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Sample records for chemically responsive nanoporous

  1. Chemically Responsive Nanoporous Pigments: Colorimetric Sensor Arrays and the Identification of Aliphatic Amines

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Jin Ho; Lim, Sung H.; Park, Erwin; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2008-01-01

    A general method has been developed for the preparation of microspheres of nanoporous pigments, their formulation into chemically responsive pigment inks, and the printing of these inks as calorimetric sensor arrays. Using an ultrasonic-spray aerosol–gel synthesis from chemically responsive dyes and common silica precursors, 16 different nanoporous pigment microspheres have been prepared and characterized. New calorimetric sensor arrays have been created by printing inks of these chemically r...

  2. Nanoporous membranes with electrochemically switchable, chemically stabilized ionic selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-10-01

    Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play important roles in regulating ionic transport through nanoporous membranes. The ability to control these parameters in situ provides a means to create ion transport systems tunable in real time. Here, we present a new strategy to address this challenge, utilizing three unique electrochemically switchable chemistries to manipulate the terminal functional group and control the resulting surface charge throughout ensembles of gold plated nanopores in ion-tracked polycarbonate membranes 3 cm2 in area. We demonstrate the diazonium mediated surface functionalization with (1) nitrophenyl chemistry, (2) quinone chemistry, and (3) previously unreported trimethyl lock chemistry. Unlike other works, these chemistries are chemically stabilized, eliminating the need for a continuously applied gate voltage to maintain a given state and retain ionic selectivity. The effect of surface functionalization and nanopore geometry on selective ion transport through these functionalized membranes is characterized in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at pH = 5.7. The nitrophenyl surface allows for ionic selectivity to be irreversibly switched in situ from cation-selective to anion-selective upon reduction to an aminophenyl surface. The quinone-terminated surface enables reversible changes between no ionic selectivity and a slight cationic selectivity. Alternatively, the trimethyl lock allows ionic selectivity to be reversibly switched by up to a factor of 8, approaching ideal selectivity, as a carboxylic acid group is electrochemically revealed or hidden. By varying the pore shape from cylindrical to conical, it is demonstrated that a controllable directionality can be imparted to the ionic selectivity. Combining control of nanopore geometry with stable, switchable chemistries facilitates superior control of molecular transport across the membrane, enabling tunable ion transport systems.Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play

  3. Effects of Confinement on Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3984, - (2006), s. 743-751. ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant ostatní: NRCC(CA) OGP 1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous materials * chemical reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  4. Single Nanoparticle Translocation Through Chemically Modified Solid Nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shengwei; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongwen; Liu, Quanjun

    2016-01-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect single nanoparticle in solution. In the present study, the silicon nitride nanopores were fabricated by focused Ga ion beam (FIB), and the surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. The positively charged nanopore surface attracted negatively charged nanoparticles when they were in the vicinity of the nanopore. And, nanoparticle translocation speed was slowed dow...

  5. Irradiation response and stability of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zepeda-Ruiz, L [Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory; Bringa, E. [CONICET, Universidad de Cuyo, Argentina; Nastasi, Mike [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-28

    Nanoporous materials consist of a regular organic or inorganic framework supporting a regular, porous structure. Pores are by definition roughly in the nanometre range, that is between 0.2 nm and 100 nm. Nanoporous materials can be subdivided into 3 categories (IUPAC): (1) Microporous materials - 0.2-2 nm; (2) Mesoporous materials - 2-50 nm; and (3) Macroporous materials - 50-1000 nm. np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process. np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa. Stacking Fault Tetrahedra (SFTs) were observed in RT irradiated np-Au foams under the highest and intermediate fluxes, but not under the lowest flux. SFTs were not observed in LNT irradiated np-Au foams under all fluxes. The vacancy diffusivity in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and then collapse to form SFTs. The high ion flux creates more damage per unit time; vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed at high ion fluxes.

  6. Single Nanoparticle Translocation Through Chemically Modified Solid Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shengwei; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongwen; Liu, Quanjun

    2016-12-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect single nanoparticle in solution. In the present study, the silicon nitride nanopores were fabricated by focused Ga ion beam (FIB), and the surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. The positively charged nanopore surface attracted negatively charged nanoparticles when they were in the vicinity of the nanopore. And, nanoparticle translocation speed was slowed down to obtain a clear and deterministic signal. Compared with previous studied small nanoparticles, the electrophoretic translocation of negatively charged polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (diameter ~100 nm) was investigated in solution using the Coulter counter principle in which the time-dependent nanopore current was recorded as the nanoparticles were driven across the nanopore. A linear dependence was found between current drop and biased voltage. An exponentially decaying function (t d   ~ e (-v/v0) ) was found between the duration time and biased voltage. The interaction between the amine-functionalized nanopore wall and PS microspheres was discussed while translating PS microspheres. We explored also translocations of PS microspheres through amine-functionalized solid-state nanopores by varying the solution pH (5.4, 7.0, and 10.0) with 0.02 M potassium chloride (KCl). Surface functionalization showed to provide a useful step to fine-tune the surface property, which can selectively transport molecules or particles. This approach is likely to be applied to gene sequencing. PMID:26831688

  7. Characterization and Functional Applications of Nanoporous Ag Foams Prepared by Chemical Dealloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. Y.; Wang, X.; Huang, J. C.; Tsai, W. Y.; Chu, Y. Y.; Chen, S. Y.; Du, X. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the pure Ag nanoporous foams, with open cell pore volume fractions 55 to 70 pct and pore sizes 100 to 400 nm, have been prepared by chemical dealloying. The Ag nanoporous foams possess favorable modulus (~0.7 GPa) and strength (~14 MPa), much higher than most of the polymers or ceramic foams. It is found that the Ag nanoporous foams are appropriate candidates for the catalytic and electrode applications. However, they do not exhibit efficient anti-bacterial effect, unless much smaller bacteria with cell sizes of 100 nm or less in the neighborhood are encountered.

  8. Advanced Nanoporous Materials for Micro-Gravimetric Sensing to Trace-Level Bio/Chemical Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing.

  9. Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials: NO Dimerization Reaction in Carbon Slit Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.; Smith, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 6 (2006), s. 64712.1-64712.14. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400720409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanopore * NO dimerization * reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  10. Investigation of microcantilever array with ordered nanoporous coatings for selective chemical detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Thornberg, Steven Michael (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Lee, J. -H. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Houk, Ronald J. T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the potential for novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Detection of chemical weapons of mass destruction (CWMD), explosives, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, such as microcantilevers and surface acoustic wave sensors, requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Traditional organic polymers are dense, impeding analyte uptake and slowing sensor response. The nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM enhance transport into and out of the NFM layer, improving response times, and their ordered structure enables structural tuning to impart selectivity. Here we describe experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and VOCs, and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Force field models show that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, using a suite of MOFs it should be possible to select for explosives vs. CWMD, VM vs. GA (nerve agents), and anthracene vs. naphthalene (VOCs). We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM with the surfaces of MEMS devices and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of VFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.

  11. Nanoporous framework materials interfaced with mechanical sensors for highly-sensitive chemical sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Hwan; Skinner, Jack L.; Houk, Ronald J. T.; Fischer, Roland A.; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Allendorf, Mark D.; Yusenko, Kirill; Meilikhov, Mikhail; Hesketh, Peter J.; Venkatasubramanian, Anandram; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    2010-04-01

    We will describe how novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be interfaced with common mechanical sensors, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW), microcantilever array, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and subsequently be used to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Chemical detection using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices (i.e. SAWs, microcantilevers) requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Unlike traditional organic polymers, which are dense, the nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM allow for greater analyte uptake and enhance transport into and out of the sensing layer. This enhancement over traditional coatings leads to improved response times and greater sensitivity, while their ordered structure allows chemical tuning to impart selectivity. We describe here experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and volatile organic compound (VOCs), and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Molecular simulation shows that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, a suite of MOFs can select for strongly interacting organics (explosives, CWMD) vs. lighter volatile organics at trace concentrations. At higher gas pressures, the CWMD are deselected in favor of the volatile organics. We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM on the surface of microcantiliver arrays, QCM crystals, and SAW devices, and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of NFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response

  12. WO3/W Nanopores Sensor for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) Determination under Visible Light

    OpenAIRE

    Xuejin Li; Jing Bai; Qiang Liu; Jianyong Li; Baoxue Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and t...

  13. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  14. Fabrication and characterization of monolithic nanoporous copper through chemical dealloying of Mg-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Mg-Cu system has been developed to fabricate monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) ribbons and bulk NPC through chemical dealloying in a 5 wt.% HCl solution. The microstructures of the NPC ribbons were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The results show that the compositions of the melt-spun Mg-Cu alloys have an important effect on the dealloying process and microstructures of the NPC ribbons. Moreover, the synergetic dealloying of Mg2Cu and MgCu2 in two-phase Mg-Cu alloys results in the formation of NPC with a uniform porous structure.

  15. Influence of Chemical Conditions on the Nanoporous Structure of Silicate Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Sinkó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica or various silicate aerogels can be characterized by highly porous, open cell, low density structures. The synthesis parameters influence the three-dimensional porous structures by modifying the kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis and condensation processes. Numerous investigations have shown that the structure of porous materials can be tailored by variations in synthesis conditions (e.g., the type of precursors, catalyst, and surfactants; the ratio of water/precursor; the concentrations; the medium pH; and the solvent. The objectives of this review are to summarize and elucidate the effects of chemical conditions on the nanoporous structure of sol-gel derived silicate aerogels.

  16. Type and distribution of chemical groups from controlled photo-oxidation of gyroid nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol

    2011-01-01

    Photo-oxidation of nanoporous polymers is little studied. The high UV penetration depth and high surface concentration in these materials give unprecedented possibilities both in fundamental work on surface photochemistry and in nanotechnological applications related for example to patterned...... hydrophilicity or refractive index. This is a quantitative study of the photo-oxidation products of nanoporous gyroid 1,2-polybutadiene in air. Irradiation of the porous sample with UV in the wavelength range of 300–400nm enables tuning of the hydrophilicity of the nanoporous polymer through formation of...... hydrophilic chemical groups, carboxyl and hydroxyls, mainly onto the large air–polymer interface. The nature and abundance of the chemical groups induced by photo-oxidation is identified by solid-state 13C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The distribution of photo-oxidation groups, both relative to the nanometre...

  17. Surfactant-controlled damage evolution during chemical mechanical planarization of nanoporous films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integration of nanoporous organosilicate thin films involving chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a significant challenge due the evolution of defects in the films during CMP in the form of cracking and delamination. This study shows that small changes in CMP electrolyte chemistry and surfactant additions can have dramatic effects on crack growth rates in the films. Crack growth rates were sensitive to the type of electrolyte and decreased in the presence of electrolytes that caused crack tip blunting. Growth rates were also sensitive to nonionic surfactant additions where molecular structure and weight were demonstrated to be important variables. An optimized blend of surfactants and electrolytes can significantly retard defect evolution due to molecular bridging. Surfactant self-assembly and resulting molecular bridging were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy and used to quantify the molecular bridging observed.

  18. Ultrathin Gas Permeable Oxide Membranes for Chemical Sensing: Nanoporous Ta2O5 Test Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Imbault

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conductometric gas sensors made of gas permeable metal oxide ultrathin membranes can combine the functions of a selective filter, preconcentrator, and sensing element and thus can be particularly promising for the active sampling of diluted analytes. Here we report a case study of the electron transport and gas sensing properties of such a membrane made of nanoporous Ta2O5. These membranes demonstrated a noticeable chemical sensitivity toward ammonia, ethanol, and acetone at high temperatures above 400 °C. Different from traditional thin films, such gas permeable, ultrathin gas sensing elements can be made suspended enabling advanced architectures of ultrasensitive analytical systems operating at high temperatures and in harsh environments.

  19. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-12

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept-the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a 'dead' metal can be transformed into a 'smart' material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices. PMID:27347850

  20. Responsive nanoporous metals: recoverable modulations on strength and shape by watering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xing-Long; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Many biological materials can readily modulate their mechanical properties and shape by interacting with water in the surrounding environment, which is essential to their high performance in application. In contrast, typical inorganic materials (such as the metals) cannot change their strength and shape without involving thermal/mechanical treatments. By introducing nano-scale porous structure and exploiting a simple physical concept—the water-capillarity in nanopores, here we report that a ‘dead’ metal can be transformed into a ‘smart’ material with water-responsive properties. We demonstrate that the apparent strength, volume and shape of nanoporous Au and Au(Pt) can be modulated in situ, dramatically and recoverably, in response to water-dipping and partial-drying. The amplitude of strength-modulation reaches 20 MPa, which is nearly 50% of the yield strength at initial state. This approach also leads to reversible length change up to 1.3% in nanoporous Au and a large reversible bending motion of a bi-layer strip with tip displacement of ∼20 mm, which may be used for actuation. This method is simple and effective, occurring in situ under ambient conditions and requiring no external power, analogous to biological materials. The findings may open up novel applications in many areas such as micro-robotics and bio-medical devices.

  1. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (silica-titania aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts. PMID:25664480

  2. WO3/W Nanopores Sensor for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD Determination under Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejin Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and the results showed that taking NaNO3 solution at the concentration of 2.5 mol·L−1 as electrolyte under the light intensity of 214 μW·cm−2 and applied bias of 2.5 V, the proposed method is accurate and well reproducible, even in a wide range of pH values. Furthermore, the COD values obtained by the WO3 sensor were fitted well with the theoretical COD value in the range of 3–60 mg·L−1 with a limit value of 1 mg·L−1, which reveals that the proposed sensor may be a practical device for monitoring and controlling surface water quality as well as slightly polluted water.

  3. Solid-State and Biological Nanopore for Real-Time Sensing of Single Chemical and Sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farzin; Li, Jinghong; Wu, Hai-Chen; Liang, Xing-Jie; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-02-01

    Sensitivity and specificity are two most important factors to take into account for molecule sensing, chemical detection and disease diagnosis. A perfect sensitivity is to reach the level where a single molecule can be detected. An ideal specificity is to reach the level where the substance can be detected in the presence of many contaminants. The rapidly progressing nanopore technology is approaching this threshold. A wide assortment of biomotors and cellular pores in living organisms perform diverse biological functions. The elegant design of these transportation machineries has inspired the development of single molecule detection based on modulations of the individual current blockage events. The dynamic growth of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology has stimulated rapid advances in the study of nanopore based instrumentation over the last decade, and inspired great interest in sensing of single molecules including ions, nucleotides, enantiomers, drugs, and polymers such as PEG, RNA, DNA, and polypeptides. This sensing technology has been extended to medical diagnostics and third generation high throughput DNA sequencing. This review covers current nanopore detection platforms including both biological pores and solid state counterparts. Several biological nanopores have been studied over the years, but this review will focus on the three best characterized systems including α-hemolysin and MspA, both containing a smaller channel for the detection of single-strand DNA, as well as bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor connector that contains a larger channel for the passing of double stranded DNA. The advantage and disadvantage of each system are compared; their current and potential applications in nanomedicine, biotechnology, and nanotechnology are discussed. PMID:23504223

  4. Multi-scale surface texture to improve blue response of nanoporous black silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.; Jones, Kim M.; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-09-01

    We characterize the optical and carrier-collection physics of multi-scale textured p-type black Si solar cells with conversion efficiency of 17.1%. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining density-graded nanoporous layer made by metal-assisted etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. We found that (1) reducing the thickness of nanostructured Si layer improves the short-wavelength spectral response and (2) multi-scale texture permits thinning of the nanostructured layer while maintaining low surface reflection. We have reduced the nanostructured layer thickness by 60% while retaining a solar-spectrum-averaged black Si reflectance of less than 2%. Spectral response at 450 nm has improved from 57% to 71%.

  5. Nanoporous magnesium aluminometasilicate tablets for precise, controlled, and continuous dosing of chemical reagents and catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhland, T.; Nielsen, S.D.; Holm, P.; Christensen, Christina Hviid

    2007-01-01

    Mechanically robust tablets of nanoporous magnesium aluminometasilicate with high surface area and porosity can be loaded with a variety of organic and inorganic reagents and catalysts. The scope of this novel dosing methodology is demonstrated through the evaluation of 14 diverse organic reactions...

  6. Modeling the diffusion/absorption response of a nanopore coated microporous silicon interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C.; Laminack, W.; Gole, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    We outline a modeling study of an extrinsic semiconductor interface formed from the interaction of nanostructured metal oxide decorated porous silicon and used for sensing gas phase analytes. We consider simple conductometric sensors that operate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Nanostructured metal oxide deposition provides a matrix of responses to various analytes, facilitating the extraction of ambient gas concentrations from sensor responses. The sensors are simulated in four stages with an emphasis to the continual improvement of the modeling effort. Stage 1 focuses solely on the diffusion mechanics of an analyte gas into and out of a micro/nanoporous interface and the observed linear response at low concentrations. Stage 2 focuses on the non-linearity resulting primarily from the quenching of sensor response at higher concentrations and introduces an absorption response mechanism. Here, stage 3 demonstrates how the consideration of charge carrier density leads to the development of a new Fermi-distribution based response mechanism. Stage 4 establishes a combined absorption-Fermi-distribution response mechanism.

  7. Development of nanoporous structure in carbons by chemical activation with zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Rinita; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Pokharel, Bhadra Prasad; Pradhananga, Raja Ram

    2013-04-01

    Series of activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared from Lapsi (Choerospondias axillaris) seed powder (LSP) by chemical activation with zinc chloride (ZnCI2) and the effects of ZnCl2 impregnation ratio, carbonization time, and precursor sources on the structure and properties of ACs have been systematically investigated. Carbonization was carried out at 400 degrees C and the ratio of LSP and ZnCI2 was varied from LSP:ZnCl2 = 1:0.25 (AC-0.25), 1:0.50 (AC-0.50) 1:1 (AC-1), 1:2 (AC-2), and 1:4 (AC-4). The ACs were characterized by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Surface properties (effective surface areas, pore volumes, and pore size distributions) were studied by nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The electrochemical and vapor sensing properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method, respectively. All the ACs are amorphous materials containing oxygenated surface functional groups and having nanoporous (microporous and mesoporous) structures. We found that surface properties depend on the LSP:ZnCI2 ratio, carbonization time, and also on the precursor type. The effective surface area increased significantly with increasing LSP:ZnCI2 ratio from 1:0.25 to 1:0.5 and then remain apparently constant. However, total pore volume increased continuously with ZnCI2 ratio. Increase in the carbonization time above 4 h decreased both the surface area and pore volume. ACs prepared from bamboo and coconut shell showed better surface properties compared to AC prepared from sugarcane; surface area and pore volume of the former systems are nearly double of the later system. AC derived from LSP (AC-4) showed excellent electrochemical performance giving specific capacitance value of 328 F/g in 1 M H2SO4 solution demonstrating the potential use of this material for supercapacitor electrodes. Our

  8. A strategy for fabricating nanoporous gold films through chemical dealloying of electrochemically deposited Au-Sn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a novel strategy for the fabrication of nanoporous gold (NPG) films. The fabrication process involves the electrodeposition of a gold–tin alloy, followed by subsequent chemical dealloying of tin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show a bicontinuous nanoporous structure formed on the substrates after chemical dealloying. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis indicates that there are no impurities in the Au–Sn alloy film with an average composition of 58 at. % Au and 42 at. % Sn. After dealloying, only gold remains in the NPG film indicating the effectiveness of this technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that the as-prepared Au–Sn alloy film is composed of two phases (Au5Sn and AuSn), while the NPG film is composed of a single phase (Au). We demonstrate that this approach enables the fabrication of NPG films, either freestanding or supported on various conductive substrates such as copper foil, stainless steel sheet and nickel foam. The resulting NPG electrode exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward both H2O2 reduction and methanol oxidation compared to the polished Au disc electrode. Our strategy provides a general method to fabricate high quality NPG films on conductive substrates, which will broaden the application potential of NPG or NPG-based materials in various fields such as catalysis, optics and sensor technology. (paper)

  9. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  10. Metal incorporation into nanoporous carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, SJ; Woolger, NEP; Carey, JD; Silva, SRP; Fuge, GM; Ashfold, MNR

    2005-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon films were deposited by 248 nm pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target in different background pressures of argon (P). The morphology changed from smooth, high-density amorphous carbon films at P = 20 mTorr to ultra-low density nanoporous material at P = 380 mTorr. Subsequently, the nanostructural, chemical and electrical properties of metal containing nanoporous carbon samples were investigated by ablating graphite targets containing known contents of Ni and Co. We demon...

