WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemistry control challenges

  1. Chemistry control challenges in a supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, David; Tremaine, Peter; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The long-term viability of a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will depend on the ability of designers to predict and control water chemistry to minimize corrosion and the transport of corrosion products and radionuclides. Meeting this goal requires an enhanced understanding of water chemistry as the temperature and pressure are raised beyond the critical point. A key aspect of SCWR water chemistry control will be mitigation of the effects of water radiolysis; preliminary studies suggest markedly different behavior than that predicted from simple extrapolations from conventional water-cooled reactor behavior. The commonly used strategy of adding excess hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to suppress the net radiolytic production of primary oxidizing species may not be effective in an SCWR. The behavior of low concentrations of impurities such as transition metal corrosion products, chemistry control agents, anions introduced via make-up water or from ion-exchange resins, and radionuclides (e.g., 60 Co) needs to be understood. The formation of neutral complexes increases with temperature, and can become important under near-critical and supercritical conditions; the most important region is from 300-450 C, where the properties of water change dramatically, and solvent compressibility effects exert a huge influence on solvation. The potential for increased transport and deposition of corrosion products (active and inactive), leading to (a) increased deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, and (b) increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose, must be assessed. There are also significant challenges associated with chemistry sampling and monitoring in an SCWR. The typical methods used in current reactor designs (grab samples, on-line monitors at the end of a cooled, depressurized sample line) will be inadequate, and in-situ measurements of key parameters will be required. This paper describes current Canadian activities in SCWR chemistry and chemistry

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Clarke, developed Natular, a plaster matrix that encapsulates the pesticide spinosad, slowly releasing it into water and effectively controlling mosquito larvae.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, developed spinosad, a highly selective, low-toxicity, nonpersistant insecticide made by a soil microorganism. It controls many chewing insect pests.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Rohm and Haas, developed Sea-Nine, a marine antifoulant to control plants and animals on ship hulls. Sea-Nine replaces persistent, toxic organotin antifoulants.

  6. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, UniEnergy,improved a vanadium redox flow battery to double the energy density, have a broader operating temperature range, a smaller footprint, reduced chemical usage, and very little capacity degradation.

  7. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, Professor Schelter, developed a new, targeted approach for separating mixtures of rare earth metals obtained from consumer waste streams comprising mixtures of Nd/Dy and Eu/Y

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  2. Reactor water chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2 (TAPS) is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and operating presently at 160MWe. TAPS -1 and 2 are one of the vintage reactors operating in the world and belongs to earlier generation of BWRs has completed 40 years of successful, commercial and safe operation. In 1980s, both the reactors were de-rated from 660MWth to 530MWth due to leaks in the Secondary Steam Generators (SSGs). In BWR the feed water acts as the primary coolant which dissipates the fission heat and thermalises the fast neutrons generated in the core due to nuclear fission reaction and under goes boiling in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) to produce steam. Under the high reactor temperature and pressure, RPV and the primary system materials are highly susceptible to corrosion. In order to avoid local concentration of the chemicals in the RPV of BWR, chemical additives are not recommended for corrosion prevention of the system materials. So to prevent corrosion of the RPV and the primary system materials, corrosion resistant materials like stainless steel (of grade SS304, SS304L and SS316LN) is used as the structural material for most of the primary system components. In case of feed water system, main pipe lines are of carbon steel and the heater shell materials are of carbon steel lined with SS whereas the feed water heater tubes are of SS-304. In addition to the choice of materials, another equally important factor for corrosion prevention and corrosion mitigation of the system materials is maintaining highly pure water quality and strict water chemistry regime for both the feed water and the primary coolant, during operation and shutdown of the reactor. This also helps in controlled migration of corrosion product to and from the reactor core and to reduce radiation field build up across the primary system materials. Experience in this field over four decades added to the incorporation of modern techniques in detection of low

  3. Nutraceuticals, A New Challenge for Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Stefania; Baldan, Valeria; Faggian, Marta; Peron, Gregorio; Dall Acqua, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    "Nutraceuticals" are food-derived products largely used for their presumed healthpromoting or disease-preventing effects. In the recent years, many efforts have been aimed at assessing nutraceutical efficacy and safety, but these factors are difficult to address because of the complex chemical compositions and multiple mode of actions. Thus, the study of nutraceutical ingredients poses several challenges for the medicinal chemistry field, some of which are related to extraction and chemical characterization, some to in vitro and in vivo bioactivity evaluation, and some to the bioavailability and interaction of these natural mixtures with organs and microbiota. Furthermore, because of their nature as medicinal and food products, these nutraceuticals can also be considered as a valuable source of new "lead compounds", creating the opportunity to discover new classes of therapeutic agents. This review provides information on these themes, showing the new challenges that comprehensive medicinal chemistry research is called to answer in the field of nutraceuticals.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Trost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner Professor Barry M. Trost, developed the concept of atom economy: chemical reactions that do not waste atoms. This is a fundamental cornerstone of green chemistry.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, SiGNa Chemistry, stabilized highly reactive sodium and lithium by encapsulating them in porous, sand-like powder, maintaining their usefulness in synthetic reactions.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Metabolix, used biotechnology to develop microorganisms that produce polyhydroxyalkanoates: natural, biodegradable plastics with a range of environmental benefits.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Buckman Laboratories International, developed Optimyze technology, which uses an esterase enzyme to remove sticky contaminants from paper products prior to recycling.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, EDEN Bioscience, discovered and commercialized harpins: nontoxic, naturally occurring, biodegradable proteins that activate a plant's defense and growth mechanisms.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Headwaters Technology Innovation, developed a metal nanocatalyst to synthesize hydrogen peroxide directly from hydrogen and oxygen, eliminating hazardous chemicals.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, The Solberg Company, replaced fluorinated surfactants in its firefighting foam concentrates with a blend of non-fluorinated surfactants and sugars.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Archer Daniels Midland, developed Archer RC, a nonvolatile, biobased, reactive coalescent that replaces volatile organic coalescents in architectural latex paints.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Solazyme, engineered microalgae to produce oils tailored to customers’ needs that can mimic or enhance properties of traditional vegetable oils.

  13. Water chemistry control at FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahi, B.S.; Jambunathan, D.; Suresh Kumar, K.V.; Ramanathan, V.; Srinivasan, G.; Ramalingam, P.V.

    2008-01-01

    Condenser cooling and service water systems together serve as the cooling water system of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR). Palar river water serves as the make-up to the cooling water system. Initially, the service water system alone was commissioned in phases depending upon the arrival of auxiliary equipments at site. During this period, the water was not treated chemically and it also inadvertently remained stagnant for some time in some systems. Thereafter, a threshold chemical treatment was started. However, pin-hole leaks and reduced flow through the heat exchangers were observed and therefore chemical cleaning of headers was done and small diameter pipelines were replaced. Following this a full fledged chemistry control with proprietary formulations was initiated. Later the condenser cooling system was commissioned and the chemical treatment was reviewed. With adoption of improved monitoring methodology and treatment formulation satisfactory corrosion control (< 3 mpy) with minimum deposition problem in this system could be achieved. The primary coolant (primary sodium) of FBTR transfers the nuclear heat to the secondary coolant (secondary sodium) that in turn transfers heat to water in Once Through Steam Generator (OTSG) to generate superheated steam (480 deg C at 125 bar). Efficient water chemistry control plays the vital role in minimizing corrosion related failures of steam generator tubes and ensuring steam generator tube integrity. Therefore, the technical specifications of chemistry parameters of feed/steam water at FBTR are made very stringent to maintain the purity of water at the best attainable level. To meet this stringent feed water and steam quality specifications, online monitoring techniques have been employed in the steam/water circuit to get continuous information about the purity. These monitors have helped significantly in achieving the required feed water quality and running the steam generator for more than 25000 hours without any tube

  14. Advanced chemistry management system to optimize BWR chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, K.; Nagasawa, K.

    2002-01-01

    BWR plant chemistry control has close relationships among nuclear safety, component reliability, radiation field management and fuel integrity. Advanced technology is required to improve chemistry control [1,3,6,7,10,11]. Toshiba has developed TACMAN (Toshiba Advanced Chemistry Management system) to support BWR chemistry control. The TACMAN has been developed as response to utilities' years of requirements to keep plant operation safety, reliability and cost benefit. The advanced technology built into the TACMAN allows utilities to make efficient chemistry control and to keep cost benefit. TACMAN is currently being used in response to the needs for tools those plant chemists and engineers could use to optimize and identify plant chemistry conditions continuously. If an incipient condition or anomaly is detected at early stage, root causes evaluation and immediate countermeasures can be provided. Especially, the expert system brings numerous and competitive advantages not only to improve plant chemistry reliability but also to standardize and systematize know-how, empirical knowledge and technologies in BWR chemistry This paper shows detail functions of TACMAN and practical results to evaluate actual plant. (authors)

  15. Challenges of green chemistry in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevtsova Ganna Ziyvna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with study of Ukrainian chemical enterprises’ ecologisation issues and elaboration of the economic problems to realize principles of green chemistry. Theoretical aspects of green chemistry as a modern interdisciplinary conception, which reveals peculiarities to implement sustainable development paradigm in the chemical industry, are studied. Based on the analysis of essence and effectiveness to introduce international initiatives on sustainable development at the chemical industry enterprises, it is concluded that the implemented measures are only first steps on the way to realize key principles of green chemistry.It is proved that in order to promote conceptual ideas of the green chemistry further, it is reasonable to consider economic and marketing aspects of the ecological innovations: to provide economic effectiveness of green chemical products and technologies, to form ecological culture of consumption, to motivate green demand and to prevent market asymmetry of information.

  16. Superheavy Elements Challenge Experimental and Theoretical Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Zvára, I

    2003-01-01

    When reflecting on the story of superheavy elements, the an experimenter, acknowledges the role, which the predictions of nuclear and chemical theories have played in ongoing studies. Today, the problems of major interest for experimental chemistry are the studies of elements 112 and 114 including their chemical identification. Advanced quantum chemistry calculations of atoms and molecules would be of much help. First experiments with element 112 evidence that the metal is much more volatile and inert than mercury.

  17. Career challenges and opportunities in the global chemistry enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article serves as an overview of the various career challenges and opportunities faced by chemistry professionals in the 21st century in the global chemistry enterprise. One goal is to highlight a broad spectrum of career paths, including non-traditional careers, and to showcase examples of ch...

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Faraday Technology, Inc., process high-performance chrome coatings to be made from the less toxic, trivalent chromium. Reduce millions of pounds hexavalent chromium without comprising performance.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winners, Arkon Consultants and NuPro Technologies, developed a safer processing system for flexographic printing that includes washout solvents and reclamation/recycling.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Shaw Industries, developed EcoWorx carpet tiles with a backing that uses less toxic materials. The carpet tile fiber and backing are readily separated for recycling.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Sherwin-Williams, developed water-based acrylic alkyd paints with VOCs that can be made from recycled soda bottle (PET), acrylics, and soybean oil.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Battelle, developed a biobased soy toner for laser printers and copiers. The technology saves energy and improves de-inking, allowing more paper fiber to be recycled.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, BASF, invented a one-component, urethane acrylate oligomer primer system for automobile refinishing that is UV-curable, has VOCs, and is free of diisocyanates.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Nalco Chemical Co., developed homogeneous dispersion polymerization with water as the solvent to make polymers to treat water in industrial and municipal operations.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Argonne National Laboratory, developed an efficient, membrane-based process to synthesize lactate esters from sugars. These esters can replace toxic solvents.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winners, Bayer and Bayer AG, Covestro, developed high-performance, water-based, two-component polyurethane (PU) coatings that eliminate most or all VOCs and HAPs in other PU coatings.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Dow Chemical Company, developed a process to manufacture polystyrene foam sheet packaging that uses carbon dioxide (CO2) as a blowing agent, eliminating CFC-12 and HCFC-22.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, S.C. Johnson & Son, developed Greenlist, a rating system for environmental and health effects of ingredients. SC Johnson uses it to reformulate many of its products.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Merck & Co. and Codexis, developed an enzymatic synthesis for sitagliptin (Januvia) that reduces waste, improves yield and safety, and eliminates a metal catalyst.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Flexsys America, developed nucleophilic aromatic substitution for hydrogen to eliminate waste from a common reaction and to produce 4-ADPA, a high-volume chemical.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, used an artificial neural network to discover spinetoram, an improved spinosad biopesticide to replace organophosphates for key pests of fruit trees.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winners, Bayer Corporation and Bayer AG, developed a waste-free manufacturing process for sodium iminodisuccinate (Baypure CX), a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Dow and BASF, jointly developed a route to make propylene oxide from hydrogen peroxide that eliminates almost all waste and greatly reduces water and energy use.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Legacy Systems, developed the Coldstrip process, which uses only water and oxygen to remove photoresist from silicon semiconductors. It replaces corrosive acids.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, BHC Company, developed a highly atom-efficient method to make ibuprofen, a common painkiller, using three catalytic steps instead of six stoichiometric ones.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, SC Fluids, with Los Alamos National Laboratory, developed supercritical CO2 resist remover technology to clean residues from semiconductor wafers during manufacture.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Elevance Renewable Sciences, used Nobel-prize-winning metathesis catalysis to produce high-value difunctional chemicals from renewable feedstocks including natural oils.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winners, Professor Kaichang Li, Columbia Forest Products, and Hercules, developed an adhesive for wood composites based on soy flour instead of resins with formaldehyde.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Lilly Research Laboratories, developed a low-waste drug synthesis using yeast for a stereospecific reduction, reducing solvent amounts, and replacing chromium oxide.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Verdezyne, developed a yeast to produce USDA Certified Biobased dodecanedioic acid (DDDA) used to make high performance nylon 6,12. Lower greenhouse gas emissions, no high temperature or nitric acid

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, BioAmber, developed an integrated technology to produce large, commercial quantities of succinic acid by bacterial fermentation, replacing petroleum-based feedstocks.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Eastman Chemical Co., makes esters for emollients and emulsifiers in cosmetics with immobilized enzymes, saving energy and avoiding strong acids and organic solvents.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Life Technologies, developed a one-pot synthesis for polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a much more efficient process that prevents about 1.5 million pounds of hazardous waste a year.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Pfizer, improved its synthesis of sertraline, the active ingredient in its drug, Zoloft, to double the yield and reduce the use of raw materials, energy, and water.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Donlar, developed thermal polyaspartate, a nontoxic, biodegradable, biobased polymer made in a highly efficient process for use in agriculture, water treatment, etc.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Monsanto Company, developed a safer synthesis for DSIDA, a key building block for the herbicide RoundUp. The synthesis uses no ammonia, cyanide, or formaldehyde.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Academic Award (Waymouth and Hedrick)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winners, Professor Robert M. Waymouth and Dr. James L. Hedrick, developed a broad class of highly active, environmentally benign, metal-free catalysts for synthesizing plastics.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 winner, Sud-Chemie, developed a synthesis for solid oxide catalysts used to make hydrogen and clean fuels. The process creates little wastewater, no nitrates, and no or little NOx.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, NovaSterilis, invented a way to sterilize delicate biological materials such as graft tissue without harming them, using supercritical carbon dioxide and a peroxide.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Bristol-Myers Squibb, manufactures paclitaxel, the active ingredient in the anticancer drug, Taxol, using plant cell fermentation and extraction to replace synthesis.

  11. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winners, Merck, developed a novel asymmetric aza-Michael cyclization, employing a chemically stable and fully recyclable organocatalyst to make Letermovir, an antiviral drug

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Kraton Performance Polymers, developed halogen-free, high-flow NEXAR polymer membranes using less solvent that save energy during reverse osmosis to desalinate water.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, RevTech, developed a process to print top-quality labels directly on glass. Their Envirogluv inks have no heavy metals, have little to no VOCs, and are biodegradable.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Roche Colorado, developed a greener synthesis for gancyclovir (Cytovene, a potent antiviral drug) that uses a second-generation Guanine Triester (GTE) process.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Codexis, directed the evolution of three designer enzymes to produce the key chiral building block for atorvastatin, the active ingredient in the drug Lipitor.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Dow Agrosciences LLC, developed Instinct®, a technology that reduces fertilizer nitrate leaching to ground and surface waters and atmospheric nitrous oxide emissions. More corn and reduces CO2.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Cargill, Inc., developed a vegetable-oil-based transformer fluid that is much less flammable, provides superior performance, is less toxic, and has a substantially lower carbon footprint.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winners, Albemarle and CB&I, developed a safer technology to produce alkylate, a clean gasoline component by replacing liquid acid catalysts with a lower environmental impact catalyst

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, LanzaTech Inc. developed a method to utilize gas streams with a range of CO and H2 compositions to produce fuels such as ethanol and chemicals at high selectivities and yields

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Albright & Wilson Americas, discovered that tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate, THPS, is an effective, safer biocide for use in industrial water systems.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Novozymes North America, developed BioPreparation, an enzyme technology to separate natural waxes, oils, and contaminants from cotton before it is made into fabric.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Chemical Specialties, developed an alkaline copper quaternary wood preservative to replace chromated copper arsenate preservative phased out due to risk to children.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, CEM Corporation, developed a fast, automated analytical process using less toxic reagents and less energy to distinguish protein from the food adulterant, melamine.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Nalco Company, developed 3D TRASAR technology to monitor the condition of cooling water continuously and add chemicals only when needed, saving water and energy.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Cargill Dow, developed the NatureWorks process to make biobased, compostable, and recyclable polylactic acid polymers for fibers and plastic packaging.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Imation, developed DryView Imaging Systems, which use a special photographic film for medical imaging that replaces hazardous developer chemicals and water with heat.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Cytec Industries, developed the MAX HT sodalite scale inhibitor for heat exchangers and pipes in the Bayer process, which converts bauxite into alumina.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Amyris, engineered yeast to make a chemical called farnesene, which is a building block hydrocarbon that can be converted into a renewable, drop-in replacement for petroleum diesel.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, DuPont, developed a genetically engineered microorganism jointly with Genencor International to manufacture 1,3-propanediol, a building block for Sorona polyester.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Codexis and Professor Yi Tang, developed a synthesis for the high cholesterol drug, simvastatin, using an engineered acyltransferase enzyme and a low-cost acyl donor as a feedstock.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, LS9, engineered microorganisms to convert fermentable sugars selectively to alkanes, olefins, fatty alcohols, or fatty esters, each in a single-unit biorefinery.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Draths and Frost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winners, Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, used benign, genetically engineered microbes and sugars (instead of benzene) to synthesize adipic acid and catechol.

  13. Applications, benefits and challenges of flow chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitic, Aleksandar; Heintz, Søren; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2013-01-01

    , environmental and manufacturing perspective. A potential solution to resolve these issues is to use flow chemistry in such processes, preferably with applications of micro-and mini-sized equipment. In addition, Process Analytical Technology (PAT) may be implemented in a very efficient way in such equipment due...

  14. Mathematical challenges from theoretical/computational chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The committee believes that this report has relevance and potentially valuable suggestions for a wide range of readers. Target audiences include: graduate departments in the mathematical and chemical sciences; federal and private agencies that fund research in the mathematical and chemical sciences; selected industrial and government research and development laboratories; developers of software and hardware for computational chemistry; and selected individual researchers. Chapter 2 of this report covers some history of computational chemistry for the nonspecialist, while Chapter 3 illustrates the fruits of some past successful cross-fertilization between mathematical scientists and computational/theoretical chemists. In Chapter 4 the committee has assembled a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of research opportunities. Most of these are descriptions of important open problems in computational/theoretical chemistry that could gain much from the efforts of innovative mathematical scientists, written so as to be accessible introductions to the nonspecialist. Chapter 5 is an assessment, necessarily subjective, of cultural differences that must be overcome if collaborative work is to be encouraged between the mathematical and the chemical communities. Finally, the report ends with a brief list of conclusions and recommendations that, if followed, could promote accelerated progress at this interface. Recognizing that bothersome language issues can inhibit prospects for collaborative research at the interface between distinctive disciplines, the committee has attempted throughout to maintain an accessible style, in part by using illustrative boxes, and has included at the end of the report a glossary of technical terms that may be familiar to only a subset of the target audiences listed above.

  15. The Challenge of Effective Teaching of Chemistry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham AVAA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry education has been identified to be one of the major bedrock for the transformation of our national economy, and hence must be accorded adequate attention. In this study, an attempt was made in ascertaining the remote causes for the poor performances reported in recent times in chemistry at the senior secondary level of education. About 80 persons were interviewed in the course of this work ranging from ex-students, students to teachers. Teacher variables, student variables and environment-related variables were investigated and the findings showed that these all contribute greatly to the poor performances of students in science subjects and chemistry in particular. The chemistry teacher, students, parents, senior secondary school administrators, curriculum planners, and the government are therefore faced with the daunting challenge of re-awaking interest and providing enabling environment for the effective teaching of chemistry in particular and the sciences in general.

  16. Analytical chemistry challenges in MSRs and HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulera, I.V.; Basak, A.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient utilisation of our abundant thorium reserves is key to long term energy sustainability for our country. The Indian Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (IMSBR), being developed in BARC, is a very attractive option for this purpose. This reactor uses molten salts as fuel, and operates at high temperature, thus providing high efficiency electricity generation. The major challenges include technology development for molten salts, high temperature resistant materials, high efficiency power generation and on-line reprocessing of fuel. Innovative High Temperature Reactor (IHTR), is being developed for production of high efficiency production of hydrogen; which is attractive as an alternate energy carrier for transport applications

  17. Chemistry Students' Challenges in Using MBL's in Science Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Understanding students' challenges about using microcomputer based laboratories (MBLs) would provide important data in understanding the appropriateness of using MBLs in high school chemistry laboratories. Identifying students' concerns about this technology will in part help educators identify the obstacles to science learning when using this…

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymers--potential and challenges in analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, J.O. [Dublin City University, School of Chemical Sciences, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Nolan, K. [Dublin City University, School of Chemical Sciences, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Smyth, M.R. [Dublin City University, School of Chemical Sciences, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 770 State Street, Boggs Building, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 (United States)]. E-mail: boris.mizaikoff@chemistry.gatech.edu

    2005-04-04

    Among the variety of biomimetic recognition schemes utilizing supramolecular approaches molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have proven their potential as synthetic receptors in numerous applications ranging from liquid chromatography to assays and sensor technology. Their inherent advantages compared to biochemical/biological recognition systems include robustness, storage endurance and lower costs. However, until recently only few contributions throughout the relevant literature describe quantitative analytical applications of MIPs for practically relevant analyte molecules and real-world samples. Increased motivation to thoroughly evaluate the true potential of MIP technology is clearly attributed to the demands of modern analytical chemistry, which include enhanced sensitivity, selectivity and applicability of molecular recognition building blocks at decreasing costs. In particular, the areas of environmental monitoring, food and beverage analysis and industrial process surveillance require analytical tools capable of discriminating chemicals with high molecular specificity considering increasing numbers of complex environmental contaminants, pollution of raw products and rigorous quality control requested by legislation and consumer protection. Furthermore, efficient product improvement and development of new products requires precise qualitative and quantitative analytical methods. Finally, environmental, food and process safety control issues favor the application of on-line in situ analytical methods with high molecular selectivity. While biorecognition schemes frequently suffer from degrading bioactivity and long-term stability when applied in real-world sample environments, MIPs serving as synthetic antibodies have successfully been applied as stationary phase separation matrix (e.g. HPLC and SPE), recognition component in bioassays (e.g. ELISA) or biomimetic recognition layer in chemical sensor systems. Examples such as MIP-based selective analysis of

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers--potential and challenges in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahony, J.O.; Nolan, K.; Smyth, M.R.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2005-01-01

    Among the variety of biomimetic recognition schemes utilizing supramolecular approaches molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have proven their potential as synthetic receptors in numerous applications ranging from liquid chromatography to assays and sensor technology. Their inherent advantages compared to biochemical/biological recognition systems include robustness, storage endurance and lower costs. However, until recently only few contributions throughout the relevant literature describe quantitative analytical applications of MIPs for practically relevant analyte molecules and real-world samples. Increased motivation to thoroughly evaluate the true potential of MIP technology is clearly attributed to the demands of modern analytical chemistry, which include enhanced sensitivity, selectivity and applicability of molecular recognition building blocks at decreasing costs. In particular, the areas of environmental monitoring, food and beverage analysis and industrial process surveillance require analytical tools capable of discriminating chemicals with high molecular specificity considering increasing numbers of complex environmental contaminants, pollution of raw products and rigorous quality control requested by legislation and consumer protection. Furthermore, efficient product improvement and development of new products requires precise qualitative and quantitative analytical methods. Finally, environmental, food and process safety control issues favor the application of on-line in situ analytical methods with high molecular selectivity. While biorecognition schemes frequently suffer from degrading bioactivity and long-term stability when applied in real-world sample environments, MIPs serving as synthetic antibodies have successfully been applied as stationary phase separation matrix (e.g. HPLC and SPE), recognition component in bioassays (e.g. ELISA) or biomimetic recognition layer in chemical sensor systems. Examples such as MIP-based selective analysis of

  20. Zambian Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Views on Chemistry Education Goals and Challenges for Achieving Them in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Asiana; Mumba, Frackson; Chabalengula, Vivien M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Zambian preservice chemistry teachers' views on the goals of chemistry education, the importance of the goals, and challenges for achieving them in schools. The study sample was comprised of 59 pre-service chemistry teachers at the University of Zambia. Data were collected using a modified Likert-scale questionnaire that was…

  1. Electrolyte chemistry control in electrodialysis processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Thomas D.; Severin, Blaine F.

    2017-12-26

    Methods for controlling electrolyte chemistry in electrodialysis units having an anode and a cathode each in an electrolyte of a selected concentration and a membrane stack disposed therebetween. The membrane stack includes pairs of cationic selective and anionic membranes to segregate increasingly dilute salts streams from concentrated salts stream. Electrolyte chemistry control is via use of at least one of following techniques: a single calcium exclusionary cationic selective membrane at a cathode cell boundary, an exclusionary membrane configured as a hydraulically isolated scavenger cell, a multivalent scavenger co-electrolyte and combinations thereof.

  2. A probabilistic approach to controlling crevice chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.; Brobst, G.E.; Riddle, J.

    1995-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the corrosion of steam generator tubing could be reduced if the local pH in regions where impurities concentrate could be controlled. The practice of molar ratio control is based on this assumption. Unfortunately, due to the complexity of the crevice concentration process, efforts to model the crevice chemistry based on bulk water conditions are quite uncertain. In-situ monitoring of the crevice chemistry is desirable, but may not be achievable in the near future. The current methodology for assessing the crevice chemistry is to monitor the hideout return chemistry when the plant shuts down. This approach also has its shortcomings, but may provide sufficient data to evaluate whether the crevice pH is in a desirable range. In this paper, an approach to controlling the crevice chemistry based on a target molar ratio indicator is introduced. The molar ratio indicator is based on what is believed to be the most reliable hideout return data. Probabilistic arguments are then used to show that the crevice pH will most likely be in a desirable range when the target molar ratio is achieved

  3. Identification of major sources controlling groundwater chemistry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study area Mettur forms an important industrial town situated NW of Salem district. The geology of the area is mainly composed of Archean crystalline metamorphic complexes. To iden- tify the major process activated for controlling the groundwater chemistry an attempt has been made by collecting a total of 46 ...

  4. Challenges in Creating Online Exercises and Exams in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaun, Bernhard; Thilgen, Carlo

    2018-02-01

    e-Learning has become increasingly important in chemical education and online exams can be an attractive alternative to traditional exams written on paper, particularly in classes with a large number of students. Ten years ago, we began to set up an e-course complementing our lecture courses Organic Chemistry I and II within the open-source e-learning environment Moodle. In this article, we retrace a number of decisions we took over time, thereby illustrating the challenges one faces when creating online exercises and exams in (organic) chemistry. Special emphasis is put on the development of MOSFECCS (MOlecular Structural Formula Editor and Calculator of Canonical SMILES), our new editor for drawing structural formulae and converting them to alphanumeric SMILES codes that can be submitted as answers to e-problems. Convinced that the possibility for structure input is essential to set up sensible chemistry quizzes and exams, and realising that existing tools present major flaws in an educational context, we decided to embark on the implementation of MOSFECCS which takes into account a number of didactic aspects.

  5. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ''modified'' B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs

  6. Control of water chemistry in operating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Water chemistry plays a major role in fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding. Although a full understanding of all mechanisms involved in cladding corrosion does not exist, controlling the water chemistry has achieved quite some progress in recent years. As an example, in PWRs the activity transport is controlled by operating the coolant under higher pH-values (i.e. the ``modified`` B/Li-Chemistry). On the other hand, the lithium concentration is limited to a maximum value of 2 ppm in order to avoid an acceleration of the fuel cladding corrosion. In BWR plants, for example, the industry has learned on how to limit the copper concentration in the feedwater in order to limit CILC (Copper Induced Localized Corrosion) on the fuel cladding. However, economic pressures are leading to more rigorous operating conditions in power reactors. Fuel burnups are to be increased, higher efficiencies are to be achieved, by running at higher temperatures, plant lifetimes are to be extended. In summary, this paper will describe the state of the art in controlling water chemistry in operating reactors and it will give an outlook on potential problems that will arise when going to more severe operating conditions. (author). 3 figs, 6 tabs.

  7. Material chemistry challenges in vitrification of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    talk is an attempt to briefly cover material chemistry challenges encountered during vitrification of waste. The chemistry aspects involved during incorporation of waste constituents in glass matrix and its interaction with the melter during waste immobilization process will be briefly described

  8. BIGCHEM: Challenges and Opportunities for Big Data Analysis in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetko, Igor V; Engkvist, Ola; Koch, Uwe; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Chen, Hongming

    2016-12-01

    The increasing volume of biomedical data in chemistry and life sciences requires the development of new methods and approaches for their handling. Here, we briefly discuss some challenges and opportunities of this fast growing area of research with a focus on those to be addressed within the BIGCHEM project. The article starts with a brief description of some available resources for "Big Data" in chemistry and a discussion of the importance of data quality. We then discuss challenges with visualization of millions of compounds by combining chemical and biological data, the expectations from mining the "Big Data" using advanced machine-learning methods, and their applications in polypharmacology prediction and target de-convolution in phenotypic screening. We show that the efficient exploration of billions of molecules requires the development of smart strategies. We also address the issue of secure information sharing without disclosing chemical structures, which is critical to enable bi-party or multi-party data sharing. Data sharing is important in the context of the recent trend of "open innovation" in pharmaceutical industry, which has led to not only more information sharing among academics and pharma industries but also the so-called "precompetitive" collaboration between pharma companies. At the end we highlight the importance of education in "Big Data" for further progress of this area. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Challenges of restarting Bruce Units 3 and 4 from a chemistry and materials perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.; Langguth, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, Bruce Power leased the Bruce Units 1-8 reactors from Ontario Power Generation. Bruce Power decided to restart Bruce Units 3 and 4 following a condition assessment of Bruce A Units 3 and 4. This paper describes the challenges that were encountered and how they were overcome, specifically for heat transport system chemistry in order to adequately protect carbon steel surfaces. The heat transport system, by design, has close inter-relations with other station systems and the related issues of some of these systems are also discussed. Considerations of material impacts have significant influences on the approach to, and control of, chemistry. Specific material impacts led to a novel, and successful, approach. This approach was arrived at following significant efforts by a multi-disciplinary team of operations, maintenance and chemistry staff. The issues, approaches considered and solutions used for a successful outcome will be presented. (author)

  10. Challenges of restarting Bruce Units 3 and 4 from a chemistry and materials perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.G.; Langguth, K. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    In 2001, Bruce Power leased the Bruce Units 1-8 reactors from Ontario Power Generation. Bruce Power decided to restart Bruce Units 3 and 4 following a condition assessment of Bruce A Units 3 and 4. This paper describes the challenges that were encountered and how they were overcome, specifically for heat transport system chemistry in order to adequately protect carbon steel surfaces. The heat transport system, by design, has close inter-relations with other station systems and the related issues of some of these systems are also discussed. Considerations of material impacts have significant influences on the approach to, and control of, chemistry. Specific material impacts led to a novel, and successful, approach. This approach was arrived at following significant efforts by a multi-disciplinary team of operations, maintenance and chemistry staff. The issues, approaches considered and solutions used for a successful outcome will be presented. (author)

  11. Recent Discoveries and Future Challenges in Atmospheric Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasius, Marianne; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-03-15

    Earth's atmosphere contains a multitude of organic compounds, which differ by orders of magnitude regarding fundamental properties such as volatility, reactivity, and propensity to form cloud droplets, affecting their impact on global climate and human health. Despite recent major research efforts and advances, there are still substantial gaps in understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry, hampering efforts to understand, model, and mitigate environmental problems such as aerosol formation in both polluted urban and more pristine regions. The analytical toolbox available for chemists to study atmospheric organic components has expanded considerably during the past decade, opening new windows into speciation, time resolution and detection of reactive and semivolatile compounds at low concentrations. This has provided unprecedented opportunities, but also unveiled new scientific challenges. Specific groundbreaking examples include the role of epoxides in aerosol formation especially from isoprene, the importance of highly oxidized, reactive organics in air-surface processes (whether atmosphere-biosphere exchange or aerosols), as well as the extent of interactions of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and the resulting impact on atmospheric organic chemistry.

  12. Controlling Chemistry in Dynamic Nanoscale Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesorka, Aldo; Lizana, Ludvig; Konkoli, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Spatial organization and shape dynamics are inherent properties of biological cells and cell interiors. There are strong indications that these features are important for the in vivo control of reaction parameters in biochemical transformations. Nanofluidic model devices founded on surfactant...... of the concept. Controlled release of chol-DNA molecules from SU-8 surfaces gives the possibility to dynamically change surface and/or solution properties in micro and nanoreactor applications, opening access to stable 2D chemistry on surface-based devices with potential for easy interfacing with conventional...

  13. Advances in water chemistry control for BWRs and PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the effects of water chemistry developments on the current operation of nuclear power plants in the United States, and the mitigation of corrosion-related degradation processes and radiation field build-up processes through the use of advanced water chemistry. Recent modifications in water chemistry to control and reduce radiation fields are outlined, including revisions to the EPRI water chemistry guidelines for BWRs and PWR primary and secondary systems. The change from a single water chemistry specification for all plants to a set of options, from which a plant-specific chemistry programme can be defined, is described. (author)

  14. Racing chemistry: A century of challenges and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmer, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Horseracing has been called 'one of the first quintessentially modern sports'. Its urge towards standardization, its mathematically set odds, its concern with weights, and its pioneering embrace of drug-testing reflect an empirical temperament crucial to its transformation from a gentleman's pastime to a global industry funded by wagering. Ironically, in the late nineteenth century, it was modern science itself, and in particular the purification and synthesis of the drugs of nature, that turned the doping of racing animals - a practice recorded in antiquity - into an organized criminal enterprise. This paper presents original research into the history of racing chemistry in Australia in the context of developments in the field worldwide. Using a case-study approach based on extensive archival materials, it reveals unpublished diaries kept by an analyst working at Sydney Racing Laboratory in the 1950s that document conflicts between scientists over identification of performance drugs in racing animals. The author presents evidence that augments and revises earlier narratives concerning the history of the establishment of laboratory control at Australian racetracks and the removal of the country's first official analyst for racing, Miss Jean Kimble. The Kimble case illustrates the inevitable political, professional, and personal pressures that bear upon drug-testing in sports, and also conflicts between scientists over standards and priorities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Proceedings of the 11. ENQA: Brazilian meeting on analytical chemistry. Challenges for analytical chemistry in the 21st century. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The 11th National Meeting on Analytical Chemistry was held from 18 to 21 September, 2001 at the Convention Center of UNICAMP, with the theme Challenges for Analytical Chemistry in the 21st Century. This meeting have discussed on the development of new methods and analytical tools needed to solve new challenges. The papers presented topics related to the different sub-areas of Analytical Chemistry such as Environmental Chemistry; Chemiometry techniques; X-ray Fluorescence Analysis; Spectroscopy; Separation Processes; Electroanalytic Chemistry and others. Were also included lectures on the Past and Future of Analytical Chemistry and on Ethics in Science

  16. Geochemical controls on groundwater chemistry in shales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of groundwaters is one of the most important parameters in determining the mobility of species within a rock formation. A three pronged approach was used to determine the composition of, and geochemical controls, on groundwaters specifically within shale formations: (1) available data were collected from the literature, the US Geological Survey WATSTORE data base, and field sampling, (2) the geochemical modeling code EQ3/6 was used to simulate interaction of various shales and groundwaters, and (3) several types of shale were reacted with synthetic groundwaters in the laboratory. The comparison of model results to field and laboratory data provide a means of validating the models, as well as a means of deconvoluting complex field interactions. Results suggest that groundwaters in shales have a wide range in composition and are primarily of the Na-Cl-HCO 3 - type. The constancy of the Na:Cl (molar) ratio at 1:1 and the Ca:Mg ratio from 3:1 to 1:1 suggests the importance of halite and carbonates in controlling groundwater compositions. In agreement with the reaction path modeling, most of the groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline at low temperatures. Model and experimental results suggest that reaction (1) at elevated temperatures, or (2) in the presence of oxygen will lead to more acidic conditions. Some acetate was found to be produced in the experiments; depending on the constraints applied, large amounts of acetate were produced in the model results. 13 refs., 1 tab

  17. Automated Water Chemistry Control at University of Virginia Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the technologically advanced aquatic and fitness center at the University of Virginia. Discusses the imprecise water chemistry control at the former facility and its intensive monitoring requirements. Details the new chemistry control standards initiated in the new center, which ensure constant chlorine and pH levels. (RJM)

  18. Microplastics in the environment: Challenges in analytical chemistry - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana B; Bastos, Ana S; Justino, Celine I L; da Costa, João P; Duarte, Armando C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P

    2018-08-09

    Microplastics can be present in the environment as manufactured microplastics (known as primary microplastics) or resulting from the continuous weathering of plastic litter, which yields progressively smaller plastic fragments (known as secondary microplastics). Herein, we discuss the numerous issues associated with the analysis of microplastics, and to a less extent of nanoplastics, in environmental samples (water, sediments, and biological tissues), from their sampling and sample handling to their identification and quantification. The analytical quality control and quality assurance associated with the validation of analytical methods and use of reference materials for the quantification of microplastics are also discussed, as well as the current challenges within this field of research and possible routes to overcome such limitations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and Use of Data from the Award Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0003, January 9, 2018. The OIG plans to begin preliminary research to evaluate the agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and how the agency uses the data from the award nominations.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, Algenol, blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels, uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters, reduces the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, no reliance on food crops

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Designing Greener Chemicals and Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Newlight Technologies, developed a net carbon negative plastic made from methane-based GHG. It is cheaper than petroleum-based plastic; used to make cell phone cases, furniture, and other products.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award (Merck & Co., Inc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Merck, designed an atom-economical, energy- and water-saving, convergent synthesis for aprepitant, the active ingredient in Emend, a drug for nausea and vomiting.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Academic Award - James C. Liao and Easel Biotechnologies, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Dr. James C. Liao, genetically engineered microorganisms to make higher alcohols (with 3 to 8 carbon atoms) from glucose or directly from carbon dioxide (CO2).

  4. Primary Water Chemistry Control during a Planned Outage at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Guoping; Nashiem, Rod; Matheson, Shane; Yabar, Berman; Harper, Bill; Roberts, John G.

