DM and non-DM groups did not differ significantly with regard to the identification of either metastatic lesions (AUC, 0.967/0.947/0.925, P>0.05) or primary tumours/local recurrence (AUC, 0.950/0.938/0.979, P>0.05). Considering all DM patients, PET showed a significantly higher detection power than MRI/CT scans in respect of metastatic lesions (AUC=0.956 vs 0.824, P=0.012). In comparison with its accuracy in non-DM patients, the accuracy of PET in cervical cancer patients with mild to moderate DM was not significantly reduced. (orig.)

  7. Experimentally calibrated computational chemistry of tryptophan hydroxylase: Trans influence, hydrogen-bonding, and 18-electron rule govern O-2-activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Lærke Tvedebrink; Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Boesen, Jane;

    2010-01-01

    Insight into the nature of oxygen activation in tryptophan hydroxylase has been obtained from density functional computations. Conformations of O2-bound intermediates have been studied with oxygen trans to glutamate and histidine, respectively. An O2-adduct with O2 trans to histidine (Ohis) and a...... peroxo intermediate with peroxide trans to glutamate (Pglu) were found to be consistent (0.57–0.59 mm/s) with experimental Mössbauer isomer shifts (0.55 mm/s) and had low computed free energies. The weaker trans influence of histidine is shown to give rise to a bent O2 coordination mode with O2 pointing...

  8. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Skoog Lambert; Shaw Peter; Pawitan Yudi; Nordgren Hans; Miller Lance D; Liu Edison T; Lin Chin-Yo; Huang Fei; Bjöhle Judith; Ploner Alexander; Hall Per; Smeds Johanna; Wedrén Sara; Öhd John; Bergh Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) pr...

  9. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Polyacrylate coatings with controlled surface functionalities. • Impact of surface chemistry and morphology on dengue antibody immobilization. • Enhancement of detection signal as a result of bio-activation of polymer surface. - Abstract: Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional “spacers”, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups

  10. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.djordjevic@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana [Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Marel, Cees van der [Philips Materials Analysis, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koole, Leo H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University (Netherlands)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Polyacrylate coatings with controlled surface functionalities. • Impact of surface chemistry and morphology on dengue antibody immobilization. • Enhancement of detection signal as a result of bio-activation of polymer surface. - Abstract: Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional “spacers”, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups

  11. Influence of nanometer scale film structure of ZDDP tribofilm on Its mechanical properties: A computational chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the influence of a nanometer scale film structure of a tribofilm generated from zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) anti-wear additive on its mechanical properties using a combined molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element (FE) method. The frictional behavior of an interface between a native iron oxide layer on steel surface and zinc metaphosphate - regarded as a model material of ZDDP tribofilm - was firstly studied using the MD method. The results showed that the iron atoms in the oxide layer diffused into the phosphate layer during the friction process. The zinc atoms in the phosphate layer also diffused into the oxide layer. Significant interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms was observed with increasing simulation time. Thus, metallic phosphate with a gradient composition of iron and zinc atoms was formed on the phosphate/oxide interface. We then constructed an axisymmetric nanoindentation simulation model from the MD-derived structures at a certain simulation time and carried out a FE calculation. As a result, we found that the rubbed ZDDP tribofilm, including the phosphate with the gradient composition of metallic atoms, showed larger contact stiffness and hardness. The combined MD/FE simulation indicates that the tribofilm becomes stiffer and harder due to the interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms on the tribofilm/oxide interface. We have found that the gradient composition formation in ZDDP tribofilm during friction process influences on its mechanical properties.

  12. Influence of nanometer scale film structure of ZDDP tribofilm on Its mechanical properties: A computational chemistry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Tasuku; Kuriaki, Takanori; Morita, Yusuke [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Suzuki, Ai [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Koyama, Michihisa [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takaba, Hiromitsu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Del Carpio, Carlos A. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kubo, Momoji [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-701 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Minfray, Clotilde; Martin, Jean-Michel [Laboratory of Tribology and Dynamical Systems, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36, avenue Guy de Collongue 69134, ECULLY Cedex (France); Miyamoto, Akira, E-mail: miyamoto@aki.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1302 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    We investigated the influence of a nanometer scale film structure of a tribofilm generated from zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) anti-wear additive on its mechanical properties using a combined molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element (FE) method. The frictional behavior of an interface between a native iron oxide layer on steel surface and zinc metaphosphate - regarded as a model material of ZDDP tribofilm - was firstly studied using the MD method. The results showed that the iron atoms in the oxide layer diffused into the phosphate layer during the friction process. The zinc atoms in the phosphate layer also diffused into the oxide layer. Significant interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms was observed with increasing simulation time. Thus, metallic phosphate with a gradient composition of iron and zinc atoms was formed on the phosphate/oxide interface. We then constructed an axisymmetric nanoindentation simulation model from the MD-derived structures at a certain simulation time and carried out a FE calculation. As a result, we found that the rubbed ZDDP tribofilm, including the phosphate with the gradient composition of metallic atoms, showed larger contact stiffness and hardness. The combined MD/FE simulation indicates that the tribofilm becomes stiffer and harder due to the interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms on the tribofilm/oxide interface. We have found that the gradient composition formation in ZDDP tribofilm during friction process influences on its mechanical properties.

  13. Influence of nanometer scale film structure of ZDDP tribofilm on Its mechanical properties: A computational chemistry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Tasuku; Kuriaki, Takanori; Morita, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ai; Koyama, Michihisa; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Kubo, Momoji; Minfray, Clotilde; Martin, Jean-Michel; Miyamoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the influence of a nanometer scale film structure of a tribofilm generated from zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) anti-wear additive on its mechanical properties using a combined molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element (FE) method. The frictional behavior of an interface between a native iron oxide layer on steel surface and zinc metaphosphate - regarded as a model material of ZDDP tribofilm - was firstly studied using the MD method. The results showed that the iron atoms in the oxide layer diffused into the phosphate layer during the friction process. The zinc atoms in the phosphate layer also diffused into the oxide layer. Significant interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms was observed with increasing simulation time. Thus, metallic phosphate with a gradient composition of iron and zinc atoms was formed on the phosphate/oxide interface. We then constructed an axisymmetric nanoindentation simulation model from the MD-derived structures at a certain simulation time and carried out a FE calculation. As a result, we found that the rubbed ZDDP tribofilm, including the phosphate with the gradient composition of metallic atoms, showed larger contact stiffness and hardness. The combined MD/FE simulation indicates that the tribofilm becomes stiffer and harder due to the interdiffusion of iron and zinc atoms on the tribofilm/oxide interface. We have found that the gradient composition formation in ZDDP tribofilm during friction process influences on its mechanical properties.

  14. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.)

  15. Social Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Robert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    International audience This article is both an essay to propose social chemistry as a new scientific discipline, and a preface of the book Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World. Environmental chemistry is a fast emerging discipline aiming at the understanding the fate of pollutants in ecosystems and at designing novel processes that are safe for ecosystems. Past pollution should be cleaned, future pollution should be predicted and avoided (Lichtfouse et al., 2005a). Such advices ...

  16. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  17. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  18. Biogeochemical Influences on the Determination of Water Chemistry in a Temperate Forest Basin: Factors Determining the pH value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohte, Nobuhito; Tokuchi, Naoko; Suzuki, Masakazu

    1995-01-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of pH determination in a temperate forest watershed in Japan, intensive hydrochemical observations that included in situ measurement of dissolved pCO2 were carried out in 1991 and 1992. From the variations of observed pCO2 and pH and estimated alkalinity associated with the hydrological process, the factors determining pH were described. There were two hydrological processes which have different determining hydrochemical processes: (1) rainfall and throughfall to infiltration in the soil layer to stable groundwater and (2) stable groundwater to spring water to stream water. In the first process, pH is influenced by infiltration from the low pCO2 layer to the high CO2 layer and by an increase of alkalinity, which is mainly caused by an exchange reaction and chemical weathering. In the shallow soil layer the protons for alkalinity generation are supplied by acid deposits from rainfall and throughfall, microbial acid production, and CO2 dissolution reaction. In the deeper layer an increase of alkalinity caused by Na+ generation becomes remarkable as depth increases. This process is strongly controlled by chemical weathering. In the second process, pH increases with CO2 degassing around the spring point. The alkalinity is kept at the same level as that of the stable groundwater. These results suggests that the biochemically supplied CO2 in soil not only directly controls the pH determination, but also has influences on the alkalinity generation as another determining factor of pH.

  19. The Influence of Surface Coal Mining on Runoff Processes and Stream Chemistry in the Elk Valley, British Colubmbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S. K.; Wellen, C. C.; Shatilla, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surface mining is a common method of accessing coal. In high-elevation environments, vegetation and soils are typically removed prior to the blasting of overburden rock, thereby allowing access to mineable ore. Following this, the removed overburden rock is deposited in adjacent valleys as waste rock spoils. Previous research has identified that areas downstream of surface coal mining have impaired water quality, yet there is limited information about the interaction of hydrology and geochemistry across a range of mining conditions, particularly at the headwater scale. Here, we provide an analysis of an extensive long-term data set of geochemistry and flows across a gradient of coal mining in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada. This work is part of a broader R&D program examining the influence of surface coal mining on hydrological and water quality responses in the Elk Valley aimed at informing effective management responses. Results indicate that water from waste rock piles has an ionic profile distinct from unimpacted catchments. While the concentration of geochemicals increased with the degree of mine impact, the control of hydrological transport capacity over geochemical export did not vary with degree of mine impact. Geochemical export in mine-influenced catchments was limited more strongly by transport capacity than supply, implying that more water moving through the waste rock mobilized more geochemicals. Placement of waste rock within the catchment (headwaters or outlet) did not affect chemical concentrations but did alter the timing with which chemically distinct water mixed. This work advances on results reported earlier using empirical models of selenium loading and further highlights the importance of limiting water inputs into waste rock piles.

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: age differences in factors influencing patients' treatment decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen ML

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mikaela L Jorgensen,1,2 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon1,31Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: Older colorectal cancer patients are significantly less likely than younger patients to receive guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy. Previous research has indicated that patient refusal of treatment is a contributing factor. This study aimed to identify potential barriers to adjuvant chemotherapy use in older patients by examining the associations between patient age, factors influencing chemotherapy treatment decisions, and preferences for information and decision-making involvement.Patients and methods: Sixty-eight patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer in Sydney, Australia, within the previous 24 months completed a self-administered survey.Results: Fear of dying, health status, age, quality of life, and understanding treatment procedures and effects were significantly more important to older patients (aged ≥65 years than younger patients in deciding whether to accept chemotherapy (all P < 0.05. Reducing the risk of cancer returning and physician trust were important factors for all patients. Practical barriers such as traveling for treatment and cost were rated lowest. Older patients preferred less information and involvement in treatment decision making than younger patients. However, 60% of the older group wanted detailed information about chemotherapy, and 83% wanted some involvement in decision making. Those preferring less information and involvement still rated many factors as important in their decision making, including understanding treatment procedures and effects.Conclusion: A range of factors appears to influence

  1. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  2. Influence of sex hormone and cancer prevention by soy products on liver and breast cancers in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer development has been well documented by a combination of genetic events and environmental factors. Initiation of cancer cells to clinical cancers is a life long event. The events are classified as initiation of transformed cell, promotion and progression. Gender is another key factor for the occurrence of solid cancers in liver and stomach in the males and thyroid in the females. Development of cancers may be intervened by consumption of foods and food additives containing proven anti-cancerous chemicals. In this review application of soy products of miso and isoflavones have been assessed in terms of prevention and diminution of cancer in experimental models on liver tumors in mice and breast carcinomas in rats. (author)

  3. The Influence of Absolute and Comparative Risk Perceptions on Cervical Cancer Screening and the Mediating Role of Cancer Worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyan; Nan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the interrelationships between cancer risk perceptions (absolute and comparative risk perceptions), cancer worry, and cervical cancer screening. Using a nationally representative survey data set (N = 2,304) from the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey Circle 1, we found that although neither absolute risk perceptions nor comparative risk perceptions exerted a direct impact on women's compliance with the cervical cancer screening recommendation (i.e., that women ages 21 to 65 obtain Pap smear every 3 years; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 2012 ), both types of risk perceptions had an indirect effect on cervical cancer screening through the mediation of cancer worry. These results suggest a primal role of affect in health decision making. Implications of the findings for cancer risk communication are discussed. PMID:26312444

  4. The adsorption of biomolecules to multi-walled carbon nanotubes is influenced by both pulmonary surfactant lipids and surface chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During production and processing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, they may be inhaled and may enter the pulmonary circulation. It is essential that interactions with involved body fluids like the pulmonary surfactant, the blood and others are investigated, particularly as these interactions could lead to coating of the tubes and may affect their chemical and physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize the possible coatings of different functionalized MWCNTs in a cell free environment. Results To simulate the first contact in the lung, the tubes were coated with pulmonary surfactant and subsequently bound lipids were characterized. The further coating in the blood circulation was simulated by incubating the tubes in blood plasma. MWCNTs were amino (NH2- and carboxyl (-COOH-modified, in order to investigate the influence on the bound lipid and protein patterns. It was shown that surfactant lipids bind unspecifically to different functionalized MWCNTs, in contrast to the blood plasma proteins which showed characteristic binding patterns. Patterns of bound surfactant lipids were altered after a subsequent incubation in blood plasma. In addition, it was found that bound plasma protein patterns were altered when MWCNTs were previously coated with pulmonary surfactant. Conclusions A pulmonary surfactant coating and the functionalization of MWCNTs have both the potential to alter the MWCNTs blood plasma protein coating and to determine their properties and behaviour in biological systems.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 level and culture conditions influence NS398-induced apoptosis and caspase activation in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H C; Weng, C F

    2001-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) catalyze the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid. Overexpression of COX-2 is frequently found in human cancers and is suggested to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Recent studies indicated that COX-2 inhibitors exert potent anti-cancer effects on a number of cancers. Interestingly, some COX-2 inhibitors potently induce apoptosis, while other COX-2 inhibitors primarily induce growth inhibition. Therefore, there is a variability in the effects that different COX-2 inhibitors have on cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that induction of apoptosis of high COX-2-expressing A549 lung cancer cells by a specific COX-2 inhibitor NS398 was observed in cells cultured under serum-free condition. However, this drug induced G1 growth arrest rather than apoptosis in A549 cells maintained in 10% serum medium. Conversely, low COX-2-expressing H226 lung cancer cells were resistant to NS398-induced apoptosis under both serum-free and serum-containing conditions. Moreover, our results showed that NS398-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of caspase-3, a cysteine protease that plays a crucial role in the execution phase of apoptosis. These results suggest that the cytotoxic effect of COX-2 inhibitors on cancer cells may be influenced by extracellular environments and the anti-cancer action of these inhibitors in vivo needs careful evaluation. Additionally, a correlation between the level of COX-2 expression and the extent of apoptosis induced by COX-2 inhibitors was found. PMID:11605058

  6. Factors influencing the presence of circulating differentiated thyroid cancer cells in the thyroidectomy perioperative period*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wentao Wei; Qinjiang Liu; Wei Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to detect circulating differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) micrometas-tasis and to investigate the factors influencing their presence in the perioperative thyroidectomy period. Methods DTC micrometastases in the peripheral blood were detected with flow cytometry, and patient clinical and pathological factors were analyzed in 327 DTC patients.Results Circulating blood micrometastases were present in the peripheral circulation at a higher rate 1 week postoperatively than preoperatively and at 4 weeks postoperatively (P 0.05). At 4 weeks postoperatively, the presence of circulating micrometastasis was not associated with tumor size or lymph node stage (P > 0.05), but was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (P < 0.05). Conclusion The presence of circulating DTC micrometastases correlates to tumor size, lymph node stage, and operative manipulation. The differentiation degree of the tumors were associated with the persistent presence of micrometastasis in the circulating blood.

  7. Anthropometric measures and nutritional indices influencing sentinel node visualization on breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty female patients with breast cancer were evaluated at the Nuclear Medicine Centre IPEN-INEN. These patients were previously scheduled for linfoscintigraphy. An analysis of the following factors was performed: height, weight, body mass index (BMI), age, thoracic perimeter, tumour size and time required for sentinel node identification; in order to determine their influence on uptake and visualization of the sentinel node, using a standard dose of radiopharmaceutical, 5mCi of Dextran labelled with Technetium-99m (Tc-99m). This study demonstrates that weight, BMI, age, thoracic perimeter and tumour size affect time required for sentinel node identification. The variables previously mentioned must be considered when performing linfoscintigraphy for optimization of this procedure. (orig.)

  8. Common variation near CDKN1A, POLD3 and SHROOM2 influences colorectal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, Malcolm G; Dobbins, Sara E.; Farrington, Susan Mary; Jones, Angela M; Palles, Claire; Whiffin, Nicola; Tenesa, Albert; Spain, Sarah; Broderick, Peter; Ooi, Li-Yin; Domingo, Enric; Smillie, Claire; Henrion, Marc; Frampton, Matthew; Martin, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies to identify common variants influencing colorectal cancer (CRC) risk comprising 8,682 cases and 9,649 controls. Replication analysis was performed in case-control sets totaling 21,096 cases and 19,555 controls. We identified three new CRC risk loci at 6p21 (rs1321311, near CDKN1A; P = 1.14 × 10(-10)), 11q13.4 (rs3824999, intronic to POLD3; P = 3.65 × 10(-10)) and Xp22.2 (rs5934683, near SHROOM2; P = 7.30 × 10(-10)) This brin...

  9. Factors influencing success and failures in radiotherapy and cost of cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cure in cancer can be defined in terms of disease free interval following initial therapy. Disease free interval of four to five years has only 1% year chance of relapse and therefore can be said to have achieved a cure. Various factors influencing success of radiotherapy are discussed. They are : cell type, host site and tissues infiltrated, oxygenation of tumour cells, radiosensitisation of tumour, patient's condition as to anemia and blood pressure, beam quality, increasing radiosensitivity by using ultrasound simultaneously with radiotherapy, fractionated irradiation, dose rate and treatment planning. Two common causes of failure are undetected metastases and local recurrence or incomplete sterilisation of the treated volume. Factors which may lead to incomplete sterilisation are enumerated. Taking into consideration the cost of various components of treatment, the average recurring cost of radiotherapy per patient worked out to be Rs. 1000/- at the hospital attached to the Medical college, Bikaner. (M.G.B.)

  10. Integrative modelling of the influence of MAPK network on cancer cell fate decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Grieco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK network consists of tightly interconnected signalling pathways involved in diverse cellular processes, such as cell cycle, survival, apoptosis and differentiation. Although several studies reported the involvement of these signalling cascades in cancer deregulations, the precise mechanisms underlying their influence on the balance between cell proliferation and cell death (cell fate decision in pathological circumstances remain elusive. Based on an extensive analysis of published data, we have built a comprehensive and generic reaction map for the MAPK signalling network, using CellDesigner software. In order to explore the MAPK responses to different stimuli and better understand their contributions to cell fate decision, we have considered the most crucial components and interactions and encoded them into a logical model, using the software GINsim. Our logical model analysis particularly focuses on urinary bladder cancer, where MAPK network deregulations have often been associated with specific phenotypes. To cope with the combinatorial explosion of the number of states, we have applied novel algorithms for model reduction and for the compression of state transition graphs, both implemented into the software GINsim. The results of systematic simulations for different signal combinations and network perturbations were found globally coherent with published data. In silico experiments further enabled us to delineate the roles of specific components, cross-talks and regulatory feedbacks in cell fate decision. Finally, tentative proliferative or anti-proliferative mechanisms can be connected with established bladder cancer deregulations, namely Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR over-expression and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 activating mutations.

  11. Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected to these factors was assayed. Mature leaves generally were more nutritious with greater amino acids and a greater ratio of protein to non-structural carbohydrate (P:C) than young leaves, in particular when trees were grown in shade. On the other hand, mature leaves had lower amounts of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors, and total phenolics compared to young leaves. Lower defense of mature leaves alone, or along with higher nutritional quality may lead to increased survival and longevity of emerald ash borer feeding on mature leaves. Sunlight reduced amino acids and P:C ratio, irrespective of leaf age and girdling, and elevated total protein of young foliage, but not protein of mature leaves. Sunlight also dramatically increased all investigated defensive compounds of young, but not mature leaves. Girdling reduced green ash foliar nutrition, especially, of young leaves grown in shade and of mature leaves grown in sun. However emerald ash borer performance did not differ when fed leaves from trees grown in sun or shade, or from girdled or control trees. One explanation is that emerald ash borer reared on lower nutritional quality food may compensate for nutrient deficiency by increasing its consumption rate. The strong interactions among leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on nutrition and defense highlight the need for caution when interpreting data without considering possible interactions. PMID:19568811

  12. Good chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The subject matter in chemistry courses reflects almost nothing of the issues that chemists are interested in. It is important to formulate a set of topics - and a Medical College Admissions Test reflecting them - that would leave chemistry departments no choice but to change their teaching.

  13. Prostate cancer and the influence of dietary factors and supplements: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Mandair, D.; Rossi, R; Pericleous, M.; Whyand, T.; Caplin, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer worldwide after lung cancer. There is increasing evidence that diet and lifestyle plays a crucial role in prostate cancer biology and tumourigenesis. Prostate cancer itself represents a good model of cancer in which to look for chemopreventive agents due to the high disease prevalence, slowly progressive nature, and long latency period. Dietary agents have gained considerable attention, often receiving much publicity in t...

  14. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2012-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia s...

  15. Evaluation of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in lung cancer: factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate factors influencing the CT assessment of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. CT scans of 198 patients who had undergone thoracotomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for non-small cell lung cancer were retrospectively evaluated using a size criterion of ≥ 10mm in the short axis. To evaluate the accuracy of CT in diagnosing lymph node metastasis on a nodal station-by-station basis, CT and pathological results were correlated. Analysis included a comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of CT according to 1) cell type of tumor, squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma (excluding bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma); 2) histologic differentiation; 3) tumor size ; 4) central and peripheral location of the tumor; 5) the presence or absence of obstructive pneumonitis and /or atelectasis; 6) the presence or absence of prior granulomatous disease. In the CT assessment of mediastinal lymph node metastasis the cell type of adenocarcinoma adversely affected sensitivity, with a high frequency of normal-sized metastatic nodes. Obstructive pneumonitis caused by central tumor adversely affected specificity with the frequent occurrence of hyperplastic nodes. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs

  16. Silencing of LASP-1 influences zyxin localization, inhibits proliferation and reduces migration in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIM and SH3 protein (LASP-1), initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell migration. LASP-1 is an actin binding protein, which also interacts with the proline-rich domains of zyxin, a scaffolding protein required for cell movement and gene transcription. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of LASP-1 on different human breast cancer cell lines. Transfection with LASP-1-specific siRNA resulted in a reduced protein level of LASP-1 in BT-20 and MCF-7 cell lines. The siRNA-treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of cell cycle, and proliferation of the tumor cells was suppressed by 30-50% corresponding to around 50% of the cells being transfected successfully as seen by immunofluorescence. In addition, tumor cells showed a 50% reduced migration after siRNA treatment, while overexpression of LASP-1 in non-tumor PTK-2 cells, which do not express endogenous LASP-1, resulted in a significant increase in cell motility. LASP-1 silencing is accompanied with a reduced binding of the of LASP-1 binding partner zyxin to focal contacts without changes in actin stress fiber organization as observed in immunofluorescence experiments. The data provide evidence for an essential role of LASP-1 in tumor cell growth and migration, possibly by influencing the localization of zyxin

  17. Factors Influencing communication between the patients with cancer and their nurses in oncology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as "three-factor effects" that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of "Patient as the center of communication", "Nurse as a human factor", and "Organizational structures". The first category consists of two sub-categories of "Imposed changes by the disease" and "the patient′s particular characteristics". The second category includes sub-categories of "sense of vulnerability" and "perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication". The third category consists of the sub-categories of "workload and time imbalance", "lack of supervision", and "impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs". Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach.

  18. Monitoring noise-resonant effects in cancer growth influenced by spontaneous fluctuations and periodic treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    In the paper we investigate a mathematical model describing the growth of tumor in the presence of immune response of a host organism. The dynamics of tumour and immune cells is based on the generic Michaelis-Menten kinetics describing interaction and competition between the tumour and the immune system. The appropriate phenomenological equation modeling cell-mediated immune surveillance against cancer is of the predator-prey form and within a given choice of parameters exhibits bistability. Under the influence of spontaneous weak fluctuations, the model may be analyzed in terms of a stochastic differential equation bearing the form of an overdamped Langevin-like dynamics in the external quasi-potential represented by a double well. We analyze properties of the system within the range of parameters for which the potential wells are of the same depth and when the additional perturbation describing a periodic treatment is insufficient to overcome the barrier height and to cause cancer extinction. In this case t...

  19. Radioresponsiveness of locally advanced breast cancer. Analysis of factors influencing the response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioresponsiveness of locally advanced breast cancer was studied in 239 patients treated with primary RT from 1977 to 1985. The response to RT was assessed on clinical and histological bases. For patients with no residual disease or heavily damaged residual disease in the breast and negative axillary lymph nodes after RT, the 5-year probability of local tumour control (LTC) was 90%. Response to RT was mainly affected by the T and N stages. Primary tumour size or RT dose had only a moderate influence on tumour response in this stage of the disease. The 5-year LTC was 37% for N3 and 43% for T4d conditions. Heavy tumour tissue damage was associated with microcapillary lesions, while the microvasculature around the florid tumour growth was in better condition. Microcapillaries have to be regarded as an important target in RT. The oxygen supply may worsen during fractionated RT as a result of vascular damage. Chronically hypoxic cells may be killed earlier than euoxic ones. Findings indicate that the radioresponsiveness of locally advanced breast cancer is more likely to be attributable to the biological nature of the disease than to chronically hypoxic cells present during RT. (author)

  20. Evaluation of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in lung cancer: factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Du Hwan; Lee, Tae Hyun; Kim, Kie Hwan; Chin, Soo Yil; Zo, Jae Ill; Cho, Kyung Ja [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate factors influencing the CT assessment of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. CT scans of 198 patients who had undergone thoracotomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection for non-small cell lung cancer were retrospectively evaluated using a size criterion of {>=} 10mm in the short axis. To evaluate the accuracy of CT in diagnosing lymph node metastasis on a nodal station-by-station basis, CT and pathological results were correlated. Analysis included a comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of CT according to 1) cell type of tumor, squamous cell carcinoma versus adenocarcinoma (excluding bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma); 2) histologic differentiation; 3) tumor size ; 4) central and peripheral location of the tumor; 5) the presence or absence of obstructive pneumonitis and /or atelectasis; 6) the presence or absence of prior granulomatous disease. In the CT assessment of mediastinal lymph node metastasis the cell type of adenocarcinoma adversely affected sensitivity, with a high frequency of normal-sized metastatic nodes. Obstructive pneumonitis caused by central tumor adversely affected specificity with the frequent occurrence of hyperplastic nodes. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Influences of combination of chemotherapy and autophagy inhibitor on the calreticulin expression in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-qing PENG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the influence of chemotherapy combined with autophagy inhibitor on apoptosis and calreticulin (CRT expression on colonic cancer cells. Methods  The colon cancer cells HCT116 were taken as the target in the present study. The inhibition rates (IC50 of chemotherapeutics oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN-38 were assessed by MTT assay. The changes in CRT expression on the membrane of HCT116 and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with chemotherapeutics. CRT location in HCT116 was detected by fluorescent immunoassay before and after treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The influence on HCT116 autophagy was determined by Western blotting after treatment with these chemotherapeutic agents. The changes in CRT expression on HCT116 membrane and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry before and after treatment with the chemotherapeutics combined with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ. Results  The ratio of apoptosis and membrane expression of CRT were elevated 12 hours after treatment with Oxaliplatin, 5-Fu and SN38, but without statistical significance. Fluorescent immunoassay showed a transposition of CRT from cytoplasm to the membrane after oxaliplatin treatment. Western blotting revealed that oxaliplatin, 5Fu and SN38 induced autophagy of HCT116 cells, and the autophagy was inhibited by the addition of CQ. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the percentages of annexin V+ cells and membrane expression of CRT were higher after treatment with the chemotherapy agents combined with CQ. The upregulation of CRT expression on membrane was obviously higher after treatment with oxaliplatin combined with CQ than that before the treatment with these agents (P=0.027. Conclusion  Oxaliplatin combined with CQ may increase the apoptosis rate of HCT116 cells and upregulate CRT expression in the membrane. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.03

  2. Factors influencing survival outcome for radiotherapy for biliary tract cancer: A multicenter retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To seek for the possible factors influencing overall survival (OS) with radiotherapy (RT) for biliary tract cancer. Materials and methods: Data were collected retrospectively from RT database of 31 institutions in Japan. All patients underwent at least external beam RT. The factors influencing OS were investigated. Results: Data of 498 patients were analyzed. Median OS of the 212 patients who underwent surgery was significantly better than that of the 286 patients without surgery (31 vs. 15 months, p < 0.001). The OS for the R0 or R1 resection group was significantly longer than that for the R2 or non-surgery group, as well as for n0 compared to n1 (all p < 0.001). Chemoradiotherapy (CRT), both sequential and concurrent, resulted in a better OS than RT alone for the n1 group (31 vs. 13 months, p < 0.001), and marginally better for the R0/R1 group (p = 0.065; p = 0.054 for concurrent CRT). However, no such benefit was observed for the R2/non-surgical patients. Multivariate analysis identified performance status, clinical stage, and surgery as significant factors. Conclusion: Surgery, especially R0/R1 resection, seemed as the gold standard for treatment of biliary tract cancer including RT, even in the highly heterogeneous population obtained from the multicenter retrospective study. The possibility was shown that CRT yielded better survival benefit especially for n1 patients. We recommend that future prospective trials include an arm of adjuvant CRT at least for n1 and possibly R0/R1 patients

  3. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle–substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Samer; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    Summary One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (–CH3) and hydroxyl (–OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  4. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle–substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Darwich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM. Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (–CH3 and hydroxyl (–OH terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity. Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles.