  11. Structural and chemical investigation of CdSe crystals deposited in a nanoporous sol-gel: Effect of chemistry and defects on photovoltaic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoporous cadmium selenide films were prepared by electro crystallization inside a nanoporous SiO2 network, prepared by a sol-gel process on an electrically conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. Subsequent removal of the SiO2 template should, according to literature reports, give a nanoporous network of CdSe in electronic contact with the substrate. The structure/morphology of the film was explored during the preparative steps by grazing incidence small/wide angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The chemistry was studied by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry methodologies, such as imaging and depth profiling that maps the in-plane and in-depth distribution of chemistry, i.e. full 3-dimensional chemical imaging of the nanoporous CdSe layer. Finally, the nanoporous CdSe films were tested as electron conductors in hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells employing CdSe as the electron conductor and poly-3-hexylthiophene as the hole conductor. ITO and gold served as the electrodes. It was found that removal of the SiO2 from the micellar SiO2-CdSe nanostructure led to a collapse of the resulting CdSe structure with a poor structural conservation. Furthermore, a high pinhole density in the sol-gel resulted in a high degree of shunting paths that led to poor photovoltaic properties

  12. Noncovalent functionalization of solid-state nanopores via self-assembly of amphipols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mitta, Gonzalo; Burr, Loïc; Tuninetti, Jimena S.; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the development of new methods for conferring functional features to nanopore-based fluidic devices. In this work, we describe for the first time the noncovalent integration of amphoteric-amphipathic polymers, also known as ``amphipols'', into single conical nanopores in order to obtain signal-responsive chemical nanodevices. Highly-tapered conical nanopores were fabricated by single-sided chemical etching of polycarbonate foils. After etching, the surface of the conical nanopores was chemically modified, by first metallizing the surface via gold sputtering and then by amphiphilic self-assembly of the amphipol. The net charge of adsorbed amphipols was regulated via pH changes under the environmental conditions. The pH-dependent chemical equilibrium of the weak acidic and basic monomers facilitates the regulation of the ionic transport through the nanopore by adjusting the pH of the electrolyte solution. Our results demonstrate that functional amphipathic polymers are powerful building blocks for the surface modification of nanopores and might ultimately pave the way to a new means of integrating functional and/or responsive units within nanofluidic structures.In recent years there has been increasing interest in the development of new methods for conferring functional features to nanopore-based fluidic devices. In this work, we describe for the first time the noncovalent integration of amphoteric-amphipathic polymers, also known as ``amphipols'', into single conical nanopores in order to obtain signal-responsive chemical nanodevices. Highly-tapered conical nanopores were fabricated by single-sided chemical etching of polycarbonate foils. After etching, the surface of the conical nanopores was chemically modified, by first metallizing the surface via gold sputtering and then by amphiphilic self-assembly of the amphipol. The net charge of adsorbed amphipols was regulated via pH changes under the environmental

  13. Chemical reactivity of self-organized alumina nanopores in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, E., E-mail: emmanuel.rocca@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Department CP2S, Nancy University, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Vantelon, D. [Synchrotron Soleil, l' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gehin, A. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR CNRS 7198, Department CP2S, Nancy University, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Augros, M.; Viola, A. [Messier-Bugatti (Safran Group), 5 Rue Antoine St Exupery, 67129 Molsheim (France)

    2011-02-15

    This work is devoted to the characterization of the structure and chemistry of small self-organized nanopores of aluminum oxide in aqueous medium (diameter <20 nm). A structural model based on AlO{sub 4}/AlO{sub 6} clusters is proposed to describe the amorphous oxide constituting the walls of the nanostructure. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy measurements, electrokinetic measurements and O{sup 18} tracer experiments bring to light the structural changes and the specific diffusion mechanism in the nanometer network. Immersion in boiling water induces both the transformation of AlO{sub 4} to AlO{sub 6} clusters and the release of sulfate species by hydrolysis. Water molecules rapidly diffuse in the nanostructure, but ion diffusion is selective because of surface positive charges and overlap of the surface electric field in very small pores.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  15. The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion track nanopores in polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Y. U.; Apel, P. Y. U.

    2010-11-01

    The use of surfactants in etching of the track membranes (TMs) enables one to control the pore shape in TMs. This technique is useful to improve flow rate, and to optimize the retention and permeation properties of TMs. The addition of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulphonate (SDDD), to etching solutions leads to the highly tapered pore shape in TMs of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET). To understand the mechanism of the surfactant effect on track etching in the nanometer range, we study the diffusion and adsorption of SDDD on non-etched non-porous, etched non-porous and etched porous PET films. The comparison of non-etched non-porous and etched non-porous films shows the effect of negatively charged surface on the adsorption of surfactant. The comparison of etched non-porous and etched porous PET films shows the different adsorption on film surface and inner wall of nanopore, thus the influence of curvature of the surface on the adsorption of surfactant molecules.

  16. The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion track nanopores in polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of surfactants in etching of the track membranes (TMs) enables one to control the pore shape in TMs. This technique is useful to improve flow rate, and to optimize the retention and permeation properties of TMs. The addition of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulphonate (SDDD), to etching solutions leads to the highly tapered pore shape in TMs of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET). To understand the mechanism of the surfactant effect on track etching in the nanometer range, we study the diffusion and adsorption of SDDD on non-etched non-porous, etched non-porous and etched porous PET films. The comparison of non-etched non-porous and etched non-porous films shows the effect of negatively charged surface on the adsorption of surfactant. The comparison of etched non-porous and etched porous PET films shows the different adsorption on film surface and inner wall of nanopore, thus the influence of curvature of the surface on the adsorption of surfactant molecules.

  17. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors: towards a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Bala Murali; Polans, James; Comer, Jeffrey; Sridhar, Supriya; Wendell, David; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Bashir, Rashid

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are highly versatile platforms for the rapid, label-free electrical detection and analysis of single molecules, applicable to next generation DNA sequencing. The versatility of this technology allows for both large scale device integration and interfacing with biological systems. Here we report on the development of a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore platform that incorporates a highly mobile lipid bilayer on a single solid-state Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensor, for the potential reconstitution of ion channels and biological nanopores. Such a system seeks to combine the superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical stability of Al(2)O(3) solid-state nanopores with the chemical specificity of biological nanopores. Bilayers on Al(2)O(3) exhibit higher diffusivity than those formed on TiO(2) and SiO(2) substrates, attributed to the presence of a thick hydration layer on Al(2)O(3), a key requirement to preserving the biological functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the electrostatic repulsion between the dipole of the DOPC headgroup and the positively charged Al(2)O(3) surface may be responsible for the enhanced thickness of this hydration layer. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors exhibit excellent electrical properties and enhanced mechanical stability (GΩ seals for over 50 h), making this technology ideal for use in ion channel electrophysiology, the screening of ion channel active drugs and future integration with biological nanopores such as α-hemolysin and MspA for rapid single molecule DNA sequencing. This technology can find broad application in bio-nanotechnology. PMID:21487665

  18. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  19. A Density Functional Theory study of the chemical surface modification of {beta}-SiC nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvino, M.; Trejo, A.; Cuevas, J.L.; Carvajal, E.; Duchen, G.I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIME-Culhuacan, Av. Santa Ana 1000, 04430, D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Irisson, M., E-mail: irisson@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIME-Culhuacan, Av. Santa Ana 1000, 04430, D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    The dependence of the electronic band structure and density of states on the chemical surface passivation of cubic porous silicon carbide (PSiC) is investigated by means of the ab-initio Density Functional Theory and the supercell method in which pores with different sizes and morphologies were created. The porous structures were modeled by removing atoms in the [0 0 1] direction producing two different surface chemistries; one with both Silicon (Si) and Carbon (C) atoms and the other with only Si or C atoms. The changes in the electronic band gap due to a Si-rich and C-rich phase in the porous surfaces are studied with two kind of surface passivation, one with hydrogen atoms and other with a combination between hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The calculations show that for the hydrogenated case, the band gap is larger for the C-rich than for the Si-rich case. For the partial oxygenation the tendency is contrary, by decreasing and increasing the band gap for the C-rich and Si-rich configuration, respectively, according to the percentage of oxygen in the pore surface.

  20. Method to fabricate functionalized conical nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Leo J.; Spoerke, Erik David; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-07-12

    A pressure-based chemical etch method is used to shape polymer nanopores into cones. By varying the pressure, the pore tip diameter can be controlled, while the pore base diameter is largely unaffected. The method provides an easy, low-cost approach for conically etching high density nanopores.

  1. Molecular-Level Simulations of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium and Diffusion in Slit and Cylindrical Nanopores: Model Dimerisation Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Předota, Milan; Brennan, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 13 (2013), s. 1103-1120. ISSN 0892-7022 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08651S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : molecular dynamics * reaction ensemble Monte Carlo * slit and cylindrical nanopores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.119, year: 2013

  2. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  3. Molecular-level Simulations of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium for Nitric Oxide Dimerization Reaction in Disordered Nanoporous Carbons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Cosoli, P.; Smith, W. R.; Jain, S.K.; Gubbins, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 272, 1-2 (2008), s. 18-31. ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0094; GA AV ČR 1ET400720409; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR KAN400720701; GA AV ČR IAA400720710 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous carbon * adsorption model * remc Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.699, year: 2008

  4. Motivation of chemical industry social responsibility through Responsible Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givel, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Advocates of corporate social responsibility argue corporations should not only meet the needs of shareholders, but other key stakeholders including the community, customers, suppliers, and employees. Since 1988, the chemical industry has engaged in a major self-regulatory "Responsible Care" industry-wide social responsibility campaign to ensure environmental, public health, safety, and security performance among member companies. Contrary to the arguments of advocates of corporate social responsibility that such efforts meet the needs of stakeholders other than shareholders such as the community, the primary goal of the Responsible Care effort has been to change public concerns and opinion about chemical industry environmental and public health practices while also opposing support for stronger and more expensive public health and environmental legislation and regulation of chemical products, even if warranted. PMID:16797774

  5. Facile chemical synthesis of nanoporous layered δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film for high-performance flexible electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yu; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Xionghua; Zheng, Yanfeng [The Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Zhenxing, E-mail: chenzx65@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Layered δ-MnO{sub 2} thin films with a three-dimensional nanostructure are successfully fabricated on stainless steel foil substrates for flexible electrochemical capacitors by a facile and effective chemical bath deposition technology from ethanol and potassium permanganate solution at 15 °C. The as-prepared thin films display nanoporous morphology and a water contact angle of 20°. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses reveal that the thin films are composed of δ-MnO{sub 2}. Electrochemical data demonstrate that the δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film electrodes can deliver a high special capacitance of 447 F/g at 2 mV/s, and provide a good capacitance retention ratio of 87% after 1000 continuous cycles at 10 mV/s in 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Compressive and tensile bending tests show that the as-prepared electrodes can steadily work over a wide range of applied curvatures between −2.5 cm{sup −1} (tension) and 2.5 cm{sup −1} (compression). Only a small decrease in special capacitance (0.9% at a curvature of 2.5 cm{sup −1} under compressive strain, or 1.2% at a curvature of −2.5 cm{sup −1} under tensile strain) is observed even after bending for 200 cycles, indicating the excellent mechanical flexibility and electrochemical stability of the δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film electrodes.

  6. Design, chirality, and flexibility in nanoporous molecule-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, D; Claridge, J B; Cussen, E J; Prior, T J; Rosseinsky, M J

    2005-04-01

    Scientific and technological interest in porous materials with molecule-sized channels and cavities has led to an intense search for controlled chemical routes to systems with specific properties. This Account details our work on directing the assembly of open-framework structures based on molecules and investigating how the response of nanoporous examples of such materials to guests differs from classical rigid porous systems. The stabilization of chiral nanoporosity by a hierarchy of interactions that both direct and maintain a helical open-framework structure exemplifies the approach. PMID:15835874

  7. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  8. Nanoporous gold microelectrode prepared from potential modulated electrochemical alloying–dealloying in ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A green chemistry method for producing nanoporous gold microelectrode was studied. • An ionic liquid plating bath was utilized for electrochemical alloying–dealloying. • Nanostructures of gold surface layers can be tuned by modulating potential. • Nanoporous gold microelectrode has high surface area and merit of a microelectrode. • Nitrite oxidation and reduction on nanoporous gold microelectrode were studied. -- Abstract: Nanoporous gold (NPG) microelectrodes with high surface area and open pore network were successfully prepared by applying modulated potential to a polycrystalline Au-disk microelectrode in ionic liquid electrolyte containing ZnCl2 at elevated temperature. During cathodic process, Zn is electrodeposited and interacted with Au microdisk substrate to form a AuZn alloy phase. During subsequent anodic process, Zn is selectively dissolved from the alloy phase, leading to the formation of a NPG layer which can grow with repetitive potential modulation. Scanning-electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray microscope measurements show that the NPG microelectrodes possessing nanoporous structures can be tuned via potential modulation, and chemically contain a small amount of Zn whose presence has no obvious influence on electrochemical responses of the electrodes. Steady-state and cyclic voltammetric studies suggest that the NPG microelectrodes have high surface area and keep diffusional properties of a microelectrode. Electrochemical nitrite reduction and oxidation are studied as model reactions to demonstrate potential applications of the NPG microelectrodes in electrocatalysis and electroanalysis. These facts suggest that the potential-modulated electrochemical alloying/dealloying in ionic liquid electrolyte offers a convenient green-chemistry method for the preparation of nanoporous microelectrodes

  9. Enhanced MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast response and bone formation on the addition of nano-needle and nano-porous features to microtopographical titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro/nanotopographical modifications on titanium surfaces constitute a new process to increase osteoblast response to enhance bone formation. In this study, we utilized alkali heat treatment at high (SB-AH1) and low temperatures (SB-AH2) to nano-modify sandblasted titanium with microtopographical surfaces. Then, we evaluated the surface properties, biocompatibility and osteogenic capability of SB-AH1 and SB-AH2 in vitro and in vivo, and compared these with conventional sandblast-acid etching (SLA) and Ti control surfaces. SB-AH1 and SB-AH2 surfaces exhibited micro/nanotopographical modifications of nano-needle structures and nano-porous network layers, respectively, compared with the sole microtopographical surface of macro and micro pits on the SLA surface and the relatively smooth surface on the Ti control. SB-AH1 and SB-AH2 showed different roughness and elemental components, but similar wettability. MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts anchored closely on the nanostructures of SB-AH1 and SB-AH2 surfaces, and these two surfaces more significantly enhanced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than others, while the SB-AH2 surface exhibited better cell proliferation and higher ALP activity than SB-AH1. All four groups of titanium domes with self-tapping screws were implanted in rabbit calvarial bone models, and these indicated that SB-AH1 and SB-AH2 surfaces achieved better peri-implant bone formation and implant stability, while the SB-AH2 surface achieved the best percentage of bone-implant contact (BIC%). Our study demonstrated that the micro/nanotopographical surface generated by sandblasting and alkali heat treatment significantly enhanced preosteoblast proliferation, ALP activity and bone formation in vitro and in vivo, and nano-porous network topography may further induce better preosteoblast proliferation, ALP activity and BIC%. (paper)

  10. Chemicals and corporate social responsibility: Is there a fit?

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Lorna E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the author develops an argument for the adoption of Corporate Social Responsibility by Canadian Chemical industry firms. The majority of Canadian firms in the chemical industry are members of the Canadian Chemical Producer's Association and a requirement of that membership is the adoption of Responsible Care. Responsible Care is a riskbased initiative that applies to all facets of the chemical business throughout product lifecycles. This paper provides a comparison of Responsib...

  11. Recent advances in nanopore sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, Raj D.; Kim, Jungsuk; Dunbar, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of nanopores as a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform has been a topic of growing interest and considerable government-sponsored research for more than a decade. Oxford Nanopore Technologies recently announced the first commercial nanopore sequencing devices, to be made available by the end of 2012, while other companies (Life, Roche, IBM) are also pursuing nanopore sequencing approaches. In this paper, the state of the art in nanopore sequencing is reviewed, focusing on th...

  12. Conical nanopore membranes: solvent shaping of nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have undertaken a systematic investigation of the influence of ethanol on the shape of conical pores produced by the track-etch technique in poly(ethylene terephthalate) films. We have found that the cone angle of the conical nanopore generated is dependent on the amount of ethanol present in an alkaline etching solution. By varying the percentage of ethanol in the etch solution, precise control over the geometry of the conical nanopore and nanomaterials templated within these pores can be attained. We prove this by plating gold nanocones within the various conical nanopores prepared, dissolving the membrane to liberate the nanocones, and imaging the nanocones using scanning electron microscopy. The results of these investigations are reported here

  13. Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

    2007-11-28

    Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect

  14. Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Alon; Kuhn, Heiko; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim; Meller, Amit

    2010-11-17

    The ability to detect and measure dsDNA thermal fluctuations is of immense importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for transcription and replication regulation. We describe here the ability of solid-state nanopores to detect sub-nanometer changes in DNA structure as a result of chemically enhanced thermal fluctuations. In this study, we investigate the subtle changes in the mean effective diameter of a dsDNA molecule with 3-5 nm solid-state nanopores as a function of urea concentration and the DNA's AT content. Our studies reveal an increase in the mean effective diameter of a DNA molecule of approximately 0.6 nm at 8.7 M urea. In agreement with the mechanism of DNA local denaturation, we observe a sigmoid dependence of these effects on urea concentration. We find that the translocation times in urea are markedly slower than would be expected if the dynamics were governed primarily by viscous effects. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of the nanopore is sufficient to statistically differentiate between DNA molecules of nearly identical lengths differing only in sequence and AT content when placed in 3.5 M urea. Our results demonstrate that nanopores can detect subtle structural changes and are thus a valuable tool for detecting differences in biomolecules' environment. PMID:21339599

  15. Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to detect and measure dsDNA thermal fluctuations is of immense importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for transcription and replication regulation. We describe here the ability of solid-state nanopores to detect sub-nanometer changes in DNA structure as a result of chemically enhanced thermal fluctuations. In this study, we investigate the subtle changes in the mean effective diameter of a dsDNA molecule with 3-5 nm solid-state nanopores as a function of urea concentration and the DNA's AT content. Our studies reveal an increase in the mean effective diameter of a DNA molecule of approximately 0.6 nm at 8.7 M urea. In agreement with the mechanism of DNA local denaturation, we observe a sigmoid dependence of these effects on urea concentration. We find that the translocation times in urea are markedly slower than would be expected if the dynamics were governed primarily by viscous effects. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of the nanopore is sufficient to statistically differentiate between DNA molecules of nearly identical lengths differing only in sequence and AT content when placed in 3.5 M urea. Our results demonstrate that nanopores can detect subtle structural changes and are thus a valuable tool for detecting differences in biomolecules' environment.

  16. Thin Nanoporous Metal-Insulator-Metal Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Morteza; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-02-24

    Insulating nanoporous materials are promising platforms for soft-ionizing membranes; however, improvement in fabrication processes and the quality and high breakdown resistance of the thin insulator layers are needed for high integration and performance. Here, scalable fabrication of highly porous, thin, silicon dioxide membranes with controlled thickness is demonstrated using plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition. The fabricated membranes exhibit good insulating properties with a breakdown voltage of 1 × 10(7) V/cm. Our calculations suggest that the average electric field inside a nanopore of the membranes can be as high as 1 × 10(6) V/cm; sufficient for ionization of wide range of molecules. These metal-insulator-metal nanoporous arrays are promising for applications such soft ionizing membranes for mass spectroscopy. PMID:26846250

  17. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian; Nguyen, Vinh

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  18. Nanoporous microscale microbial incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhifei; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals abundant microbial diversity that has not been cultured in the laboratory. Many attribute this so-called 'great plate count anomaly' to traditional microbial cultivation techniques, which largely facilitate the growth of a single species. Yet, it is widely recognized that bacteria in nature exist in complex communities. One technique to increase the pool of cultivated bacterial species is to co-culture multiple species in a simulated natural environment. Here, we present nanoporous microscale microbial incubators (NMMI) that enable high-throughput screening and real-time observation of multi-species co-culture. The key innovation in NMMI is that they facilitate inter-species communication while maintaining physical isolation between species, which is ideal for genomic analysis. Co-culture of a quorum sensing pair demonstrates that the NMMI can be used to culture multiple species in chemical communication while monitoring the growth dynamics of individual species. PMID:26584739

  19. Chemical agents and the immune response.

    OpenAIRE

    Luster, M I; Rosenthal, G J

    1993-01-01

    Our desire to understand the potential adverse human health effects of environmental chemical exposure has coincided with an increased understanding of the immune system and an appreciation of its complex regulatory network. This has spawned a broad interest in the area of immunotoxicology within the scientific community as well as certain concerns in the public sector regarding chemical-induced hypersensitivity and immunosuppression. The incidence of alleged human sensitization to chemicals ...

  20. Hydrophilic nanoporous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present application discloses a method for preparing and rendering hydrophilic a nanoporous material of a polymer matrix which has a porosity of 0.1-90 percent (v/v), such that the ratio between the final water absorption (percent (w/w)) and the porosity (percent (v/v)) is at least 0.05, the...... method comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a precursor material comprising at least one polymeric component and having a first phase and a second phase; (b) removal of at least a part of the first phase of the precursor material prepared in step (a) so as to leave behind a nanoporous material of the...... polymer matrix; (c) irradiating at least a part of said nanoporous material with light of a wave length of in the range of 250-400 nm (or 200-700 nm) in the presence of oxygen and/or ozone. Corresponding hydrophilic nanoporous materials are also disclosed. L...

  1. 1/f noise in graphene nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene nanopores are receiving great attention due to their atomically thin membranes and intrinsic electrical properties that appear greatly beneficial for biosensing and DNA sequencing. Here, we present an extensive study of the low-frequency 1/f noise in the ionic current through graphene nanopores and compare it to noise levels in silicon nitride pore currents. We find that the 1/f noise magnitude is very high for graphene nanopores: typically two orders of magnitude higher than for silicon nitride pores. This is a drawback as it significantly lowers the signal-to-noise ratio in DNA translocation experiments. We evaluate possible explanations for these exceptionally high noise levels in graphene pores. From examining the noise for pores of different diameters and at various salt concentrations, we find that in contrast to silicon nitride pores, the 1/f noise in graphene pores does not follow Hooge’s relation. In addition, from studying the dependence on the buffer pH, we show that the increased noise cannot be explained by charge fluctuations of chemical groups on the pore rim. Finally, we compare single and bilayer graphene to few-layer and multi-layer graphene and boron nitride (h-BN), and we find that the noise reduces with layer thickness for both materials, which suggests that mechanical fluctuations may be the underlying cause of the high 1/f noise levels in monolayer graphene nanopore devices. (paper)

  2. Meso-/Nanoporous Semiconducting Metal Oxides for Gas Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and/or design of new materials and/or structures for effective gas sensor applications with fast response and high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability are very important issues in the gas sensor technology. This critical review introduces our recent progress in the development of meso-/nanoporous semiconducting metal oxides and their applications to gas sensors. First, the basic concepts of resistive gas sensors and the recent synthesis of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for gas sensor applications are introduced. The advantages of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides are also presented, taking into account the crystallinity and ordered/disordered porous structures. Second, the synthesis methods of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides including the soft-template, hard-template, and temple-free methods are introduced, in which the advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are figured out. Third, the applications of meso-/nanoporous metal oxides as gas sensors are presented. The gas nanosensors are designed based on meso-/nanoporous metal oxides for effective detection of toxic gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the meso-/nanoporous gas nanosensors are also discussed. Finally, some conclusions and an outlook are presented.