    2012-09-01

    Bruce Power has developed a comprehensive outage water chemistry program, which includes both primary and secondary chemistry requirements during planned outages. The purpose of the program is to emphasize the chemistry requirements during outages and subsequent start-ups in order to maintain the integrity of the systems, minimise activity transport and radiation fields, reduce the Carbon-14 release, and to ensure that the requirements are integrated with the outage management program. Prior to a planned outage, Station Chemical Technical Sections identify outage chemistry requirements to Operations and Outage Planning and ensure that work necessary to correct system chemistry issues is within outage work scope. The outage water chemistry program provides direction for establishing alternative sampling locations as demanded by the system configuration during the outage and identifies outage prerequisites for nuclear system purification capabilities. These requirements are contained in an outage checklist. The paper mainly highlights the primary water chemistry issues and chemistry control strategies during planned outages and discusses challenges and successes. (authors)

  5. Advanced studies in chemistry control with morpholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddle, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    Prior studies at Beaver Valley Unit 1 and at Prairie Island found that the substitution of morpholine for ammonia reduced corrosion and iron transport in the feedtrain of pressurized water reactors. The benefits of using morpholine encouraged other utilities to consider morpholine water chemistry. Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 was the first domestic PWR with deep-bed condensate polishers to use morpholine water chemistry. Typically a bed is operated in the hydrogen cycle for eight to ten days, followed by an additional 25 days in the morpholine cycle. Morpholine reduced feedwater iron levels by 28 percent. With morpholine treatment at Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, corrosion product transport in feedwater was reduced by a factor of 1.3 -- 1.4. Morpholine treatment at higher levels at Prairie Island Unit 2 provided a factor of 2.3 reduction in feedwater iron transport, in agreement with data from Electricity de France. EdF data show that the factor increases as the pH for ammonia chemistry is reduced from 9.5. When possible, the factors were compared at a pH of 9.2 for morpholine at room temperature. Aqueous solutions of morpholine thermally decompose at increasing rates with temperature above about 288 degree C (550 degree F). Oxygen and several metal oxides appear to increase the rate of decomposition to a small extent. Acetate, formate, and various amines, including ammonia, are the principal decomposition products

  6. Green Chemistry for Nanotechnology: Opportunities and Future Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preeti Nigam, Joshi, E-mail: ph.joshi@ncl.res.in [Combichem Bioresource Center, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune (India)

    2016-01-26

    Nanotechnology is a paradigm for emerging technologies and much talked about area of science. It is the technology of future and has revolutionized all fields of medicine, agriculture, environmental and electronics by providing abilities that would never have previously dreamt of. It is a unique platform of multidisciplinary approaches integrating diverse fields of engineering, biology, physics and chemistry. In recent years, nanotechnology has seen the fastest pace in its all aspects of synthesis methodologies and wide applications in all areas of medicine, agricultural, environmental, and electronics. It is the impact of nanotechnology approaches that new fields of nanomedicine, cancer nanotechnology, nanorobotics and nanoelectronics have been emerged and are flourishing with the advances in this expanding field. Nanotechnology holds the potential for pervasive and promising applications and getting significant attention and financial aids also. Although there are different definitions of nanotechnology, in broad prospective, nanotechnology can be described as designing or exploiting materials at nanometer dimensions (i.e., one dimension less than 100 nanometers). At nanoscale, substances have a larger surface area to volume ratio than conventional materials which is the prime reason behind their increased level of reactivity, improved and size tunable magnetic, optical and electrical properties and more toxicity also.

  7. Green Chemistry for Nanotechnology: Opportunities and Future Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preeti Nigam, Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a paradigm for emerging technologies and much talked about area of science. It is the technology of future and has revolutionized all fields of medicine, agriculture, environmental and electronics by providing abilities that would never have previously dreamt of. It is a unique platform of multidisciplinary approaches integrating diverse fields of engineering, biology, physics and chemistry. In recent years, nanotechnology has seen the fastest pace in its all aspects of synthesis methodologies and wide applications in all areas of medicine, agricultural, environmental, and electronics. It is the impact of nanotechnology approaches that new fields of nanomedicine, cancer nanotechnology, nanorobotics and nanoelectronics have been emerged and are flourishing with the advances in this expanding field. Nanotechnology holds the potential for pervasive and promising applications and getting significant attention and financial aids also. Although there are different definitions of nanotechnology, in broad prospective, nanotechnology can be described as designing or exploiting materials at nanometer dimensions (i.e., one dimension less than 100 nanometers). At nanoscale, substances have a larger surface area to volume ratio than conventional materials which is the prime reason behind their increased level of reactivity, improved and size tunable magnetic, optical and electrical properties and more toxicity also

  8. Ask the experts: the challenges and benefits of flow chemistry to optimize drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neal; Gernaey, Krist V; Jamison, Timothy F; Kircher, Manfred; Wiles, Charlotte; Leadbeater, Nicholas E; Sandford, Graham; Richardson, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Against a backdrop of a struggling economic and regulatory climate, pharmaceutical companies have recently been forced to develop new ways to provide more efficient technology to meet the demands of a competitive drug industry. This issue, coupled with an increase in patent legislation and a rising generics market, makes these themes common issues in the growth of drug development. As a consequence, the importance of process chemistry and scale-up has never been more under the spotlight. Future Medicinal Chemistry wishes to share the thoughts and opinions of a variety of experts from this field, discussing issues concerning the use of flow chemistry to optimize drug development, the potential regulatory and environmental challenges faced with this, and whether the academic and industrial sectors could benefit from a more harmonized system relevant to process chemistry.

  9. Designing multiple ligands - medicinal chemistry strategies and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphy, Richard; Rankovic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely recognised over the recent years that parallel modulation of multiple biological targets can be beneficial for treatment of diseases with complex etiologies such as cancer asthma, and psychiatric disease. In this article, current strategies for the generation of ligands with a specific multi-target profile (designed multiple ligands or DMLs) are described and a number of illustrative example are given. Designing multiple ligands is frequently a challenging endeavour for medicinal chemists, with the need to appropriately balance affinity for 2 or more targets whilst obtaining physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties that are consistent with the administration of an oral drug. Given that the properties of DMLs are influenced to a large extent by the proteomic superfamily to which the targets belong and the lead generation strategy that is pursued, an early assessment of the feasibility of any given DML project is essential.

  10. Major Challenges for the Modern Chemistry in Particular and Science in General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskokovíc, Vuk

    2010-11-01

    In the past few hundred years, science has exerted an enormous influence on the way the world appears to human observers. Despite phenomenal accomplishments of science, science nowadays faces numerous challenges that threaten its continued success. As scientific inventions become embedded within human societies, the challenges are further multiplied. In this critical review, some of the critical challenges for the field of modern chemistry are discussed, including: (a) interlinking theoretical knowledge and experimental approaches; (b) implementing the principles of sustainability at the roots of the chemical design; (c) defining science from a philosophical perspective that acknowledges both pragmatic and realistic aspects thereof; (d) instigating interdisciplinary research; (e) learning to recognize and appreciate the aesthetic aspects of scientific knowledge and methodology, and promote truly inspiring education in chemistry. In the conclusion, I recapitulate that the evolution of human knowledge inherently depends upon our ability to adopt creative problem-solving attitudes, and that challenges will always be present within the scope of scientific interests.

  11. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.E.; Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  12. BWR chemistry control status: a summary of industry chemistry status relative to the BWR water chemistry guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, M.L., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The EPRI Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Water Chemistry Guidelines were revised and issued in October 2008. The 2008 Revision of the Guidelines continues to focus on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), which can limit the service life of susceptible materials and components exposed to water chemistry environments. The 2008 Revision also places increased emphasis on fuel performance and meeting the industry goal of zero fuel failures by 2010. As an industry consensus document, the Guidelines were created to provide proactive water chemistry control strategies for mitigating IGSCC, maintaining fuel integrity and controlling radiation fields. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for an effective BWR water chemistry program. This paper provides an overview of industry experience relative to the Guidelines. Over the past few years, many BWR units have implemented noble metal chemical application technologies either during plant hot or cold shutdown or at normal power operating conditions. This paper explores plant experience with optimized water chemistry, implementation of various additive chemistries such as noble metal application and zinc addition, and compliance with the Guidelines recommendations. Depleted zinc oxide addition has been broadly applied across the BWR fleet since the 1980s. The guidance for zinc addition has been revised in the Guidelines to reflect concerns with fuel performance. While zinc addition is a successful method for shutdown dose rate control, concerns still exist for high zinc deposition on fuel surfaces, especially when feedwater iron is elevated and as fuel cores are being driven to provide maximum power output over longer fuel cycles. Recent plant experience has shown that the utilization of online noble metal application and continued zinc addition may provide additional benefits for radiation control. Dose rate experiences at plants utilizing the online noble metal application technology and zinc addition

  13. Chemistry, manufacturing and controls in passive transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Tarun; Audett, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are used for the delivery of the drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation by applying them to the intact skin. The development of TDDS is a complex and multidisciplinary affair which involves identification of suitable drug, excipients and various other components. There have been numerous problems reported with respect to TDDS quality and performance. These problems can be reduced by appropriately addressing chemistry, manufacturing and controls requirements, which would thereby result in development of robust TDDS product and processes. This article provides recommendations on the chemistry, manufacturing and controls focusing on the unique technical aspects of TDDS.

  14. Recent experience in water chemistry control at PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Ichiro

    2000-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWRs are under operation in all of Japan, among which 11 units are operated by the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEP). Plant availability in KEP's PWRs has been improved for the past several years, through their successive stable operation. Recently, a focus is given not only to maintenance of plant integrity, but also to preventive maintenance and water chemistry control. Various measures have been carried out to enhance exposure reduction of the primary water chemistry control in the Japanese PWRs. As a result, environmental dose equivalent rate is decreasing. A secondary system is now under excellent condition because of application of diversified measures for prevention of the SG tube corrosion. At present, the water chemistry control measures which take into account of efficient chemistry control and plant aging deterioration prevention, are being examined to use for both primary and secondary systems in Japanese PWRs, to further enhance their plant integrity and availability. And, some of them are currently being actually applied. (G.K.)

  15. Developing 21st century skills in chemistry classrooms: Opportunities and challenges of STEAM integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadinugrahaningsih, Tritiyatma; Rahmawati, Yuli; Ridwan, Achmad

    2017-08-01

    The paper portrays the first year of two-year study in integration Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics (STEAM) in chemistry learning. The research focused on developing 21st-century skills of chemistry students in secondary schools. The 21st-century skills as a set of abilities that students need to develop in facing the future challenge which involves learning, literacy, and life skills. The study was conducted in two secondary schools both public and private school in topics of hydrocarbon, petroleum, solubility, and acid base in year 10 and 11. The qualitative methodology was applied to explore the students' learning experiences and understanding the research context. Data was collected through observation, interview, reflective journal, and 21st-century rubric. The STEAM approach was integrated through modification of project-based learning model. The students had opportunities to develop their own projects by integrating chemistry and STEAM principles to their project. The results show that students have developed their critical and creative thinking, problem-solving skills, collaboration and argumentation skills, leadership and responsibility, information and literacy skills. The researchers faced the challenges of integrating STEAM within the chemistry curricula, empowering students, and managing the teaching and time resources. Students have started to challenge their critical and creative thinking within the existing learning environments. Integrating STEAM into chemistry learning has developed students' 21st-century skills in those three areas. Teachers also learned to develop their competencies for being facilitators and agents of change, in addition to skills development in dealing with students' differences.

  16. Current challenges in tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, K

    2004-10-01

    Tobacco is the world's biggest preventable killer, but the circumstances of its history, the power and influence of its commerce and the nature of addiction make it a very difficult public health issue. Determinants of smoking are both individual and environmental. Genetics and environment influence to varying degrees all of the steps in a smoker's career. Persistence of use, degree of addiction to nicotine and difficulty in stopping are influenced by inherited traits and nicotine susceptibility, whereas the social environment and the individual's cognitions are the key factors in starting smoking and successfully stopping smoking. The tools available to tobacco control include influencing the social and cultural norms concerning tobacco; legislative and regulatory measures to protect the population and to limit tobacco industry marketing tactics, now encapsulated in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and programmes to enhance the chance of not starting and successfully stopping. Strategies for tobacco control must work at both societal and individual levels, and directions are being taken that include genetic, pharmacological, behavioural, socio-cultural and international approaches.

  17. Smoking control: challenges and achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Corrêa da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Smoking is the most preventable and controllable health risk. Therefore, all health care professionals should give their utmost attention to and be more focused on the problem of smoking. Tobacco is a highly profitable product, because of its large-scale production and great number of consumers. Smoking control policies and treatment resources for smoking cessation have advanced in recent years, showing highly satisfactory results, particularly in Brazil. However, there is yet a long way to go before smoking can be considered a controlled disease from a public health standpoint. We can already perceive that the behavior of our society regarding smoking is changing, albeit slowly. Therefore, pulmonologists have a very promising area in which to work with their patients and the general population. We must act with greater impetus in support of health care policies and social living standards that directly contribute to improving health and quality of life. In this respect, pulmonologists can play a greater role as they get more involved in treating smokers, strengthening anti-smoking laws, and demanding health care policies related to lung diseases.

  18. Smoking control: challenges and achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luiz Carlos Corrêa; de Araújo, Alberto José; de Queiroz, Ângela Maria Dias; Sales, Maria da Penha Uchoa; Castellano, Maria Vera Cruz de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smoking is the most preventable and controllable health risk. Therefore, all health care professionals should give their utmost attention to and be more focused on the problem of smoking. Tobacco is a highly profitable product, because of its large-scale production and great number of consumers. Smoking control policies and treatment resources for smoking cessation have advanced in recent years, showing highly satisfactory results, particularly in Brazil. However, there is yet a long way to go before smoking can be considered a controlled disease from a public health standpoint. We can already perceive that the behavior of our society regarding smoking is changing, albeit slowly. Therefore, pulmonologists have a very promising area in which to work with their patients and the general population. We must act with greater impetus in support of health care policies and social living standards that directly contribute to improving health and quality of life. In this respect, pulmonologists can play a greater role as they get more involved in treating smokers, strengthening anti-smoking laws, and demanding health care policies related to lung diseases. PMID:27832238

  19. Smoking control: challenges and achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Carlos Corrêa da; Araújo, Alberto José de; Queiroz, Ângela Maria Dias de; Sales, Maria da Penha Uchoa; Castellano, Maria Vera Cruz de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable and controllable health risk. Therefore, all health care professionals should give their utmost attention to and be more focused on the problem of smoking. Tobacco is a highly profitable product, because of its large-scale production and great number of consumers. Smoking control policies and treatment resources for smoking cessation have advanced in recent years, showing highly satisfactory results, particularly in Brazil. However, there is yet a long way to go before smoking can be considered a controlled disease from a public health standpoint. We can already perceive that the behavior of our society regarding smoking is changing, albeit slowly. Therefore, pulmonologists have a very promising area in which to work with their patients and the general population. We must act with greater impetus in support of health care policies and social living standards that directly contribute to improving health and quality of life. In this respect, pulmonologists can play a greater role as they get more involved in treating smokers, strengthening anti-smoking laws, and demanding health care policies related to lung diseases. RESUMO O tabagismo é o fator de risco mais prevenível e controlável em saúde e, por isso, precisa ter a máxima atenção e ser muito mais enfocado por todos os profissionais da saúde. O tabaco é um produto de alta rentabilidade pela sua grande produção e pelo elevado número de consumidores. As políticas de controle e os recursos terapêuticos para o tabagismo avançaram muito nos últimos anos e têm mostrado resultados altamente satisfatórios, particularmente no Brasil. Entretanto, ainda resta um longo caminho a ser percorrido para que se possa considerar o tabagismo como uma doença controlada sob o ponto de vista da saúde pública. Já se observam modificações do comportamento da sociedade com relação ao tabagismo, mas ainda em escala muito lenta, de modo que os pneumologistas têm nesse setor um campo

  20. In-serviceMathematics and Chemistry Teachers’ Preparednessfor Mathematics and Chemistry Courses at the University of Botswana: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesego Tawana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research study’s aim was to track the paths of chemistry and mathematics in-service students studying for a degree at the University of Botswana who seemed to struggle with degree level concepts in their respective programmes despite holding diplomas in their fields. The authors are lecturers of both methodology and content courses in science and mathematics who became concerned about the seeminglyunderpreparedness of most in-service students for degree courses over the years. The study can be located within a social structuralist theoretical perspective where learning is viewed as a social entity, social structure referring to the ways people are interrelated or interdependent within their cultural mores as is the norm in an academic setting. The research team identified four categories of operational challenges that the students are most likely to face as university leaners, namely academic, social and emotional, economic and environmental challenges and these formed the basis on which the data collection process ensued. The qualitative methods paradigm was found to appropriate and the study was conducted within the framework of an action research approach. A qualitative research was relevant to the study because it had the capacity to enable the researchers to identify the cognitive views held by in-service students and the meanings they made of their experiences concerning their studies or the program (Hancock, 2004. The research sought to identify where the identified challenges emanated from with a view to make those involved in the academic paths of these learners to take heed of their problems. The study found that in-service learners are faced with all sorts of problems including lack of accommodation on campus, uncooperative lecturers, the university system which lumps them together with pre-service students making them academic prisoners, large class sizes which render learning a near impossibility for some, and the fast

  1. Developing a crevice chemistry control target from uncertain data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that the corrosion of steam generator tubing could be reduced if the local pH in regions where impurities concentrate could be controlled. The practice of molar ratio control is based on this assumption. Direct measurement of the crevice chemistry is not possible at this time. Deterministic models based on bulk water conditions are quite uncertain, due to both the variability of crevices in the steam generator and the level of impurities in the bulk water which are often below or at the level of detection. The current methodology for assessing the crevice chemistry is to monitor the hideout return chemistry when the plant shuts down. This approach also has its shortcomings, but may provide sufficient data to evaluate whether the crevice pH is in a desirable range. In this paper, an approach for establishing a target crevice chemistry based on the plant data which is believed to be the most certain or reliable is presented

  2. Cernavoda NPP - Boiler and steam cycle chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotica, D.

    2001-01-01

    Steam generators protection against corrosion and fouling is an ongoing issue for nuclear power plants. The true effectiveness of the secondary chemistry control program is best judged by the absence of secondary side corrosion related tube degradation particularly that leads to tube plugging or sleeving or tube support degradation. To continue striving for excellence in chemical control, the following issues should be considered: Continuous evaluation of the effectiveness of the chemistry control program in mitigating SG damage; Evaluation of plant compliance with the program; Laboratory quality assurance program to assure that laboratory analyses are accurate and reproductibile; Quality assurance program for on-line monitoring equipment to assure that results from this equipment are accurate. (R.P.)

  3. Control challenges in domestic heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Honglian; Larsen, Lars F. S.; Weitzmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze domestic heating applications and identify unfavorable building constructions and control challenges to be addressed by high performance heating control systems. Heating of domestic houses use a large amount of the total energy consumption in Scandinavia....... Hence the potential of reducing energy consumption by applying high performance control is vast. Indoor climate issues are becoming more in focus, which also leads to a demand for high performance heating systems. The paper presents an analysis of how the building elements of today's domestic houses...... with water based floor heating affect the control challenge. The analysis is documented with simulation results....

  4. Flow chemistry to control the synthesis of nano and microparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Lara, Pablo; Guerrero, Simón; Cabuil, Valérie; Abou-Hassan, Ali; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2014-03-01

    In this article we review the flow chemistry methodologies for the controlled synthesis of different kind of nano and microparticles for biomedical applications. Injection mechanism has emerged as new alternative for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to this strategy allows achieving superior levels of control of self-assemblies, leading to higher-ordered structures and rapid chemical reactions. Self-assembly events are strongly dependent on factors such as the local concentration of reagents, the mixing rates, and the shear forces, which can be finely tuned, as an example, in a microfluidic device. Injection methods have also proved to be optimal to elaborate microsystems comprising polymer solutions. Concretely, extrusion based methods can provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. We provide an update of synthesis of nano and microparticles such as core/shell, Janus, nanocrystals, liposomes, and biopolymeric microgels through flow chemistry, its potential bioapplications and future challenges in this field are discussed.

  5. A Radio-Controlled Car Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Watching a radio-controlled car zip along a sidewalk or street has become a common sight. Within this toy are the basic ingredients of a mobile robot, used by industry for a variety of important and potentially dangerous tasks. In this challenge, students consider modifying an of-the-shelf, radio-controlled car, adapting it for a robotic task.

  6. PWR primary system chemistry control during hot functional testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Richard D.; Little, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Hot Functional Testing (HFT) involves a number of pre-operational exercises performed to confirm the operability of plant systems at conditions expected during both normal and off-normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), including operability of safety systems. While the primary purposes of HFT are to demonstrate operability of plant systems and satisfy regulatory requirements, chemistry control during HFT is important to long-term integrity and performance of plant systems. Specifically, HFT is the first time plant equipment is exposed to high temperature water and the chemistry maintained during HFT can impact the passivation layers that form on wetted surfaces and long-term release of metals from these surfaces. Metals released from the inner surfaces of steam generator tubing and reactor coolant loop piping become activated in the core and can redeposit on ex-core surfaces. Because HFT is performed before fuel is loaded in the core, HFT provides an opportunity to produce a passive layer on primary surfaces that is free of activated corrosion products, resistant to metals release during subsequent plant operation, and also resistant to incorporation of activated corrosion products (once fuel is loaded in the core). Thus, maintaining desirable primary chemistry control during HFT is important for source term management, minimization of future shutdown activity releases, minimization of dose rates, and asset preservation. This paper presents an overview of passive film formation in the austenitic stainless steel and high nickel alloys that make up the majority of the primary circuit in advanced PWR designs. Based on this information, a summary is provided of the effects on passive film formation of key chemistry parameters that may be controlled during HFT. (author)

  7. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  8. Plutonium metallurgy: The materials science challenges bridging condensed-matter physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: schwartz6@llnl.gov

    2007-10-11

    Although there exists evidence of metallurgical practices dating back over 6000 years, studies of Pu and Pu alloys have been conducted for barely 60 years. During the time of the Manhattan Project and extending for some time afterward, the priority to produce the metal took precedence over the fundamental understanding of the metallurgical principals. In the past decade or so, there has been a resurgence in the basic metallurgy, condensed-matter physics, and chemistry of Pu and Pu alloys. These communities have made substantial progress, both experimentally and theoretically in many areas; however, many challenges still remain. The intent of this brief overview is to highlight a number important challenges that we face in the metallurgy of Pu including phase transformations and phase stability, aging, and the connection between electronic structure and metallurgy.

  9. Challenges of adolescent and maturing nuclear plants: a chemistry perspective on maintenance and outages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.G. [Bruce Power, Chemistry Design, Plant Design Engineering, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: john.roberts@brucepower.com

    2003-07-01

    In his address to the Canadian Nuclear Society, Bruce Power's Section Manager for Chemistry Design will relate how Designers and Specifiers for Plant and Components have historically limited their approach to that of new plants. As nuclear plants become operational, John G. Roberts will explain how the requirements to protect the assets change as a result of changed capabilities, environments and requirements. John will offer examples to show how challenges were met during construction and commissioning. While plant changes are often necessary following commissioning to prevent serious operational problems, John will also discuss ways in which planners, suppliers and maintenance staff can broaden their views and embrace new work methods to ensure those changes don't unwittingly create new challenges. (author)

  10. Challenges of adolescent and maturing nuclear plants: a chemistry perspective on maintenance and outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    In his address to the Canadian Nuclear Society, Bruce Power's Section Manager for Chemistry Design will relate how Designers and Specifiers for Plant and Components have historically limited their approach to that of new plants. As nuclear plants become operational, John G. Roberts will explain how the requirements to protect the assets change as a result of changed capabilities, environments and requirements. John will offer examples to show how challenges were met during construction and commissioning. While plant changes are often necessary following commissioning to prevent serious operational problems, John will also discuss ways in which planners, suppliers and maintenance staff can broaden their views and embrace new work methods to ensure those changes don't unwittingly create new challenges. (author)

  11. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  12. Spatially controlled immobilisation of biomolecules: A complete approach in green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenval, Eva; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Vinet, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The development of 'green' sensors is a challenging task in the field of biomolecule sensing, for example in the detection of cardiac troponin-I (cTnI). In the present work a complete approach in green chemistry was developed to create chemically active patterns for the immobilisation of biological probes. This key technology is discussed on the basis of the twelve green chemistry principles, and is a combination of surface patterning by spotting and surface chemistries modified by molecular vapour deposition. The (1H,1H,2H,2H)-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) was used as a novel anti-adsorption layer while the 3,4-epoxybutyltrimethoxysilane (EBTMOS) was used to immobilise probes. Oligonucleotides and the anti-cTnI antibody were studied. The spatially controlled immobilisation of probes was characterised by fluorescence. The demonstrated surface modification has broad applications in areas such as diagnostics and bio-chemical sensing. Moreover, the environmental impacts of surface patterning and surface chemistry were discussed from a 'greenness' point of view.

  13. Optimum Water Chemistry in radiation field buildup control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien, C. [Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Nuclear utilities continue to face the challenGE of reducing exposure of plant maintenance personnel. GE Nuclear Energy has developed the concept of Optimum Water Chemistry (OWC) to reduce the radiation field buildup and minimize the radioactive waste production. It is believed that reduction of radioactive sources and improvement of the water chemistry quality should significantly reduce both the radiation exposure and radwaste production. The most important source of radioactivity is cobalt and replacement of cobalt containing alloy in the core region as well as in the entire primary system is considered the first priority to achieve the goal of low exposure and minimized waste production. A plant specific computerized cobalt transport model has been developed to evaluate various options in a BWR system under specific conditions. Reduction of iron input and maintaining low ionic impurities in the coolant have been identified as two major tasks for operators. Addition of depleted zinc is a proven technique to reduce Co-60 in reactor water and on out-of-core piping surfaces. The effect of HWC on Co-60 transport in the primary system will also be discussed.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Climate-Chemistry Connections: Recent Developments and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jöckel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state and development of different numerical model classes that are used to simulate the global atmospheric system, particularly Earth’s climate and climate-chemistry connections. The focus is on Chemistry-Climate Models. In general, these serve to examine dynamical and chemical processes in the Earth atmosphere, their feedback, and interaction with climate. Such models have been established as helpful tools in addition to analyses of observational data. Definitions of the global model classes are given and their capabilities as well as weaknesses are discussed. Examples of scientific studies indicate how numerical exercises contribute to an improved understanding of atmospheric behavior. There, the focus is on synergistic investigations combining observations and model results. The possible future developments and challenges are presented, not only from the scientific point of view but also regarding the computer technology and respective consequences for numerical modeling of atmospheric processes. In the future, a stronger cross-linkage of subject-specific scientists is necessary, to tackle the looming challenges. It should link the specialist discipline and applied computer science.

  15. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubler, W.F.; O'Hara, J..M.

    1996-01-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls

  16. Epoxy coatings for anticorrosion challenges: a link between chemistry and performance?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauvant-Moynot, Valerie; Schweitzer, Sylvie; Grenier, Jacky; Duval, Sebastien [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 et 4 avenue Bois Preau, 92450 Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2004-07-01

    Epoxy coatings have been used extensively for pipeline protection in the oil and gas industries over the past decades. Thank to their outstanding adhesive properties, epoxy resins are classically used for external coating of offshore pipelines although cathodic protection is applied. They provide corrosion protection while being used as neat coating or as primer layer in a three-layer coating. Protection of internal pipelines devoted to gas transport is another application of epoxy coatings. Whatever the case, the choice of the right epoxy formulation should be adapted to the service conditions, namely exposition medium and temperature, in order to provide efficient and sustainable corrosion protection. Epoxy resins constitute a wide family and classical formulations may not fulfill the requirements of today's challenges: as pipelines are require d to operate in more and more difficult conditions, coatings are expected to function in higher temperature conditions; additionally, practical conditions such as temporary injection of methanol make the environmental exposure of the epoxy coating harsher. Therefore, there is a need of a better knowledge of technical performance and limitations of high temperature epoxy resins. This paper examined the influence of the epoxy network architecture on their protection properties and durability while exposed to distilled / sea water at 110 deg. C and to methanol at room temperature. The objective was to investigate the link between resin chemistry and final performance with respect to anticorrosion applications. Five epoxy resin formulations mixed in stoichiometric proportions were cured and post-cured to infinite extent in order to achieve densely cross-linked networks exhibiting controlled and reproducible architectures. Gravimetric and pressurised differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were performed to evaluate the plasticization effect of both water and methanol on formulations under study. The related

  17. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF 4 --H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF 2 --ThF 4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF 4 for Te

  18. Water chemistry control practices and data of the European BWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Laendner, A.; Weiss, S.; Huettner, F.

    2010-01-01

    Nineteen BWR plants are in operation in Europe, nine built by ASEA Atom, six by Siemens KWU and four by General Electric. This paper gives an overview of water chemistry operation practices and parameters of the European BWR plants. General design characteristics of the plants are described. Chemistry control strategies and underlying water chemistry guidelines are summarized. Chemistry data are presented and discussed with regard to plant design characteristics. The paper is based on a contract of the European BWR Forum with AREVA on a chemistry sourcebook for member plants. The survey of chemistry data was conducted for the years 2002 to 2008. (author)

  19. Physics and chemistry of plasma pollution control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J S

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous pollution control technologies for acid gases (NO x , SO x , etc), volatile organic compounds, greenhouse gases, ozone layer depleting substances, etc have been commercialized based on catalysis, incineration and adsorption methods. However, non-thermal plasma techniques based on electron beams and corona discharges are becoming significant due to advantages such as lower costs, higher removal efficiency and smaller space volume. In order to commercialize this new technology, the pollution gas removal rate, energy efficiency of removal, pressure drop of reactors and useable by-product production rates must be improved and identification of major fundamental processes and optimizations of reactor and power supply for an integrated system must be investigated. In this work, the chemistry and physics of plasma pollution control are discussed and the limitation of this type of plasma is outlined based on the plasma parameters.

  20. Challenges to nuclear export controls today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelus, R.; Sevini, F.; Janssens, W.; Michel, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear energy and nuclear proliferation programs are potentially inter-twinned, which is a point to be taken into account when analysing the development of civil nuclear energy, both domestically and as foreign investment. International agreements ensure that the adhering countries fulfil their obligations and do not abuse civil nuclear programs for the production of nuclear weapons. Uranium enrichment is the process currently most focused on in this respect by recent news and recent technological and commercial developments. But also the so-called reactor-based pathway, with extraction of plutonium from spent nuclear fuel by reprocessing remains in the spotlight of inspectors. Two of the main and complementary pillars on which the prevention of such diversion relies, are Strategic Export Control and International Safeguards. Strategic export control is a key barrier against nuclear proliferation. In many countries including the EU, it is set by a legal framework, envisaging implementation, enforcement and prosecution. The goods that can exported only with authorisations are those identified by the international export control regimes; primarily the Nuclear Suppliers Group in the case of nuclear items. It is complemented by nuclear safeguards measures, and especially in the past few years, by the IAEA State Level concept, which looks at the overall country's potential, including its industrial structure to derive conclusions on the absence of undeclared activities. However, the strict control of goods and knowledge is a moving target, since technological developments, globalisation and the intensifying exchange of information via the worldwide web offer increasing opportunities to proliferators to acquire sensitive items and competencies, and create bigger challenges to enforcement, calling for new responses. Research and development programmes must be directed towards supporting the adaptation of current proliferation containment systems to these new

  1. Teaching Green and Sustainable Chemistry: A Revised One-Semester Course Based on Inspirations and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteel-Parrish, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    An elective course, "Toward the Greening of Our Minds": Green and Sustainable Chemistry, has been offered at Washington College since 2005. This new course without laboratory is designed for chemistry and biology majors and minors who have previously taken two semesters of general chemistry and organic chemistry. Due to the popularity of…

  2. The Challenge of Recruiting Control Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2011-01-01

    . This study was a direct reaction to the first recruitment attempt that had a 10% response rate. This study consisted of four groups of randomly selected elderly married people (65-81 years) receiving a postal questionnaire measuring depression, social support, coping style, adult attachment, life......  Recruitment of a large and reliable control group is a challenge in psychological survey based research. The effect of recruitment styles and age on response-rate, data quality, and individual differences were investigated in a control group for a postal survey of elderly bereaved people...... incentive had the highest response-rate (51%), good data quality, and no sampling bias in individual differences. This method can be highly recommended in future control group recruitment....

  3. Coolant Chemistry Control: Oxygen Mass Transport in Lead Bismuth Eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G.; Bruzzese, C.; Glass, A.

    2015-01-01

    In lead-bismuth cooled transmutation systems, oxygen, dissolved in the coolant at defined quantities, is required for stable long-term operation by assuring the formation of protective oxide scales on structural steel surfaces. Extracted oxygen must be permanently delivered to the system and distributed in the entire core. Therefore, coolant chemistry control involves detailed knowledge on oxygen mass transport. Beside the different flow regimes a core might have stagnant areas at which oxygen delivery can only be realised by diffusion. The difference between oxygen transport in flow paths and in stagnant zones is one of the targets of such experiments. To investigate oxygen mass transport in flowing and stagnant conditions, a dedicated facility was designed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD also was applied to define the position of oxygen sensors and ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry transducers for flow measurements. This contribution will present the test facility, design relevant CFD calculations and results of first tests performed. (authors)

  4. Automating multistep flow synthesis: approach and challenges in integrating chemistry, machines and logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay A. Shukla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of automation in the multistep flow synthesis is essential for transforming laboratory-scale chemistry into a reliable industrial process. In this review, we briefly introduce the role of automation based on its application in synthesis viz. auto sampling and inline monitoring, optimization and process control. Subsequently, we have critically reviewed a few multistep flow synthesis and suggested a possible control strategy to be implemented so that it helps to reliably transfer the laboratory-scale synthesis strategy to a pilot scale at its optimum conditions. Due to the vast literature in multistep synthesis, we have classified the literature and have identified the case studies based on few criteria viz. type of reaction, heating methods, processes involving in-line separation units, telescopic synthesis, processes involving in-line quenching and process with the smallest time scale of operation. This classification will cover the broader range in the multistep synthesis literature.

  5. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te 2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF 4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na 3 CrF 6 and Na 5 Cr 3 F 14 , were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li 2 BeF 4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe 2+ and Cr 3+ and the determination of the U 3+ /U 4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF 4 --NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF 4 --NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  6. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  7. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin J; Torgersen, Christian E; Likens, Gene E; Buso, Donald C; Lowe, Winsor H; Bailey, Scott W

    2014-05-13

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  8. Nanoparticles for mosquito control: Challenges and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito control programs are facing important and timely challenges, including the recent outbreaks of novel arbovirus, the development of resistance in several Culicidae species, and the rapid spreading of highly invasive mosquitoes worldwide. Current control tools mainly rely on the employment of (i synthetic or microbial pesticides, (ii insecticide-treated bed nets, (iii adult repellents, (iv biological control agents against mosquito young instars (mainly fishes, amphibians and copepods (v Sterile Insect Technique (SIT, (vi “boosted SIT”, (vii symbiont-based methods and (viii transgenic mosquitoes. Currently, none of these single strategies is fully successful. Novel eco-friendly strategies to manage mosquito vectors are urgently needed. The plant-mediated fabrication of nanoparticles is advantageous over chemical and physical methods, since it is cheap, single-step, and does not require high pressure, energy, temperature, or the use of highly toxic chemicals. In the latest years, a growing number of plant-borne compounds have been proposed for efficient and rapid extracellular synthesis of metal nanoparticles effective against mosquitoes at very low doses (i.e. 1–30 ppm. In this review, we focused on the promising potential of green-fabricated nanoparticles as toxic agents against mosquito young instars, and as adult oviposition deterrents. Furthermore, we analyzed current evidences about non-target effects of these nanocomposites used for mosquito control, pointing out their moderate acute toxicity for non-target aquatic organisms, absence of genotoxicity at the doses tested against mosquitoes, and the possibility to boost the predation rates of biological control agents against mosquitoes treating the aquatic environment with ultra-low doses (e.g. 1–3 ppm of green-synthesized nanoparticles, which reduce the motility of mosquito larvae. Challenges for future research should shed light on (i the precise mechanism(s of action of

  9. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  10. Controlled Assembly of Fibronectin Nanofibrils Triggered by Random Copolymer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanyan, Hayk; Rico, Patricia; Grigoriou, Eleni; Candelas, Aarón Maturana; Rodrigo-Navarro, Aleixandre; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel; Sabater i Serra, Roser

    2015-08-19

    Fibronectin fibrillogenesis is the physiological process by which cells elaborate a fibrous FN matrix. Poly(ethyl acrylate), PEA, has been described to induce a similar process upon simple adsorption of fibronectin (FN) from a protein solution-in the absence of cells-leading to the so-called material-driven fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Poly(methyl acrylate), PMA, is a polymer with very similar chemistry to PEA, on which FN is adsorbed, keeping the globular conformation of the protein in solution. We have used radical polymerization to synthesize copolymers with controlled EA/MA ratio, seeking to modulate the degree of FN fibrillogenesis. The physicochemical properties of the system were studied using dynamic-mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and water contact angle. Both the degree of FN fibrillogenesis and the availability of the integrin binding region of FN directly depend on the percentage of EA in the copolymer, whereas the same total amount of FN was adsorbed regardless the EA/MA ratio. Cell morphology adhesion and differentiation of murine C2C12 were shown to depend on the degree of FN fibrillogenesis previously attained on the material surface. Myogenic differentiation was enhanced on the copolymers with higher EA content, i.e. more interconnected FN fibrils.

  11. Surface chemistry: Key to control and advance myriad technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, John T.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field. PMID:21245359

  12. Improved water chemistry controls for minimizing degradation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawochka, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute and the Steam Generator Owners Group have sponsored several efforts to develop secondary water chemistry guidelines to minimize pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing degradation. To develop these guidelines, chemical species known to accelerate corrosion of Alloy 600 were identified, and values for normal and abnormal chemistry situations were established. For example, sodium hydroxide was known to accelerate Alloy 600 intergranular attack stress corrosion cracking; thus, guidelines were developed for blowdown sodium concentrations in recirculating steam generator systems. Similarly, formation of acidic solutions, particularly as a result of chloride ingress at seawater sites, was known to accelerate denting; thus, chloride guidelines were established. A blowdown cation conductivity limit was established to minimize concentrations of other anionic species. Guidelines also were developed for condensate and feedwater chemistry to minimize general corrosion of system materials, thereby minimizing sludge and deposit buildup in the steam generators

  13. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Sato, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  14. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin J. McGuire; Christian E. Torgersen; Gene E. Likens; Donald C. Buso; Winsor H. Lowe; Scott W. Bailey

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in...

  15. The Need and Challenges for Distributed Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    The presentation describes the challenges facing the turbine engine control system. These challenges are primarily driven by a dependence on commercial electronics and an increasingly severe environment on board the turbine engine. The need for distributed control is driven by the need to overcome these system constraints and develop a new growth path for control technology and, as a result, improved turbine engine performance.

  16. Chemistry control experiences at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, K.; Somasundaram, K.M.; Sanathkumar, V.V.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Chemistry control section at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL had keenly pursued many developmental works and projects which had not only improved the system performance and reliability but also largely benefited the Station by many ways. The highlights of some of the major developmental works that have contributed significantly are: 1. Studies on frequent and sharp rise in dew point values of AGMS: In the Annulus Gas Monitoring Systems (AGMS) of KGS units, it was observed that the system dew points were rising very sharply and abruptly. The systematic studies revealed the presence of Hydrogen impurity in CO 2 gas cylinders, hence emphasized the need to ensure the gaseous contents before injecting the media from the cylinders to the system. 2. a. Studies on frequent tube failures of TG auxiliary coolers: The detailed studies and investigation revealed that under deposit corrosion contributed by microbiological attack was the main cause for frequent failures of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes which could be minimized either by resorting to periodical mechanical/chemical cleaning of cooler tubes or by regular chemical treatment with a suitable chemical formulation. b. Development of suitable chemical formulation for chemical cleaning of TG auxiliary coolers: A series of in-house experiments at site resulted in developing a suitable chemical formulation for effective cleaning of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes. The formulation with 1 % w/w Citric acid with pH adjusted to 8.0 by Ammonia in first step followed by 1 % w/w EDTA with pH adjusted to 9.0 by Hydrazine in the second step could yield more than 90 % cleanliness. 3. Chemical cleaning of cooling circuits of AHUs: An in-house formulation was developed and used for chemical cleaning of cooling circuits (with copper tubes) of AHUs. Post chemical cleaning, the room temperatures decreased by 3-4 degC, hence resulted in better cooling. 4. Enhancement in service period of BBD IX columns: The service period of

  17. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation-Derived...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information--Fermentation-Derived... (CMC) Information-- Fermentation-Derived Intermediates, Drug Substances, and Related Drug Products for... to submit to support the CMC information for fermentation-derived intermediates, drug substances, and...

  18. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, X.; Chen, K.; Xing, H.; Yang, Q.; Krishna, R.; Bao, Z.; Wu, H.; Zhou, W.; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Y.; Li, B.; Ren, Q.; Zaworotko, M. J.; Chen, B.

    2016-01-01

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination

  19. Challenging Gifted Learners: General Principles for Science Educators; and Exemplification in the Context of Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    There is concern in some counties about the number of able young people entering degree level study and careers in physical science, including chemistry. Too few of the most talented young people are selecting "STEM" subjects to ensure the future supply of scientists, engineers and related professionals. The present paper sets out general…

  20. Role of Precursor-Conversion Chemistry in the Crystal-Phase Control of Catalytically Grown Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2017-12-26

    Crystal-phase control is one of the most challenging problems in nanowire growth. We demonstrate that, in the solution-phase catalyzed growth of colloidal cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum wires (QWs), the crystal phase can be controlled by manipulating the reaction chemistry of the Cd precursors and tri-n-octylphosphine telluride (TOPTe) to favor the production of either a CdTe solute or Te, which consequently determines the composition and (liquid or solid) state of the Bi x Cd y Te z catalyst nanoparticles. Growth of single-phase (e.g., wurtzite) QWs is achieved only from solid catalysts (y ≪ z) that enable the solution-solid-solid growth of the QWs, whereas the liquid catalysts (y ≈ z) fulfill the solution-liquid-solid growth of the polytypic QWs. Factors that affect the precursor-conversion chemistry are systematically accounted for, which are correlated with a kinetic study of the composition and state of the catalyst nanoparticles to understand the mechanism. This work reveals the role of the precursor-reaction chemistry in the crystal-phase control of catalytically grown colloidal QWs, opening the possibility of growing phase-pure QWs of other compositions.