  5. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle-substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Samer; Mougin, Karine; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (-CH(3)) and hydroxyl (-OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  6. Influence of water chemistry on the distribution of an acidophilic protozoan in an acid mine drainage system at the abandoned Green Valley coal mine, Indiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A.; Hasiotis, S.T. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography Geology & Anthropology

    2001-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis, a benthic photosynthetic protozoan that intracellularly sequesters Fe, is variably abundant in the main effluent channel that contains acid mine drainage (AMD) discharging from the Green Valley coal mine site in western Indiana. Samples of effluent (pH 3.0-4.6) taken from the main channel and samples of contaminated stream water (pH 3.3 to 8.0) collected from an adjacent stream were analyzed to evaluate the influence of water chemistry on E. mutabilis distribution. E. mutabilis communities were restricted to areas containing unmixed effluent with the thickest (up to 3 mm) benthic communities residing in effluent containing high concentrations of total Fe (up to 12110 mg/l), SO{sub 4}(up to 2940 mg/l), Al (up to 1846 mg/l), and Cl (up to 629 mg/l). Communities were also present, but much less abundant, in areas with effluent containing lower concentrations of these same constituents. In effluent where SO{sub 4} was most highly concentrated, E. mutabilis was largely absent, suggesting that extremely high concentrations of SO{sub 4} may have an adverse effect on this potentially beneficial Fe-mediating, acidophilic protozoan.

  7. Influence of turbulence-chemistry interaction for n-heptane spray combustion under diesel engine conditions with emphasis on soot formation and oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michele; Farrace, Daniele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of the turbulence-chemistry interaction (TCI) for n-heptane sprays under diesel engine conditions has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The conditional moment closure approach, which has been previously validated thoroughly for such flows, and the homogeneous reactor (i.e. no turbulent combustion model) approach have been compared, in view of the recent resurgence of the latter approaches for diesel engine CFD. Experimental data available from a constant-volume combustion chamber have been used for model validation purposes for a broad range of conditions including variations in ambient oxygen (8‑21% by vol.), ambient temperature (900 and 1000 K) and ambient density (14.8 and 30 kg/m3). The results from both numerical approaches have been compared to the experimental values of ignition delay (ID), flame lift-off length (LOL), and soot volume fraction distributions. TCI was found to have a weak influence on ignition delay for the conditions simulated, attributed to the low values of the scalar dissipation relative to the critical value above which auto-ignition does not occur. In contrast, the flame LOL was considerably affected, in particular at low oxygen concentrations. Quasi-steady soot formation was similar; however, pronounced differences in soot oxidation behaviour are reported. The differences were further emphasised for a case with short injection duration: in such conditions, TCI was found to play a major role concerning the soot oxidation behaviour because of the importance of soot-oxidiser structure in mixture fraction space. Neglecting TCI leads to a strong over-estimation of soot oxidation after the end of injection. The results suggest that for some engines, and for some phenomena, the neglect of turbulent fluctuations may lead to predictions of acceptable engineering accuracy, but that a proper turbulent combustion model is needed for more reliable results.

  8. Plants and Medicinal Chemistry--2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D.

    1977-01-01

    Second of a two part article on the influence of plants on medicinal chemistry. This part considers how drugs work, the attempts to develop anaesthetics safer than cocaine, and useful poisons. (Author/SL)

  9. The results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers; influence of radiation beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose; To report our results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers and to analyze the influence of various parameters. Materials and Methods; Reviewed were the outcome of 57 patients with T1 glottic cancers who received definitive radiotherapy between 1985 and 1993. Of 57 patients, 46 had T1a lesions and 11 T1b. Of 57 lesions, 29 were well differentiated carcinoma, 12 moderately, one poorly and 15 unknown. Seven patients were treated with cobalt-60 unit, 26 with 3-MV linear accelerator, 7 with 6-MV and 17 with 10-MV. Of 17 patients treated with 10-MV, 4 also received part of their treatment with a cobalt-60 unit. Right and left lateral parallel opposed fields was used with all patients. The average field size was 30cm2, with typical field sizes ranging from 5x5 cm to 6x6 cm. Doses reported in this study refer to the central absorbed dose calculated at the central axis. The total radiation doses was 6000 cGy for 49 patients (86%) and the mean total radiation doses was 6100 cGy (range, 5600-7000 cGy). A daily fraction dose was 200 cGy for all patients. All courses of radiotherapy were delivered by using once-a-day fractionation 5 days per week without interruption. Chemotherapy was concurrently used with radiotherapy for 32 patients. Median follow-up was 53 months (range, 3-102 months). The local control and survival curves were adjusted and expressed by Kaplan-Meier method and comparison of the curves were calculated using the log-rank test. Results; Of 54 patients, 13 (24%) had local recurrence. Various parameters including substage; histologic grade; treatment machine; use of chemotherapy were analyzed. The only factor that influenced local control was treatment machine. The local control rate at five years was 93% for cases treated with cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator and 53% for cases treated with a 6- or 10-MV linear accelerator. The local control rate for cases treated with cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator was significantly better (p

  10. The influence of family history of cancer, irradiation and anticancer medication (mitomycin C), on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of family history of cancer, radiation therapy and anticancer drug therapy (mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms, following treatment of a first primary cancer of the breast, was analyzed by the person-year method in 1,359 patients, in Japan. During 14,371.8 person-years of observation, 111 multiple primary neoplasms including bilateral breast cancers were found in 109 patients. The incidence rate of multiple primary neoplasms were 0.00772 per person-year. The incidence in patients with a family history of cancer was 1.29 times greater than that in patients without such a family history, and the incidence in patients with a family history of breast cancer was about three times greater than that in those without it (p < 0.01). Radiation therapy raised the occurrence of subsequent primary neoplasms 1.28-fold (or 1.62 fold after 5 years), and mitomycin C (a total dose of 0.8 mg/kg) therapy caused no increase in the occurrence of subsequent primary cancers, after an observation of 10 years or so. (author)

  11. Temperature and altitudinal influence on karst dripwater chemistry: Implications for regional-scale palaeoclimate reconstructions from speleothems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsato, Andrea; Johnston, Vanessa E.; Frisia, Silvia; Miorandi, Renza; Corradini, Flavio

    2016-03-01

    The reconstruction of robust past climate records from speleothems requires a prior understanding of the environmental and hydrological conditions that lead to speleothem formation and the chemical signals encoded within them. On regional-scales, there has been little quantification of the dependency of cave dripwater geochemistry on meteorology (net infiltration, temperature), environmental and geographical factors (elevation, latitude, soil activity, vegetation cover, atmospheric aerosol composition) and geological properties of the aquifer (lithology, porosity and thickness). In the present study, we analysed over 200 karst waters collected in 11 caves of the Trentino region (NE Italy). The caves span sub-humid Mediterranean to cold-humid temperate climates and infiltration elevations (Zinf) ranging from 355 to 2400 m a.s.l., corresponding to infiltration mean annual temperatures (MATinf) between 12 and 0 °C. Since all the caves developed in pure carbonate rocks, soil pCO2 is found to be the main factor controlling the carbonate dissolution. For this reason, the parameters controlling the carbonate-carbonic acid system and calcite saturation state (SICC) are directly correlated with the MATinf, which influences the vegetation zones and eventually the production of CO2 in the soil. SICC linearly depends on MATinf (SICC = 0.09 MATinf - 0.4) and SICC = 0 is reached at Zinf = 1.66 km a.s.l., corresponding to a MATinf = 4.4 °C. This point identifies the "speleothem limit" defined here as the elevation (or corresponding MATinf) above which no sparitic speleothem precipitation usually occurs. We demonstrate that due to temperature-forced changes in the soil and vegetation and subsequently SICC, the speleothem limit shifts to higher altitudes during maximum interglacial conditions. Speleothems from high altitude caves (1.5-2.5 km a.s.l.) thus can identify optimum interglacial periods. By contrast, speleothems formed at lower altitudes are better suited as archives of

  12. Organochlorine exposures influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to estrogen receptor status:a Danish cohort-nested case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Rank Fritz; Jørgensen Torben; Høyer Annette P; Grandjean Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background The relationship between breast cancer and organochlorine exposure is controversial and complex. As estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer may represent different entities of the disease, this study was undertaken to evaluate organochlorines influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to receptor status. Methods The background material stems from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Denmark 1976-78). The breast cancer risk was investigated in a cohort...

  13. Influence of dietary protein sources on putative in vitro and in vivo colon cancer biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Colon cancer (cancer of the large intestine) is a worldwide problem in especially Western countries. The diet might be responsible for up to 90% of these colon cancer cases. This means that decreasing colon cancer risk should be possible by changing the diet. The research presented in this thesis co

  14. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  15. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  16. Influence of different variables in lymphoscintigraphy and gamma probe detection of sentinel node in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of age, injection site and tumor characteristics on visualizing sentinel nodes (SLN) by lymphoscintigraphy and tracer spread in 216 breast cancer. Two injection sites were assessed, either peritumoral injection site (166 patients) or peri-areolar (50 patients). Results: In the peri-areolar group, 6% of the observed cases were negative with lymphoscintigraphy and 4% with the probe, results to be compared with 21% (lymphoscintigraphy) and 11 % (probe) in the peritumoral group. Metastatic nodes were detected in both group, with a rate of 27% in peri-areolar group and 32% in peritumoral group. At least one SLNs was found in 82% of the cases. When lymphoscintigraphy has found more than one node, probe detection was positive in all cases. In the eventuality of negative lymphoscintigraphy, probe identification by surgeon was positive in 47% of the cases. Thirty-four percent of metastatic SLNs were observed in negative lymphoscintigraphy, 29% in negative probe detection. In case of negative lymphoscintigraphy average age of patients was 66.3 years old whereas it was 60.6 in positive ones. Neither tumor type nor harpoon have shown significant influence on the detection of node by both techniques. Probe captation intensity was higher in positive scintigraphy. Conclusion: The location of the injection site and node invasion do not show any significant influence on gamma probe detection. However the effect of massive character or not of metastatic invasion has not been taken into the consideration. Lack of scintigraphic visualization does not predict lack of probe detection. (authors)

  17. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  18. Could hormonal influences and lifestyle factors affect the risk of developing breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women throughout the world and the third most common cause of cancer deaths in adults, according to recent figures. Many authorities, both medical and non-medical, have written about the risks and causes of breast cancer, and research has been conducted into many diverse theories. This paper is a review of some of these ideas and possible risks of breast cancer

  19. Influence of race on microsatellite instability and CD8+ T cell infiltration in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Carethers

    Full Text Available African American patients with colorectal cancer show higher mortality than their Caucasian counterparts. Biology might play a partial role, and prior studies suggest a higher prevalence for microsatellite instability (MSI among cancers from African Americans, albeit patients with MSI cancers have improved survival over patients with non-MSI cancers, counter to the outcome observed for African American patients. CD8+ T cell infiltration of colon cancer is postively correlated with MSI tumors, and is also related to improved outcome. Here, we utilized a 503-person, population-based colon cancer cohort comprising 45% African Americans to determine, under blinded conditions from all epidemiological data, the prevalence of MSI and associated CD8+ T cell infiltration within the cancers. Among Caucasian cancers, 14% were MSI, whereas African American cancers demonstrated 7% MSI (P = 0.009. Clinically, MSI cancers between races were similar; among microsatellite stable cancers, African American patients were younger, female, and with proximal cancers. CD8+ T cells were higher in MSI cancers (88.0 vs 30.4/hpf, P<0.0001, but was not different between races. Utilizing this population-based cohort, African American cancers show half the MSI prevalence of Caucasians without change in CD8+ T cell infiltration which may contribute towards their higher mortality from colon cancer.

  20. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  1. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  2. S100A4 influences cancer stem cell-like properties of MGC803 gastric cancer cells by regulating GDF15 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junfu; Bian, Yue; Wang, Yu; Chen, Lisha; Yu, Aiwen; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have revealed that S100A4 is involved in cancer progression by affecting a variety of biological functions. Our previous study showed that S100A4 influences many biological properties of gastric cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we used cDNA microarray analysis to investigate the global alterations in gene expression in MGC803 gastric cancer cells after siRNA-mediated S100A4 inhibition. Among the total genes investigated, 179 differentially expressed genes (38 upregulated and 141 downregulated) were detected in S100A4-siRNA transfected MGC803 cells compared with NC-siRNA transfected cells. We focused on the GDF15 gene, which was significantly downregulated after S100A4 inhibition. ChIP studies showed that the S100A4 protein binds to the GDF15 promoter, implicating S100A4 in GDF15 regulation at the transcriptional level. GDF15 overexpression promoted CSC-like properties of MGC803 cells, such as spheroid and soft-agar colony forming abilities. S100A4 inhibition suppressed the CSC-like properties of the cells, whereas, GV141-GDF15 vector transfection reversed these effects. Our results suggest that S100A4 influences the CSC-like properties of MGC803 gastric cancer cells by regulating GDF15 expression. PMID:27278086

  3. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  4. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  5. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  6. Does nutrition influence quality of life in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate in cancer patients referred for radiotherapy (RT): (1) quality of life (QoL), nutritional status and nutrient intake, at the onset and at the end of RT; (2) whether individualised nutritional counselling, despite symptoms, was able to enhance nutrient intake over time and whether the latter influenced the patient's QoL; and (3) which symptoms may anticipate poorer QoL and/or reduced nutritional intake. Material and methods: One hundred and twenty-five patients with tumours of the head-neck/gastrointestinal tract (high-risk: HR), prostate, breast, lung, brain, gallbladder, uterus (low-risk: LR) were evaluated before and at the end of RT. Nutritional status was evaluated by Ottery's Subjective Global Assessment, nutritional intake by a 24-h recall food questionnaire and QoL by two instruments: EUROQOL and the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ)-C30. Results: Baseline malnutrition was prevalent in HR vs. LR (P=0.02); nutritional intake was associated with nutritional status (P=0.007); the latter did not change significantly during RT. In LR, baseline energy intake was higher than EER (P=0.001), and higher than HR' intake (P=0.002); the latter increased (P<0.03), in spite of symptom increase anew and/or in severity (P=0.0001). According to both instruments, QoL was always better in LR vs. HR (P=0.01); at the end of RT, QoL improvement in HR was correlated with increased nutritional intake (P=0.001), both remained stable in LR. Conclusions: Individualised nutritional counselling accounting for nutritional status and clinical condition, was able to improve nutritional intake and patients' QoL, despite self-reported symptoms

  7. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors. PMID:19931013

  8. Factors Influencing Conformity Index in Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  9. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  10. INFLUENCE OF NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL INFUSION CHEMOTHERAPY ON APOPTOSIS AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED GENES OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 张颖; 惠京; 王德华

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Through investigating the influence of neoadjuvant intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (NIAC) on the timing changes of apoptosis, PCNA and multiple drug resistance associated genes of endometrial cancer, to study the mechanism of chemotherapy and to define the best operation time. Methods: Twenty patients were subjected to neoadjuvant consecutive uterine arterial infusion with CDDP 100 mg and ADM 50 mg. The biopsy of endometrial tumor tissues was performed before, immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy. Apoptosis index (AI) was estimated by a combination of histologic and TUNEL assays. Proliferative index (PI) was examined by SABC immunohistochemical staining. Expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The AI of endometrial cancer cells immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, after chemotherapy were 3.03%, 3.47% and 5.04%, respectively, much higher than that before chemotherapy which was 2.31%. After chemotherapy, AI/PI gradually increased. It was highest in 2-2+3 w, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy the AI and AI/PI were both significantly lower than that before chemotherapy. The expression of MDR1, MRP and LRP all decreased temporarily after chemotherapy, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy they all increased to levels higher than that before chemotherapy, but the difference were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant consecutive intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via uterine artery can inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis effectively. To evaluate the response of intra-arterial chemotherapy the change of apoptosis index and cell proliferation should be analyzed. The most suitable time for the operation is 3 weeks after intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  11. Oxygen-Induced Restructuring of Rutile TiO(2)(110): Formation Mechanism, Atomic Models, and Influence on Surface Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min; Hebenstreit, Wilhelm; Diebold, Ulrike; Henderson, Michael A.; Jennison, Dwight R.

    1999-07-07

    The rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) (1x1) surface is considered the prototypical ''well-defined'' system in the surface science of metal oxides. Its popularity results partly from two experimental advantages: bulk-reduced single crystals do not exhibit charging, and stoichiometric surfaces--as judged by electron spectroscopes--can be prepared reproducibly by sputtering and annealing in oxygen. We present results that show that this commonly-applied preparation procedure may result in a surface structure that is by far more complex than generally anticipated. Flat, (1x1) terminated surfaces are obtained by sputtering and annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. When re-annealed in oxygen at moderate temperatures (470 K to 660 K), irregular networks of partially-connected, pseudohexagonal rosettes (6.5 x 6 {angstrom} wide), one-unit cell wide strands, and small ({approximately} tens of {angstrom}) (1x1) islands appear. This new surface phase is formed through reaction of oxygen gas with interstitial Ti from the reduced bulk. Because it consists of an incomplete, kinetically-limited (1x1) layer, this phenomenon has been termed restructuring. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study that systematically explores this restructuring process. The influence of several parameters (annealing time, temperature, pressure, sample history, gas) on the surface morphology is investigated using STM. The surface coverage of the added phase as well as the kinetics of the restructuring process are quantified by LEIS and SSIMS measurements in combination with annealing in {sup 18}O-enriched gas. Atomic models of the essential structural elements are presented and are shown to be stable with first-principles density functional calculations. The effect of oxygen-induced restructuring on surface chemistry and its importance for TiO{sub 2} and other bulk-reduced oxide materials is briefly discussed.

  12. Psychological and Social Factors influencing Patients’ Treatment Selection for Localised Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Robles, Luke A; Chou, Shihning; Cole, Owen J; Hamid, Akhlil; Griffiths, Amanda; Vedhara, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 3. Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in the United Kingdom (UK). A quarter of all new cases of cancer diagnosed in men are prostate cancers. In 2009, over 40,000 cases of prostate cancer were reported in the UK and more than 10,000 men die from the disease each year [1]. Prostate cancer is also a major concern worldwide. Its highest incidence rates are found in Australia and New Zealand with its lowest in South-Central Asia [2]. The rate of men being dia...

  13. Axillary dissection in primary breast cancer: variations of the surgical technique and influence on morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcinski S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Wojcinski1,*, Sirin Nuengsri2,*, Peter Hillemanns3, Werner Schmidt4, Mustafa Deryal5, Kubilay Ertan6, Friedrich Degenhardt11Franziskus Hospital, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Bielefeld, Germany; 2Karlsruhe Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Karlsruhe, Germany; 3Hannover Medical School, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Hannover, Germany; 4University Hospital of Saarland, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Homburg/Saar, Germany; 5Caritas Hospital Saarbrücken St Theresia, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Saarbrücken, Germany; 6Leverkusen Hospital, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Leverkusen, Germany*The first two authors contributed equally to this manuscriptAbstract: Lymphedema of the arm is the most common and impairing complication after breast cancer surgery with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND. Our prospective study evaluated the effect of two different surgical techniques for ALND on postoperative morbidity. Patients were scheduled to undergo ALND. Patients in group 1 (n = 17 underwent the most common and standard technique of ALND, which uses sharp dissection of the tissue and subsequent electrocoagulation of bleedings. Patients in group 2 (n = 17 underwent a modified standard technique of ALND with clamping and ligatures of all resection margins. Postoperative wound secretion was quantified and patients were followed up for 6 months to assess long-term morbidity. The variations in surgical technique had no significant influence on the outcome variables. However, patients in group 2 showed a tendency to less wound secretion (713 versus 802 mL; P = nonsignificant, a decreased rate of immediate postoperative seromas (11.8 versus 23.5%; P = nonsignificant and less lymphedema after 3 months (29.4 versus 41.2%; P = nonsignificant. Moreover, the number of resected lymph nodes correlated with the total amount of drained fluid (P = 0.006, the duration of the drain (P = 0.015, and the risk for the

  14. Early glottic cancer: the influence of primary treatment on voice preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis was performed to assess the influence of primary surgical or irradiation treatment on local control, survival, and final preservation of larynx in comparable groups of patients with T1N0 and T2N0 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred sixty-three previously untreated patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis (187T1 and 76T2) were treated with primary radiotherapy (159T1 and 60T2) or primary surgery (28T1 and 16T2) between January 1976 and December 1990, at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Conventional one daily fraction of 2 Gy to doses of 60-74 Gy (median: 65 Gy) were used in 98% of primarily irradiated patients through out the observed period. To enable better comparison between the two treatment groups, primarily irradiated patients were retrospectively stratified by the criteria of suitability for primary voice-sparing operation. Several host, tumor, and treatment parameters were analyzed. Results: Only the stage of the disease significantly influenced both 10-year recurrence-free and disease-specific survival regardless primary treatment modality (p = 0.0002). In all primary irradiated patients local control was significantly better for those with overall treatment time of less than 48 days (p = 0.007). In patients suitable for voice-sparing operation, local control of primarily operated patients was similar to that of patients primarily irradiated with shorter overall treatment time, which was 93 and 88% for T1 and 67 and 64% for T2 tumors, respectively. Ultimate local control in primary surgery and radiotherapy group was 96 and 96% for T1 and 89 and 88% for T2 tumors, respectively. Equal larynx preservation of 100% in T1 and 90% in T2 patients was achieved in finally cured primarily operated patients and those patients primarily irradiated with a shorter overall treatment time. If treatment time was longer than 48 days, significantly worse final larynx preservation of 84% in T1 and 75% in

  15. Topographical influence on soil chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Rasmus,

    2006-01-01

    Topography is one of the five basic soil forming factors together with parent material, climate, biota and time, and therefore a major controlling factor on the soil properties. Topography can be quantified numerically by topographic indices, calculated based on a digital elevation model (DEM). The topographic wetness index (TWI) is a measure of the hydrological condition of a site, determined by a combined measure of upslope area and slope. TWI is a useful estimator of hydrological, pedologi...

  16. Views on ocular cancer in Arabo-Islamic medicine and the leading influence of the ancient Greek medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, Konstantinos; Karamanou, Marianna; Chatziioannou, Achilleas; Nikolopoulos, Thomas; Moschos, Marilita M; Androutsos, George

    2016-01-01

    In the ophthalmological treatises of the medieval Arabo-Islamic physicians such as al-Mawsili (9th-10th century), al-Kahhal (ca. 940-1010), Haly Abbas (10th century) and al Sadili (14th century) we may find references about ocular cancer, focusing on eyelid tumors and cancerous ulcers of the cornea. These references are similar to the analogous ones of ancient Greek physicians as these are preserved in the medical texts of the most famous Byzantine doctors, indicating the influence of ancient Greek medicine in the Arabo-Islamic one. PMID:27061559

  17. Fatty Foods During Teen Years May Influence Later Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Breast Cancer Child Nutrition Dietary Fats Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Child Nutrition Dietary Fats About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  18. Study of influence of regulatory polymorphisms of expression in development of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Joana Margarida Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    The human genome has millions of genetics variants that can affect gene expression. These variants are known as cis-regulatory variants and are responsible for intra-species phenotypic differences and individual susceptibility to disease. One of the diseases affected by cis-regulatory variants is breast cancer. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, with approximately 4500 new cases each year in Portugal. Breast cancer has many genes mutated and TP53 has been shown to be relevant fo...

  19. Influences on uptake of cancer screening in mental health service users: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Clifton, Abigail; Burgess, Caroline; Clement, Sarah; Ohlsen, Ruth; Ramluggun, Pras; Sturt, Jackie; Walters, Paul; Barley, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancers are a leading cause of death worldwide. People with mental illness are 30 % more likely to die from cancer than the general population. One reason for this may be low uptake of nationally offered cancer screening tests by people with mental illness. We aimed to identify barriers and facilitators for breast, cervical and bowel cancer screening uptake by people with mental illness in order to inform interventions to promote equal access. Methods The interview study was conduc...

  20. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  1. A study of indoor radon levels in Indian dwellings, influencing factors and lung cancer risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive integrating solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were used to study the Radon-222 (Rn) concentrations in Indian dwellings. The study was made in 300 dwellings in the cities of Lucknow and Kanpur in northern India. The influence of some factors e.g. age of the house, number of floors and ventilation conditions, etc. on indoor Rn concentrations were studied. The equilibrium factor in 65 dwellings were also investigated. Average Rn concentrations in living rooms were found to be 34±8 Bq.m-3 and 40±10 Bq.m-3 respectively, with equilibrium factors of 0.35 and 0.38. Assuming an occupancy factor of 0.8, the annual average effective dose equivalents in living rooms of the two places are estimated as 0.8 and 1.0 mSv respectively. The average life-time risks of lung cancer for radon exposure of the Lucknow and Kanpur populations at home would be about 0.26% and 0.34% respectively and the mean relative loss of life expectancies were 0.06% and 0.074% respectively

  2. Why do some students struggle while others succeed in chemistry? A study of the influence of undergraduate student beliefs, perceptions, and use of resources on performance in introductory chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sinapuelas, Michelle Leigh Shaver

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation explores how student beliefs about the nature of science learning, beliefs in their academic ability, perceptions of the classroom environment, perceptions of external support, and use of resources contribute to success in introductory chemistry as measured by midterm and final exam scores. These factors were selected for study because they are susceptible to instructional intervention. A beliefs and perceptions survey and use of resources framework were developed, tested,...