  3. Bivalent ion transport through graphene/PET nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huijun; Cheng, Yaxiong; Zeng, Jian; Mo, Dan; Duan, Jinglai; Liu, Jiande; Zhai, Pengfei; Sun, Youmei; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The PET suspended single graphene nanopore (G/PET) was produced by heavy ion irradiation and asymmetric chemical etching. The solutions of NiSO4, NiCl2, CuSO4 and CuCl2 with different concentration were adopted to study the transport properties of bivalent ion in single G/PET nanopore by measuring the I-V curves. The perfect "diode effect" and excellent rectification effect of G/PET nanopore were observed, and the huge rectification ratio up to 43.3 was obtained in NiSO4 solution. The great solution selectivity and ion current magnification effect of graphene/PET nanopore were also confirmed in our study.

  4. Chemical Leasing business models and corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Frank; Jakl, Thomas; Joas, Reihard; Dondi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Chemical Leasing is a service-oriented business model that shifts the focus from increasing sales volume of chemicals towards a value-added approach. Recent pilot projects have shown the economic benefits of introducing Chemical Leasing business models in a broad range of sectors. A decade after its introduction, the promotion of Chemical Leasing is still predominantly done by the public sector and international organizations. We show in this paper that awareness-raising activities to disseminate information on this innovative business model mainly focus on the economic benefits. We argue that selling Chemical Leasing business models solely on the grounds of economic and ecological considerations falls short of branding it as a corporate social responsibility initiative, which, for this paper, is defined as a stakeholder-oriented concept that extends beyond the organization's boundaries and is driven by an ethical understanding of the organization's responsibility for the impact of its business activities. For the analysis of Chemical Leasing business models, we introduce two case studies from the water purification and metal degreasing fields, focusing on employees and local communities as two specific stakeholder groups of the company introducing Chemical Leasing. The paper seeks to demonstrate that Chemical Leasing business models can be branded as a corporate social responsibility initiative by outlining the vast potential of Chemical Leasing to improve occupational health and safety and to strengthen the ability of companies to protect the environment from the adverse effects of the chemicals they apply. PMID:24943884

  5. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I. PMID:27111839

  6. Chemical spill response during the Ievoli Sun incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ievoli Sun was an Italian chemical tanker that sank off the north west coast of France on October 30, 2000, leaving behind a chemical spill of 4412 m3 of styrene, 1254 m3 of methyl ethyl ketone and 1268 m3 of isopropyl alcohol as well as 180 m3 of intermediate fuel oil and 62 m3 of marine gas oil. The incident provided a major test for the marine chemical response capabilities in the United Kingdom and France and underlined the need for 24 hour access to expert advice on the fate and hazards of marine chemical spills. During the incident the National Chemical Emergency Centre carried out assessments of chemical hazards, undertook numerical modelling to evaluate the fate of the chemical and oil spills, analyzed samples and mobilized atmospheric monitoring equipment. In the initial stages, the main focus was on the safety of response crews and local populations. Mathematical models were used to help in the preparation of a spill response. In particular, the ChemSIS model, a validated tool that can be used for marine chemical spills, was used to predict the environmental behaviour of the chemicals. The safety critical nature of the operational decisions made using such tools places much importance on the need for appropriate field validation. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs

  7. Chemical spill response during the Ievoli Sun incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corps, J.M.; Davies, L. [National Chemical Emergency Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The Ievoli Sun was an Italian chemical tanker that sank off the north west coast of France on October 30, 2000, leaving behind a chemical spill of 4412 m{sup 3} of styrene, 1254 m{sup 3} of methyl ethyl ketone and 1268 m{sup 3} of isopropyl alcohol as well as 180 m{sup 3} of intermediate fuel oil and 62 m{sup 3} of marine gas oil. The incident provided a major test for the marine chemical response capabilities in the United Kingdom and France and underlined the need for 24 hour access to expert advice on the fate and hazards of marine chemical spills. During the incident the National Chemical Emergency Centre carried out assessments of chemical hazards, undertook numerical modelling to evaluate the fate of the chemical and oil spills, analyzed samples and mobilized atmospheric monitoring equipment. In the initial stages, the main focus was on the safety of response crews and local populations. Mathematical models were used to help in the preparation of a spill response. In particular, the ChemSIS model, a validated tool that can be used for marine chemical spills, was used to predict the environmental behaviour of the chemicals. The safety critical nature of the operational decisions made using such tools places much importance on the need for appropriate field validation. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  8. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Molin, Søren; Yang, Liang;

    2013-01-01

    -b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment...

  9. Local solid-state modification of nanopore surface charges

    CERN Document Server

    Kox, Ronald; Chen, Chang; Arjmandi, Nima; Lagae, Liesbet; Borghs, Gustaaf; 10.1088/0957-4484/21/33/335703

    2012-01-01

    The last decade, nanopores have emerged as a new and interesting tool for the study of biological macromolecules like proteins and DNA. While biological pores, especially alpha-hemolysin, have been promising for the detection of DNA, their poor chemical stability limits their use. For this reason, researchers are trying to mimic their behaviour using more stable, solid-state nanopores. The most successful tools to fabricate such nanopores use high energy electron or ions beams to drill or reshape holes in very thin membranes. While the resolution of these methods can be very good, they require tools that are not commonly available and tend to damage and charge the nanopore surface. In this work, we show nanopores that have been fabricated using standard micromachning techniques together with EBID, and present a simple model that is used to estimate the surface charge. The results show that EBID with a silicon oxide precursor can be used to tune the nanopore surface and that the surface charge is stable over a...

  10. Photocatalytic activity of Pt-modified Bi2WO6 nanoporous wall under sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, Bi2WO6 nanoporous wall was synthesized by using Bi2O3 as template and Bi source. Pt nanoparticles whose average size is about 8 nm were further immobilized on the Bi2WO6 nanoporous wall via a simple chemical reduction process. Their photocatalytic activity and the effect of Pt modification were studied by analyzing the degradation of an organic dye, rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), under simulated sunlight. It was found that the photocatalytic ability of Bi2WO6 nanoporous wall was enhanced by introducing Pt nanoparticles. Bare Bi2WO6 shows a degradation efficiency of 78 % after 1 h, while the degradation efficiency of 5 wt% Pt-modified Bi2WO6 was 99 %, and on further increasing the Pt content in the as-prepared Pt-modified Bi2WO6 catalysts, their photocatalytic ability will decrease. The optimal catalyst could be reused without any decrease for five cycles, which may due to Pt be able to help trap the conduction band electrons in the absence of Rh6G. A possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed and further proved by transient photocurrent response experiment

  11. Controlling molecular transport through nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2011-01-01

    Nanopores are emerging as powerful tools for the detection and identification of macromolecules in aqueous solution. In this review, we discuss the recent development of active and passive controls over molecular transport through nanopores with emphasis on biosensing applications. We give an overview of the solutions developed to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the resistive-pulse technique based on biological and solid-state nanopores.

  12. Particle dynamics in nanopore systems

    OpenAIRE

    Krems, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, I discuss various aspects of the dynamics of charged particles in nanopore systems. In recent years, there have been numerous studies of organic and inorganic nanopores. Nonetheless, there is still much to be understood about these systems. I begin by summarizing some of the important literature on nanopore systems as well as the dynamics of ions in aqueous solutions. An important tool for studying these systems at the nanoscopic level has been molecular dynamics. Some o...

  13. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERATION OF NANOPOROUS SILICA FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷明志; 张良莹; 姚熹

    2003-01-01

    Colloidal silica sol is formed by a novel hydrolyzing procedure of tetraethyl-orthosilicate(TEOS) catalyzing with NH3*H2O in aqueous mediums. Glycerol, combining with the hydrolyzed intermediates of TEOS, controls growing of the silica particles; poly(vinyl-vinyl alcohol makes the colloidal silica sol with polymeric structure and spinning, thermal strain makes the gel silica film changed into a nanoporous structure with diameter ranging 50-150 nm. Morphologies of the nanoporous silica film have been characterized; the porosities (%) is 32-64; the average dielectric constant at 1MHz region is 2.0 and 2.1; the thermal conductivity is less than 0.8. Chemical mechanism of the sol-gel process is discussed.

  14. Gyroid Nanoporous Membranes with Tunable Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Schulte, Lars; Clausen, Lydia D.;

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relevant permeability properties of ultrafiltration membranes is facilitated by using materials and procedures that allow a high degree of control on morphology and chemical composition. Here we present the first study on diffusion permeability through gyroid nanoporous cross...... chemistry of 1,2-PB nanoporous membranes can be controlled, for example, by hydrophilic patterning of the originally hydrophobic membranes, which allows for different active porosity toward aqueous solutions and, therefore, different permeability. The membrane selectivity is evaluated by comparing the...... effective diffusion coefficients of a series of antibiotics, proteins, and other biomolecules; solute permeation is discussed in terms of hindered diffusion. The combination of uniform bulk morphology, isotropically percolating porosity, controlled surface chemistry, and tunable permeability is distinctive...

  15. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    amphiphilic principles used in the foldamer catalysts were extended to a few other systems, particularly to interfacially cross-linked reverse micelles and micelles. These features enabled unusual catalytic features such as basic/nucleophilic catalysis under acidic conditions. We were able to create highly active metal nanoclusters catalysts whose local environment could be tuned by the organic framework. We were even able to create a “catalytic nanomachine” that grabs the substrate to the encapsulated Au clusters, which efficiently convert the substrate to the product that is rapidly ejected due to its different binding properties. Our research has important impacts on fundamental and applied energy-related sciences. On the fundamental level, it tests important biocatalytic principles on relatively simple synthetic systems and is expected to afford deeper understanding of biological catalysis. On the practical level, the research is anticipated to lead to “smart” catalysts and open up exiting applications in chemical analysis, reaction control, and materials synthesis. Part 2. Electrochemical Reduction of CO₂ The primary objective of our research involving the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide is to apply a multidisciplinary approach toward developing a greater understanding of the problem of efficiently converting CO₂ to hydrocarbons through electrochemical routes. Our goal is to provide a better understanding of the principles that underlie the electrocatalytic reduction of CO₂ at electrode surfaces and the molecular pathways that lead to desired compounds. This understanding is essential for the design and development of new catalytic materials for the selective production of renewable feedstocks. The electrochemical reduction of CO₂ involves the formation of various reaction products and adsorbed intermediates whose distribution depends upon the nature of the electrode material and the electrochemical conditions, including applied potential

  16. Nanopore sensors for DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Venkatesan, B.M.; Shim, Jeong;

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene-based, and functionali......Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene...

  17. Capacitive humidity sensing properties of carbon nanotubes grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG WeiFen; XIAO ShunHua; ZHANG HuanYun; DONG YongFen; LI XinJian

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition method, and the structural and capacitive humidity sensing properties of CNT/Si-NPA were studied. It was found that with the relative humidity (RH) changing from 11% to 95%, a device response of ~480% was achieved at the frequency of 50000 Hz, and a linear device response curve could be obtained by adopting longitudinal logarithmic coordinate. The response/recovery times were measured to be ~20 s and ~10 s, respectively, which indicated a rather fast response/recovery rate. The adsorption-desorption dynamic cycle experiments demonstrated the high measurement reproducibility of CNT/Si-NPA sensors. These excellent performances were attributed to the unique surface structure, morphology and chemical inertness of CNT/Si-NPA.

  18. Capacitive humidity sensing properties of carbon nanotubes grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition method, and the structural and capacitive humidity sensing properties of CNT/Si-NPA were studied. It was found that with the relative humidity (RH) changing from 11% to 95%, a device re-sponse of ~480% was achieved at the frequency of 50000 Hz, and a linear device response curve could be obtained by adopting longitudinal logarithmic coordinate. The response/recovery times were measured to be ~20 s and ~10 s, respectively, which indicated a rather fast response/recovery rate. The adsorption-desorption dynamic cycle experiments demonstrated the high measurement reproducibility of CNT/Si-NPA sensors. These excellent performances were attributed to the unique surface structure, morphology and chemical inertness of CNT/Si-NPA.

  19. In-Situ Creation of Solid State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Kyle; Kwok, Harold; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in nanopore technology have demonstrated that they are a powerful tool for single biomolecule analysis, and great progress has been made toward the promise of nanopore-based DNA sequencing devices. A limiting factor in solid-state nanopore science is the complexity, throughput and cost of current fabrication methods, based on focused ion or election beam drilling, which require sophisticated equipment and highly trained personnel. Our laboratory at the University of Ottawa has demonstrated a simple and extremely low cost method to fabricate individual nanopores on thin solid-state membranes. By controlling an applied voltage across the membrane in aqueous salt solution, we are able to routinely create sub-5nm pores in dielectric membranes. In addition, the method can easily be extended to tune nanopore size with sub-nm precision. We will describe the fabrication method in detail, and present the effects of electric field strength, membrane material, solution salt composition, concentration and pH on the pore creation time and size distribution. These results allow us to elucidate the physical mechanisms responsible for nanopore formation.

  20. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  1. Fabrication of nanopore on pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong Soo, E-mail: sscphy2010@gmail.com [Department of Nanoscience and Instrument Center, SunMoon University, Ahsan 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Myong-Jin; Yamaguchi, Tokutaro [Department of Nanoscience and Instrument Center, SunMoon University, Ahsan 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-In; Park, Kyung-Jin [Team for Measurement and Analysis, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nam Kyoo [School of Electrical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Au nanopores on the apex of the pyramidal structure were fabricated. • The nanopore formations dependent upon the electron currents, the primary electron voltage, and the scan rate were examined. • Nanopore formation using focused ion beam was also investigated. - Abstract: There have been tremendous interests about the fabrication of metallic nanopore due to the ultrafast genome sequencing biosensor capability. In this report, the fabrication of the nanopore on the Au coated SiO{sub 2} pyramid has been examined using various high energy electron beam irradiation and focused ion beam (FIB) milling techniques. The microfabricated Au nano-apertures on pyramid were irradiated with various high energy electron beam and FIB techniques. The formation of the nanopore dependent on the probe current was also examined using electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The nanopore on the Au coated SiO{sub 2} pyramid is found to be an Au-Si mixture. The Au nanopore on the crater type hole was also fabricated using FIB Ga ion beam scanning. The shrinking rate was found to be the fastest compared with those fabricated with the other electron beam techniques.

  2. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  3. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S, E-mail: zsiwy@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  4. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  5. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    Nanoporous metal-based solids are of particular interest because they combine a large quantity of surface metal sites, interconnected porous networks, and nanosized crystalline walls, thus exhibiting unique physical and chemical properties compared to other nanostructures and bulk counterparts. Among all of the synthetic approaches, nanocasting has proven to be a highly effective method for the syntheses of metal oxides with three-dimensionally ordered porous structures and crystalline walls. A typical procedure involves a thermal annealing process of a porous silica template filled with an inorganic precursor (often a metal nitrate salt), which converts the precursor into a desired phase within the silica pores. The final step is the selective removal of the silica template in either a strong base or a hydrofluoric acid solution. In the past decade, nanocasting has become a popular synthetic approach and has enabled the syntheses of a variety of nanoporous metal oxides. However, there is still a lack of synthetic methods to fabricate nanoporous materials beyond simple metal oxides. Therefore, the development of new synthetic strategies beyond nanocasting has become an important direction. This Account describes new progress in the preparation of novel nanoporous metal-based solids for heterogeneous catalysis. The discussion begins with a method called dealloying, an effective method to synthesize nanoporous metals. The starting material is a metallic alloy containing two or more elements followed by a selective chemical or electrochemical leaching process that removes one of the preferential elements, resulting in a highly porous structure. Nanoporous metals, such as Cu, Ag, and CuTi, exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic properties in carbon dioxide reduction, oxygen reduction, and hydrogen evolution reactions. In addition, the syntheses of metal oxides with hierarchical porous structures are also discussed. On the basis of the choice of hard template, nanoporous

  6. Chemosensory perception, symptoms and autonomic responses during chemical exposure in multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna Sara; Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a prevalent medically unexplained symptom characterized by symptom reactions to everyday chemical exposure below hygienic thresholds. The aim of this study was to investigate the expressions of hyper-reactivity in MCS during whole-body exposure to l...... found for breathing rate or tonic electrodermal activity responses. Conclusions: We conclude that MCS sufferers differ from healthy controls in terms of autonomic responses, symptoms and chemosensory perception during chemical exposure......./m3. Results: MCS participants, compared with controls, reported greater perceived odor intensities, more unpleasantness to the exposure and increasing symptoms over time. MCS participants also expressed higher pulse rate and lower pulse rate variability than controls did. No group differences were...

  7. Single molecule transistor based nanopore for the detection of nicotine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, S. J., E-mail: ray.sjr@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-28

    A nanopore based detection methodology was proposed and investigated for the detection of Nicotine. This technique uses a Single Molecular Transistor working as a nanopore operational in the Coulomb Blockade regime. When the Nicotine molecule is pulled through the nanopore area surrounded by the Source(S), Drain (D), and Gate electrodes, the charge stability diagram can detect the presence of the molecule and is unique for a specific molecular structure. Due to the weak coupling between the different electrodes which is set by the nanopore size, the molecular energy states stay almost unaffected by the electrostatic environment that can be realised from the charge stability diagram. Identification of different orientation and position of the Nicotine molecule within the nanopore area can be made from specific regions of overlap between different charge states on the stability diagram that could be used as an electronic fingerprint for detection. This method could be advantageous and useful to detect the presence of Nicotine in smoke which is usually performed using chemical chromatography techniques.

  8. Nanoporous hard data: optical encoding of information within nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Pereira, Taj; Losic, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for developing advanced nanophotonic tools for a wide range of applications, including sensing, photonic tagging, self-reporting drug releasing systems and secure encoding of information.Herein, we present a method for storing binary data within the spectral signature of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. A rationally designed multi-sinusoidal anodisation approach makes it possible to engineer the photonic stop band of nanoporous anodic alumina with precision. As a result, the transmission spectrum of these photonic nanostructures can be engineered to feature well-resolved and selectively positioned characteristic peaks across the UV-visible spectrum. Using this property, we implement an 8-bit binary code and assess the versatility and capability of this system by a series of experiments aiming to encode different information within the nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals. The obtained results reveal that the proposed nanosized platform is robust, chemically stable, versatile and has a set of unique properties for data storage, opening new opportunities for

  9. Catalytic Rapid Pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis over Nanoporous Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Koo Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic rapid pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis, a Korean native tree species, was carried out using Py-GC/MS. Mesoporous MFI, which has both nanopores and micropores, and three nanoporous materials, Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and γ-Al2O3, were used as the catalyst. The acid sites of mesoporous MFI were strong Brønsted acid sites, whereas those of nanoporous materials were mostly weak acid sites. The composition of the product bio-oil varied greatly depending on the acid characteristics of the catalyst used. Phenolics were the most abundant species in the bio-oil, followed by acids and furanics, obtained over Al-MCM-41 or Al-SBA-15 with weak acid sites, whereas aromatics were the most abundant species produced over mesoporous MFI with strong acid sites, followed by phenolics. Aromatics, phenolics, and furanics are all important chemicals contributing to the improvement of bio-oil quality.

  10. Multistep Current Signal in Protein Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    KAUST Repository

    Bonome, Emma Letizia

    2015-05-07

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments.

  11. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, P. B.; van Roij, R.; Bazant, M. Z.; Biesheuvel, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the classical problem of flow of electrolyte solutions through charged capillary nanopores or nanotubes as described by the capillary pore model (also called "space charge" theory). This theory assumes very long and thin pores and uses a one-dimensional flux-force formalism which relates fluxes (electrical current, salt flux, and fluid velocity) and driving forces (difference in electric potential, salt concentration, and pressure). We analyze the general case with overlapping electric double layers in the pore and a nonzero axial salt concentration gradient. The 3 ×3 matrix relating these quantities exhibits Onsager symmetry and we report a significant new simplification for the diagonal element relating axial salt flux to the gradient in chemical potential. We prove that Onsager symmetry is preserved under changes of variables, which we illustrate by transformation to a different flux-force matrix given by Gross and Osterle [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 228 (1968), 10.1063/1.1669814]. The capillary pore model is well suited to describe the nonlinear response of charged membranes or nanofluidic devices for electrokinetic energy conversion and water desalination, as long as the transverse ion profiles remain in local quasiequilibrium. As an example, we evaluate electrical power production from a salt concentration difference by reverse electrodialysis, using an efficiency versus power diagram. We show that since the capillary pore model allows for axial gradients in salt concentration, partial loops in current, salt flux, or fluid flow can develop in the pore. Predictions for macroscopic transport properties using a reduced model, where the potential and concentration are assumed to be invariant with radial coordinate ("uniform potential" or "fine capillary pore" model), are close to results of the full model.