  1. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on volcanic ash surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Diplas, Spyros; Damby, David E.; Hornby, Adrian J.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Delmelle, Pierre; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on environmental systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surfaces are a composite product of magmatic properties and fragmentation mechanisms, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration processes acting upon those surfaces during and after the eruption. Recent attention has focused on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces; most notably, several studies have utilised X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a technique probing the elemental composition and coordination state of atoms within the top 10 nm of ash surfaces, to identify patterns of elemental depletions and enrichments relative to bulk ash chemical composition. Under the presumption of surface and bulk equivalence, any disparities have been previously attributed to surface alteration processes, but the ubiquity of some depletions (e.g., Ca, Fe) across multiple ash studies, irrespective of eruptive origin, could suggest these to be features of the surface produced at the instant of magma fragmentation. To investigate this possibility further, we conducted rapid decompression experiments at different pressure conditions and at ambient and magmatic temperature on porous andesitic rocks. These experiments produced fragmented ash material untouched by secondary alteration, which were compared to particles produced by crushing of large clasts from the same experiments. We investigated a restricted size fraction (63-90 μm) from both fragmented and crushed materials, determining bulk chemistry and mineralogy via XRF, SEM-BSE and EPMA, and investigated the chemical composition of the ash surface by XPS. Analyses suggest that fragmentation under experimental conditions partitioned a greater fraction of plagioclase-rich particles into the selected size fraction, relative to particles produced by crushing. Trends in surface chemical composition in fragmented and crushed particles mirror that

  2. Chemistry and physics of a single atomic layer: strategies and challenges for functionalization of graphene and graphene-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Zheng, Yue Bing; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Gao, Xingfa; Xu, Bingqian; Weiss, Paul S; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-01-07

    Graphene has attracted great interest for its superior physical, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties that enable a wide range of applications from electronics to nanoelectromechanical systems. Functionalization is among the significant vectors that drive graphene towards technological applications. While the physical properties of graphene have been at the center of attention, we still lack the knowledge framework for targeted graphene functionalization. In this critical review, we describe some of the important chemical and physical processes for graphene functionalization. We also identify six major challenges in graphene research and give perspectives and practical strategies for both fundamental studies and applications of graphene (315 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  3. Challenges with managing hazardous chemicals in the international frame - opportunity for educating on sustainable chemistry and alternatives assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, R.; Fantke, Peter

    sustainable alternatives. A bottle neck is, however, that chemists, engineers, industrial designers, and policy makers often lack knowledge on green/sustainable chemistry and alternatives assessment. This is particularly a challenge in developing and transition countries. Methodologies and tools are hence...... needed to disseminate information on and guidance on how to phase in more sustainable alternatives. In this presentation, we suggest a comprehensive yet efficient approach of alternatives assessment which could be integrated in the education of stakeholders within the process of the substitution...

  4. Water chemistry: cause and control of corrosion degradation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kain, Vivekanand

    2008-01-01

    The corrosion degradation of a material is directly determined by the water chemistry, material (composition, fabrication procedure and microstructure) and by the stress/strain in the material under operating conditions. Water chemistry plays an important role in both uniform corrosion and localized forms of corrosion of materials. Once we understand how water chemistry is contributing to corrosion of a material, it is logical to modify/change that water chemistry to control the corrosion degradation. In nuclear power plants, different water chemistries have been used in different components/systems. This paper will cover the origin of corrosion degradation in the Primary Heat Transport system of different reactor types, Steam Generator tubing, secondary circuit pipelines, service water pipelines and auxiliary systems and establish the role of water chemistry in causing corrosion degradation. The history of changes in water chemistry adopted in these systems to control corrosion degradation is also described. It is shown by examples that there is an obvious limitation in changing water chemistry to control corrosion degradation and in those cases, a change of material or change of the state of stresses/fabrication procedure becomes necessary. The role of water chemistry as a causative factor and also as a controlling parameter on particular types of corrosion degradation e.g. stress corrosion cracking, flow accelerated corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion is illustrated. It will be shown that increase in dissolved oxygen content (due to radiolysis in nuclear reactors) is sufficient to make even the de-mineralized water to cause stress corrosion cracking in Boiling Water Reactors. Hydrogen Water Chemistry (by hydrogen injection) to control dissolved oxygen is shown to control the stress corrosion cracking. However, it is not possible to control dissolved oxygen at all parts of the Boiling Water Reactors. Therefore, a further refinement in terms of noble metal

  5. TB control programmes: the challenges for Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, T

    1996-11-01

    Governmental neglect of tuberculosis (TB), inadequately managed and inaccurately designed TB control programs, population growth, and the HIV epidemic account for the resurgence of TB in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization and the International Union against TB and Lung Disease have developed a TB control strategy that aims to reduce mortality, morbidity, and transmission of TB. It aims for an 85% cure rate among detected new cases of smear-positive TB and a 70% rate of detecting existing smear-positive TB cases. The strategy involves the provision of short-course chemotherapy (SCC) to all identified smear-positive TB cases through directly observed treatment (DOTS). SCC treatment regimens for smear-positive pulmonary TB recommended for sub-Saharan African countries are: initial phase = daily administration over 2 months of streptomycin, rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide; continuation phase = 3 doses over 4 months of isoniazid and rifampicin or daily administration of thiacetazone and isoniazid or of ethambutol and isoniazid. A TB control policy must be implemented to bring about effective TB control. The essential elements of this policy include political commitment, case detection through passive case-finding, SCC, a regular supply of essential drugs, and a monitoring and evaluation system. Political commitment involves establishing a National TB Control Program to be integrated into the existing health structure. Increased awareness of TB in the community and among health workers and a reference laboratory are needed to make case finding successful. A distribution and logistics system is needed to ensure uninterrupted intake of drugs throughout treatment. These regimens have been very successful and cost-effective but pose several disadvantages (e.g., heavy workload of recommended 3 sputum smear tests). A simplified approach involves 1 initial sputum smear for 6 months; 6-months, intermittent rifampicin-based therapy, 100% DOTS throughout

  6. Operating experience in correcting severe secondary chemistry upsets by controlling makeup water organics (TOC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, W.G.; Mc Intosh, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper following observations are presented: conductivity and chloride excursions in steam condensate were directly linked to makeup water quality. Data strongly suggests that the breakdown of makeup water organics was responsible for substandard condensate water quality; although the short-term effects of gross organic contamination have been documented, the longer term consequences of continuous exposure by moderate organic levels needs to be addressed; a greater understanding of the organic removal efficiency of the various water purification technologies is essential to controlling TOC contamination; and a much better understanding of makeup plant chemistry and the interrelationship of makeup water contamination and plant chemistry has proven essential to optimizing plant performance and guaranteeing the best possible steam chemistry. The role of the chemistry group as an active participant in operations has been proven at Kewaunee Nuclear Plant

  7. Water Chemistry Control Technology to Improve the Performance of Nuclear Power Plants for Extended Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Na, J. W.; Lee, E. H.

    2010-07-01

    Ο To Develop the technology to manage the problems of AOA and radiation, corrosion as long term PWR operation. Ο To Establish the advanced water chemical operating systems. - Development of the proper water chemistry guidelines for long term PWR operation. AOA(Axial Offest Anomaly) has been reported in many PWR plants in the world, including Korea, especially in the plants of higher burn-up and longer cycle operation or power up-rate. A test loop has been designed and made by KAERI, in order to investigate and mitigate AOA problems in Korea. This project included the study of hydrodynamic simulation and the modeling about AOA. The analysis of radioactive crud was performed to investigate of NPPs primary water chemical effect on AOA and to reduce the radioactive dose rate. The high temperature measurement system was developed to on-line monitor of water chemistry in nuclear power plants. The effects of various environmental factors such as temperature, pressure, and flow rate on YSZ-based pH electrode were evaluated for ensuring the accuracy of high-temperature pH measurement. The inhibition technology for fouling and SCC of SG tube was evaluated to establish the water chemistry technology of corrosion control of nuclear system. The high temperature and high pressure crevice chemistry analysis test loop was manufactured to develop the water chemistry technology of crevice chemistry control

  8. 76 FR 13629 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information--Fermentation-Derived... Controls (CMC) Information-- Fermentation-Derived Intermediates, Drug Substances, and Related Drug Products... documentation to submit to support the CMC information for fermentation-derived intermediates, drug substances...

  9. Challenges for remote monitoring and control of small reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, D., E-mail: traskd@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper considers a model for small, unmanned, remotely located reactors and discusses the ensuing cyber security and operational challenges for monitoring and control and how these challenges might be overcome through some of AECL's research initiatives and experience. (author)

  10. Notification: FY 2018 CSB Management Challenges and Internal Control Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    December 26, 2017. The OIG is beginning work to update for fiscal year 2018 its list of proposed key management challenges and internal control weaknesses confronting the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).

  11. Foodborne disease control: a transnational challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käferstein, F K; Motarjemi, Y; Bettcher, D W

    1997-01-01

    In the globalized political economy of the late 20th century, increasing social, political, and economic interdependence is occurring as a result of the rapid movement of people, images, values, and financial transactions across national borders. Another consequence of the increase in transnational trade, travel, and migration is the greater risk of cross-border transmission of infectious diseases. As the world becomes more interconnected, diseases spread more rapidly and effectively. With more than one million people crossing international borders every day, and with the globalization of food production, manufacturing, and marketing, the risk of infectious disease transmission is greater. Economic globalization has also increased the need for governmental budget austerity, and consequent national preparedness has been eroded. The emergence of new infectious diseases, as well as the reemergence of old ones, thus represents a crucial transnational policy issue. These problems cannot be resolved by national governments alone; they require international cooperation. This article analyzes the role of foodborne disease surveillance programs, nationally and internationally, in the control of foodborne diseases.

  12. A prototype expert system 'SMART' for water chemistry control in reactor water circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The operational safety of a power plant depends mainly on the material compatibility of the system materials with the environment. However, for an operating plant, the material is almost fixed and hence one can improve the safety by controlling the surrounding environment. From the economy point of view, the plant availability factor as well as plant life extension (PLEX) are important considerations and these necessitate a systematic approach for continuous parametric monitoring, rapid data analysis and diagnosis for controlling the water chemistry regime. A prototype expert system 'SMART' was developed in BASIC language. The expert system consists of four modules. The DATA HANDLER module controls all the data handling functions and graphical display of the data parameters. It also generates weekly and monthly reports of the water chemistry data. The DATA INTERPRETER module compares the experimental data with the theoretically calculated values and predicts the presence of impurity ingress in the system. The CHEMISTRY EXPERT contains the knowledge base about the various sub-systems. All the water chemistry specifications are translated in the form of IF... THEN.. rules and are stored in this module. The expert system inferences with the forward chain reasoning mechanism to identify the diagnostic parameters by consulting the knowledge base and applying the appropriate rules. The ACTION EXPERT module collects all the diagnostic parameters and suggests the operator, the remedial actions/counter measures that should be taken immediately. This rule based system can be expanded to accommodate different water chemistry regimes. (author)

  13. PWR water chemistry controls: a perspective on industry initiatives and trends relative to operating experience and the EPRI PWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Choi, S.; Haas, C.; Pender, M.; Perkins, D.

    2010-01-01

    An effective PWR water chemistry control program must address the following goals: Minimize materials degradation (e.g., PWSCC, corrosion of fuel, corrosion damage of steam generator (SG) tubes); Maintain fuel integrity and good performance; Minimize corrosion product transport (e.g., transport and deposition on the fuel, transport into the SGs where it can foul tube surfaces and create crevice environments for the concentration of corrosive impurities); Minimize dose rates. Water chemistry control must be optimized to provide overall improvement considering the sometimes variant constraints of the goals listed above. New technologies are developed for continued mitigation of materials degradation, continued fuel integrity and good performance, continued reduction of corrosion product transport, and continued minimization of plant dose rates. The EPRI chemistry program, in coordination with other EPRI programs, strives to improve these areas through application of chemistry initiatives, focusing on these goals. This paper highlights the major initiatives and issues with respect to PWR primary and secondary system chemistry and outlines the recent, on-going, and proposed work to effectively address them. These initiatives are presented in light of recent operating experience, as derived from EPRI's PWR chemistry monitoring and assessment program, and EPRI's water chemistry guidelines. (author)

  14. Scaffolding students’ reflective dialogues in the chemistry lab: challenging the cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Hougaard, Rikke Frøhlich

    The paper reports on a cross-case analysis comparing students’ activities and dialogue during BA level laboratory exercises, applying a mixed methods research design with video-data, student questionnaires and interviews. Our analysis identified specific affordances in relation to macro and micro......-scaffolding of students’ activities and dialogues, in order to stimulate them to work at higher cognitive levels. A specific lab-exercise in the course Macroscopic Physical Chemistry was redesigned with the aim of stimulating students’ metacognition both before and during the experimental work. The redesign included......-student dialogue on course content. Furthermore, dialogues between students and teaching assistant revealed elements of micro-scaffolding exploratory talk and a dialogic approach with open questions and prompts. The students expressed that the preparatory assignments and the dialogue with the teaching assistant...

  15. Nanoscale control of energy and matter: challenges and opportunities for plasma science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary challenges and opportunities in the ultimate ability to achieve nanoscale control of energy and matter are discussed using an example of the Plasma Nanoscience. This is an emerging multidisciplinary research field at the cutting edge of a large number of disciplines including but not limited to physics and chemistry of plasmas and gas discharges, materials science, surface science, nanoscience and nanotechnology, solid state physics, space physics and astrophysics, photonics, optics, plasmonics, spintronics, quantum information, physical chemistry, biomedical sciences and related engineering subjects. The origin, progress and future perspectives of this research field driven by the global scientific and societal challenges, is examined. The future potential of the Plasma Nanoscience to remain as a highly topical area in the global research and technological agenda in the Age of Fundamental-Level Control for a Sustainable Future is assessed using a framework of the five Grand Challenges for Basic Energy Sciences recently mapped by the US Department of Energy. It is concluded that the ongoing research is very relevant and is expected to substantially expand to competitively contribute to the solution of all of these Grand Challenges. The approach to control energy and matter at nano- and subnanoscales is based on identifying the prevailing carriers and transfer mechanisms of the energy and matter at the spatial and temporal scales that are most relevant to any particular nanofabrication process. Strong accent is made on the competitive edge of the plasma-based nanotechnology in applications related to the major socio-economic issues (energy, food, water, health and environment) that are crucial for a sustainable development of humankind. Several important emerging topics, opportunities and multidisciplinary synergies for the Plasma Nanoscience are highlighted. The main nanosafety issues are also discussed and the environment- and human health

  16. From nanofabrication to self-fabrication--tailored chemistry for control of single molecule electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    as alternatives to the dominant top-down nanofabrication techniques. One example is solution-based self-assembly of a molecule enclosed by two gold nanorod electrodes. This article will discuss recent attempts to control the self-assembly process by the use of supramolecular chemistry and how to tailor...

  17. Water chemistry control of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Yuichi; Makino, Ichiro; Yamauchi, Sumio; Fukuda, Fumihito.

    1992-01-01

    In PWR power plants, the primary system taking heat out of nuclear reactors and the secondary system generating steam and driving turbines are completely separated by steam generators, accordingly, by mutually independent water treatment, both systems are to be maintained in the optimal conditions. Namely, primary system is the closed water circulation circuit of simple liquid phase though under high temperature, high pressure condition, therefore, water shows the stable physical and chemical properties, and the minute water treatment for restraining the corrosion of structural materials and reducing radioactivity can be done. Secondary system is similar to the condensate and feedwater system of thermal power plants, and is the circuit for liquid-vapor two-phase transformation, but due to the local concentration of impurities by evaporation, the strict requirement is set for secondary water quality. However, secondary system can be treated in the state without radioactivity, and this is a great merit. The outline, basic concept and execution of primary water quality control, and the outline, concept, control criteria, facilities and execution of secondary water quality control are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Advanced analytical techniques for boiling water reactor chemistry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, H P; Schenker, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-02-01

    The analytical techniques applied can be divided into 5 classes: OFF-LINE (discontinuous, central lab), AT-LINE (discontinuous, analysis near loop), ON-LINE (continuous, analysis in bypass). In all cases pressure and temperature of the water sample are reduced. In a strict sense only IN-LINE (continuous, flow disturbance) and NON-INVASIVE (continuous, no flow disturbance) techniques are suitable for direct process control; - the ultimate goal. An overview of the analytical techniques tested in the pilot loop is given. Apart from process and overall water quality control, standard for BWR operation, the main emphasis is on water impurity characterization (crud particles, hot filtration, organic carbon); on stress corrosion crackling control for materials (corrosion potential, oxygen concentration) and on the characterization of the oxide layer on austenites (impedance spectroscopy, IR-reflection). The above mentioned examples of advanced analytical techniques have the potential of in-line or non-invasive application. They are different stages of development and are described in more detail. 28 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Quality Control Practices for Chemistry and Immunochemistry in a Cohort of 21 Large Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Flood, James G; Melanson, Stacy E F; Baumann, Nikola A; Marzinke, Mark A; Rai, Alex J; Hayden, Joshua; Wu, Alan H B; Ladror, Megan; Lifshitz, Mark S; Scott, Mitchell G; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Bowen, Raffick; Babic, Nikolina; Sobhani, Kimia; Giacherio, Donald; Bocsi, Gregary T; Herman, Daniel S; Wang, Ping; Toffaletti, John; Handel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Kathleen A; Albeiroti, Sami; Wang, Sihe; Zimmer, Melissa; Driver, Brandon; Yi, Xin; Wilburn, Clayton; Lewandrowski, Kent B

    2018-05-29

    In the United States, minimum standards for quality control (QC) are specified in federal law under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment and its revisions. Beyond meeting this required standard, laboratories have flexibility to determine their overall QC program. We surveyed chemistry and immunochemistry QC procedures at 21 clinical laboratories within leading academic medical centers to assess if standardized QC practices exist for chemistry and immunochemistry testing. We observed significant variation and unexpected similarities in practice across laboratories, including QC frequency, cutoffs, number of levels analyzed, and other features. This variation in practice indicates an opportunity exists to establish an evidence-based approach to QC that can be generalized across institutions.

  20. Potential and challenges of zeolite chemistry in the catalytic conversion of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaert, Thijs; Van Aelst, Joost; Dijkmans, Jan; De Clercq, Rik; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Verboekend, Danny; Sels, Bert F

    2016-02-07

    Increasing demand for sustainable chemicals and fuels has pushed academia and industry to search for alternative feedstocks replacing crude oil in traditional refineries. As a result, an immense academic attention has focused on the valorisation of biomass (components) and derived intermediates to generate valuable platform chemicals and fuels. Zeolite catalysis plays a distinct role in many of these biomass conversion routes. This contribution emphasizes the progress and potential in zeolite catalysed biomass conversions and relates these to concepts established in existing petrochemical processes. The application of zeolites, equipped with a variety of active sites, in Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, or multifunctional catalysed reactions is discussed and generalised to provide a comprehensive overview. In addition, the feedstock shift from crude oil to biomass involves new challenges in developing fields, like mesoporosity and pore interconnectivity of zeolites and stability of zeolites in liquid phase. Finally, the future challenges and perspectives of zeolites in the processing of biomass conversion are discussed.

  1. Technical Basis for Water Chemistry Control of IGSCC in Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Barry; Garcia, Susan

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water. However, even the utilization of near theoretical conductivity water cannot prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel, wrought nickel alloys and nickel weld metals under oxygenated conditions. IGSCC can be further accelerated by the presence of certain impurities dissolved in the coolant. The goal of this paper is to present the technical basis for controlling various impurities under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions for mitigation of IGSCC. More specifically, the effects of typical BWR ionic impurities (e.g., sulfate, chloride, nitrate, borate, phosphate, etc.) on IGSCC propensities in both NWC and HWC environments will be discussed. The technical basis for zinc addition to the BWR coolant will also provided along with an in-plant example of the most severe water chemistry transient to date.

  2. Water Chemistry Control in Reducing Corrosion and Radiation Exposure at PWR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febrianto

    2006-01-01

    Water chemistry control plays an important role in relation to plant availability, reliability and occupational radiation exposures. Radiation exposures of nuclear plant workers are determined by the radiation rate dose and by the amount maintenance and repair work time Water chemistry has always been, from beginning of operation of power Pressurized Water Reactor, an important factor in determining the integrity of reactor components, fuel cladding integrity and minimize out of core radiation exposures. For primary system, the parameters to control the quality of water chemistry have been subject to change in time. Reactor water coolant pH need to be optimally controlled and be operated in range pH 6.9 to 7.4. At pH lower than 6.9, cause increasing the radiation exposure level and increasing coolant water pH higher than 7.4 will decrease radiation exposure level but increasing risk to fuel cladding and steam generator tube. Since beginning 90 decade, PWR water coolant pH tend to be operated at pH 7.4. This paper will discuss concerning water chemistry development in reducing corrosion and radiation exposure dose in PWR reactor. (author)

  3. Secondary side water chemistry pH control strategy improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roumiguiere, Fernando-Mario; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Drexler, Andreas [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    When selecting a pH control strategy, plant design and operation characteristics have to be carefully considered. The strategy should be tailored to the plant-specific needs and requirements. Owing to the complexity of the interrelated variables, the best way is to perform a modeling with a suitable computer code. This work investigated the possibility of complementing the classic high pH all-volatile treatment (H-AVT) by addition of an organic amine at low concentrations complementarily to ammonia dosing to locally increase the pH in the water phase of the wet steam areas to counteract flow-assisted corrosion (FAC). Alternative conditioning scenarios were considered and calculated for comparative analysis using a computer code. The results obtained argue for the convenience of using ammonia as the main alkalizing agent whenever possible, avoiding multiple amine concepts and their associated drawbacks. (orig.)

  4. Biological forcing controls the chemistry of the coral exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, A.; Mostefaoui, S.; Cuif, J.; Yurimoto, H.; Dauphin, Y.; Houlbreque, F.; Dunbar, R.; Constantz, B.

    2006-12-01

    A multitude of marine organisms produce calcium carbonate skeletons that are used extensively to reconstruct water temperature variability of the tropical and subtropical oceans - a key parameter in global climate-change models. Such paleo-climate reconstructions are based on the notion that skeletal oxygen isotopic composition and certain trace-element abundances (e.g., Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios) vary in response to changes in the water temperature. However, it is a fundamental problem that poorly understood biological processes introduce large compositional deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium and hinder precise calibrations of many paleo-climate proxies. Indeed, the role of water temperature in controlling the composition of the skeleton is far from understood. We have studied trace-element abundances as well as oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of individual skeletal components in the zooxanthellate and non-zooxanthellate corals at ultra-structural, i.e. micrometer to sub-micrometer length scales. From this body of work we draw the following, generalized conclusions: 1) Centers of calcification (COC) are not in equilibrium with seawater. Notably, the Sr/Ca ratio is higher than expected for aragonite equilibrium with seawater at the temperature at which the skeleton was formed. Furthermore, the COC are further away from equilibrium with seawater than fibrous skeleton in terms of stable isotope composition. 2) COC are dramatically different from the fibrous aragonite skeleton in terms of trace element composition. 3) Neither trace element nor stable isotope variations in the fibrous (bulk) part of the skeleton are directly related to changes in SST. In fact, changes in SST can have very little to do with the observed compositional variations. 4) Trace element variations in the fibrous (bulk) part of the skeleton are not related to the activity of zooxanthellae. These observations are directly relevant to the issue of biological versus non

  5. Controlling Processes on Carbonate Chemistry across the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    The SWIRE NOC Ocean Monitoring System (SNOMS) project is an innovative programme helping to answer important questions about global climate change by using a commercial ship of opportunity to measure carbon in the surface of the ocean. Daily sampling coupled to continuous underway observation from a ship of opportunity (MV Shengking) provides new insights into the processes controlling variability in the carbonate system across the Pacific. The ships track runs from Vancouver (Canada) to Brisbane (Australia). Daily samples were taken on-board and measurements of Total alkalinity (TA) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined. This was alongside measurements of nutrients and continuous records of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-fluorescence, carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen (DO). These sensor based measurements were validated using the discrete samples. Carbon dioxide calculated from DIC and TA showed an offset from the sensor data of up to 8uatm. This and comparisons with climatology were used to calibrate the sensor data. The data have been compared with previous data from the MV Pacific Celebes that ran a similar route until 2012. The data show a clear increase in seawater carbon dioxide, tracking the atmospheric increases. Along track the partial pressure of seawater carbon dioxide varied by over 150 uatm. The highest values were seen just south of the equator in the Pacific, which is an important source region for carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  6. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J.

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of ammonia, morpholine, ethanolamine, and dimethylamine onto the surfaces of colloidal magnetite and hematite was measured at 25 o C. The effect of the adsorption on the surface potential was quantified by measuring the resulting shift in the isoelectric point of the corrosion products and by the direct measurement of the surface interaction force between the corrosion products and Inconel 600. These measurements have served to support the hypothesis that adsorption of amine affects the magnetite deposition rate by lowering the force of repulsion between magnetite and the surface of Inconel 600. The deposition rate of hematite increased as the oxygen concentration increased. A mechanism to account for enhanced deposition rates at high mixture qualities (> 0.35) has been identified and shown to predict behaviour that is consistent with both experimental and plant data. As a result of this investigation, several criteria are proposed to reduce the extent of corrosion product deposition on the tube bundle. Low hematite deposition is favoured by a low concentration of dissolved oxygen, and low magnetite deposition is favoured by choosing an amine for pH control that has little tendency to adsorb onto the surface of magnetite. To minimize adsorption the amine should have a high base strength and a large 'footprint' on the surface of magnetite. To prevent enhanced deposition at high mixture qualities, it is proposed that a modified amine be used that will reduce the surface tension or the elasticity of the steam-water interface or both

  7. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of ammonia, morpholine, ethanolamine, and dimethylamine onto the surfaces of colloidal magnetite and hematite was measured at 25{sup o}C. The effect of the adsorption on the surface potential was quantified by measuring the resulting shift in the isoelectric point of the corrosion products and by the direct measurement of the surface interaction force between the corrosion products and Inconel 600. These measurements have served to support the hypothesis that adsorption of amine affects the magnetite deposition rate by lowering the force of repulsion between magnetite and the surface of Inconel 600. The deposition rate of hematite increased as the oxygen concentration increased. A mechanism to account for enhanced deposition rates at high mixture qualities (> 0.35) has been identified and shown to predict behaviour that is consistent with both experimental and plant data. As a result of this investigation, several criteria are proposed to reduce the extent of corrosion product deposition on the tube bundle. Low hematite deposition is favoured by a low concentration of dissolved oxygen, and low magnetite deposition is favoured by choosing an amine for pH control that has little tendency to adsorb onto the surface of magnetite. To minimize adsorption the amine should have a high base strength and a large 'footprint' on the surface of magnetite. To prevent enhanced deposition at high mixture qualities, it is proposed that a modified amine be used that will reduce the surface tension or the elasticity of the steam-water interface or both.

  8. Geometric control of nuclearity in copper(I)/dioxygen chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yuma; Tano, Tetsuro; Mieda, Kaoru; Sugimoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Itoh, Shinobu

    2014-08-18

    Copper(I) complexes supported by a series of N3-tridentate ligands bearing a rigid cyclic diamine framework such as 1,5-diazacyclooctane (L8, eight-membered ring), 1,4-diazacycloheptane (L7, seven-membered ring), or 1,4-diazacyclohexane (L6, six-membered ring) with a common 2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl side arm were synthesized and their reactivity toward O2 were compared. The copper(I) complex of L8 preferentially provided a mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxide complex S as reported previously [Itoh, S., et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 2788-2789], whereas a copper(I) complex of L7 gave a bis(μ-oxido)dicopper(III) complex O at a low temperature (-85 °C) in acetone. On the other hand, no such active-oxygen complex was detected in the oxygenation reaction of the copper(I) complex of L6 under the same conditions. In addition, O2-reactivity of the copper(I) complex supported by an acyclic version of the tridentate ligand (LA, PyCH2CH2N(CH3)CH2CH2CH2N(CH3)2; Py = 2-pyridyl) was examined to obtain a mixture of a (μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxido)dicopper(II) complex (S)P and a bis(μ-oxido)dicopper(III) complex O. Careful inspection of the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes and the redox potentials of copper(I) complexes has revealed important geometric effects of the supporting ligands on controlling nuclearity of the generated copper active-oxygen complexes.

  9. Secondary side water chemistry pH control strategy improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumiguiere, Fernando-Mario; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Drexler, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Over the years the PWR plant operators were aware of the need of optimizing the pH control strategy in the water-steam cycle with the focus on improvement of steam generator performance with the main goal of reducing the corrosion product ingress into the steam generators and their consequences: SG fouling, SG tube corrosion beneath deposits. To achieve this goal, it becomes necessary to harmonize three requirements: a. High overall pH along the circuit for suppression of general corrosion, requiring a volatile amine to ensure a suitable distribution in steam areas and condenser, and b. High local pH at the water phase of two-phase flow areas, requiring an either rather low volatile amine to ensure high pH in the wet steam water film, or larger amounts of a volatile amine. c. Sufficient amount of hydrazine to ensure reducing conditions in the steam generators. The basic strategy of AREVA NP GmbH (formerly KWU), successfully applied in German nuclear power plants since the late seventies consisted on the achievement of the necessary pH by means of ammonia, as generated by thermal decomposition of hydrazine. By dosing of hydrazine at the necessary amounts to ensure reducing conditions, also sufficient ammonia is generated to achieve a high overall pH along the cycle, being the target pH (25 deg. C) ≥ 9.8 resulting in < 1 ppb Fe in final feed water. This treatment is known as H-AVT (High pH - All Volatile Treatment). Main prerequisite for its application is to have a copper-free system. Eventually, H-AVT started to be applied later at some other western nuclear power plants. In some units, the high condenser exhaust flow rate applied caused a considerable amount of ammonia being removed from the cycle, resulting in too low ammonia concentrations to maintain a sufficiently high pH, making the addition of ammonia necessary. AREVA NP GmbH together with plant operators investigated the possibility of complementing the applied classical H-AVT by addition of an advanced

  10. Controls for microgrids with storage: Review, challenges, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Ramon [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mississippi State University, P O Box 9571, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh 23111 (Indonesia); Srivastava, Anurag K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mississippi State University, P O Box 9571, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The interest on microgrid has increased significantly triggered by the increasing demand of reliable, secure, efficient, clean, and sustainable electricity. More research and implementation of microgrid will be conducted in order to improve the maturity of microgrid technology. Among different aspects of microgrid, this paper focuses on controls of microgrid with energy storage. A comprehensive review on current control technology is given with a discussion on challenges of microgrid controls. Basic simulation results are also presented to enhance and support the analysis. Finally, research needs and roadmap for microgrid control are also described. (author)

  11. International trade agreements challenge tobacco and alcohol control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Donald W

    2006-11-01

    This report reviews aspects of trade agreements that challenge tobacco and alcohol control policies. Trade agreements reduce barriers, increase competition, lower prices and promote consumption. Conversely, tobacco and alcohol control measures seek to reduce access and consumption, raise prices and restrict advertising and promotion in order to reduce health and social problems. However, under current and pending international agreements, negotiated by trade experts without public health input, governments and corporations may challenge these protections as constraints on trade. Advocates must recognise the inherent conflicts between free trade and public health and work to exclude alcohol and tobacco from trade agreements. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control has potential to protect tobacco policies and serve as a model for alcohol control.

  12. OBESITY: CHALLENGES TO VENTILATORY CONTROL DURING EXERCISE A BRIEF REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Tony G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a national health issue in the US. Among the many physiological changes induced by obesity, it also presents a unique challenge to ventilatory control during exercise due to increased metabolic demand of moving larger limbs, increased work of breathing due to extra weight on the chest wall, and changes in breathing mechanics. These challenges to ventilatory control in obesity can be inconspicuous or overt among obese adults but for the most part adaptation of ventilatory control during exercise in obesity appears remarkably unnoticed in the majority of obese people. In this brief review, the changes to ventilatory control required for maintaining normal ventilation during exercise will be examined, especially the interaction between respiratory neural drive and ventilation. Also, gaps in our current knowledge will be discussed. PMID:23707540

  13. Deep Space Control Challenges of the New Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, David S.; Burdick, Garry M.

    1999-01-01

    The exploration of deep space presents a variety of significant control challenges. Long communication delays coupled with challenging new science objectives require high levels of system autonomy and increasingly demanding pointing and control capabilities. Historically, missions based on the use of a large single spacecraft have been successful and popular since the early days of NASA. However, these large spacecraft missions are currently being displaced by more frequent and more focused missions based on the use of smaller and less expensive spacecraft designs. This trend drives the need to design smart software and good algorithms which together with the miniaturization of control components will improve performance while replacing the heavier and more expensive hardware used in the past. NASA's future space exploration will also include mission types that have never been attempted before, posing significant challenges to the underlying control system. This includes controlled landing on small bodies (e.g., asteroids and comets), sample return missions (where samples are brought back from other planets), robotic exploration of planetary surfaces (e.g., intelligent rovers), high precision formation flying, and deep space optical interferometry, While the control of planetary spacecraft for traditional flyby and orbiter missions are based on well-understood methodologies, control approaches for many future missions will be fundamentally different. This paradigm shift will require completely new control system development approaches, system architectures, and much greater levels of system autonomy to meet expected performance in the presence of significant environmental disturbances, and plant uncertainties. This paper will trace the motivation for these changes and will layout the approach taken to meet the new challenges. Emerging missions will be used to explain and illustrate the need for these changes.

  14. Challenges in setting up quality control in diagnostic radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 24, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or ... Quality control (QC) on diagnostic radiology equipment form part of the fundamental requirements for the ... Inadequate cooperation by facilities management, lack of QC equipment and insufficient staff form the major challenges in setting up QC in the facilities under study.

  15. Of Radicals and DREAMers: Harnessing Exceptionality to Challenge Immigration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Luisa Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to the literature on undocumented youth activism and citizenship by assessing undocumented youth's challenges to a growing regime of migration control in the US. It uses Doug McAdam's tactical interaction as an analytical lens to explore two consecutive high-risk campaigns, ICE infiltrations and expulsion/re-entry. In this…

  16. Challenges of Technology, Social Media, and Information Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Today's youth must deal with friend management 24 hours a day, seven days a week, through smartphones and such social networking sites as Facebook. Technology in the classroom can be valuable, but not without challenges. The key is well-thought-out policies. While school districts can't completely control how students use their…

  17. Factors Relating to Staff Attributions of Control over Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Jennifer A.; Phillips, Neil; Rose, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research has suggested that severity of intellectual disability (ID) and topography of behaviour may influence staff causal attributions regarding challenging behaviour. Subsequently, these causal attributions may influence helping behaviours. This study investigated the relationship between attributions of control over…

  18. Control Engineering, System Theory and Mathematics: The Teacher's Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenger, K.

    2007-01-01

    The principles, difficulties and challenges in control education are discussed and compared to the similar problems in the teaching of mathematics and systems science in general. The difficulties of today's students to appreciate the classical teaching of engineering disciplines, which are based on rigorous and scientifically sound grounds, are…

  19. Immigrants and health system challenges to TB control in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fochsen Grethe

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past three decades, Oman has made significant progress in controlling TB within it's borders. However, the national TB control program elimination target has yet to be reached. This study aims to explore the perceived roles played by the immigrant population and the private health sector in relation to TB control in Oman. Methods We conducted seventeen interviews with different health care providers. The verbatim transcripts were processed using content analysis. Results Three main themes emerged. Firstly the threat of repatriation faced by underprivileged expatriates, secondly the criticized and forgotten private health sector as a key player and thirdly the user and provider barriers faced by Omani patients in the Omani public health system. Conclusions The study has identified some of the challenges and barriers to TB control in Oman. These challenges are mainly related to unintended negative consequences arising from the current repatriation policy of immigrants and to and the lack of involvement of the private sector in TB control. TB control strategies designed to address these challenges are needed, for Oman to reach its TB elimination targets.

  20. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouse, Lon; Brouse, Richard; Brouse, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms that grow in evaporative cooling water systems, but can adversely affect the environment and human health. However, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years to inhibit microorganisms with excellent results. The water chemistry method concentrates natural minerals in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, while maintaining low calcium and magnesium content. The method provides further benefits in water conservation, and generates a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This report describes the antimicrobial effects of these chemistry modifications in the cooling water environment and the resultant collective inhibition of microbes, biofilm, and pathogen growth. This article also presents a novel perspective of parasitic microbiome functional relationships, including “Trojan Protozoans” and biofilms, and the function of polyvalent metal ions in the formation and inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Concurrently, scientists have concluded that discharge of antibacterial agents plays a key role in development of pathogen resistance to antimicrobials as well as antibiotics. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner. PMID:28420074

  1. Analytical chemistry in semiconductor manufacturing: Techniques, role of nuclear methods and need for quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report is the result of a consultants meeting held in Gaithersburg, USA, 2-3 October 1987. The meeting was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards and Technology, and it was attended by 18 participants from Denmark, Finland, India, Japan, Norway, People's Republic of China and the USA. The purpose of the meeting was to assess the present status of analytical chemistry in semiconductor manufacturing, the role of nuclear analytical methods and the need for internationally organized quality control of the chemical analysis. The report contains the three presentations in full and a summary report of the discussions. Thus, it gives an overview of the need of analytical chemistry in manufacturing of silicon based devices, the use of nuclear analytical methods, and discusses the need for quality control. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge with apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skamstrup Hansen, K; Vestergaard, H; Stahl Skov, P

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate different methods of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with apple. Three different DBPCFC models were evaluated: fresh apple juice, freshly grated apple, and freeze-dried apple powder. All challenges were performed outside...... frequency of reactions to placebo, probably due to the ingredients used for blinding. The sensitivity of the models with freshly grated apple and freeze-dried apple powder was 0.74/0.60. An increase in sensitivity is desirable. The freeze-dried apple powder proved to be useful for SPT, HR, and oral...

  3. An approach to quality and performance control in a computer-assisted clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrill, P E; Frazer, S C

    1979-01-01

    A locally developed, computer-based clinical chemistry laboratory system has been in operation since 1970. This utilises a Digital Equipment Co Ltd PDP 12 and an interconnected PDP 8/F computer. Details are presented of the performance and quality control techniques incorporated into the system. Laboratory performance is assessed through analysis of results from fixed-level control sera as well as from cumulative sum methods. At a simple level the presentation may be considered purely indicative, while at a more sophisticated level statistical concepts have been introduced to aid the laboratory controller in decision-making processes. PMID:438340

  4. Development of an automated system for CANDU secondary coolant circuit chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.R.; Stewart, R.B.

    1978-04-01

    This report is a summary of work done to develop a means for automated control of the secondary coolant chemistry of CANDU 600 MW(e) power reactors using on-line analyzers and a minicomputer. The development work was carried out in cooperation with Saskatchewan Power Corporation at Estevan. Results and conclusions of the program are included, as are recommendations for a prototype installation in a domestic CANDU 600 MW steam generator. (author)

  5. Description and principles of use of an automatic control device usable, in particular, in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigaudiere, Roger; Jeanmaire, Lucien

    1969-01-01

    This note describes an automatic control device for the programming of about 20 different functions, chronologically and during a given time. Any voltage can be chosen at the output to perform the different functions. Three examples of utilisation taken in analytical chemistry are given to illustrate the possibilities offered by this device, but its domain of use is much more universal and independent of the type of functions [fr

  6. User's guide for vectorized code EQUIL for calculating equilibrium chemistry on Control Data STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A vectorized code, EQUIL, was developed for calculating the equilibrium chemistry of a reacting gas mixture on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. The code provides species mole fractions, mass fractions, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the mixture for given temperature, pressure, and elemental mass fractions. The code is set up for the electrons H, He, C, O, N system of elements. In all, 24 chemical species are included.

  7. Role of photoexcited nitrogen dioxide chemistry on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new hydroxyl radical formation pathway via photo-excited nitrogen dioxide chemistry is incorporated into a chemistry-only box model as well as a 3D air quality model to examine its potential role on ozone formation and emission control strategy over the Pearl River Delta region...