  3. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    2006-01-01

    Lowe's new edition assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry. It can serve as a primary text in quantum chemistry courses, and enables students and researchers to comprehend the current literature. This third edition has been thoroughly updated and includes numerous new exercises to facilitate self-study and solutions to selected exercises.* Assumes little initial mathematical or physical sophistication, developing insights and abilities in the context of actual problems* Provides thorough treatment

  4. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  5. Influences on uptake of reproductive health services in Nsangi community of Uganda and their implications for cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirembe Florence

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the most common female cancer in Uganda. Over 80% of women diagnosed or referred with cervical cancer in Mulago national referral and teaching hospital have advanced disease. Plans are underway for systematic screening programmes based on visual inspection, as Pap smear screening is not feasible for this low resource country. Effectiveness of population screening programmes requires high uptake and for cervical cancer, minimal loss to follow up. Uganda has poor indicators of reproductive health (RH services uptake; 10% postnatal care attendance, 23% contraceptive prevalence, and 38% skilled attendance at delivery. For antenatal attendance, attendance to one visit is 90%, but less than 50% for completion of care, i.e. three or more visits. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using eight focus group discussions with a total of 82 participants (16 men, 46 women and 20 health workers. We aimed to better understand factors that influence usage of available reproductive health care services and how they would relate to cervical cancer screening, as well as identify feasible interventions to improve cervical cancer screening uptake. Results Barriers identified after framework analysis included ignorance about cervical cancer, cultural constructs/beliefs about the illness, economic factors, domestic gender power relations, alternative authoritative sources of reproductive health knowledge, and unfriendly health care services. We discuss how these findings may inform future planned screening programmes in the Ugandan context. Conclusion Knowledge about cervical cancer among Ugandan women is very low. For an effective cervical cancer-screening programme, awareness about cervical cancer needs to be increased. Health planners need to note the power of the various authoritative sources of reproductive health knowledge such as paternal aunts (Sengas and involve them in the awareness campaign. Cultural and economic

  6. The normal breast microenvironment of premenopausal women differentially influences the behavior of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsburg Erika

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer studies frequently focus on the role of the tumor microenvironment in the promotion of cancer; however, the influence of the normal breast microenvironment on cancer cells remains relatively unknown. To investigate the role of the normal breast microenvironment on breast cancer cell tumorigenicity, we examined whether extracellular matrix molecules (ECM derived from premenopausal African-American (AA or Caucasian-American (CAU breast tissue would affect the tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We chose these two populations because of the well documented predisposition of AA women to develop aggressive, highly metastatic breast cancer compared to CAU women. Methods The effects of primary breast fibroblasts on tumorigenicity were analyzed via real-time PCR arrays and mouse xenograft models. Whole breast ECM was isolated, analyzed via zymography, and its effects on breast cancer cell aggressiveness were tested in vitro via soft agar and invasion assays, and in vivo via xenograft models. Breast ECM and hormone metabolites were analyzed via mass spectrometry. Results Mouse mammary glands humanized with premenopausal CAU fibroblasts and injected with primary breast cancer cells developed significantly larger tumors compared to AA humanized glands. Examination of 164 ECM molecules and cytokines from CAU-derived fibroblasts demonstrated a differentially regulated set of ECM proteins and increased cytokine expression. Whole breast ECM was isolated; invasion and soft agar assays demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER-, progesterone receptor (PR/PR- cells were significantly more aggressive when in contact with AA ECM, as were ER+/PR+ cells with CAU ECM. Using zymography, protease activity was comparatively upregulated in CAU ECM. In xenograft models, CAU ECM significantly increased the tumorigenicity of ER+/PR+ cells and enhanced metastases. Mass spectrometry analysis of ECM proteins showed that only 1

  7. Perioperative transfusion of leukocyte depleted blood products in gastric cancer patients negatively influences oncologic outcome: A retrospective propensity score weighted analysis on 610 curatively resected gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reim, Daniel; Strobl, Andreas N; Buchner, Christian; Schirren, Rebekka; Mueller, Werner; Luppa, Peter; Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Friess, Helmut; Novotny, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The influence of perioperative transfusion (PT) on outcome following surgery for gastric cancer (GC) remains controversial, with randomized trials lacking and observational series confounded by patient risk factors. This analysis determines the association between reception of leukocyte-depleted blood products and post-operative survival for GC.Data from 610 patients who underwent curative surgery for GC in a German tertiary care clinic from 2001 to 2013 were included. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied to determine the association of PT and clinical and patient risk factors for overall and relapse-free survival. Propensity score analysis was performed to adjust for observational biases in reception of PT.Higher Union International Contre le Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer (UICC/AJCC)-stages (P female gender (P = 0.03). In the adjusted propensity score weighted analysis, PT remained associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.31, 95% CI: 1.01-1.69, P = 0.04).Because of the association of PT with negative influence on patient survival following resection for GC, risks from application of blood products should be weighed against the potential benefits. PMID:27442682

  8. Influences of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Xi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore and analyze the influences on neoadjuvant chemotherapy for serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer.Methods:Patients with advanced breast cancer who had been treated in our hospital from February 2010 to February 2014 were randomly selected as research objects. They were randomly divided into control group (conventional surgical treatment group) and observation group (neoadjuant chemotherapy group). There were 32 cases of each group. Then, the changes of the different periods of serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes in pretherapy and post-treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer in the two groups were observed.Results:The postoperative serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes in different periods of the observation group were all lower than those of the control group, and the postoperative evaluation indexes of the two groups had significant difference. Conclusions:Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has great influences on serum tumor markers, invasion and metastasis related indexes of patients with advanced breast cancer and possesses high clinical application values.

  9. The influence of death-certificate errors on cancer mortality trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years, several reports have suggested a recent increase in cancer mortality based on death-certificate diagnoses. To explore the effect of death-certificate errors on temporal trends in cancer mortality rates, we analyzed the data from the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission/Radiation Effects Research Foundation's autopsy program in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This series includes 5886 autopsies conducted between 1961 and 1987. Our analyses were focused on lymphoma, cancer of the breast, neoplasms of the brain, multiple myeloma, and melanoma (172 cases, total) because of concern over reports of their increased mortality. These 172 autopsy cases were referred to as Cancers of Interest. A significant increase in detection rates was observed for these Cancers of Interest primarily due to a large rise in mortality between 1976 and 1987. For the remaining cancers excluding stomach and lung (defined as Other), the pattern was similar to that seen for Cancers of Interest, but the fluctuation over time was not statistically significant. Confirmation rates generally increased with time except for Cancers of Interest. As a measure of bias in mortality rates due to death-certification errors and as a method to quantify under- or overestimation of death-certificate-based mortality rates,an adjustment factor (confirmation rate divided by detection rate) was calculated. The higher the adjustment factor, the greater the need to compensate for underreporting. For Cancers of Interest the adjustment factor decreased dramatically over time, but it did not change significantly for Other cancers. When the adjustment factors for Cancers of Interest and Other were compared, a statistically significant difference was found. For Cancers of Interest, a significant interaction between type of cancer and period was seen. Our findings indicate that considerable care must be shown when interpreting temporal trends in cancer vital statistics. (author)

  10. Studies on the Chemistry of Paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Haiqing Jr.

    1998-01-01

    STUDIES ON THE CHEMISTRY OF PACLITAXEL HAIQING YUAN (ABSTRACT) Paclitaxel is a natural occurring diterpene alkaloid originally isolated from the bark of Taxus brevifolia. It is now one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents for clinical treatment of ovarian and breast cancers. Recent clinical trials have also shown paclitaxel's potential for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and other types of cancers. While tremendous chemica...

  11. Prominent Chemists Team Up to Review Frontiers in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a symposium which focused on the influence of inorganic chemistry on organic synthesis, the impact of organic chemistry on biochemistry and vice versa, chemical reaction dynamics, and advances in inorganic chemistry. Explains the purpose of the symposium was to illustrate the intellectual dynamism of modern chemistry. (MVL)

  12. Relationships among growth mechanism, structure and morphology of PEALD TiO2 films: the influence of O2 plasma power, precursor chemistry and plasma exposure mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappim, W; Testoni, G E; Doria, A C O C; Pessoa, R S; Fraga, M A; Galvão, N K A M; Grigorov, K G; Vieira, L; Maciel, H S

    2016-07-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films have generated considerable interest over recent years, because they are functional materials suitable for a wide range of applications. The efficient use of the outstanding functional properties of these films relies strongly on their basic characteristics, such as structure and morphology, which are affected by deposition parameters. Here, we report on the influence of plasma power and precursor chemistry on the growth kinetics, structure and morphology of TiO2 thin films grown on Si(100) by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). For this, remote capacitively coupled 13.56 MHz oxygen plasma was used to act as a co-reactant during the ALD process using two different metal precursors: titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Furthermore, we investigate the effect of direct plasma exposure during the co-reactant pulse on the aforementioned material properties. The extensive characterization of TiO2 films using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, ellipsometry, x-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have revealed how the investigated process parameters affect their growth per cycle (GPC), crystallization and morphology. The GPC tends to increase with plasma power for both precursors, however, for the TTIP precursor, it starts decreasing when the plasma power is greater than 100 W. From XRD analysis, we found a good correlation between film crystallinity and GPC behavior, mainly for the TTIP process. The AFM images indicated the formation of films with grain size higher than film thickness (grain size/film thickness ratio ≈20) for both precursors, and plasma power analysis allows us to infer that this phenomenon can be directly related to the increase of the flux of energetic oxygen species on the substrate/growing film surface. Finally, the effect of direct plasma exposure on film structure and morphology was evidenced

  13. Relationships among growth mechanism, structure and morphology of PEALD TiO2 films: the influence of O2 plasma power, precursor chemistry and plasma exposure mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappim, W.; Testoni, G. E.; Doria, A. C. O. C.; Pessoa, R. S.; Fraga, M. A.; Galvão, N. K. A. M.; Grigorov, K. G.; Vieira, L.; Maciel, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films have generated considerable interest over recent years, because they are functional materials suitable for a wide range of applications. The efficient use of the outstanding functional properties of these films relies strongly on their basic characteristics, such as structure and morphology, which are affected by deposition parameters. Here, we report on the influence of plasma power and precursor chemistry on the growth kinetics, structure and morphology of TiO2 thin films grown on Si(100) by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). For this, remote capacitively coupled 13.56 MHz oxygen plasma was used to act as a co-reactant during the ALD process using two different metal precursors: titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Furthermore, we investigate the effect of direct plasma exposure during the co-reactant pulse on the aforementioned material properties. The extensive characterization of TiO2 films using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, ellipsometry, x-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have revealed how the investigated process parameters affect their growth per cycle (GPC), crystallization and morphology. The GPC tends to increase with plasma power for both precursors, however, for the TTIP precursor, it starts decreasing when the plasma power is greater than 100 W. From XRD analysis, we found a good correlation between film crystallinity and GPC behavior, mainly for the TTIP process. The AFM images indicated the formation of films with grain size higher than film thickness (grain size/film thickness ratio ≈20) for both precursors, and plasma power analysis allows us to infer that this phenomenon can be directly related to the increase of the flux of energetic oxygen species on the substrate/growing film surface. Finally, the effect of direct plasma exposure on film structure and morphology was evidenced

  14. Generation of Organ-conditioned Media and Applications for Studying Organ-specific Influences on Breast Cancer Metastatic Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaseczny, Matthew M; Pio, Graciella M; Chu, Jenny E; Xia, Ying; Nguyen, Kim; Goodale, David; Allan, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer preferentially metastasizes to the lymph node, bone, lung, brain and liver in breast cancer patients. Previous research efforts have focused on identifying factors inherent to breast cancer cells that are responsible for this observed metastatic pattern (termed organ tropism), however much less is known about factors present within specific organs that contribute to this process. This is in part because of a lack of in vitro model systems that accurately recapitulate the organ microenvironment. To address this, an ex vivo model system has been established that allows for the study of soluble factors present within different organ microenvironments. This model consists of generating conditioned media from organs (lymph node, bone, lung, and brain) isolated from normal athymic nude mice. The model system has been validated by demonstrating that different breast cancer cell lines display cell-line specific and organ-specific malignant behavior in response to organ-conditioned media that corresponds to their in vivo metastatic potential. This model system can be used to identify and evaluate specific organ-derived soluble factors that may play a role in the metastatic behavior of breast and other types of cancer cells, including influences on growth, migration, stem-like behavior, and gene expression, as well as the identification of potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. This is the first ex vivo model system that can be used to study organ-specific metastatic behavior in detail and evaluate the role of specific organ-derived soluble factors in driving the process of cancer metastasis. PMID:27341354

  15. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the mycotoxin research group are discussed. This includes the isolation and structure determination of mycotoxins, plant products, the biosyntheris of mycotoxins, the synthesis and characteristics of steroids, the synthesis and mechanistic aspects of heterocyclic chemistry and the functionality of steroids over long distances. Nmr spectra and mass spectroscopy are some of the techniques used

  16. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  17. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  18. The Influence of Galactic Cosmic Rays on Ion-Neutral Hydrocarbon Chemistry in the Upper Atmospheres of Free-Floating Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, P B; Bilger, C

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic rays may be linked to the formation of volatiles necessary for prebiotic chemistry. We explore the effect of cosmic rays in a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere, as a proof-of-concept that ion-neutral chemistry may be important for modelling hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. In order to accomplish this, we utilize Monte Carlo cosmic ray transport models with particle energies of $10^6$ eV $< E < 10^{12}$ eV in order to investigate the cosmic ray enhancement of free electrons in substellar atmospheres. Ion-neutral chemistry is then applied to a Drift-Phoenix model of a free-floating giant gas planet. Our results suggest that the activation of ion-neutral chemistry in the upper atmosphere significantly enhances formation rates for various species, and we find that C$_2$H$_2$, C$_2$H$_4$, NH$_3$, C$_6$H$_6$ and possibly C$_{10}$H are enhanced in the upper atmospheres because of cosmic rays. Our results suggest a potential connection between cosmic ray chemistry and the hazes observed in the upper atmospher...

  19. How do changes in the mtDNA and mitochondrial dysfunction influence cancer and cancer therapy? Challenges, opportunities and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, M. W.; Voets, A. M.; Starmans, M. H. W.; de Coo, I. F. M.; Yadak, R.; Hoffmann, R. F.; Boutros, P. C.; Smeets, H. J. M.; Dubois, L.; Lambin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Several mutations in nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial components have been associated with an increased cancer risk or are even causative, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes) and iso-citrate dehydrogenase (IDH1 and IDH2 genes). Recently, studies have suggested an eminent

  20. Factors influencing receptivity to future screening options for pancreatic cancer in those with and without pancreatic cancer family history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitkopf Carmen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer (PC is considered the most lethal cancer and approximately 10% of PC is hereditary. The purpose of the study was to assess attitudes of at-risk family members with two or more relatives affected with pancreas cancer (PC toward PC risk and future screening options. Methods At-risk family members and primary care controls were surveyed regarding perceived PC risk, PC worry/concern, attitude toward cancer screening, screening test accuracy, and intentions regarding PC screening via blood testing or more invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS. Results PC family members reported greater perceived risk of PC than controls (54% vs. 6%, respectively, p 89% receptivity to the potential PC screening options presented, though receptivity was greater among PC family members as compared to controls (p  Conclusions Receptivity to screening options for PC appears high. Clinicians should address behavioral and genetic risk factors for PC and foster appropriate concern regarding PC risk among at-risk individuals.

  1. The influence of I-131 therapy on FDG uptake in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) [or PET/computed tomography (CT)] is more likely to show false-negative results when it is performed shortly after chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy because of ''metabolic stunning''. The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of I-131 therapy on FDG uptake and the detection of recurrence or metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). We retrospectively enrolled 16 consecutive FDG-PET/CT studies which had been performed in patients with DTC with elevated thyroglobulin (TG) but negative I-131 whole-body scan. All studies were performed under L-thyroxine suppression. The patients were divided into groups A and B for PET/CT performed within 4 months of I-131 therapy or no such therapy, respectively. Each lesion identified on PET/CT was characterized using a 5-point scale by visual analysis: 0=definitely benign, 1=probably benign, 2=equivocal, 3=probably malignant, and 4=definitely malignant. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in each lesion was also measured for semiquantitative analysis. We compared the visual grading and SUVmax of the lesion of highest FDG uptake between groups A and B. For visual analysis, group B had significantly more patients with an uptake score of 3 or 4 than group A (80% vs. 17%, P=0.01). In addition, there were significantly more equivocal results from group A than from group B (67% vs. 10%, P=0.02). If the patients with the highest uptake scores of 2, 3, and 4 were considered to be positive for local recurrence or metastasis, there would be no significant difference between the positive rates of groups A and B (83% vs. 90%, P=0.7). However, the mean SUVmax of positive results was significantly lower for group A than for group B (3.1±0.9 and 6.6±3.5 respectively, P=0.02). The preliminary results suggested that FDG uptake in DTC may be negatively influenced by I-131 therapy within 4 months, resulting in lower FDG uptake and more equivocal results. Further

  2. Multiple factors influence compliance with colorectal cancer staging recommendations: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa Mahmoud A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with colorectal cancer (CRC retrieval by surgeons, and assessment by pathologists of at least 12 lymph nodes (LNs predicts the need for adjuvant treatment and improved survival. Different interventions (educational presentation, engaging clinical opinion leaders, performance data sent to hospital executives to improve compliance with this practice had variable results. This exploratory study examined factors hypothesized to have influenced the outcome of those interventions. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 surgeons and pathologists at eleven hospitals. Clinicians were identified by intervention organizers, public licensing body database, and referral from interviewees. An interview guide incorporating open-ended questions was pilot-tested on one surgeon and pathologist. A single investigator conducted all interviews by phone. Transcripts were analyzed independently by two investigators using a grounded approach,ho then compared findings to resolve differences. Results Improvements in LN staging practice may have occurred largely due to educational presentations that created awareness, and self-initiated changes undertaken by pathologists. Executives that received performance data may not have shared this with staff, and opinion leaders engaged to promote compliance may not have fulfilled their roles. Barriers to change that are potentially amenable to quality improvement included perceptions about the practice (perceived lack of evidence for the need to examine at least 12 LNs and associated responsibilities (blaming other profession, technical issues (need for pathology assistants, better clearing solutions and laboratory facilities, and a lack of organizational support for multidisciplinary interaction (little communication between surgeons and pathologists or quality improvement (no change leaders or capacity for monitoring. Conclusion Use of an exploratory approach provided an in

  3. Multiple primary cancers in Denmark 1943-80; influence of possible underreporting and suggested risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of developing a second primary cancer was studied among 171,749 men and 208,192 women who were reported to the Danish Cancer Registry between 1943 and 1980. Only those who survived at least two months were included in the analysis, and more than 1.7 million person-years of observation were accrued. Altogether, 15,084 second primary cancers developed, of which 13,231 were in organs other than the initial or adjacent site [relative risk (RR) = 1.01]. Adjustment for possible underreporting of multiple primary cancers increased the RR to 1.24, which stresses the need for detailed knowledge of registration procedures interpreting results from cancer registries. The unadjusted RR for all sites increased with time, from 0.94 during the first decade of follow-up (excluding the first year) to 1.13 among 30-year survivors, whereas the adjusted RR increased from 1.08 to 1.41. Elevated risks were observed for sites thought to have a common etiology. For example, cancers of smoking-related sites were increased in both directions following cancers of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, and urinary organs. For cancers suspected to have a hormone- or dietary fat-related association, significant reciprocal relationships were seen among cancers of the endometrium, ovary, and colon. Cancer treatment probably is an important factor in second cancer development, even when judged indirectly in the present study. For example, radiotherapy may have been responsible for an elevated risk of subsequent cancers of the thyroid, breast, colon, rectum, bladder, and connective tissue in long-term survivors. Chemotherapy may have increased the risk of subsequent leukemias

  4. Genomic instability influences the transcriptome and proteome in endometrial cancer subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann Jens K; Bündgen Nana K; Gemoll Timo; Hautaniemi Sampsa; Lundgren Caroline; Wangsa Danny; Doering Jana; Bruch Hans-Peter; Nordstroem Britta; Roblick Uwe J; Jörnvall Hans; Auer Gert; Ried Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to clinical characteristics, DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in epithelial malignancies in general and in endometrial cancers in particular. We mapped ploidy-associated chromosomal aberrations and identified corresponding gene and protein expression changes in endometrial cancers of different prognostic subgroups. Methods DNA image cytometry classified 25 endometrioid cancers to be either diploid (n = 16) or aneuploid (n = 9), and all ...

  5. Factors Influencing Cancer Risk Perception in High Risk Populations: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tilburt Jon C; James Katherine M; Sinicrope Pamela S; Eton David T; Costello Brian A; Carey Jantey; Lane Melanie A; Ehlers Shawna L; Erwin Patricia J; Nowakowski Katherine E; Murad Mohammad H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients at higher than average risk of heritable cancer may process risk information differently than the general population. However, little is known about clinical, demographic, or psychosocial predictors that may impact risk perception in these groups. The objective of this study was to characterize factors associated with perceived risk of developing cancer in groups at high risk for cancer based on genetics or family history. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Em...

  6. The influence of advanced age on the morbi-mortality of gastric cancer after curative surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Araceli Mayol-Oltra; Roberto Martí-Obiol; Fernando López-Mozos; Gloria Báguena-Requena; Joaquín Ortega-Serrano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Spain after lung, colorectal, breast and prostate tumours. Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment in localized gastric cancer. Objective: the aim of our study is to evaluate and compare the clinical and surgical aspects, development of postoperative complications and outcomes of patients over 75 years old compared with younger patients in our centre. Material and methods: comparative retrospectiv...

  7. Practice setting and physician influences on judgments of colon cancer treatment by community physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    McFall, S L; Warnecke, R B; Kaluzny, A D; Ford, L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article compares judgments about the treatment of Dukes' B2 and C colon cancer made by general surgeons to those of internists and family practitioners. Physician and practice variables were specialty, affiliation with a Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) hospital, time in practice, professional centrality (level of participation in cancer information networks), solo practice, and number of colon cancer patients. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Data are combined from national...

  8. Influence of postsurgical residual tumor volume on local control in radiotherapy for maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to study the influence of postsurgical gross residual tumor volume on local control of maxillary sinus cancer treated with radiotherapy combined with debulking surgery. Forty-three patients who underwent combined surgery and radiotherapy (50-72 Gy, median 60 Gy) for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus were reviewed. Gross residual tumor volume (GRTV) after surgery was measured on computed tomograms obtained during the radiotherapy planning. Patients were classified according to GRTV as follows: group AA, GRTV=0 (microscopic residual, n=2); group A, GRTV 3 (n=24); group B, 10-40 cm3 (n=9); and group C, ≥40 cm3 (n=8). The relationship between local control and GRTV was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis. The 2-year local control rate for all patients was 62%. The differences in local control rates between groups AA, A and B were not significant (P<0.05), but the rate was significantly lower in group C than in the other groups (69% at 2 years vs 31% at 1 year, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GRTV (P=0.002) and histological differentiation (poorly differentiated histology was favorable, P=0.035) were independent prognostic factors and that intraarterial chemotherapy and administered total dose were not. Local control in groups A and B significantly depended on the total dose of radiotherapy, with 2-year control rates of patients receiving 50 Gy (n=6) and ≥60 Gy (n=27) of 17% vs 79%, respectively (P<0.001). Our data suggest that adequate, not complete, debulking associated with a total radiotherapy dose of ≥60 Gy can provide satisfactory local control for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. (author)

  9. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  10. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Bolton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively, but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013. This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012. Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported.

  11. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Katherine A; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Bowden, Nikola A

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively), but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013). This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012). Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported. PMID:27090263

  12. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. ► Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. ► Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. ► Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  13. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  14. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F;

    2011-01-01

    variability with opioid doses in a large population using a confirmatory validation population was warranted. We recruited 2294 adult European patients using a World Health Organization (WHO) step III opioid and analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes with a putative influence on opioid...... validating findings obtained in genetic association studies to avoid reporting spurious associations as valid findings. To elicit knowledge about new genes that influence pain and the need for opioids, strategies other than the candidate gene approach is needed....

  15. [Influence of the diet on cell proliferation in the large bowel and the rectum. Does a strict vegetarian diet reduct the risk of intestinal cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendingen, K; Trygg, K; Vatn, M

    1995-08-10

    Colorectal cancers are the most frequent cancer in Norway for men and women combined. Several theories have been suggested as etiological explanations. In this review the influence of dietary factors on the cell proliferation rate has been evaluated. A higher cell proliferation rate is statistically associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. Foods associated with a lower cell proliferation rate match the staple foods in parts of the world were the incidence of colorectal cancer is low. Vegetarians show a low rate of cell proliferation, and low incidence of colorectal cancer. The low incidence of colorectal cancer among vegetarians may be due not only to the lack of animal foods, but also to several other healthy lifestyle habits. We conclude that a well planned lacto-vegetarian diet or a mixed diet with abundant amounts of vegetables and fruits is beneficial as regards the rate of cell proliferation, and most likely also reduces the risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:7652722

  16. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk : implications for clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schroeder, Fritz H.; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    A family history of prostate cancer has long been identified as an important risk factor for developing the disease. This risk factor can be easily assessed in clinical practice and current guidelines recommend to initiate prostate cancer early detection 5 years earlier (i.e. around the age of 40 ye

  17. The influence of the pre-metastatic niche on breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Siegel, Peter M

    2016-09-28

    The emergence of metastatic disease constitutes a significant life-threatening development during cancer progression. To date, intensive efforts have been focused on understanding the intrinsic properties that confer malignant potential to cancer cells, as well as the role of the primary tumour microenvironment in promoting cancer metastasis. Beyond events occurring at the primary site, the metastatic cascade is composed of numerous barriers that must be overcome in order for disseminating cancer cells to form distal metastases. The most formidable of these is the ability of cancer cells to seed and grow in a completely foreign microenvironment. Interestingly, solid malignancies often display a particular tropism for specific tissue sites. For example, breast patients with metastatic disease will often develop bone, lung, liver or brain metastases. This mini-review will explore aspects of pre-existing and induced metastatic niches and focus on how the unique composition and function of diverse niche components, within common sites of breast cancer metastasis, enable the survival and growth of disseminated cancer cells. These common supportive functions of the niche are provided by a complex array of stromal components and molecular mechanisms that are, in part, reflective of the tissue in which the metastases arise. Finally, the metastatic niche is a dynamic structure that is continually altered and sculpted by the cancer cells during progression of the metastatic lesion. PMID:26577808

  18. Risk of colon cancer in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients as predicted by fuzzy modeling: Influence of smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rhonda M Brand; David D Jones; Henry T Lynch; Randall E Brand; Patrice Watson; Ramesh Ashwathnayaran; Hemant K Roy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether a fuzzy logic model could predict colorectal cancer (CRC) risk engendered by smoking in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer(HNPCC) patients.METHODS: Three hundred and forty HNPCC mismatch repair (MMR) mutation carriers from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Institute Registry were selected for modeling. Age-dependent curves were generated to elucidate the joint effects between gene mutation (hMLH1 or hMSH2), gender, and smoking status on the probability of developing CRC.RESULTS: Smoking significantly increased CRC risk in male hMSH2 mutation carriers (P<0.05). hMLH1 mutations augmented CRC risk relative to hMSH2 mutation carriers for males (P < 0.05). Males had a significantly higher risk of CRC than females for hMLH1 non smokers (P<0.05), hMLH1 smokers (P < 0.1) and hMSH2 smokers (P < 0.1). Smoking promoted CRC in a dose-dependent manner in hMSH2 in males (P<0.05).Females with hMSH2 mutations and both sexes with the hMLH1 groups only demonstrated a smoking effect after an extensive smoking history (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CRC promotion by smoking in HNPCC patients is dependent on gene mutation, gender and age. These data demonstrate that fuzzy modeling may enable formulation of clinical risk scores, thereby allowing individualization of CRC prevention strategies.