  12. Conical Nanopore PC Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Template synthesis can be considered an alternative to conventional lithography methods. It is one way of providing a panel of nanoscale metallic wires, tubes or organic polymeric devices. Our interest is focused on track-etched membranes produced from swift heavy ions bombardment of polymer films. In comparison with self-assembly of block copolymers, this bottom-up approach has the advantage of being economic, it is not time-consuming and it allows track formation of diverse geometries. Tailoring of the conical nanopore tip opening would have a tremendous impact on sensing domain, as well as on fundamental understanding of perpendicular giant magneto Resistance properties observed in metallic multilayered cylindrical nanowires. By combining low-energy heavy ion beam radiation effects with asymmetric etching, the etching temperature and time can be tuned to prepare conical nanopores of controlled geometry from 0.5 to 1μm at the base to a few nanometers at the top. Asymmetric etching onto PC films was pH-monitored at various temperatures in the range of 65 degree to 80 degree. Fluence impact onto track etch pores was also investigated. The pore shape characterization was achieved by electronic microscopy measurements on membrane surfaces and on electrodeposited nanowires. We have also observed a difference in the conical shape of replicated nanowires. Some showed sting shapes and others displayed shell shapes depending on whether a neutralizing agent was used during etching or not

  13. Fabrication of faceted nanopores in magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shujing; Cao, Fan; Zheng, He; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo, E-mail: wang@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Center for Electron Microscopy and MOE Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2013-12-09

    In this paper, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we showed the fabrication of faceted nanopores with various shapes in magnesium by focused electron beam (e-beam). The characteristics of nanopore shapes and the crystallographic planes corresponding to the edges of the nanopores were discussed in detail. Interestingly, by manipulating the e-beam (e.g., irradiation direction and duration), the nanopore shape and size could be effectively controlled along different directions. Our results provide important insight into the nanopore patterning in metallic materials and are of fundamental importance concerning the relevant applications, such as nanopore-based sensor, etc.

  14. Fabrication of faceted nanopores in magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we showed the fabrication of faceted nanopores with various shapes in magnesium by focused electron beam (e-beam). The characteristics of nanopore shapes and the crystallographic planes corresponding to the edges of the nanopores were discussed in detail. Interestingly, by manipulating the e-beam (e.g., irradiation direction and duration), the nanopore shape and size could be effectively controlled along different directions. Our results provide important insight into the nanopore patterning in metallic materials and are of fundamental importance concerning the relevant applications, such as nanopore-based sensor, etc

  15. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  16. Transport mechanisms in nanopores and nanochannels: can we mimic nature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tagliazucchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed major advancements in the synthesis, modification, characterization and modeling of nanometer-size solid-state channels and pores. Future applications in sensing, energy conversion and purification technologies will critically rely on qualitative improvements in the control over the selectivity, directionality and responsiveness of these nanochannels and nanopores. It is not surprising, therefore, that researchers in the field seek inspiration in biological ion channels and ion pumps, paradigmatic examples of transport selectivity. This work reviews our current fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of transport of ions and larger cargoes through nanopores and nanochannels by examining recent experimental and theoretical work. It is argued that that structure and transport in biological channels and polyelectrolyte-modified synthetic nanopores are strongly coupled: the structure dictates transport and transport affects the structure. We compare synthetic and biological systems throughout this review to conclude that while they present interesting similarities, they also have striking differences.

  17. Photocatalytic activity of Pt-modified Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoporous wall under sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ya-Nan; Lu, Shi-Yu; Bao, Shu-Juan, E-mail: baoshj@swu.edu.cn [Southwest University, Faculty of Material & Energy, Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this work, Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoporous wall was synthesized by using Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} as template and Bi source. Pt nanoparticles whose average size is about 8 nm were further immobilized on the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoporous wall via a simple chemical reduction process. Their photocatalytic activity and the effect of Pt modification were studied by analyzing the degradation of an organic dye, rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), under simulated sunlight. It was found that the photocatalytic ability of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} nanoporous wall was enhanced by introducing Pt nanoparticles. Bare Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} shows a degradation efficiency of 78 % after 1 h, while the degradation efficiency of 5 wt% Pt-modified Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was 99 %, and on further increasing the Pt content in the as-prepared Pt-modified Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} catalysts, their photocatalytic ability will decrease. The optimal catalyst could be reused without any decrease for five cycles, which may due to Pt be able to help trap the conduction band electrons in the absence of Rh6G. A possible photocatalytic mechanism was proposed and further proved by transient photocurrent response experiment.

  18. Noise Properties of Rectifying Nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M R; Sa, N; Davenport, M; Healy, K; Vlassiouk, I; Letant, S E; Baker, L A; Siwy, Z S

    2011-02-18

    Ion currents through three types of rectifying nanoporous structures are studied and compared for the first time: conically shaped polymer nanopores, glass nanopipettes, and silicon nitride nanopores. Time signals of ion currents are analyzed by power spectrum. We focus on the low-frequency range where the power spectrum magnitude scales with frequency, f, as 1/f. Glass nanopipettes and polymer nanopores exhibit non-equilibrium 1/f noise, thus the normalized power spectrum depends on the voltage polarity and magnitude. In contrast, 1/f noise in rectifying silicon nitride nanopores is of equilibrium character. Various mechanisms underlying the voltage-dependent 1/f noise are explored and discussed, including intrinsic pore wall dynamics, and formation of vortices and non-linear flow patterns in the pore. Experimental data are supported by modeling of ion currents based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. We conclude that the voltage-dependent 1/f noise observed in polymer and glass asymmetric nanopores might result from high and asymmetric electric fields inducing secondary effects in the pore such as enhanced water dissociation.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of conformal, functional, and responsive polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alf, Mahriah E; Asatekin, Ayse; Barr, Miles C; Baxamusa, Salmaan H; Chelawat, Hitesh; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Petruczok, Christy D; Sreenivasan, Ramaswamy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Trujillo, Nathan J; Vaddiraju, Sreeram; Xu, Jingjing; Gleason, Karen K

    2010-05-11

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization utilizes the delivery of vapor-phase monomers to form chemically well-defined polymeric films directly on the surface of a substrate. CVD polymers are desirable as conformal surface modification layers exhibiting strong retention of organic functional groups, and, in some cases, are responsive to external stimuli. Traditional wet-chemical chain- and step-growth mechanisms guide the development of new heterogeneous CVD polymerization techniques. Commonality with inorganic CVD methods facilitates the fabrication of hybrid devices. CVD polymers bridge microfabrication technology with chemical, biological, and nanoparticle systems and assembly. Robust interfaces can be achieved through covalent grafting enabling high-resolution (60 nm) patterning, even on flexible substrates. Utilizing only low-energy input to drive selective chemistry, modest vacuum, and room-temperature substrates, CVD polymerization is compatible with thermally sensitive substrates, such as paper, textiles, and plastics. CVD methods are particularly valuable for insoluble and infusible films, including fluoropolymers, electrically conductive polymers, and controllably crosslinked networks and for the potential to reduce environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with solvents. Quantitative models aid the development of large-area and roll-to-roll CVD polymer reactors. Relevant background, fundamental principles, and selected applications are reviewed. PMID:20544886

  20. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  1. High-density nanopore array for selective biomolecule transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2011-11-01

    Development of sophisticated tools capable of manipulating molecules at their own length scale enables new methods for chemical synthesis and detection. Although nanoscale devices have been developed to perform individual tasks, little work has been done on developing a truly scalable platform: a system that combines multiple components for sequential processing, as well as simultaneously processing and identifying the millions of potential species that may be present in a biological sample. The development of a scalable micro-nanofluidic device is limited in part by the ability to combine different materials (polymers, metals, semiconductors) onto a single chip, and the challenges with locally controlling the chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties within a micro or nanochannel. We have developed a unique construct known as a molecular gate: a multilayered polymer based device that combines microscale fluid channels with nanofluidic interconnects. Molecular gates have been demonstrated to selectively transport molecules between channels based on size or charge. In order to fully utilize these structures, we need to develop methods to actively control transport and identify species inside a nanopore. While previous work has been limited to creating electrical connections off-channel or metallizing the entire nanopore wall, we now have the ability to create multiple, separate conductive connections at the interior surface of a nanopore. These interior electrodes will be used for direct sensing of biological molecules, probing the electrical potential and charge distribution at the surface, and to actively turn on and off electrically driven transport of molecules through nanopores.

  2. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  3. Confident methods for the evaluation of the hydrogen content in nanoporous carbon microfibers

    OpenAIRE

    Culebras, Mario; Madroñero de la Cal, Antonio; Cantarero, Andrés; Amo, José M.; Domingo, Concepción; López, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nanoporous carbon microfibers were grown by chemical vapor deposition in the vapor-liquid solid mode using different fluid hydrocarbons as precursors in different proportions. The as-grown samples were further treated in argon and hydrogen atmospheres at different pressure conditions and annealed at several temperatures in order to deduce the best conditions for the incorporation and re-incorporation of hydrogen into the microfibers through the nanopores. Since there are some discrep...

  4. Ionic Capillary Evaporation in Weakly Charged Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; MANGHI, Manoel; Palmeri, John

    2010-01-01

    Using a variational field theory, we show that an electrolyte confined to a neutral cylindrical nanopore traversing a low dielectric membrane exhibits a first-order ionic liquid-vapor pseudo-phase-transition from an ionic-penetration "liquid" phase to an ionic-exclusion "vapor" phase, controlled by nanopore-modified ionic correlations and dielectric repulsion. For weakly charged nanopores, this pseudotransition survives and may shed light on the mechanism behind the rapid switching of nanopor...

  5. Characterization of nanopores ordering in anodic alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2008-01-01

    A simple characterization method of the ordering of the nanopores is described for nanoporous anodized aluminium oxides. The method starts with image analysis on scanning electron microscopy representations for the purpose to find repetitive shapes and their centres, i.e. nanopores. Then triangle...

  6. Gyroid nanoporous scaffold for conductive polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Zhang, Weimin;

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanoporous polymers with interconnected large surface area have been prepared by depositing polypyrrole onto nanocavity walls of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene films with gyroid morphology. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole was used to generate ultrathin films and prevent pore blocking....... The resulting nanoporous polymers exhibited a promising electroactivity....

  7. Chemical Response of CESM/CAM-Chem to MOPITT CO Ensemble-based Chemical Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubert, B.; Arellano, A. F.; Barré, J.; Worden, H. M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tilmes, S.; Buchholz, R. R.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Vitt, F.; Anderson, J. L.; Deeter, M. N.; Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon Monoxide is a key component in tropospheric chemistry. It plays an important role by affecting the oxidative capacity through its reaction with OH and being a precursor of tropospheric ozone. One year of multispectral retrievals of CO partial columns obtained from the MOPITT instrument have been assimilated into the Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-Chem). The assimilation is carried out using an Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter algorithm within the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) package. Two assimilation experiments have been performed: 1) assimilation of meteorological observations and 2) joint assimilation of meteorological observations and MOPITT CO. We first evaluate the assimilation performance by investigating skill scores and other statistics for the two experiments, and comparing to independent CO datasets such as surface (WDCGG), aircraft (MOZAIC-IAGOS), and FTS (NDACC). Our results clearly demonstrate an overall improvement for spatio-temporal magnitude and variability in representing CO abundance in CAM-Chem. We then investigate the response of CAM-Chem to changes in CO fields (via CO assimilation) focusing mainly on the oxidative capacity (i.e., OH distribution, methane lifetime) and CO chemical production and loss (i.e., regional to global budget). This is carried out by analyzing the mean 6-hourly forecast adjustments as reflected between the two experiments. We show that changes in CO directly impact OH abundance, with subsequent non-linear responses in CO chemical production (CO from methane and VOCs) and CO loss. This is clearly evident in NOx-limited regions (e.g., Southern Hemisphere, remote sites). Such analysis has direct implications on the consistencies in inverse modeling estimates of CO sources through improved representation of chemical response (including full chemistry) in atmospheric chemistry models and through multi-species constraints.

  8. Nanoscale dynamics of Joule heating and bubble nucleation in a solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edlyn V; Burns, Michael M; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Joule heating of an electrolytic solution in a nanopore. The model couples the electrical and thermal dynamics responsible for rapid and extreme superheating of the electrolyte within the nanopore. The model is implemented numerically with a finite element calculation, yielding a time and spatially resolved temperature distribution in the nanopore region. Temperatures near the thermodynamic limit of superheat are predicted to be attained just before the explosive nucleation of a vapor bubble is observed experimentally. Knowledge of this temperature distribution enables the evaluation of related phenomena including bubble nucleation kinetics, relaxation oscillation, and bubble dynamics. PMID:26871171

  9. Nanoporous nickel oxide thin films and its improved electrochromic performance: Effect of thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochromic properties of chemically bath deposited nanoporous NiO thin films were investigated as a function of film thickness using Ni sulphate precursor, aqueous ammonia and potassium persulphate as complexing and oxidizing agents respectively. The films were characterized for their structural, morphological, optical and electrochromic properties using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and optical transmittance studies. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the films are polycrystalline, consisting of NiO cubic phase. Infrared spectroscopy results show the presence of free hydroxyl ion and water in NiO thin films. SEM micrographs revealed nanoporous nature composed of interconnected nanoporous network, forming well defined 3D nano envelopes. The optical band gap energy was found to be decreased from 3.22 to 2.80 eV with increasing film thickness. The electrochromic properties of all the films were investigated in aqueous (KOH) and non aqueous (LiClO4-PC) electrolyte by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC) and optical studies. The transmittance modulations or optical density differences during the coloring/bleaching process were found to be increased with the film thickness. This increment in optical differences led to an increase in coloration efficiency (CE) to about 95 cm2/C, which is two times more than that observed in KOH and response time of 2.9 s for bleaching (reduction) and 3.5 s for coloration (oxidation) observed for the film deposited at 60 min with excellent electrochemical stability up to 3000 c/b cycles in LiClO4-PC electrolyte.

  10. Nanoporous nickel oxide thin films and its improved electrochromic performance: Effect of thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalavi, D.S.; Suryavanshi, M.J.; Patil, D.S.; Mali, S.S. [Thin Films Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416004, Maharashtra (India); Moholkar, A.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University (Korea, Republic of); Kalagi, S.S.; Vanalkar, S.A. [Thin Films Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416004, Maharashtra (India); Kang, S.R.; Kim, J.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University (Korea, Republic of); Patil, P.S., E-mail: patilps_2000@yahoo.com [Thin Films Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416004, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-01-15

    Electrochromic properties of chemically bath deposited nanoporous NiO thin films were investigated as a function of film thickness using Ni sulphate precursor, aqueous ammonia and potassium persulphate as complexing and oxidizing agents respectively. The films were characterized for their structural, morphological, optical and electrochromic properties using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and optical transmittance studies. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the films are polycrystalline, consisting of NiO cubic phase. Infrared spectroscopy results show the presence of free hydroxyl ion and water in NiO thin films. SEM micrographs revealed nanoporous nature composed of interconnected nanoporous network, forming well defined 3D nano envelopes. The optical band gap energy was found to be decreased from 3.22 to 2.80 eV with increasing film thickness. The electrochromic properties of all the films were investigated in aqueous (KOH) and non aqueous (LiClO{sub 4}-PC) electrolyte by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC) and optical studies. The transmittance modulations or optical density differences during the coloring/bleaching process were found to be increased with the film thickness. This increment in optical differences led to an increase in coloration efficiency (CE) to about 95 cm{sup 2}/C, which is two times more than that observed in KOH and response time of 2.9 s for bleaching (reduction) and 3.5 s for coloration (oxidation) observed for the film deposited at 60 min with excellent electrochemical stability up to 3000 c/b cycles in LiClO{sub 4}-PC electrolyte.

  11. Template Transfer Nanoimprint for Uniform Nanopores and Nanopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology is developed for the fabrication of nanostructures on substrate based on anodized Al2O3 (AAO porous template transfer process. It includes (1 forming amorphous alloy, negative UV-resist resin (i.e., SU-8, or PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate plate nanorod arrays by hot-press molding amorphous alloy, negative UV-resist resin (i.e., SU-8, or PMMA plate into the anodized Al2O3 porous substrates; (2 removing AAO templates by chemical etching process after suitable posttreatment (annealing and/or irradiation to improve the mechanical strength of the nanorod arrays; (3 reforming nanopore films by hot-embossing the nanorod arrays into a thin layer of polymer film on substrates (e.g., silica; (4 cleaning the bottom residues in pores of the films by oxygen plasmon. The results indicate that the diameters of amorphous alloy (or negative UV-resist resin or PMMA nanorod arrays can be ranged from 32 nm to 200 nm. The diameters of the imprinted ILR-1050 photoresist nanopores are about 94.5 ± 12.2 nm and the diameters of the imprinted or SU-8 resin on glass slides nanopores are about 207 ± 26.4 nm, which inherit the diameters of AAO templates. This methodology provides a general method to fabricate nanorods arrays and/or thin nanopore films by template transfer nanoimprint process.

  12. Thermophoretic Regulation of Molecular Flux through a Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Maxim; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-03-01

    Transport of ions, nucleic acids and other molecular species through pores in thin membranes is a process of fundamental importance to the biological function of a cell and practical applications in the field of molecular separation, filtering, and, recently, DNA sequencing. Various approaches to control the transport have been examined, including the effects of the geometry, charge and chemical functionalization of the nanopore surface. Thermophoresis in liquids, i.e. movement of molecules along a temperature gradient, was discovered more than a century ago and has already been employed in various applications, typically involving macroscopic systems. In this work, we explore the use of thermal gradients for regulation of nanoscale fluxes. Specifically, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to examine the effect of thermal gradients on transport of ions, small organic solutes and long DNA molecules through solid-state nanopores. In our typical simulation, multiple thermostats are applied to different parts of the same simulation system, allowing steady-state temperature gradients to be established and the effective forces associated with the thermal gradients to be determined. The results of our simulations suggest that nanopore fluxes of molecular species can be regulated by means of thermal gradients. We expect our results to find applications in molecular separation and filtering technologies, nanofluidic electronics and nanopore sequencing of DNA. This work was supported through NSF DMR-0955959

  13. The effects of geometry and stability of solid-state nanopores on detecting single DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Ryan; Graef, Edward; Walsh, Nathan; Nandivada, Santoshi; Benamara, Mourad; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work we use a combination of 3D-TEM tomography, energy filtered TEM, single molecule DNA translocation experiments, and numerical modeling to show a more precise relationship between nanopore shape and ionic conductance and show that changes in geometry while in solution can account for most deviations between predicted and measured conductance. We compare the structural stability of ion beam sculpted (IBS), IBS-annealed, and TEM drilled nanopores. We demonstrate that annealing can significantly improve the stability of IBS made pores. Furthermore, the methods developed in this work can be used to predict pore conductance and current drop amplitudes of DNA translocation events for a wide variety of pore geometries. We discuss that chemical dissolution is one mechanism of the geometry change for SiNx nanopores and show that small modification in fabrication procedure can significantly increase the stability of IBS nanopores.

  14. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol Ndoni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms cause extensive damage to industrial settings. Thus, it is important to improve the existing techniques and develop new strategies to prevent bacterial biofilm formation. In the present study, we have prepared nanoporous polymer films from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment in short-term (3 h and significantly reduce biofilm formation in long-term (1 week by gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Tuning the thickness or surface morphology of the nanoporous polymer films allowed to extent the anti-biofilm capability.

  15. Engineering of highly ordered TiO2 nanopore arrays by anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhang, Li; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yong; Kou, Shengzhong; Yang, Hangsheng

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis was used to simulate the current density distributions in the TiO2 barrier layer formed at the initial stage of Ti anodization. The morphology modification of the barrier layer was found to induce current density distribution change. By starting the anodization with proper TiO2 barrier layer morphology, the current density distribution can be adjusted to favor the formation of either nanotube arrays or nanopore arrays of anodic TiO2. We also found that the addition of sodium acetate into the electrolyte suppressed both the field-assisted chemical dissolution of TiO2 and the TiF62- hydrolysis induced TiO2 deposition during anodization, and thus further favored the nanopore formation. Accordingly, highly ordered anodic TiO2 nanopore arrays, similar to anodic aluminum oxide nanopore arrays, were successfully prepared.

  16. The effects of geometry and stability of solid-state nanopores on detecting single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we use a combination of 3D-TEM tomography, energy filtered TEM, single molecule DNA translocation experiments, and numerical modeling to show a more precise relationship between nanopore shape and ionic conductance and show that changes in geometry while in solution can account for most deviations between predicted and measured conductance. We compare the structural stability of ion beam sculpted (IBS), IBS-annealed, and TEM drilled nanopores. We demonstrate that annealing can significantly improve the stability of IBS made pores. Furthermore, the methods developed in this work can be used to predict pore conductance and current drop amplitudes of DNA translocation events for a wide variety of pore geometries. We discuss that chemical dissolution is one mechanism of the geometry change for SiNx nanopores and show that small modification in fabrication procedure can significantly increase the stability of IBS nanopores. (paper)

  17. Embedding a carbon nanotube across the diameter of a solid state nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Sadki, E S; Vlassarev, D; Golovchenko, J A; Branton, D

    2013-01-01

    A fabrication method for positioning and embedding a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) across the diameter of a solid state nanopore is presented. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow SWNTs over arrays of focused ion beam (FIB) milled pores in a thin silicon nitride membrane. This typically yields at least one pore whose diameter is centrally crossed by a SWNT. The final diameter of the FIB pore is adjusted to create a nanopore of any desired diameter by atomic layer deposition (ALD), simultaneously embedding and insulating the SWNT everywhere but in the region that crosses the diameter of the final nanopore, where it remains pristine and bare. This nanotube-articulated nanopore is an important step towards the realization of a new type of detector for biomolecule sensing and electronic characterization, including DNA sequencing.

  18. Switchable Imbibition in Nanoporous Gold

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Yahui; Duan, Huiling; Weissmueller, Joerg; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous imbibition enables the elegant propelling of nano-flows because of the dominance of capillarity at small length scales. The imbibition kinetics are, however, solely determined by the static geometry of the porous host, the capillarity, and the fluidity of the imbibed liquid. This makes active control particularly challenging. Here, we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid-liquid interfacial tension, i.e. we can accelerate the imbibition front, stop it, and have it proceed at will. Simultaneous measurements of the mass flux and the electrical current allow us to document simple scaling laws for the imbibition kinetics, and to explore the charge flow dynamics in the metallic nanopores. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for ionic and/or fluid transport render nanoporous elemental gold a versatile, accurately controllable elec...