  8. Double-blind, placebo controlled food challenge with apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.S.; Vestergaard, H.S.; Skov, P.S.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate different methods of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with apple. Three different DBPCFC models were evaluated: fresh apple juice, freshly grated apple, and freeze-dried apple powder. All challenges were performed outside...... the pollen season and took place from 1997 to 1999. The freeze-dried apple material was characterized by means of leukocyte histamine release (HR), skin prick test (SPT), and immunoblotting experiments. The study population consisted of birch pollen-allergic patients with a history of rhinitis in the birch......-pollen season and positive specific IgE to birch. For comparison of the DBPCFC models, 65 patients with a positive open oral challenge with apple were selected. In the characterization of the freeze-dried apple material, 46 birch pollen-allergic patients were included. The IgE reactivity to apple was evaluated...

  9. Quality control in diagnostic radiology: experience and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Mohd Ramli Arshad; Mohd Khalid Matori; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Husaini Salleh; Abdullah Tahir Aliyasak; Zainal Jamaluddin; Hasrul Hisham Hussain

    2005-01-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research through its Medical Physics Group has been providing Quality Control (QC) services for medical x-ray apparatus used in diagnostic radiology to private clinics and hospitals since the year 1997. The quality control (QC) in diagnostic radiology is considered as part of quality assurance program which provide accurate diagnostic information at the lowest cost and the least exposure of the patients to radiation. Many experience and obstacles were faced by Medical Physics Group. This paper will discuss on some of the experiences and challenges that could be shared together with MINT staff especially in the safety aspect related to electrical and mechanical, radiation protection, performance and standard. The challenging in administrative aspect also will discuss. (Author)

  10. Reported challenges in nurse-led randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang Vedelø, Tina; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore and discuss the methodological challenges nurse researchers report after conducting nurse-led randomised controlled trials in clinical hospital settings. Our research questions were (i) what are the most commonly experienced...... and the clinical nursing staff. Two lessons learned from this integrative review can be highlighted. First, we recommend researchers openly to share their experiences of barriers and challenges. They should describe factors that may have inhibited the desired outcome. Second, efforts to improve the collaboration...... between nurse researchers and clinicians, including education, training and support may increase the success rate and quality of nurse-led studies using the randomised controlled trial....

  11. Gold nanoparticle growth control - Implementing novel wet chemistry method on silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ameer, Ammar; Katsiev, Habib; Sinatra, Lutfan; Hussein, Irshad; Bakr, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Controlling particle size, shape, nucleation, and self-assembly on surfaces are some of the main challenges facing electronic device fabrication. In this work, growth of gold nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes was investigated by using a novel

  12. Controls on dripwater chemistry of Oregon Caves National Monument, northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Ersek, Vasile; Mix, Alan C.; Clark, Peter U.

    2018-02-01

    Cave dripwater chemistry of Oregon Caves National Monument (OCNM) was studied, where the parameters pH, total alkalinity, calcium, magnesium, strontium, sodium and barium were analyzed at quasi-monthly intervals from 2005 to 2007. Different statistical analyses have been used to investigate the variability of the chemical parameters in the different sites in the OCNM cave system. The dripwater varies in response to seasonal changes in rainfall. The drip rates range from zero in summer to continuous flow in winter, closely following the rainfall intensity. Spatial variations of dripwater chemistry, which is nonlinearly related to dripwater discharge likely, reflect the chemical composition of bedrock and overlying soil, and the residence time of the ground water within the aquifer. The residence time of infiltrated water in bedrock cracks control the dissolution carbonate bedrock, reprecipitation of calcium carbonate and the degree of saturation of dripwater with respect to calcium carbonate minerals. Spatiotemporal fluctuations of dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are controlled by dissolution of carbonate bedrock and the degree of calcite reprecipitation in bedrock cracks. This suggests that trace elements in speleothem deposits at the OCNM may serve as paleoclimatological proxies for precipitation, if interpreted within the context of understanding local bedrock chemistry.

  13. Chemistry control approach of pre commissioning and power operation of primary and auxiliary system of KGS-3 and 4 and trouble shooting made

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennet Raj, N.; Sahu, B.S.; Kumar, Vineet; Valluri, J.

    2008-01-01

    KGS (Kaiga Generating Station) 3 and 4 is a 220 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) using heavy water (D 2 O) as moderator and primary heat coolant and the secondary system is light water which is used to make the steam for generating the power. The chemistry control approach made for the successful commissioning and subsequent power operation of the unit is discussed here. The chemistry control is of two parts first part covers the pre commissioning chemistry control and the second part covers the commissioning chemistry control. During commissioning all systems were preserved by proper chemistry control and regular recirculation of system to avoid stagnancy. The major pre commissioning and commissioning chemistry control are depicted below: Pre commissioning chemistry control of primary heat transport (PHT) system and auxiliaries; Pre commissioning chemistry control of moderator system; Primary heat transport system hot conditioning with light water; Commissioning chemistry control of End Shield System (ESC) and Calandria Vault Cooling (CVC) system; Heavy water addition and its chemistry control in moderator system; and Heavy water addition and its chemistry control in PHT system. During power operation dew point in annular gas monitoring system (AGMS) of KGS unit 3 was maintaining in higher side under recirculation. The increase of dew point could be due to ingress of heavy water or light water. A new device was developed to collect condensate and the chemistry of the condensate was checked. The result indicated the ingress of light water. (author)

  14. Best possible cycle chemistry control in steam turbine plants; Baesta moejliga oevervakning av vattenkemin i anlaeggningar med aangturbin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Mats [Hellman Vatten AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    A project has been conducted of a large number of power and pulp plants in Sweden. Production managers and those responsible for water quality control were visited and interviewed. In addition, a research of cycle chemistry literature has been conducted to determine what has been done in other countries. The review of this literature shows that the Electric Power Research Institute in the USA and ESKOM in South Africa are in the forefront regarding QA/QC and have come a long way in water control management. A key requirement for successful plant cycle chemistry is corporate management support. The project makes it clear that cycle chemistry control was best at plants where production management was aware of the importance of high water quality. There is a real need for feed water technique and water quality education at all company levels. The objective should be that 'everyone should know the importance of right water quality'. Personnel without an education in chemistry often regard cycle chemistry as somewhat complicated. Better understanding and better working cycle chemistry control can be obtained by making the control easier and clearer for persons without training in chemistry. Extensive on-line instrumentation with well-designed systems for presenting the data, by-far, gives the best cycle chemistry control. It is important to have a holistic view when water treatment systems and on-line instrumentation are planned. It is not the amount of instruments or the number of chemistry personnel that is important. The important thing is to ensure that all functions needed fit together in the best way possible. Today, when cycle chemistry monitoring is heavily dependent on on-line instrumentation, the reliability of the instruments is crucial. Therefore, it is important to have well-established routines for maintenance, calibration and service. In order to decrease forced outages of plants due to poor cycle chemistry, the focus of chemistry control should

  15. Challenges for maintaining the modernization of instrumentation and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, V.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumentation and control system upgrades in nuclear power plants come with some challenges for their maintenance staff. It is important to have a long term modernization plant that derives from specific studies for each system. Training, spares, configuration control and cybersecurity are critical topics to take into account from the beginning of these projects. New system maintenance plans can require a new approach in accordance with the technology. FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Array) appear as the alternative for the future, mainly in safety systems. (Author)

  16. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  17. Advanced motion control for next-generation precision mechatronics: Challenges for control, identification, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing equipment and scientific instruments, including wafer scanners, printers, microscopes, and medical imaging scanners, require accurate and fast motions. Increasing requirements necessitate enhanced control performance. The aim of this paper is to identify several challenges for advanced

  18. The role of water chemistry and geomorphic control in the presence of Didymosphenia geminata in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, C.; Gabor, R. S.; Cullis, J. D.; Ran, L.; Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    waters which offer high solar radiation as well as stable riverbed. Both water chemistry and geomorphic factors appear to control Didymosphenia geminata spatial patterns and occurrence.

  19. [China faces a challenge of breast cancer prevention and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B N; Chen, W Q; Zhang, X; Qiao, Y L

    2016-10-23

    The incidence and mortality of breast cancer is in an increasing trend. In contrast to the global breast cancer situation, the prevention and control is challenging in China. Some suggestions are presented to the project of breast cancer prevention and control in China. Combining the global screening experiences with the epidemiological features of Chinese female breast cancer, aims to improve the population screening and early detection rate. Standardizing clinical diagnosis and treatment practice, aims to increase the efficacy and decrease the mortality. Intervening lifestyle and dietary behaviors, and intends to reduce risk exposure and incidence. Building national breast cancer registry provides preventive strategies. Great efforts should be made to carry out large sample multicenter clinical trails and translational research on the prevention and cotrol of breast cancer coordiated by health care service and science and technology administrations. Breast cancer prevention and control has a long way to go in China.

  20. Challenges and opportunities in integration of design and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    2015-01-01

    Process synthesis and design of plant operation are related topics but current industrial practice solves these problems sequentially. The implication of this sequential strategy may result in design of processing systems which are very hard to control. This paper presents a discussion on drivers...... for an integrated approach and outlines the challenges in formulation of such a multi-objective synthesis problem. This discussion is viewed in relation to some of the changing trends in the industry. Significant results have been published which in different ways seek to handle the integrated problem. Further...

  1. Methodologies for nuclear material accounting and control: challenges and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Material Accounting and Control (NUMAC) represents one of the most important and indispensable responsibilities of any nuclear installation. The emphasis is to ensure that the nuclear material being handled in the nuclear installation is properly accounted for with the expected accuracy and confidence levels. A number of analytical methods based on both destructive and non-destructive assay techniques are available at the disposal of the nuclear analytical scientists for this purpose and they have been enumerated extensively in literature. Instead of recounting the analytical methodologies available, an attempt has been made in this paper to highlight some of the challenges. (author)

  2. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  3. Achievements in and Challenges of Tuberculosis Control in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Han; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-11-01

    After the Korean War (1950-1953), nearly 6.5% of South Korea's population had active tuberculosis (TB). In response, South Korea implemented the National Tuberculosis Program in 1962. From 1965 to 1995, the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB in South Korea decreased from 940 to 219 cases per 100,000 population. Astounding economic growth might have contributed to this result; however, TB incidence in South Korea remains the highest among high-income countries. The rate of decrease in TB incidence seems to have slowed over the past 15 years. A demographic shift toward an older population, many of whom have latent TB and various concurrent conditions, is challenging TB control efforts in South Korea. The increasing number of immigrants also plays a part in the prolonged battle against TB. A historical review of TB in South Korea provides an opportunity to understand national TB control efforts that are applicable to other parts of the world.

  4. SNS Resonance Control Cooling Systems and Quadrupole Magnet Cooling Systems DIW Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magda, Karoly [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    This report focuses on control of the water chemistry for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS)/Quadrupole Magnet Cooling System (QMCS) deionized water (DIW) cooling loops. Data collected from spring 2013 through spring 2016 are discussed, and an operations regime is recommended.It was found that the RCCS operates with an average pH of 7.24 for all lines (from 7.0 to 7.5, slightly alkaline), the average low dissolved oxygen is in the area of < 36 ppb, and the main loop average resistivity of is > 14 MΩ-cm. The QMCS was found to be operating in a similar regime, with a slightly alkaline pH of 7.5 , low dissolved oxygen in the area of < 45 ppb, and main loop resistivity of 10 to 15 MΩ-cm. During data reading, operational corrections were done on the polishing loops to improve the water chemistry regime. Therefore some trends changed over time.It is recommended that the cooling loops operate in a regime in which the water has a resistivity that is as high as achievable, a dissolved oxygen concentration that is as low as achievable, and a neutral or slightly alkaline pH.

  5. Cassini at Saturn Proximal Orbits - Attitude Control Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn will come to an end in the spring and summer of 2017 with a series of 22 orbits that will dip inside the rings of Saturn. These are called proximal orbits and will conclude with spacecraft disposal into the atmosphere of the ringed world on September 15, 2017. These unique orbits that cross the ring plane only a few thousand kilometers above the cloud tops of the planet present new attitude control challenges for the Cassini operations team. Crossing the ring plane so close to the inner edge of the rings means that the Cassini orientation during the crossing will be tailored to protect the sensitive electronics bus of the spacecraft. This orientation will put the sun sensors at some extra risk so this paper discusses how the team prepares for dust hazards. Periapsis is so close to the planet that spacecraft controllability with RCS thrusters needs to be evaluated because of the predicted atmospheric torque near closest approach to Saturn. Radiation during the ring plane crossings will likely trigger single event transients in some attitude control sensors. This paper discusses how the attitude control team deals with radiation hazards. The angular size and unique geometry of the rings and Saturn near periapsis means that star identification will be interrupted and this paper discusses how the safe mode attitude is selected to best deal with these large bright bodies during the proximal orbits.

  6. Controlling chemistry parameters in nuclear reactors and power plants, plant chemistry specification requirements and compliance - an overview of TAPS 1 and 2 experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindranath; Muralidharan, K.; Save, C.B.; Patil, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station -TAPS 1 and 2 is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant commissioned in the year 1969. Both units are running with capacity factor of more than 90 % in their 20 th cycle of operation as on today. The 220 MWe units were derated to 160 MWe during 1984 consequent to isolation of Secondary Steam Generators (SSG) in the 10 th cycle of operation due to SSG tube leaks. This paper presents an overview of Plant Chemistry Control measures and experiences during the last 38 years of operation. The overall plant chemistry performance of TAPS 1 and 2 observed is very good; which is evident from the material condition of various systems reflected in QC and I reports, NDT and ISI reports. This is also supported by the fact that both Units are showing excellent performance continuously during recent years. (author)

  7. Monitoring and control system for tuneable high frequency microwave assisted chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, G P; Wylie, S R; Shaw, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Phipps, D; Alkhaddar, R; Bond, G

    2007-01-01

    Microwave chemistry is an established technique in the synthesis of organic compounds at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. This is considered to be a result of the development of microwave ovens, rather than an objective solution, which maximises efficiency through careful selection of the operating frequency. To obtain a frequency for a dielectric, the complex permittivity should be determined as a function of frequency. If the correct heating frequency is found, superheating can occur when a liquid solvent reaches its boiling point and exceeds it. This paper presents sensor diodes and temperature sensors used in a mono-mode reactor, with computer control of an E-H tuner, frequency and incident power to control temperature and power, experimental results showing heating and reactions using ethanol are reported

  8. Data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (DAWAC). Report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This publication provides information on the current status and development trends in monitoring, diagnostics and control of water chemistry and corrosion of core and primary circuit materials in water cooled power reactors. It summarizes the results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project and focuses on the methods for development, qualification and implementation of water chemistry expert systems at nuclear power plants. These systems are needed to have full benefit from using on-line sensors in real time mode when sensor signals, and other chemistry and operational data, are collected and continuously analysed with data acquisition and evaluation software. Technical knowledge was acquired in water chemistry control techniques (grab sampling, on-line monitoring, data collecting and processing, etc), plant chemistry and corrosion diagnostics, plant monitoring (corrosion, chemistry, activity) and plant chemistry improvement (analytical models and practices). This publication covers contributions from leading experts in water chemistry/corrosion, representing organizations from 16 countries with the largest nuclear capacities

  9. Nanomaterials for membrane fouling control: accomplishments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-11-01

    We report a review of recent research efforts on incorporating nanomaterials-including metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanomaterials, and polymeric nanomaterials-into/onto membranes to improve membrane antifouling properties in biomedical or potentially medical-related applications. In general, nanomaterials can be incorporated into/onto a membrane by blending them into membrane fabricating materials or by attaching them to membrane surfaces via physical or chemical approaches. Overall, the fascinating, multifaceted properties (eg, high hydrophilicity, superparamagnetic properties, antibacterial properties, amenable functionality, strong hydration capability) of nanomaterials provide numerous novel strategies and unprecedented opportunities to fully mitigate membrane fouling. However, there are still challenges in achieving a broader adoption of nanomaterials in the membrane processes used for biomedical applications. Most of these challenges arise from the concerns over their long-term antifouling performance, hemocompatibility, and toxicity toward humans. Therefore, rigorous investigation is still needed before the adoption of some of these nanomaterials in biomedical applications, especially for those nanomaterials proposed to be used in the human body or in contact with living tissue/body fluids for a long period of time. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to predict that the service lifetime of membrane-based biomedical devices and implants will be prolonged significantly with the adoption of appropriate fouling control strategies. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Security Challenges in Smart-Grid Metering and Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Fan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The smart grid is a next-generation power system that is increasingly attracting the attention of government, industry, and academia. It is an upgraded electricity network that depends on two-way digital communications between supplier and consumer that in turn give support to intelligent metering and monitoring systems. Considering that energy utilities play an increasingly important role in our daily life, smart-grid technology introduces new security challenges that must be addressed. Deploying a smart grid without adequate security might result in serious consequences such as grid instability, utility fraud, and loss of user information and energy-consumption data. Due to the heterogeneous communication architecture of smart grids, it is quite a challenge to design sophisticated and robust security mechanisms that can be easily deployed to protect communications among different layers of the smart grid-infrastructure. In this article, we focus on the communication-security aspect of a smart-grid metering and control system from the perspective of cryptographic techniques, and we discuss different mechanisms to enhance cybersecurity of the emerging smart grid. We aim to provide a comprehensive vulnerability analysis as well as novel insights on the cybersecurity of a smart grid.

  11. Materials control and accountability challenges associated with plutonium inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    There are currently many initiatives underway within the Department of Energy (DOE) to safely and securely manage large plutonium inventories arising from weapons dismantlement, changing missions and facility operations. Plutonium inventory information is increasingly accessible to the public as a result of the secretary of energy's openness initiative. As a result, knowledge of these inventories and levels to which the department has accounted for and controlled these inventories, will be under increased scrutiny from a variety of interest groups. The quality of this accountability data and what this data means will greatly influence the public's perception of how the US is protecting its plutonium inventories. In addition, the department's safeguards program provides an essential basis for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards that, in addition to possibly other international control regimes, will be in place over a large portion of these future inventories. The capability and functionality of the department's nuclear safeguards program will be important contributors to the success of US programs for the responsible stewardship of these vast plutonium inventories. This paper discusses some of the challenges, in terms of specific issues relating to one part of the department's safeguards program--materials control and accountability (MC and A)--to meet the growing domestic and international requirements and expectations associated with these plutonium inventories

  12. Operational challenges to feedwater/steam generator water level control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, V.M.; Whaley, S.D.; Federico, P.A. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Feedwater control and turbine control have historically been at the top of the list of contributors to unplanned outages and forced curtailments in the nuclear industry, and they remain so according to recent industry data. Much has been done and is available by way of measures to improve this area and, in spite of much progress, opportunities remain to extend implementation. Toward this end, this paper aims to focus upon feedwater control and provide background on associated characteristics and attributes as a context for identifying the issues which are key challenges that lie at the root of this concern. Primary groupings of these issues will be discussed in order to better define their nature and to establish a basis for a presentation of the range of solutions which have been implemented and remain available to address them. The need for a systems engineering approach, and the role of I&C and field-mounted equipment to application of these solutions will be discussed. (author)

  13. Materials control and accountability challenges associated with plutonium inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.W. [USDOE Office of Safeguards and Security, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    There are currently many initiatives underway within the Department of Energy (DOE) to safely and securely manage large plutonium inventories arising from weapons dismantlement, changing missions and facility operations. Plutonium inventory information is increasingly accessible to the public as a result of the secretary of energy`s openness initiative. As a result, knowledge of these inventories and levels to which the department has accounted for and controlled these inventories, will be under increased scrutiny from a variety of interest groups. The quality of this accountability data and what this data means will greatly influence the public`s perception of how the US is protecting its plutonium inventories. In addition, the department`s safeguards program provides an essential basis for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards that, in addition to possibly other international control regimes, will be in place over a large portion of these future inventories. The capability and functionality of the department`s nuclear safeguards program will be important contributors to the success of US programs for the responsible stewardship of these vast plutonium inventories. This paper discusses some of the challenges, in terms of specific issues relating to one part of the department`s safeguards program--materials control and accountability (MC and A)--to meet the growing domestic and international requirements and expectations associated with these plutonium inventories.

  14. Signal processing and control challenges for smart vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Braun, Simon G.

    2017-03-01

    Smart phones have changed not only the mobile phone market but also our society during the past few years. Could the next potential intelligent device may be the vehicle? Judging by the visibility, in all media, of the numerous attempts to develop autonomous vehicles, this is certainly one of the logical outcomes. Smart vehicles would be equipped with an advanced operating system such that the vehicles could communicate with others, optimize the operation to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, enhance safety, or even become self-driving. These combined new features of vehicles require instrumentation and hardware developments, fast signal processing/fusion, decision making and online optimization. Meanwhile, the inevitable increasing system complexity would certainly challenges the control unit design.

  15. The challenge of gun control for mental health advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Anand

    2013-09-01

    Mass shootings, such as the 2012 Newtown massacre, have repeatedly led to political discourse about limiting access to guns for individuals with serious mental illness. Although the political climate after such tragic events poses a considerable challenge to mental health advocates who wish to minimize unsympathetic portrayals of those with mental illness, such media attention may be a rare opportunity to focus attention on risks of victimization of those with serious mental illness and barriers to obtaining psychiatric care. Current federal gun control laws may discourage individuals from seeking psychiatric treatment and describe individuals with mental illness using anachronistic, imprecise, and gratuitously stigmatizing language. This article lays out potential talking points that may be useful after future gun violence.

  16. Cold Plasmas for Biofilm Control: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Brendan F; Flynn, Padrig B; O'Brien, Séamus; Hickok, Noreen; Freeman, Theresa; Bourke, Paula

    2018-06-01

    Bacterial biofilm infections account for a major proportion of chronic and medical device associated infections in humans, yet our ability to control them is compromised by their inherent tolerance to antimicrobial agents. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) represents a promising therapeutic option. CAP treatment of microbial biofilms represents the convergence of two complex phenomena: the production of a chemically diverse mixture of reactive species and intermediates, and their interaction with a heterogeneous 3D interface created by the biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix. Therefore, understanding these interactions and physiological responses to CAP exposure are central to effective management of infectious biofilms. We review the unique opportunities and challenges for translating CAP to the management of biofilms. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Photoinducible bioorthogonal chemistry: a spatiotemporally controllable tool to visualize and perturb proteins in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Reyna K V; Lin, Qing

    2011-09-20

    to label proteins rapidly (within ∼1 min) both in vitro and in E. coli . To create an effective interface with biology, we have identified both a metabolically incorporable alkene amino acid, homoallylglycine, and a genetically encodable tetrazole amino acid, p-(2-tetrazole)phenylalanine. We demonstrate the utility of these two moieties, respectively, in spatiotemporally controlled imaging of newly synthesized proteins and in site-specific labeling of proteins. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of the photoclick chemistry to perturb the localization of a fluorescent protein in mammalian cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Improving chemistry performance in CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.; Guzonas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong interplay between coolant chemistry and materials selection in any nuclear power plant system. To achieve the design life of reactor components it is necessary to monitor and control relevant chemistry parameters, such as ionic conductivity, pH, concentrations of dissolved ions and redox species (e.g., hydrogen, hydrazine, oxygen) and the concentrations of suspended corrosion products. Chemistry specifications are set to achieve a balance between the sometimes conflicting requirements to minimize corrosion and radiological dose and to minimize operating and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the plant. For the past decade, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has taken a rigorous and disciplined approach to reviewing and updating all aspects of chemistry control in the CANDU® nuclear power plant (NPP). This approach has included proactively reviewing chemistry operating experience from existing CANDU® and other water-cooled NPPs worldwide to identify and address emerging issues, updating all of our chemistry control documentation to ensure that each chemistry parameter is linked to a specific requirement (e.g., reduce activity transport, monitor for condenser leak) and incorporating the latest results from our Research and Development (R and D) programs to ensure that all chemistry specifications are supported by a sound rationale. The results of this review and update have been incorporated into updated chemistry specifications and, in some cases, modified operating procedures for new and existing plants. In addition, recommendations have been made for design modifications to improve chemistry control in new build plants, especially during periods of shutdown and startup when chemistry control has traditionally been more challenging. Chemistry control in new-build CANDU® plants will rely increasingly on the use of on-line instrumentation interfaced directly to AECL's state-of-the-art chemistry monitoring, diagnostics and analysis

  19. Water chemistry controlled aggregation and photo-transformation of silver nanoparticles in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongguang; Yang, Xiaoya; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wang, Weidong; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-08-01

    The inevitable release of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into aquatic environments has drawn great concerns about its environmental toxicity and safety. Although aggregation and transformation play crucial roles in the transport and toxicity of AgNPs, how the water chemistry of environmental waters influences the aggregation and transformation of engineered AgNPs is still not well understood. In this study, the aggregation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs was investigated in eight typical environmental water samples (with different ionic strengths, hardness, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations) by using UV-visible spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. Raman spectroscopy was applied to probe the interaction of DOM with the surface of AgNPs. Further, the photo-transformation and morphology changes of AgNPs in environmental waters were studied by UV-visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The results suggested that both electrolytes (especially Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) and DOM in the surface waters are key parameters for AgNP aggregation, and sunlight could accelerate the morphology change, aggregation, and further sedimentation of AgNPs. This water chemistry controlled aggregation and photo-transformation should have significant environmental impacts on the transport and toxicity of AgNPs in the aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. The role of cation exchange in controlling groundwater chemistry at Aspo, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Construction-induced groundwater flow has resulted in the mixing of relatively dilute shallow groundwater with more concentrated groundwater at depth in the underground Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) at Aespoe, Sweden. The observed compositional variation of the mixed groundwater cannot be explained using a conservative mixing model. The geochemical modeling package EQ3/6, to which a cation-exchange model was added, was used to simulate mixing between the two fluids. The results of modeling simulations suggest that cation exchange between groundwater and fracture-lining clays can explain the major element fluid chemistry observed in the HRL. The quantity of exchanger required to match simulated with observed fluid chemistry is reasonable and is consistent with the observed fracture mineralogy. This preliminary study establishes cation exchange as a viable mechanism for controlling the chemical evolution of groundwaters in a fracture-dominated dynamic flow system. This modeling study also strengthens their confidence in the ability to model the potential effects of fracture-lining minerals on the transport of radionuclides in a high level nuclear waste repository

  1. Surface-Chemistry-Mediated Control of Individual Magnetic Helical Microswimmers in a Swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopu; Hu, Chengzhi; Schurz, Lukas; De Marco, Carmela; Chen, Xiangzhong; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2018-05-31

    Magnetic helical microswimmers, also known as artificial bacterial flagella (ABFs), perform 3D navigation in various liquids under low-strength rotating magnetic fields by converting rotational motion to translational motion. ABFs have been widely studied as carriers for targeted delivery and release of drugs and cells. For in vivo/ in vitro therapeutic applications, control over individual groups of swimmers within a swarm is necessary for several biomedical applications such as drug delivery or small-scale surgery. In this work, we present the selective control of individual swimmers in a swarm of geometrically and magnetically identical ABFs by modifying their surface chemistry. We confirm experimentally and analytically that the forward/rotational velocity ratio of ABFs is independent of their surface coatings when the swimmers are operated below their step-out frequency (the frequency requiring the entire available magnetic torque to maintain synchronous rotation). We also show that ABFs with hydrophobic surfaces exhibit larger step-out frequencies and higher maximum forward velocities compared to their hydrophilic counterparts. Thus, selective control of a group of swimmers within a swarm of ABFs can be achieved by operating the selected ABFs at a frequency that is below their step-out frequencies but higher than the step-out frequencies of unselected ABFs. The feasibility of this method is investigated in water and in biologically relevant solutions. Selective control is also demonstrated inside a Y-shaped microfluidic channel. Our results present a systematic approach for realizing selective control within a swarm of magnetic helical microswimmers.

  2. Controlling nonspecific protein adsorption in a plug-based microfluidic system by controlling interfacial chemistry using fluorous-phase surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, L Spencer; Song, Helen; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2005-02-01

    Control of surface chemistry and protein adsorption is important for using microfluidic devices for biochemical analysis and high-throughput screening assays. This paper describes the control of protein adsorption at the liquid-liquid interface in a plug-based microfluidic system. The microfluidic system uses multiphase flows of immiscible fluorous and aqueous fluids to form plugs, which are aqueous droplets that are completely surrounded by fluorocarbon oil and do not come into direct contact with the hydrophobic surface of the microchannel. Protein adsorption at the aqueous-fluorous interface was controlled by using surfactants that were soluble in fluorocarbon oil but insoluble in aqueous solutions. Three perfluorinated alkane surfactants capped with different functional groups were used: a carboxylic acid, an alcohol, and a triethylene glycol group that was synthesized from commercially available materials. Using complementary methods of analysis, adsorption was characterized for several proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen), including enzymes (ribonuclease A (RNase A) and alkaline phosphatase). These complementary methods involved characterizing adsorption in microliter-sized droplets by drop tensiometry and in nanoliter plugs by fluorescence microscopy and kinetic measurements of enzyme catalysis. The oligoethylene glycol-capped surfactant prevented protein adsorption in all cases. Adsorption of proteins to the carboxylic acid-capped surfactant in nanoliter plugs could be described by using the Langmuir model and tensiometry results for microliter drops. The microfluidic system was fabricated using rapid prototyping in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Black PDMS microfluidic devices, fabricated by curing a suspension of charcoal in PDMS, were used to measure the changes in fluorescence intensity more sensitively. This system will be useful for microfluidic bioassays, enzymatic kinetics, and protein crystallization, because it does not require

  3. Current status and future perspectives of electron interactions with molecules, clusters, surfaces, and interfaces [Workshop on Fundamental challenges in electron-driven chemistry; Workshop on Electron-driven processes: Scientific challenges and technological opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt H.; McCurdy, C. William; Orlando, Thomas M.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2000-09-01

    This report is based largely on presentations and discussions at two workshops and contributions from workshop participants. The workshop on Fundamental Challenges in Electron-Driven Chemistry was held in Berkeley, October 9-10, 1998, and addressed questions regarding theory, computation, and simulation. The workshop on Electron-Driven Processes: Scientific Challenges and Technological Opportunities was held at Stevens Institute of Technology, March 16-17, 2000, and focused largely on experiments. Electron-molecule and electron-atom collisions initiate and drive almost all the relevant chemical processes associated with radiation chemistry, environmental chemistry, stability of waste repositories, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, plasma processing of materials for microelectronic devices and other applications, and novel light sources for research purposes (e.g. excimer lamps in the extreme ultraviolet) and in everyday lighting applications. The life sciences are a rapidly advancing field where the important role of electron-driven processes is only now beginning to be recognized. Many of the applications of electron-initiated chemical processes require results in the near term. A large-scale, multidisciplinary and collaborative effort should be mounted to solve these problems in a timely way so that their solution will have the needed impact on the urgent questions of understanding the physico-chemical processes initiated and driven by electron interactions.

  4. Controlled nuclear fusion, a challenging task with a big payoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion carries the promise of providing the world with a new source of energy, the same energy that powers the stars. Research in this area has progressed steadily for several decades now, and is ready to move into a new phase. The probability is high that a new international experimental machine (ITER) which will prove the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy, will be built. This paper introduces nuclear fusion for people familiar with the fission process. It starts from the basic principles common to fusion and fission. It moves on to point out the differences, explains the reasons for those differences and the consequences. Controlled thermonuclear fusion can be obtained in several ways, which have led to different research lines. One line, on which this talk focuses, is by confining the reacting particles with magnetic fields. Another, which is the subject of a different talk, relies on the inertia of the particles to create the conditions necessary for fusion. The progress of the magnetic confinement research is shown, with examples of major hurdles, which have occurred and have been overcome. Recent results, which make us optimistic that the next machine can prove the feasibility of fusion energy, are highlighted. The talk also addresses the challenges that remain before us, and suggests that the promise of fusion energy opens up new perspectives and opportunities for the development and the use of fission energy. (author)

  5. Pore chemistry and size control in hybrid porous materials for acetylene capture from ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, X.

    2016-05-20

    The trade-off between physical adsorption capacity and selectivity of porous materials is a major barrier for efficient gas separation and purification through physisorption. We report control over pore chemistry and size in metal coordination networks with hexafluorosilicate and organic linkers for the purpose of preferential binding and orderly assembly of acetylene molecules through cooperative host-guest and/or guest-guest interactions. The specific binding sites for acetylene are validated by modeling and neutron powder diffraction studies. The energies associated with these binding interactions afford high adsorption capacity (2.1 millimoles per gram at 0.025 bar) and selectivity (39.7 to 44.8) for acetylene at ambient conditions. Their efficiency for the separation of acetylene/ethylene mixtures is demonstrated by experimental breakthrough curves (0.73 millimoles per gram from a 1/99 mixture).

  6. Fast and controlled fabrication of porous graphene oxide: application of AFM tapping for mechano-chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Liangyong; Korobko, Alexander V.; Bus, Marcel; Boshuizen, Bart; Sudhölter, Ernst J. R.; Besseling, Nicolaas A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes a novel method to fabricate porous graphene oxide (PGO) from GO by exposure to oxygen plasma. Compared to other methods to fabricate PGO described so far, e.g. the thermal and steam etching methods, oxygen plasma etching method is much faster. We studied the development of the porosity with exposure time using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that the development of PGO upon oxygen-plasma exposure can be controlled by tapping mode AFM scanning using a Si tip. AFM tapping stalls the growth of pores upon further plasma exposure at a level that coincides with the fraction of sp2 carbons in the GO starting material. We suggest that AFM tapping procedure changes the bond structure of the intermediate PGO structure, and these stabilized PGO structures cannot be further etched by oxygen plasma. This constitutes the first report of tapping AFM as a tool for local mechano-chemistry.

  7. Statistical applications for chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) in the pharmaceutical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdick, Richard K; Pfahler, Lori B; Quiroz, Jorge; Sidor, Leslie; Vukovinsky, Kimberly; Zhang, Lanju

    2017-01-01

    This book examines statistical techniques that are critically important to Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control (CMC) activities. Statistical methods are presented with a focus on applications unique to the CMC in the pharmaceutical industry. The target audience consists of statisticians and other scientists who are responsible for performing statistical analyses within a CMC environment. Basic statistical concepts are addressed in Chapter 2 followed by applications to specific topics related to development and manufacturing. The mathematical level assumes an elementary understanding of statistical methods. The ability to use Excel or statistical packages such as Minitab, JMP, SAS, or R will provide more value to the reader. The motivation for this book came from an American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) short course on statistical methods applied to CMC applications presented by four of the authors. One of the course participants asked us for a good reference book, and the only book recomm...

  8. Alloy chemistry and microstructural control to meet the demands of the automotive Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine now under development by DOE/NASA as an alternative to the internal combustion engine, imposes severe materials requirements for the hot portion of the engine. Materials selected must be low cost and contain a minimum of strategic elements so that availability is not a problem. Heater head tubes contain high pressure hydrogen on the inside and are exposed to hot combustion gases on the outside surface. The cylinders and regenerator housings must be readily castable into complex shapes having varying wall thicknesses and be amenable to brazing and welding operations. Also, high strength, oxidation resistance, resistance to hydrogen permeation, cyclic operation, and long-life are required. A research program conducted by NASA Lewis focused on alloy chemistry and microstructural control to achieve the desired properties over the life of the engine. Results of alloy selection, characterization, evaluation, and actual engine testing of selected materials are presented.

  9. Recombinant erythropoietin and analogues: a challenge for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, J A; Belalcazar, V; de Bolos, C; Gutiérrez, R; Llop, E; Segura, J

    2004-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) increases the number of circulating erythrocytes and thus muscle oxygenation. The availability of the recombinant protein (rEPO) has increased the risk of its illegal use in sports, its detection being a difficult challenge. Five different hematopoietic parameters were initially chosen as indirect markers of rEPO abuse: concentration of serum EPO, concentration of serum-soluble transferrin receptors (sTFr), hematocrit, percentage of reticulocytes, and percentage of macrocytes. New models considering only hemoglobin, serum EPO concentration, and percentage of reticulocytes are simpler and seem to be more sensitive when low doses of rEPO are used. A more direct method of urine analysis (isoelectrofocusing, double blotting, and chemiluminescent detection) based on the charge differences between rEPO and endogenous EPO, related to their carbohydrate composition, provides proof of rEPO use. Furthermore, this approach permits the detection of darbepoetin, a direct analogue of EPO also known as NESP ("new erythropoiesis stimulating protein"). Recently a protein conjugate, "synthetic erythropoiesis protein" (SEP), containing precision-length, monodisperse, negatively charged polymers instead of oligosaccharides has been synthesized. Finally, EPO-mimetics are molecules capable of acting as EPO in dimerizing the EPO receptor. Two kinds of EPO-mimetics have been described: peptides and nonpeptides. The enhancement of oxygen availability to muscles by rEPO, analogues, and mimetics constitutes one of the main challenges to doping control. Major steps have already been developed for detection ofrEPO and some analogues. In the near future, the transfection to an athlete's body of genes that code for erythropoietin might be an emerging doping issue, and sports authorities have incorporated "gene doping" among the prohibited practices.

  10. Controlled Human Malaria Infection: Applications, Advances, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisic, Danielle I; McCarthy, James S; Good, Michael F

    2018-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) entails deliberate infection with malaria parasites either by mosquito bite or by direct injection of sporozoites or parasitized erythrocytes. When required, the resulting blood-stage infection is curtailed by the administration of antimalarial drugs. Inducing a malaria infection via inoculation with infected blood was first used as a treatment (malariotherapy) for neurosyphilis in Europe and the United States in the early 1900s. More recently, CHMI has been applied to the fields of malaria vaccine and drug development, where it is used to evaluate products in well-controlled early-phase proof-of-concept clinical studies, thus facilitating progression of only the most promising candidates for further evaluation in areas where malaria is endemic. Controlled infections have also been used to immunize against malaria infection. Historically, CHMI studies have been restricted by the need for access to insectaries housing infected mosquitoes or suitable malaria-infected individuals. Evaluation of vaccine and drug candidates has been constrained in these studies by the availability of a limited number of Plasmodium falciparum isolates. Recent advances have included cryopreservation of sporozoites, the manufacture of well-characterized and genetically distinct cultured malaria cell banks for blood-stage infection, and the availability of Plasmodium vivax -specific reagents. These advances will help to accelerate malaria vaccine and drug development by making the reagents for CHMI more widely accessible and also enabling a more rigorous evaluation with multiple parasite strains and species. Here we discuss the different applications of CHMI, recent advances in the use of CHMI, and ongoing challenges for consideration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Human development VIII: a theory of "deep" quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organisms consciousness and complex behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-11-14

    Deep quantum chemistry is a theory of deeply structured quantum fields carrying the biological information of the cell, making it able to remember, intend, represent the inner and outer world for comparison, understand what it "sees", and make choices on its structure, form, behavior and division. We suggest that deep quantum chemistry gives the cell consciousness and all the qualities and abilities related to consciousness. We use geometric symbolism, which is a pre-mathematical and philosophical approach to problems that cannot yet be handled mathematically. Using Occam's razor we have started with the simplest model that works; we presume this to be a many-dimensional, spiral fractal. We suggest that all the electrons of the large biological molecules' orbitals make one huge "cell-orbital", which is structured according to the spiral fractal nature of quantum fields. Consciousness of single cells, multi cellular structures as e.g. organs, multi-cellular organisms and multi-individual colonies (like ants) and human societies can thus be explained by deep quantum chemistry. When biochemical activity is strictly controlled by the quantum-mechanical super-orbital of the cell, this orbital can deliver energetic quanta as biological information, distributed through many fractal levels of the cell to guide form and behavior of an individual single or a multi-cellular organism. The top level of information is the consciousness of the cell or organism, which controls all the biochemical processes. By this speculative work inspired by Penrose and Hameroff we hope to inspire other researchers to formulate more strict and mathematically correct hypothesis on the complex and coherence nature of matter, life and consciousness.