  19. Fine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Fine Chemistry laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research programs are centered on the renewal of the organic chemistry most important reactions and on the invention of new, highly efficient and highly selective reactions, by applying low cost reagents and solvents. An important research domain concerns the study and fabrication of new catalysts. They are obtained by means of the reactive sputtering of the metals and metal oxydes thin films. The Monte Carlo simulations of the long-range electrostatic interaction in a clay and the obtention of acrylamides from anhydrous or acrylic ester are summarized. Moreover, the results obtained in the field of catalysis are also given. The published papers and the congress communications are included

  20. Genetic variants at chromosomes 2q35, 5p12, 6q25.1, 10q26.13, and 16q12.1 influence the risk of breast cancer in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Orr; Rosie Cooke; Michael Jones; Olivia Fletcher; Frank Dudbridge; Sarah Chilcott-Burns; Katarzyna Tomczyk; Peter Broderick; Richard Houlston; Alan Ashworth; Anthony Swerdlow

    2011-01-01

    Male breast cancer accounts for approximately 1% of all breast cancer. To date, risk factors for male breast cancer are poorly defined, but certain risk factors and genetic features appear common to both male and female breast cancer. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently identified common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence female breast cancer risk; 12 of these have been independently replicated. To examine if these variants contribute to male breast cancer ...

  1. Genetic Variants at Chromosomes 2q35, 5p12, 6q25.1, 10q26.13, and 16q12.1 Influence the Risk of Breast Cancer in Men

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, N.; Cooke, R; Jones, M.(Purdue University, West Lafayette, U.S.A.); Fletcher, O.; Dudbridge, F; Chilcott-Burns, S; Tomczyk, K; Broderick, P.; Houlston, R.; Ashworth, A.; Swerdlow, A.

    2011-01-01

    Male breast cancer accounts for approximately 1% of all breast cancer. To date, risk factors for male breast cancer are poorly defined, but certain risk factors and genetic features appear common to both male and female breast cancer. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently identified common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence female breast cancer risk; 12 of these have been independently replicated. To examine if these variants contribute to male breast cancer ...

  2. The influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk of developing gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastric cancer. The disease progression is influenced by the host inflammatory responses, and cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may have a role in the course of the disease. The aim of our study was to investigate proinflammatory cytokine polymorphisms, previously associated with the development of gastric cancer, in a Slovenian population. In total 318 patients and controls were selected for the study and divided into three groups: (i) patients with gastric cancer (n = 58), (ii) patients with chronic gastritis (n = 60) and (iii) healthy control group (n = 200). H. pylori infection in patient groups was determined by serology, histology and culture. Four proinflammatory gene polymorphisms were determined (IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, TLR-4) in all subjects. We found a statistically significant difference between males and females for the groups (p = 0.025). Odds ratio (OR) for gastric cancer risk for females was 0.557 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.233–1.329) and for chronic gastritis 2.073 (95% CI: 1.005–4.277). IL-1B-511*T/T homozygous allele for cancer group had OR = 2.349 (95% CI: 0.583–9.462), heterozygous IL-1B-511*T had OR = 1.470 (95% CI: 0.583–3.709) and heterozygotes in TNF-A-308 genotype for chronic gastritis had OR = 1.402 (95% CI: 0.626–3.139). Other alleles had OR less than 1. We could not prove association between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis due to H. pylori in any cytokine SNPs studied in Slovenian population. Other SNPs might be responsible besides infection with H. pylori for the progression from atrophy to neoplastic transformation

  3. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  4. Organometallic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkin, James K.; M.L.H. Green; Dr. M. L. H. Green

    1982-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic chemistry is a rapidly expanding field, which has an important relationship to industrial problems of petrochemical catalysis. This thesis describes studies of fundamental organometallic reaction processes, such as C-H and C-C bond formation and cleavage, and investigations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds. A number of techniques were used to pursue these studies, including synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and semi-em...

  5. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  6. Interstellar chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species o...

  7. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  8. The influence of chemistry, production and community composition on leaf litter decompositon under elevated atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 in a northern hardwood ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone have the potential to alter leaf litter production and chemistry. In turn, these changes may alter the decomposition of labile and recalcitrant carbon compounds, as well as forest productivity and sequestration of soil carbon...

  9. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  10. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  11. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depletion of world fossil fuel reserves and the involvement of greenhouse gases in the global warming has led to change the industrial and energy policies of most developed countries. The goal is now to reserve petroleum to the uses where it cannot be substituted, to implement renewable raw materials obtained from plants cultivation, and to consider the biodegradability of molecules and of manufactured objects by integrating the lifetime concept in their expected cycle of use. The green chemistry includes the design, development and elaboration of chemical products and processes with the aim of reducing or eliminating the use and generation of harmful compounds for the health and the environment, by adapting the present day operation modes of the chemical industry to the larger framework of the sustainable development. In addition to biofuels, this book reviews the applications of green chemistry in the different industrial processes in concern. Part 1 presents the diversity of the molecules coming from renewable carbon, in particular lignocellulose and the biotechnological processes. Part 2 is devoted to materials and treats of the overall available technological solutions. Part 3 focusses on functional molecules and chemical intermediates, in particular in sugar- and fats-chemistry. Part 4 treats of biofuels under the aspects of their production and use in today's technologies. The last part deals with the global approaches at the environmental and agricultural levels. (J.S.)

  12. Factors influencing the return rate in a direct mail campaign to inform minority women about prevention of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignan, M B; Michielutte, R; Jones-Lighty, D D; Bahnson, J

    1994-01-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project was a 5-year community-based health education program funded by the National Cancer Institute. The program was developed to reduce cervical cancer mortality among black women in Forsyth County, and it was targeted to those ages 18 and older. The program tried to educate the target population through a combination of mass media and direct education. This paper reports on an experiment conducted to investigate sources of influence on the effectiveness of direct mail, a technique used to augment mass media health education. Direct mail has shown promise as a method for reaching target populations that are difficult to reach with other mass media approaches. Using commercially prepared mailing lists sorted by zip code and other characteristics of the resident, health-related materials can be targeted to persons at their homes. A randomized experiment involving 1,000 households was carried out to estimate the influence of type of postage and address (name versus "resident or occupant") on the response rate to direct mail. Results indicated that there was no significant advantage from use of first class over bulk rate postage, but the return was significantly greater when the envelope bore a name rather than "resident or occupant." PMID:8041850

  13. Influence of different operation methods for the pain stress and digestive function of patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe and compare the influence state of different operation methods for the pain stress and digestive function of patients with esophageal cancer. Methods:A total of 56 patients with esophageal cancer treated with surgery in our hospital from January 2013 to August 2015 were selected as the research object. According to the differences of operation methods, 56 cases were divided into Group A (thoracotomy group) 28 cases and Group B (thoracic surgery group) 28 cases, then the serum levels of pain stress and gastrointestinal hormones, stomach digestive function indexes of two groups at the 1st day before the surgery and at the 1st, 3rd and 7th day after the surgery were compared. Results:The serum levels of pain stress and gastrointestinal hormones, stomach digestive function indexes of two groups at the 1st day before the surgery were compared. Those statistical indexes of Group B at the 1st, 3rd and 7th day after the surgery were all obviously better than those of Group A, and there are significant differences. Conclusion:The influence of thoracoscopic surgery for the pain stress and digestive function of patients with esophageal cancer are obviously better than those of thoracic surgery, and it has better control effect for the postoperative discomfort and digestive function of patients.

  14. Radiation dose does not influence anastomotic complications in patients with esophageal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation and transhiatal esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation might increase anastomotic leakage and stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation and esophagectomy. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of radiation dose on the incidence of leakage and stenosis. Fifty-three patients with esophageal cancer received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (23 × 1.8 Gy) (combined with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin) followed by a transhiatal esophagectomy between 2009 and 2011. On planning CT, the future anastomotic region was determined and the mean radiation dose, V20, V25, V30, V35 and V40 were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine determinants of anastomotic leakage and stenosis. Anastomotic leaks occurred in 13 of 53 patients (25.5%) and anastomotic stenosis occurred in 24 of 53 patients (45.3%). Median follow-up was 20 months. Logistic regression analysis showed that mean dose, V20-V40, age, co-morbidity, method of anastomosis, operating time and interval between last radiotherapy treatment and surgery were not predictors of anastomotic leakage and stenosis. A radiation dose of 23 × 1.8 Gy on the future anastomotic region has no influence on the occurrence of anastomotic leakage and stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by transhiatal esophagectomy

  15. Cardiac comorbidity in head and neck cancer patients and its influence on cancer treatment selection and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Roland; Breitenstein, Kerstin; Eßer, Dirk; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Comorbidity assessment and a profound cardiac examination were implemented into pre-treatment diagnostics to analyze their influence on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) therapy selection and short-term mortality. Comorbidity was measured prospectively in 49 HNSCC patients using standard indices between 2012 and 2013. Cardiac examinations included electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and bicycle ergometry. Most patients had stage IV tumors (61 %), smoked (61 %), and showed alcohol abuse (57 %); 38 patients (78 %) received a multimodal therapy; 65 % had an adult comorbidity evaluation 27 index ≥2, 59 % a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) ≥4, and 12 % a revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) ≥2. Additional cardiac examinations revealed moderate to severe cardiovascular pathologies in 32 % of the patients and led to recommendations for additional therapy in 4 patients (8 %) necessary only after cancer treatment. RCRI was associated with CCI and cardiac examinations (p = 0.009, p = 0.030). Chemotherapy, stroke history, and RCRI ≥2 were risk factors for early mortality within first 2 years after cancer therapy (p = 0.037; p = 0.012; p = 0.015). Although one-third of a strongly smoking and drinking patient cohort had relevant cardiac morbidity, extended unselected cardiac diagnostics had only low impact on HNSCC therapy selection. The risk of early mortality after HNSCC cancer treatment seems to be sufficiently reflected by the RCRI. PMID:26581475

  16. Analysis of autonomic nerve preservation and pouch reconstruction influencing fragmentation of defecation after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, K; Sumi, T; Enomoto, M; Mori, Y; Aoki, T

    2010-01-01

    Our questionnaire survey on defecation disorders after rectal cancer surgery revealed that 66.7% of postoperative patients were most annoyed with fragmentation of defecation. Therefore, we performed a change-over-time analysis on the relationship of fragmentation and factors including location of rectal cancer, surgical technique, anastomosis method, pouch reconstruction, extent of lymph node dissection, and degree of pelvic and colonic nerve preservation surrounding the superior mesenteric artery. The fragmentation decreased over time at the postoperative time points of 6 months, 2 and 5 years. A statistical analysis of factors influencing fragmentation revealed that location of cancer, reconstruction technique, anastomosis method and degree of pelvic nerve preservation were significant factors for the entire patient population and that colonic nerve preservation was a significant factor 5 years after surgery. Analysis of patients with lower rectal cancer only showed that in addition to surgical technique and anastomosis method, pouch reconstruction was effective and autonomic nerve preservation was effective 5 years after surgery. As a result, when the anastomotic site was closer to the anus, the frequency of fragmentation increased; we concluded that pouch reconstruction was an effective surgical technique and colonic nerve preservation was effective in the longer term. PMID:21051900

  17. Pretreatment factors significantly influence quality of life in cancer patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the impact of pretreatment factors on quality of life (QOL) in cancer patients. Methods and Materials Pretreatment QOL (via Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy [FACT], version 2) was obtained in 1,428 patients in several prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials including nonmetastatic head-and-neck (n = 1139), esophageal (n = 174), lung (n = 51), rectal (n = 47), and prostate (n = 17) cancer patients. Clinically meaningful differences between groups were defined as a difference of 1 standard error of measurement (SEM). Results The mean FACT score for all patients was 86 (20.7-112) with SEM of 5.3. Statistically significant differences in QOL were observed based on age, race, Karnofsky Performance Status, marital status, education level, income level, and employment status, but not by gender or primary site. Using the SEM, there were clinically meaningful differences between patients ≤50 years vs. ≥65 years. Hispanics had worse QOL than whites. FACT increased linearly with higher Karnofsky Performance Status and income levels. Married patients (or live-in relationships) had a better QOL than single, divorced, or widowed patients. College graduates had better QOL than those with less education. Conclusion Most pretreatment factors meaningfully influenced baseline QOL. The potentially devastating impact of a cancer diagnosis, particularly in young and minority patients, must be addressed

  18. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood tests (which look for chemicals such as tumor markers) Bone marrow biopsy (for lymphoma or leukemia) Chest ... the case with skin cancers , as well as cancers of the lung, breast, and colon. If the tumor has spread ...

  19. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  20. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schröder, Fritz H; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    • The most recent evidence for the link between a family history of prostate cancer and individual risk for future disease was examined, with the aim of understanding what the existence and nature of a family history of prostate cancer does to a man's risk of developing the disease. • Our findings highlighted the clear association between a family history of prostate cancer and increased risk of developing the disease; with a greater proximity of relatedness, greater number of family members affected and/or earlier age at diagnosis of the family member elevating risk further. • These findings have important clinical implications for the identification and subsequent management of men deemed to be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The evidence for prostate cancer risk reduction with the mono 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) finasteride in a low-risk population and, more recently, with the dual 5ARI dutasteride in a population at increased risk of developing the disease, has potential to expand management options for men at risk of developing prostate cancer beyond more frequent and/or earlier surveillance. • Given that family history can be easily assessed in routine clinical practice, it should be regarded as an important parameter to consider alongside PSA level for prostate cancer risk assessment. PMID:21166744

  1. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  2. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin K Ederer

    Full Text Available The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V̇O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI, total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total, and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98. During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01 The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V̇O2 and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV̇O2 relative to ΔV̇O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively. In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V̇O2 and O2 delivery during exercise.

  3. Radiation chemistry of oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Primary investigations have been conducted at the end of the 1950th years in the area of radiation chemistry of the oils, the physical-chemical properties of crude oil have been investigated the influence of ionizing rays. This report by M. Malikzadeh is about the results of investigations carried out in the field of development of radiation chemistry. The power of the radiation dose and temperature-thermal effect of the collapse of Phentadekan -Oil, and oil fractions (200-400 degrees Celsium, 230-310 degrees Celsium) of radiation-thermal separation of olefins - Conversion of hydrogen from the transormation of black oil, bitumen and tar Kinetics of the above-mentioned processes was studied, the technical-economic indicators of the products were determined

  4. Colorectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver Metastases: Influence of Surgical Strategy on Treatment Results and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnik, O. O.; Burlaka, A. A.; Lukashenko, A. V.; Priymak, V. V.; Volk, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the research was to improve immediate and long-term results of treatment in patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancers (smCRC) developing surgical treatment program with application of simultaneous and staged methods for resection of primary tumor and liver metastases.   Materials and methods. The study was based upon reviewing treatment results for 125 patients with smCRC (рТ1-4N0-2M1 in colon cancer and рТ1-3N0-2M1 in rectal cancer) who underwent either simulta...

  5. SU-E-T-633: Dose Differences in Lung Cancer SBRT: The Influences of MLC Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to compare the plan dose distribution of lung SBRT with MLCs in different width. Methods: Cases with phase INSCLC were enrolled. 9 cases were undergone 4D-CT scanning in the supine position with both arms raised. 3D-CT images without IV contrast were afterwards acquired with 3mm thickness and used for dose calculations. ITV was generated by using the inspiration and expiration images. The ITV can be expanded by geometric set-up uncertainty (5 mm) to generate the PTV. All chest normal tissues including chest wall were contoured by doctors. A total dose of 55 Gy will be given in 5 fractions within 10–14 days with an inter fraction interval of 2–3 days. Guided by the RTOG trial 3502 protocol, 11–13 non-coplanar fields with 6MV photon were arranged. Three types of MLCs with width of 3mm, 5mm and 10mm at isocenter position, were used separately to generate a CRT plan for each case. Monte Carlo algorithm was applied to dose calculation. All plans were adjusted as possible to meet the dose constraints. Dose-volume parameters from plans as followed were compared and analysized: PTV V55Gy, COMPTV D70% (70% of normalization dose), volume A (body minus PTV), and R100% and R50% (the ratio of x% of prescription dose isoline volume to PTV volume). Results: MLCs, 3mm and 5mm wide, played the identical roles on dosimetry of the plans, excluding the parameter volume A (p<0.05). On the contrary, MLC with width of 10mm was significantly inferior to the other two types on most parameters (p<0.05). For R50%, all types contributed equally (p>0.05). Conclusion: For lung cancer SBRT, MLC width had influence to dosimetry, especially in irradiation area. Small size MLC, e.g. 3mm and 5mm, are helpful to generate a high quality treatment plan, which could meet the strict criteria for targets and OAR.

  6. The influence of MRI scan position on patients with oropharyngeal cancer undergoing radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patient position protocols influence registration quality in patients with oropharyngeal cancer undergoing radical radiotherapy and the consequences for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition and radiotherapy planning. Twenty-two oropharyngeal patients underwent a computed tomography (CT), a diagnostic MRI (MRID) and an MRI in the radiotherapy position within an immobilization mask (MRIRT). Clinicians delineated the GTV on the CT viewing the MRID separately (GTVC); on the CT registered to MRID (GTVD) and on the CT registered to MRIRT (GTVRT). Planning target volumes (PTVs) were denoted similarly. Registration quality was assessed by measuring disparity between structures in the three set-ups. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiotherapy planning was performed for PTVC, PTVD and PTVRT. To determine the dose received by the reference PTVRT, we optimized for PTVC and PTVD while calculating the dose to PTVRT. Statistical significance was determined using the two-tailed Mann–Whitney or two-tailed paired student t-tests. A significant improvement in registration accuracy was found between CT and MRIRT versus the MRID measuring distances from the centre of structures (geometric mean error of 2.2 mm versus 6.6 mm). The mean GTVC (44.1 cm3) was significantly larger than GTVD (33.7 cm3, p value = 0.027) or GTVRT (30.5 cm3, p value = 0.014). When optimizing the VMAT plans for PTVC and investigating the mean dose to PTVRT neither the dose to 99% (58.8%) nor 95% of the PTV (84.7%) were found to meet the required clinical dose constraints of 90% and 95% respectively. Similarly, when optimizing for PTVD the mean dose to PTVRT did not meet clinical dose constraints for 99% (14.9%) nor 95% of the PTV (66.2%). Only by optimizing for PTVRT were all clinical dose constraints achieved. When oropharyngeal patients MRI scans are performed in the radiotherapy position there are significant

  7. SU-E-T-633: Dose Differences in Lung Cancer SBRT: The Influences of MLC Width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim is to compare the plan dose distribution of lung SBRT with MLCs in different width. Methods: Cases with phase INSCLC were enrolled. 9 cases were undergone 4D-CT scanning in the supine position with both arms raised. 3D-CT images without IV contrast were afterwards acquired with 3mm thickness and used for dose calculations. ITV was generated by using the inspiration and expiration images. The ITV can be expanded by geometric set-up uncertainty (5 mm) to generate the PTV. All chest normal tissues including chest wall were contoured by doctors. A total dose of 55 Gy will be given in 5 fractions within 10–14 days with an inter fraction interval of 2–3 days. Guided by the RTOG trial 3502 protocol, 11–13 non-coplanar fields with 6MV photon were arranged. Three types of MLCs with width of 3mm, 5mm and 10mm at isocenter position, were used separately to generate a CRT plan for each case. Monte Carlo algorithm was applied to dose calculation. All plans were adjusted as possible to meet the dose constraints. Dose-volume parameters from plans as followed were compared and analysized: PTV V55Gy, COMPTV D70% (70% of normalization dose), volume A (body minus PTV), and R100% and R50% (the ratio of x% of prescription dose isoline volume to PTV volume). Results: MLCs, 3mm and 5mm wide, played the identical roles on dosimetry of the plans, excluding the parameter volume A (p<0.05). On the contrary, MLC with width of 10mm was significantly inferior to the other two types on most parameters (p<0.05). For R50%, all types contributed equally (p>0.05). Conclusion: For lung cancer SBRT, MLC width had influence to dosimetry, especially in irradiation area. Small size MLC, e.g. 3mm and 5mm, are helpful to generate a high quality treatment plan, which could meet the strict criteria for targets and OAR

  8. Influence of Long-Distance Bicycle Riding on Serum/Urinary Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a study focused on the determination of the influence of long-distance (53 km bicycle riding on levels of chosen biochemical urinary and serum prostate cancer (PCa biomarkers total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA, free PSA (fPSA and sarcosine. Fourteen healthy participants with no evidence of prostate diseases, in the age range from 49–57 years with a median of 52 years, underwent physical exercise (mean race time of 150 ± 20 min, elevation increase of 472 m and pre- and post-ride blood/urine sampling. It was found that bicycle riding resulted in elevated serum uric acid (p = 0.001, median 271.76 vs. 308.44 µmol/L pre- and post-ride, respectively, lactate (p = 0.01, median 2.98 vs. 4.8 mmol/L and C-reactive protein (p = 0.01, 0.0–0.01 mg/L. It is noteworthy that our work supports the studies demonstrating an increased PSA after mechanical manipulation of the prostate. The subjects exhibited either significantly higher post-ride tPSA (p = 0.002, median 0.69 vs. 1.1 ng/mL pre- and post-ride, respectively and fPSA (p = 0.028, median 0.25 vs. 0.35 ng/mL. Contrary to that, sarcosine levels were not significantly affected by physical exercise (p = 0.20, median 1.64 vs. 1.92 µmol/mL for serum sarcosine, and p = 0.15, median 0.02 µmol/mmol of creatinine vs. 0.01 µmol/mmol of creatinine for urinary sarcosine. Taken together, our pilot study provides the first evidence that the potential biomarker of PCa—sarcosine does not have a drawback by means of a bicycle riding-induced false positivity, as was shown in the case of PSA.

  9. Influence of Long-Distance Bicycle Riding on Serum/Urinary Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Ondrak, Ales; Skoda, Jan; Zitka, Zdenek; Cernei, Natalia; Masarik, Michal; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we present a study focused on the determination of the influence of long-distance (53 km) bicycle riding on levels of chosen biochemical urinary and serum prostate cancer (PCa) biomarkers total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA) and sarcosine. Fourteen healthy participants with no evidence of prostate diseases, in the age range from 49-57 years with a median of 52 years, underwent physical exercise (mean race time of 150 ± 20 min, elevation increase of 472 m) and pre- and post-ride blood/urine sampling. It was found that bicycle riding resulted in elevated serum uric acid (p = 0.001, median 271.76 vs. 308.44 µmol/L pre- and post-ride, respectively), lactate (p = 0.01, median 2.98 vs. 4.8 mmol/L) and C-reactive protein (p = 0.01, 0.0-0.01 mg/L). It is noteworthy that our work supports the studies demonstrating an increased PSA after mechanical manipulation of the prostate. The subjects exhibited either significantly higher post-ride tPSA (p = 0.002, median 0.69 vs. 1.1 ng/mL pre- and post-ride, respectively) and fPSA (p = 0.028, median 0.25 vs. 0.35 ng/mL). Contrary to that, sarcosine levels were not significantly affected by physical exercise (p = 0.20, median 1.64 vs. 1.92 µmol/mL for serum sarcosine, and p = 0.15, median 0.02 µmol/mmol of creatinine vs. 0.01 µmol/mmol of creatinine for urinary sarcosine). Taken together, our pilot study provides the first evidence that the potential biomarker of PCa-sarcosine does not have a drawback by means of a bicycle riding-induced false positivity, as was shown in the case of PSA. PMID:26999116

  10. Influence of the overall time of radiotherapy on local control for T2 cancer of the tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty patients with T2 cancer of the tongue treated with external irradiation plus radium implants at Aichi Cancer Center were reviewed retrospectively to analyze the influence of overall treatment time on local control. One hundred percent (11/11) local control was achieved in patients irradiated within 35 days, in contrast to only 52% (13/25) local control in those irradiated over 35 days. This result indicates that prolonged overall time is associated with loss of local control. This prolongation is mainly due to the prolonged interval between external and internal irradiation. The interval was likely to be longer because of enhanced acute radiation mucositis, especially in patients administered bleomycin during external irradiation. External irradiation should be followed by interstitial irradiation as soon as possible to keep overall time shorter. (author)

  11. Spiritual well-being and its influence on fatigue in patients undergoing active cancer directed treatment: A correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spiritual well-being and fatigue are key parameters in assessing health related quality of life that determine treatment tolerance, treatment outcomes and reflect patient′s coping ability in the illness-wellness disease trajectory. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients on active cancer treatment were enrolled to the study. Functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-spirituality (FACIT-Sp and FACIT-Fatigue scales were used to assess spiritual well-being and fatigue scores during their cancer treatment. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and bivariate relationships determined using the Spearman Correlation analysis. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of fatigue score during treatment. Results: Mean spiritual well-being score was 20.96 out of 48 and scores were significantly higher in females compared with males (P = 0.03, lower with higher stage (P = 0.008 and lower in head and neck and gastrointestinal malignancies (P = 0.03 when compared with gynecological and breast malignancies. Fatigue was present in all the 200 patients studied and the mean fatigue score was 13.09. Higher fatigue scores were observed in patients with advanced stages of cancer (Stage IV (F [3,199] = 5.67, P = 0.001. There was a significant inverse relationship between fatigue scores with spiritual well-being (P < 0.001. Spiritual well-being score emerged as a significant primary negative predictor (β = -0.23, P = 0.001 for fatigue scores followed by stage of disease (β =0.23, P = 0.001 and gender (β = -0.18, P = 0.01 as significant secondary predictors. Conclusion: Fatigue during cancer directed treatment is influenced by spiritual wellbeing, disease stage and gender. Further studies should examine the mediating variables that influence fatigue.