  19. DNA Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Grégory F; Calado, Victor E; Pandraud, Grégory; Zandbergen, Henny W; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Dekker, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Nanopores -- nanosized holes that can transport ions and molecules -- are very promising devices for genomic screening, in particular DNA sequencing. Both solid-state and biological pores suffer from the drawback, however, that the channel constituting the pore is long, viz. 10-100 times the distance between two bases in a DNA molecule (0.5 nm for single-stranded DNA). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to realize and use ultrathin nanopores fabricated in graphene monolayers for single-molecule DNA translocation. The pores are obtained by placing a graphene flake over a microsize hole in a silicon nitride membrane and drilling a nanosize hole in the graphene using an electron beam. As individual DNA molecules translocate through the pore, characteristic temporary conductance changes are observed in the ionic current through the nanopore, setting the stage for future genomic screening.

  20. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  1. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:24992278

  2. Thermally controlled permeation of ionic molecules through synthetic nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    We present temperature-dependent ionic transport through an array of nanopores (cylindrical and conical) and a single conical nanopore functionalized with amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAM-NH2] brushes. For this purpose, nanopores are fabricated in heavy ion irradiated polyethylene terephthlate (PET) membranes by a controlled chemical track-etching technique, which leads to the generation of carboxyl (COOH) groups on the pore surface. End-functionalized polymer chains are immobilized onto the inner pore walls via a ‘grafting-to’ approach through the covalent linkage of surface COOH moieties with the terminal amine groups of the PNIPAAM molecules by using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The success of the chemical modification reaction is corroborated by measuring the permeation flux of charged analytes across the multipore membranes in an aqueous solution, and for the case of single conical pore by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, which are dictated by the electrostatic interaction of the charged pore surface with the mobile ions in an electrolyte solution. The effective nanopore diameter is tuned by manipulating the environmental temperature due to the swelling/shrinking behaviour of polymer brushes attached to the inner nanopore walls, leading to a decrease/increase in the ionic transport across the membrane. This process should permit the thermal gating and controlled release of ionic drug molecules through the nanopores modified with thermoresponsive polymer chains across the membrane.

  3. Thermally controlled permeation of ionic molecules through synthetic nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present temperature-dependent ionic transport through an array of nanopores (cylindrical and conical) and a single conical nanopore functionalized with amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAM-NH2] brushes. For this purpose, nanopores are fabricated in heavy ion irradiated polyethylene terephthlate (PET) membranes by a controlled chemical track-etching technique, which leads to the generation of carboxyl (COOH) groups on the pore surface. End-functionalized polymer chains are immobilized onto the inner pore walls via a ‘grafting-to’ approach through the covalent linkage of surface COOH moieties with the terminal amine groups of the PNIPAAM molecules by using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The success of the chemical modification reaction is corroborated by measuring the permeation flux of charged analytes across the multipore membranes in an aqueous solution, and for the case of single conical pore by measuring the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics, which are dictated by the electrostatic interaction of the charged pore surface with the mobile ions in an electrolyte solution. The effective nanopore diameter is tuned by manipulating the environmental temperature due to the swelling/shrinking behaviour of polymer brushes attached to the inner nanopore walls, leading to a decrease/increase in the ionic transport across the membrane. This process should permit the thermal gating and controlled release of ionic drug molecules through the nanopores modified with thermoresponsive polymer chains across the membrane. (paper)

  4. A Mask-Free Passivation Process for Low Noise Nanopore Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Lee, Min-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Bum; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Young-Rok

    2015-08-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been studied widely for the label-free analysis of single biomolecules. The translocation of charged biomolecules through a solid-state nanopore is driven by the applied voltage across a thin membrane. The ionic current changes in response to the translocation of DNA through the nanopore. Solid-state nanopores have many advantages over biological nanopores, such as α-hemolysin and MspA, but the high DNA translocation velocity and the inherent noise in solid-state nanopores have hindered its applications to more precise measurements, such as DNA sequencing. This paper reports a simple and reproducible way of passivating the surface of a nanopore device using an insulating layer, photodefinable PDMS (P-PDMS), to reduce noise and enhance the accuracy of the electrical measurements. This new approach does not require a separate photo-mask or sophisticated micro-alignment equipment to pattern the insulating layer. The pit structure on the back side of the support chip serves as a mask, enabling mask-free photolithography, and the insulating layer only on top of the free-standing silicon nitride membrane can be irradiated selectively by UV and removed by subsequent development in toluene. The resulting nanopore device with a small free standing silicon nitride membrane surrounded by a thick insulating layer showed improved noise characteristics. The root-mean-square noise of the ionic current was reduced to 3.8 pA from 90.8 pA by the formation of a micron-thick insulating layer. The overall performance of the nanopores with an insulating layer was improved significantly when tested with the double-stranded DNA (λ-DNA). PMID:26369183

  5. Nitrogen-Containing Nanoporous Coal for Electrodes of Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    B.K. Ostafiychuk; I.M. Budzulyak; M.M. Kuzyshyn; B.I. Rachiy; R.A. Zatorskiy; R.P. Lisovskiy; V.I. Mandzyuk

    2013-01-01

    Chemical activation of nanoporous carbon material with nitric acid, followed by activation in a stream of argon at different temperatures, initiates formation on the surface of the material of amide, pyrrole and pyridine nitrogen compounds that improves the hydrophilic properties and increases its electrical conductivity. Value of the specific capacity of N-enriched carbon material in KOH aqueous solution increases by 30 % and an additional heat treatment in the temperature range of 440-460°C...

  6. Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation

    KAUST Repository

    Wolfram, M-T

    2010-10-29

    High surface charges of polymer pore walls and applied electric fields can lead to the formation and subsequent dissolution of precipitates in nanopores. These precipitates block the pore, leading to current fluctuations. We present an extended Poisson-Nernst-Planck system which includes chemical reactions of precipitation and dissolution. We discuss the mathematical modeling and present 2D numerical simulations. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Pink Noise of Ionic Conductance through Single Artificial Nanopore Revisted

    OpenAIRE

    Tasserit, Christophe; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Lairez, Didier; Zalczer, Gilbert; Clochard, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience We report voltage-clamp measurements through single conical nanopore obtained by chemical etching of a single ion track in polyimide film. Special attention is paid to the pink noise of the ionic current (i.e., 1=f noise) measured with different filling liquids. The relative pink-noise amplitude is almost independent of concentration and pH for KCl solutions, but varies strongly using ionic liquids. In particular, we show that depending on the ionic liquid, the trans...

  8. Surface treatment of nanoporous silicon with noble metal ions and characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very large surface to volume ratio of nanoporous silicon (PS) produces a high density of surface states, which are responsible for uncontrolled oxidation of the PS surface. Hence it disturbs the stability of the material and also creates difficulties in the formation of a reliable electrical contact. To passivate the surface states of the nanoporous silicon, noble metals (Pd, Ru, and Pt) were dispersed on the PS surface by an electroless chemical method. GIXRD (glancing incidence X-ray diffraction) proved the crystallinity of PS and the presence of noble metals on its surface. While FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) showed the morphology, the EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) line scans and digital X-ray image mapping indicated the formation of the noble metal islands on the PS surface. Dynamic SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) further confirmed the presence of noble metals and other impurities near the surface of the modified PS. The variation of the surface roughness after the noble metal modification was exhibited by AFM (atomic force microscopy). The formation of a thin oxide layer on the modified PS surface was verified by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy).

  9. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  10. Nanopore-Based Target Sequence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Trevor J; Shropshire, Tyler; Liu, Xu; Briggs, Kyle; Huynh, Cindy; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Wang, Hongyun; Dunbar, William B

    2016-01-01

    The promise of portable diagnostic devices relies on three basic requirements: comparable sensitivity to established platforms, inexpensive manufacturing and cost of operations, and the ability to survive rugged field conditions. Solid state nanopores can meet all these requirements, but to achieve high manufacturing yields at low costs, assays must be tolerant to fabrication imperfections and to nanopore enlargement during operation. This paper presents a model for molecular engineering techniques that meets these goals with the aim of detecting target sequences within DNA. In contrast to methods that require precise geometries, we demonstrate detection using a range of pore geometries. As a result, our assay model tolerates any pore-forming method and in-situ pore enlargement. Using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes modified for conjugation with synthetic bulk-adding molecules, pores ranging 15-50 nm in diameter are shown to detect individual PNA-bound DNA. Detection of the CFTRΔF508 gene mutation, a codon deletion responsible for ∼66% of all cystic fibrosis chromosomes, is demonstrated with a 26-36 nm pore size range by using a size-enhanced PNA probe. A mathematical framework for assessing the statistical significance of detection is also presented. PMID:27149679

  11. Nanopore-Based Target Sequence Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Trevor J.; Shropshire, Tyler; Liu, Xu; Briggs, Kyle; Huynh, Cindy; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Wang, Hongyun; Dunbar, William B.

    2016-01-01

    The promise of portable diagnostic devices relies on three basic requirements: comparable sensitivity to established platforms, inexpensive manufacturing and cost of operations, and the ability to survive rugged field conditions. Solid state nanopores can meet all these requirements, but to achieve high manufacturing yields at low costs, assays must be tolerant to fabrication imperfections and to nanopore enlargement during operation. This paper presents a model for molecular engineering techniques that meets these goals with the aim of detecting target sequences within DNA. In contrast to methods that require precise geometries, we demonstrate detection using a range of pore geometries. As a result, our assay model tolerates any pore-forming method and in-situ pore enlargement. Using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes modified for conjugation with synthetic bulk-adding molecules, pores ranging 15-50 nm in diameter are shown to detect individual PNA-bound DNA. Detection of the CFTRΔF508 gene mutation, a codon deletion responsible for ∼66% of all cystic fibrosis chromosomes, is demonstrated with a 26-36 nm pore size range by using a size-enhanced PNA probe. A mathematical framework for assessing the statistical significance of detection is also presented. PMID:27149679

  12. DNA sequence-dependent ionic currents in ultra-small solid-state nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of ionic currents through nanopores partially blocked by DNA have emerged as a powerful method for characterization of the DNA nucleotide sequence. Although the effect of the nucleotide sequence on the nanopore blockade current has been experimentally demonstrated, prediction and interpretation of such measurements remain a formidable challenge. Using atomic resolution computational approaches, here we show how the sequence, molecular conformation, and pore geometry affect the blockade ionic current in model solid-state nanopores. We demonstrate that the blockade current from a DNA molecule is determined by the chemical identities and conformations of at least three consecutive nucleotides. We find the blockade currents produced by the nucleotide triplets to vary considerably with their nucleotide sequences despite having nearly identical molecular conformations. Encouragingly, we find blockade current differences as large as 25% for single-base substitutions in ultra small (1.6 nm × 1.1 nm cross section; 2 nm length) solid-state nanopores. Despite the complex dependence of the blockade current on the sequence and conformation of the DNA triplets, we find that, under many conditions, the number of thymine bases is positively correlated with the current, whereas the number of purine bases and the presence of both purines and pyrimidines in the triplet are negatively correlated with the current. Based on these observations, we construct a simple theoretical model that relates the ion current to the base content of a solid-state nanopore. Furthermore, we show that compact conformations of DNA in narrow pores provide the greatest signal-to-noise ratio for single base detection, whereas reduction of the nanopore length increases the ionic current noise. Thus, the sequence dependence of the nanopore blockade current can be theoretically rationalized, although the predictions will likely need to be customized for each nanopore type.Measurements of ionic

  13. DNA sequence-dependent ionic currents in ultra-small solid-state nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of ionic currents through nanopores partially blocked by DNA have emerged as a powerful method for characterization of the DNA nucleotide sequence. Although the effect of the nucleotide sequence on the nanopore blockade current has been experimentally demonstrated, prediction and interpretation of such measurements remain a formidable challenge. Using atomic resolution computational approaches, here we show how the sequence, molecular conformation, and pore geometry affect the blockade ionic current in model solid-state nanopores. We demonstrate that the blockade current from a DNA molecule is determined by the chemical identities and conformations of at least three consecutive nucleotides. We find the blockade currents produced by the nucleotide triplets to vary considerably with their nucleotide sequences despite having nearly identical molecular conformations. Encouragingly, we find blockade current differences as large as 25% for single-base substitutions in ultra small (1.6 nm × 1.1 nm cross section; 2 nm length) solid-state nanopores. Despite the complex dependence of the blockade current on the sequence and conformation of the DNA triplets, we find that, under many conditions, the number of thymine bases is positively correlated with the current, whereas the number of purine bases and the presence of both purines and pyrimidines in the triplet are negatively correlated with the current. Based on these observations, we construct a simple theoretical model that relates the ion current to the base content of a solid-state nanopore. Furthermore, we show that compact conformations of DNA in narrow pores provide the greatest signal-to-noise ratio for single base detection, whereas reduction of the nanopore length increases the ionic current noise. Thus, the sequence dependence of the nanopore blockade current can be theoretically rationalized, although the predictions will likely need to be customized for each nanopore type. PMID:27103233

  14. Nanopore DNA sequencing with MspA

    OpenAIRE

    Derrington, Ian M.; Butler, Tom Z.; Collins, Marcus D.; Manrao, Elizabeth; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H.

    2010-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a direct, fast, and inexpensive DNA sequencing technology. The simplest form of nanopore DNA sequencing utilizes the hypothesis that individual nucleotides of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore will uniquely modulate an ionic current flowing through the pore, allowing the record of the current to yield the DNA sequence. We demonstrate that the ionic current through the engineered Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A, MspA, has the ability...

  15. Nanopore-Based Sensors for Ligand-Receptor Lead Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-02-01

    Developing a low-cost and high-efficacy method to optimize prescreened or designed drug candidates will facilitate drug discovery and biomedical research in general. Current methods of drug screening usually involve tedious sample preparation and costly biological/chemical assays. Here, through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a new drug optimization method, based on the nanopore force spectroscopy, to electrically detect the binding strength between a drug molecule and a target protein. Simulation results demonstrate that the drug-protein complex can be electrophoretically driven into a nanopore, which is followed by the rupture of the complex at a critical biasing voltage. The latter determines the binding strength of the tested drug molecule. It is expected that the application of this single-molecule technology could help to accelerate the drug discovery, particularly for processes of the narrow screening and further lead optimization. PMID:26261942

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of gases adsorbed within nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasca, Raluca A.; Mercedes Calbi, M.; Cole, Milton W.

    2003-03-01

    Condensation of gases within nanopores is different from bulk condensation because of the role of confinement including reduced dimensionality. For a typical range of nanotube radii, the adsorption may take place on two different sites (corresponding to different interaction energies with the nanopore), which we call shell and axial sites. Thus, we model the shell and axial adatoms as interacting species, and employ both a lattice gas model and Monte Carlo simulations to find their corresponding adsorption isotherms and specific heat. We compare these results with exact results at T=0 and with mean field results at finite T, obtained in a previous paper (1,*). 1. Raluca A. Trasca, M. Mercedes Calbi and Milton W. Cole, PRE 65, 061607 (2002) * This research is supported by the Petroleum Research of the American Chemical Society.

  17. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina: A Versatile Platform for Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA has become one of the most promising nanomaterials in optical biosensing as a result of its unique physical and chemical properties. Many studies have demonstrated the outstanding capabilities of NAA for developing optical biosensors in combination with different optical techniques. These results reveal that NAA is a promising alternative to other widely explored nanoporous platforms, such as porous silicon. This review is aimed at reporting on the recent advances and current stage of development of NAA-based optical biosensing devices. The different optical detection techniques, principles and concepts are described in detail along with relevant examples of optical biosensing devices using NAA sensing platforms. Furthermore, we summarise the performance of these devices and provide a future perspective on this promising research field.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of a Porous Silicon Drug Delivery System with an Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition Temperature-Responsive Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Steven J P; Szili, Endre J; Al-Bataineh, Sameer A; Vasani, Roshan B; Xu, Jingjing; Alf, Mahriah E; Gleason, Karen K; Short, Robert D; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-01-12

    This paper reports on the fabrication of a pSi-based drug delivery system, functionalized with an initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) polymer film, for the sustainable and temperature-dependent delivery of drugs. The devices were prepared by loading biodegradable porous silicon (pSi) with a fluorescent anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and coating the surface with temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-diethylene glycol divinyl ether) (pNIPAM-co-DEGDVE) or non-stimulus-responsive poly(aminostyrene) (pAS) via iCVD. CPT released from the uncoated oxidized pSi control with a burst release fashion (∼21 nmol/(cm(2) h)), and this was almost identical at temperatures both above (37 °C) and below (25 °C) the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the switchable polymer used, pNIPAM-co-DEGDVE (28.5 °C). In comparison, the burst release rate from the pSi-pNIPAM-co-DEGDVE sample was substantially slower at 6.12 and 9.19 nmol/(cm(2) h) at 25 and 37 °C, respectively. The final amount of CPT released over 16 h was 10% higher at 37 °C compared to 25 °C for pSi coated with pNIPAM-co-DEGDVE (46.29% vs 35.67%), indicating that this material can be used to deliver drugs on-demand at elevated temperatures. pSi coated with pAS also displayed sustainable drug delivery profiles, but these were independent of the release temperature. These data show that sustainable and temperature-responsive delivery systems can be produced by functionalization of pSi with iCVD polymer films. Benefits of the iCVD approach include the application of the iCVD coating after drug loading without causing degradation of the drug commonly caused by exposure to factors such as solvents or high temperatures. Importantly, the iCVD process is applicable to a wide array of surfaces as the process is independent of the surface chemistry and pore size of the nanoporous matrix being coated. PMID:26654169

  19. Eco-friendly synthesis for MCM-41 nanoporous materials using the non-reacted reagents in mother liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Eng-Poh; Goh, Jia-Yi; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous materials such as Mobil composite material number 41 (MCM-41) are attractive for applications such as catalysis, adsorption, supports, and carriers. Green synthesis of MCM-41 is particularly appealing because the chemical reagents are useful and valuable. We report on the eco-friendly synthesis of MCM-41 nanoporous materials via multi-cycle approach by re-using the non-reacted reagents in supernatant as mother liquor after separating the solid product. This approach was achieved vi...

  20. Electroosmotic flow rectification in conical nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental work has suggested that electroosmotic flows (EOF) through conical nanopores exhibit rectification in the opposite sense to the well-studied effect of ionic current rectification. A positive bias voltage generates large EOF and small current, while negative voltages generate small EOF and large current. Here we systematically investigate this effect using finite-element simulations. We find that inside the pore, the electric field and salt concentration are inversely correlated, which leads to the inverse relationship between the magnitudes of EOF and current. Rectification occurs when the pore is driven into states characterized by different salt concentrations depending on the sign of the voltage. The mechanism responsible for this behaviour is concentration polarization, which requires the pore to exhibit the properties of permselectivity and asymmetry.

  1. Potential/charge induced nanoporous metal actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, R N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical response to the electrochemical charging of nanoporous metals with their pore space wetted by electrolyte have been studied in-situ using dilatometry and wide angle x-ray diffractometry techniques. The actuation strain reported in this manuscript is purely elastic and completely reversible. The capacitive double layer charging became more effective near to the potential to zero charge (pzc) and contribute significantly to the variations of surface stress and crystal strain. In a suitable experimental setup, the actuator effect from porous metals can be amplified, where deliberate movements of the actuator parts are desirable with minimum external force, suggesting that metallic foam-like materials with high surface to volume ratio could be used to mimic natural muscles. PMID:19964917

  2. Modifying the surface charge of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical modification of nanopore surfaces is of great interest as it means that the surface composition is no longer fixed by the choice of substrate material, even to the point where large biomolecules can be attached to the pore walls. Controlling nanopore transport characteristics is one important application of surface modification which is very relevant given the significant interest in sensors based on the transport of ions and molecules through nanopores. Reported here is a method to change the surface charge polarity of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide, which also has the potential to attach more complex molecules to the carboxyl groups on the nanopore walls. These carboxyl groups were converted into terminal amino groups, first by activation with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) followed by the covalent coupling of ethylenediamine. This results in a changed surface charge polarity. Regeneration of a carboxyl-terminated surface was also possible, by reaction of the amino groups with succinic anhydride. The success of these reactions was confirmed by measurements of the pore's pH sensitive current-voltage (I-V) characteristics before and after the chemical modification, which depend on surface charge. The permselectivity of the pores also changed accordingly with the modification

  3. Modifying the surface charge of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M; Schiedt, B; Healy, K; Neumann, R; Ensinger, W

    2008-02-27

    Chemical modification of nanopore surfaces is of great interest as it means that the surface composition is no longer fixed by the choice of substrate material, even to the point where large biomolecules can be attached to the pore walls. Controlling nanopore transport characteristics is one important application of surface modification which is very relevant given the significant interest in sensors based on the transport of ions and molecules through nanopores. Reported here is a method to change the surface charge polarity of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide, which also has the potential to attach more complex molecules to the carboxyl groups on the nanopore walls. These carboxyl groups were converted into terminal amino groups, first by activation with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) followed by the covalent coupling of ethylenediamine. This results in a changed surface charge polarity. Regeneration of a carboxyl-terminated surface was also possible, by reaction of the amino groups with succinic anhydride. The success of these reactions was confirmed by measurements of the pore's pH sensitive current-voltage (I-V) characteristics before and after the chemical modification, which depend on surface charge. The permselectivity of the pores also changed accordingly with the modification. PMID:21730744

  4. Modifying the surface charge of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M; Ensinger, W [Department of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstrasse 23, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Schiedt, B; Neumann, R [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Healy, K [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland (Ireland)

    2008-02-27

    Chemical modification of nanopore surfaces is of great interest as it means that the surface composition is no longer fixed by the choice of substrate material, even to the point where large biomolecules can be attached to the pore walls. Controlling nanopore transport characteristics is one important application of surface modification which is very relevant given the significant interest in sensors based on the transport of ions and molecules through nanopores. Reported here is a method to change the surface charge polarity of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide, which also has the potential to attach more complex molecules to the carboxyl groups on the nanopore walls. These carboxyl groups were converted into terminal amino groups, first by activation with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) followed by the covalent coupling of ethylenediamine. This results in a changed surface charge polarity. Regeneration of a carboxyl-terminated surface was also possible, by reaction of the amino groups with succinic anhydride. The success of these reactions was confirmed by measurements of the pore's pH sensitive current-voltage (I-V) characteristics before and after the chemical modification, which depend on surface charge. The permselectivity of the pores also changed accordingly with the modification.