  12. The challenge of controlling phosphorus in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Martin, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenesis and management of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders (CKD-MBD) has experienced major changes, but the control of serum phosphorus at all stages of CKD still seems to be a key factor to improve clinical outcomes. High serum phosphorus is the most important uremia-related, non-traditional risk factor associated with vascular calcification in CKD patients and in the general population. Phosphorus may also be one of the key elements linking vascular calcification with low bone turnover. The main hormones and factors that contribute to the kidney regulation of phosphorus and calcium include parathyroid hormone, FGF-23, klotho and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). Serum phosphorus did not start rising until CKD 3b in contrast with the earlier changes observed with fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite FGF-23 and PTH having synergic effects regarding phosphorus removal, they have opposite effects on 1,25(OH)2D3. At the same stages of CKD in which phosphorus retention appears to occur, calcium retention also occurs. As phosphorus accumulation is associated with poor outcomes, an important question without a clear answer is at which level-range should serum phosphorus be maintained at different stages of CKD to improve clinical outcomes. There are four main strategies to manage phosphate homeostasis; phosphorus dietary intake, administration of phosphate binder agents, effective control of hyperparathyroidism and to ensure in the CKD 5D setting, an adequate scheme of dialysis. Despite all the available strategies, and the introduction of new phosphate binder agents in the market, controlling serum phosphorus remains challenging, and hyperphosphatemia continues to be extremely common in CKD 5 patients. Furthermore, despite phosphate binding agents having proved to be effective in reducing serum phosphorus, their ultimate effects on clinical outcomes remain controversial. Thus, we still

  13. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  14. Strategic elements of steam cycle chemistry control practices at TXU's Comanche Peak steam electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Stevens, J.; Nichols, G.

    2002-01-01

    Early industry experience defined the critical importance of Chemistry Control Practices to maintaining long-term performance of PWR steam generators. These lessons provided the impetus for a number of innovations and alternate practices at Comanche Peak. For example, advanced amine investigations and implementation of results provided record low iron transport and deposition. The benefits of the surface-active properties of dimethyl-amine exceeded initial expectations. Operation of pre-coat polishers and steam generator blowdown demineralizers in the amine cycle enabled optimization of amine concentrations and stable pH control. The strategy for coordinated control of oxygen and hydrazine dosing complemented the advanced amine program for protective oxide stabilization. Additionally, a proactive chemical cleaning was performed on Unit 1 to prevent degradations from general fouling of steam generator tube-tube support plate (TSP) and top-of-tubesheet (TTS) crevices. This paper shares the results of these innovations and practices. Also, the bases, theory, and philosophy supporting the strategic elements of program will be presented. (authors)

  15. Infection control challenges in deployed US military treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Crouch, Helen K

    2009-04-01

    Personnel sustaining combat-related injuries in current overseas conflicts continue to have their care complicated by infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms, including Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas. Although presumed to be due to multiple factors both within and outside of the combat theater, concern has been raised about the difficulties in establishing and maintaining standard infection control (IC) practices in deployed medical treatment facilities and in the evacuation of the injured back to the United States. Level III facilities (hospitals capable of holding patients >72 hours) in Iraq and Afghanistan and the evacuation system from Iraq to the continental US were reviewed by an expert IC-infectious disease team. All reviewed facilities had established IC programs, but these were staffed by personnel with limited IC experience, often without perceived adequate time dedicated to perform their duties, and without uniform levels of command emphasis or support. Proper hand hygiene between patients was not always ideal. Isolation and cohorting of patients to decrease multidrug-resistant organism colonization and infection varied among facilities. Review of standard operating procedures found variability among institutions and in quality of these documents. Application of US national and theater-specific guidelines and of antimicrobial control measures also varied among facilities. Effective IC practices are often difficult to maintain in modern US hospitals. In the deployed setting, with ever-changing personnel in a less than optimal practice environment, IC is even more challenging. Standardization of practice with emphasis on the basics of IC practice (e.g., hand hygiene and isolation procedures) needs to be emplaced and maintained in the deployed setting.

  16. Competitive pricing and the challenge of cost control in medicare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulam, Robert F; Feldman, Roger D; Dowd, Bryan E

    2011-08-01

    The Medicare program faces a serious challenge: it must find ways to control costs but must do so through a system of congressional oversight that necessarily limits its choices. We look at one approach to prudent purchasing - competitive pricing - that Medicare has attempted many times and in various ways since the beginning of the program, and in all but one case unsuccessfully due to the politics of provider opposition working through Congress and the courts. We look at some related efforts to change Medicare pricing to explore when the program has been successful in making dramatic changes in how it pays for health care. A set of recommendations emerges for ways to respond to the impediments of law and politics that have obstructed change to more efficient payment methods. Except in unusual cases, competitive pricing threatens too many stakeholders in too many ways for key political actors to support it. But an unusual case may arise in the coming Medicare fiscal crisis, a crisis related in part to the prices Medicare pays. At that point, competitive pricing may look less like a problem and more like a solution coming at a time when the system badly needs one.

  17. Cancer prevention and control: alarming challenges in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-03-01

    China is geographically the third largest country in the world and the most populated low-to-middle-income country. Cancer incidence and mortality rates for some cancers in the USA and European countries have steadily decreased over the last decades, whereas the incidence and mortality of certain cancers in China have been increasing at an alarming speed. Rapid industrialization and urbanization in China have been accompanied by incredible changes in lifestyle and environment combined with an aging population. Mortality caused by lung, colorectal and breast cancers has been steadily increasing, whereas cancer mortality from gastric, esophageal and cervical tumors has tended to decrease. Similar to what has occurred in the United States, unhealthy lifestyles in China, including heavy smoking and poor diet combined with pollution, have contributed to increased cancer risk. China is facing many challenges in cancer treatment and prevention for the general population. The major areas that need to be addressed in the control of cancer in China include cancers associated with environmental pollution, tobacco use, occupational carcinogens, infection, excessive alcohol consumption, dietary deficiencies and obesity. In this perspective, we review the problems in each area and suggest ideas for future directions in cancer research and strategies and actions to reduce the incidence of cancer in China.

  18. Cancer survivorship: a new challenge in comprehensive cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Lori A; Greer, Greta E; Rowland, Julia H; Miller, Andy; Doneski, Donna; Coughlin, Steven S; Stovall, Ellen; Ulman, Doug

    2005-10-01

    Cancer survivors are a growing population in the United States because of earlier cancer diagnosis, the aging of society, and more effective risk reduction and treatment. Concerns about the long-term physical, psychosocial, and economic effects of cancer treatment on cancer survivors and their families are increasingly being recognized and addressed by public, private, and non-profit organizations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how survivorship fits within the framework of comprehensive cancer control. We summarize three national reports on cancer survivorship and highlight how various organizations and programs are striving to address the needs of cancer survivors through public health planning, including the challenges these groups face and the gaps in knowledge and available services. As cancer survivorship issues are being recognized, many organizations have objectives and programs to address concerns of those diagnosed with cancer. However, better coordination and dissemination may decrease overlap and increase the reach of efforts and there is limited evidence for the effectiveness and impact of these efforts.

  19. Controls on Surface Water Chemistry in the Upper Merced River Basin, Yosemite National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Alisa Mast, M.; Campbell, Donald H.

    1996-05-01

    Surface water draining granitic bedrock in Yosemite National Park exhibits considerable variability in chemical composition, despite the relative homogeneity of bedrock chemistry. Other geological factors, including the jointing and distribution of glacial till, appear to exert strong controls on water composition. Chemical data from three surface water surveys in the upper Merced River basin conducted in August 1981, June 1988 and August 1991 were analysed and compared with mapped geological, hydrological and topographic features to identify the solute sources and processes that control water chemistry within the basin during baseflow. Water at most of the sampling sites was dilute, with alkalinities ranging from 26 to 77 equiv. l-1. Alkalinity was much higher in two subcatchments, however, ranging from 51 to 302 equiv. l-1. Base cations and silica were also significantly higher in these two catchments than in the rest of the watershed. Concentrations of weathering products in surface water were correlated to the fraction of each subcatchment underlain by surficial material, which is mostly glacial till. Silicate mineral weathering is the dominant control on concentrations of alkalinity, silica and base cations, and ratios of these constituents in surface water reflect the composition of local bedrock. Chloride concentrations in surface water samples varied widely, ranging from <1 to 96 equiv. l-1. The annual volume-weighted mean chloride concentration in the Merced River at the Happy Isles gauge from 1968 to 1990 was 26 equiv. l-1, which was five times higher than in atmospheric deposition (4-5 equiv. l-1), suggesting that a source of chloride exists within the watershed. Saline groundwater springs, whose locations are probably controlled by vertical jointing in the bedrock, are the most likely source of the chloride. Sulphate concentrations varied much less than most other solutes, ranging from 3 to 14 equiv. l-1. Concentrations of sulphate in quarterly samples

  20. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Tan, Huaping, E-mail: hptan@njust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Hu, Xiaohong [School of Material Engineering, Jinling Institute of Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37 °C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. - Highlights: • A biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogel was crosslinked via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone was covalently immobilized into the hyaluronic acid hydrogel via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone could be released from the Diels–Alder hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a controlled fashion.

  1. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui; Tan, Huaping; Hu, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37 °C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. - Highlights: • A biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogel was crosslinked via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone was covalently immobilized into the hyaluronic acid hydrogel via aqueous Diels–Alder chemistry. • Dexamethasone could be released from the Diels–Alder hyaluronic acid hydrogel in a controlled fashion

  2. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling water and dissolved gas chemistry at the Accesa sinkhole (southern Tuscany, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 38.5 m deep Lake Accesa is a sinkhole located in southern Tuscany (Italy that shows a peculiar water composition, being characterized by relatively high total dissolved solids (TDS values (2 g L-1 and a Ca(Mg-SO4 geochemical facies. The presence of significant amounts of extra-atmospheric gases (CO2 and CH4, which increase their concentrations with depth, is also recognized. These chemical features, mimicking those commonly shown by volcanic lakes fed by hydrothermal-magmatic reservoirs, are consistent with those of mineral springs emerging in the study area whose chemistry is produced by the interaction of meteoric-derived waters with Mesozoic carbonates and Triassic evaporites. Although the lake has a pronounced thermocline, water chemistry does not show significant changes along the vertical profile. Lake water balance calculations demonstrate that Lake Accesa has >90% of its water supply from sublacustrine springs whose subterranean pathways are controlled by the local structural assessment that likely determined the sinking event, the resulting funnel-shape being then filled by the Accesa waters. Such a huge water inflow from the lake bottom (~9·106 m3 yr-1 feeds the lake effluent (Bruna River and promotes the formation of water currents, which are able to prevent the establishment of a vertical density gradient. Consequently, a continuous mixing along the whole vertical water column is established. Changes of the drainage system by the deep-originated waters in the nearby former mining district have strongly affected the outflow rates of the local mineral springs; thus, future intervention associated with the ongoing remediation activities should carefully be evaluated to preserve the peculiar chemical features of Lake Accesa.

  3. Impact of the Flipped Classroom on Student Performance and Retention: A Parallel Controlled Study in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael D.; Reid, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in the flipped classroom, quantitative studies are slowly emerging, particularly in the sciences. We report a year-long parallel controlled study of the flipped classroom in a second-term general chemistry course. The flipped course was piloted in the off-semester course in Fall 2014, and the availability of the…

  4. Chemistry and radiochemistry strategies supported by FA3-EPRTM and UK-EPRTM auxiliary systems: performances and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tigeras, Arancha; Fourment, Pierre; Elgallaf; Anas; Chupin, Antoine; Fauvel, Nicola

    2012-09-01

    The design and the operation of auxiliary systems play an essential role in: - the preservation of the primary circuit integrity, - the prevention of hydrogen risk, - the control of the boron concentration and radioactivity, - the application of pH and zinc programmes. While the source term generation mainly depends on the primary circuit material and primary coolant chemistry conditioning, the source term spreading is directly linked to the auxiliary systems treatment and performances. Indeed, the auxiliary systems regulate the boron, hydrogen, lithium and zinc injection as well as the countermeasures to ensure the reactivity control and the hazardous H 2 /O 2 mixture prevention. The main principles governing the chemistry and radiochemistry in the auxiliary systems are based on the application of: - Design features for hydrogen and boron management. - Criteria for selecting the appropriate material of each system considering the functional requirements and the source term build up reduction. - Measures for minimizing the activity deposition on the surfaces of components and pipings. - Adequate and reliable systems of purification for reducing the accumulation of liquid/gas radioactivity and impurities in the circuits and for optimizing the waste production. - Chemistry program for limiting the material corrosion of auxiliary systems and preventing the source term transfer to the core. - Appropriate sampling locations and equipment to monitor the chemistry and radiochemistry parameters. This paper describes the operation of the main auxiliary systems of FLAMANVILLE3-EPR TM and UK-EPR- TM participating in the chemistry/radiochemistry management such as Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS), Reactor Borated Water Make-up System (RBWMS), Coolant Treatment System (CTS), Gaseous Waste Processing System (GWPS), Fuel Pool Purification System (PTR [FPPS/FPCS]) also. The performances requested to these systems and the chemistry programs applied to them are discussed

  5. Enhancement of Engine Oil Wear and Friction Control Performance Through Titanium Additive Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevremont, J.; Guinther, G.; Szemenyei, D.; Devlin, M.; Jao, T.; Jaye, C.; Woicik, J.; Fischer, D.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, wear protection and friction modification by engine oil is provided by zinc dithiophosphate (ZDDP) or other phosphorus compounds. These additives provide effective wear protection and friction control on engine parts through formation of a glassy polyphosphate antiwear film. However, the deposition of phosphorus species on automotive catalytic converters from lubricants has been known for some time to have a detrimental effect of poisoning the catalysts. To mitigate the situation, the industry has been making every effort to find ZDDP-replacement additives that are friendly to catalysts. Toward this goal we have investigated a titanium additive chemistry as a ZDDP replacement. Fully formulated engine oils incorporating this additive component have been found to be effective in reducing wear and controlling friction in a high-frequency reciprocating rig (HFRR), 4-ball bench wear, Sequence IIIG, and Sequence IVA engine tests. Surface analysis of the tested parts by Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have shown that Ti species have been incorporated into the wear tracks and can only be found on the wear tracks. We used synchrotron based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) to investigate the chemical bonding mechanism of the Ti additive with the metal surface that affects the wear improvement mechanism. We postulate that Ti provides antiwear enhancement through inclusion in the metal/metal oxide structure of the ferrous surface by forming FeTiO3.

  6. Remote-controlling chemical reactions by light: towards chemistry with high spatio-temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göstl, Robert; Senf, Antti; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    The foundation of the chemical enterprise has always been the creation of new molecular entities, such as pharmaceuticals or polymeric materials. Over the past decades, this continuing effort of designing compounds with improved properties has been complemented by a strong effort to render their preparation (more) sustainable by implementing atom as well as energy economic strategies. Therefore, synthetic chemistry is typically concerned with making specific bonds and connections in a highly selective and efficient manner. However, to increase the degree of sophistication and expand the scope of our work, we argue that the modern aspiring chemist should in addition be concerned with attaining (better) control over when and where chemical bonds are being made or broken. For this purpose, photoswitchable molecular systems, which allow for external modulation of chemical reactions by light, are being developed and in this review we are covering the current state of the art of this exciting new field. These "remote-controlled synthetic tools" provide a remarkable opportunity to perform chemical transformations with high spatial and temporal resolution and should therefore allow regulating biological processes as well as material and device performance.

  7. Selective control of reformed composition of n-heptane via plasma chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Manoj Kumar Reddy, P.

    2016-08-23

    This paper presents experimental results for reforming n-heptane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor to show detailed chemical composition in the products and to propose a potential method to control the product composition. Reformed products of n-heptane and water mixture in an inert Ar feed could be identified as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygenates, and various hydrocarbons, having a wide range of carbon numbers. To selectively increase production of short-chain hydrocarbons, Ar was replaced by CH4. An increased pool of methyl radicals, via plasma chemistry of CH4, might facilitate to stabilize intermediate alkyls (R) into RCH3, which successfully increased short-chain hydrocarbon concentration. When CO2 was supplied instead of Ar (to provide enriched OH and O radicals), significantly higher oxygenate concentrations were obtained through the stabilization of alkyls as ROH (alcohol), and RC([Formula presented])R′ (ketone). The use of methane and carbon dioxide as feed to tailor the products of plasma-assisted reforming of n-heptane with methyl (CH3), or O radicals, is successfully demonstrated in the presence of water vapor. Detailed product analysis, such as product selection, rates and energy efficiency using a gas chromatograph and a gas chromatography mass spectrometer, will be elaborated upon. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  9. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  10. Investigating Affective Experiences in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Students' Perceptions of Control and Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Malakpa, Zoebedeh; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Meaningful learning requires the integration of cognitive and affective learning with the psychomotor, i.e., hands-on learning. The undergraduate chemistry laboratory is an ideal place for meaningful learning to occur. However, accurately characterizing students' affective experiences in the chemistry laboratory can be a very difficult task. While…

  11. Stereospecific control of peptide gas-phase ion chemistry with cis and trans cyclo ornithine residues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, Aleš; Nguyen, H. T. H.; Brož, Břetislav; Tureček, F.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2018), s. 124-137 ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cis and trans isomers * cyclo ornithine * peptide dissociations * peptide ion structures * stereochemistry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.422, year: 2016

  12. Water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and primary circuit components. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Corrosion is the principal life limiting degradation mechanism in nuclear steam supply systems, especially taking into account the trends to increase fuel burnup, thermal rate and cycle length. Primary circuit components of water cooled power reactors have an impact on Zr-based alloys behaviour due to crud (primary circuit corrosion products) formation, transport and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. Crud deposits influence water chemistry, radiation and thermal hydraulic conditions near cladding surface, and by this way-Zr-based alloy corrosion. During the last decade, significant improvements were achieved in the reduction of the corrosion and dose rates by changing the cladding material for one more resistant to corrosion or by the improvement of water chemistry conditions. However, taking into account the above mentioned tendency for heavier fuel duties, corrosion and water chemistry, control will remain a serious task to work with for nuclear power plant operators and scientists, as well as development of generally accepted corrosion model of Zr-based alloys in a water environment in a new millennium. Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, water chemistry and corrosion of cladding and primary circuit components are in the focus of the IAEA activities in the area of fuel technology and performance. At present the IAEA performs two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs): on On-line High Temperature Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion (WACOL) and on Activity Transport in Primary Circuits. Two CRPs deal with hydrogen and hydride degradation of the Zr-based alloys. A state-of-the-art review entitled: 'Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants' was published in 1998. Technical Committee meetings on the subject were held in 1985 (Cadarache, France), 1989 (Portland, USA), 1993 (Rez, Czech Republic). During the last few years extensive exchange of experience in

  13. Control of energy and matter at nanoscales: challenges and opportunities for plasma nanoscience in a sustainability age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya

    2011-01-01

    Plasma nanoscience is an emerging multidisciplinary research field at the cutting edge of a large number of disciplines including but not limited to physics and chemistry of plasmas and gas discharges, materials science, surface science, nanoscience and nanotechnology, solid-state physics, space physics and astrophysics, photonics, optics, plasmonics, spintronics, quantum information, physical chemistry, biomedical sciences and related engineering subjects. This paper examines the origin, progress and future perspectives of this research field driven by the global scientific and societal challenges. The future potential of plasma nanoscience to remain a highly topical area in the global research and technological agenda in the age of fundamental-level control for a sustainable future is assessed using a framework of the five Grand Challenges for Basic Energy Sciences recently mapped by the US Department of Energy. It is concluded that the ongoing research is very relevant and is expected to substantially expand to competitively contribute to the solution of all of these Grand Challenges. The approach to controlling energy and matter at nano- and subnanoscales is based on identifying the prevailing carriers and transfer mechanisms of the energy and matter at the spatial and temporal scales that are most relevant to any particular nanofabrication process. Strong accent is made on the competitive edge of the plasma-based nanotechnology in applications related to the major socio-economic issues (energy, food, water, health and environment) that are crucial for a sustainable development of humankind. Several important emerging topics, opportunities and multidisciplinary synergies for plasma nanoscience are highlighted. The main nanosafety issues are also discussed and the environment- and human health-friendly features of plasma-based nanotech are emphasized.

  14. Control of energy and matter at nanoscales: challenges and opportunities for plasma nanoscience in a sustainability age

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2011-05-01

    Plasma nanoscience is an emerging multidisciplinary research field at the cutting edge of a large number of disciplines including but not limited to physics and chemistry of plasmas and gas discharges, materials science, surface science, nanoscience and nanotechnology, solid-state physics, space physics and astrophysics, photonics, optics, plasmonics, spintronics, quantum information, physical chemistry, biomedical sciences and related engineering subjects. This paper examines the origin, progress and future perspectives of this research field driven by the global scientific and societal challenges. The future potential of plasma nanoscience to remain a highly topical area in the global research and technological agenda in the age of fundamental-level control for a sustainable future is assessed using a framework of the five Grand Challenges for Basic Energy Sciences recently mapped by the US Department of Energy. It is concluded that the ongoing research is very relevant and is expected to substantially expand to competitively contribute to the solution of all of these Grand Challenges. The approach to controlling energy and matter at nano- and subnanoscales is based on identifying the prevailing carriers and transfer mechanisms of the energy and matter at the spatial and temporal scales that are most relevant to any particular nanofabrication process. Strong accent is made on the competitive edge of the plasma-based nanotechnology in applications related to the major socio-economic issues (energy, food, water, health and environment) that are crucial for a sustainable development of humankind. Several important emerging topics, opportunities and multidisciplinary synergies for plasma nanoscience are highlighted. The main nanosafety issues are also discussed and the environment- and human health-friendly features of plasma-based nanotech are emphasized.

  15. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, John C.; Cannon, Amy S.; Dye, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    A grand challenge facing government, industry, and academia in the relationship of our technological society to the environment is reinventing the use of materials. To address this challenge, collaboration from an interdisciplinary group of stakeholders will be necessary. Traditionally, the approach to risk management of materials and chemicals has been through inerventions intended to reduce exposure to materials that are hazardous to health and the environment. In 1990, the Pollution Prevention Act encouraged a new tact-elimination of hazards at the source. An emerging approach to this grand challenge seeks to embed the diverse set of environmental perspectives and interests in the everyday practice of the people most responsible for using and creating new materials--chemists. The approach, which has come to be known as Green Chemistry, intends to eliminate intrinsic hazard itself, rather than focusing on reducing risk by minimizing exposure. This chapter addresses the representation of downstream environmental stakeholder interests in the upstream everyday practice that is reinventing chemistry and its material inputs, products, and waste as described in the '12 Principles of Green Chemistry'

  16. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  17. Role of modern chemistry in sustainable arable crop protection

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Keith; Evans, David A; El-Hiti, Gamal A

    2007-01-01

    Organic chemistry has been, and for the foreseeable future will remain, vitally important for crop protection. Control of fungal pathogens, insect pests and weeds is crucial to enhanced food provision. As world population continues to grow, it is timely to assess the current situation, anticipate future challenges and consider how new chemistry may help meet those challenges. In future, agriculture will increasingly be expected to provide not only food and feed, but also crops for conversion ...

  18. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  19. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  20. Opportunities and challenges for process control in process intensification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikacevic, N.M.; Huesman, A.E.M.; Hof, Van den P.M.J.; Stankiewicz, A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a review and position article discussing the role and prospective for process control in process intensification. Firstly, the article outlines the classical role of control in process systems, presenting an overview of control systems’ development, from basic PID control to the advanced

  1. Primary Water Chemistry Control at Units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, J.; Pinter, G. Patek T.; Tilky, P.; Doma, A. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Co. Ltd., Paks (Hungary); Osz, J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-03-15

    The primary water chemistry of the four identical units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been developed based on Western type PWR units, taking into consideration some Russian modifications. The political changes in the 1990s have also influenced the water chemistry specifications and directions. At PWR units the transition operational modes have been developed while in case of WWER units - in lack of central uniform regulation - this question has become the competence and responsibility of each individual plant. This problem has resulted in separate water chemistry developments with a considerable time delay. The need for lifetime extensions worldwide has made the development of startup and shutdown chemistry procedures extremely important, since they considerably influence the long term and safe operation of plants. The uniformly structured limit value system, the principles applied for the system development, and the logic schemes for actions to be taken are discussed in the paper, both for normal operation and transition modes. (author)

  2. Chemistry control at Bruce NGS 'B' from constructed to commercial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pre-operational storage chemistry and flushing of the secondary side is described. The approach devised for Bruce NGS 'B' Unit 6 was unique for an Ontario Hydro Nuclear Unit. The significance of the improved Construction installation and Quality Assurance procedures, combined with those of Operations is identified. Secondary side chemistry during both commissioning and later operation is reported. It will be shown that the application of ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) concept has resulted in tighter chemical specifications being met

  3. Masking foods for food challenge: practical aspects of masking foods for a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, G. B.; Colen, A. A.; Jansen, J. J.; Kardinaal, A. F.; Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Martens, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    In diagnosing a food allergy or food intolerance, a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) with the suspected food or food substance is the only method available for objective confirmation of an assumed relationship between a suspected agent and a complaint. When the use of

  4. NASA Engineering Design Challenges: Environmental Control and Life Support Systems. Water Filtration Challenge. EG-2008-09-134-MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Twila, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This educator guide is organized into seven chapters: (1) Overview; (2) The Design Challenge; (3) Connections to National Curriculum Standards; (4) Preparing to Teach; (5) Classroom Sessions; (6) Opportunities for Extension; and (7) Teacher Resources. Chapter 1 provides information about Environmental Control and Life Support Systems used on NASA…

  5. Development and validation of challenge materials for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, BJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van der Heide, S; Beusekamp, BJ; Wolt-Plompen, SAA; Kukler, J; Brinkman, J; Duiverman, EJ; Dubois, AEJ

    Background: The use of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of food allergy. Despite this, materials and methods used in DBPCFCs have not been standardized. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate

  6. Geoinformatics in Infectious Disease Control: Challenges and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenges in this wise were low level of technological development, inconsistency and inept implementation of government policies, low level of investment in the health sector, inadequate healthcare facilities, high cost of acquisition of relevant space technology, and low level of literacy. To surmount these constraints, ...

  7. Extreme challenges on cardiovascular control during gravity transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, B.; Beckers, F.; Aubert, A. E.

    Introduction. During parabolic flights transient periods of hypergravity and microgravity are created. These periods cause translocations of bodily fluids in the longitudinal axis of the body, leading to altered cardiac preload and afterload. These extreme orthostatic challenges provide a unique platform to study baroreflex-mediated responses of the cardiovascular autonomic control system. This might have important features for the development of a model of cardiovascular deconditioning that is observed in a variety of patient populations. Purpose. Until now, due to methodological restrictions, most studies have been concentrating on the analysis of cardiovascular variability in time domain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) simultaneously, using frequency domain analysis techniques (low frequency power (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz); high frequency power (HF: 0.16-0.4 Hz)), providing additional information about cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic modulation during gravity transitions. Methods. 12 healthy non-medicated volunteers (age = 24 ± 2.5 yr) underwent continuous ECG and blood pressure (BP) recordings during the 32nd and 34th parabolic flight campaign organized by ESA. The subjects performed 15 parabolas in supine and 15 parabolas in standing position. 5 transient gravity phases were abstracted; phase 1 and 5: before and after the parabola (1G); phase 2 and 4: at the ascending and descending leg of the parabola (2G); phase 3: at the apex of the parabola (0g). Phase 2, 3 and 4 last 20 seconds. Results. No significant differences were found in HRV and BPV parameters in supine position between the different gravity phases. In standing position, mean RR- interval was higher during 0G (900 ± 103 ms) compared to 1G (700 ± 87 ms) and 2G (600 ± 94 ms). Mean arterial BP remained relatively constant during 0G but tended to decrease during 2G (102 ± 2 mmHg vs. 105 ± 3 mmHg). Positive correlations were

  8. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Gauthier, C. [CTGIX Services Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Schexnailder, S. [GE Water and Process Technologies, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  9. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K.; Gauthier, C.; Schexnailder, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  10. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  11. The challenge of nuclear proliferation control in South Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Prevention of nuclear weapon proliferation in South Asia is considered a a difficult challenge. The paper discusses the difficulties met in implementing the nuclear non-proliferation policy due to numerous disputes concerning China, North and South Korea, India and Pakistan, and the countries of former Soviet Union. Matters preventing proliferation are mentioned as well as obstacles to non-proliferation proposing that decisions whether voluntary or, eventually, compulsory would have to be consistently enforced by the Security Council, if states are to rely upon those methods for their security

  12. The Challenges of the "Software Support for Industrial Controls" Contract

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P

    2000-01-01

    ST division is currently specifying a 'Software Support for Industrial Controls' contract. The application of this contract and its success will require several changes in our habits for specifying, designing, and maintaining control systems. This paper summarizes some key concepts which should be respected in order to obtain maximum benefits from the future contract and to optimize the software activities in the division. The contract concerns the maintenance and development of the monitoring and control systems used for supervising CERN's technical infrastructure (electrical distribution, cooling water, air conditioning, safety, and access control). The systems concerned consist of computer and communication hardware and software, tailored to provide specific functionalities for the remote operation, command, and monitoring of equipment. All these systems use commercially available software and hardware such as SCADA, PLCs and associated drivers, controllers, fieldbuses, and networks. It is intended to cont...

  13. Thiol-ene and photo-cleavage chemistry for controlled presentation of biomolecules in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Joseph C; Marozas, Ian A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-12-10

    Hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds in regenerative medicine for the delivery of biomolecules to promote healing. However, increasing evidence suggests that the context that biomolecules are presented to cells (e.g., as soluble verses tethered signals) can influence their bioactivity. A common approach to deliver biomolecules in hydrogels involves physically entrapping them within the network, such that they diffuse out over time to the surrounding tissues. While simple and versatile, the release profiles in such system are highly dependent on the molecular weight of the entrapped molecule relative to the network structure, and it can be difficult to control the release of two different signals at independent rates. In some cases, supraphysiologically high loadings are used to achieve therapeutic local concentrations, but uncontrolled release can then cause deleterious off-target side effects. In vivo, many growth factors and cytokines are stored in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and released on demand as needed during development, growth, and wound healing. Thus, emerging strategies in biomaterial chemistry have focused on ways to tether or sequester biological signals and engineer these bioactive scaffolds to signal to delivered cells or endogenous cells. While many strategies exist to achieve tethering of peptides, protein, and small molecules, this review focuses on photochemical methods, and their usefulness as a mild reaction that proceeds with fast kinetics in aqueous solutions and at physiological conditions. Photo-click and photo-caging methods are particularly useful because one can direct light to specific regions of the hydrogel to achieve spatial patterning. Recent methods have even demonstrated reversible introduction of biomolecules to mimic the dynamic changes of native ECM, enabling researchers to explore how the spatial and dynamic context of biomolecular signals influences important cell functions. This review will highlight how two

  14. Chemistry of a serpentinization-controlled hydrothermal system at the Lost City hydrothermal vent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Butterfield, D. A.; Nelson, B. K.; Karson, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF), at 30° N near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is an off-axis, low temperature, high-pH, ultramafic-hosted vent system. Within the field, carbonate chimneys tower up to 60 m above the seafloor, making them the tallest vent structures known. The chemistry of the vent structures and fluids at the LCHF is controlled by reactions between seawater and ultramafic rocks beneath the Atlantis massif. Mixing of warm alkaline vent fluids with seawater causes precipitation of calcium carbonate and growth of the edifaces, which range from tall, graceful pinnacles to fragile flanges and colloform deposits. Geochemical and petrological analyses of the carbonate rocks reveal distinct differences between the active and extinct structures. Actively venting chimneys and flanges are extremely porous, friable formations composed predominantly of aragonite and brucite. These structures provide important niches for well-developed microbial communities that thrive on and within the chimney walls. Some of the active chimneys may also contain the mineral ikaite, an unstable, hydrated form of calcium carbonate. TIMS and ICP-MS analyses of the carbonate chimneys show that the most active chimneys have low Sr isotope values and that they are low in trace metals (e.g., Mn, Ti, Pb). Active structures emit high-pH, low-Mg fluids at 40-90° C. The fluids also have low Sr values, indicating circulation of hydrothermal solutions through the serpentinite bedrock beneath the field. In contrast to the active structures, extinct chimneys are less porous, are well lithified, and they are composed predominantly of calcite that yields Sr isotopes near seawater values. Prolonged lower temperature seawater-hydrothermal fluid interaction within the chimneys results in the conversion of aragonite to calcite and in the enrichment of some trace metals (e.g., Mn, Ti, Co, Zn). It also promotes the incorporation of foraminifera within the outer, cemented walls of the carbonate

  15. Current vector control challenges in the fight against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Beier, John C

    2017-10-01

    The effective and eco-friendly control of Anopheles vectors plays a key role in any malaria management program. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) suggests making use of the full range of vector control tools available. The strategies for IVM require novel technologies to control outdoor transmission of malaria. Despite the wide number of promising control tools tested against mosquitoes, current strategies for malaria vector control used in most African countries are not sufficient to achieve successful malaria control. The majority of National Malaria Control Programs in Africa still rely on indoor residual spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). These methods reduce malaria incidence but generally have little impact on malaria prevalence. In addition to outdoor transmission, growing levels of insecticide resistance in targeted vectors threaten the efficacy of LLINs and IRS. Larvicidal treatments can be useful, but are not recommended for rural areas. The research needed to improve the quality and delivery of mosquito vector control should focus on (i) optimization of processes and methods for vector control delivery; (ii) monitoring of vector populations and biting activity with reliable techniques; (iii) the development of effective and eco-friendly tools to reduce the burden or locally eliminate malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases; (iv) the careful evaluation of field suitability and efficacy of new mosquito control tools to prove their epidemiological impact; (v) the continuous monitoring of environmental changes which potentially affect malaria vector populations; (vi) the cooperation among different disciplines, with main emphasis on parasitology, tropical medicine, ecology, entomology, and ecotoxicology. A better understanding of behavioral ecology of malaria vectors is required. Key ecological obstacles that limit the effectiveness of vector control include the variation in mosquito behavior, development of insecticide resistance

  16. The LHCb Silicon Tracker - Control system specific tools and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, G; Esperante Pereira, D; Gallas, A; Pazos Alvarez, A; Perez Trigo, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Saborido, J; Amhis, Y; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Bressieux, J; Conti, G; Dupertuis, F; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Luisier, J; Marki, R; Muresan, R; Nakada, T; Needham, M; Knecht, M; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Anderson, J; Buechler, A; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; De Cian, M; Elsasser, C; Salzmann, C; Saornil Gamarra, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; van Tilburg, J; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2014-01-01

    The Experiment Control System (ECS) of the LHCb Silicon Tracker sub-detectors is built on the integrated LHCb ECS framework. Although all LHCb sub-detectors use the same framework and follow the same guidelines, the Silicon Tracker control system uses some interesting additional features in terms of operation and monitoring. The main details are described in this document. Since its design, the Silicon Tracker control system has been continuously evolving in a quite disorganized way. Some major maintenance activities are required to be able to keep improving. A description of those activities can also be found here.

  17. Climatic Controls on the Porewater Chemistry of Mid-Continental Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Zeno Francis

    Wetlands develop where climate and physiography conspire to maintain saturated soils at the land surface, support diverse plant and animal communities, and serve as globally important sinks for atmospheric carbon. The chemistry of wetland porewaters impacts near-surface biological communities and subsurface biogeochemical processes that influence carbon cycling in the environment. Wetland porewater chemistry is a dynamic byproduct of complex hydrogeological processes that cause meteoric waters to enter groundwater systems (recharge) or groundwater to flow to the land surface (discharge). Changes in climate can alter subsurface hydraulic gradients that determine the recharge and discharge functions of wetlands, which in turn control the hydrogeochemical evolution of wetland porewaters. The climate of mid-continental North America is influenced by competing air masses with vastly different temperature and moisture contents originating from the Pacific Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Arctic. The interactions of these air masses result in large dynamic shifts of climate regimes characterized by decadal-scale oscillations between periods of drought and heavy rain. Over the course of the 20th century, a shift occurred towards wetter climate in the mid-continental region. This dissertation examines the impact of this climate shift on the porewater chemistry of two very different wetland systems, located only 350 km apart: the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands (GLAP) of northern Minnesota and the Cottonwood Lake Study Area (CLSA) of North Dakota. The former study site consists of a large (7,600 km2), circumboreal peatland that developed an extensive blanket of peat over the last 5000 years on a relatively flat glacial lake bed within a sub-humid to semi-arid climate gradient characterized by small annual atmospheric moisture surpluses and frequent droughts. The latter study site consists of a 0.92 km2 complex of small (meter-scale) "prairie pothole" wetlands located on a

  18. Interstellar chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, William

    2006-08-15

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature.

  19. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors for urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn-Christie, Rebekah G; Flatland, Bente; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Szladovits, Balazs; Harr, Kendal E; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Knoll, Joyce S; Wamsley, Heather L; Freeman, Kathy P

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and documents recommendations for control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors related to urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.2 (clinical chemistry), 1.3 and 2.5 (urinalysis), 1.4 and 2.6 (cytology), and 3 (postanalytical factors important in veterinary clinical pathology) of these guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  20. Primary water chemistry control at units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunk, J.; Patek, G.; Pinter, T.; Tilky, P.; Doma, A.; Osz, J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary water chemistry of the four identical units of Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been developed based on Western-type PWR units, taking into consideration some Soviet-Russian modifications. The political changes in 90s have also influenced the water chemistry specifications and directions. At PWR units the transition operational modes have been developed while in case of VVER units - in lack of central uniform regulation - this question has become the competence and responsibility of each individual plant. This problem has resulted in separate water chemistry developments with a considerable time delay. The needs for life-time extensions all over the World have made the development of start-up and shut-down chemistry procedures extremely important, since they considerably influence the long term and safe operation of plants. The uniformly structured limit value system, the principles applied for the system development, and the logic schemes for actions to be taken are discussed in the paper, both for normal operation and transition modes. (author)

  1. Gold nanoparticle growth control - Implementing novel wet chemistry method on silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ameer, Ammar

    2013-04-01

    Controlling particle size, shape, nucleation, and self-assembly on surfaces are some of the main challenges facing electronic device fabrication. In this work, growth of gold nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes was investigated by using a novel wet chemical method, where potassium iodide is used as the reducing solution and gold chloride as the metal precursor, on silicon substrates. Four parameters were studied: soaking time, solution temperature, concentration of the solution of gold chloride, and surface pre-treatment of the substrate. Synthesized nanoparticles were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The precise control of the location and order of the grown gold overlayer was achieved by using focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of a silicon surface, pre-treated with potassium iodide. By varying the soaking time and temperature, different particle sizes and shapes were obtained. Flat geometrical shapes and spherical shapes were observed. We believe, that the method described in this work is potentially a straightforward and efficient way to fabricate gold contacts for microelectronics. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. The challenge of tobacco control at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Ferreira Cruz

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the actions taken by the Commission of Tobacco Control (CTC to control smoking in the hospital environment.Methods: Descriptive and exploratory retrospective documentary research conducted at a university hospital in southern Brazil, in 2014. The content of the minutes of CTC meetings was used to create a database, and the rounds reports were descriptively analyzed. We sought to identify the most relevant actions from 2005 to 2014.Results: The CTC implemented the Tobacco-Free Environment programme restricted cigarette smoking to designated areas and subsequently deactivated these areas. The only remaining outdoor smoking area in 2014 was deactivated.Conclusion: CTC actions have contributed to tobacco control in the hospital environment. This study will hopefully serve as a model to encourage other institutions to implement similar actions.

  3. Multidrug-resistant opportunistic pathogens challenging veterinary infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birgit; Tedin, Karsten; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    2017-02-01

    Although the problems associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the emergence of zoonotic and multidrug-resistant pathogens in companion animal (dogs, cats and horses) medicine have been well-known for decades, current progress with respect to practical implementation of infection control programs in veterinary clinics has been limited. Clinical outbreak events reported for methicillin-resistant Staphylooccus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Serovars indicate the necessity of infection control strategies for protecting animal patients at risk as well as veterinary personnel. The close bond between humans and their companion animals provides opportunities for exchange of microorganisms, including MDR pathogens. This particular aspect of the "One Health" idea requires more representative surveillance efforts and infection control strategies with respect to animal-species specific characters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic leviation. ; Challenge for control design in mechatronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleuler, H.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that development of active magnetic bearing is far from being under closed circumstanses. In this paper, magnetic levitation is classified and it is shown that the industrially applied magnetic levitation is a typical mechatronics system. Control problems for active magnetic bearings are then presented. It is introduced that there are several very interesting control issues to be solved and the potential for industrial applications is vast. Among the application areas, clean-room and vacuum handling, precision optics, scanning, machining, and turbo machines are described. In addition, is introduced the emerging of new fields of research, such as micro-scale active magnetic bearings, in which a project has been started. Furthermore, status of other current research is provided, which includes identification and control methods and the position sensorless bearing. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Mark; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Peterson, Per; Calderoni, Pattrick; Scheele, Randall; Casekka, Andrew; McNamara, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    -evaluate thermophysical properties of flibe and flinak. Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has focused on evaluating the fluorinating gas nitrogen trifluoride as a potential salt purification agent. Work there was performed on removing hydroxides and oxides from flinak salt under controlled conditions. Lastly, the University of California Berkeley has spent considerable time designing and simulating reactor components with fluoride salts at high temperatures. Despite the hurdles presented by the innate chemical hazards, considerable progress has been made. The stage has been set to perform new research on salt chemical control which could advance the fluoride salt cooled reactor concept towards commercialization. What were previously thought of as chemical undesirable, but nuclear certified, alloys have been shown to be theoretically compatible with fluoride salts at high temperatures. This preliminary report has been prepared to communicate the construction of the basic infrastructure required for flibe, as well as suggest original research to performed at the University of Wisconsin. Simultaneously, the contents of this report can serve as a detailed, but introductory guide to allow anyone to learn the fundamentals of chemistry, engineering, and safety required to work with flibe salt.