  12. The influence of personality and perceived stress on the development of breast cancer: 20-year follow-up of 29,098 Japanese women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Takayuki; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Norimasa; Wang, Chaochen; Lin, Yingsong; Mori, Mitsuru; Tanno, Kozo; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. However, it remains unproven whether psychological factors have an influence on breast cancer incidence. In our earlier study, subjects possessing two personality traits, decisiveness and “ikigai” (a Japanese word meaning something that makes one’s life worth living), showed a significantly lower risk of developing breast cancer, although no psychological factors have been convincingly demonstrated to have an influence on breast cancer development in other studies. Therefore, we conducted this follow-up analysis to confirm the association between breast cancer incidence and psychological traits, using the final dataset of a large-scale prospective cohort study in Japan. We identified 209 cases of incident breast cancer out of a maximum 21-year follow-up of 29,098 Japanese women. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, adjusted for the same potential confounders used in our previous study, did not reveal any significant relationships between breast cancer incidence and four psychological traits: having “ikigai”, decisiveness, ease of anger arousal, and perceived stress. Our finding is consistent with previous studies, and suggests that the psychological traits are unlikely to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:27586560

  13. Influence of metabolic indicators, smoking, alcohol and socioeconomic position on mortality after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe Benzon; Kroman, Niels; Ibfelt, Else Helene;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors differently distributed among social groups like obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, smoking, and alcohol intake predict survival after breast cancer diagnosis and therefore might mediate part of the observed social inequality in survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a...... cohort study among 1250 postmenopausal breast cancer patients identified among 29 875 women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. Participants completed questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were made at enrollment. Information on survival, socioeconomic position, and comorbidity was...... circumference and diabetes, and smoking and alcohol affected but did not explain the social gradient. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that these factors explain some but not all the social inequality in survival after breast cancer and that improvement of lifestyle to some extent would improve survival among...

  14. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs significantly associated with breast size (p−8: rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH, and a third (ZNF365 is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk.

  15. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; Desmond, Renee; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Nagy, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggr...

  16. The influence of race and ethnicity on the biology of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Brian E.; Lee, Norman H.; Seewaldt, Victoria; Shen, Hongbing

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming clear that some of the differences in cancer risk, incidence and survival among people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds can be attributed to biological factors. However, identifying these factors and exploiting them to help eliminate cancer disparities has proved challenging. With this in mind, we asked four scientists for their opinions on the most crucial advances, as well as the challenges and what the future holds for this important emerging area of research.

  17. The Influence of Arm Swelling Duration on Shoulder Pathology in Breast Cancer Patients with Lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Dae-Hyun Jang; Min-Wook Kim; Se-Jeong Oh; Jae Min Kim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the pathological effect of the duration of arm swelling on the shoulder pathology in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods Forty seven breast cancer patients with unilateral arm lymphedema were assessed. The duration of the arm swelling and shoulder pain were recorded. Ultrasound examination of the shoulder joint was performed in all patients to detect any lesions. Results Abnormalities were detected by ultrasound in 41/47 (87.2%) study participants. Suba...

  18. Tumor Regression Grades: Can They Influence Rectal Cancer Therapy Decision Tree?

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa D. Santos; Cristina Silva; Anabela Rocha; Eduarda Matos; Carlos Nogueira; Carlos Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Background. Evaluating impact of tumor regression grade in prognosis of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials and Methods. We identified from our colorectal cancer database 168 patients with LARC who received neoadjuvant therapy followed by complete mesorectum excision surgery between 2003 and 2011: 157 received 5-FU-based chemoradiation (CRT) and 11 short course RT. We excluded 29 patients, the remaining 139 were reassessed for disease recurrence and survival; the sl...

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: age differences in factors influencing patients' treatment decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen ML; Young JM; Solomon MJ

    2013-01-01

    Mikaela L Jorgensen,1,2 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon1,31Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe), Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR), Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: Older colorectal cancer patients are significantly less likely than younger patients to receive gu...

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: age differences in factors influencing patients’ treatment decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen,Mikaela; Young, Jane; Solomon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mikaela L Jorgensen,1,2 Jane M Young,1,2 Michael J Solomon1,31Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe), Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Sydney Local Health District, NSW, Australia; 2Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR), Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaPurpose: Older colorectal cancer patients are significantly less likely than younger patients to receive gu...

  1. Influence of free fatty acids on glucose uptake in prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntalkumar;

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate.......The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate....

  2. Factors influencing the decline in lung density in a Danish lung cancer screening cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Saher B.; Dirksen, Asger; Lo, Pechin; Skovgaard, L.T.; de Bruijne, Marleen; Pedersen, Jesper H.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer screening trials provide an opportunity to study the natural history of emphysema by using CT lung density as a surrogate parameter.In the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 2,052 participants were included. At screening rounds, smoking habits were recorded and spirometry was performed....... CT lung density was measured as the volume-adjusted 15th percentile density (PD15). A mixed effects model was used with former smoking males with...

  3. Influence of imaging and histological factors on prostate cancer detection and localisation on multiparametric MRI: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess factors influencing prostate cancer detection on multiparametric (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced) MRI. One hundred and seventy-five patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were included. Pre-operative MRI performed at 1.5 T (n = 71) or 3 T (n = 104), with (n = 58) or without (n = 117) an endorectal coil were independently interpreted by two radiologists. A five-point subjective suspicion score (SSS) was assigned to all focal abnormalities (FAs). MR findings were then compared with whole-mount sections. Readers identified 192-214/362 cancers, with 130-155 false positives. Detection rates for tumours of 3), 0.5-2 cc and >2 cc were 33-45/155 (21-29 %), 15-19/35 (43-54 %) and 8-9/12 (67-75 %) for Gleason ≤6, 17/27 (63 %), 42-45/51 (82-88 %) and 34/35 (97 %) for Gleason 7 and 4/5 (80 %), 13/14 (93 %) and 28/28 (100 %) for Gleason ≥8 cancers respectively. At multivariate analysis, detection rates were influenced by tumour Gleason score, histological volume, histological architecture and location (P < 0.0001), but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS was a significant predictor of both malignancy of FAs (P < 0.005) and aggressiveness of tumours (P < 0.00001). Detection rates were significantly influenced by tumour characteristics, but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS significantly stratified the risk of malignancy of FAs and aggressiveness of detected tumours. (orig.)

  4. Genomic instability influences the transcriptome and proteome in endometrial cancer subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Jens K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to clinical characteristics, DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in epithelial malignancies in general and in endometrial cancers in particular. We mapped ploidy-associated chromosomal aberrations and identified corresponding gene and protein expression changes in endometrial cancers of different prognostic subgroups. Methods DNA image cytometry classified 25 endometrioid cancers to be either diploid (n = 16 or aneuploid (n = 9, and all uterine papillary serous cancers (UPSC to be aneuploid (n = 8. All samples were subjected to comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression profiling. Identified genes were subjected to Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA and were correlated to protein expression changes. Results Comparative genomic hybridization revealed ploidy-associated specific, recurrent genomic imbalances. Gene expression analysis identified 54 genes between diploid and aneuploid endometrioid carcinomas, 39 genes between aneuploid endometrioid cancer and UPSC, and 76 genes between diploid endometrioid and aneuploid UPSC to be differentially expressed. Protein profiling identified AKR7A2 and ANXA2 to show translational alterations consistent with the transcriptional changes. The majority of differentially expressed genes and proteins belonged to identical molecular functions, foremost Cancer, Cell Death, and Cellular Assembly and Organization. Conclusions We conclude that the grade of genomic instability rather than the histopathological subtype correlates with specific gene and protein expression changes. The identified genes and proteins might be useful as molecular targets for improved diagnostic and therapeutic intervention and merit prospective validation.

  5. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  6. Hypercarbon chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text points out the emerging significance of higher-valent carbon compounds. It describes the compounds of carbon with coordination numbers greater than four and explores the delocalized bonds of π aromatic molecules as a basis for rational description of orbitals; localized multicentered orbitals; the interactions of metallic ions with other atoms and molecules; the skeletal electron counts as a guide for synthesis; and the isolobal concept. Illustrated are the ways in which these subjects bring together structure and reactivity in the great diversity of novel carbon chemistry and its relationship to that of boron, lithium, hydrogen, the metals, and others

  7. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M.; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2014-01-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 t...

  8. Influence of drainage status on soil and water chemistry, litter decomposition and soil respiration in central Amazonian forests on sandy soils

    OpenAIRE

    Berton Zanchi, F.; M. J. Waterloo; A. J. Dolman; Groenendijk, M; Kruijt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Central Amazonian rainforest landscape supports a mosaic of tall terra firme rainforest and ecotone campinarana, riparian and campina forests, reflecting topography-induced variations in soil, nutrient and drainage conditions. Spatial and temporal variations in litter decomposition, soil and groundwater chemistry and soil CO2 respiration were studied in forests on sandy soils, whereas drought sensitivity of poorly-drained valley soils was investigated in an artificial drainage experiment. Sli...

  9. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  10. MODERN INTEGRATION INTO THE WORLDWIDE EDUCATION PROCESS ON THE EXAMPLE OF THE TOXICOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY DISCIPLINE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THE BOLOGNA SYSTEM IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Nizhenkovskaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  On the current moment of time one of most important strategic tasks of modernization of the system of higher education inUkraineis the education of high quality provided to the pharmacists in order to satisfy the worldwide needs. Therefore, the improvement of higher education system and formatting of new conceptual directions of its development on the basis of analytical marking and strategic approaches are very important for studying of pharmaceutical courses, namely Toxicological chemistry. Nowadays people live in the conditions of toxicological strain; therefore, we have an important task to give the complete, systematic and accessible knowledge of Toxicological chemistry to the future pharmacists. The purpose of this work is the implementation of new pedagogical, psychological, statistical, chemical, analytical and biochemical methods into the studying of Toxicological chemistry in the conditions of Bologna System inUkraine. Testing control is the first most important modern diagnostic and control instrument used for the evaluation of students’ activities in the conditions of credit-modular system. The second most important instrument is a complex of principles used during the studying of this course such as "general-to-specific and specific-to-general" and “from simple to complex, from complex to simple”, “synthesis and analysis of information”, “visualization of toxicological processes on the new schemes”, work “on-line”. The third important instrument is the connection with modern sciences. All these instruments are provided by credit-modular educational system.

  11. Influence of oncogenic transcription factors on chromatin conformation and implications in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang YA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeqing Angela Yang,1 Jung Kim,1 Jindan Yu1,21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: In recent years, facilitated by rapid technological advances, we are becoming more adept at probing the molecular processes, which take place in the nucleus, that are crucial for the hierarchical regulation and organization of chromatin architecture. With an unprecedented level of resolution, a detailed atlas of chromosomal structures (histone displacement, variants, modifications, chromosome territories, and DNA looping and mechanisms underlying their establishment, provides invaluable insight into physiological as well as pathological phenomena. In this review, we will focus on prostate cancer, a prevalent malignancy in men worldwide, and for which a curative treatment strategy is yet to be attained. We aim to catalog the most frequently observed oncogenic alterations associated with chromatin conformation, while emphasizing the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, which is found in more than one-half of prostate cancer patients and its functions in compromising the chromatin landscape in prostate cancer.Keywords: chromatin conformation, ERG, prostate cancer

  12. [Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  13. Performance of the colorectal cancer screening marker Sept9 is influenced by age, diabetes and arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørntoft, Mai-Britt Worm; Nielsen, Hans J; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Annually, colorectal cancer (CRC) is diagnosed in >1.4 million subjects worldwide and incidence is increasing. Much effort has therefore been focused on screening, which has proven to reduce cancer-related mortality. The Sept9 DNA-methylation assay is among the most well studied blood......: Using a retrospective nested case-control study design, we studied plasma from 150 cancer and 150 controls selected from a well-characterized cohort of 4698 subjects referred for diagnostic colonoscopy due to CRC-related symptoms. The cases and controls were matched on age and gender, and moreover cases...... higher false positive rate (p = 0.007). Diabetes was associated with Sept9 positivity with an OR of 5.2 (95 % CI 1.4-19.1). When the performance of Sept9 was adjusted for these parameters in a final multivariate regression model, the OR for a positive Sept9 test to be associated with CRC increased from 8...

  14. Identifying Factors Influencing Pancreatic Cancer Management to Inform Quality Improvement Efforts and Future Research: A Scoping Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Soong, Daniel; Gallinger, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) patients appear to receive suboptimal care. We conducted a systematic review to identify factors that influence PC management which are amenable to quality improvement. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the references of eligible studies were searched from 1996 to July 2014. Two authors independently selected and reviewed eligible studies. Identified factors were mapped onto a framework of determinants of care delivery and outcomes. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using Downs and Black criteria. Most of the 33 eligible studies were population-based observational studies conducted in the United States. Patient (age, socioeconomic status, race) and institutional (case volume, academic status) factors influence care delivery and outcomes (complications, mortality, readmission, survival). Two studies implemented interventions to improve quality of care (centralization to high-volume hospitals, multidisciplinary care). One study examined system determinants (referral wait times). No studies examined the influence of guideline or provider characteristics. The overall lack of health services research in PC is striking. Factors and interventions identified here can be used to plan PC quality improvement programs. Further research is needed to explore the influence of guideline and provider factors on PC management and evaluate the impact of quality improvement interventions. PMID:26752254

  15. Expression profiling to predict outcome in breast cancer: the influence of sample selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression profiling of tumors using DNA microarrays is a promising method for predicting prognosis and treatment response in cancer patients. It was recently reported that expression profiles of sporadic breast cancers could be used to predict disease recurrence better than currently available clinical and histopathological prognostic factors. Having observed an overlap in those data between the genes that predict outcome and those that predict estrogen receptor-α status, we examined their predictive power in an independent data set. We conclude that it may be important to define prognostic expression profiles separately for estrogen receptor-α-positive and estrogen receptor-α-negative tumors

  16. Influence of comorbidity on cancer patients’ rehabilitation needs, participation in rehabilitation activities and unmet needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, L.V.; Hansen, D.G.; Kragstrup, Jakob; Johansen, C.; Christensen, R.de.P.; Vedsted, P.; Søndergaard, J.

    2014-01-01

    and stratified for gender, age and cancer type. RESULTS: A total of 3,439 patients responded (70 %). Comorbidity at all levels was statistically significant associated with a physical rehabilitation need, and moderate to severe comorbidity was statistically significant associated with a need in the...... emotional, family-oriented and financial areas as well as participation in physical-related rehabilitation activities. Stratified analyses showed that significant results in most cases were related to being older than 65 years or having colorectal or prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Comorbidity at all levels...

  17. Influence of sex differences on the progression of cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Uldall, Maria; Appel, Camilla;

    2013-01-01

    on the progression of cancer-induced bone pain. Materials and Methods: 4T1-luc2 mammary cancer cells were introduced into the femoral cavity of female and male BALB/cJ mice. Bioluminescence tumor signal, pain-related behavior and bone degradation were monitored for 14 days. Results: Female mice demonstrated...... a significantly greater bioluminescence signal on day 2 compared to male mice and, in addition, a significant earlier onset of pain-related behavior was observed in the females. No sex difference was observed for bone degradation. Finally, a strong correlation between pain-related behavior and bone degradation...

  18. What Is Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unneeded cells. Cancer cells may be able to influence the normal cells, molecules, and blood vessels that ... Cancers . We also have collections of information on childhood cancers and cancers in adolescents and young adults . ...

  19. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  20. Characterization of groundwater chemistry under the influence of lithologic and anthropogenic factors along a climatic gradient in Upper Cauvery basin, South India

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya, B. S.; Sekhar, M.; Riotte, Jean; Banerjee, A.; Braun, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogeological and climatic effect on chemical behavior of groundwater along a climatic gradient is studied along a river basin. 'Semi-arid' (500-800 mm of mean annual rainfall), 'sub-humid' (800-1,200 mm/year) and 'humid' (1,200-1,500 mm/year) are the climatic zones chosen along the granito-gneissic plains of Kabini basin in South India for the present analysis. Data on groundwater chemistry is initially checked for its quality using NICB ratio ( 40 % of pollution) and eliminated for the ch...

  1. Influence of defect chemistry on heterogeneous catalysis : two examples using Sr(FexTi1-x)O3-delta and Li3N

    OpenAIRE

    Vracar, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Starting point for this work was to emphasize the role of defect chemistry in heterogeneous catalysis, particularly in respect of point defects. These act as active centers and are basic requirement for ionic conductivity which is important for electrocatalysis. Two systems will be considered from two different aspects. In both systems ionic charge carriers play an important role. As first example, catalytic properties of the mixed-conducting Sr(FexTi1-x)O3-d solid solution series will be inv...

  2. Genetic variants in the HER2 gene: Influence on HER2 overexpression and loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresti, Nicola; Lee, Joanne; Rourke, Emma; Televantou, Despina; Jamieson, David; Verrill, Mark; Boddy, Alan V

    2016-03-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression in breast cancer is an indicator of poor prognosis and is the pre-requisite for treatment with the agents targeting this member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family. In order to determine the influence of these common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HER2 gene, genomic DNA was obtained from 361 patients with breast cancer, aged between 29 and 82 years. Samples of tumour tissue were obtained from 241 (66%) patients and material for extraction of DNA is isolated from surrounding normal tissue by laser capture microdissection. Genotyping was performed using the Taqman fluorogenic 5' nuclease assay. Of the 360 patients with definitive determination of HER2 status, 49% were positive. The Ile655Val SNP had no influence on the frequency of HER2 expression. However, the proline allele of the Ala1170Pro SNP was associated with a higher frequency of HER2 overexpression (56% versus 43%, p = 0.015). Where the germline genotype was homozygous, the tumour genotype was identical in every case and for both SNPs. In HER2-positive tumours, heterozygosity was maintained in only 15% and 18% of the Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro SNPs, respectively. This was lower than in the HER2-negative tumours (46% and 43%, respectively). Normal breast tissue (n = 23) retained the germline genotype in all but one case. The underlying link between the Ala1170Pro SNP and HER2 positivity is not known, nor is the significance of HER2 overexpression and loss of heterozygosity in breast cancer. However, these results illustrate the complexity of HER2 genotype and overexpression in this disease. PMID:26773371

  3. Aichi Cancer Center 10-year experience with conservative breast treatment of early breast cancer: retrospective analysis regarding failure patterns and factors influencing local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We analyzed the clinical results of conservative breast therapy in our institute to determine the risk factors influencing local and distant disease recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1989 to 1997, 301 breasts of 295 women with early breast cancer were treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. There were 212 incidences of Stage I breast cancer, and 89 of Stage II. Patients were routinely treated with local resection, axillar dissection, and 46-50 Gy irradiation given in 23-25 fractions. Some also received a radiation boost to the tumor bed. Results: The 5-/8-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 93.2/91.5%, 86.0/80.6%, and 95.1/92.5%, respectively. Using both univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor volume, estrogen receptor status, and age <40 years were significant prognostic factors for disease-free survival. Both age <40 years and surgical method had a strong effect on local control by uni- and multivariate analysis. Surgical margin status was a significant prognostic factor for local control at the univariate level (p<0.0001), though it had only borderline significance at the multivariate level (p 0.08). No patient experienced severe morbidity due to radiotherapy. Conclusion: The results obtained are comparable to previously reported data. Although the follow-up period was too short to draw definite conclusions about long-term outcomes, the outcome from conservative breast treatment was acceptable

  4. Comparison of quality of life between urban and rural gastric cancer patients and analysis of influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Tian; Zhen-Chun Chen; Bin Wu; Xin Meng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The conception of quality of life has been widely accepted by clinic doctors. Evaluations of the treatment effect of chronic diseases have been changed to depend not only on the survival time, but also on the quality of life of the patients. Fuzhou City and Changle County are highincidence areas of the gastric cancer in Fujian Province.The aims of this research were to compare the quality of life of urban patients with that of rural patients and analyze the factors influencing quality of life of gastric cancer patients in Fujian Province.METHODS: The samples were drawn with cluster sampling. The urban sample consisted of 162 patients aged 25 to 75 with 143 males and 19 females. The rural sample consisted of 200 patients aged 32 to 78 with 166 males and 34 females. The patients in both the urban and rural areas were investigated, and their scores on 21 items reflecting the quality of life were measured. The methods of ttest and stepwise regression were used to analyze the data.RESULTS: The average total scores of quality of life of the urban patients and rural patients were 64.11 and 68.69respectively. There was a significant difference between the means of two samples (P = 0.0004). Seven variables in the regression model estimated by the urban sample and 4 variables in the model by the rural sample were at the level of significance α = 0.05. Family income, nutrition and rehabilitating exercise were selected into both the urban and rural regression models.CONCLUSION: Most of the gastric cancer patients have poor quality of life in Fujian Province and the rural patients have lower quality of life than that of urban patients. The patients having more family income have better quality of life, and enhanced nutrition and doing rehabilitating exercise are helpful in improving the quality of life of the gastric cancer patients.

  5. Influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function in elderly patients with advanced lung cancer and to establish a comprehensive therapeutic pattern which is effective and economical with lower side-effects. Methods: A total of 60 aged patients with lung cancer were randomly and equally divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. Patients in group A were purely treated with traditional Chinese medicine and patients in group B were treated with a combination of interventional chemotherapy and traditional Chinese medicine. And two therapeutic courses (6-8 weeks) were conducted in both groups. The serum T-lymphocyte subsets levels of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, NK cells and CD4+CD25+ Treg cell levels were estimated with flow cytometry. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: No significant difference in serum levels of T cell subsets and CD4+CD25+ Treg cell levels existed between the two groups, both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). However, after the treatment the CD4+CD25+ Treg cell level in group B was significantly lower than that in group A (P < 0.05). The short-term effective rate and the total clinical benefit rate in group B were 40% and 73.3% respectively, which were much better than those in group A (20% and 63.3% respectively). Conclusion: Interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine will not damage the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer, on the contrary, the combination therapy, through effectively reducing the suppressor T cell level,shows excellent short-term effect. It indicates that interventional chemotherapy combined with Chinese medicine is an effective comprehensive therapeutic mode for elderly patients with advanced lung cancer. (authors)

  6. The influence of advanced age on the morbi-mortality of gastric cancer after curative surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Mayol-Oltra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: gastric cancer (GC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Spain after lung, colorectal, breast and prostate tumours. Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment in localized gastric cancer. Objective: the aim of our study is to evaluate and compare the clinical and surgical aspects, development of postoperative complications and outcomes of patients over 75 years old compared with younger patients in our centre. Material and methods: comparative retrospective study, from March 2003 to June 2011. We diagnosed 166 cases of GC, 109 (65 % underwent curative surgery. Two groups were settled: group M: ≥ 75 years (41 patients and group m: < 75 years (68 patients. We analyzed age, sex, comorbidities, tumour location, clinical stage, perioperative chemotherapy, surgical technique, postoperative complications, recurrence and mortality from cancer. Results: a more frequent presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and a greater postoperative mortality by medical causes were the only significant differences between both groups. Also, a lower proportion of patients in group M received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent D1 lymphadenectomy. However, the rate of local and systemic recurrence and overall survival were similar in both groups. Conclusions: age should not be considered a contraindication for curative surgery on GC. The general condition and comorbidities are more important to contraindicate surgical treatment.

  7. Lung cancer incidence after exposure of rats to low doses of radon: influence of dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect on lung cancer incidence of a long exposure to low levels of radon, 500 male 3-months-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were exposed to a cumulative dose of 25 WLM of radon and its daughters, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, during 18 months. Exposure conditions were controlled in order to maintain a defined PAEC: 42 x 106 J.m-3 (2 WL), in the range of domestic and environmental exposures. Animals were kept until they died or given euthanasia when moribund. Mean survival times were similar in both irradiated and control groups: 828 days (SD = 169) and 830 days (SD = 137), as well as lung cancer incidence, 0.60% at 25 WLM and 0.63% for controls. The incidence of lung lesions was compared statistically with controls and those previously obtained at cumulative exposures of 25 and 50 WLM delivered over a 4-6 month period, inducing a significant increase of lung cancer, 2.2% and 3.8% respectively. Such a comparison showed a decreased lung cancer incidence related to a decrease in the dose rate for low levels of radon exposure. (author)

  8. Existing evidence on the influence of prebiotic intake on the risk of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Hidalgo-Garcia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Among the risk of developing colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota there is a complex relationship that can be modified by diet. The effect of prebiotics on the composition and colonic microbiota activity can produce beneficial changes in the altered flora of pacients with colon cancer. Of all the prebiotic inulin HP and sinergil (30% oligofructose and 70% inulin are supposed to be the ones that keep a closer relationship with the tumor. This phenomenon could be explained by the long chain fructans. The animal studies observed that administration of prebiotics reduces the number and multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci, reduce the number and lifetime of the tumors, inhibits their growth and potentiates the effect of different chemotherapeutic drugs. The results obtained in rodents that are intended to simulate genetic predisposition are not homogeneous. Some human studies, mostly healthy, observed changes in the composition of the microbiota, in the bile acid profile and the short chain fatty acids, but the results differ among studies and no conclusive results are obtained.

  9. Rectal cancer: the influence of tumor proliferation on response to preoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Regression of rectal carcinoma after preoperative irradiation is variable, likely reflecting differences in the physical and biologic properties of these tumors. This study examines the association between the pathologic response of rectal cancer after irradiation and its pretreatment proliferative state as assayed by the activity of the proliferative dependent antigens (Ki-67, PCNA) and mitotic counts. Methods and Materials: One hundred and twenty-two patients with locally advanced rectal cancer received preoperative irradiation followed by surgery. Pretreatment tumor biopsies were scored for the extent of Ki-67 and PCNA immunostaining and the number of mitoses per 10 high-powered fields. Postirradiation surgical specimens were examined for extent of residual disease. Results: The tumors of 38 of 122 patients (31%) exhibited marked pathologic downstaging (no residual tumor or cancer confined to the rectal wall) after preoperative irradiation. Two features were associated with the likelihood of marked pathologic regression after preoperative irradiation: tumor proliferative activity and lesion size. When stratified by lesion size, marked tumor regression occurred most frequently in smaller tumors with high Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity compared to larger tumors with lower Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity. Intermediate downstaging rates were seen for small or large tumors with moderate Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity. Conclusion: Tumor Ki-67, PCNA, and mitotic activity predicts the likelihood of response to irradiation, which may aid in formulating treatment policies for patients with rectal cancer

  10. Functional screening identifies miRNAs influencing apoptosis and proliferation in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Holm, Anja; Rantala, Juha; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rasmussen, Mads H; Ostenfeld, Marie S; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Øster, Bodil; Schepeler, Troels; Tobiasen, Heidi; Thorsen, Kasper; Sieber, Oliver M; Gibbs, Peter; Lamy, Philippe; Hansen, Torben F; Jakobsen, Anders; Riising, Eva M; Helin, Kristian; Lubinski, Jan; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke; Laurberg, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorect...

  11. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  12. Influence of taste disorders on dietary behaviors in cancer patients under chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laviano Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the relationship between energy and nutrient consumption with chemosensory changes in cancer patients under chemotherapy. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study, enrolling 60 subjects. Cases were defined as patients with cancer diagnosis after their second chemotherapy cycle (n = 30, and controls were subjects without cancer (n = 30. Subjective changes of taste during treatment were assessed. Food consumption habits were obtained with a food frequency questionnaire validated for Mexican population. Five different concentrations of three basic flavors --sweet (sucrose, bitter (urea, and a novel basic taste, umami (sodium glutamate-- were used to measure detection thresholds and recognition thresholds (RT. We determine differences between energy and nutrient consumption in cases and controls and their association with taste DT and RT. Results No demographic differences were found between groups. Cases showed higher sweet DT (6.4 vs. 4.4 μmol/ml; p = 0.03 and a higher bitter RT (100 vs. 95 μmol/ml; p = 0.04 than controls. Cases with sweet DT above the median showed significant lower daily energy (2,043 vs.1,586 kcal; p = 0.02, proteins (81.4 vs. 54 g/day; p = 0.01, carbohydrates (246 vs.192 g/day; p = 0.05, and zinc consumption (19 vs.11 mg/day; p = 0.01 compared to cases without sweet DT alteration. Cases with sweet DT and RT above median were associated with lower completion of energy requirements and consequent weight loss. There was no association between flavors DT or RT and nutrient ingestion in the control group. Conclusion Changes of sweet DT and bitter RT in cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment were associated with lower energy and nutrient ingestion. Taste detection and recognition thresholds disorders could be important factors in malnutrition development on patients with cancer under chemotherapy treatment.