  5. Modifying the surface charge of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Schiedt, B.; Healy, K.; Neumann, R.; Ensinger, W.

    2008-02-01

    Chemical modification of nanopore surfaces is of great interest as it means that the surface composition is no longer fixed by the choice of substrate material, even to the point where large biomolecules can be attached to the pore walls. Controlling nanopore transport characteristics is one important application of surface modification which is very relevant given the significant interest in sensors based on the transport of ions and molecules through nanopores. Reported here is a method to change the surface charge polarity of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide, which also has the potential to attach more complex molecules to the carboxyl groups on the nanopore walls. These carboxyl groups were converted into terminal amino groups, first by activation with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) followed by the covalent coupling of ethylenediamine. This results in a changed surface charge polarity. Regeneration of a carboxyl-terminated surface was also possible, by reaction of the amino groups with succinic anhydride. The success of these reactions was confirmed by measurements of the pore's pH sensitive current-voltage (I-V) characteristics before and after the chemical modification, which depend on surface charge. The permselectivity of the pores also changed accordingly with the modification.

  6. French technologies for oil spill response by chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that for minimizing adverse ecological impacts, treatment chemicals are an important tool, but the success depends on understanding their action and respecting their limitations. Three types of chemical compounds can be used: dispersants, anti emulsifying and biodegrading agents. Emulsion inhibition prevents mousse formation and promote further natural dispersion into the water column. Offshore dispersal of oil prevents the pollution from standing as a slick and thereby reduces damage to marine life, coastal habitats and facilities. The simultaneous processes of dispersion and emulsification compete to determine the ultimate fate of oil; therefore an application of a combination of chemicals, to the freshly spilled oil, could be practical

  7. Survey on methodologies in the risk assessment of chemical exposures in emergency response situations in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinälä, Milla; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Wood, Maureen Heraty;

    2013-01-01

    A scientifically sound assessment of the risk to human health resulting from acute chemical releases is the cornerstone for chemical incident prevention, preparedness and response. Although the general methodology to identify acute toxicity of chemicals has not substantially changed in the last...

  8. Enhancing nanopore sensing with DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanopores are on the brink of fundamentally changing DNA sequencing. At the same time, DNA origami provides unprecedented freedom in molecular design. Here, I suggest why a combination of solid-state nanopores and DNA nanotechnology will lead to exciting new experiments.

  9. A nanoporous gold membrane for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Swe Zin; Silva, Gloria; Carpignano, Francesca; Noual, Adnane; Pechstedt, Katrin; Mateos, Luis; Grant-Jacob, James A.; Brocklesby, Bill; Horak, Peter; Charlton, Martin; Boden, Stuart A.; Melvin, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Design and fabrication of three-dimensionally structured, gold membranes containing hexagonally close-packed microcavities with nanopores in the base, are described. Our aim is to create a nanoporous structure with localized enhancement of the fluorescence or Raman scattering at, and in the nanopore when excited with light of approximately 600 nm, with a view to provide sensitive detection of biomolecules. A range of geometries of the nanopore integrated into hexagonally close-packed assemblies of gold micro-cavities was first evaluated theoretically. The optimal size and shape of the nanopore in a single microcavity were then considered to provide the highest localized plasmon enhancement (of fluorescence or Raman scattering) at the very center of the nanopore for a bioanalyte traversing through. The optimized design was established to be a 1200 nm diameter cavity of 600 nm depth with a 50 nm square nanopore with rounded corners in the base. A gold 3D-structured membrane containing these sized microcavities with the integrated nanopore was successfully fabricated and ‘proof of concept’ Raman scattering experiments are described. PMID:26973809

  10. Mechanical behavior of intragranular, nano-porous electrodeposited zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of nano-porous ZnO thin films electrodeposited on glass substrates were determined by nanoindentation and in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) micropillar compression. The intragranular nature of the nanoscale porosity within the individual mono-crystals of the films was probed at nano- and micro-scales for determining their mechanical response. The hardness (3.5 GPa) and reduced elastic modulus (65 GPa) of the compact thin film were found to decrease by increasing the intragranular porosity controlled by the electrochemical deposition potential of ZnO. Focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sections of residual imprints reveal that the decrease in hardness and elastic modulus observed is primarily due to compaction of the nano-porous structure. In situ SEM compression of FIB machined micropillars reveals brittle fracture and near theoretical strengths in the compact film (~ 2 GPa), and a higher flaw tolerant response despite lower failure stress in the most porous film. - Highlights: • Micromechanical behavior of intragranular, nanoporous electrodeposited ZnO thin films • Densification by closure of porosity during indentation • Resistance to fracture by crack deflection and blunting in porous films during microcompression

  11. Domains of States of Chemical Systems: Le Chatelier Response, Structure of the Domains and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Zilbergleyt, B.

    2005-01-01

    The paper investigates influence of the Le Chatelier response on the chemical system behavior under stress, the shape of its domains of states in terms of static and dynamic bifurcation diagrams, and the system proneness to evolution. The usage of maps in thermodynamics of chemical systems is discussed. Thermodynamics of chemical triggers, designed in similarity with laser, is described. Results of this work are important in context of new model of chemical equilibrium.

  12. Nanopore DNA sequencing with MspA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Ian M; Butler, Tom Z; Collins, Marcus D; Manrao, Elizabeth; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H

    2010-09-14

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a direct, fast, and inexpensive DNA sequencing technology. The simplest form of nanopore DNA sequencing utilizes the hypothesis that individual nucleotides of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore will uniquely modulate an ionic current flowing through the pore, allowing the record of the current to yield the DNA sequence. We demonstrate that the ionic current through the engineered Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A, MspA, has the ability to distinguish all four DNA nucleotides and resolve single-nucleotides in single-stranded DNA when double-stranded DNA temporarily holds the nucleotides in the pore constriction. Passing DNA with a series of double-stranded sections through MspA provides proof of principle of a simple DNA sequencing method using a nanopore. These findings highlight the importance of MspA in the future of nanopore sequencing. PMID:20798343

  13. Nanoporous metals for advanced energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art research in nanoporous metals for potential applications in advanced energy fields, including proton exchange membrane fuel cells, Li batteries (Li ion, Li-S, and Li-O2), and supercapacitors. The related structural design and performance of nanoporous metals as well as possible mechanisms and challenges are fully addressed. The formation mechanisms of nanoporous metals during dealloying, the microstructures of nanoporous metals and characterization methods, as well as miscrostructural regulation of nanoporous metals through alloy design of precursors and surface diffusion control are also covered in detail. This is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, graduate students, and government/industry officers who are in charge of R&D investments and strategy related to energy technologies.

  14. Flow-Injection Responses of Diffusion Processes and Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    manifold may be characterised by a diffusion coefficient that depends on flow rate, denoted as the kinematic diffusion coefficient. The description was applied to systems involving species of chromium, both in the case of simple diffusion and in the case of chemical reactions. It is suggested that it may...... be used in the resolution of FIA profiles to obtain information about the content of interference’s, in the study of chemical reaction kinetics and to measure absolute concentrations within the FIA-detector cell.......The technique of Flow-injection Analysis (FIA), now aged 25 years, offers unique analytical methods that are fast, reliable and consuming an absolute minimum of chemicals. These advantages together with its inherent feasibility for automation warrant the future applications of FIA as an attractive...

  15. Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Zilbergleyt, B

    2012-01-01

    The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combinati...

  16. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  17. Functionalized Nanoporous Track-Etched b-PVDF Membrane Electrodes for Heavy Metal Determination by Square-Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessbousse H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Track-etched functionalized nanoporous β-PVDF membrane electrodes, or functionalized membrane electrodes (FMEs, are electrodes made from track-etched, poly(acrylic acid (PAA functionalized nanoporous β-poly(vinylidene fluoride (β-PVDF membranes with thin porous Au films sputtered on each side as electrodes. To form the β-PVDF nanoporous membranes, β-PVDF films are irradiated by swift heavy ions. After irradiation, radical tracks are stable in the membranes. Chemical etching removes some of the radical tracks revealing nanopores. Radicals, remaining in the pores, initiate radio grafting of PAA from the pore walls of the nanoporous β-PVDF. PAA is a cation exchange polymer that adsorbs metal ions, such as Pb2+, from aqueous solutions thus concentrating the ions into the membrane. After a calibrated time the FME is transferred to an electrochemical cell for square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry analysis.

  18. Flow-Injection Responses of Diffusion Processes and Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Flow-injection Analysis (FIA), now aged 25 years, offers unique analytical methods that are fast, reliable and consuming an absolute minimum of chemicals. These advantages together with its inherent feasibility for automation warrant the future applications of FIA as an attractive...... tool of automated analytical chemistry. The need for an even lower consumption of chemicals and for computer analysis has motivated a study of the FIA peak itself, that is, a theoretical model was developed, that provides detailed knowledge of the FIA profile. It was shown that the flow in a FIA...

  19. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Satarifard, Vahid; Foroutan, Masumeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assesse...

  20. Chemical response to groundwater extraction southeast of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizar-Alvarez, R.; Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Ángeles-Serrano, G.; Hergt, T.; Cardona, A.

    An alternative procedure of pumping test data interpretation is used through a joint analysis of the standard time-drawdown curve and simultaneous field measurements of total dissolved solids (TDS); additional support is also provided by the temperature of extracted groundwater and the chemical composition of extracted water. The overall information was applied to characterise the groundwater flow system and its sources, the hydraulic conditions of the aquifer and hydraulic response of extraction boreholes. The analysis of this information suggests the presence of: (i) a local flow system that circulates at shallow depth through basalt units interstratified with fine grained sediments and pyroclastics; these materials contain water with TDS of 127-600 mg/L and Na of 24-178 mg/L, and temperature of 18-19.5 °C (ii) intermediate flow in granular material under reducing conditions by the oxidation of organic matter in aquitard sediments; this water has TDS and Na values of 203-940 and 30-370 mg/L, respectively, and temperatures of about 20-22 °C (iii) regional flow through volcanic rocks and limestone, with TDS content of 300-700 mg/L, Na of 80-230 mg/L and temperature of 23.0-24.8 °C. The hydraulic response and the chemical composition of the water produced by some boreholes are affected by the seepage inflow from sewage effluents, the input from an overlying aquitard unit and the inducement of regional flow. The conception of the flow regime thus obtained allowed the recognition of hydraulic conditions which were more consistent with the hydrogeological setting, than if only a time vs. drawdown test analysis would have been carried out. L'interprétation simultanée de pompages d'essais, des données de température et résidu sec (RS) de L'eau souterraine pompée, mesurées simultanément sur le terrain et la composition chimique de L'eau pompée comme un aide additionnelle, est utilisée comme une différent procédure pour interpréter les pompages d'essais. La

  1. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site

  2. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

  3. Track-etched nanopores in spin-coated polycarbonate films applied as sputtering mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin polycarbonate films were spin-coated on silicon substrates and subsequently irradiated with 1-GeV U ions. The ion tracks in the polymer layer were chemically etched yielding nanopores of about 40 nm diameter. In a second process, the nanoporous polymer film acted as mask for structuring the Si substrate underneath. Sputtering with 5-keV Xe ions produced surface craters of depth ∼150 nm and diameter ∼80 nm. This arrangement can be used for the fabrication of track-based nanostructures with self-aligned apertures.

  4. Non-Faradaic Energy Storage by Room Temperature Ionic Liquids in Nanoporous Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatamanu, Jenel; Vatamanu, Mihaela; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2015-06-23

    The enhancement of non-Faradaic charge and energy density stored by ionic electrolytes in nanostructured electrodes is an intriguing issue of great practical importance for energy storage in electric double layer capacitors. On the basis of extensive molecular dynamics simulations of various carbon-based nanoporous electrodes and room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes, we identify atomistic mechanisms and correlations between electrode/electrolyte structures that lead to capacitance enhancement. In the symmetric electrode setup with nanopores having atomically smooth walls, most RTILs showed up to 50% capacitance increase compared to infinitely wide pore. Extensive simulations using asymmetric electrodes and pores with atomically rough surfaces demonstrated that tuning of electrode nanostructure could lead to further substantial capacitance enhancement. Therefore, the capacitance in nanoporous electrodes can be increased due to a combination of two effects: (i) the screening of ionic interactions by nanopore walls upon electrolyte nanoconfinement, and (ii) the optimization of nanopore structure (volume, surface roughness) to take into account the asymmetry between cation and anion chemical structures. PMID:26038979

  5. Preparation and characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces based on hexamethyldisilazane-modified nanoporous alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Deniz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Superhydrophobic nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (alumina surfaces were prepared using treatment with vapor-phase hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS. Nanoporous alumina substrates were first made using a two-step anodization process. Subsequently, a repeated modification procedure was employed for efficient incorporation of the terminal methyl groups of HMDS to the alumina surface. Morphology of the surfaces was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, showing hexagonally ordered circular nanopores with approximately 250 nm in diameter and 300 nm of interpore distances. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance analysis showed the presence of chemically bound methyl groups on the HMDS-modified nanoporous alumina surfaces. Wetting properties of these surfaces were characterized by measurements of the water contact angle which was found to reach 153.2 ± 2°. The contact angle values on HMDS-modified nanoporous alumina surfaces were found to be significantly larger than the average water contact angle of 82.9 ± 3° on smooth thin film alumina surfaces that underwent the same HMDS modification steps. The difference between the two cases was explained by the Cassie-Baxter theory of rough surface wetting.

  6. Monitoring tetracycline through a solid-state nanopore sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuechuan; Chen, Yanling; Fu, Yongqi; Ying, Cuifeng; Feng, Yanxiao; Huang, Qimeng; Wang, Chao; Pei, De-Sheng; Wang, Deqiang

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics as emerging environmental contaminants, are widely used in both human and veterinary medicines. A solid-state nanopore sensing method is reported in this article to detect Tetracycline, which is based on Tet-off and Tet-on systems. rtTA (reverse tetracycline-controlled trans-activator) and TRE (Tetracycline Responsive Element) could bind each other under the action of Tetracycline to form one complex. When the complex passes through nanopores with 8 ~ 9 nanometers in diameter, we could detect the concentrations of Tet from 2 ng/mL to 2000 ng/mL. According to the Logistic model, we could define three growth zones of Tetracycline for rtTA and TRE. The slow growth zone is 0–39.5 ng/mL. The rapid growth zone is 39.5−529.7 ng/mL. The saturated zone is > 529.7 ng/mL. Compared to the previous methods, the nanopore sensor could detect and quantify these different kinds of molecule at the single-molecule level. PMID:27306259

  7. Monitoring tetracycline through a solid-state nanopore sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuechuan; Chen, Yanling; Fu, Yongqi; Ying, Cuifeng; Feng, Yanxiao; Huang, Qimeng; Wang, Chao; Pei, De-Sheng; Wang, Deqiang

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics as emerging environmental contaminants, are widely used in both human and veterinary medicines. A solid-state nanopore sensing method is reported in this article to detect Tetracycline, which is based on Tet-off and Tet-on systems. rtTA (reverse tetracycline-controlled trans-activator) and TRE (Tetracycline Responsive Element) could bind each other under the action of Tetracycline to form one complex. When the complex passes through nanopores with 8 ~ 9 nanometers in diameter, we could detect the concentrations of Tet from 2 ng/mL to 2000 ng/mL. According to the Logistic model, we could define three growth zones of Tetracycline for rtTA and TRE. The slow growth zone is 0–39.5 ng/mL. The rapid growth zone is 39.5‑529.7 ng/mL. The saturated zone is > 529.7 ng/mL. Compared to the previous methods, the nanopore sensor could detect and quantify these different kinds of molecule at the single-molecule level.

  8. Glass nanopore-based ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jun Ho; Kim, Juneho; Cha, Geun Sig; Nam, Hakhyun; White, Ryan J; White, Henry S; Brown, Richard B

    2007-05-15

    Glass nanopore-based all-solid-state ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have been developed to probe the distribution of ionic species at micro- or submicrometer-length scales, e.g., mapping of ion flux through micrometer-sized pores. The all-solid-state ISE was fabricated by sealing a conically etched platinum wire (d = 25-microm; radius of etched tip scanning electrochemical microscope experiments to map the ion flux through a micropore. The same ISE was also used as the base transducer of the neutral carrier-doped solvent polymeric membrane. The optimized polymer membranes used for the glass nanopore-based all-solid-state ISE require a higher ratio of plasticizer/polymer (9/1) compared to those for conventional ISE (2/1). An ISE based on deposition of an IrO2 layer at the base of a glass nanopore electrode exhibited a highly sensitive response (79.7 +/- 2.3 mV/pH) to variations in pH and could be used for approximately 3 weeks. PMID:17411008

  9. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses can induce nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Short infrared (IR) laser pulses on the order of hundreds of microseconds to single milliseconds with typical wavelengths of 1800-2100 nm, have shown the capability to reversibly stimulate action potentials (AP) in neuronal cells. While the IR stimulation technique has proven successful for several applications, the exact mechanism(s) underlying the AP generation has remained elusive. To better understand how IR pulses cause AP stimulation, we determined the threshold for the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Using a surrogate calcium ion, thallium, which is roughly the same shape and charge, but lacks the biological functionality of calcium, we recorded the flow of thallium ions into an exposed cell in the presence of a battery of channel antagonists. The entry of thallium into the cell indicated that the ions entered via nanopores. The data presented here demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental effects of IR stimulation and speculates that nanopores, formed in response to the IR exposure, play an upstream role in the generation of AP.

  10. Chemical response of lithiated graphite with deuterium irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C N; B. Heim; Allain, Jean Paul

    2011-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been found to enhance plasma performance for graphite walled fusion devices such as TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX. Among observed plasma enhancements is a reduction in edge density and reduced deuterium recycling. The mechanism by which lithiated graphite retains deuterium is largely unknown. Under controlled laboratory conditions, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to observe the chemical changes that occur on ATJ graphite after lithium depositi...

  11. A biosensor based on graphene nanoribbon with nanopores: a first-principles devices-design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Fang-Ping; Peng Sheng-Lin; Zhang Hua; Weng Li-Bo; Xu Hui

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor device, built from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with nanopores, was designed and studied by firstprinciples quantum transport simulation. We have demonstrated the intrinsic transport properties of the device and the effect of different nucleobases on device properties when they are located in the nanopores of GNRs. It was found that the device's current changes remarkably with the species of nucleobases, which originates from their different chemical compositions and coupling strengths with GNRs. In addition, our first-principles results clearly reveal that the distinguished ability of a device's current depends on the position of the pore to some extent. These results may present a new way to read off the nucleobases sequence of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule by such GNRs-based device with designed nanopores

  12. Surface modification of nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene by atom transfer radical polymerization or click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova, Katja; Schulte, Lars; Vigild, Martin E; Ndoni, Sokol

    2010-02-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry were used to obtain functional nanoporous polymers based on nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) with gyroid morphology. The ATRP monolith initiator was prepared by immobilizing bromoester initiators onto the pore walls through two different methodologies: (1) three-step chemical conversion of double bonds of PB into bromoisobutyrate, and (2) photochemical functionalization of PB with bromoisobutyrate groups. Azide functional groups were attached onto the pore walls before click reaction with alkynated MPEG. Following ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while the morphology was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:20099923

  13. Gas Flow in Nanoporous Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    Sofia: -, 2009 - (Petrova, G.; Vayssilov, G.), s. 137 ISBN 978-954-323-558-2. [International Symposium Advanced Micro- and Mesoporous Materials /3./. Albena (BG), 06.09.2009-09.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1093; GA ČR GA101/09/1633; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400720804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : molecule scattering * surface diffusion * nanopores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://bg-conferences.org/micro2009_new_1/

  14. Water behaviour in nanoporous aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel, E-mail: Konstantin.Smirnov@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite Lille 1, Sciences et Technologie, CNRS, Batiment C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-07-21

    This paper briefly reviews results of molecular dynamics simulation studies of water confined in nanoporous aluminosilicates. The behaviour of confined molecules is shown to be influenced by the nature of the host structure, and the size and the topology of the voids. For some of the systems discussed the ambiguity in results of different modelling studies call for the use of extended potential and structural models. Thus, the use of polarizable force fields was shown to be necessary to take into account the variation of the molecular dipole of confined molecules in different environments.

  15. Nitrogen-Containing Nanoporous Coal for Electrodes of Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Ostafiychuk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical activation of nanoporous carbon material with nitric acid, followed by activation in a stream of argon at different temperatures, initiates formation on the surface of the material of amide, pyrrole and pyridine nitrogen compounds that improves the hydrophilic properties and increases its electrical conductivity. Value of the specific capacity of N-enriched carbon material in KOH aqueous solution increases by 30 % and an additional heat treatment in the temperature range of 440-460°C increases it by 10 %.

  16. Nanoporous gold assembly of glucose oxidase for electrochemical biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xinxin; Ulstrup, Jens; Li, Hui;

    2014-01-01

    (GOx) has been brought to assemble on NPG via surface chemical reactions to form enzyme modified NPG nanomaterial with promising sensitivity for glucose detection. Cyclic voltammetry and single-potential step chronoamperometry (SPSC) are employed to study the electrochemical behavior of both bare and......Nanoporous gold (NPG) is composed of three-dimensional (3D) bicontinuous nanostructures with large surface area. Nano-channels inside NPG provide an ideal local environment for immobilization of enzyme molecules with expected stabilization of the protein molecules. In this work, glucose oxidase...... properties of NPG materials aiming at evolving enzymatic biosensors with high performance. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....