  6. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Calderoni, Pattrick [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheele, Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Casekka, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McNamara, Bruce [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-22

    -evaluate thermophysical properties of flibe and flinak. Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has focused on evaluating the fluorinating gas nitrogen trifluoride as a potential salt purification agent. Work there was performed on removing hydroxides and oxides from flinak salt under controlled conditions. Lastly, the University of California Berkeley has spent considerable time designing and simulating reactor components with fluoride salts at high temperatures. Despite the hurdles presented by the innate chemical hazards, considerable progress has been made. The stage has been set to perform new research on salt chemical control which could advance the fluoride salt cooled reactor concept towards commercialization. What were previously thought of as chemical undesirable, but nuclear certified, alloys have been shown to be theoretically compatible with fluoride salts at high temperatures. This preliminary report has been prepared to communicate the construction of the basic infrastructure required for flibe, as well as suggest original research to performed at the University of Wisconsin. Simultaneously, the contents of this report can serve as a detailed, but introductory guide to allow anyone to learn the fundamentals of chemistry, engineering, and safety required to work with flibe salt.

  7. Quality Control through Design and Process: Gambrel Roof Truss Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dell; Jones, James

    2011-01-01

    Customers determine whether a product fulfills their needs or satisfies them. "Quality control", then, is the process of finding out what the customer wants, along with designing, producing, delivering, and servicing the product--and ultimately satisfying the customer's expectations. For many years, people considered a product to be of good…

  8. Communication, control and security challenges for the smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Muyeen, SM

    2017-01-01

    The Smart Grid is a modern electricity grid allowing for distributed, renewable intermittent generation, partly owned by consumers. This requires advanced control and communication technologies in order to provide high quality power supply and secure generation, transmission and distribution. This book outlines these emerging technologies.

  9. The character of harms: operational challenges in control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sparrow, Malcolm K

    2008-01-01

    ... approach which he terms "the sabotage of harms." The book explores the institutional arrangements and decision-frameworks necessary to support this emerging operational model. Written for reflective practitioners charged with risk-control responsibilities across the public, private, and non-governmental sectors, The Character ...

  10. Human African Trypanosomiasis and challenges to its control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was poor capacity for most of the health facilities in the diagnosis, treatment and control of HAT. In both districts, communities were knowledgeable of the tsetse identity (82.4%) and had experienced tsetse bites (94%). The majority (91.4%) of the community members knew that they were at risk of acquiring HAT.

  11. Controlling sugarcane diseases in Florida: a challenge in constant evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases are limiting factors for the sugarcane crop in almost any sugarcane growing location. More than 40 diseases have been recorded in Florida, with bown rust, orange rust and yellow leaf currently impacting on sugarcane production. Ideally, these diseases should be controlled using resistant ...

  12. Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program: Evolution, Achievements, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devidas Trimbak Khedkar

    2014-01-01

    For this review, information has been collected from official websites of World Health Organisation (WHO Geneva, WHO South East Asia Regional Office (SEARO New Delhi, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Government of India and published literature, through search engines like Google, Google Scholar and Pub Med using MeSH Terms "DOTS" and "Tuberculosis Control."

  13. Controlling sugarcane diseases in Florida: a challenge in constant evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases are limiting factors for the sugarcane crop in almost any sugarcane growing location. More than 40 diseases have been recorded in Florida, with brown rust, orange rust and yellow leaf currently impacting on sugarcane production. Ideally, these diseases should be controlled using resistant c...

  14. Fifty years of Tsetse control in Tanzania: challenges and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even after 50 years of independence, Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) or Sleeping Sickness is still one of the major public health problems with about 300 cases being reported annually. Tsetse control has been sporadic and uncoordinated hence no tangible results have been accrued since independence despite ...

  15. Challenges for control of taeniasis/cysticercosis in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroso, Thomas; Margono, Sri S; Wandra, Toni; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis/cysticercosis has been reported from several provinces of Indonesia: Papua (=former Irian Jaya), Bali, North Sumatra, East Nusa Tenggara, South East Sulawesi, Lampung, North Sulawesi, Jakarta, West Kalimantan, and East Java. The highest level of endemicity of taeniasis/cysticercosis has been found in Papua. Recent surveys in Jayawijaya District of Papua in 2000 and 2001 showed that 5 of 58 local people (8.6%) harbored the adult tapeworm, Taenia solium, whereas 44 of 96 people (45.8%), 50 of 71 pigs (70.4%), and 7 of 64 local dogs (10.9%) were seropositive for T. solium cysticercosis. Current surveys in Bali and Samosir District, North Sumatra during 2002-2005 revealed that Taenia saginata taeniasis has increased in incidence whereas T. solium cysticercosis is now rather rare compared to one-two decades ago in Bali. Taenia asiatica taeniasis is still common in Samosir District. Data from other provinces of Indonesia are very limited or unavailable. Control of these diseases is not a priority in the health or veterinary services, neither at central or local government levels. However, limited efforts toward control of the diseases have been implemented such as training of health personnel, community education on disease prevention, and provision of anthelminthics. A working group for control of the disease in Indonesia and an international collaboration have been established among Ministry of Health, Indonesia; University of Indonesia; and Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan since 1996. Future goals include implementation of active case finding (active surveillance) and treatment of tapeworm carriers, sustainable public health education, establishment of a system to check the quality of beef/pork and determine the distribution of infected animals and strengthening of laboratory capacity. Efforts to motivate provinces and districts should be implemented in developing the strategic plan to control of the disease. Given the considerable differences in

  16. Visceral leishmaniasis in large Brazilian cities: challenges for control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Di Lorenzo Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this article were to discuss the rapid spread of visceral leishmaniasis in urban areas of Brazil and to raise practical questions and perspectives related to control of the disease. Among the proposed methods, the elimination of seropositive dogs is the most controversial and least accepted by society. Its impact on incidence rates varies among studies (positive in some and relatively unimportant in others. Treatment of infected dogs, although widespread in veterinary practice, is based on studies with weak scientific evidence. Insecticide spraying of areas is more acceptable to the population, but is costly and operationally difficult. Intra and inter-urban factors have scarcely been studied and may affect control of the disease. Finally, the article discusses the use of deltamethrin-impregnated dog collars and vaccines, with high expectations for impact on disease transmission, although no product currently available on the market has been fully evaluated, so that further studies are required.

  17. Prevention and control of high blood pressure: challenges and opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in developed countries and is becoming more common in the developing world. The reduction in incidence of many cardiovascular diseases in the last few decades may be attributed in part to extensive programs to reduce and manage risk factors such as hypertension. Nevertheless, untreated, uncontrolled and undiagnosed hypertension remains a significant concern. Many nations have adopted policies and programs for hypertension control. An ...

  18. Control and Characterization of Titanium Dioxide Morphology: Applications in Surface Organometallic Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jeantelot, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Surface Organometallic Chemistry leads to the combination of the high activity and specificity of homogeneous catalysts with the recoverability and practicality of heterogeneous catalysts. Most metal complexes used in this chemistry are grafted on metal oxide supports such as amorphous silica (SiO2) and γ-alumina (Al2O3). In this thesis, we sought to enable the use of titania (TiO2) as a new support for single-site well-defined grafting of metal complexes. This was achieved by synthesizing a special type of anatase-TiO2, bearing a high density of identical hydroxyl groups, through hydrothermal synthesis then post-treatment under high vacuum followed by oxygen flow, and characterized by several analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. Finally, as a proof of concept, the grafting of vanadium oxychloride (VOCl3) was successfully attempted.

  19. Biodegradable hyaluronic acid hydrogels to control release of dexamethasone through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Zhang, Ziwei; Mao, Jiahui; Tan, Huaping; Hu, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    A robust synthetic strategy of biopolymer-based hydrogels has been developed where hyaluronic acid derivatives reacted through aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry without the involvement of chemical catalysts, allowing for control and sustain release of dexamethasone. To conjugate the hydrogel, furan and maleimide functionalized hyaluronic acid were synthesized, respectively, as well as furan functionalized dexamethasone, for the covalent immobilization. Chemical structure, gelation time, morphologies, swelling kinetics, weight loss, compressive modulus and dexamethasone release of the hydrogel system in PBS at 37°C were studied. The results demonstrated that the aqueous Diels-Alder chemistry provides an extremely selective reaction and proceeds with high efficiency for hydrogel conjugation and covalent immobilization of dexamethasone. Cell culture results showed that the dexamethasone immobilized hydrogel was noncytotoxic and preserved proliferation of entrapped human adipose-derived stem cells. This synthetic approach uniquely allows for the direct fabrication of biologically functionalized gel scaffolds with ideal structures for adipose tissue engineering, which provides a competitive alternative to conventional conjugation techniques such as copper mediated click chemistry. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Loop capabilities in Rez for water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and in-core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.; Zmitko, M.; Srank, J.; Vsolak, R.

    1999-01-01

    Main characteristics of LVR-15 research reactor and its irradiation facilities are presented. For testing of cladding, internals and RPV materials specialised loop are used. There are now five high pressure loops modelling PWR, WWER or BWR water environment and chemistry. Loops can be connected with instrumented in-pile channels enable slow strain rate testing, 1CT or 2CT specimens loading and electrically heated rods exposition. Reactor dosimetry including neutronic parameters measurements and calculations and mock-up experiments are used. Water chemistry control involves gas (O 2 , H 2 ) dosing system, Orbisphere H 2 /O 2 measurement, electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements and specialised analytical chemistry laboratory. For cladding corrosion studies in-pile channels with four electrically heated rods with heat flux up to 100 W/cm 2 , void fraction 5 % at the outlet, inlet temperature 320 deg. C and flow velocity 3 m/s were development and tested. For corrosion layer investigation there is eddy current measurements and PIE techniques which use crud thickness measurement, chemical analyses of the crud, optical metallography, hydrogen analysis, SEM and TEM. (author)

  1. Web Football Soccer, Thesaurus, and Taxinomies: Vocabulary control challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Caminotti, María Laura; Martínez, Ana María

    2006-01-01

    Se analizó la terminología empleada en las taxonomías de 31 sitios Web de clubes de fútbol argentinos, 20 oficiales y 11 no oficiales, de acuerdo con las normas de construcción de tesauros y las directrices para el control de autoridades de nombres y materia. El vocabulario empleado en estos sitios Web es coloquial y expresa cierta carga emocional. Muchos términos incluyen un artículo determinado (el, la, los, las) como primera palabra, otros necesitan una nota de alcance por tener un signifi...

  2. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; AlYami, Noktan; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Burlakov, Victor M.; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  3. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrow, Alec P; Besong, Tabot M D; AlYami, Noktan M; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Costa, Pedro M F J; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman M

    2017-02-21

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  4. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.

    2017-02-06

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  5. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  6. No matrix effect in double-blind, placebo-controlled egg challenges in egg allergic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libbers, L.; Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; van der Heide, S.; van der Meulen, G. N.; Kukler, J.; Kerkhof, M.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    Background Diagnostic and accidental food allergic reactions may be modified by the matrix containing the allergenic food. Previous studies of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs) with peanut found an effect of the fat content of the challenge matrix on the severity of the

  7. 77 FR 52105 - Announcement of the Innovation in Arms Control Challenge Under the America Competes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Challenge: This Challenge seeks creative ideas from the general public to use the tools and devices commonly..., shall be incorporated in and maintaining a primary place of business in the United States, and in the... provision of the following: 1. A description of the proposed mechanism or idea to support arms control...

  8. Validation and acceptability of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venter, Carina; Maslin, Kate; Patil, Veeresh; Grundy, Jane; Glasbey, Gillian; Raza, Abid; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber; Dean, Taraneh

    2016-01-01

    The Double Blind Placebo Controlled Food Challenge (DBPCFC) is considered the gold standard for food allergy diagnosis (1, 2). It is recommended that active and placebo challenge foods for DBPCFCs are sufficiently blinded in terms of smell, flavour and texture. Difficulties arise with children

  9. Parsing pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: forensic chemistry, receptor models, and source control policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Kirk T; Pietari, Jaana; Boehm, Paul D

    2014-04-01

    A realistic understanding of contaminant sources is required to set appropriate control policy. Forensic chemical methods can be powerful tools in source characterization and identification, but they require a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach. Atmospheric receptor models, such as the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s chemical mass balance (CMB), are increasingly being used to evaluate sources of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments. This paper describes the assumptions underlying receptor models and discusses challenges in complying with these assumptions in practice. Given the variability within, and the similarity among, pyrogenic PAH source types, model outputs are sensitive to specific inputs, and parsing among some source types may not be possible. Although still useful for identifying potential sources, the technical specialist applying these methods must describe both the results and their inherent uncertainties in a way that is understandable to nontechnical policy makers. The authors present an example case study concerning an investigation of a class of parking-lot sealers as a significant source of PAHs in urban sediment. Principal component analysis is used to evaluate published CMB model inputs and outputs. Targeted analyses of 2 areas where bans have been implemented are included. The results do not support the claim that parking-lot sealers are a significant source of PAHs in urban sediments. © 2013 SETAC.

  10. Measurement and control of in-plane surface chemistry during the oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Bilal; Adles, Eric J.; Aspnes, David E.; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2010-01-01

    In-plane directional control of surface chemistry during interface formation can lead to new opportunities regarding device structures and applications. Control of this type requires techniques that can probe and hence provide feedback on the chemical reactivity of bonds not only in specific directions but also in real time. Here, we demonstrate both control and measurement of the oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si. Control is achieved by externally applying uniaxial strain, and measurement by second-harmonic generation (SHG) together with the anisotropic-bond model of nonlinear optics. In this system anisotropy results because bonds in the strain direction oxidize faster than those perpendicular to it, leading in addition to transient structural changes that can also be detected at the bond level by SHG. PMID:20876145

  11. Secondary water chemistry control practices and results of the Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Akihiro; Shoda, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Nobuo; Murata, Kazutoyo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-09-01

    In Japan, since the start of the operation of the first PWR plant, Mihama Unit-1 in 1970, 24 PWR plants have been built by 2010, and all of them are in operation. Due to the plant-specific needs of management, and by flexibly incorporating the state-of-the-art insights into the design, the system configurations of the plants vary so many as 15 types. Meanwhile, the geographical feature of Japan makes all the Japanese PWR plants to have condensers cooled by sea water, and all the plants have a common system with a full-flow Condensate Polisher System (CPS). To prevent corrosion, continued improvements of the secondary water chemistry management has been performed like other countries, and one of the major features of the Japanese PWR plants is an enhanced provision for the condenser leakage. The water quality of SG (Steam Generator) has been significantly improved by the provision for the sea water leakage, in combination with other improvements in water chemistry management. Also in Japan, almost all of the treatments of the spent polisher resin and the wastewater are performed within the power plant sites. To facilitate the treatment of the waste water and the regeneration of the spent resins, either ammonia or ETA (Ethanol Amine) is selected as the pH adjustment agent for the secondary system water. Also at the ammonia treatment, high pH accomplishes the inhibition of the piping wall thinning and the lower iron transportation into SGs. In addition, the iron transported into the SG is removed by the chemical conditioning treatment called ASCA (Advanced Scale Conditioning Agent). This provides the effective recovery of the SG heat-transfer performance, and the improved SG support plate BEC (Broached Egg Crate) hole blockage rates. Basically in Japan, the secondary water chemistry management has been improved based on a single basic specification, for the variety of the plant configurations, with the plant-specific investigations and analyses. This paper summarizes

  12. Biological stability of drinking water: controlling factors, methods and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle ePrest

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g. development of opportunistic pathogens, aesthetic (e.g. deterioration of taste, odour, colour or operational (e.g. fouling or biocorrosion of pipes problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors such as (i type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii presence of predators such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv environmental conditions such as water temperature, and (v spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment or biofilm. Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discuss how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to

  13. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  14. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.

    2016-02-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  15. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  16. A Parallel Controlled Study of the Effectiveness of a Partially Flipped Organic Chemistry Course on Student Performance, Perceptions, and Course Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Organic chemistry is very challenging to many students pursuing science careers. Flipping the classroom presents an opportunity to significantly improve student success by increasing active learning, which research shows is highly beneficial to student learning. However, flipping an entire course may seem too daunting or an instructor may simply…

  17. When Spreadsheets Become Software - Quality Control Challenges and Approaches - 13360

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fountain, Stefanie A.; Chen, Emmie G.; Beech, John F.; Wyatt, Elizabeth E.; Quinn, Tanya B.; Seifert, Robert W.; Bonczek, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a preliminary waste acceptance criteria (PWAC) development, several commercial models were employed, including the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance model (HELP) [1], the Disposal Unit Source Term - Multiple Species model (DUSTMS) [2], and the Analytical Transient One, Two, and Three-Dimensional model (AT123D) [3]. The results of these models were post-processed in MS Excel spreadsheets to convert the model results to alternate units, compare the groundwater concentrations to the groundwater concentration thresholds, and then to adjust the waste contaminant masses (based on average concentration over the waste volume) as needed in an attempt to achieve groundwater concentrations at the limiting point of assessment that would meet the compliance concentrations while maximizing the potential use of the landfill (i.e., maximizing the volume of projected waste being generated that could be placed in the landfill). During the course of the PWAC calculation development, one of the Microsoft (MS) Excel spreadsheets used to post-process the results of the commercial model packages grew to include more than 575,000 formulas across 18 worksheets. This spreadsheet was used to assess six base scenarios as well as nine uncertainty/sensitivity scenarios. The complexity of the spreadsheet resulted in the need for a rigorous quality control (QC) procedure to verify data entry and confirm the accuracy of formulas. (authors)

  18. When Spreadsheets Become Software - Quality Control Challenges and Approaches - 13360

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountain, Stefanie A.; Chen, Emmie G.; Beech, John F. [Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 1255 Roberts Boulevard NW, Suite 200, Kennesaw, GA 30144 (United States); Wyatt, Elizabeth E. [LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC, 761 Veterans Ave, Kevil, KY 42053 (United States); Quinn, Tanya B. [Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 2002 Summit Boulevard NE, Suite 885, Atlanta, GA 30319 (United States); Seifert, Robert W. [Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, United States Department of Energy, 5600 Hobbs Rd, Kevil, KY 42053 (United States); Bonczek, Richard R. [Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office, United States Department of Energy, 1017 Majestic Drive, Lexington, KY 40513 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    As part of a preliminary waste acceptance criteria (PWAC) development, several commercial models were employed, including the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance model (HELP) [1], the Disposal Unit Source Term - Multiple Species model (DUSTMS) [2], and the Analytical Transient One, Two, and Three-Dimensional model (AT123D) [3]. The results of these models were post-processed in MS Excel spreadsheets to convert the model results to alternate units, compare the groundwater concentrations to the groundwater concentration thresholds, and then to adjust the waste contaminant masses (based on average concentration over the waste volume) as needed in an attempt to achieve groundwater concentrations at the limiting point of assessment that would meet the compliance concentrations while maximizing the potential use of the landfill (i.e., maximizing the volume of projected waste being generated that could be placed in the landfill). During the course of the PWAC calculation development, one of the Microsoft (MS) Excel spreadsheets used to post-process the results of the commercial model packages grew to include more than 575,000 formulas across 18 worksheets. This spreadsheet was used to assess six base scenarios as well as nine uncertainty/sensitivity scenarios. The complexity of the spreadsheet resulted in the need for a rigorous quality control (QC) procedure to verify data entry and confirm the accuracy of formulas. (authors)

  19. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Antiparallel Dynamic Covalent Chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Bartosz M; Nowak, Piotr; Cvrtila, Ivica; Pappas, Charalampos G; Liu, Bin; Komáromy, Dávid; Otto, Sijbren

    2017-05-17

    The ability to design reaction networks with high, but addressable complexity is a necessary prerequisite to make advanced functional chemical systems. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry has proven to be a useful tool in achieving complexity, however with some limitations in controlling it. Herein we introduce the concept of antiparallel chemistries, in which the same functional group can be channeled into one of two reversible chemistries depending on a controllable parameter. Such systems allow both for achieving complexity, by combinatorial chemistry, and addressing it, by switching from one chemistry to another by controlling an external parameter. In our design the two antiparallel chemistries are thiol-disulfide exchange and thio-Michael addition, sharing the thiol as the common building block. By means of oxidation and reduction the system can be reversibly switched from predominantly thio-Michael chemistry to predominantly disulfide chemistry, as well as to any intermediate state. Both chemistries operate in water, at room temperature, and at mildly basic pH, which makes them a suitable platform for further development of systems chemistry.

  1. Implementation Challenges for Multivariable Control: What You Did Not Learn in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Multivariable control allows controller designs that can provide decoupled command tracking and robust performance in the presence of modeling uncertainties. Although the last two decades have seen extensive development of multivariable control theory and example applications to complex systems in software/hardware simulations, there are no production flying systems aircraft or spacecraft, that use multivariable control. This is because of the tremendous challenges associated with implementation of such multivariable control designs. Unfortunately, the curriculum in schools does not provide sufficient time to be able to provide an exposure to the students in such implementation challenges. The objective of this paper is to share the lessons learned by a practitioner of multivariable control in the process of applying some of the modern control theory to the Integrated Flight Propulsion Control (IFPC) design for an advanced Short Take-Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft simulation.

  2. PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Control Status: A Summary of Industry Initiatives, Experience and Trends Relative to the EPRI PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, Keith; Choi, Samuel

    2012-09-01

    The latest revision of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines was issued in February 2009. The Guidelines continue to focus on minimizing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator tubes, as well as minimizing degradation of other major components / subsystems of the secondary system. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for a plant-specific and effective PWR secondary water chemistry program. With the issuance of Revision 7 of the Guidelines in 2009, many plants have implemented changes that allow greater flexibility on startup. For example, the previous Guidelines (Revision 6) contained a possible low power hold at 5% power and a possible mid power hold at approximately 30% power based on chemistry constraints. Revision 7 has established a range over which a plant-specific value can be chosen for the possible low power hold (between 5% and 15%) and mid power hold (between 30% and 50%). This has provided plants the ability to establish significant plant evolutions prior to reaching the possible power hold; such as establishing seal steam to the condenser, placing feed pumps in service, or initiating forward flow of heater drains. The application of this flexibility in the industry will be explored. This paper also highlights the major initiatives and industry trends with respect to PWR secondary chemistry; and outlines the recent work to effectively address them. These will be presented in light of recent operating experience, as derived from EPRI's PWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment (CMA) program (which contains more than 400 cycles of operating chemistry data). (authors)

  3. Morphology control of anatase TiO2 for well-defined surface chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jeantelot, Gabriel; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Sofack-Kreutzer, Julien; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Lopatin, Sergei; Harb, Moussab; Cavallo, Luigi; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    A specific allotrope of titanium dioxide (anatase) was synthesized both with a standard thermodynamic morphology ({101}-anatase) and with a highly anisotropic morphology ({001}-anatase) dominated by the {001} facet (81%). The surface chemistry of both samples after dehydroxylation was studied by 1H NMR and FT-IR. The influence of surface fluorides on the surface chemistry was also studied by 1H NMR, FT-IR and DFT. Full attribution of the IR spectra of anatase with dominant {001} facets could be provided based on experimental data and further confirmed by DFT. Our results showed that chemisorbed H2O molecules are still present on anatase after dehydroxylation at 350 °C, and that the type of surface hydroxyls present on the {001} facet is dependent on the presence of fluorides. They also provided general insight into the nature of the surface species on both fluorinated and fluorine-free anatase. The use of vanadium oxychloride (VOCl3) allowed the determination of the accessibility of the various OH groups spectroscopically observed.

  4. Morphology control of anatase TiO2 for well-defined surface chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jeantelot, Gabriel

    2018-05-16

    A specific allotrope of titanium dioxide (anatase) was synthesized both with a standard thermodynamic morphology ({101}-anatase) and with a highly anisotropic morphology ({001}-anatase) dominated by the {001} facet (81%). The surface chemistry of both samples after dehydroxylation was studied by 1H NMR and FT-IR. The influence of surface fluorides on the surface chemistry was also studied by 1H NMR, FT-IR and DFT. Full attribution of the IR spectra of anatase with dominant {001} facets could be provided based on experimental data and further confirmed by DFT. Our results showed that chemisorbed H2O molecules are still present on anatase after dehydroxylation at 350 °C, and that the type of surface hydroxyls present on the {001} facet is dependent on the presence of fluorides. They also provided general insight into the nature of the surface species on both fluorinated and fluorine-free anatase. The use of vanadium oxychloride (VOCl3) allowed the determination of the accessibility of the various OH groups spectroscopically observed.

  5. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  6. Security, development and human rights: normative, legal and policy challenges for the international drug control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Damon

    2010-03-01

    This commentary addresses some of the challenges posed by the broader normative, legal and policy framework of the United Nations for the international drug control system. The 'purposes and principles' of the United Nations are presented and set against the threat based rhetoric of the drug control system and the negative consequences of that system. Some of the challenges posed by human rights law and norms to the international drug control system are also described, and the need for an impact assessment of the current system alongside alternative policy options is highlighted as a necessary consequence of these analyses. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The THIRST chemistry module as a tool to determine optimal steam generator corrosion control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppner, K.; Laroche, S.; Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a coordinated program, AECL is developing a set of tools to aid with the prediction and management of steam generator performance. Although stress corrosion cracking (of Alloy 800) has not been detected in any operating steam generator, for life management it is necessary to develop mechanistic models to predict the conditions under which stress corrosion cracking is plausible. Therefore, constant extension rate tests were carried out for Alloy 800 under various steam generator crevice chemistry conditions at applied potentials. These tests were designed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800 under CANDU( steam generator operating conditions. Based on the experimental results, the recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zone for Alloy 800 determined by electrochemical polarization measurements was verified with the respect of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The effects of lead contamination on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800 tubing were also evaluated. The experimental results from constant extension rate tests obtained under applied potentials suggest that Alloy 800 has good performance inside much of a previously recommended electrochemical corrosion potential/pH zone determined by electrochemical analysis. Alloy 800 is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under normal CANDU steam generator operating conditions. However, Alloy 800 may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under near-neutral crevice chemistry conditions in the presence of oxidants. In addition, stress corrosion cracking susceptibility is increased by lead contamination. This observation suggests that the previously defined electrochemical corrosion potential limit under near-neutral crevice conditions could be modified to minimize stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 800. The test results from this work also suggest that the pH dependency of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Alloy 800

  8. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality control in clinical chemistry laboratory in Ghana: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa, Justice; Gyekye, Seth A; Owiredu, William K B A; Ephraim, Richard K D; Essien-Baidoo, Samuel; Amoah, Samuel; Simpong, David L; Arthur, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Sigma metrics provide a uniquely defined scale with which we can assess the performance of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the internal quality control (QC) in the clinical chemistry laboratory of the University of Cape Cost Hospital (UCC) using the six sigma metrics application. We used commercial control serum [normal (L1) and pathological (L2)] for validation of quality control. Metabolites (glucose, urea, and creatinine), lipids [triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (AST)], electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and total protein were assessed. Between-day imprecision (CVs), inaccuracy (Bias) and sigma values were calculated for each control level. Apart from sodium (2.40%, 3.83%), chloride (2.52% and 2.51%) for both L1 and L2 respectively, and glucose (4.82%), cholesterol (4.86%) for L2, CVs for all other parameters (both L1 and L2) were >5%. Four parameters (HDL-C, urea, creatinine and potassium) achieved sigma levels >1 for both controls. Chloride and sodium achieved sigma levels >1 for L1 but sigma levels 1 for L2. Glucose and ALP achieved a sigma level >1 for both control levels whereas TG achieved a sigma level >2 for both control levels. Unsatisfactory sigma levels (six sigma levels for the laboratory.

  9. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  10. The Role of Controlled Surface Topography and Chemistry on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Attachment, Growth and Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Melanie; Williams, Rachel; Downes, Joni; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2017-09-14

    The success of stem cell therapies relies heavily on our ability to control their fate in vitro during expansion to ensure an appropriate supply. The biophysical properties of the cell culture environment have been recognised as a potent stimuli influencing cellular behaviour. In this work we used advanced plasma-based techniques to generate model culture substrates with controlled nanotopographical features of 16 nm, 38 nm and 68 nm in magnitude, and three differently tailored surface chemical functionalities. The effect of these two surface properties on the adhesion, spreading, and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were assessed. The results demonstrated that physical and chemical cues influenced the behaviour of these stem cells in in vitro culture in different ways. The size of the nanotopographical features impacted on the cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation, while the chemistry influenced the cell self-renewal and differentiation.

  11. Controlling Short-Range Interactions by Tuning Surface Chemistry in HDPE/Graphene Nanoribbon Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Soheil; Zehtab Yazdi, Alireza; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2015-09-03

    Unique dispersion states of nanoparticles in polymeric matrices have the potential to create composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. The present work aims to determine the state of dispersion from the melt-state rheological behavior of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon (GNR) nanomaterials. GNRs were synthesized from nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via a chemical route using potassium permanganate and some second acids. High-density polyethylene (HDPE)/GNR nanocomposite samples were then prepared through a solution mixing procedure. Different nanocomposite dispersion states were achieved using different GNR synthesis methods providing different surface chemistry, interparticle interactions, and internal compartments. Prolonged relaxation of flow induced molecular orientation was observed due to the presence of both carbon nanotubes and GNRs. Based on the results of this work, due to relatively weak interactions between the polymer and the nanofillers, it is expected that short-range interactions between nanofillers play the key role in the final dispersion state.

  12. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  13. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Crosslinked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Controlling Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved or in different phases of clinical trials or under rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger the various components of the immune system, unintentionally, and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers to predict the effect of biotherapeutics on modulating the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, and were found recently to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse and experiments are usually conducted using different assays and under specific conditions, making direct comparisons nearly impossible and, thus, tailoring properties of nanomaterials based on the available data is challenging. In this account, the effects of chemical structure, crosslinking, degradability, morphology, concentration and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with focus being given on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized, uniquely, to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple and easy way to compare the immunotoxicity of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate-well with published data. Based on the investigated polymeric systems in this study, valuable information has been collected that aids in the

  14. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Cross-Linked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Control of Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-06-16

    The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved, in different phases of clinical trials, or undergoing rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger various components of the immune system unintentionally and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers for predicting the effect of biotherapeutics on modulation of the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and they were recently found to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for the construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse, and experiments are usually conducted using different assays under specific conditions. As a result, making direct comparisons nearly impossible, and thus, tailoring the properties of nanomaterials on the basis of the available data is challenging. In this Account, the effects of chemical structure, cross-linking, degradability, morphology, concentration, and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with a focus on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized uniquely to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple way to compare the immunotoxicities of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate well with published data. On the basis of the polymeric systems investigated in this study, valuable information has been collected that

  15. Verification and Validation Challenges for Adaptive Flight Control of Complex Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2018-01-01

    Autonomy of aerospace systems requires the ability for flight control systems to be able to adapt to complex uncertain dynamic environment. In spite of the five decades of research in adaptive control, the fact still remains that currently no adaptive control system has ever been deployed on any safety-critical or human-rated production systems such as passenger transport aircraft. The problem lies in the difficulty with the certification of adaptive control systems since existing certification methods cannot readily be used for nonlinear adaptive control systems. Research to address the notion of metrics for adaptive control began to appear in the recent years. These metrics, if accepted, could pave a path towards certification that would potentially lead to the adoption of adaptive control as a future control technology for safety-critical and human-rated production systems. Development of certifiable adaptive control systems represents a major challenge to overcome. Adaptive control systems with learning algorithms will never become part of the future unless it can be proven that they are highly safe and reliable. Rigorous methods for adaptive control software verification and validation must therefore be developed to ensure that adaptive control system software failures will not occur, to verify that the adaptive control system functions as required, to eliminate unintended functionality, and to demonstrate that certification requirements imposed by regulatory bodies such as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) can be satisfied. This presentation will discuss some of the technical issues with adaptive flight control and related V&V challenges.

  16. Design Challenges Encountered in a Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft Flight Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Trindel; Burken, John; Burcham, Frank; Schaefer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center conducted flight tests of a propulsion-controlled aircraft system on an F-15 airplane. This system was designed to explore the feasibility of providing safe emergency landing capability using only the engines to provide flight control in the event of a catastrophic loss of conventional flight controls. Control laws were designed to control the flightpath and bank angle using only commands to the throttles. Although the program was highly successful, this paper highlights some of the challenges associated with using engine thrust as a control effector. These challenges include slow engine response time, poorly modeled nonlinear engine dynamics, unmodeled inlet-airframe interactions, and difficulties with ground effect and gust rejection. Flight and simulation data illustrate these difficulties.

  17. NASA flight controllers - Meeting cultural and leadership challenges on the critical path to mission success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L., Jr.; Ritsher, Jennifer Boyd

    2006-01-01

    As part of its preparation for missions to the Moon and Mars, NASA has identified high priority critical path roadmap (CPR) questions, two of which focus on the performance of mission control personnel. NASA flight controllers have always worked in an incredibly demanding setting, but the International Space Station poses even more challenges than prior missions. We surveyed 14 senior ISS flight controllers and a contrasting sample of 12 more junior controllers about the management and cultural challenges they face and the most effective strategies for addressing them. There was substantial consensus among participants on some issues, such as the importance of building a personal relationship with Russian colleagues. Responses from junior and senior controllers differed in some areas, such as training. We frame the results in terms of two CPR questions. We aim to use our results to improve flight controller training.

  18. Transuranic Computational Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2018-02-26

    Recent developments in the chemistry of the transuranic elements are surveyed, with particular emphasis on computational contributions. Examples are drawn from molecular coordination and organometallic chemistry, and from the study of extended solid systems. The role of the metal valence orbitals in covalent bonding is a particular focus, especially the consequences of the stabilization of the 5f orbitals as the actinide series is traversed. The fledgling chemistry of transuranic elements in the +II oxidation state is highlighted. Throughout, the symbiotic interplay of experimental and computational studies is emphasized; the extraordinary challenges of experimental transuranic chemistry afford computational chemistry a particularly valuable role at the frontier of the periodic table. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Maternal sensitivity and latency to positive emotion following challenge: pathways through effortful control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Anne; McDonough, Susan C; Mackenzie, Michael; Miller, Alison; Dayton, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Katherine; Muzik, Maria; Sameroff, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-generate positive emotions is an important component of emotion regulation. In this study, we focus on children's latency to express positive emotions following challenging situations and assess whether this ability operates through early maternal sensitivity and children's effortful control. Longitudinal relations between maternal sensitivity, infant negative affect, effortful control, and latency to positive emotion following challenge were examined in 156 children who were 33 months of age. Structural equation models supported the hypothesis that maternal sensitivity during infancy predicted better effortful control and, in turn, shorter latencies to positive emotions following challenge at 33 months. Directions for future research are discussed. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  20. Atomic Layer Control of Thin Film Growth Using Binary Reaction Sequence Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Our research is focusing on the atomic layer control of thin film growth. Our goal is to deposit films with precise control of thickness and conformality on both flat and high aspect ratio structures...

  1. Selective control of reformed composition of n-heptane via plasma chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Manoj Kumar Reddy, P.; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for reforming n-heptane in a temperature-controlled dielectric barrier discharge reactor to show detailed chemical composition in the products and to propose a potential method to control the product

  2. Process qualification and control in electron beams--requirements, methods, new concepts and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittendorfer, J.; Gratzl, F.; Hanis, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the status of process qualification and control in electron beam irradiation is analyzed in terms of requirements, concepts, methods and challenges for a state-of-the-art process control concept for medical device sterilization. Aspects from process qualification to routine process control are described together with the associated process variables. As a case study the 10 MeV beams at Mediscan GmbH are considered. Process control concepts like statistical process control (SPC) and a new concept to determine process capability is briefly discussed

  3. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids)

  4. New validated recipes for double-blind placebo-controlled low-dose food challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, Anna; Nordström, Lisbeth; Strinnholm, Åsa; Nylander, Annica; Jonsäll, Anette; Rönmark, Eva; West, Christina E

    2013-05-01

    Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges are considered the most reliable method to diagnose or rule out food allergy. Despite this, there are few validated challenge recipes available. The present study aimed to validate new recipes for low-dose double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges in school children, by investigating whether there were any sensory differences between the active materials containing cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat or cod, and the placebo materials. The challenge materials contained the same hypoallergenic amino acid-based product, with or without added food allergens. The test panels consisted of 275 school children, aged 8-10 and 14-15 yr, respectively, from five Swedish schools. Each participant tested at least one recipe. Standardized blinded triangle tests were performed to investigate whether any sensory differences could be detected between the active and placebo materials. In our final recipes, no significant differences could be detected between the active and placebo materials for any challenge food (p > 0.05). These results remained after stratification for age and gender. The taste of challenge materials was acceptable, and no unfavourable side effects related to test materials were observed. In summary, these new validated recipes for low-dose double-blinded food challenges contain common allergenic foods in childhood; cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat and cod. All test materials contain the same liquid vehicle, which facilitates preparation and dosing. Our validated recipes increase the range of available recipes, and as they are easily prepared and dosed, they may facilitate the use of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges in daily clinical practice. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Chemistry for the nuclear energy of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry - radiochemistry, radiation chemistry and nuclear chemical engineering play a very important role in the nuclear power development. Even at present, the offered technology is well developed, but still several improvements are needed and proposed. These developments concern all stages of the technology; front end, reactor operation (coolant chemistry and installation components decontamination, noble gas release control), back end of fuel cycle, etc. Chemistry for a partitioning and a transmutation is a new challenge for the chemists and chemical engineers. The IV th generation of nuclear reactors cannot be developed without chemical solutions for fuel fabrication, radiation-coolants interaction phenomena understanding and spent fuel/waste treatment technologies elaboration. Radiochemical analytical methods are fundamental for radioecological monitoring of radioisotopes of natural and anthropological origin. This paper addresses just a few subjects and is not a detailed overview of the field, however it illustrates a role of chemistry for a safe and economical nuclear power development. (author)

  6. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  7. Model-based nonlinear control of hydraulic servo systems: Challenges, developments and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyong

    2018-06-01

    Hydraulic servo system plays a significant role in industries, and usually acts as a core point in control and power transmission. Although linear theory-based control methods have been well established, advanced controller design methods for hydraulic servo system to achieve high performance is still an unending pursuit along with the development of modern industry. Essential nonlinearity is a unique feature and makes model-based nonlinear control more attractive, due to benefit from prior knowledge of the servo valve controlled hydraulic system. In this paper, a discussion for challenges in model-based nonlinear control, latest developments and brief perspectives of hydraulic servo systems are presented: Modelling uncertainty in hydraulic system is a major challenge, which includes parametric uncertainty and time-varying disturbance; some specific requirements also arise ad hoc difficulties such as nonlinear friction during low velocity tracking, severe disturbance, periodic disturbance, etc.; to handle various challenges, nonlinear solutions including parameter adaptation, nonlinear robust control, state and disturbance observation, backstepping design and so on, are proposed and integrated, theoretical analysis and lots of applications reveal their powerful capability to solve pertinent problems; and at the end, some perspectives and associated research topics (measurement noise, constraints, inner valve dynamics, input nonlinearity, etc.) in nonlinear hydraulic servo control are briefly explored and discussed.

  8. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  9. Development of Distributed System for Informational Location and Control on the Corporate Web Portal "Analytical Chemistry in Russia"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, V. I.; Kolotov, V. P.; Alenina, M. V.