  13. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this ...

  14. Decision making in the surgical treatment of breast cancer: factors influencing women’s choices for mastectomy and breast conserving surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Catherine Bellavance; Susan Beth Kesmodel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to healthcare, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through...

  15. Influence of climate and eolian dust on the major-element chemistry and clay mineralogy of soils in the northern Bighorn basin, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Soil chronosequences in the northern Bighorn basin permit the study of chronologic changes in the major-element chemistry and clay mineralogy of soils formed in different climates. Two chronosequences along Rock Creek in south-central Montana formed on granitic alluvium in humid and semiarid climates over the past two million years. A chronosequence at the Kane fans in north-central Wyoming formed on calcareous alluvium in an arid climate over the past 600,000 years. Detailed analyses of elemental chemistry indicate that the soils in all three areas gradually incorporated eolian dust that contained less zirconium, considered to be chemically immobile during weathering, than did the alluvium. B and C horizons of soils in the wettest of the chronosequences developed mainly at logarithmic rates, suggesting that leaching, initially rapid but decelerating, dominated the dust additions. In contrast, soils in the most arid of the chronosequences developed at linear rates that reflect progressive dust additions that were little affected by leaching. Both weathering and erosion may cause changes with time to appear logarithmic in A horizons of soils under the moist and semiarid climatic regimes. Clay minerals form with time in the basal B and C horizons and reflect climatic differences in the three areas. Vermiculite, mixed-layer illite-smectite, and smectite form in the soils of the moist-climate chronosequence; smectite forms in the semiarid-climate chronosequence; and smectite and palygorskite form in the arid-climate chronosequence. ?? 1990.

  16. Surface chemistry of solid and liquid interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Erbil, Husnu Yildirim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the chemistry of surfaces and interfaces is required by many research personnel in the chemical and life science industries, as surfaces and interfaces play a critical role in many of the processes they seek to influence.Surface Chemistry of Solid and Liquid Interfaces provides a concise and easily accessible introduction to this fascinating subject. With a smooth evolution of ideas from familiar physical chemistry principles, the student can develop a sophisticated understanding of the chemistry of surfaces and interfaces. The book is also highly relevant to new re

  17. Multinomial Logistic Regression Predicted Probability Map To Visualize The Influence Of Socio-Economic Factors On Breast Cancer Occurrence in Southern Karnataka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, B.; Ashok, N. C.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2014-11-01

    Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to develop statistical model that can predict the probability of breast cancer in Southern Karnataka using the breast cancer occurrence data during 2007-2011. Independent socio-economic variables describing the breast cancer occurrence like age, education, occupation, parity, type of family, health insurance coverage, residential locality and socioeconomic status of each case was obtained. The models were developed as follows: i) Spatial visualization of the Urban- rural distribution of breast cancer cases that were obtained from the Bharat Hospital and Institute of Oncology. ii) Socio-economic risk factors describing the breast cancer occurrences were complied for each case. These data were then analysed using multinomial logistic regression analysis in a SPSS statistical software and relations between the occurrence of breast cancer across the socio-economic status and the influence of other socio-economic variables were evaluated and multinomial logistic regression models were constructed. iii) the model that best predicted the occurrence of breast cancer were identified. This multivariate logistic regression model has been entered into a geographic information system and maps showing the predicted probability of breast cancer occurrence in Southern Karnataka was created. This study demonstrates that Multinomial logistic regression is a valuable tool for developing models that predict the probability of breast cancer Occurrence in Southern Karnataka.

  18. Short rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles are associated with prostate cancer susceptibility and influence gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) gene contains five variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and previous studies have described polymorphisms for hTERT-VNTR2-2nd. We investigated how allelic variation in hTERT-VNTR2-2nd may affect susceptibility to prostate cancer. A case-control study was performed using DNA from 421 cancer-free male controls and 329 patients with prostate cancer. In addition, to determine whether the VNTR polymorphisms have a functional consequence, we examined the transcriptional levels of a reporter gene linked to these VNTRs and driven by the hTERT promoter in cell lines. Three new rare alleles were detected from this study, two of which were identified only in cancer subjects. A statistically significant association between rare hTERT-VNTR2-2nd alleles and risk of prostate cancer was observed [OR, 5.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-24.43; P = 0.021]. Furthermore, the results indicated that these VNTRs inserted in the enhancer region could influence the expression of hTERT in prostate cancer cell lines. This is the first study to report that rare hTERT VNTRs are associated with prostate cancer predisposition and that the VNTRs can induce enhanced levels of hTERT promoter activity in prostate cancer cell lines. Thus, the hTERT-VNTR2-2nd locus may function as a modifier of prostate cancer risk by affecting gene expression

  19. Creating a Context for Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman Schwartz, A.

    Until relatively recently, the teaching of chemistry at the college and university level in the United States has been quite traditional and oriented primarily toward the preparation of chemists. Students not concentrating in the sciences have often been poorly served by existing courses. Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, a textbook for nonscience majors developed under the sponsorship of the American Chemical Society, is an effort to address the needs and interests of this audience. The book introduces the phenomena and principles of chemistry within the context of socially significant issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, alternate energy sources, nutrition, and genetic engineering. The chemistry is presented as needed to inform an understanding of the central topics, and the text features student-centered activities designed to promote critical thinking and risk-benefit analysis as well as an understanding of chemical principles. This paper summarizes the origin, development, content, pedagogy, evaluation, and influence of Chemistry in Context and considers its potential implications for other disciplines and the instruction of science majors.

  20. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  1. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  2. Influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms in breast carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (Mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms was analysed using the person-year method in 1359 Japanese breast carcinoma patients. There were 111 multiple primary neoplasms, including bilaterl breast cancer, in 109 patients; the incidence rate was 0.0072 per person-year. The incidence rate in patients with a family history of cancer was 1.29 times higher than in those without. In the bilateral breast cancer group there was about a 3 times higher frequency of family history of breast cancer. Irradiation therapy raised the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms 1.28 fold, and Mitomycin C (40 mg) had no effect on the occurrence of neoplasms during a 10-year observation period. (author)

  3. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  4. Dosimetric influence of hyaluronic acid in patients with prostate cancer treated with RT3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to assess the influence on dosimetry by the introduction of hyaluronic acid and assess the need for the realization of a second CT scan and consequent re-planning of RT3D treatment. (Author)

  5. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F;

    2011-01-01

    C, HTR3D, HTR3E, HTR1, or CNR1 showed significant associations with opioid dose in both the development and the validation analyzes. These findings do not support the use of pharmacogenetic analyses for the assessed SNPs to guide opioid treatment. The study also demonstrates the importance of...... variability with opioid doses in a large population using a confirmatory validation population was warranted. We recruited 2294 adult European patients using a World Health Organization (WHO) step III opioid and analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes with a putative influence on opioid...... opioid dose and were included as covariates. The patients were randomly divided into 1 development sample and 1 validation sample. None of 112 SNPs in the 25 candidate genes OPRM1, OPRD1, OPRK1, ARRB2, GNAZ, HINT1, Stat6, ABCB1, COMT, HRH1, ADRA2A, MC1R, TACR1, GCH1, DRD2, DRD3, HTR3A, HTR3B, HTR2A, HTR3...

  6. Monitoramento atmosférico passivo de SO2, NO2 e O3 em áreas urbanas e de influência industrial como prática de química ambiental para alunos de graduação Atmospheric passive monitoring of SO2, NO2 and O3 in urban areas and in those under industrial influence as an environmental chemistry experiment for undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    Vânia P. Campos; Lícia P. S. Cruz; Eagles M. Alves; Tatiane S. Santos; Adriano D. Silva; Ana C. C. dos Santos; Lima, Angelo M. V.; Carine S. Paixão; Daniele C. M. B. Santos; Denise S. Brandão; Elisângela J. S. Andrade; José I. Moreira Jr.; Karla C. S. Conceição; Márcia de S. Ramos; Maria C. G. Pontes

    2006-01-01

    This study is a result of undergraduate student participation in the Environmental Chemistry discipline provided by the Chemistry Institute/UFBA. The students were involved in the development of passive samplers, a project of the LAQUAM (Environmental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory). The students' residences and other neighborhoods were used to create a passive sampling network, allowing the measurement of atmospheric levels of pollutants in urban areas and in those under industrial influenc...

  7. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  8. MAP kinase pathways and calcitonin influence CD44 alternate isoform expression in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dysregulated expression and splicing of cell adhesion marker CD44 is found in many types of cancer. In prostate cancer (PC) specifically, the standard isoform (CD44s) has been found to be downregulated compared with benign tissue whereas predominant variant isoform CD44v7-10 is upregulated. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and paracrine calcitonin are two common factors linked to dysregulated expression and splicing of CD44 in cancer. Calcitonin has been found to increase proliferation and invasion in PC acting through the protein kinase A pathway. In androgen-independent PC with known high CD44v7-10 expression, CD44 total and CD44v7-10 RNA or protein were assessed in response to exogenous and endogenous calcitonin and to inhibitors of protein kinase A, MEK, JNK, or p38 kinase. Benign cells and calcitonin receptor-negative PC cells were also tested. MEK or p38 but not JNK reduced CD44 total RNA by 40%–65% in cancer and benign cells. Inhibition of protein kinase A reduced CD44 total and v7-10 protein expression. In calcitonin receptor-positive cells only, calcitonin increased CD44 variant RNA and protein by 3 h and persisting to 48 h, apparently dependent on an uninhibited p38 pathway. Cells with constitutive CT expression showed an increase in CD44v7-10 mRNA but a decrease in CD44 total RNA. The MEK pathway increases CD44 RNA, while calcitonin, acting through the protein kinase A and p38 pathway, facilitates variant splicing. These findings could be used in the formulation of therapeutic methods for PC targeting CD44 alternate splicing

  9. The Influence of Arm Swelling Duration on Shoulder Pathology in Breast Cancer Patients with Lymphedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hyun Jang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pathological effect of the duration of arm swelling on the shoulder pathology in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.Forty seven breast cancer patients with unilateral arm lymphedema were assessed. The duration of the arm swelling and shoulder pain were recorded. Ultrasound examination of the shoulder joint was performed in all patients to detect any lesions.Abnormalities were detected by ultrasound in 41/47 (87.2% study participants. Subacromial subdeltoid bursal thickening was found in 26/47 (55.3% participants, distension of the biceps brachii tendon sheath was found in 14/47 (29.8% and a supraspinatus tendon tear was found in 13/47 (27.7%. Patients with a supraspinatus tendon tear were found to have a significantly longer duration of lymphedema (1310 days vs. 398 days, p = 0.032.The duration of arm lymphedema has a progressive pathological effect on rotator cuff. Clinicians should adopt an early management approach of shoulder pain in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema.

  10. Trace Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  11. Thermoplastic patient fixation. Influence on chest wall and target motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, A.; Hadjiev, J.; Lakosi, F.; Vallyon, M.; Cselik, Z.; Bogner, P.; Repa, I. [Kaposvar Univ. (Hungary). Health Science Center; Horvath, A. [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2007-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Several methods have been developed to reduce tumor motions and patient movements during radiotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, a multislice CT-based analysis was performed to examine the effect of a thermoplastic patient immobilization system on the chest wall and tumor motions. Patients and Methods: Ten patients with stage II-IV lung cancer were enrolled into the study. According to tumor localization, five patients had peripheral, and five patients central lung cancer (T2-T4). In total, six series of measurements were made with a multislice CT scanner, both with and without mask fixation, in normal breathing, at maximal tidal volume inhalation, and at maximal tidal volume exhalation. Results: Movements of chest wall, diaphragm and tumor, with and without mask, under different breathing conditions were registered. With the use of the immobilization system, no significant difference was found in diaphragmatic movements (mean deviation of diaphragm: 41.7-40.5 mm to the right, and 40.5-36.8 mm to the left side) and in tumor motions (mean deviation of tumor: 15.3-12.4 mm in craniocaudal, and 11.5-8.8 mm in posterolateral direction, mean medial deviation: 4.6-4.1 mm, mean lateral deviation: 7.2-5 mm). Significant differences were observed concerning tumor motions in anteroposterior direction (mean: 8.9-6.3 mm) and transverse chest movements in anteroposterior direction. Conclusion: Besides the advantage of optimal patient positioning, the movements of the bony chest wall can be considerably reduced by using the immobilization system. However, this fixation system has limitations concerning its suitability for minimizing tumor motions. (orig.)

  12. Depressive symptoms in lung cancer Patients and their family caregivers and the influence of family environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoff, Laura A.; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Baker, Sherman

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study investigated depressive symptomatology in lung cancer patients and their identified caregiver. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews and administered measures of family environment, depressive symptomatology, and the extent to which the caregiver blamed the cancer on the patient not having taken better care of him/herself to 190 patient-caregiver dyads. Multivariate two-level models were used to estimate the unique effects for each dyad member and cross-partner effects while controlling for interdependencies in the data. Results More than half of patients (55%) were male but 74% of caregivers were female. The majority (57.4%) were spouses, followed by offspring and other family or friends The baseline model with covariates showed that younger caregivers, spouse caregivers, and caregivers who blamed the patient for the cancer had higher depressive symptom scores. When examining the unique effect for each dyad member, with the exception of patient report of familial conflict, patient and caregiver reports of lower familial cohesion and expressiveness and higher conflict were associated with higher depression scores for patient and caregiver respectively. When examining cross-partner effects, patient reports of lower cohesion, lower expressiveness and greater conflict were associated with higher caregiver depression scores. Offspring caregivers reported less depression than non-offspring caregivers. Conclusion The family environment and blaming the patient during times of illness can affect both patient and caregiver depression. Findings suggest that quality of the family dynamic is important for patients but may be particularly influential for caregivers. Future research should aid clinicians' assessment of family environment when making treatment plans. PMID:20119935

  13. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lips, Irene M., E-mail: I.M.Lips@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kotte, Alexis N.T.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center of Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leerdam, Monique E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as {>=}50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2-3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4-3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  14. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as ≥50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2–3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4–3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07–4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  15. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoog Lambert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER protein positive tumors (n = 72 was associated with an altered regulation of 276 genes. Expression profiles based on these genes clustered ER-positive tumors into two molecular subclasses, one of which was associated with HRT use and had significantly better recurrence free survival despite lower ER levels. A comparison with external data suggested that gene regulation in tumors associated with HRT was negatively correlated with gene regulation induced by short-term estrogen exposure, but positively correlated with the effect of tamoxifen. Conclusion Our findings suggest that post-menopausal HRT use is associated with a distinct gene expression profile related to better recurrence-free survival and lower ER protein levels. Tentatively, HRT-associated gene expression in tumors resembles the effect of tamoxifen exposure on MCF-7 cells.

  16. Influence of radioiodine therapy on the immuno phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with thyroid cancer of different age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the results of a study of the phenotypic composition of blood lymphocytes in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer of different all age before and on day 6 after radioiodine therapy. The phenotypic profile of peripheral blood cells was determined in patients of three age groups: patients aged under 18 years (group 1), patients whose age was within the range 19 to 40 years (group 2), and patients older than 41 years (group 3). The studies have shown that in patients with thyroid cancer, abnormalities developed in the composition of peripheral blood lymphocytes, which were more pronounced in elderly patients. Under the influence of radioiodine, disturbances in the immune system of patients are aggravated. The most significant after-effects of radioiodine therapy that had been identified in patients of all age groups, were represented by a significant decrease in the number of B-lymphocytes, an increase in natural killer cells and CD95+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, it was found that radioiodine has the most significant effect on the immune system of children and adolescents. In this age group, the content of lymphocyte subpopulations is changing: CD4+, CD8+, IRI, CD19+, CD16+CD56+, CD95+ and HLA-DR, which suggests the need for further dynamic studies in this age group of patients, which is the most sensitive to radioiodine effect in order to determine the extent of immunological disorders and the terms of their recovery

  17. Factors influencing the uptake of 18F-fluoroestradiol in patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: 18F-Fluoroestradiol (FES) PET imaging provides a non-invasive method to measure estrogen receptor (ER) expression in tumors. Assessment of factors that could affect the quantitative level of FES uptake is important as part of the validation of FES PET for evaluating regional ER expression in breast cancer. Methods: This study examines FES uptake in tumors from 312 FES PET scans (239 patients) with documented ER+ primary breast cancer. FES uptake was compared to clinical and laboratory data, treatment prior to or at time of scan, and properties of FES and its metabolism and transport. Linear mixed models were used to explore univariate, threshold-based and multivariate associations. Results: Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was inversely associated with FES SUV. Average FES uptake did not differ by levels of plasma estradiol, age or rate of FES metabolism. FES tumor uptake was greater for patients with a higher body mass index (BMI), but this effect did not persist when SUV was corrected for lean body mass (LBM). In multivariate analysis, only plasma SHBG binding was an independent predictor of LBM-adjusted FES SUV. Conclusions: Calculation of FES SUV, possibly adjusted for LBM, should be sufficient to assess FES uptake for the purpose of inferring ER expression. Pre-menopausal estradiol levels do not appear to interfere with FES uptake. The availability and binding properties of SHBG influence FES uptake and should be measured. Specific activity did not have a clear influence on FES uptake, except perhaps at higher injected mass per kilogram. These results suggest that FES imaging protocols may be simplified without sacrificing the validity of the results.

  18. Do tumor size or patient age influence the accuracy of sentinel lymph node (Sn) detection in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim was to analyze the influence of the age of the patient and tumor size on the accuracy to identify SN in patients with breast cancer. The whole population are 250 patients with breast cancer. In 236 data on size and age were available. Mean age was 53.6 years, range 28-87 years. Patients were classified 1) depending an age: 40 60 years: 73 p and 2) depending on tumor size (mm): 30: 46 p. Examination protocol: All patients received a peritumoral injection of 111 MBq (3mCi) of 99mTc-HSA-nanocolloid in 1 - 3 ml. 2 h later 300 seconds anterior and lateral thoracic scans were obtained. A 57-Co flood phantom was positioned back to the patient to outline the anatomical contour and help to localize SN. SN was marked on the skin with permanent ink. Intraoperative SN localization was performed using a gamma probe. Histopathologic analysis of SN was done with haematoxylin/eosin, immunohistochemistry and PCR. Histopathology of the SN was compared to the histopathology of all the other lymph nodes drawn out by the surgeon. SN were identified by lymphoscintigraphy in 227 cases of 250 (91 %). 221 of them (97 %) were localized in axyla. In 210 of 221 SN could be localized and drawn out at surgery. The no detection and false negative rate were much higher in patients aged > 60 (29 and 33 %) and in tumors > 30 mm (32 and 19 %) than in patients 60 y and tumors > 30 mm (46 %) and the highest false negative rate appears in patients >60 and tumors > 30 mm (33 %) 1) No FN were found in patients with tumor size <10 mm. 2) No FN were found in patients aged under 40 years. 3) FN rate seems to be higher in older patients. 4) The age of patients and the size of tumor seem to influence an the SN detection rates. (author)

  19. Can the clinical course of cancer be influenced by non-antineoplastic drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    Brandes, L. J.; Friesen, L A

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory and anecdotal clinical evidence suggests that some common non-antineoplastic drugs may affect the course of cancer. The authors present two cases that appear to be consistent with such a possibility: that of a 63-year-old woman in whom a high-grade angiosarcoma of the forehead improved after discontinuation of lithium therapy and then progressed rapidly when treatment with carbamazepine was started, and that of a 74-year-old woman with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon that re...

  20. Factors that influence the provision of sexual health care by Dutch cancer nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamel, C; Hengeveld, M W; Davis, B; Van der Tweel, I

    1995-06-01

    A descriptive-correlational design was used with a sample of Dutch cancer nurses (n = 104) to describe provision of sexual health care (SHC) and to explore influential factors. This report is limited to the second goal. The Theory of Reasoned Action provided the conceptual framework for investigation of five previously identified factors and one unexplored factor. Knowledge, comfort, attitude (towards sexuality) and subjective norm were significantly related with provision of SHC. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that knowledge and comfort were significant explanatory variables, accounting for 37% of the variance. PMID:7665318

  1. Von Hippel-Lindau status influences phenotype of liver cancers arising from PTEN loss

    OpenAIRE

    Sendor AB; Hacker KE; Chen S; Corona AL; Sen O; Chiang DY; Snavely A; Rogers AB; Montgomery SA; Rathmell WK; McRee AJ

    2015-01-01

    Adam B Sendor,1 Kathryn E Hacker,1 Shufen Chen,1 Armando L Corona,1 Oishee Sen,1 Derek Y Chiang,1 Anna Snavely,1 Arlin B Rogers,2 Stephanie A Montgomery,1 W Kimryn Rathmell,1 Autumn J McRee11Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Section of Pathology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USABackground: PTEN loss contributes to the development of liver diseases including he...

  2. Factors influencing the speed of cancer diagnosis in rural Western Australia: a General Practice perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Marthe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The speed of diagnosis impacts on prognosis and survival in all types of cancer. In most cases survival and prognosis are significantly worse in rural and remote Australian populations who have less access to diagnostic and therapeutic services than metropolitan communities in this country. Research suggests that in general delays in diagnosis were a factor of misdiagnosis, the confounding effect of existing conditions and delayed or misleading investigation of symptoms. The aim of this study is to further explore the factors that impact on the speed of diagnosis in rural Western Australia with direct reference to General Practitioners (GPs working in this setting. Methods The methodology consisted of a structured discussion of specific cases. GPs based in two rural locations in Western Australia were asked to identify up to eight clinical cases for discussion. A diversity of cases was requested encompassing those with timely and delayed diagnosis of cancer. Focus groups were held with the practitioners to identify which factors under six headings delayed or facilitated the diagnosis in each case. A structured summary of the discussion was relayed to a wider group of GPs to seek additional views or comments on specific factors that impact on the speed of cancer diagnosis in rural and remote locations in Australia. Results A number of factors affecting the speed of diagnosis were identified: the demographic shift towards a frailer and older population, presenting with multiple and complex diseases, increases the challenge to identify early cancer symptoms; seasonal and demanding work patterns leading to procrastination in presenting for medical care; unhelpful scheduling of specialist appointments; and the varying impact of informal networks and social relationships. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study we have generated a number of hypotheses that require formal evaluation: (1 GPs working within informal

  3. [The influence of the combined treatment on the energy metabolism in patients with the uterine cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, S V

    2000-12-01

    The experience of management of the patients with cancer of the uterus body was summarized to improve the results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment. The essential initial disorders of the power supply metabolism, keeping worsening after the operation, were revealed. The conduction of the immune correction therapy in complex of preoperative preparation with individual selection of the immune preparations using the tests in vitro had promoted the postoperative period course improvement, the frequency of complications reduction, the stabilization and tendency for the power supply metabolism restoration after the operation and further during the radiation therapy conduction. PMID:11247494

  4. Influence of amifostine on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korst, A.E.C.; Sterre, M.L.T. van der; Gall, H.E.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Vermorken, J.B.; Vijgh, W.J.F. van der

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cisplatin was investigated in 13 patients receiving 18 courses of cisplatin alone or in combination with amifostine to investigate the influence of amifostine (WR 2721; Ethyol) on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin. Cisplatin was administered as a 1-h i.v. infusion, whereas am

  5. Challenges to complementary and alternative medical research: focal issues influencing integration into a cancer care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Engebretson, Joan; Garcia, Mary K

    2005-09-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies are increasingly used by cancer patients for palliative and postcancer preventive and/or wellness care. It is critical that evidence-based models be employed to both provide information for patients' use and informed consent and for physicians to advise patients and assess relative risk:benefit ratios of using specific complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches within the cancer care paradigm. Research models for biomedicine have been somewhat limited when applied to broader, more holistic conceptualizations of health common to many forms of CAM. Thus, while numerous challenges to studying CAM exist, a fundamental question is not just what CAM practices should be studied but how CAM should be studied. The authors propose a model that emphasizes methodologic rigor yet approaches CAM research according to relative levels of evidence, meaning, and context, ranging from experimental, quantitative studies of mechanism to qualitative, observational studies of noetic/salutogenic variables. Responsibility for training researchers prepared to meet such challenges rests on both CAM and mainstream academic institutions, and care must be taken to avoid philosophical and practical pitfalls that might befall a myopic perspective of integration. PMID:16113028

  6. The influence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells on angiogenesis and tumor growth after cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Su, Xiaosan; Yang, Liu; Qiao, Fei; Fang, Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yiyin; Yin, Yanfeng; Chen, Rui; Hong, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    While myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been reported to participate in the promotion of angiogenesis and tumor growth, little is known about their presence and function during perioperative period. Here, we demonstrated that human MDSCs expressing CD11b(+) , CD33(+) and HLA-DR(-) significantly increased in lung cancer patients after thoracotomy. CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs isolated 24 hr after surgery from lung cancer patients were more efficient in promoting angiogenesis and tumor growth than MDSCs isolated before surgical operation in allograft tumor model. In addition, CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs produced high levels of MMP-9. Using an experimental lung metastasis mouse model, we demonstrated that the numbers of metastases on lung surface and Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs at postoperative period were enhanced in proportion to the degree of surgical manipulation. We also examined that syngeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) significantly inhibited the induction and proliferation of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and further prevented lung metastasis formation in the mice undergoing laparotomy. Taken together, our results suggest that postoperatively induced MDSCs were qualified with potent proangiogenic and tumor-promotive ability and this cell population should be considered as a target for preventing postoperative tumor metastasis. PMID:26756887

  7. Influence of different variables in lymphoscintigraphy and gamma probe detection of sentinel node in breast cancer; Parametres influencant la lymphoscintigraphie et la detection per-operatoire du ganglion sentinelle dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, A.; Irlinger, P.; Malezieux, X. [Hopitaux Civils de Colmar, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 68 - Colmar (France); Meyer, C. [Hopitaux Civils de Colmar, Dept. Chirurgie, 68 - Colmar (France)

    2006-10-15

    Aim: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of age, injection site and tumor characteristics on visualizing sentinel nodes (SLN) by lymphoscintigraphy and tracer spread in 216 breast cancer. Two injection sites were assessed, either peritumoral injection site (166 patients) or peri-areolar (50 patients). Results: In the peri-areolar group, 6% of the observed cases were negative with lymphoscintigraphy and 4% with the probe, results to be compared with 21% (lymphoscintigraphy) and 11 % (probe) in the peritumoral group. Metastatic nodes were detected in both group, with a rate of 27% in peri-areolar group and 32% in peritumoral group. At least one SLNs was found in 82% of the cases. When lymphoscintigraphy has found more than one node, probe detection was positive in all cases. In the eventuality of negative lymphoscintigraphy, probe identification by surgeon was positive in 47% of the cases. Thirty-four percent of metastatic SLNs were observed in negative lymphoscintigraphy, 29% in negative probe detection. In case of negative lymphoscintigraphy average age of patients was 66.3 years old whereas it was 60.6 in positive ones. Neither tumor type nor harpoon have shown significant influence on the detection of node by both techniques. Probe captation intensity was higher in positive scintigraphy. Conclusion: The location of the injection site and node invasion do not show any significant influence on gamma probe detection. However the effect of massive character or not of metastatic invasion has not been taken into the consideration. Lack of scintigraphic visualization does not predict lack of probe detection. (authors)

  8. The influence of redox chemistry and pH on chemically active forms of arsenic in sewage sludge-amended soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell-Barrachina, A.; Jugsujinda, A.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Wetland Biogeochemistry Inst.; Burlo, F. [Univ. Miguel Hernandez, Alicante (Spain). Div. Tecnologia de Alimentos; Sirisukhodom, S. [Mahidol Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Environmental Health Science Dept.; Anurakpongsatorn, P. [Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Environmental Science

    1999-07-01

    Chemical fractionation procedures were used to quantify the effect of the sediment redox and pH conditions on the adsorption and solubility of arsenic (As) in municipal sewage sludge and sewage sludge-amended soil. Sludge and sludge-amended soil were incubated in microcosms in which Eh-pH conditions were controlled. Samples were sequentially extracted to determine As in various chemical forms (water soluble, exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides, bound to insoluble organics and sulfides) and the chemically inactive fraction (mineral residues). In both sewage sludge and sludge-amended soil, As chemistry was governed by large molecular humic matter and sulfides and Fe and Mn-oxides. Solubility of As remained low and constant under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in sludge-amended soil. After dissolution of Fe and Mn-oxides, As{sup 5+} was released into sludge solution, reduced to As{sup 3+} and likely precipitated as sulfide. Therefore, an organic amendment rich in sulfur compounds, such as sewage sludge, would drastically reduce the potential risks derived from As pollution under highly anoxic conditions by precipitation of this toxic metalloid as insoluble and immobile sulfides.