  17. Pink noise of ionic conductance through single artificial nanopores revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Tasserit, C.; Koutsioumpas, A.; Lairez, D; Zalczer, G.; Clochard, M.-C

    2010-01-01

    We report voltage-clamp measurements through single conical nanopore obtained by chemical etching of a single ion-track in polyimide film. Special attention is paid on the pink noise of the ionic current (i.e. $1/f$ noise) measured with different filling liquids. The relative pink noise amplitude is almost independent of concentration and pH for KCl solutions, but varies strongly using ionic liquids. In particular we show that depending on the ionic liquid, the transport of charge carriers is...

  18. Development of nanoporous gold electrodes for electrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Xueling; Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Boisen, Anja; Tenje, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have used simple microfabrication techniques and chemical de-alloying of co-sputtered AgAu alloys to create nanoporous gold (np-Au) electrodes. The physical properties of the np-Au electrodes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis......, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy and profilometer. The electrochemical performance of the np-Au electrodes was measured by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have fabricated np-Au electrodes with pore sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm, directly related to the Ag:Au ratio...

  19. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David B.; Fares, Stephen J.; Tran, Kim L.; Langham, Mary E.

    2012-04-17

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  20. On the stability of surface-confined nanoporous molecular networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assembly of molecular building blocks into two-dimensional nanoporous networks has been a topic of broad interest for many years. However, various factors govern the specific outcome of the self-assembly process, and understanding and controlling these are key to successful creation. In this work, the self-assembly of two alkylated dehydrobenzo[12]annulene building blocks was compared at the liquid-solid interface. It turned out that only a small chemical modification within the building blocks resulted in enhanced domain sizes and stability of the porous packing relative to the dense linear packing. Applying a thermodynamic model for phase transition revealed some key aspects for network formation

  1. Unusually Stable Hysteresis in the pH-Response of Poly(Acrylic Acid) Brushes Confined within Nanoporous Block Polymer Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Jacob L; Mulvenna, Ryan A; Boudouris, Bryan W; Phillip, William A

    2016-06-01

    Stimuli-responsive soft materials are a highly studied field due to their wide-ranging applications; however, only a small group of these materials display hysteretic responses to stimuli. Moreover, previous reports of this behavior have typically shown it to be short-lived. In this work, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) chains at extremely high grafting densities and confined in nanoscale pores displayed a unique long-lived hysteretic behavior caused by their ability to form a metastable hydrogen bond network. Hydraulic permeability measurements demonstrated that the conformation of the PAA chains exhibited a hysteretic dependence on pH, where different effective pore diameters arose in a pH range of 3 to 8, as determined by the pH of the previous environment. Further studies using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the fraction of ionized PAA moieties depended on the thin film history; this was corroborated by metal adsorption capacity, which demonstrated the same pH dependence. This hysteresis was shown to be persistent, enduring for days, in a manner unlike most other systems. The hypothesis that hydrogen bonding among PAA units contributed to the hysteretic behavior was supported by experiments with a urea solution, which disrupted the metastable hydrogen bonded state of PAA toward its ionized state. The ability of PAA to hydrogen bond within these confined pores results in a stable and tunable hysteresis not previously observed in homopolymer materials. An enhanced understanding of the polymer chemistry and physics governing this hysteresis gives insight into the design and manipulation of next-generation sensors and gating materials in nanoscale applications. PMID:27172428

  2. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-10-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing.

  3. Ural River benthic communities response on the chemical spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ural River is the second river of the North Caspian basin, on the north-west border of the Kazakhstan and Russian. The middle flow of the Ural River is limited by the dam of Iriklin water reservoirs (about 80 km up from Orsk town, Orenburg district) to the mouth of Barbastay River (about 45 km down from Ural'sk town). On 13--17 November 1991, after an industrial incident in Orsk oil refinery enterprise effluent polluted the Ural River. An assessment of the Middle flow Ural River benthic communities by oil and phenols spill response is described. The paper is based on a study of the short-term response of benthic biocenosises compared with natural transformation of the community structure before pollution

  4. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field. PMID:27115249

  5. Chemosensory responses to chemical and visual stimuli in five species of colubrid snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Saviola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Snakes utilize chemical and visual stimuli during predation, however the emphasis on these cues and which cues are used to initiate predation varies among species. For example, rattlesnakes using the ambush strategy rely on chemical cues to locate an ambush station, then visual and thermal cues to initiate envenomating strikes, then chemical cues again to track prey. By contrast, many natricine snakes use chemical cues to initiate predation, increasing the rate of tongue flicking regardless of whether visual cues are present. The present study examined the individual and interactive effects of chemical and visual stimuli of prey on the predatory behavior of five snake taxa representing three feeding guilds. Bull snakes (Pituophis catenifer, Eastern Corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus, and Midland Rat snakes (Scotophis spiloides have a diet primarily consisting of mammals; Western Fox snakes (Mintonius vulpina prey primarily on bird eggs; and Common Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis getula prey equally on mammals and reptiles. Three patterns of response to chemical and visual stimuli of the test prey (Mus musculus were observed. Mammal specialists responded to chemical cues. Fox snakes responded to visual cues, but not to chemical cues. Kingsnakes exhibited increased rates of tongue flicking in response to both chemical and visual stimuli. This study suggests correlations between the evolution of prey preference, foraging ecology and the utilization of chemical or visual stimuli by snakes.

  6. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5–C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV–vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA. (paper)

  7. MspA nanopores from subunit dimers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Pavlenok

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore

  8. MspA nanopores from subunit dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenok, Mikhail; Derrington, Ian M; Gundlach, Jens H; Niederweis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) forms an octameric channel and represents the founding member of a new family of pore proteins. Control of subunit stoichiometry is important to tailor MspA for nanotechnological applications. In this study, two MspA monomers were connected by linkers ranging from 17 to 62 amino acids in length. The oligomeric pore proteins were purified from M. smegmatis and were shown to form functional channels in lipid bilayer experiments. These results indicated that the peptide linkers did not prohibit correct folding and localization of MspA. However, expression levels were reduced by 10-fold compared to wild-type MspA. MspA is ideal for nanopore sequencing due to its unique pore geometry and its robustness. To assess the usefulness of MspA made from dimeric subunits for DNA sequencing, we linked two M1-MspA monomers, whose constriction zones were modified to enable DNA translocation. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that this construct also formed functional channels. Voltage gating of MspA pores made from M1 monomers and M1-M1 dimers was identical indicating similar structural and dynamic channel properties. Glucose uptake in M. smegmatis cells lacking porins was restored by expressing the dimeric mspA M1 gene indicating correct folding and localization of M1-M1 pores in their native membrane. Single-stranded DNA hairpins produced identical ionic current blockades in pores made from monomers and subunit dimers demonstrating that M1-M1 pores are suitable for DNA sequencing. This study provides the proof of principle that production of single-chain MspA pores in M. smegmatis is feasible and paves the way for generating MspA pores with altered stoichiometries. Subunit dimers enable better control of the chemical and physical properties of the constriction zone of MspA. This approach will be valuable both in understanding transport across the outer membrane in mycobacteria and in tailoring MspA for nanopore sequencing of DNA. PMID

  9. Nanopore sensors for nucleic acid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Bala Murali; Bashir, Rashid

    2011-10-01

    Nanopore analysis is an emerging technique that involves using a voltage to drive molecules through a nanoscale pore in a membrane between two electrolytes, and monitoring how the ionic current through the nanopore changes as single molecules pass through it. This approach allows charged polymers (including single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and RNA) to be analysed with subnanometre resolution and without the need for labels or amplification. Recent advances suggest that nanopore-based sensors could be competitive with other third-generation DNA sequencing technologies, and may be able to rapidly and reliably sequence the human genome for under $1,000. In this article we review the use of nanopore technology in DNA sequencing, genetics and medical diagnostics.

  10. Nanopore Back Titration Analysis of Dipicolinic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Liang; Guan, Xiyun

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a novel label-free nanopore back titration method for the detection of dipicolinic acid, a marker molecule for bacterial spores. By competitive binding of the target analyte and a large ligand probe to metal ions, dipicolinic acid could be sensitively and selectively detected. This nanopore back titration approach should find useful applications in the detection of other species of medical, biological, or environmental importance if their direct detection is difficult to achieve.

  11. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

  12. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation

  13. Ontogenetic shift in response to prey-derived chemical cues in prairie rattlesnakes Crotalus viridis viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. SAVIOLA, David CHISZAR, Stephen P. MACKESSY

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Snakes often have specialized diets that undergo a shift from one prey type to another depending on the life stage of the snake. Crotalus viridis viridis (prairie rattlesnake takes different prey at different life stages, and neonates typically prey on ectotherms, while adults feed almost entirely on small endotherms. We hypothesized that elevated rates of tongue flicking to chemical stimuli should correlate with particular prey consumed, and that this response shifts from one prey type to another as individuals age. To examine if an ontogenetic shift in response to chemical cues occurred, we recorded the rate of tongue flicking for 25 neonate, 20 subadult, and 20 adult (average SVL = 280.9, 552, 789.5 mm, respectively wild-caught C. v. viridis to chemical stimuli presented on a cotton-tipped applicator; water-soluble cues from two ectotherms (prairie lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, and house gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus, two endotherms (deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus and lab mouse, Mus musculus, and water controls were used. Neonates tongue flicked significantly more to chemical cues of their common prey, S. undulatus, than to all other chemical cues; however, the response to this lizard’s chemical cues decreased in adult rattlesnakes. Subadults tongue flicked with a higher rate of tongue flicking to both S. undulatus and P. maniculatus than to all other treatments, and adults tongue flicked significantly more to P. maniculatus than to all other chemical cues. In addition, all three sub-classes demonstrated a greater response for natural prey chemical cues over chemical stimuli of prey not encountered in the wild (M. musculus and H. frenatus. This shift in chemosensory response correlated with the previously described ontogenetic shifts in C. v. viridis diet. Because many vipers show a similar ontogenetic shift in diet and venom composition, we suggest that this shift in prey cue discrimination is likely a general phenomenon among viperid

  14. Osmium-Based Pyrimidine Contrast Tags for Enhanced Nanopore-Based DNA Base Discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Y Henley

    Full Text Available Nanopores are a promising platform in next generation DNA sequencing. In this platform, an individual DNA strand is threaded into nanopore using an electric field, and enzyme-based ratcheting is used to move the strand through the detector. During this process the residual ion current through the pore is measured, which exhibits unique levels for different base combinations inside the pore. While this approach has shown great promise, accuracy is not optimal because the four bases are chemically comparable to one another, leading to small differences in current obstruction. Nucleobase-specific chemical tagging can be a viable approach to enhancing the contrast between different bases in the sequence. Herein we show that covalent modification of one or both of the pyrimidine bases by an osmium bipyridine complex leads to measureable differences in the blockade amplitudes of DNA molecules. We qualitatively determine the degree of osmylation of a DNA strand by passing it through a solid-state nanopore, and are thus able to gauge T and C base content. In addition, we show that osmium bipyridine reacts with dsDNA, leading to substantially different current blockade levels than exhibited for bare dsDNA. This work serves as a proof of principle for nanopore sequencing and mapping via base-specific DNA osmylation.

  15. Pulsed plasma polymerization for controlling shrinkage and surface composition of nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asghar, Waseem; Ilyas, Azhar; Iqbal, Samir M [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, TX 76011 (United States); Deshmukh, Rajendra R; Timmons, Richard B [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Sumitsawan, Sulak, E-mail: smiqbal@uta.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Solid-state nanopores have emerged as sensors for single molecules and these have been employed to examine the biophysical properties of an increasingly large variety of biomolecules. Herein we describe a novel and facile approach to precisely adjust the pore size, while simultaneously controlling the surface chemical composition of the solid-state nanopores. Specifically, nanopores fabricated using standard ion beam technology are shrunk to the requisite molecular dimensions via the deposition of highly conformal pulsed plasma generated thin polymeric films. The plasma treatment process provides accurate control of the pore size as the conformal film deposition depends linearly on the deposition time. Simultaneously, the pore and channel chemical compositions are controlled by appropriate selection of the gaseous monomer and plasma conditions employed in the deposition of the polymer films. The controlled pore shrinkage is characterized with high resolution AFM, and the film chemistry of the plasma generated polymers is analyzed with FTIR and XPS. The stability and practical utility of this new approach is demonstrated by successful single molecule sensing of double-stranded DNA. The process offers a viable new advance in the fabrication of tailored nanopores, in terms of both the pore size and surface composition, for usage in a wide range of emerging applications.

  16. Film Growth on Nanoporous Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James; Zhao, Chenwei; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James

    Self-ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) provides an easy way to fabricate nano structured material, such as nano wires and nano particles. We employ AAO as substrates and focus on the thermally evaporated film growth on the surface of the substrate. With various materials deposited onto the substrate, we find the films show different structures, e,g. ordered array of nano particles for Lead and nanohoneycomb structure for Silver. We relate the differing behaviors to the difference of surface energy and diffusion constant. To verify this, the effect of substrate temperature on the film growth has been explored and the structure of the film has been successfully changed through the process. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grants No. DMR-1307290.

  17. Quantized ionic conductance in nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwolak, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lagerqvist, Johan [UCSD; Di Ventra, Massimilliano [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    Ionic transport in nanopores is a fundamentally and technologically important problem in view of its ubiquitous occurrence in biological processes and its impact on DNA sequencing applications. Using microscopic calculations, we show that ion transport may exhibit strong non-liDearities as a function of the pore radius reminiscent of the conductance quantization steps as a function of the transverse cross section of quantum point contacts. In the present case, however, conductance steps originate from the break up of the hydration layers that form around ions in aqueous solution. Once in the pore, the water molecules form wavelike structures due to multiple scattering at the surface of the pore walls and interference with the radial waves around the ion. We discuss these effects as well as the conditions under which the step-like features in the ionic conductance should be experimentally observable.

  18. Ion selectivity of graphene nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Ryan C; Kuan, Aaron T; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2016-01-01

    As population growth continues to outpace development of water infrastructure in many countries, desalination (the removal of salts from seawater) at high energy efficiency will likely become a vital source of fresh water. Due to its atomic thinness combined with its mechanical strength, porous graphene may be particularly well-suited for electrodialysis desalination, in which ions are removed under an electric field via ion-selective pores. Here, we show that single graphene nanopores preferentially permit the passage of K(+) cations over Cl(-) anions with selectivity ratios of over 100 and conduct monovalent cations up to 5 times more rapidly than divalent cations. Surprisingly, the observed K(+)/Cl(-) selectivity persists in pores even as large as about 20 nm in diameter, suggesting that high throughput, highly selective graphene electrodialysis membranes can be fabricated without the need for subnanometer control over pore size. PMID:27102837

  19. Ion selectivity of graphene nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Ryan C.; Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2016-01-01

    As population growth continues to outpace development of water infrastructure in many countries, desalination (the removal of salts from seawater) at high energy efficiency will likely become a vital source of fresh water. Due to its atomic thinness combined with its mechanical strength, porous graphene may be particularly well-suited for electrodialysis desalination, in which ions are removed under an electric field via ion-selective pores. Here, we show that single graphene nanopores preferentially permit the passage of K+ cations over Cl− anions with selectivity ratios of over 100 and conduct monovalent cations up to 5 times more rapidly than divalent cations. Surprisingly, the observed K+/Cl− selectivity persists in pores even as large as about 20 nm in diameter, suggesting that high throughput, highly selective graphene electrodialysis membranes can be fabricated without the need for subnanometer control over pore size. PMID:27102837

  20. Stepwise Nanopore Evolution in One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Jang Wook

    2010-04-14

    We report that established simple lithium (Li) ion battery cycles can be used to produce nanopores inside various useful one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures such as zinc oxide, silicon, and silver nanowires. Moreover, porosities of these 1D nanomaterials can be controlled in a stepwise manner by the number of Li-battery cycles. Subsequent pore characterization at the end of each cycle allows us to obtain detailed snapshots of the distinct pore evolution properties in each material due to their different atomic diffusion rates and types of chemical bonds. Also, this stepwise characterization led us to the first observation of pore size increases during cycling, which can be interpreted as a similar phenomenon to Ostwald ripening in analogous nanoparticle cases. Finally, we take advantage of the unique combination of nanoporosity and 1D materials and demonstrate nanoporous silicon nanowires (poSiNWs) as excellent supercapacitor (SC) electrodes in high power operations compared to existing devices with activated carbon. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

    2014-05-20

    Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

  2. Nano-porous calcium phosphate balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ildyko; Kosmella, Sabine; Prietzel, Claudia; Bagdahn, Christian; Koetz, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    By dropping a NaH2PO4·H2O precursor solution to a CaCl2 solution at 90°C under continuous stirring in presence of two biopolymers, i.e. gelatin (G) and chitosan (C), supramolecular calcium phosphate (CP) card house structures are formed. Light microscopic investigations in combination with scanning electron microscopy show that the GC-based flower-like structure is constructed from very thin CP platelets. Titration experiments indicate that H-bonding between both biopolymers is responsible for the synergistic effect in presence of both polymers. Gelatin-chitosan-water complexes play an important role with regard to supramolecular ordering. FTIR spectra in combination with powder X-ray diffraction show that after burning off all organic components (heating up >600°C) dicalcium and tricalcium phosphate crystallites are formed. From high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) it is obvious to conclude, that individual crystal platelets are dicalcium phosphates, which build up ball-like supramolecular structures. The results reveal that the GC guided crystal growth leads to nano-porous supramolecular structures, potentially attractive candidates for bone repair. PMID:26052107

  3. Plasmonic devices and sensors built from ordered nanoporous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Kobayashi, Yoji (University of California, Berkeley); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Long, Jeffrey R. (University of California, Berkeley); Robertson, Ian M. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); House, Stephen D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Graham, Dennis D. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Chang, Noel N. (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); El Gabaly Marquez, Farid

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this project is to lay the foundation for using ordered nanoporous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to create devices and sensors whose properties are determined by the dimensions of the MOF lattice. Our hypothesis is that because of the very short (tens of angstroms) distances between pores within the unit cell of these materials, enhanced electro-optical properties will be obtained when the nanopores are infiltrated to create nanoclusters of metals and other materials. Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles in disordered templates or in solution typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report results of synthetic efforts. First, we describe a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions {le} 1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag{sub 3} clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible. Second, a preliminary study of methods to incorporate fulleride (K{sub 3}C{sub 60}) guest molecules within MOF pores that will impart electrical conductivity is described.

  4. Reticulated Nanoporous Polymers by Controlled Polymerization-Induced Microphase Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Myungeun; Hillmyer, Marc A. (UMM)

    2013-04-08

    Materials with percolating mesopores are attractive for applications such as catalysis, nanotemplating, and separations. Polymeric frameworks are particularly appealing because the chemical composition and the surface chemistry are readily tunable. We report on the preparation of robust nanoporous polymers with percolating pores in the 4- to 8-nanometer range from a microphase-separated bicontinuous precursor. We combined polymerization-induced phase separation with in situ block polymer formation from a mixture of multifunctional monomers and a chemically etchable polymer containing a terminal chain transfer agent. This marriage results in microphase separation of the mixture into continuous domains of the etchable polymer and the emergent cross-linked polymer. Precise control over pore size distribution and mechanical integrity renders these materials particularly suited for various advanced applications.

  5. Electrochemical Properties of Nanoporous Carbon Material in Aqueous Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiy, Bogdan I; Budzulyak, Ivan M; Vashchynsky, Vitalii M; Ivanichok, Nataliia Ya; Nykoliuk, Marian O

    2016-12-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the behavior of capacitor type electrochemical system in the К(+)-containing aqueous electrolytes. Nanoporous carbon material (NCM) was used as the electrode material, obtained by carbonization of plant raw materials with the following chemical activation. Optimization of pore size distribution was carried out by chemical-thermal method using potassium hydroxide as activator. It is shown that obtained materials have high values of capacitance which is realized by charge storage on the electrical double layer and by pseudocapacitive ion storage on the surface of the material. It is established that based on NCM, electrochemical capacitors are stable in all range of current density and material capacity essentially depends on appropriate choice of electrolyte. PMID:26759354

  6. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  7. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established

  8. First Implantation of Silicon Nanopore Membrane Hemofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensinger, Clark; Karp, Seth; Kant, Rishi; Chui, Benjamin W; Goldman, Kenneth; Yeager, Torin; Gould, Edward R; Buck, Amanda; Laneve, David C; Groszek, Joseph J; Roy, Shuvo; Fissell, William H

    2016-01-01

    An implantable hemofilter for the treatment of kidney failure depends critically on the transport characteristics of the membrane and the biocompatibility of the membrane, cartridge, and blood conduits. A novel membrane with slit-shaped pores optimizes the trade-off between permeability and selectivity, enabling implanted therapy. Sustained (3-8) day function of an implanted parallel-plate hemofilter with minimal anticoagulation was achieved by considering biocompatibility at the subnanometer scale of chemical interactions and the millimeter scale of blood fluid dynamics. A total of 400 nm-thick polysilicon flat sheet membranes with 5-8 nm × 2 micron slit-shaped pores were surface-modified with polyethylene glycol. Hemofilter cartridge geometries were refined based on computational fluid dynamics models of blood flow. In an uncontrolled pilot study, silicon filters were implanted in six class A dogs. Cartridges were connected to the cardiovascular system by anastamoses to the aorta and inferior vena cava and filtrate was drained to collection pouches positioned in the peritoneum. Pain medicine and acetylsalicylic acid were administered twice daily until the hemofilters were harvested on postoperative days 3 (n = 2), 4 (n = 2), 5 (n = 1), and 8 (n = 1). No hemofilters were thrombosed. Animals treated for 5 and 8 days had microscopic fractures in the silicon nanopore membranes and 20-50 ml of transudative (albumin sieving coefficient θalb ~ 0.5 - 0.7) fluid in the collection pouches at the time of explant. Shorter experimental durations (3-4 days) resulted in filtration volumes similar to predictions based on mean arterial pressures and membrane hydraulic permeability and (θalb ~ 0.2 - 0.3), similar to preimplantation measurements. In conclusion, a detailed mechanistic and materials science attention to blood-material interactions allows implanted hemofilters to resist thrombosis. Additional testing is needed to determine optimal membrane characteristics and

  9. Biomimetic phosphate assay based on nanopores obtained by immobilization of zirconium(IV) on a film of polyethyleneimine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomimetic ion-responsive single nanopore sensor was constructed by immobilizing zirconium(IV) ion on a film of poly(ethylene terephthalate) whose surface was modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI) to form nanopores. PEI is an excellent metal-chelating ligand that was initially modified on the surface of the membrane through amidation. The Zr-chelated nanopore responds to inorganic phosphate by a change in the ion current–voltage plot. This is due to a reversal of the charge from positive to negative after binding of the phosphate to the tip of the ion channel. Inorganic phosphate can be quantified by measurement of the extent of rectification. The limit of detection of the method is 118 nM, and response is linear in the 0 to 40 μM phosphate concentration range. The formation of the Zr(IV)/phosphate system on the surface was corroborated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and current–voltage characterization. The single synthetic nanopore display excellent selectivity, high sensitivity and a wide response range for phosphate. The accuracy of the method and applicability of the nanopore-based detection scheme was proven by the successful determination of inorganic phosphate in (spiked) lake water and a cola drink. (author)

  10. Nanoporous gold-alumina core-shell films with tunable optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuning of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of nanoporous metals is at the heart of manipulating light within extremely small volumes for the implementation of optical devices at the nanoscale. In this work, nanoporous gold-alumina core-shell films with fixed gold skeletons and different thicknesses of alumina shells are fabricated using chemical corrosion and subsequent atomic layer deposition. Optical transmission of the nanoporous composite films can be tailored through LSPR excitations of the three-dimensional gold skeleton and the alterable alumina shells as the covering dielectric. A 92 nanometer red-shift of the LSPR band is attained via its dielectric medium dependence and the comparable decay length with pore size. The widely tunable optical transmission and significantly improved stability thus suggest incorporating nanoporous gold-alumina into promising nano-devices with reliable performance. Low temperature surface decoration (<100 deg. C) provides a universal route to tune the optical properties while retaining the spatial geometry of the metallic nanostructures.