    A new Internet portal developed by community of Russian analysts has been launched in 2001 (http://www.geokhi.ru/~rusanalytchem, http://www.rusanalytchem.org) Corporate Web Portal information, "Analytical Chemistry in Russia" , Corporate Web Portal information, "Analytical Chemistry in Russia" ). Now the portal contains a large amount of information, great part of it is stored in the form of SQL data base (MS SQL). The information retrieval is made by means of ASP pages, containing VB Scripts. The obtained experience of work with such topical portal has detected some weak points, related with its centralized administration and updating. It has been found that urgent supporting of all requests from different persons/organizations on information allocation on the portal's server takes a lot of efforts and time. That is why, the further development of portal we relate with development of a distributed system for information allocation and control, under preserving of centralized administration for ensuring of security and stable working of the portal. Analysis and testing of some available technologies lead us to conclusion to apply MS Share Point technologies. A MS Share Point Team Services (SPTS) has been selected as a technology supporting relatively small groups, where MS SQL is used for storage data and metadata. The last feature was considered as decisive one for SPTS selection, allowing easy integration with data base of the whole portal. SPTS was launched as an independent Internet site accessible from home page of the portal. It serves as a root site to exit to dozens of subsites serving different bodies of Russian Scientific Council on analytical chemistry and external organizations located over the whole Russia. The secure functioning of such hierarchical system, which includes a lot of remote information suppliers, based on use of roles to manage user rights independently for each subsite. The root site is controlled by portal administrator, whereas the

  10. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  11. Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  12. High temperature water chemistry monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants can be prevented or at least damped by water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry. Successful water chemistry control needs regular and continuous monitoring of such water chemistry parameters like dissolved oxygen content, pH, conductivity and impurity contents. Conventionally the monitoring is carried out at low pressures and temperatures, which method, however, has some shortcomings. Recently electrodes have been developed which enables the direct monitoring at operating pressures and temperatures. (author). 2 refs, 5 figs

  13. Status, Vision, and Challenges of an Intelligent Distributed Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Alireza; Culley, Dennis; Garg, Sanjay; Millar, Richard; Smith, Bert; Wood, Jim; Mahoney, Tim; Quinn, Ronald; Carpenter, Sheldon; Mailander, Bill; hide

    2007-01-01

    A Distributed Engine Control Working Group (DECWG) consisting of the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) and industry has been formed to examine the current and future requirements of propulsion engine systems. The scope of this study will include an assessment of the paradigm shift from centralized engine control architecture to an architecture based on distributed control utilizing open system standards. Included will be a description of the work begun in the 1990's, which continues today, followed by the identification of the remaining technical challenges which present barriers to on-engine distributed control.

  14. Obesity: challenges to ventilatory control during exercise--a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Tony G

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is a national health issue in the US. Among the many physiological changes induced by obesity, it also presents a unique challenge to ventilatory control during exercise due to increased metabolic demand of moving larger limbs, increased work of breathing due to extra weight on the chest wall, and changes in breathing mechanics. These challenges to ventilatory control in obesity can be inconspicuous or overt among obese adults but for the most part adaptation of ventilatory control during exercise in obesity appears remarkably unnoticed in the majority of obese people. In this brief review, the changes to ventilatory control required for maintaining normal ventilation during exercise will be examined, especially the interaction between respiratory neural drive and ventilation. Also, gaps in our current knowledge will be discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  16. Aquatic Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yeun; Kim, Oh Sik; Kim, Chang Guk; Park, Cheong Gil; Lee, Gwi Hyeon; Lee, Cheol Hui

    1987-07-01

    This book deals aquatic chemistry, which treats water and environment, chemical kinetics, chemical balance like dynamical characteristic, and thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry such as summary, definition, kinetics, and PH design for mixture of acid-base chemistry, complex chemistry with definition, and kinetics, precipitation and dissolution on summary, kinetics of precipitation and dissolution, and balance design oxidation and resolution with summary, balance of oxidation and resolution.

  17. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  18. Challenges of Control in Functional Organization Structures: Example of Outsourcing Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Maciejczyk

    2016-01-01

    Effective control of an organization is strictly connected with its organization structure. When a company decides to outsource a part of its operations, a new structure is applied. Also, the system of control should be reviewed and adjusted to the new model of business in order to be effective. Usually, the outsourcing companies apply functional organization structure which is the most common way of grouping business activities. The goal of the paper was to point challenges and aspects which...

  19. 78 FR 48683 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Million Hearts® Hypertension Control Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... and integrating team-based approaches to care, as well as community approaches, such as strengthening... control hypertension may be shared in documents or other communication products that describe generally... marketing. Winners are permitted to cite that they won this challenge. The names, cities, and states of...

  20. Exclusively breastfed infants at risk for false negative double blind placebo controlled milk challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus, N. C. M.; Kole, E. A.; Schoemaker, A. A.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Sprikkelman, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    The double blind placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is the gold standard for diagnosing cow's milk allergy (CMA). However, false-negative DBPCFC have been reported. We present 2 cases with a false negative DBPCFC in exclusively breastfed infants suspected of CMA. These cases highlight the

  1. The challenge of recruiting patients into a placebo-controlled surgical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, L Stefan; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Randomized placebo-controlled trials represent the gold standard in evaluating healthcare interventions but are rarely performed within orthopedics. Ethical concerns or well-known challenges in recruiting patients for surgical trials in general have been expressed and adding a placebo...

  2. [Major ion chemistry of surface water in the Xilin River Basin and the possible controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Under the increasing pressure of water shortage and steppe degradation, information on the hydrological cycle in the steppe region in Inner Mongolia is urgently needed. Major ions are widely used to identify the hydrological processes in a river basin. Based on the analysis results of 239 river water samples collected in 13 sections along the Xilin River system during 2006 to 2008, combined with data from groundwater and precipitation samples collected in the same period and the meteorological and hydrological data in the Xilin River Basin, hydrochemical characteristics and the chemistry of major ions of the Xilin River water have been studied by means of Piper triangle plots and Gibbs diagrams. The results showed that: (1) the total dissolved solid (TDS) in river water mainly ranged between 136.7 mg x L(-1) and 376.5 mg x L(-1), and (2) it had an increasing trend along the river flow path. (3) The major cations and anions of river water were Ca2+ and HCO3-, respectively, and the chemical type of the river water varied from HCO3- -Ca2+ in the headwater area to HCO(3-)-Ca2+ Mg2+ in the lower part. (4) The variation in the concentration of major irons in surface water was not significant at the temporal scale. Usually, the concentration values of major irons were much higher in May than those in other months during the runoff season, while the values were a bit lower in 2007 than those in 2006 and 2008. Except for SO4(2-), the concentrations of other ions such as Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cl- and HCO3- showed a upward trend along the river flow path. Comparing major ion concentrations of the river water with those of local groundwater and precipitation, the concentration in river water was between those of precipitation and groundwater but was much closer to the concentration of groundwater. This indicated that the surface water was recharged by a mixture of precipitation and groundwater, and groundwater showed a larger impact. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical

  3. An Overview of the EPRI PWR Primary Chemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, David; Fruzzetti, Keith; Haas, Carey; Wells, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Primary chemistry controls continue to evolve, impacting long term equipment reliability goals, optimized core designs, and radiation dose management practices. Chemistry initiatives include increased primary system pH (T) , zinc injection, and optimization of primary system hydrogen concentration. Nevertheless, utilities are faced with ever changing challenges as fuel vendors continue to optimize core power densities coupled with longer operating cycles and material replacement efforts. These challenges must be collaboratively addressed by the plant chemists, engineers, and operators. Operational chemistry has changed dramatically over the years with increased primary pH (T) programs requiring some utilities to operate with up to 6 ppm lithium or slightly higher. Coupled with primary pH (T) program optimization, are ongoing EPRI research efforts attempting to develop an optimized hydrogen control program balancing material issues associated with primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) crack growth rate against fuel concerns associated with increased hydrogen concentrations. One of the most significant primary chemistry changes that effectively balances the demands of materials, fuels, chemistry and dose management strategies is zinc injection into the primary coolant. Since 1994 when Farley initiated zinc injection, zinc injection has been successfully injected at over 70 pressurized water reactors world-wide. Combining operational chemistry with shutdown chemistry controls provides the plant chemist with a technically based and balanced approach to fuel and material integrity as well as dose management strategies. Shutdown chemistry has continually evolved since the 1970's when the chemist was primarily concerned with fission products. Now the chemist must manage corrosion product release, and support Outage Management and Radiation Protection through the performance of a controlled shutdown. In part, this change was driven as plant materials evolved

  4. Control of Maillard-type off-flavor development in ultrahigh-temperature-processed bovine milk by phenolic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinidou, Smaro; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-08-13

    The application of phenolic compounds to suppress Maillard chemistry and off-flavor development in ultrahigh-termperature (UHT)-processed milk during processing and storage was investigated. Five phenolic compounds were examined for structure-reactivity relationships (catechin, genistein, daidzein, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene). The levels of key transient Maillard reaction (MR) intermediates (reactive carbonyl species) and select off-flavor markers (methional, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) were quantified by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/ToF, respectively. The addition of phenolic compounds prior to UHT processing significantly reduced the concentration of MR intermediates and related off-flavor compounds compared to a control sample (p markers and reactive carbonyl species. Sensory studies were in agreement with the analytical data. The cooked flavor intensity was rated lower for the recombination model samples of the catechin-treated UHT milk compared to the control UHT milk. Additionally, consumer acceptability studies showed catechin-treated UHT milk to have significantly higher liking scores when compared the control sample (Fisher's LSD = 0.728).

  5. Constructibility Challenges for Perimeter Control Blasting and Slope Development in Shale and Other "Weak" Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpato, D. J.

    2016-02-01

    Slope construction in shale can present some interesting challenges for geotechnical design engineers and contractors alike. There are challenges that can be expected and designed for; however, all too frequently, such challenges manifest themselves as "surprises" in the field. Common constructibility challenges can include drill hole deviation during drilling for controlled blasting; and, excavation slope instability arising from inconsistent perimeter control drilling. Drill hole deviation results from the cumulative effects from both drilling mechanics and rock mass conditions. Once a hole has initiated the deviation trajectory, it is difficult to rectify drill steel position. Although such challenges are not necessarily unique to shale, they are often exacerbated by weak, weathered and transversely isotropic nature of bedrock conditions. All too often, the working assumption is that shale is "soft" and easily excavatable; however, this blanket assumption can prove to be costly. This paper is intended to provide design professionals and contractors with the practical considerations needed to avoid the "surprises" associated with drill hole deviation, and minimize the potential for costly claims.

  6. Forensic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  7. Land cover controls on summer discharge and runoff solution chemistry of semi-arid urban catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Erika L.; Brooks, Paul D.; Lohse, Kathleen A.; McLain, Jean E. T.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryRecharge of urban runoff to groundwater as a stormwater management practice has gained importance in semi-arid regions where water resources are scarce and urban centers are growing. Despite this trend, the importance of land cover in controlling semi-arid catchment runoff quantity and quality remains unclear. Here we address the question: How do land cover characteristics control the amount and quality of storm runoff in semi-arid urban catchments? We monitored summertime runoff quantity and quality from five catchments dominated by distinct urban land uses: low, medium, and high density residential, mixed use, and commercial. Increasing urban land cover increased runoff duration and the likelihood that a rainfall event would result in runoff, but did not increase the time to peak discharge of episodic runoff. The effect of urban land cover on hydrologic responses was tightly coupled to the magnitude of rainfall. At distinct rainfall thresholds, roads, percent impervious cover and the stormwater drainage network controlled runoff frequency, runoff depth and runoff ratios. Contrary to initial expectations, runoff quality did not vary in repose to impervious cover or land use. We identified four major mechanisms controlling runoff quality: (1) variable solute sourcing due to land use heterogeneity and above ground catchment connectivity; (2) the spatial extent of pervious and biogeochemically active areas; (3) the efficiency of overland flow and runoff mobilization; and (4) solute flushing and dilution. Our study highlights the importance of the stormwater drainage systems characteristics in controlling urban runoff quantity and quality; and suggests that enhanced wetting and in-stream processes may control solute sourcing and retention. Finally, we suggest that the characteristics of the stormwater drainage system should be integrated into stormwater management approaches.

  8. Controller Placement Algorithms in Software Defined Network - A Review of Trends and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Si-Kee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional network architectures are complex to manage, comparatively static, rigid and difficult to make changes for new innovation. The proprietary devices in such architectures are based on manual configuration which are unwieldy and error-prone. Software Defined Network (SDN which is described as a new network paradigm that decouple the control plane from data plane are capable to solve today's network issues and improve the network performance. Nevertheless, among so many challenges and research opportunity in SDN, Controller Placement Problem (CPP is said to be the most important issues which can directly affect the overall network performance. Thus far, the issue regarding the CPP and its challenge has not been completely reviewed and discussed properly in any other papers. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on several optimized controller placement problem algorithms in SDN. This paper also highlights some limitations of the reviewed methods and also emphasizes on suitable approach to address the aforementioned problems.

  9. Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Scott; Beaton, Andrea; Nascimento, Bruno R; Zühlke, Liesl J; Khorsandi, Maziar; Wilson, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs. PMID:29440834

  10. Challenges in Modelling and Control of Offshore De-oiling Hydrocyclone Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Pedersen, Simon; Yang, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    , and alternatively this task imposes a number of key control challenges. Specifically, there is much research to be performed in the direction of dynamic modelling and control of de-oiling hydrocyclone systems. The current solutions rely heavily on empirical trial-and-error approaches. This paper gives a brief......Offshore de-oiling installations are facing an increasing challenge with regards to removing oil residuals from produced water prior to discharge into the ocean. The de-oiling of produced water is initially achieved in the primary separation processes using gravity-based multi-phase separators...... in the produced water before it can be discharged into the ocean. The popularity of hydrocyclone technology in the offshore oil and gas industry is mainly due to its rugged design and low maintenance requirements. However, to operate and control this type of system in an efficient way is far less simple...

  11. JACoW Challenges of the ALICE Detector Control System for the LHC RUN3

    CERN Document Server

    Chochula, Peter; Bond, Peter; Kurepin, Alexander; Lechman, Mateusz; Lang, John; Pinazza, Ombretta

    2018-01-01

    The ALICE Detector Control System (DCS) has provided its services to the experiment since 10 years. During this period it ensured uninterrupted operation of the experiment and guaranteed stable conditions for the data taking. The DCS has been designed to cope with the detector requirements compatible with the LHC operation during its RUN1 and RUN2 phases. The decision to extend the lifetime of the experiment beyond this horizon requires the redesign of the DCS data flow and represents a major challenge. The major challenges of the system upgrade are presented in this paper.

  12. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt

  13. Control of Chemical Equilibrium by Solvent: A Basis for Teaching Physical Chemistry of Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Craig, Colleen F.; Fialkov, Yuriy; Prezhdo, Victor V.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates that the solvent present in a system can highly alter and control the chemical equilibrium of a system. The results show that the dipole moment and polarizibility of a system can be highly altered by using different mixed solvents.

  14. Immunity induced by a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials is directly controlled by their chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Williams (Gareth); K. Fierens (Kaat); S.G. Preston (Stephen); A.C. Lunn; O. Rysnik (Oliwia); S. de Prijck (Sofie); M. Kool (Mirjam); H.C. Buckley (Hannah); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); D. O'Hare (Dermot); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThere is currently no paradigm in immunology that enables an accurate prediction of how the immune system will respond to any given agent. Here we show that the immunological responses induced by members of a broad class of inorganic crystalline materials are controlled purely by their

  15. Chemistry in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Norring, K.

    1994-01-01

    The international conference Chemistry in Water Reactors was arranged in Nice 24-27/04/1994 by the French Nuclear Energy Society. Examples of technical program areas were primary chemistry, operational experience, fundamental studies and new technology. Furthermore there were sessions about radiation field build-up, hydrogen chemistry, electro-chemistry, condensate polishing, decontamination and chemical cleaning. The conference gave the impression that there are some areas that are going to be more important than others during the next few years to come. Cladding integrity: Professor Ishigure from Japan emphasized that cladding integrity is a subject of great concern, especially with respect to waterside corrosion, deposition and release of crud. Chemistry control: The control of the iron/nickel concentration quotient seems to be not as important as previously considered. The future operation of a nuclear power plant is going to require a better control of the water chemistry than achievable today. One example of this is solubility control via regulation in BWR. Trends in USA: means an increasing use of hydrogen, minimization of SCC/IASCC, minimization of radiation fields by thorough chemistry control, guarding fuel integrity by minimization of cladding corrosion and minimization of flow assisted corrosion. Stellite replacement: The search for replacement materials will continue. Secondary side crevice chemistry: Modeling and practical studies are required to increase knowledge about the crevice chemistry and how it develops under plant operation conditions. Inhibitors: Inhibitors for IGSCC and IGA as well for the primary- (zinc) as for the secondary side (Ti) should be studied. The effects and mode of operation of the inhibitors should be documented. Chemical cleaning: of heat transfer surfaces will be an important subject. Prophylactic cleaning at regular intervals could be one mode of operation

  16. Environmental and community controls on plant canopy chemistry in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Kyla M; Asner, Gregory P; Field, Christopher B

    2013-04-23

    Understanding how and why plant communities vary across space has long been a goal of ecology, yet parsing the relative importance of different influences has remained a challenge. Species-specific models are not generalizable, whereas broad plant functional type models lack important detail. Here we consider plant trait patterns at the local scale and ask whether plant chemical traits are more closely linked to environmental gradients or to changes in species composition. We used the visible-to-shortwave infrared (VSWIR) spectrometer of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory to develop maps of four plant chemical traits--leaf nitrogen per mass, leaf carbon per mass, leaf water concentration, and canopy water content--across a diverse Mediterranean-type ecosystem (Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, CA). For all four traits, plant community alone was the strongest predictor of trait variation (explaining 46-61% of the heterogeneity), whereas environmental gradients accounted for just one fourth of the variation in the traits. This result emphasizes the critical role that species composition plays in mediating nutrient and carbon cycling within and among different communities. Environmental filtering and limits to similarity can act strongly, simultaneously, in a spatially heterogeneous environment, but the local-scale environmental gradients alone cannot account for the variation across this landscape.

  17. Water chemistry control in thermal and nuclear power plants. 9. Nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The chemical management of fuels in nuclear power plants aims at maintenance of the soundness of nuclear fuels and at reduction of the radiation exposure of the working employees. With regard to the former, particular attention should be paid to the fabrication process of fuel assembly, mainly for chemical management for fuel cladding tubes together with fuel pellet-clad chemical interactions, and to the outer tubes in the power plants. With regard to the latter, the fabrication process should be carefully controlled to prevent radioactive impurity increase in primary cooling water systems by maintaining cleaning level and decreasing surface contamination. Reactions of zircalloy with water or hydrogen forming ZrH 2 , sintered density of UO 2 pellet controlling water content, pellet-clad interactions, stress corrosion cracking, crud induced fuel failure, behaviors of such fission products as I, Xe, Kr, and Cs in plants are also important to water and chemical management of nuclear fuels. (S. Ohno)

  18. Development of chemistry support programme for algae control in spray pond waters of CIRUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramabhadran, S.; Ghosh, S.; Bose, H.

    2008-01-01

    A major problem in any open recirculating cooling water system, is the growth of micro-organisms, especially algae, which adversely affects the efficient and safe operation of the plant. The algae control depends to a great extent, on the selection of an effective algaecide and on the adoption of proper dose and dosing frequency of the algaecide. The present paper describes the development of (i) a generally applicable analytical method for comparing the algicidal efficacies of available commercial algaecides, for the specific local strains of algae in the spray pond waters of CIRUS reactor at Trombay, and (ii) a procedure for assessing 'algicide demand' in open recirculating cooling water systems, which can be used to establish an effective and efficient algae control programme. (author)

  19. Challenges of Control in Functional Organization Structures: Example of Outsourcing Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Maciejczyk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of an organization is strictly connected with its organization structure. When a company decides to outsource a part of its operations, a new structure is applied. Also, the system of control should be reviewed and adjusted to the new model of business in order to be effective. Usually, the outsourcing companies apply functional organization structure which is the most common way of grouping business activities. The goal of the paper was to point challenges and aspects which should be taken into consideration in order to adapt control systems to new organization structures in case of Business Process Outsourcing and Shared Service Centers. The research was based on literature studies as well as empirical analysis of selected companies from business service centers sector. The key findings of the study suggest that the mechanisms of control differ in Business Process Outsourcing and Shared Service organizations although both base on building trust and relationship. The main challenges of adapting the control system to new conditions comprise people and process related factors such as: knowledge management, control split and owners, new processes flows, virtual teams. Building control system is a process which foundation is a new organization structure.

  20. Sonogashira cross-coupling under non-basic conditions. Flow chemistry as a new paradigm in reaction control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voltrová, Svatava; Šrogl, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 9 (2014), s. 1067-1071 ISSN 2052-4129 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12013 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Sonogashira * cross-coupling * flow chemistry Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  1. A Controlled-Environment Chamber for Atmospheric Chemistry Studies Using FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    necessary and identify by block number) FELD GROUP SUB-GROUP i >Chamber, controlled environment; long-path cell ; 07 04 FT-IR; Hydrazine decay...modification doubles the useable path length of the original multipass cell described by White (Reference 8). The pattern of images formed on the nesting...system is shown in Figure 13. 24 z C C02, Ibm, El4 944 C3 ta) caC E-4- 252 14 $4 41) 41) 0. 0 04 04 4 41) ~0 to 0.0 V-4 (A q14 0~ 1% 4-r4 $4 0 u P416 4 4

  2. Healthcare workers' challenges in the implementation of tuberculosis infection prevention and control measures in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Miranda; Coelho, Eliana; Mosse, Carla das Dores; Brondi, Luciana; Winterton, Laura; van Leth, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare Workers (HCWs) have a higher frequency of TB exposure than the general population and have therefore an occupational TB risk that infection prevention and control (IPC) measures aim to reduce. HCWs are crucial in the implementation of these measures. The objective of the study was to investigate Mozambican HCWs' perceptions of their occupational TB risk and the measures they report using to reduce this risk. In addition, we explored the challenges HCWs encounter while using these TBIPC measures. Focus group discussion. Analysis according content method. Four categories of HCWs: auxiliary workers, medical (doctors and clinical officers), nurses and TB program staff. HCWs are aware of their occupational TB risk and use various measures to reduce their risk of infection. HCWs find it challenging to employ measures that minimize such risks and a lack of clear guidelines contributes to these challenges. HCWs' and patient behavior further complicate the use of TBIPC measures. HCWs in Mozambique perceive a high occupational risk of TB infection. They report several challenges using measures to reduce this risk such as shortage of material, lack of clear guidelines, insufficient motivation and inadequate training. Robust training with motivational approaches, alongside supervision and support for HCWs could improve implementation of TBIPC measures. Healthcare management should address the areas for improvement that are beyond the individual HCW's control.

  3. Neuromechanical Control for Hexapedal Robot Walking on Challenging Surfaces and Surface Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Xiaofeng; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    The neuromechanical control principles of animal locomotion provide good insights for the development of bio-inspired legged robots for walking on challenging surfaces. Based on such principles, we developed a neuromechanical controller consisting of a modular neural network (MNN) and of virtual...... agonist–antagonist muscle mechanisms (VAAMs). The controller allows for variable compliant leg motions of a hexapod robot, thereby leading to energy-efficient walking on different surfaces. Without any passive mechanisms or torque and position feedback at each joint, the variable compliant leg motions...... are achieved by only changing the stiffness parameters of the VAAMs. In addition, six surfaces can be also classified by observing the motor signals generated by the controller. The performance of the controller is tested on a physical hexapod robot. Experimental results show that it can effectively walk...

  4. Challenges and prospects for dengue and malaria control in Thailand, Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, Vincent; Nosten, Francois; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Luxemburger, Christine; Kongmee, Monthathip; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2013-12-01

    Despite significant advances in the search for potential dengue vaccines and new therapeutic schemes for malaria, the control of these diseases remains difficult. In Thailand, malaria incidence is falling whereas that of dengue is rising, with an increase in the proportion of reported severe cases. In the absence of antiviral therapeutic options for acute dengue, appropriate case management reduces mortality. However, the interruption of transmission still relies on vector control measures that are currently insufficient to curtail the cycle of epidemics. Drug resistance in malaria parasites is increasing, compromising malaria control and elimination. Deficiencies in our knowledge of vector biology and vectorial capacity also hinder public health efforts for vector control. Challenges to dengue and malaria control are discussed, and research priorities identified. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in China: barriers, challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-Wei; Lee, Anita H; Mao, Zhengzhong

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the barriers in the implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) in China and present recommendations on ways to address these challenges in tobacco control in China. We review the available literature on progress and explore the barriers and challenges that impede a speedier pace in the adoption of the effective tobacco control measures, and present recommendations based on in-depth knowledge of decision-making process on the implementation of FCTC in China. The pace of progress in China is too slow. China faces intractable political, structural, economic and social barriers in tobacco control, which make the whole-hearted implementation of FCTC measures a painstaking process. The authors recommend a comprehensive approach to speed up the implementation of tobacco control measures. This includes strong political leadership from the top, structural changes to the tobacco industry and government oversight of the tobacco industry, as well as advocacy and support for tobacco control from civil society at the grassroots level.

  6. Challenges in Slug Modeling and Control for Offshore Oil and Gas Productions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    The upstream offshore multi-phase well-pipeline-riser installations are facing huge challenges related to slugging flow: An unstable flow regime where the flow rates, pressures and temperatures oscillate in the multi-phase pipelines. One typical severe slug is induced by vertical wells or risers...... most models require specific facility and operating data which, unfortunately, often is not available from most offshore installations. Anti-slug control have been investigated for several decades in oil & gas industry, but many of these existing methods suffer the consequent risk of simultaneously...... reducing the oil & gas production. This paper concludes that slug is a well defined phenomenon, but even though it has been investigated for several decades the current anti-slug control methods still have problems related to robustness. It is predicted that slug-induced challenges will be even more severe...

  7. Controlling destiny through chemistry: small-molecule regulators of cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Ari J; Chen, James K

    2010-01-15

    Controlling cell fate is essential for embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and the prevention of human disease. With each cell in the human body sharing a common genome, achieving the appropriate spectrum of stem cells and their differentiated lineages requires the selective activation of developmental signaling pathways, the expression of specific target genes, and the maintenance of these cellular states through epigenetic mechanisms. Small molecules that target these regulatory processes are therefore valuable tools for probing and manipulating the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells self-renew, differentiate, and arise from somatic cell reprogramming. Pharmacological modulators of cell fate could also help remediate human diseases caused by dysregulated cell proliferation or differentiation, heralding a new era in molecular therapeutics.

  8. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  9. Radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on radiation chemistry of heavy elements that includes the following topics: radiation chemistry of plutonium in nitric acid solutions (spectrophotometric analysis and gamma radiolysis of Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) in nitric acid solution); EPR studies of intermediates formed in radiolytic reactions with aqueous medium; two-phase radiolysis and its effect on the distribution coefficient of plutonium; and radiation chemistry of nitric acid. (DHM)

  10. Inspiring and Challenging Laboratory Exercise in Multivariable Control Theory – The Four-rotor Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag A. H. Samuelsen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students in a module on multivariable control theory are given a laboratory exercise for developing their skills in practical implementation of control systems. This is done in an effort to create a more complete module that gives the students experiences in the practical sides of implementing control systems, while still being theoretically challenging and inspiring. Presenting students with this kind of real-life challenges like sub-optimal models, limited processing time and large degree of uncertainty, is a challenging task, partly due to the need of adapting the level of complexity to the student or group of students doing the exercise in order to keep them engaged throughout the exercise, and in part due to the university's need to reduce expenses related to the administration, supervision, and execution of laboratory exercises. The possibility of adapting the complexity of the exercise to each student's skill level is important, both through the design of the exercise and through the students choosing between different models. The eager student might be tempted by the better performing, but more complex models, while the struggling student can find satisfaction in stabilising the aircraft using the less complex models. The laboratory setup presented uses low-cost components, giving low investment and maintenance costs.

  11. Chemistry Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Chemistry technology experts at NCATS engage in a variety of innovative translational research activities, including:Design of bioactive small molecules.Development...

  12. Challenges of implementing economic model predictive control strategy for buildings interacting with smart energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yi; Böning, Georg Martin; Santos, Rui Mirra

    2016-01-01

    ) strategy for energy management in smart buildings, which can act as active users interacting with smart energy systems. The challenges encountered during the implementation of EMPC for active demand side management are investigated in detail in this paper. A pilot testing study shows energy savings......When there is a high penetration of renewables in the energy system, it requires proactive control of large numbers of distributed demand response resources to maintain the system’s reliability and improve its operational economics. This paper presents the Economic Model Predictive Control (EMPC...

  13. The regulatory control of radiation sources in Australia -- The challenges of a federal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loy, J.; Colgan, P.

    2001-01-01

    The report refers to the challenges that Australia is facing, as a federal nation having a Commonwealth Government and six States and two territories, in establishing appropriate regulatory control of radiation sources. Information on the national inventory of radiation sources and existing regulatory infrastructure, including the system of notification, registration, licensing, inspection and enforcement, is explained in the report. The national provisions for the management of disused sources; the planning, preparedness and response to abnormal events and emergencies; the recovery of control over orphan sources; and education and training; are specifically emphasized. (author)

  14. The control of nuclear proliferation: future challenges. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Stockholm, 23 April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs in Stockholm on 23 April 1998. After a short presentation of the Agency's current verification activities, particularly in Iraq and Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Director General focuses on the present and future role of the IAEA in the control of nuclear proliferation through its strengthened safeguards system, in the prevention of nuclear terrorism, and future challenges of controlling nuclear proliferation from both political and technical point of view

  15. Surface temperature: A key parameter to control the propanethiol plasma polymer chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiry, Damien, E-mail: damien.thiry@umons.ac.be; Aparicio, Francisco J. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Laha, Priya; Terryn, Herman [Research Group Electrochemical and Surface Engineering (SURF), Department of Materials and Chemistry (MACH), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons, Belgium and Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the influence of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the chemical composition of propanethiol plasma polymers was investigated for a given set of plasma conditions. In a first study, a decrease in the atomic sulfur content (at. %S) with the deposition time (t{sub d}) was observed. This behavior is explained by the heating of the growing film during deposition process, limiting the incorporation of stable sulfur-based molecules produced in the plasma. Experiments carried out by controlling the substrate temperature support this hypothesis. On the other hand, an empirical law relating the T{sub s} and the at. %S was established. This allows for the formation of gradient layer presenting a heterogeneous chemical composition along the thickness, as determined by depth profile analysis combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and C{sub 60} ion gun sputtering. The experimental data fit with the one predicted from our empiric description. The whole set of our results provide new insights in the relationship between the substrate temperature and the sulfur content in sulfur-based plasma polymers, essential for future developments.

  16. Factors controlling peat chemistry and vegetation composition in Sudbury peatlands after 30 years of pollution emission reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Sophie E.; Watmough, Shaun A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess factors controlling peat and plant chemistry, and vegetation composition in 18 peatlands surrounding Sudbury after more than 30 years of large (>95%) pollution emission reductions. Sites closer to the main Copper Cliff smelter had more humified peat and the surface horizons were greatly enriched in copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni). Copper and Ni concentrations in peat were significantly correlated with that in the plant tissue of Chamaedaphne calyculata. The pH of peat was the strongest determining factor for species richness, diversity, and community composition, although percent vascular plant cover was strongly negatively correlated with surface Cu and Ni concentrations in peat. Sphagnum frequency was also negatively related to peat Cu and Ni concentrations indicating sites close to Copper Cliff smelter remain adversely impacted by industrial activities. - Highlights: • Surface peat in wetlands in Sudbury is contaminated with Cu and Ni. • The pH of peat is positively related to species richness and diversity. • Metal levels in peat is negatively related to vascular vegetation and Sphagnum cover. • Loss of Sphagnum at contaminated peatlands may impede recovery. - Sudbury peatlands remain impacted by industrial activities as indicated by elevated copper and nickel concentrations and diminished vascular plant cover and Sphagnum frequency.

  17. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well

  18. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellization is analyzed in relation to the previously elaborated thesis that each self-assembly in reality presents a co-assembly, since it implies a mutual reorganization of the assembling system and its immediate environment. Parameters used in the design of fine particles by precipitation are discussed while referring to solubility product, various measures of supersaturation levels, induction time, nucleation and crystal growth rates, interfacial energies, and the Ostwald–Lussac law of phases. Again, the main drawbacks and inadequacies of using the aforementioned parameters in tailoring the materials properties in a soft and colloidal chemical setting were particularly emphasized. The basic and practical limitations of zeta-potential analyses, routinely used to stabilize colloidal dispersions and initiate specific interactions between soft chemical entities, were also outlined. The final section of the paper reiterates the unavoidable presence of practical qualitative models in the design and control of nanoparticulate colloids, which is supported by the overwhelming complexity of quantitative relationships that govern the processes of their formation and assembly. PMID:24490052

  19. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-10-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellization is analyzed in relation to the previously elaborated thesis that each self-assembly in reality presents a co-assembly, since it implies a mutual reorganization of the assembling system and its immediate environment. Parameters used in the design of fine particles by precipitation are discussed while referring to solubility product, various measures of supersaturation levels, induction time, nucleation and crystal growth rates, interfacial energies, and the Ostwald-Lussac law of phases. Again, the main drawbacks and inadequacies of using the aforementioned parameters in tailoring the materials properties in a soft and colloidal chemical setting were particularly emphasized. The basic and practical limitations of zeta-potential analyses, routinely used to stabilize colloidal dispersions and initiate specific interactions between soft chemical entities, were also outlined. The final section of the paper reiterates the unavoidable presence of practical qualitative models in the design and control of nanoparticulate colloids, which is supported by the overwhelming complexity of quantitative relationships that govern the processes of their formation and assembly.

  20. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plante, Ianik, E-mail: ianik.plante-1@nasa.gov [Wyle Science, Technology & Engineering, 1290 Hercules, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Devroye, Luc, E-mail: lucdevroye@gmail.com [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal H3A 0E9 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  1. [Consideration about chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) key problems in simplified registration of classical traditional Chinese medicine excellent prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Ju-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Wang, De-Qin; Yan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Jin-Jin; Gao, Hui-Min; Li, Chun; Wang, Jin-Yu; Li, Chu-Yuan; Ni, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ji-Sheng; Lin, Juan

    2017-05-01

    As an outstanding representative of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) prescriptions accumulated from famous TCM doctors' clinical experiences in past dynasties, classical TCM excellent prescriptions (cTCMeP) are the most valuable part of TCM system. To support the research and development of cTCMeP, a series of regulations and measures were issued to encourage its simplified registration. There is still a long-way to go because many key problems and puzzles about technology, registration and administration in cTCMeP R&D process are not resolved. Based on the analysis of registration and management regulations of botanical drug products in FDA of USA and Japan, and EMA of Europe, the possible key problems and countermeasures in chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) of simplified registration of cTCMeP were analyzed on the consideration of its actual situation. The method of "reference decoction extract by traditional prescription" (RDETP) was firstly proposed as standard to evaluate the quality and preparation uniformity between the new developing product under simplified registration and traditional original usages of cTCMeP, instead of Standard Decoction method in Japan. "Totality of the evidence" approach, mass balance and bioassay/biological assay of cTCMeP were emphatically suggested to introduce to the quality uniformity evaluation system in the raw drug material, drug substance and final product between the modern product and traditional decoction. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems

  3. Leadership Challenges in ISS Operations: Lessons Learned from Junior and Senior Mission Control Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L.; Ritsher, Jennifer Boyd; Saylor, Stephanie A.; Kanas, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is operated by a multi-national, multi-organizational team that is dispersed across multiple locations, time zones, and work schedules. At NASA, both junior and senior mission control personnel have had to find ways to address the leadership challenges inherent in such work, but neither have had systematic training in how to do so. The goals of this study were to examine the major leadership challenges faced by ISS mission control personnel and to highlight the approaches that they have found most effective to surmount them. We pay particular attention to the approaches successfully employed by the senior personnel and to the training needs identified by the junior personnel. We also evaluate the extent to which responses are consistent across the junior and senior samples. Further, we compare the issues identified by our interview survey to those identified by a standardized questionnaire survey of mission control personnel and a contrasting group of space station crewmembers. We studied a sample of 14 senior ISS flight controllers and a contrasting sample of 12 more junior ISS controllers. Data were collected using a semi-structured qualitative interview and content analyzed using an iterative process with multiple coders and consensus meetings to resolve discrepancies. To further explore the meaning of the interview findings, we also conducted new analyses of data from a previous questionnaire study of 13 American astronauts, 17 Russian cosmonauts, and 150 U.S. and 36 Russian mission control personnel supporting the ISS or Mir space stations. The interview data showed that the survey respondents had substantial consensus on several leadership challenges and on key strategies for dealing with them, and they offered a wide range of specific tactics for implementing these strategies. Interview data from the junior respondents will be presented for the first time at the meeting. The questionnaire data showed that the US mission

  4. Fuel Chemistry Research | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Chemistry Research Fuel Chemistry Research Photo of a hand holding a beaker containing a clear oils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's fuel chemistry research explores how biofuels, advanced , emissions control catalysts, and infrastructure materials. Results from NREL's fuel chemistry studies feed

  5. U3Si2 behavior in H2O environments: Part II, pressurized water with controlled redox chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; Migdisov, A.; Wood, E. Sooby; Grote, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Recent interest in U3Si2 as an advanced light water reactor fuel has driven assessment of numerous properties, but characterization of its response to H2O environments is sparse in available literature. The behavior of U3Si2 in H2O containing atmospheres is investigated and presented in a two-part series of articles. This work examines the behavior of U3Si2 following exposure to pressurized H2O at temperatures from 300 to 350 °C. Testing was performed using two autoclave configurations and multiple redox conditions. Use of solid state buffers to attain a controlled water chemistry is also presented as a means to test actinide-bearing systems. Buffers were used to vary the hydrogen concentration between 1 and 30 parts per million H2. Testing included UN, U3Si5, and UO2. Both UN and U3Si5 were found to rapidly pulverize in less than 50 h at 300 °C. Uranium dioxide was included as a control for the autoclave system, and was found to be minimally impacted by exposure to pressurized water at the conditions tested for extended time periods. Testing of U3Si2 at 300 °C found reasonable stability through 30 days in 1-5 ppm H2. However, pulverization was observed following 35 days. The redox condition of testing strongly affected pulverization. Characterization of the resulting microstructures suggests that the mechanism responsible for pulverization under more strongly reducing conditions differs from that previously identified. Hydride formation is hypothesized to drive this transition. Testing performed at 350 °C resulted in rapid pulverization of U3Si2 in under 50 h.

  6. Hybrid Nanomaterials with Single-Site Catalysts by Spatially Controllable Immobilization of Nickel Complexes via Photoclick Chemistry for Alkene Epoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dwaipayan; Febriansyah, Benny; Gupta, Disha; Ng, Leonard Kia-Sheun; Xi, Shibo; Du, Yonghua; Baikie, Tom; Dong, ZhiLi; Soo, Han Sen

    2018-05-22

    Catalyst deactivation is a persistent problem not only for the scientific community but also in industry. Isolated single-site heterogeneous catalysts have shown great promise to overcome these problems. Here, a versatile anchoring strategy for molecular complex immobilization on a broad range of semiconducting or insulating metal oxide ( e. g., titanium dioxide, mesoporous silica, cerium oxide, and tungsten oxide) nanoparticles to synthesize isolated single-site catalysts has been studied systematically. An oxidatively stable anchoring group, maleimide, is shown to form covalent linkages with surface hydroxyl functionalities of metal oxide nanoparticles by photoclick chemistry. The nanocomposites have been thoroughly characterized by techniques including UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The IR spectroscopic studies confirm the covalent linkages between the maleimide group and surface hydroxyl functionalities of the oxide nanoparticles. The hybrid nanomaterials function as highly efficient catalysts for essentially quantitative oxidations of terminal and internal alkenes and show molecular catalyst product selectivities even in more eco-friendly solvents. XAS studies verify the robustness of the catalysts after several catalytic cycles. We have applied the photoclick anchoring methodology to precisely control the deposition of a luminescent variant of our catalyst on the metal oxide nanoparticles. Overall, we demonstrate a general approach to use irradiation to anchor molecular complexes on oxide nanoparticles to create recyclable, hybrid, single-site catalysts that function with high selectivity in a broad range of solvents. We have achieved a facile, spatially and temporally controllable photoclick method that can potentially be extended to other ligands, catalysts, functional molecules, and surfaces.

  7. Water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Baston, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident, the coolants in the primary and secondary systems were within normal chemistry specifications for an operating pressurized water reactor with once-through steam generators. During and immediately after the accident, additional boric acid and sodium hydroxide were added to the primary coolant for control of criticality and radioiodine solubility. A primary to secondary leak developed contaminating the water in one steam generator. For about 5 years after the accident, the primary coolant was maintained at 3800 +. 100 ppm boron and 1000 +. 100 ppm sodium concentrations. Dissolved oxygen was maintained 7.5, corrosion caused by increased dissolved oxygen levels (up to 8 ppm) and higher chloride ion content (up to 5 ppm) is minimized. Chemical control of dissolved oxygen was discontinued and the coolant was processed. Prior to removal of the reactor vessel head, the boron concentration in the coolant was increased to ≅ 5000 ppm to support future defueling operations. Decontamination of the accident generated water is described in terms of contaminated water management. In addition, the decontamination and chemical lay-up conditions for the secondary system are presented along with an overview of chemical management at TMI-2

  8. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a program...