  9. Evaluation of pH control agents influencing on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary water chemistry condition of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, In Hyoung; Jung, Hyun Jun; Cho, Dae Chul [Dept. of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The effect of various pH agents on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was investigated under a simulated secondary water chemistry condition of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a laboratory, and the steel's corrosion performance was compared with the field data obtained from Uljin NPP unit 2 reactor. All tests were carried out at temperatures of 50 degrees C-250 degrees C and pH of 8.5 - 10. The pH at a given temperature was controlled by adding different agents. Laboratory data indicate that the corrosion rate of carbon steel decreased as the pH increased under the test conditions and the highest corrosion rate was measured at 150 degrees C. This high corrosion rate may be related to high dissolution and instability of Fe oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at 150 degrees C. It was also found that an addition of ethanolamine (ETA) to ammonia was more effectivefor anticorrosion than ammonia alone, and that mixed treatment reduced 50% of iron or more at pHs of 9.5 or higher, especially in the steam generator (SG) and the moisture separator and re-heater.

  10. Post-exposure temperature influence on the toxicity of conventional and new chemistry insecticides to green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Muhammad Mudassir; Afzal, Muhammad; Raza, Abu Bakar M; Akram, Zeeshan; Waqar, Adil; Afzal, Muhammad Babar Shahzad

    2015-05-01

    Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) is an important biological control agent currently being used in many integrated pest management (IPM) programs to control insect pests. The effect of post-treatment temperature on insecticide toxicity of a spinosyn (spinosad), pyrethroid (lambda cyhalothrin), organophosphate (chlorpyrifos) and new chemistry (acetamiprid) to C. carnea larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature coefficients of each insecticide tested were evaluated. From 20 to 40 °C, toxicity of lambda cyhalothrin and spinosad decreased by 2.15- and 1.87-fold while toxicity of acetamiprid and chlorpyrifos increased by 2.00 and 1.79-fold, respectively. The study demonstrates that pesticide effectiveness may vary according to environmental conditions. In cropping systems where multiple insecticide products are used, attention should be given to temperature variation as a key factor in making pest management strategies safer for biological control agents. Insecticides with a negative temperature coefficient may play a constructive role to conserve C. carnea populations. PMID:25972753

  11. The influence of goal-directed fluid therapy on the prognosis of elderly patients with hypertension and gastric cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Zeng,* Yanzhen Li,* Min Liang, Youguang Gao, Hongda Cai, Caizhu LinDepartment of Anesthesia, the First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: We aimed to investigate the influence of perioperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT on the prognosis of elderly patients with gastric cancer and hypertension. Methods: Sixty elderly patients (>60 years old with primary hypertension who received gastric cancer radical surgery and who were American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class II or III were enrolled in the current study. Selected patients were divided randomly into two arms, comprising a conventional intraoperative fluid management arm (arm C, n=30 and a GDFT arm (arm G, n=30. Patients in arm C were infused with crystalloids or colloids according to the methods of Miller’s Anesthesia (6th edition, while those in arm G were infused with 200 mL hydroxyethyl starch over 15 minutes under the FloTrac/Vigileo monitoring system, with stroke volume variation between 8% and 13%. Hemodynamics and tissue perfusion laboratory indicators in patients were recorded continuously from 30 minutes before the operation to 24 hours after the operation. Results: Compared with arm C, the average intraoperative intravenous infusion quantity in arm G was significantly reduced (2,732±488 mL versus 3,135±346 mL, P<0.05, whereas average colloid fluid volume was significantly increased (1,235±360 mL versus 760±280 mL, P<0.05. In addition, there were more patients exhibiting intraoperatively and postoperatively stable hemodynamics and less patients with low blood pressure in arm G. Postoperative complications were less frequent, and the time of postoperative hospital stay shorter, in arm G. No significant differences were observed in mortality between the two arms.Conclusion: Our research showed that GDFT stabilized perioperative hemodynamics and reduced the

  12. 经皮肝动脉化疗栓塞肝癌患者癌性疲乏影响因素分析%Influence Factors of Cancer Fatigue in Liver Cancer Patients with Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘珩; 郭中献; 沙丽艳; 廖婧; 王立明; 勾玉莉; 孙德光; 刘千志; 伊静; 刘洋

    2015-01-01

    目的:探究经皮肝动脉化疗栓塞肝癌患者癌性疲乏的影响因素。方法采用癌性疲乏量表(Cancer Fatigue Scale, CFS)和希望水平量表(Herth Hope Inder,HHI)对124例经皮肝动脉化疗栓塞的肝癌患者癌性疲乏和希望水平进行调查,并分析影响癌性疲乏的主要因素。结果经皮肝动脉化疗栓塞的肝癌患者癌性疲乏总分为(32.79±6.65)分,各维度得分从高到低依次为:躯体疲乏、情感疲乏、认知疲乏。文化程度、家庭经济压力、医疗费用来源、希望水平4个因素进入线性回归方程,影响作用的大小依次是希望水平、家庭经济压力、文化程度、医疗费用来源。结论希望水平、家庭经济压力、文化程度、医疗费用来源是经皮肝动脉化疗栓塞肝癌患者癌性疲乏的主要影响因素。%Objective To analyze the influence factors of cancer related fatigue in liver cancer patients who treated with TACE (transcatheter arterial chemoembolization). Methods Totally 124 liver cancer patients who treated with TACE were surveyed by CFS (Cancer Fatigue Scale) and HHI (Herth Hope Index) and the influence factors of cancer related fatigue were analyze. Results The total score of cancer related fatigue in liver cancer patients who treated with TACE was (32.79 ±6.65).The dimensions with scores from high to low were body fatigue, emotional fatigue and cognitive fatigue. Four factors entered into linear regression, including hope, family income, educational background and source of medical cost. Hope exerted most influence on cancer fatigue, followed by family economic pressure, educational background and source of medical cost. Conclusion Hope, family income, educational background and source of medical cost are the major factors impacting cancer related fatigue of liver cancer patients who treated with TACE.

  13. Influence of radiotherapy on node-positive prostate cancer treated with androgen ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with node-positive prostate cancer that is regionally localized (T1-4, N1-3, M0) have a relatively poor prognosis when a single-treatment modality such as radical surgery, definitive radiotherapy, or androgen ablation is used. While promising results using radical surgery and androgen ablation have been reported, there are no data to support an analogous approach using local radiotherapy and androgen ablation. In this retrospective review, the outcome after local radiotherapy and early androgen ablation (XRT/HORM) was compared to early androgen ablation alone (HORM). Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 1992 there were 181 patients treated with HORM and 27 patients treated with XRT/HORM at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The nodal status of all patients was established pathologically by lymph node dissection, which was terminated after frozen section confirmation of involvement. In the majority of cases androgen ablation was by orchiectomy. The median dose to the prostate in XRT/HORM group was 66 Gy. The median follow-up was 45 months; 49 months for the HORM group and 25 months for the XRT/HORM group. Results: The distribution of prognostic factors between the HORM and XRT/HORM groups was similar, with the exception of tumor grade. There was a significantly larger proportion of high grade tumors in the HORM group. In terms of actuarial disease outcome, at 4 years the results of patients in the HORM group were significantly worse, including a rising prostate specific antigen (PSA) of 53%, any disease progression of 32%, a rising PSA or disease progression of 55%, and local progression of 22%. None of the patients in the XRT/HORM group failed biochemically or clinically. To determine the impact of grade on these findings, the analyses were repeated, using only those with grade 2 tumors. A similar pattern was evidenced with significantly worse actuarial outcome at 4 years for the HORM group using the endpoints of a rising PSA

  14. A Clinical Investigation into the Factors Influencing the Prognosis of Patients with Primary Liver Cancer after Hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Xi-qing; Li Chao-long; Sheng Xing-hua

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore the factors influencing the prognosis of patients with primary liver cancer(PLC) after hepatectomy on purpose to provide the preventive measures for improving the long-term effect.Methods All of the 189 patients who underwent hepatectomy with PLC from May,1994 to January,1998 were included by reviewing their clinical pathological characteristics and treatments. Totally, 22 factors contributed to the long-term survival rate(SR)and the disease-free SR were analysed . All patients were followed up at least 5 years. Results The 3- and 5-year cumulative SRs in the total group were 63% and 45% respectively. The 3- and 5-year SRs and disease-free SRs in the curative resection (CR) group (n=162) were 67%,47%,and 45% and 26% respectively. It was showed that the way by which a tumor was found, tumor size, portal thrombi, satellite nodule, cirrhosis type, TNM stage, tumor envelope, recurrence and treatment, vascular exclusion and transfusion, differentiation grade and CR were prognostic factors by individual variable analysis. A multivariable analysis showed that CR , tumor size and reoperation were significant factors associated with the prognosis. Conclusion The type of CR and tumor size are determinants influencing the prognosis. Early diagnosis of small carcinoma and CR as soon as possible is essential to improving the prognosis of PLC. Avoiding transfusion and controlling the progress of cirrhosis are expected to improve the disease-free SR.

  15. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  16. Factors influencing sentinel lymph node identification failure in breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straalman, K.; Kristoffersen, U.S.; Galatius, H.;

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for failed sentinel lymph node identification in breast cancer surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics, surgeon experience and detection success/failure were registered at 748 sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures...... at our inpatient clinic. Data were analysed with backward stepwise multiple logistic regression with a cut-off point of p<0.05. We found that increased age, increased BMI, medial tumour location and less surgeon experience independently were associated with a lower sentinel lymph node detection rate....... Tumour size, palpability and biopsy method were not significantly associated with the sentinel lymph node detection rate. In conclusion, it is possible to identify patients with a higher risk of sentinel lymph node identification failure and we recommend that these patients are operated by experienced...

  17. Factors Influencing Breast Density in Japanese Women Aged 40-49 in Breast Cancer Screening Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori,Keisuke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A relatively large number of women in their 40s with high-density breasts, in which it can be difficult to detect lesions, are encountered in mammography cancer screenings in Japan. Here, we retrospectively investigated factors related to breast density. Two hundred women (40-49 years old were examined at the screening center in our hospital. Multivariate analysis showed that factors such as small abdominal circumference, high HDL cholesterol, and no history of childbirth were related to high breast density in women in their 40s undergoing mammography. Other non-mammographic screening methods should be considered in women with abdominal circumferences <76cm, HDL-C >53mg/dl, and no history of childbirth, as there is a strong possibility of these women having high-density breasts that can make lesion detection difficult.

  18. Factors influencing local recurrence after excision and radiotherapy for primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between November 1979 and December 1986, 262 patients were treated for primary breast cancer by local excision and radiotherapy at the City Hospital, Nottingham. Local recurrence within the treated breast occurred in 56 patients (21 per cent), in 18 (6.8 per cent) of whom it was gross and uncontrollable. Analysis of clinicopathological features shows patient age, nodal status, tumour size, presence of definitive vascular invasion, adjacent ductal carcinoma in situ and grade to be predictive of local recurrence. A Cox's multivariate analysis of these factors shows the first four to be independently significant. The factors can be combined as a prognostic index which allows identification of patients at high risk of local recurrence. On the basis of these findings the authors altered their selection policy for patients suitable for breast conservation. (author)

  19. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  20. [Influence of music on the quality of life of palliative cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polt, Günter; Fink, Margit; Schieder, Helga; Tanzmeister, Silke

    2014-05-01

    A small prospective, multicentre study examined the effect of a perceptual acoustic stimulus (music) on quality of life of palliative cancer patients with special reference to pain.14 test subjects (m = 4, w = 10; age 67.6 (SD = 9.7)) in stationary or mobile care situation were included. The current therapy has not been modified.Each subject received a CD with 12 songs, an information folder, a guide to using the CD as well as a questionnaire.The offered music therapy was experienced by all study participants (100 %) as helpful. The effect was seen differently in psychological, physical, spiritual, and social quality of life. The pain was reduced nociable in 11 out of 14 participants.From the experience of the autors we demand to offer and enable music therapy in palliative care to each patient, but also adapt to their individual needs. PMID:24723126

  1. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  2. Influence of radiotherapy on the dose of adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    399 patients with early breast cancer were randomly allocated to treatment by either modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomty and radiotherapy. 169 had histologically involved axillary nodes and were randomised to receive either adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy (76 patients) or no systemic adjuvant treatment (93 patients). Chemotherapy comprised a combination of oral cyclophosphamide and intravenous methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF) for 12 cycles over one year. Patients in the mastectomy group received a significantly higher percentage of the planned chemotherapy dose compared with those in the radiotherapy group (median 85% v. 71% p < 0.05). Patients treated with radiotherapy were more frequently nauseated and developed more severe alopecia, but these differences were not statistically significant. At median follow-up of 37 months the relapse-rate and pattern of relapse were similar in both groups of patients receiving CMF. (author). 11 refs.; 5 tabs

  3. Redox Signaling and Bioenergetics Influence Lung Cancer Cell Line Sensitivity to the Isoflavone ME-344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manevich, Yefim; Reyes, Leticia; Britten, Carolyn D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Tew, Kenneth D

    2016-08-01

    ME-344 [(3R,4S)-3,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-8-methyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-chromen-7-ol] is a second-generation derivative natural product isoflavone presently under clinical development. ME-344 effects were compared in lung cancer cell lines that are either intrinsically sensitive or resistant to the drug and in primary immortalized human lung embryonic fibroblasts (IHLEF). Cytotoxicity at low micromolar concentrations occurred only in sensitive cell lines, causing redox stress, decreased mitochondrial ATP production, and subsequent disruption of mitochondrial function. In a dose-dependent manner the drug caused instantaneous and pronounced inhibition of oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in drug-sensitive cells (quantitatively significantly less in drug-resistant cells). This was consistent with targeting of mitochondria by ME-344, with specific effects on the respiratory chain (resistance correlated with higher glycolytic indexes). OCR inhibition did not occur in primary IHLEF. ME-344 increased extracellular acidification rates in drug-resistant cells (significantly less in drug-sensitive cells), implying that ME-344 targets mitochondrial proton pumps. Only in drug-sensitive cells did ME-344 dose-dependently increase the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species and cause oxidation of total (mainly glutathione) and protein thiols and the concomitant immediate increases in NADPH levels. We conclude that ME-344 causes complex, redox-specific, and mitochondria-targeted effects in lung cancer cells, which differ in extent from normal cells, correlate with drug sensitivity, and provide indications of a beneficial in vitro therapeutic index. PMID:27255112

  4. Influence of Multiple Genetic Polymorphisms on Genitourinary Morbidity After Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the genetic risk of late urinary morbidity after carbon ion radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 prostate cancer patients who had undergone carbon ion radiotherapy were evaluated for urinary morbidity. The distribution of patients with dysuria was as follows: Grade 0, 165; Grade 1, 28; and Grade 2, 4 patients. The patients were divided (2:1) consecutively into the training and test sets and then categorized into control (Grade 0) and case (Grade 1 or greater) groups. First, 450 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 118 candidate genes were genotyped in the training set. The associations between the SNP genotypes and urinary morbidity were assessed using Fisher's exact test. Then, various combinations of the markers were tested for their ability to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUC-ROC) curve analysis results. Finally, the test set was validated for the selected markers. Results: When the SNP markers in the SART1, ID3, EPDR1, PAH, and XRCC6 genes in the training set were subjected to AUC-ROC curve analysis, the AUC-ROC curve reached a maximum of 0.86. The AUC-ROC curve of these markers in the test set was 0.77. The SNPs in these five genes were defined as 'risk genotypes.' Approximately 90% of patients in the case group (Grade 1 or greater) had three or more risk genotypes. Conclusions: Our results have shown that patients with late urinary morbidity after carbon ion radiotherapy can be stratified according to the total number of risk genotypes they harbor

  5. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  6. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  7. Environmental chemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe disposal of waste is perceived by public opinion as probably the greatest technical problem of the nuclear industry. This concern derives from the large quantities of radioactivity involved and from the suspicion that man-made barriers are not completely reliable for the lifetime of such waste. Therefore, the biogeochemical cycling of long-lived radionuclides resulting from nuclear power generation represents an important factor influencing decisions regarding the future development of the nuclear industry. As far as technetium is concerned, it should be mentioned that the hazard from the isotope /sup 99/Tc remains practically unchanged for some 30,000 years because of its 2.1x10/sup 5/ year half-life. In this paper the information available on the environmental chemistry of technetium is discussed in order to evaluate the importance of chemical processes in determining the distribution of technetium in the biosphere

  8. Modelling electric discharge chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry occurring in a electric discharge was modelled to predict how it would be influenced by discharge conditions. The discharge was characterized by a calculated Boltzmann electron-energy distribution, from which rate constants for electron-molecule processes in air were determined. These rate constants were used in a chemical kinetics calculation that also included reactions between neutral molecules, ions, free radicals and electronically excited species. The model describes how the discharge chemistry was influenced by humidity, electric field, electron number density, and concentrations of key reagents identified in the study. The use of an electric discharge to destroy airborne contaminant molecules was appraised, the targeted contaminants being CF2Cl2, HCN, and SO2. The modelling results indicate that an electric discharge should be able to remove HCN and CF2Cl2 effectively, especially if the discharge conditions have been optimized. Effective destruction is achieved with a moderate electric field (over 1 x 10-15 V.cm2), a substantial electron number density (over 1 x 1012 cm-3), and the presence of H20 in the process air. The residence time in the discharge was also shown to be important in contaminant destruction. An attempt was made to explain the results of the electric discharge abatement of SO2, a component of a simulated flue-gas mixture. Results from the model indicate that the discharge parameters that increase the concentration of hydroxyl radical also increase the rate of decomposition of SO2. An objective of the study was to explain the apparent enhancement of SO2 destruction by the presence of a small amount of NO2. It was thought that a likely explanation would be the stabilization of HOSO2, an important intermediate in the oxidation of SO2 by NO2. (49 figs., 14 tabs., 75 refs.)

  9. The influence of radiation technique on xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients - prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Irradiation of salivary glands during the treatment of head and neck cancer may lead to an alteration in the amount of saliva produced. Because of this, patients can suffer dryness of the mouth with oral discomfort, taste disturbance and dental decay. Aim: The aim of this study is to estimate late toxicity dependence on radiotherapy method. The main goal is to investigate the correlations between the radiation doses in salivary glands and their salivary excretion fractions (SEF) measured by dynamic scintigraphy. Materials/Methods: In 40 patients with pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer irradiated by IMRT or conformal 3D to a total dose of 62.5 - 72.0 Gy, parotid SEFs were measured. Parotid dose-volume histograms were obtained from 3D computer treatment planning. SEF measurements were performed before (baseline), and 6 weeks and 6 months after radiotherapy by 185 MBq 99Tc injected intravenously and next SEF rates were analysed in relation to radiation doses accumulated. The late radiation toxicity of salivary glands was tested according to the CTC v. 3.0 and SOMA-LENT scales. The non-parametric Mann Whitney test was used for the estimation of relationships. Results: Pre- and post-treatment SEFs were measured in 31 patients treated by IMRT and in 9 patients treated by 3D CRT. Six weeks after radiotherapy SEF was generally lower by 34 %, and 6 months after irradiation by 29.3 % in IMRT technique. In 3D CRT relatively it was lower: after 6 weeks by average 52 % and after 6 months by 35.5 %. Late radiation toxicity of salivary glands was observed at a similar level according to CTC and SOMA-LENT scales in both methods of radiotherapy. Conclusions: The level of SEF in parotid glands measured 6 weeks after radiotherapy clearly reflects the dose-response relationship of irradiated salivary tissue; 6 months later changes of SEF are the result of partial recovery of parotids. The results of sparing salivary glands can be optimized in the future; that is, a further

  10. Factors influencing delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most frequent tumor in developed countries. Since survival from CRC depends mostly on disease stage at the time of diagnosis, individuals with symptoms or signs suspicious of CRC should be examined without delay. Many factors, however, intervene between symptom onset and diagnosis. This study was designed to: 1) Describe the diagnostic process of CRC from the onset of first symptoms to diagnosis and treatment. 2) Establish the time interval from initial symptoms to diagnosis and treatment, globally and considering patient's and doctors' delay, with the latter due to family physician and/or hospital services. 3) Identify the factors related to defined types of delay. 4) Assess the concordance between information included in primary health care and hospital clinical records regarding onset of first symptoms. Descriptive study, coordinated, with 5 participant groups of 5 different Spanish regions (Balearic Islands, Galicia, Catalunya, Aragón and Valencia Health Districts), with a total of 8 acute public hospitals and 140 primary care centers. Incident cases of CRC during the study period, as identified from pathology services at the involved hospitals. A sample size of 896 subjects has been estimated, 150 subjects for each participant group. Information will be collected through patient interviews and primary health care and hospital clinical records. Patient variables will include sociodemographic variables, family history of cancer, symptom perception, and confidence in the family physician; tumor variables will include tumor site, histological type, grade and stage; symptom variables will include date of onset, type and number of symptoms; health system variables will include number of patient contacts with family physician, type and content of the referral, hospital services attending the patient, diagnostic modalities and results; and delay intervals, including global delays and delays attributed to the patient

  11. Influence of free fatty acids on glucose uptake in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and acetate. Methods: Human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, CWR22Rv1, LNCaP, and DU145) were incubated for 2 h and 24 h in glucose-containing (5.5 mM) Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM) with varying concentrations of the free fatty acid palmitate (0–1.0 mM). Then the cells were incubated with [18 F]-FDG (1 μCi/mL; 0.037 MBq/mL) in DMEM either in presence or absence of glucose and in presence of varying concentrations of palmitate for 1 h. Standardized procedures regarding cell counting and measuring for 18 F radioactivity were applied. Cell uptake studies with 14C-1-acetate under the same conditions were performed on PC3 cells. Results: In glucose containing media there was significantly increased FDG uptake after 24 h incubation in all cell lines, except DU145, when upper physiological levels of palmitate were added. A 4-fold increase of FDG uptake in PC3 cells (15.11% vs. 3.94%/106 cells) was observed in media with 1.0 mM palmitate compared to media with no palmitate. The same tendency was observed in PC3 and CWR22Rv1 cells after 2 h incubation. In glucose-free media no significant differences in FDG uptake after 24 h incubation were observed. The significant differences after 2 h incubation all pointed in the direction of increased FDG uptake when palmitate was added. Acetate uptake in PC3 cells was significantly lower when palmitate was added in glucose-free DMEM. No clear tendency when comparing FDG or acetate uptake in the same media at different time points of incubation was observed. Conclusions: Our results indicate a FFA dependent metabolic boost/switch of glucose uptake in PCa, with patterns reflecting the true heterogeneity of the disease

  12. Functioning pulmonary metastases of thyroid cancer: does radioiodine influence the prognosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functioning pulmonary metastases are the most common distant lesions of differentiated thyroid cancer. About 50% of patients with such metastases die within 10 years. The impact of iodine-131 therapy is controversial. In this study we examined: (1) the early diagnostic value of post-surgery 131I ablation for lung invasion and (2) the survival of patients receiving periodic 131I therapy. Between January 1970 and December 1995 we provided initial treatment for 509 patients with thyroid cancer. Most of them (74%) underwent total thyroidectomy and 131I ablation. Functioning pulmonary metastases occurred in 20 patients. All these patients received periodic 131I therapy for as long as 131I uptake persisted. Additional therapy consisted of lung surgery in three patients and local treatment of bone lesions in four patients. Follow-up data were recorded up to December 2001. Functioning pulmonary metastases occurred late in one patient, and were visible on the post-surgery 131I therapy scan in the other 19 patients. At diagnosis of lung invasion, 11 patients had negative chest X-ray findings, and serum thyroglobulin levels were not suggestive of metastatic disease in 56% of these cases. One of the 11 patients with negative chest X-ray findings died with a neck recurrence, two have persistent pulmonary 131I uptake, and the other eight are in apparent remission after receiving an average cumulative 131I activity of 338 mCi (12.51 GBq). The nine patients with positive chest X-ray findings received an average of 939 mCi (34.74 GBq); two of them died, five are continuing to receive therapy and two are in apparent remission. Overall survival at 10 years is 84%. The average follow-up of the 17 survivors is 12.7 years. These results suggest that patients with functioning pulmonary metastases, even in advanced stages, may survive for many years on 131I therapy. Early diagnosis, during post-surgery 131I scanning, of radiologically inapparent metastases is associated with a better

  13. Influence of free fatty acids on glucose uptake in prostate cancer cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntalkumar; Koziorowski, Jacek; Lewis, Jason S.; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The study focuses on the interaction between glucose and free fatty acids (FFA) in malignant human prostate cancer cell lines by an in vitro observation of uptake of fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and acetate. Methods Human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, CWR22Rv1, LNCaP, and DU145) were incubated for 2 h and 24 h in glucose-containing (5.5 mM) Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM) with varying concentrations of the free fatty acid palmitate (0–1.0 mM). Then the cells were incubated with [18 F]-FDG (1 µCi/mL; 0.037 MBq/mL) in DMEM either in presence or absence of glucose and in presence of varying concentrations of palmitate for 1 h. Standardized procedures regarding cell counting and measuring for 18F radioactivity were applied. Cell uptake studies with 14C-1-acetate under the same conditions were performed on PC3 cells. Results In glucose containing media there was significantly increased FDG uptake after 24 h incubation in all cell lines, except DU145, when upper physiological levels of palmitate were added. A 4-fold increase of FDG uptake in PC3 cells (15.11% vs. 3.94%/106 cells) was observed in media with 1.0 mM palmitate compared to media with no palmitate. The same tendency was observed in PC3 and CWR22Rv1 cells after 2 h incubation. In glucose-free media no significant differences in FDG uptake after 24 h incubation were observed. The significant differences after 2 h incubation all pointed in the direction of increased FDG uptake when palmitate was added. Acetate uptake in PC3 cells was significantly lower when palmitate was added in glucose-free DMEM. No clear tendency when comparing FDG or acetate uptake in the same media at different time points of incubation was observed. Conclusions Our results indicate a FFA dependent metabolic boost/switch of glucose uptake in PCa, with patterns reflecting the true heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:24440212

  14. Functional screening identifies miRNAs influencing apoptosis and proliferation in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Lotte Christensen

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC only a small fraction has been characterized functionally. Using high-throughput functional screening and miRNA profiling of clinical samples the present study aims at identifying miRNAs important for the control of cellular growth and/or apoptosis in CRC. The high-throughput functional screening was carried out in six CRC cell lines transfected with a pre-miR library including 319 synthetic human pre-miRs. Phenotypic alterations were evaluated by immunostaining of cleaved cPARP (apoptosis or MKI67 (proliferation. Additionally, TaqMan Human MicroRNA Array Set v2.0 was used to profile the expression of 667 miRNAs in 14 normal colon mucosa and 46 microsatellite stable stage II CRC patients. Among the miRNAs that induced growth arrest and apoptosis in the CRC cell lines, and at same time were dys-regulated in the clinical samples, miR-375 was selected for further analysis. Independent in vitro analysis of transient and stable transfected CRC cell lines confirmed that miR-375 reduces cell viability through the induction of apoptotic death. We identified YAP1 as a direct miR-375 target in CRC and show that HELLS and NOLC1 are down-stream targets. Knock-down of YAP1 mimicked the phenotype induced by miR-375 over-expression indicating that miR-375 most likely exerts its pro-apoptotic role through YAP1 and its anti-apoptotic down-stream targets BIRC5 and BCL2L1. Finally, in vivo analysis of mouse xenograft tumors showed that miR-375 expression significantly reduced tumor growth. We conclude that the high-throughput screening successfully identified miRNAs that induce apoptosis and/or inhibit proliferation in CRC cells. Finally, combining the

  15. Do the number of risk factors influence the outcome of patients with endometrial cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although 8 years have passed since the FIGO mandated surgical staging of corpus cancer, limited data have been published to assess the impact of irradiation (RT) on patients so treated. Despite the fact that retrospective reviews have documented pelvic failure rates ranging from 15-20% in patients with high risk uterine-confined disease who have received no or 'inadequate' RT, the role of RT has been questioned. Kadar et al (Ob. Gyn. 80: 655-659, 1992) suggest that the number of tumor related factors is the most important predictor of death and that RT did not affect the site of recurrence. We sought to corroborate these findings by constructing a large data base of women with corpus cancers managed with initial surgery followed by adjuvant irradiation. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1993, 394 patients received adjuvant postoperative RT from one of three academic radiation practices. RT consisted of vaginal(V) brachytherapy alone in 28 pts, pelvic(P) RT in 169 pts, P +V in 167 pts, pelvic +paraaortic (P+P)RT in 13 pts and whole abdominal (WA) RT in 17 pts. Lymph nodes(LN) were evaluated in 213 (54%). The median number of pelvic and paraaortic LN in the pathology specimen were 6 and 4, respectively. Median followup until death was 63 months. Results: 5 year disease-free survival (DFS) rate and pelvic control rates were 77% and 91%, respectively. Risk factors (defined by Kadar) refer to cervical stroma involvement, myometrial invasion >(1(3)), grade 3, and capillary space invasion (CSI) for patients with PSI/II excluding unfavorable histologies. Multivariate analysis revealed that age, histology, and pathologic stage were independent prognostic indicators for disease free survival. The number of factors was not significantly associated with inferior outcomes as suggested by Kadar et al, who reported 5-year survival rates of 66% and 17% for patients with 2 and 3 or 4 risk factors, respectively. Conclusion: The excellent pelvic control and disease

  16. Algorithmic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, W.

    1990-12-13

    In this paper complex adaptive systems are defined by a self- referential loop in which objects encode functions that act back on these objects. A model for this loop is presented. It uses a simple recursive formal language, derived from the lambda-calculus, to provide a semantics that maps character strings into functions that manipulate symbols on strings. The interaction between two functions, or algorithms, is defined naturally within the language through function composition, and results in the production of a new function. An iterated map acting on sets of functions and a corresponding graph representation are defined. Their properties are useful to discuss the behavior of a fixed size ensemble of randomly interacting functions. This function gas'', or Turning gas'', is studied under various conditions, and evolves cooperative interaction patterns of considerable intricacy. These patterns adapt under the influence of perturbations consisting in the addition of new random functions to the system. Different organizations emerge depending on the availability of self-replicators.

  17. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  18. BMI Influences Prognosis Following Surgery and Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Lymph Node Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolins, Mara Z.; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Case, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Increased body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of disease recurrence and death. However, the association has not been consistent in the literature and may depend on several factors such as menopausal status, extent of disease, and receptor status. We performed a secondary analysis on what we believe is the largest prospective trial of adjuvant chemotherapy to assess the effect of BMI on prognosis in women with lymph node positive breast cancer. The study included 636 women with a median follow-up of over 13 years. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the effect of BMI on outcomes. Kaplan–Meier methods were used to estimate survival curves and log rank tests were used to assess differences in survival for BMI groups. We found that increased BMI was generally predictive of faster time to recurrence and decreased survival, but that the relationship was stronger for younger women, those with progesterone receptor negative disease and those with a greater number of lymph nodes that were positive. PMID:18540954

  19. A novel TP53 pathway influences the HGS-mediated exosome formation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yulin; Zheng, Weiwei; Guo, Zhengguang; Ju, Qiang; Zhu, Lin; Gao, Jiajia; Zhou, Lanping; Liu, Fang; Xu, Yang; Zhan, Qimin; Zhou, Zhixiang; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes are important for cell-cell communication. However, the role of TP53 in the control of exosome production in colorectal cancer (CRC) is controversial and unclear. The features of exosomes secreted from HCT116 TP53-wild type (WT), TP53-knockout (KO) and constructed TP53 (R273H)-mutant (MT) cells were assessed. The exosomes from the MT and KO cells exhibited significantly reduced sizes compared with the WT cells. A comprehensive proteomic analysis of exosomal proteins was performed using the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-2D-LC-MS/MS strategy. A total of 3437 protein groups with ≥2 matched peptides were identified. Specifically, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (HGS) was consistently down-regulated in the exosomes from the MT and KO cells. Functional studies demonstrated that low HGS levels were responsible for the decreased exosome size. TP53 regulated HGS expression and thus HGS-dependent exosome formation. Furthermore, the HGS expression was gradually increased concomitant with CRC carcinogenesis and was an independent poor prognostic factor. In conclusion, a novel HGS-dependent TP53 mechanism in exosome formation was identified in CRC. HGS may serve as a novel prognostic biomarker and a candidate target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27312428

  20. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  1. Influence of suppressor gene p16 on retinoic acid inducing cancer cell A549 differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of suppressor gene p16 in the process of differential regulation of retinoic acid (RA) on the A549 lung cancer cells.Methods Tumor suppressor gene p16 was transferred into A549 cells and the cells were treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATR) at the dosage of 5×10-6 mol/L for 4 d. After that, the proliferation and differentiation of A549 cells were examined by growth curve and cytometry analysis, the change of lung lineage-specific marker MUC1 was tested by immunohistochemical staining. Meanwhile, Western blot was used to observe the change of p16 protein expression in A549 cells treated with ATRA.Results ATRA could obviously inhibit the growth and induce the differentiation of A549 Cells that were transferred with p16 gene. There were more cells arrested in G1/G0 phase and the expression of MUG1 was markedly down-regulated than in control cells. The expression of p16 protein was up-regulated in A549 cells treated with ATRA.Conclusion Suppressor gene p16 could enhance the effects of RA and proliferated suppression and differential induction of A549 cells.

  2. Influence of rmhTNF on the Chemotherapy Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor (rmhTNF) combined with chemotherapy vs chemotherapy alone in the treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were evaluated in this study. The selected 37 patients with SCLC were divided into experimental group (n = 18) and control group (n = 19). Bothgroups were subjected to EP regimen. While in the experimental group, a regimen of 4 × 106 U/m2 rmhTNF intramuscular injection was given once a day from the 1st to 7th day and 11th to 17th day on the chemotherapy cycle.Twenty-one days were as a chemotherapy cycle and all patients received treatment with 2 cycles.The response rate was 83.3 % (15/18) in the experimental group and 63.2 % (12/19) in the control group respectively (P<0.05). The KPS score after treatment was 78.4±9.6 in the experimental group and 71.2±9.7 in the control group with the difference being significant (P<0.05).No severe adverse effects occurred in the two groups. It was concluded that the curative effectiveness of the rmhTNF combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of SCLC was more satisfactory than chemotherapy alone. The former could obviously improve the quality of life of the patients with SCLC.

  3. The influence of surface functionalization on the enhanced internalization of magnetic nanoparticles in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internalization and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with four differently charged carbohydrates have been tested in the human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Neutral, positive, and negative iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by coating with dextran, aminodextran, heparin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid, resulting in colloidal suspensions stable at pH 7 with similar aggregate size. No intracellular uptake was detected in cells incubated with neutral charged nanoparticles, while negative particles showed different behaviour depending on the nature of the coating. Thus, dimercaptosuccinic-coated nanoparticles showed low cellular uptake with non-toxic effects, while heparin-coated particles showed cellular uptake only at high nanoparticle concentrations and induced abnormal mitotic spindle configurations. Finally, cationic magnetic nanoparticles show excellent properties for possible in vivo biomedical applications such as cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cancer treatment by hyperthermia: (i) they enter into cells with high effectiveness, and are localized in endosomes; (ii) they can be easily detected inside cells by optical microscopy, (iii) they are retained for relatively long periods of time, and (iv) they do not induce any cytotoxicity.

  4. The influence of surface functionalization on the enhanced internalization of magnetic nanoparticles in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Angeles; Cañete, Magdalena; Roca, Alejandro G; Calero, Macarena; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Serna, Carlos J; del Puerto Morales, María; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2009-03-01

    The internalization and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with four differently charged carbohydrates have been tested in the human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Neutral, positive, and negative iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by coating with dextran, aminodextran, heparin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid, resulting in colloidal suspensions stable at pH 7 with similar aggregate size. No intracellular uptake was detected in cells incubated with neutral charged nanoparticles, while negative particles showed different behaviour depending on the nature of the coating. Thus, dimercaptosuccinic-coated nanoparticles showed low cellular uptake with non-toxic effects, while heparin-coated particles showed cellular uptake only at high nanoparticle concentrations and induced abnormal mitotic spindle configurations. Finally, cationic magnetic nanoparticles show excellent properties for possible in vivo biomedical applications such as cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cancer treatment by hyperthermia: (i) they enter into cells with high effectiveness, and are localized in endosomes; (ii) they can be easily detected inside cells by optical microscopy, (iii) they are retained for relatively long periods of time, and (iv) they do not induce any cytotoxicity.

  5. Organochlorine exposures influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to estrogen receptor status: a Danish cohort-nested case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rank Fritz

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between breast cancer and organochlorine exposure is controversial and complex. As estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer may represent different entities of the disease, this study was undertaken to evaluate organochlorines influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to receptor status. Methods The background material stems from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Denmark 1976-78. The breast cancer risk was investigated in a cohort nested case-control design including 161 cases and twice as many breast cancer free controls. The cases served as a cohort in the survival analysis. Serum organochlorine concentrations were determined by gaschromotography. Results The observed increased breast cancer risk associated with exposure to dieldrin derived from women who developed an estrogen receptor negative (ERN tumor (Odds ratio [OR] I vs. IV quartile, 7.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.4-46.1, p-value for linear trend 0.01. Tumors in women with the highest dieldrin serum level were larger and more often spread at the time of diagnosis than ERP tumors. The risk of dying was for the remaining evaluated compounds higher among patients with ERP breast cancer when compared to those with ERN. In the highest quartile of polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB it was more than 2-fold increased (Relative risk [RR] I vs. IV quartile, 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.7, but no dose-response relation was apparent. Conclusion The results do not suggest that exposure to potential estrogenic organochlorines leads to development of an ERP breast cancer. A possible adverse effect on prognosis of hormone-responsive breast cancers needs to be clarified.

  6. Organochlorine exposures influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to estrogen receptor status: a Danish cohort-nested case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between breast cancer and organochlorine exposure is controversial and complex. As estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer may represent different entities of the disease, this study was undertaken to evaluate organochlorines influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to receptor status. The background material stems from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Denmark 1976-78). The breast cancer risk was investigated in a cohort nested case-control design including 161 cases and twice as many breast cancer free controls. The cases served as a cohort in the survival analysis. Serum organochlorine concentrations were determined by gaschromotography. The observed increased breast cancer risk associated with exposure to dieldrin derived from women who developed an estrogen receptor negative (ERN) tumor (Odds ratio [OR] I vs. IV quartile, 7.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.4-46.1, p-value for linear trend 0.01). Tumors in women with the highest dieldrin serum level were larger and more often spread at the time of diagnosis than ERP tumors. The risk of dying was for the remaining evaluated compounds higher among patients with ERP breast cancer when compared to those with ERN. In the highest quartile of polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB) it was more than 2-fold increased (Relative risk [RR] I vs. IV quartile, 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.7), but no dose-response relation was apparent. The results do not suggest that exposure to potential estrogenic organochlorines leads to development of an ERP breast cancer. A possible adverse effect on prognosis of hormone-responsive breast cancers needs to be clarified

  7. Decreased HPV-specific T cell responses and accumulation of immunosuppressive influences in oropharyngeal cancer patients following radical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taei, Saly; Banner, Russell; Powell, Ned; Evans, Mererid; Palaniappan, Nachi; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Man, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a type of squamous cell head and neck cancer that is often associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, suggesting the potential for immunotherapeutic targeting of HPV antigens. This study aimed to determine the effect of radical therapy on HPV-specific T cells and other immune parameters in 20 OPC patients, as a prelude to future immunotherapy studies. HPV DNA could be detected in 9/12 available tissue samples (8/9 HPV(+) samples were also p16(+)). HPV-specific T cell responses against HPV16 E6 and E7 peptides were detected by enzyme-linked immunoSPOT in 10/13 and 8/13 evaluable patients, respectively, but did not appear to correlate with HPV status. Post-treatment, both HPV E6 and E7 T cell responses were decreased (4/13 and 2/13 patients, respectively). These reductions in T cell response could not be explained by a concurrent decrease in memory T cells whose absolute numbers were relatively unaffected by radical therapy (27,975 vs. 25,661/10(5) PBMC) despite a significant decrease in overall lymphocyte counts (1.74 vs. 0.69 × 10(9)/L). Instead, there were significant increases in regulatory T cells (3.7 vs. 6.8 %) and a population of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (CD14(-)HLA-DR(-)CD15(hi), 12.38 vs. 21.92 %). This suggests that immunosuppression may contribute to the reduction in HPV-specific T cell responses post-treatment, although study of larger patient cohorts will be required to test whether this affects clinical outcome. Overall these findings suggest that HPV-targeted immunotherapy in post-therapy OPC patients will require multiple strategies to boost T cell immunity and to overcome the influence of immunosuppressive cells. PMID:24146146

  8. Raphanus sativus (Radish): Their Chemistry and Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Martha Pérez Gutiérrez; Rosalinda Lule Perez

    2004-01-01

    Leaves and roots of Raphanus sativus have been used in various parts of the world to treat cancer and as antimicrobial and antiviral agents. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of this radish is reviewed. The structures of the compounds isolated and identified are listed and aspects of their chemistry and pharmacology are discussed. The compounds are grouped according to structural classes.

  9. Influence of 3D-CRT pelvic irradiation on outcome in prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of pelvic irradiation (PRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer remains unclear. We reviewed our institution's experience with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) during the prostate-specific antigen era to determine the influence of PRT on the risk of biochemical recurrence in patients who have a predicted risk of lymph node involvement. Methods and Materials: Between March 1985 and January 2001, 1832 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive 3D-CRT. All treatments involved CT planning to ensure coverage of the intended targets. Treatment consisted of prostate-only treatment, prostate and seminal vesicle treatment, or PRT of lymph nodes at risk followed by a boost. To create relatively homogenous analysis groups, each patient's percentage of risk of lymph node (%rLN) involvement was assigned by matching the patient's T stage, Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level to the appropriate value as described in the updated Partin tables. Three categories of %rLN involvement were defined: low, 0-5%; intermediate, >5-15%; and high, >15%. Biochemical recurrence was defined as the first occurrence of either the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of prostate-specific antigen failure or the initiation of salvage hormonal therapy for any reason. Results: The risk status (%rLN) could be determined for 709 low-risk, 263 intermediate-risk, and 309 high-risk patients. The actuarial freedom from biochemical recurrence (bNED) and the log-rank test for the similarity of the control and treatment survival functions are reported for each risk group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for the entire population treated with PRT, with a relative risk reduction of 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.54-0.97). Although the multivariate analysis could not determine the patient population that would most benefit from

  10. Influence of L-methionine-deprived total parenteral nutrition with 5-fluorouracil on gastric cancer and host metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bing Xiao; Wei-Xin Cao; Hao-Ran Yin; Yan-Zhen Lin; Shi-Hui Ye

    2001-01-01

    AIM To investigate the influence of L-methioninedeprived total parentaral nutrition with 5-FU on gastric cancer and host metabolism.``METHODS N-methyI-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine ( MNNG )induced gastric cancer rats were randomly divided into four groups: Met-containing TPN group (n= 11 ), Metdeprived TPN group (n = 12), Met-containing TPN + 5-FU group (n = 11) and Met-deprived TPN + 5-FU group (n-12). Five rats in each group were sacrificed after 7days of treatment and the samples were taken for examination. The remaining rats in each group were then fed separately with normal diet after the treatment until death, the life span was noted.``RESULTS The tumors were enlarged in Met-containing group and shrank in Met-deprived group markedly after the treatment. The DNA index (DI) of tumor cells and the body weight (BW) of rats had no significant change in the two groups, however, the ratio of tumor cells' S phase was increased The ratio of G2M phase went up in Metcontaining group, but down in Met-deprived group. In the other two groups that 5-FU was added, the BW of rats,and the diameter of tumors, the DI of tumor cells, the S and G2M phase ratio of tumor cells were all decreased,particularly in Met-deprived plus 5-FU group. Pathological examination revealed that the necrotic foci of the tumor tissue increased after Met-deprived TPN treatment, and the nucleoli of tumor cells enlarged. In -MetTPN + 5-FUgroup, severe nuclear damage was also found by karyopyknosis and karyorrhexis, meanwhile there was slight degeneration in some liver and kidney cells. The serum free Met and Cysteine decreased markedly (P<0.001), while other amino acids, such as serum free serine and glutamine increased significantly ( P< 0.005).All the rats died of multiple organ failure caused by cancer metastasis. The average survival time was 18.6 days in Met-containing TPN group. 31 days in Met-deprived TPN group, 27.5 days in Met-containing TPN + 5-FU group, and 43 days in Met-deprived TPN+ 5-FU group

  11. The Influence of Compound Shougong Powder on JAK2-STAT3 Signaling Pathway in Mice with Lewis Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Di

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of Compound Shougong Powder on JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway in mice with Lewis lung cancer. Methods: Fifty C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with Lewis lung cancer cell line according to the conventional method, 40 mice bearing cancer successfully were selected 6 d later and randomly divided into 5groups, namely negative control group, cis-platinum group, high-dose Compound Shougong Powder group, middle-dose Compound Shougong Powder group and low-dose Compound Shougong Powder group, 8 mice in each group. Negative control group was drenched with normal saline (NS. Compound Shougong Powder groups were drenched with Compound Shougong Powder, 4 mg/kg for high-dose group, 2 mg/kg for middle-dose group, 1 mg/kg for low-dose group, once per day for 14 d; cis-platinum group was orally administrated 4 mg/kg/w, intraperitoneal injection of 0.1 mL for each, once per week for 2 weeks. Mice’s responses to the treatment, activity levels, mental states and so on during the treatment were observed, tumor inhibition rate was calculated, pathomorphological changes of tumor tissues were observed under light microscope after HE staining, and the expression levels of JAK2 and STAT3 proteins were detected by Western Blot. Results: After drug administration, smooth, glossy body hair and good spirit were observed in cisplatin group and high-dose Compound Shougong Powder group; glossier body hair and less activity level in middle- and low- dose Compound Shougong Powder group, and great toxic and side effects, reduced activity level and weary spirit in negative control group. The tumor inhibition rate of cisplatin group, high-, middle- and low-dose Compound Shougong Powder group and negative control group was 57.69%, 53.53%, 48.40%, 38.46% and 38.46%, respectively. The expression levels of JAK2 and STAT3 proteins in drug groups showed decreases to different degrees, and the decreases of JAK2 were more significant. Conclusion: Compound

  12. Crevice chemistry estimation from bulk water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first PWR plant in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, 22 plants are running in Japan as of the end of 1994. The main purpose of secondary water chemistry control is to minimize the corrosion possibility of the secondary system equipment, especially steam generators (SG). To achieve this objective, much effort has been concentrated on improving secondary water chemistry control. As a result of this effort, the recent secondary water chemistry in Japanese plants is well maintained in every stage of operation. However, to ensure and improve the reliability of SG, it is necessary to control crevice environments, which are located at tube/tube support plate intersections and under the sludge pile on the tube sheet. According to recent crevice monitoring examination results, the concentration behavior impurities in SG bulk water at the crevice is different for each species, and SG bulk water and crevice chemical compositions are not always equal. From these results, to control the crevice chemistry, improving bulk water chemistry control methods and a new type of molar ratio control index is needed. This paper introduces a brief summary of a recent crevice chemistry evaluation technique and bulk water chemistry control method, which is employed for crevice chemistry control, based on crevice monitoring examination results

  13. Removal of nitrate ions from water by activated carbons (ACs)—Influence of surface chemistry of ACs and coexisting chloride and sulfate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kazunari; Amano, Yoshimasa; Aikawa, Masami; Machida, Motoi

    2013-07-01

    Adsorptive removal of nitrate ions in aqueous solution using activated carbons (ACs) was examined. After ash was removed from Filtrasorb 400 AC, oxidation and outgassing and several heat treatments were carried out to modify the textural and surface properties of ACs. AC oxidized with 8 M nitric acid followed by outgassing at 900 °C (Ox-9OG) exhibited the greatest Langmuir adsorption capacity and affinity for nitrate removal among the total 7 ACs examined. Influence of coexisting chloride and sulfate ions was investigated as well to inspect the nitrate adsorption sites. The highest amount of sites which adsorbed nitrate ions exclusively could be observed for Ox-9OG adsorbent even though as great as 250 times greater number of chloride or sulfate ions over nitrate ions were present in the same aqueous system. Some basic oxygen species on carbon were estimated to work as selective adsorption sites for nitrate ions.

  14. Influence of margin status and radiation on recurrence after radical hysterectomy in Stage IB cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between margin status and local recurrence (LR) or any recurrence after radical hysterectomy (RH) in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT) for Stage IB cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This study included 284 patients after RH with assessable margins between 1980 and 2000. Each margin was scored as negative (≥1 cm), close (>0 and <1 cm), or positive. The outcomes measured were any recurrence, LR, and relapse-free survival. Results: The crude rate for any recurrence was 11%, 20%, and 38% for patients with negative, close, and positive margins, respectively. The crude rate for LR was 10%, 11%, and 38%, respectively. Postoperative RT decreased the rate of LR from 10% to 0% for negative, 17% to 0% for close, and 50% to 25% for positive margins. The significant predictors of decreased relapse-free survival on univariate analysis were the depth of tumor invasion (hazard ratio [HR] 2.14/cm increase, p = 0.007), positive margins (HR 3.92, p = 0.02), tumor size (HR 1.3/cm increase, p = 0.02), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.19, p = 0.03), and margin status (HR 0.002/increasing millimeter from cancer for those with close margins, p = 0.03). Long-term side effects occurred in 8% after RH and 19% after RH and RT. Conclusion: The use of postoperative RT may decrease the risk of LR in patients with close paracervical margins. Patients with other adverse prognostic factors and close margins may also benefit from the use of postoperative RT. However, RT after RH may increase the risk of long-term side effects

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  16. Influence of obesity on the short-term outcome of laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Obesity has been generally associated with increased surgical risk. However, data on the outcome of laparoscopic colectomy in obese and non-obese patients are controversial. The aim of this study is to assess the short-term outcome of laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer (CRC in obese patients as compared with non-obese patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine patients who underwent laparoscopic anterior resection for CRC during the past six years were retrospectively evaluated. The patients with CRC involving the sigmoid or rectosigmoid colon and subjected to intracorporeal anastomosis were included in this study. They were divided into three groups according to body mass index (BMI: obese (BMI ≥ 28.0 kg/m 2 , pre-obese (BMI: 25.0-27.9 kg/m 2 and non-obese (BMI < 25.0 kg/m 2 . Results: Nine patients (13.0 % were obese, 11 patients (15.9% were pre-obese and 49 patients (71.1% were non-obese. Patient characteristics, such as age, gender, tumor location, previous laparotomy, were similar among the three groups. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, intraoperative complications and conversion rates. Postoperative complications and duration of postoperative hospital stay were also similar among the three groups. However, two of the three patients in the pre-obese group had to be operated on again due to incarceration of the small bowel into a port site. Conclusions: Laparoscopic colectomy can be safely performed in obese patients with short-term results similar to those obtained in non-obese and pre-obese patients.

  17. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Most fossil fuels contain sulphur and also biofuels and household waste have a sulphur content. As a consequence sulphur species will often be present in combustion processes. In this paper the fate and influence of fuel sulphur species in combustion will be treated. First a description of the...... sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...

  18. CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kavoussi

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many carcinogenetic elements in industry and it is for this reason that study and research concerning the effect of these materials is carried out on a national and international level. The establishment and growth of cancer are affected by different factors in two main areas:-1 The nature of the human or animal including sex, age, point and method of entry, fat metabolism, place of agglomeration of carcinogenetic material, amount of material absorbed by the body and the immunity of the body.2 The different nature of the carcinogenetic material e.g. physical, chemical quality, degree of solvency in fat and purity of impurity of the element. As the development of cancer is dependent upon so many factors, it is extremely difficult to determine whether a causative element is principle or contributory. Some materials are not carcinogenetic when they are pure but become so when they combine with other elements. All of this creates an industrial health problem in that it is almost impossible to plan an adequate prevention and safety program. The body through its system of immunity protects itself against small amounts of carcinogens but when this amount increases and reaches a certain level the body is not longer able to defend itself. ILO advises an effective protection campaign against cancer based on the Well –equipped laboratories, Well-educated personnel, the establishment of industrial hygiene within factories, the regular control of safety systems, and the implementation of industrial health principles and research programs.

  19. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  20. The spatial distribution of esophageal and gastric cancer in Caspian region of Iran: An ecological analysis of diet and socio-economic influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodi Mahmood

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have suggested a systematic geographic pattern of esophageal cancer (EC and gastric cancer (GC incidence in the Caspian region of Iran. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between these cancers and the region's dietary and socioeconomic risk factors and to map EC and GC after adjustment for the risk factors and the removal of random and geographic variations from area specific age standardised incidence ratios (SIRs. We obtained cancer data from the Babol cancer registry from 2001 to 2005, socioeconomic indices from the Statistical Centre of Iran, and dietary patterns from the control group in a case control study conducted in the study region. Regression models were fitted to identify significant covariates, and clusters of elevated rates were identified. We found evidence of systematic clustering for EC and GC in men and women and both sexes combined. EC and GC SIRs were lower in urban areas, and were also lower in areas of high income. EC SIRs were lower in areas with higher proportions of people having unrestricted food choice and higher in areas with higher proportions of people with restricted food choice. EC and GC were associated with aggregated risk factors, including income, urbanisation, and dietary patterns. These variables represent the influence of improved lifestyle which has coincided with a decrease in upper gastrointestinal cancer frequency over recent decades but which has not necessarily been uniform throughout the region.