  9. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahammad A. Hannan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil’s mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning

  10. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussein, Hussein A.; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  11. Current organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    Provides in depth reviews on current progress in the fields of asymmetric synthesis, organometallic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, natural product chemistry, and analytical...

  12. Potential Challenges of Controlling Leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka at a Disease Outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharaka Wijerathna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present works reviewed the existing information on leishmaniasis in Sri Lanka and in other countries, focusing on challenges of controlling leishmaniasis in the country, in an outbreak. Evidence from recent studies suggests that there is a possibility of a leishmaniasis outbreak in Sri Lanka in the near future. Difficulty of early diagnosis due to lack of awareness and unavailability or inadequacy of sensitive tests are two of the main challenges for effective case management. Furthermore, the absence of a proper drug for treatment and lack of knowledge about vector biology, distribution, taxonomy and bionomics, and reservoir hosts make the problem serious. The evident potential for visceralization in the cutaneous variant of L. donovani in Sri Lanka may also complicate the issue. Lack of knowledge among local communities also reduces the effectiveness of vector and reservoir host control programs. Immediate actions need to be taken in order to increase scientific knowledge about the disease and a higher effectiveness of the patient management and control programs must be achieved through increased awareness about the disease among general public and active participation of local community in control activities.

  13. Technical and regulatory challenges for digital instrumentation and control and control room systems in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.; Naser, J.; Harris, T.; Keithline, K.

    2006-01-01

    There are several unsettled technical and licensing issues in the areas of instrumentation and control (I and C), human factors, and updated control room designs that need coordinated, proactive industry attention. Some of these issues are already causing protracted regulatory reviews for existing plants, and left untreated, may cause substantial delays and increased costs for new plant combined construction and operating license approvals. Both industry and the NRC will have roles in resolving the key issues and addressing them in future design efforts and regulatory reviews. Where action is needed, the industry will want to minimize costs and risks by defining industry consensus solutions with corresponding technical bases. NEI has formed a working group to coordinate industry efforts and communications with NRC staff. The working group will also help determine priorities and coordinate both new and existing plant resources. EPRI will provide technical input and guidance for the working group. In order to be able to conduct reviews in a timely fashion, the NRC will likely need to enhance and expand staff resources as existing plants are upgraded and new plant reviews become more active. The industry initiative began with a workshop sponsored by EPRI and NEI on March 28-29, 2006, which led to the creation of the NEI working group. The working group has now identified and prioritized important generic issues, established resolution paths and schedules, and identified the roles of various stakeholders including utility companies, EPRI, NEI, vendors and the NRC. Through the course of this initiative I and C issues for both existing and new plants are being addressed. This paper describes the key I and C related technical and regulatory issues and their implications for new and operating plants, and provides a status report on the efforts to resolve them. (authors)

  14. Human Development VIII: A Theory of “Deep” Quantum Chemistry and Cell Consciousness: Quantum Chemistry Controls Genes and Biochemistry to Give Cells and Higher Organisms Consciousness and Complex Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep quantum chemistry is a theory of deeply structured quantum fields carrying the biological information of the cell, making it able to remember, intend, represent the inner and outer world for comparison, understand what it “sees”, and make choices on its structure, form, behavior and division. We suggest that deep quantum chemistry gives the cell consciousness and all the qualities and abilities related to consciousness. We use geometric symbolism, which is a pre-mathematical and philosophical approach to problems that cannot yet be handled mathematically. Using Occam’s razor we have started with the simplest model that works; we presume this to be a many-dimensional, spiral fractal. We suggest that all the electrons of the large biological molecules’ orbitals make one huge “cell-orbital”, which is structured according to the spiral fractal nature of quantum fields. Consciousness of single cells, multi cellular structures as e.g. organs, multi-cellular organisms and multi-individual colonies (like ants and human societies can thus be explained by deep quantum chemistry. When biochemical activity is strictly controlled by the quantum-mechanical super-orbital of the cell, this orbital can deliver energetic quanta as biological information, distributed through many fractal levels of the cell to guide form and behavior of an individual single or a multi-cellular organism. The top level of information is the consciousness of the cell or organism, which controls all the biochemical processes. By this speculative work inspired by Penrose and Hameroff we hope to inspire other researchers to formulate more strict and mathematically correct hypothesis on the complex and coherence nature of matter, life and consciousness.

  15. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  16. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  17. High temperature on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion control in water cooled power reactors. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the results of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on High Temperature On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion in Water Cooled Power Reactors (1995-1999). This report attempts to provide both an overview of the state of the art with regard to on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion in operating reactors, and technical details of the important contributions made by programme participants to the development and qualification of new monitoring techniques. The WACOL CRP is a follow-up to the WACOLIN (Investigations on Water Chemistry Control and Coolant Interaction with Fuel and Primary Circuit Materials in Water Cooled Power Reactors) CRP conducted by the IAEA from 1986 to 1991. The WACOLIN CRP, which described chemistry, corrosion and activity-transport aspects, clearly showed the influence of water chemistry on corrosion of both fuel and reactor primary-circuit components, as well as on radiation fields. It was concluded that there was a fundamental need to monitor water-chemistry parameters in real time, reliably and accurately. The objectives of the WACOL CRP were to establish recommendations for the development, qualification and plant implementation of methods and equipment for on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion. Chief investigators from 18 organizations representing 15 countries provided a variety of contributions aimed at introducing proven monitoring techniques into plants on a regular basis and filling the gaps between plant operator needs and available monitoring techniques. The CRP firmly demonstrated that in situ monitoring is able to provide additional and valuable information to plant operators, e.g. ECP, high temperature pH and conductivity. Such data can be obtained promptly, i.e. in real time and with a high degree of accuracy. Reliable techniques and sensor devices are available which enable plant operators to obtain additional information on the response of structural materials in

  18. CHALLENGES IN SETTING UP QUALITY CONTROL IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY FACILITIES IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, S O; Egbe, N O; Ekpo, E

    2015-01-01

    The Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA) was established to regulate and control the use of radioactive and radiation emitting sources in Nigeria. Quality control (QC) on diagnostic radiology equipment form part of the fundamental requirements for the authorization of diagnostic radiology facilities in the Country. Some quality control tests (output, exposure linearity and reproducibility) were measured on the x-ray machines in the facilities that took part in the study. Questionnaire was developed to evaluate the frequencies at which QC tests were conducted in the facilities and the challenges in setting up QC. Results show great variation in the values of the QC parameters measured. Inadequate cooperation by facilities management, lack of QC equipment and insufficient staff form the major challenges in setting up QC in the facilities under study. The responses on the frequencies at which QC tests should be conducted did not correspond to the recommended standards; indicating that personnel were not familiar with QC implementation and may require further training on QC.

  19. Long-term flow/chemistry feedback in a porous medium with heterogenous permeability: Kinetic control of dissolution and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, E.W.; Lasaga, A.C.; Rye, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of dissolution and precipitation is of central importance to understanding the long-term evolution of fluid flows in crustal environments, with implications for problems as diverse as nuclear waste disposal and crustal evolution. The authors examine the dynamics of such evolution for several geologically relevant permeability distributions (models for en-echelon cracks, an isolated sloping fractured zone, and two sloping high-permeability zones that are close enough together to interact). Although the focus is on a simple quartz matrix system, generic features emerge from this study that can aid in the broader goal of understanding the long-term feedback between flow and chemistry, where dissolution and precipitation is under kinetic control. Examples of thermal convection in a porous medium with spatially variable permeability reveal features of central importance to water-rock interaction. After a transient phase, an accelerated rate of change of porosity may be used with care to decrease computational time, as an alternative to the quasi-stationary state approximation (Lichtner, 1988). Kinetic effects produce features not expected by traditional assumptions made on the basis of equilibrium, for example, that cooling fluids are oversaturated and heating fluids are undersaturated with respect to silicic acid equilibrium. Indeed, the authors observe regions of downwelling oversaturated fluid experiencing heating and regions of upwelling, yet cooling, undersaturated fluid. When oscillatory convection is present, the amplitudes of oscillation generally increase with time in near-surface environments, whereas amplitudes tend to decrease over long times near the heated lower boundary. The authors examine the scaling behavior of characteristic length scales, of terms in the solute equation, and of the typical deviation from equilibrium, each as a function of the kinetic rate parameters

  20. Sigma metrics as a tool for evaluating the performance of internal quality control in a clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Vinodh; Mohan, Thuthi

    2018-01-01

    Six Sigma is one of the most popular quality management system tools employed for process improvement. The Six Sigma methods are usually applied when the outcome of the process can be measured. This study was done to assess the performance of individual biochemical parameters on a Sigma Scale by calculating the sigma metrics for individual parameters and to follow the Westgard guidelines for appropriate Westgard rules and levels of internal quality control (IQC) that needs to be processed to improve target analyte performance based on the sigma metrics. This is a retrospective study, and data required for the study were extracted between July 2015 and June 2016 from a Secondary Care Government Hospital, Chennai. The data obtained for the study are IQC - coefficient of variation percentage and External Quality Assurance Scheme (EQAS) - Bias% for 16 biochemical parameters. For the level 1 IQC, four analytes (alkaline phosphatase, magnesium, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol) showed an ideal performance of ≥6 sigma level, five analytes (urea, total bilirubin, albumin, cholesterol, and potassium) showed an average performance of sigma level and for level 2 IQCs, same four analytes of level 1 showed a performance of ≥6 sigma level, and four analytes (urea, albumin, cholesterol, and potassium) showed an average performance of sigma level. For all analytes sigma level, the quality goal index (QGI) was 1.2 indicated inaccuracy. This study shows that sigma metrics is a good quality tool to assess the analytical performance of a clinical chemistry laboratory. Thus, sigma metric analysis provides a benchmark for the laboratory to design a protocol for IQC, address poor assay performance, and assess the efficiency of existing laboratory processes.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities for Transactive Control of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment. A Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Meintz, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-29

    This report seeks to characterize the opportunities and challenges that arise in developing a transactive control strategy for grid-EVSE integration in various use-case scenarios in a way that provides end-user, energy market, grid, and societal benefits. A detailed review provides information about EVSE integration market trends and stakeholder activities. This is followed by an exploration of value proposition for transactive control of EVSE at both the home scale and the building/campus scale. This report will serve as a reference guide for stakeholders in the grid-EVSE integration area, illustrate potential implementations, and identify a high-value research project for overcoming the barriers and unlocking the benefits of transactive controls of EVSE. While it is not intended to specify the technical details of the transactive control solution, the report contains a list of use cases describing potential applications of transactive control of EVSE, barriers to implementing these applications, and research and development (R&D) opportunities to overcome the barriers. The use cases of transactive control of EVSE are listed in Table ES1.

  2. The national system of nuclear material control development and challenges. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the major factors which may affect the implementation of the National System of Nuclear Material Accounting and Safeguards in Egypt. Developments of this National System-being a division of the Nuclear Regulatory Body in the country-are discussed. Also, recent requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency within the policy of strengthening its regime of international nuclear control are reviewed. The challenges facing the National System are indicated taking in consideration the anticipated growth in the nuclear field in Egypt by the year 2000 and after. 2 figs

  3. The national system of nuclear material control development and challenges. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badawy, I [National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the major factors which may affect the implementation of the National System of Nuclear Material Accounting and Safeguards in Egypt. Developments of this National System-being a division of the Nuclear Regulatory Body in the country-are discussed. Also, recent requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency within the policy of strengthening its regime of international nuclear control are reviewed. The challenges facing the National System are indicated taking in consideration the anticipated growth in the nuclear field in Egypt by the year 2000 and after. 2 figs.

  4. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, L.

    1992-05-01

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional K D concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  5. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  6. Ethical Overview of Placebo Control in Psychiatric Research - Concepts and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćurković, Marko; Živković, Maja; Radić, Krešimir; Vilibić, Maja; Ćelić, Ivan; Bagarić, Dario

    2015-06-01

    Permissibility of placebo controls in psychiatric research is raising everlasting controversies. The main ethical issue remains: whether, when, under what conditions, and to what extent is it justifiable to disregard subject's present (best) interest for the presumably "greater" ones. In relation to this main ethical concern, two distinct arguments arose: proponents of placebo controls trials (placebo ortxodoxy) and proponents of active controls trials (active-control orthodoxy). More recently, in new ethical guidelines, Declaration of Helsinki and International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects, a "middle way" approach was formulated, acceptable to both sides of the argument, saying placebo controls can be justified under certain conditions: when and only when, they firstly present undisputed methodological reasoning, and secondly, fulfill certain ethical considerations - mainly regarding the permissibility of accompanied risks. These ethical evaluations are inevitably contextual and evoke the need for the principle of proportionality. In scope of recent findings of substantial and progressively increasing placebo response in psychiatric research, contextual factors are identified and both theoretical and practical challenges are discussed.

  7. Challenges with controlling varicella in prison settings: experience of California, 2010 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana S; Tootell, Elena; Baumrind, Nikki; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Leistikow, Bruce; Harriman, Kathleen H; Preas, Christopher P; Cosentino, Giorgio; Bialek, Stephanie R; Marin, Mona

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the epidemiology of varicella in one state prison in California during 2010 and 2011, control measures implemented, and associated costs. Eleven varicella cases were reported, of which nine were associated with two outbreaks. One outbreak consisted of three cases and the second consisted of six cases with two generations of spread. Among exposed inmates serologically tested, 98% (643/656) were varicella-zoster virus seropositive. The outbreaks resulted in > 1,000 inmates exposed, 444 staff exposures, and > $160,000 in costs. The authors documented the challenges and costs associated with controlling and managing varicella in a prison setting. A screening policy for evidence of varicella immunity for incoming inmates and staff and vaccination of susceptible persons has the potential to mitigate the impact of future outbreaks and reduce resources necessary to manage cases and outbreaks. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Challenges with controlling varicella in prison settings: Experience of California, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jessica; Lopez, Adriana S.; Tootell, Elena; Baumrind, Nikki; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Leistikow, Bruce; Harriman, Kathleen H.; Preas, Christopher P.; Cosentino, Giorgio; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Marin, Mona

    2015-01-01

    We describe the epidemiology of varicella in one state prison in California during 2010–2011, control measures implemented, and associated costs. Eleven varicella cases were reported, 9 associated with 2 outbreaks. One outbreak consisted of 3 cases and the second consisted of 6 cases with 2 generations of spread. Among exposed inmates serologically tested, 98% (643/656) were VZV sero-positive. The outbreaks resulted in >1,000 inmates exposed, 444 staff exposures, and >$160,000 in costs. We documented the challenges and costs associated with controlling and managing varicella in a prison setting. A screening policy for evidence of varicella immunity for incoming inmates and staff and vaccination of susceptible persons has the potential to mitigate the impact of future outbreaks and reduce resources necessary for managing cases and outbreaks. PMID:25201912

  9. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  10. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  11. Challenges of a community based pragmatic, randomised controlled trial of weight loss maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Elizabeth; McNamara, Rachel; Shaw, Christine; Espinasse, Aude; Simpson, Sharon Anne

    2015-12-18

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have a reputation for being inherently difficult to deliver as planned and often face unforeseen challenges and delays, particularly in relation to organisational and governance difficulties, participant interest, constraints due to allocation of costs, local investigator interest and lengthy bureaucracy. Recruitment is often difficult and the challenges faced often impact on the cost and delivery of a successful trial within the funded period. This paper reflects upon the challenges faced in delivering a pragmatic RCT of weight loss maintenance in a community setting and suggests some potential solutions. The weight loss maintenance in adults trial aimed to evaluate the impact of a 12 month, individually tailored weight maintenance intervention on BMI 3 years from randomisation. Participants were recruited primarily from participant identification centres (PICs)-GP surgeries, exercise on referral schemes and slimming world. The intervention was delivered in community settings. A recruitment strategy implementation plan was drafted to address and monitor poor recruitment. Delays in opening and recruitment were experienced early on. Some were beyond the control of the study team such as; disagreement over allocation of national health service costs and PIC classification as well as difficulties in securing support from research networks. That the intervention was delivered in community settings was often at the root of these issues. Key items to address at the design stage of future trials include feasibility of eligibility criteria. The most effective element of the recruitment implementation plan was to refocus sources of recruitment and target only those who could fulfil the eligibility criteria immediately. Learnings from this trial should be kept in mind by those designing similar studies in the future. Considering potential governance, cost and research network support implications at the design stage of pragmatic trials of

  12. Malaria in Brazil, Colombia, Peru and Venezuela: current challenges in malaria control and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recht, Judith; Siqueira, André M; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Herrera, Sonia M; Herrera, Sócrates; Lacerda, Marcus V G

    2017-07-04

    In spite of significant progress towards malaria control and elimination achieved in South America in the 2000s, this mosquito-transmitted tropical disease remains an important public health concern in the region. Most malaria cases in South America come from Amazon rain forest areas in northern countries, where more than half of malaria is caused by Plasmodium vivax, while Plasmodium falciparum malaria incidence has decreased in recent years. This review discusses current malaria data, policies and challenges in four South American Amazon countries: Brazil, Colombia, Peru and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. Challenges to continuing efforts to further decrease malaria incidence in this region include: a significant increase in malaria cases in recent years in Venezuela, evidence of submicroscopic and asymptomatic infections, peri-urban malaria, gold mining-related malaria, malaria in pregnancy, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and primaquine use, and possible under-detection of Plasmodium malariae. Some of these challenges underscore the need to implement appropriate tools and procedures in specific regions, such as a field-compatible molecular malaria test, a P. malariae-specific test, malaria diagnosis and appropriate treatment as part of regular antenatal care visits, G6PD test before primaquine administration for P. vivax cases (with weekly primaquine regimen for G6PD deficient individuals), single low dose of primaquine for P. falciparum malaria in Colombia, and national and regional efforts to contain malaria spread in Venezuela urgently needed especially in mining areas. Joint efforts and commitment towards malaria control and elimination should be strategized based on examples of successful regional malaria fighting initiatives, such as PAMAFRO and RAVREDA/AMI.

  13. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-15

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  14. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-01

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  15. Analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-15

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  16. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong Hu; Lee, Hu Jun; Kim, Ha Seok

    1989-02-01

    This book give explanations on analytical chemistry with ten chapters, which deal with development of analytical chemistry, the theory of error with definition and classification, sample and treatment gravimetry on general process of gravimetry in aqueous solution and non-aqueous solution, precipitation titration about precipitation reaction and types, complexometry with summary and complex compound, oxidation-reduction equilibrium on electrode potential and potentiometric titration, solvent extraction and chromatograph and experiment with basic operation for chemical experiment.

  17. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  18. Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Herpertz, I.; Pasker, L.; van der Heide, S.; Kukler, J.; Jansink, C.; Vaessen, W.; Beusekamp, B. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    P>Background: In double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs), the use of challenge materials in which blinding is validated is a prerequisite for obtaining true blinded conditions during the test procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to enlarge the available range of

  19. Validation of novel recipes for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges in children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B. J.; Herpertz, I.; Pasker, L.; van der Heide, S.; Kukler, J.; Jansink, C.; Vaessen, W.; Beusekamp, B. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs), the use of challenge materials in which blinding is validated is a prerequisite for obtaining true blinded conditions during the test procedure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to enlarge the available range of validated recipes for

  20. Chemistry and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier, Jean-Claude; Brasseur, Guy; Brechet, Yves; Candel, Sebastien; Cazenave, Anny; Courtillot, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc; Garnier, Emmanuel; Goebel, Philippe; Legrand, Jack; Legrand, Michel; Le Treut, Herve; Mauberger, Pascal; Dinh-Audouin, Minh-Thu; Olivier, Daniele; Rigny, Paul; Bigot, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In its first part, this collective publication addresses the decennial and centuries-old variations of climate: perspectives and implications of climate change for the 21. century, questions remaining about the understanding of climate change from its sources to its modelling, extreme climate variations and societies during the last millennium. The contributions of the second part outline how chemistry is a tool to study climate change: ice chemistry as an archive of our past environment, observations and predictions on sea level rise, relationship between atmosphere chemistry and climate. The third set of contributions discusses the transformation of the energy system for a cleaner atmosphere and the management of the climate risk: the chemical processing of CO_2, actions of chemical companies to support the struggle against climate change, relationship between barrel price and renewable energies, relationship between grid complexity and green energy. The last part outlines the role chemistry can have to be able to do without fossil fuels: chemistry in front of challenges of transformation of the energy system, the use of micro-algae, the use of hydrogen as a vector of energy transition

  1. Operational scale entomological intervention for malaria control: strategies, achievements and challenges in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanda Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While consensus on malaria vector control policy and strategy has stimulated unprecedented political-will, backed by international funding organizations and donors, vector control interventions are expansively being implemented based on assumptions with unequaled successes. This manuscript reports on the strategies, achievements and challenges of the past and contemporary malaria vector control efforts in Zambia. Case description All available information and accessible archived documentary records on malaria vector control in Zambia were reviewed. Retrospective analysis of routine surveillance data from the Health Management Information System (HMIS, data from population-based household surveys and various operations research reports was conducted to assess the status in implementing policies and strategies. Discussion and evaluation Empirical evidence is critical for informing policy decisions and tailoring interventions to local settings. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO encourages the adoption of the integrated vector management (IVM strategy which is a rational decision making process for optimal use of available resources. One of the key features of IVM is capacity building at the operational level to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate vector control and its epidemiological and entomological impact. In Zambia, great progress has been made in implementing WHO-recommended vector control policies and strategies within the context of the IVM Global Strategic framework with strong adherence to its five key attributes. Conclusions The country has solid, consistent and coordinated policies, strategies and guidelines for malaria vector control. The Zambian experience demonstrates the significance of a coordinated multi-pronged IVM approach effectively operationalized within the context of a national health system.

  2. Tobacco Control Policies in Vietnam: Review on MPOWER Implementation Progress and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Hoang Van; Ngan, Tran Thu; Mai, Vu Quynh; My, Nguyen Thi Tuyet; Chung, Le Hong; Kien, Vu Duy; Anh, Tran Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Bao; Giap, Vu Van; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Manh, Pham Duc; Giang, Kim Bao

    2016-01-01

    In Vietnam, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) took effect in March 2005 while MPOWER has been implemented since 2008. This paper describes the progress and challenges of implementation of the MPOWER package in Vietnam. We can report that, in term of monitoring, Vietnam is very active in the Global Tobacco Surveillance System, completing two rounds of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) and three rounds of the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS). To protect people from tobacco smoke, Vietnam has issued and enforced a law requiring comprehensive smoking bans at workplaces and public places since 2013. Tobacco advertising and promotion are also prohibited with the exception of points of sale displays of tobacco products. Violations come in the form of promotion girls, corporate social responsibility activities from tobacco manufacturers and packages displayed by retail vendors. Vietnam is one of the 77 countries that require pictorial health warnings to be printed on cigarette packages to warn about the danger of tobacco and the warnings have been implemented effectively. Cigarette tax is 70% of factory price which is equal to less than 45% of retail price and much lower than the recommendation of WHO. However, Vietnam is one of the very few countries that require manufacturers and importers to make "compulsory contributions" at 1-2% of the factory price of cigarettes sold in Vietnam for the establishment of a Tobacco Control Fund (TCF). The TCF is being operated well. In 2015, 67 units of 63 provinces/cities, 22 ministries and political-social organizations and 6 hospitals received funding from TCF to implement a wide range of tobacco control activities. Cessation services have been starting with a a toll-free quit-line but need to be further strengthened. In conclusion, Vietnam has constantly put efforts into the tobacco control field with high commitment from the government, scientists and activists. Though several remarkable achievements

  3. Nuclear export controls and the CTBT: Where we've been and challenges ahead - Views of an engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The paper discusses the following topics: the importance of export controls; the uniqueness of nuclear weapons and their export control requirements; ''dual-use'' controls; and recent developments in nonproliferation beyond export control. Also discussed are some non-obvious challenges which include computer modeling and visualization, and fissile material availability and instant nukes. The author concludes by asking the Nuclear Suppliers Group to consider whether there are ways to make its controls more effective

  4. Nuclear export controls and the CTBT: Where we`ve been and challenges ahead -- Views of an engineer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundy, A.S.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses the following topics: the importance of export controls; the uniqueness of nuclear weapons and their export control requirements; ``dual-use`` controls; and recent developments in nonproliferation beyond export control. Also discussed are some non-obvious challenges which include computer modeling and visualization, and fissile material availability and instant nukes. The author concludes by asking the Nuclear Suppliers Group to consider whether there are ways to make its controls more effective.

  5. Alien vs. predator: bacterial challenge alters coral microbiomes unless controlled by Halobacteriovorax predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory M. Welsh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Coral microbiomes are known to play important roles in organismal health, response to environmental stress, and resistance to disease. The coral microbiome contains diverse assemblages of resident bacteria, ranging from defensive and metabolic symbionts to opportunistic bacteria that may turn harmful in compromised hosts. However, little is known about how these bacterial interactions influence the mechanism and controls of overall structure, stability, and function of the microbiome. We sought to test how coral microbiome dynamics were affected by interactions between two bacteria: Vibrio coralliilyticus, a known temperature-dependent pathogen of some corals, and Halobacteriovorax, a unique bacterial predator of Vibrio and other gram-negative bacteria. We challenged reef-building coral with V. coralliilyticus in the presence or absence of Halobacteriovorax predators, and monitored microbial community dynamics with 16S rRNA gene profiling time-series. Vibrio coralliilyticus inoculation increased the mean relative abundance of Vibrios by greater than 35% from the 4 to 8 hour time point, but not in the 24 & 32 hour time points. However, strong secondary effects of the Vibrio challenge were also observed for the rest of the microbiome such as increased richness (observed species, and reduced stability (increased beta-diversity. Moreover, after the transient increase in Vibrios, two lineages of bacteria (Rhodobacterales and Cytophagales increased in coral tissues, suggesting that V. coralliilyticus challenge opens niche space for these known opportunists. Rhodobacterales increased from 6.99% (±0.05 SEM to a maximum mean relative abundance of 48.75% (±0.14 SEM in the final time point and Cytophagales from <0.001% to 3.656%. Halobacteriovorax predators are commonly present at low-abundance on coral surfaces. Based on the keystone role of predators in many ecosystems, we hypothesized that Halobacteriovorax predators might help protect corals by

  6. Health Information System Role-Based Access Control Current Security Trends and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Junior, Marcelo Antonio; Bandiera-Paiva, Paulo

    2018-01-01

    This article objective is to highlight implementation characteristics, concerns, or limitations over role-based access control (RBAC) use on health information system (HIS) using industry-focused literature review of current publishing for that purpose. Based on the findings, assessment for indication of RBAC is obsolete considering HIS authorization control needs. We have selected articles related to our investigation theme "RBAC trends and limitations" in 4 different sources related to health informatics or to the engineering technical field. To do so, we have applied the following search query string: "Role-Based Access Control" OR "RBAC" AND "Health information System" OR "EHR" AND "Trends" OR "Challenges" OR "Security" OR "Authorization" OR "Attacks" OR "Permission Assignment" OR "Permission Relation" OR "Permission Mapping" OR "Constraint". We followed PRISMA applicable flow and general methodology used on software engineering for systematic review. 20 articles were selected after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria resulting contributions from 10 different countries. 17 articles advocate RBAC adaptations. The main security trends and limitations mapped were related to emergency access, grant delegation, and interdomain access control. Several publishing proposed RBAC adaptations and enhancements in order to cope current HIS use characteristics. Most of the existent RBAC studies are not related to health informatics industry though. There is no clear indication of RBAC obsolescence for HIS use.

  7. Why has the Ebola outbreak in West Africa been so challenging to control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semalulu, T; Wong, G; Kobinger, G; Huston, P

    2014-08-14

    West Africa is in the midst of the largest Ebola outbreak ever; there have been over 1000 deaths and many new cases are reported each day. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared it an outbreak in March 2014 and on August 6, 2014 the WHO declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern. Based on the number of deaths and total number of cases reported to the WHO as of August 11, 2014, the current outbreak has an overall mortality rate of 55%. Outbreak control measures against Ebola virus disease are effective. Why then, has this outbreak been so challenging to control? Ebola is transmitted through bodily fluids and immediately attacks the immune system, then progressively attacks the major organs and the lining of blood vessels. Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia are small countries that have limited resources to respond to prolonged outbreaks, especially in rural areas. This has been made more challenging by the fact that health care workers are at risk of contracting Ebola virus disease. Treatment to date has been supportive, not curative and outbreak control strategies have been met with distrust due to fear and misinformation. However, important progress is being made. The international response to Ebola is gaining momentum, communication strategies have been developed to address the fear and mistrust, and promising treatments are under development, including a combination of three monoclonal antibodies that has been administered to two American Ebola infected health care workers. The National Microbiology Laboratory of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) has been supporting laboratory diagnostic efforts in West Africa and PHAC has been working with the provinces and territories and key stakeholders to ensure Canada is prepared for a potential Ebola importation.

  8. Understanding the Impact of a General Chemistry Course on Students' Transition to Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Webb, Alexandra; Jeffery, Kathleen A.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The move from general chemistry to organic chemistry can be a challenge for students as it often involves a transition from quantitatively-oriented to mechanistically-oriented thinking. This study found that the design of the general chemistry course can change the student experience of this transition as assessed by a reflective survey. The…

  9. Interaction design challenges and solutions for ALMA operations monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietriga, Emmanuel; Cubaud, Pierre; Schwarz, Joseph; Primet, Romain; Schilling, Marcus; Barkats, Denis; Barrios, Emilio; Vila Vilaro, Baltasar

    2012-09-01

    The ALMA radio-telescope, currently under construction in northern Chile, is a very advanced instrument that presents numerous challenges. From a software perspective, one critical issue is the design of graphical user interfaces for operations monitoring and control that scale to the complexity of the system and to the massive amounts of data users are faced with. Early experience operating the telescope with only a few antennas has shown that conventional user interface technologies are not adequate in this context. They consume too much screen real-estate, require many unnecessary interactions to access relevant information, and fail to provide operators and astronomers with a clear mental map of the instrument. They increase extraneous cognitive load, impeding tasks that call for quick diagnosis and action. To address this challenge, the ALMA software division adopted a user-centered design approach. For the last two years, astronomers, operators, software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers have been involved in participatory design workshops, with the aim of designing better user interfaces based on state-of-the-art visualization techniques. This paper describes the process that led to the development of those interface components and to a proposal for the science and operations console setup: brainstorming sessions, rapid prototyping, joint implementation work involving software engineers and human-computer interaction researchers, feedback collection from a broader range of users, further iterations and testing.

  10. Nuclear weapons, scientists, and the post-Cold War challenge selected papers on arms control

    CERN Document Server

    Drell, Sidney D

    2007-01-01

    This volume includes a representative selection of Sidney Drell's recent writings and speeches (circa 1993 to the present) on public policy issues with substantial scientific components. Most of the writings deal with national security, nuclear weapons, and arms control and reflect the author's personal involvement in such issues dating back to 1960. Fifteen years after the demise of the Soviet Union, the gravest danger presented by nuclear weapons is the spread of advanced technology that may result in the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Of most concern would be their acquisition by hostile governments and terrorists who are unconstrained by accepted norms of civilized behavior. The current challenges are to prevent this from happening and, at the same time, to pursue aggressively the opportunity to escape from an outdated nuclear deterrence trap.

  11. Automated blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes: A review of progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertachi, Arthur; Ramkissoon, Charrise M; Bondia, Jorge; Vehí, Josep

    2018-03-01

    Since the 2000s, research teams worldwide have been working to develop closed-loop (CL) systems able to automatically control blood glucose (BG) levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. This emerging technology is known as artificial pancreas (AP), and its first commercial version just arrived in the market. The main objective of this paper is to present an extensive review of the clinical trials conducted since 2011, which tested various implementations of the AP for different durations under varying conditions. A comprehensive table that contains key information from the selected publications is provided, and the main challenges in AP development and the mitigation strategies used are discussed. The development timelines for different AP systems are also included, highlighting the main evolutions over the clinical trials for each system. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. External cues challenging the internal appetite control system-Overview and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilman, Els; van Kleef, Ellen; van Trijp, Hans

    2017-09-02

    Inadequate regulation of food intake plays an important role in the development of overweight and obesity, and is under the influence of both the internal appetite control system and external environmental cues. Especially in environments where food is overly available, external cues seem to override and/or undermine internal signals, which put severe challenges on the accurate regulation of food intake. By structuring these external cues around five different phases in the food consumption process this paper aims to provide an overview of the wide range of external cues that potentially facilitate or hamper internal signals and with that influence food intake. For each of the five phases of the food consumption process, meal initiation, meal planning, consumption phase, end of eating episode and time till next meal, the most relevant internal signals are discussed and it is explained how specific external cues exert their influence.

  13. Data Quality Control: Challenges, Methods, and Solutions from an Eco-Hydrologic Instrumentation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, D.; Jones, A. S.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Cox, C.; Dastrup, D.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in electronic dataloggers and in situ sensor technology have revolutionized our ability to monitor air, soil, and water to address questions in the environmental sciences. The increased spatial and temporal resolution of in situ data is alluring. However, an often overlooked aspect of these advances are the challenges data managers and technicians face in performing quality control on millions of data points collected every year. While there is general agreement that high quantities of data offer little value unless the data are of high quality, it is commonly understood that despite efforts toward quality assurance, environmental data collection occasionally goes wrong. After identifying erroneous data, data managers and technicians must determine whether to flag, delete, leave unaltered, or retroactively correct suspect data. While individual instrumentation networks often develop their own QA/QC procedures, there is a scarcity of consensus and literature regarding specific solutions and methods for correcting data. This may be because back correction efforts are time consuming, so suspect data are often simply abandoned. Correction techniques are also rarely reported in the literature, likely because corrections are often performed by technicians rather than the researchers who write the scientific papers. Details of correction procedures are often glossed over as a minor component of data collection and processing. To help address this disconnect, we present case studies of quality control challenges, solutions, and lessons learned from a large scale, multi-watershed environmental observatory in Northern Utah that monitors Gradients Along Mountain to Urban Transitions (GAMUT). The GAMUT network consists of over 40 individual climate, water quality, and storm drain monitoring stations that have collected more than 200 million unique data points in four years of operation. In all of our examples, we emphasize that scientists

  14. Recruiting and retaining youth and young adults: challenges and opportunities in survey research for tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Jennifer; Hair, Elizabeth C; Smith, Alexandria; Bennett, Morgane; Rath, Jessica Miller; Thomas, Randall K; Fahimi, Mansour; Dennis, J Michael; Vallone, Donna

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation studies of population-based tobacco control interventions often rely on large-scale survey data from numerous respondents across many geographic areas to provide evidence of their effectiveness. Significant challenges for survey research have emerged with the evolving communications landscape, particularly for surveying hard-to-reach populations such as youth and young adults. This study combines the comprehensive coverage of an address-based sampling (ABS) frame with the timeliness of online data collection to develop a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of young people aged 15-21. We constructed an ABS frame, partially supplemented with auxiliary data, to recruit this hard-to-reach sample. Branded and tested mail-based recruitment materials were designed to bring respondents online for screening, consent and surveying. Once enrolled, respondents completed online surveys every 6 months via computer, tablet or smartphone. Numerous strategies were utilized to enhance retention and representativeness RESULTS: Results detail sample performance, representativeness and retention rates as well as device utilization trends for survey completion among youth and young adult respondents. Panel development efforts resulted in a large, nationally representative sample with high retention rates. This study is among the first to employ this hybrid ABS-to-online methodology to recruit and retain youth and young adults in a probability-based online cohort panel. The approach is particularly valuable for conducting research among younger populations as it capitalizes on their increasing access to and comfort with digital communication. We discuss challenges and opportunities of panel recruitment and retention methods in an effort to provide valuable information for tobacco control researchers seeking to obtain representative, population-based samples of youth and young adults in the U.S. as well as across the globe. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  15. 17th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: addressing the disruption challenge for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Richard

    2013-08-01

    This annual workshop on magnetohydrodynamic stability control was held on 5-7 November 2012 at Columbia University in the city of New York, in the aftermath of a violent hydrodynamic instability event termed 'Hurricane Sandy'. Despite these challenging circumstances, Columbia University managed an excellent meeting, enabling the full participation of the community. This Workshop has been held since 1996 to help in the development of understanding and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities for future fusion reactors. It covers a wide range of stability topics—from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, edge-localized modes (ELMs), resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD—spanning many device types (tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches) to identify commonalities in the physics and a means of control. The theme for 2012 was 'addressing the disruption challenge for ITER', and thus the first day had a heavy focus on both the avoidance and mitigation of disruptions in ITER. Key elements included understanding how to apply 3D fields to maintain stability, as well as managing the disruption process itself through mitigating loads in the thermal quench and handling so called 'runaway electrons'. This culminated in a panel discussion on the disruption mitigation strategy for ITER, which noted that heat load asymmetries during the thermal quench appear to be an artifact of MHD processes, and that runaway electron generation may be inevitable, suggesting research should focus on control and dissipation of the runaway beam. The workshop was combined this year with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop, with a special section looking more deeply at 'Fundamentals of 3D Perturbed Equilibrium Control', with interesting sessions on 3D equilibrium reconstruction, RWM physics, novel control concepts such as non-magnetic sensing, adaptive control, q operation, and the effects of flow. The final day turned to tearing mode interactions, exploring the state

  16. Condensate and feedwater systems, pumps, and water chemistry. Volume seven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes condensate and feedwater systems (general features of condensate and feedwater systems, condenser hotwell level control, condensate flow, feedwater flow), pumps (principles of fluid flow, types of pumps, centrifugal pumps, positive displacement pumps, jet pumps, pump operating characteristics) and water chemistry (water chemistry fundamentals, corrosion, scaling, radiochemistry, water chemistry control processes, water pretreatment, PWR water chemistry, BWR water chemistry, condenser circulating water chemistry

  17. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry within Biphenyl Scaffolds: Reversible Covalent Bonding, Control of Selectivity, and Chirality Sensing with a Single System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Cailing; Zha, Daijun; Ye, Hebo; Hai, Yu; Zhou, Yuntao; Anslyn, Eric V; You, Lei

    2018-01-26

    Axial chirality is a prevalent and important phenomenon in chemistry. Herein we report a combination of dynamic covalent chemistry and axial chirality for the development of a versatile platform for the binding and chirality sensing of multiple classes of mononucleophiles. An equilibrium between an open aldehyde and its cyclic hemiaminal within biphenyl derivatives enabled the dynamic incorporation of a broad range of alcohols, thiols, primary amines, and secondary amines with high efficiency. Selectivity toward different classes of nucleophiles was also achieved by regulating the distinct reactivity of the system with external stimuli. Through induced helicity as a result of central-to-axial chirality transfer, the handedness and ee values of chiral monoalcohol and monoamine analytes were reported by circular dichroism. The strategies introduced herein should find application in many contexts, including assembly, sensing, and labeling. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Conjugation chemistry through acetals toward a dextran-based delivery system for controlled release of siRNA

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Lina

    2012-09-26

    New conjugation chemistry for polysaccharides, exemplified by dextran, was developed to enable the attachment of therapeutic or other functional moieties to the polysaccharide through cleavable acetal linkages. The acid-lability of the acetal groups allows the release of therapeutics under acidic conditions, such as that of the endocytic compartments of cells, regenerating the original free polysaccharide in the end. The physical and chemical behavior of these acetal groups can be adjusted by modifying their stereoelectronic and steric properties, thereby providing materials with tunable degradation and release rates. We have applied this conjugation chemistry in the development of water-soluble siRNA carriers, namely acetal-linked amino-dextrans, with various amine structures attached through either slow- or fast-degrading acetal linker. The carriers with the best combination of amine moieties and structural composition of acetals showed high in vitro transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in the delivery of siRNA. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry1

    OpenAIRE

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellizatio...

  20. System Chemistry to Control Potential Environmental and Safety Hazards of Recycled Concrete Aggregate With Lead-Based Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    will usually buffer the TCLP test so it would not be classified as a hazardous waste. Acidification of soil does change the chemistry and mobility...crushed concrete product from around the stockpile at Fort Jackson (Figure 8). Each sample of a few kilograms was placed in a plastic “zip-lock...Jackson, rainfall quantity and pH for Columbia, SC first had to be determined. 5.2 Columbia rain data A review of data from National Oceanic and