  11. Molecular switch for tuning ions across nanopores by an external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active control of ion transport in nanoscale channels is attracting increasing attention. Recently, experimental and theoretical results have verified that depending on the charged surface of nanopores, the solution inside nanopores can contain either negative or positive ions, which does not happen in macroscale channels. However, the control of the surface chemistry of synthetic nanopores is difficult and the design of nanotubes with novel recognition mechanisms that regulate the ionic selectivity of negative and positive charges remains a challenge. We present here a design for an ion-selective nanopore that is controllable by external charges. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that this remarkable selectivity can be switched from predominantly negative to positive ions and that the magnitude of the ionic flux can be varied by changing the distance of the external charges. The results suggest that the hydration structures around ions play a prominent role in the selectivity process, which is tuned by the external charge. These studies may be useful for developing ways to control the behavior, properties and chemical composition of liquids and provide possible technical applications for nanofluidic field effect transistors. (paper)

  12. Fluoride-induced modulation of ionic transport in asymmetric nanopores functionalized with ``caged'' fluorescein moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ramirez, Patricio; Nasir, Saima; Cervera, Javier; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a nanofluidic fluoride sensing device based on a single conical pore functionalized with ``caged'' fluorescein moieties. The nanopore functionalization is based on an amine-terminated fluorescein whose phenolic hydroxyl groups are protected with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl (TBDPS) moieties. The protected fluorescein (Fcn-TBDPS-NH2) molecules are then immobilized on the nanopore surface via carbodiimide coupling chemistry. Exposure to fluoride ions removes the uncharged TBDPS moieties due to the fluoride-promoted cleavage of the silicon-oxygen bond, leading to the generation of negatively charged groups on the fluorescein moieties immobilized onto the pore surface. The asymmetrical distribution of these groups along the conical nanopore leads to the electrical rectification observed in the current-voltage (I-V) curve. On the contrary, other halides and anions are not able to induce any significant ionic rectification in the asymmetric pore. In each case, the success of the chemical functionalization and deprotection reactions is monitored through the changes observed in the I-V curves before and after the specified reaction step. The theoretical results based on the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations further demonstrate the validity of an experimental approach to fluoride-induced modulation of nanopore current rectification behaviour.

  13. Efficient biocatalyst by encapsulating lipase into nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xueying; Li, Yufei; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lipases are one of the most important biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Immobilization is an efficient method to increase the stability and reusability of lipases. In this study, nanoporous gold (NPG), a new kind of nanoporous material with tunable porosity and excellent biocompatibility, was employed as an effective support for lipase immobilization. The pore size of NPG and adsorption time played key roles in the construction of lipase-NPG biocomposites. The morphology and composition of NPG before and after lipase loading are verified using a scanning electron microscope, equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The resulting lipase-NPG biocomposites exhibited excellent catalytic activity and remarkable reusability. The catalytic activity of the lipase-NPG biocomposite with a pore size of 35 nm had no decrease after ten recycles. Besides, the lipase-NPG biocomposite exhibited high catalytic activity in a broader pH range and higher temperature than that of free lipase. In addition, the leaching of lipase from NPG could be prevented by matching the protein's diameter and pore size. Thus, the encapsulation of enzymes within NPG is quite useful for establishing new functions and will have wide applications for different chemical processes.

  14. Combined HRTEM and PEELS analysis of nanoporous and amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the mass density (1.37 kgm/m3) and sp2+sp3 bonding fraction (0.15) were determined for an unusual nanoporous amorphous carbon consisting of curved single graphitic sheets. A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) was used. The values of these two parameters provide important constraints for the determination of the structure of this relatively low density variety of nanoporous carbon. The results are relevant also in the search for negatively-curved Schwarzite-related carbon structures. New date are also presented for highly-oriented pyrollytic graphite (HOPG), chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond, C60, glassy carbon (GC) and evaporated amorphous carbon (EAC); these are compared with the results for NAC. Kramers-Kronig analysis (KKA) of the low-loss PEELS data shows that the band gaps of both NAC and EAC are collapsed relative to that of CVD diamond. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    OpenAIRE

    Weili Duan; Bin He

    2015-01-01

    In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the ...

  16. Ion transport through a graphene nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Guohui; Ghosal, Sandip; 10.1088/0957-4484/23/39/395501

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to investigate the ionic transport of NaCl in solution through a graphene nanopore under an applied electric field. Results show the formation of concentration polarization layers in the vicinity of the graphene sheet. The non-uniformity of the ion distribution gives rise to an electric pressure which drives vortical motions in the fluid if the electric field is sufficiently strong to overcome the influence of viscosity and thermal fluctuations. The relative importance of hydrodynamic transport and thermal fluctuations in determining the pore conductivity is investigated. A second important effect that is observed is the mass transport of water through the nanopore, with an average velocity proportional to the applied voltage and independent of the pore diameter. The flux arises as a consequence of the asymmetry in the ion distribution with respect to reflection about the plane of the graphene sheet. The accumulation of liquid molecules in the vicinity of the nanopore...

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOPOROUS CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nigu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical double layer and electrochemical characteristics at the nanoporous carbon | (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface have been studied by the cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy methods. The value of zero charge potential (0.23 V vs. SCE in H2O, the region of ideal polarizability and other characteristics have been established. Analysis of complex plane plots shows that the nanoporous carbon | x M (C2H54NBF4 + acetonitrile interface can be simulated by the equivalent circuit, in which the two parallel conduction parts in the solid and liquid phases are interconnected by the double layer capacitance in parallel with the complex admittance of hindered reaction of the charge transfer process. The values of the characteristic frequency depend on the electrolyte concentration and on the electrode potential, i.e. on the nature of ions adsorbed at the surface of nanoporous carbon electrode.

  18. Polyelectrolyte Threading through a Nanopore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Yi Hsiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Threading charged polymers through a nanopore, driven by electric fields E, is investigated by means of Langevin dynamics simulations. The mean translocation time 〈 τ 〉 is shown to follow a scaling law Nα, and the exponent α increases monotonically from 1.16 (4 to 1.40 (3 with E. The result is double-checked by the calculation of mean square displacement of translocation coordinate, which asserts a scaling behavior tβ (for t near τ with β complying with the relation αβ = 2. At a fixed chain length N, 〈τ〉 displayed a reciprocal scaling behavior E−1 in the weak and also in the strong fields, connected by a transition E−1.64(5 in the intermediate fields. The variations of the radius of gyration of chain and the positions of chain end are monitored during a translocation process; far-from-equilibrium behaviors are observed when the driving field is strong. A strong field can strip off the condensed ions on the chain when it passes the pore. The total charges of condensed ions are hence decreased. The studies for the probability and density distributions reveal that the monomers in the trans-region are gathered near the wall and form a pancake-like density profile with a hump cloud over it in the strong fields, due to fast translocation.

  19. Nanoporous polymers for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Jonathan; Fréchet, Jean M J; Svec, Frantisek

    2009-05-01

    The design of hydrogen storage materials is one of the principal challenges that must be met before the development of a hydrogen economy. While hydrogen has a large specific energy, its volumetric energy density is so low as to require development of materials that can store and release it when needed. While much of the research on hydrogen storage focuses on metal hydrides, these materials are currently limited by slow kinetics and energy inefficiency. Nanostructured materials with high surface areas are actively being developed as another option. These materials avoid some of the kinetic and thermodynamic drawbacks of metal hydrides and other reactive methods of storing hydrogen. In this work, progress towards hydrogen storage with nanoporous materials in general and porous organic polymers in particular is critically reviewed. Mechanisms of formation for crosslinked polymers, hypercrosslinked polymers, polymers of intrinsic microporosity, and covalent organic frameworks are discussed. Strategies for controlling hydrogen storage capacity and adsorption enthalpy via manipulation of surface area, pore size, and pore volume are discussed in detail. PMID:19360719

  20. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    CERN Document Server

    Satarifard, Vahid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assessed. Simulation results demonstrate the strong effect of the pore shape as well as geometrical symmetry on free energy barrier, orientations and dynamic of DNA translocation through graphene nanopore. Our study proposes that the symmetric circular geometry of monolayer graphene nanopore with high pulling velocity can be used for DNA sequencing.

  1. Savannah River Site management response plan for chemical safety vulnerability field assessment. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to identify potential chemical safety vulnerabilities in the DOE complex, the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Core Working Group issued a field verification assessment report. While the report concluded that Savannah River Site (SRS) is moving in a positive direction, the report also identified five chemical safety vulnerabilities with broad programmatic impact that are not easily nor quickly remedied. The May 1994 SRS Management Response Plan addressed the five SRS vulnerabilities identified in the field assessment report. The SRS response plan listed observations supporting the vulnerabilities and any actions taken or planned toward resolution. Many of the observations were resolved by simple explanations, such as the existence of implementation plans for Safety Analysis Report updates. Recognizing that correcting individual observations does not suffice in remedying the vulnerabilities, a task team was assembled to address the broader programmatic issues and to recommend corrective actions

  2. Savannah River Site management response plan for chemical safety vulnerability field assessment. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahal, E.J.; Murphy, S.L.; Salaymeh, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) initiative to identify potential chemical safety vulnerabilities in the DOE complex, the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Core Working Group issued a field verification assessment report. While the report concluded that Savannah River Site (SRS) is moving in a positive direction, the report also identified five chemical safety vulnerabilities with broad programmatic impact that are not easily nor quickly remedied. The May 1994 SRS Management Response Plan addressed the five SRS vulnerabilities identified in the field assessment report. The SRS response plan listed observations supporting the vulnerabilities and any actions taken or planned toward resolution. Many of the observations were resolved by simple explanations, such as the existence of implementation plans for Safety Analysis Report updates. Recognizing that correcting individual observations does not suffice in remedying the vulnerabilities, a task team was assembled to address the broader programmatic issues and to recommend corrective actions.

  3. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  4. UV Defined Nanoporous Liquid Core Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ndoni, Sokol;

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous liquid core waveguides, where both core and cladding are made from the same material, are presented. The nanoporous polymer used is intrinsically hydrophobic, but selective UV exposure enables it to infiltrate with an aqueous solution, thus raising the refractive index from 1.26 to 1.......42. The waveguides are promising for integrated optofluidic sensor systems, where a long optical interaction length can be achieved with a small fluid sample. The propagation loss of a 200×200 μm waveguide is measured to 0.62 dB/mm....

  5. Sub-5 nm graphene nanopore fabrication by nitrogen ion etching induced by a low-energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Daniel S.; Maguire, Pierce; Zhou, Yangbo; Rodenburg, Cornelia; O’Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    A flexible and efficient method to fabricate nanopores in graphene has been developed. A focused, low-energy (5 keV) electron beam was used to locally activate etching of a graphene surface in a low pressure (0.3 Pa) N2 environment. Nanopores with sub-5 nm diameters were fabricated. The lattice structure of the graphene was observed to recover within 20 nm of the nanopore edge. Nanopore growth rates were investigated systematically. The effects of nitrogen pressure, electron beam dwell time and beam current were characterised in order to understand the etching mechanism and enable optimisation of the etching parameters. A model was developed which describes how the diffusion of ionised nitrogen affects the nanopore growth rate. Etching of other two-dimensional materials was attempted as demonstrated with MoS2. The lack of etching observed supports our model of a chemical reaction-based mechanism. The understanding of the etching mechanism will allow more materials to be etched by selection of an appropriate ion species.

  6. Design and fabrication of asymmetric nanopores using pulsed PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Sanket S.

    Manipulating matter at nanometric length scales is important for many electronic, chemical and biological applications. Structures such as nanopores demonstrate a phenomenon known as hindered transport which can be exploited in analytical applications such as DNA sequencing, ionic transistors, and molecular sieving. Precisely controlling the size, geometry and surface characteristics of the nanopores is important for realizing these applications. In this work, we employ relatively large template structures (˜ 100 nm) produced by track-etching or electron beam lithography. The pore size is then reduced to the desired level by deposition of material using pulsed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Pulsed PECVD has been developed as a high throughput alternative to atomic layer deposition (ALD) to deliver self-limiting growth of thin films. The goal of this thesis is to extend the application of pulsed PECVD to fabricate asymmetric nanopores. In contrast to ALD, pulsed PECVD does not result in perfectly conformal deposition profiles, and predicting the final nanostructure is more complicated. A two dimensional feature scale model was developed to predict film profile evolution. The model was built in COMSOL, and is based on a diffusion reaction framework with a spatially varying Knudsen diffusion coefficient to account for the molecular transport inside the features. A scaling analysis was used to account for ALD exposure limitations that commonly occur when coating these extremely high aspect ratio features. The model was verified by cross-section microscopy of deposition profiles on patterned cylinders and trenches. The model shows that it is possible to obtain unique nanopore morphologies in pulsed PECVD that are distinct from either steady state deposition processes such as physical vapor deposition (PVD) or conventional ALD. Polymeric track etched (TE) membrane supports with a nominal size of 100 nm were employed as model template structures to

  7. Supercapacitive properties of nanoporous oxide layer formed on 304 type stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, A A; Lokhande, A C; Kim, J H; Lokhande, C D

    2016-07-01

    The nanoporous oxide layer is formed on the surface of 304 type stainless steel (SS) by chemical oxidation method. The characterization of the oxide layer is carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The supercapacitive properties of oxide layer are studied using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. PMID:27042821

  8. Water soluble nanoporous nanoparticle for in vivo targeted drug delivery and controlled release in B cells tumor context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, F; Pujia, A; Falcone, C; Iaccino, E; Palmieri, C; Liberale, C; Mecarini, F; Candeloro, P; Luberto, L; de Laurentiis, A; Das, G; Scala, G; Di Fabrizio, E

    2010-10-01

    Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated with an effective control of porosity, surface chemistry and particle size, up to a few nm. The proposed nanoparticles exhibit several remarkable features including high payload, biodegradability, no toxicity, and multiple loading in water without the need of additional chemical reagents at room temperature. The targeting strategy is based on phage display technology that was successfully used to discover cell surface binding peptide for murine B lymphoma A20 cell line. The peptide used in combination with the nanoporous nanoparticles allows an efficient in vivo targeting, a sustained release and a sensible therapeutic effect. PMID:20835434

  9. Humidity sensing properties of Ce-doped nanoporous ZnO thin film prepared by sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mansoor Anbia; Seyyed Ebrahim Moosavi Fard

    2012-01-01

    The humidity sensitive characteristics of the sensor fabricated from Ce-doped nanoporous ZnO by screen-printing on the alumina substrate with Ag-Pd interdigital electrodes were investigated at different sintering temperatures.The nanoporous thin films were prepared by sol-gel technique.It was found that the impedance of the sensor sintered at 600 ℃ changed more than four order of magnitude in the relative humidity (RH) range of 11%-95% at 25 ℃.The response and recovery time of the sensor were about 13 and 17 s,respectively.The sensor showed high humidity sensitivity,rapid response and recovery,prominent stability,good repeatability and narrow hysteresis loop.These results indicated that Ce-doped nanoporous ZnO thin films can be used in fabricating high-performance humidity sensors.

  10. Investigation of bioactivity and cell effects of nano-porous sol–gel derived bioactive glass film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhijun, E-mail: mokuu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Ji, Huijiao [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China); Hu, Xiaomeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Teng, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Zhao, Guiyun; Mo, Lijuan; Zhao, Xiaoli [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China); Chen, Weibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Qiu, Jianrong, E-mail: qjr@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Zhang, Ming, E-mail: zhangming201201@126.com [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China)

    2013-11-01

    In orthopedic surgery, bioactive glass film coating is extensively studied to improve the synthetic performance of orthopedic implants. A lot of investigations have confirmed that nano-porous structure in bioactive glasses can remarkably improve their bioactivity. Nevertheless, researches on preparation of nano-porous bioactive glasses in the form of film coating and their cell response activities are scarce. Herein, we report the preparation of nano-porous bioactive glass film on commercial glass slide based on a sol–gel technique, together with the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity through immersion in simulated body fluid and monitoring the precipitation of apatite-like layer. Cell responses of the samples, including attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, were also investigated using BMSCS (bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) as a model. The results presented here provide some basic information on structural influence of bioactive glass film on the improvement of bioactivity and cellular effects.

  11. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device.

  12. Observation and analysis of the Coulter effect through carbon nanotube and graphene nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; Drahushuk, Lee W; Strano, Michael S

    2016-02-13

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are the rolled and flat analogues of graphitic carbon, respectively, with hexagonal crystalline lattices, and show exceptional molecular transport properties. The empirical study of a single isolated nanopore requires, as evidence, the observation of stochastic, telegraphic noise from a blocking molecule commensurate in size with the pore. This standard is used ubiquitously in patch clamp studies of single, isolated biological ion channels and a wide range of inorganic, synthetic nanopores. In this work, we show that observation and study of stochastic fluctuations for carbon nanopores, both CNTs and graphene-based, enable precision characterization of pore properties that is otherwise unattainable. In the case of voltage clamp measurements of long (0.5-1 mm) CNTs between 0.9 and 2.2 nm in diameter, Coulter blocking of cationic species reveals the complex structuring of the fluid phase for confined water in this diameter range. In the case of graphene, we have pioneered the study and the analysis of stochastic fluctuations in gas transport from a pressurized, graphene-covered micro-well compartment that reveal switching between different values of the membrane permeance attributed to chemical rearrangements of individual graphene pores. This analysis remains the only way to study such single isolated graphene nanopores under these realistic transport conditions of pore rearrangements, in keeping with the thesis of this work. In summary, observation and analysis of Coulter blocking or stochastic fluctuations of permeating flux is an invaluable tool to understand graphene and graphitic nanopores including CNTs. PMID:26712649

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanoporous Niobia, and Nanotubular Tantala, Titania and Zirconia via Anodization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Minagar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Valve metals such as titanium (Ti, zirconium (Zr, niobium (Nb and tantalum (Ta that confer a stable oxide layer on their surfaces are commonly used as implant materials or alloying elements for titanium-based implants, due to their exceptional high corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactivity of the nanostructures of tantala (Ta2O5, niobia (Nb2O5, zirconia (ZrO2 and titania (TiO2 in accordance to their roughness and wettability. Therefore, four kinds of metal oxide nanoporous and nanotubular Ta2O5, Nb2O5, ZrO2 and TiO2 were fabricated via anodization. The nanosize distribution, morphology and the physical and chemical properties of the nanolayers and their surface energies and bioactivities were investigated using SEM-EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis and 3D profilometer. It was found that the nanoporous Ta2O5 exhibited an irregular porous structure, high roughness and high surface energy as compared to bare tantalum metal; and exhibited the most superior bioactivity after annealing among the four kinds of nanoporous structures. The nanoporous Nb2O5 showed a uniform porous structure and low roughness, but no bioactivity before annealing. Overall, the nanoporous and nanotubular layers of Ta2O5, Nb2O5, ZrO2 and TiO2 demonstrated promising potential for enhanced bioactivity to improve their biomedical application alone or to improve the usage in other biocompatible metal implants.

  14. Implementation of Responsible Care in the chemical industry: Evidence from Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical industry can be held accountable for numerous large-scale accidents which have led to the release of dangerous hazardous materials, pollutants and toxic chemicals into the environment, two well-known examples being the Union Carbide Bhopal disaster and the Three Mile Island tragedy). To ensure environmental protection and the Health and Safety (H and S) of communities, the chemical industry has voluntarily adopted integrated management programs such as the Responsible Care Program. The theoretical body of relevant literature attempts to explain the origin of the Responsible Care Program (RCP) through socio-political and economic theories. At the same time, the empirical research examines the ways in which various factors affect the choice of the chemical industry in their adoption of the RCP. This paper contributes to the debate by examining the challenges and barriers faced by the Greek chemical industry when adopting RCP, the environmental and H and S issues that prevail and finally, the extent of participation of stakeholders in the planning of RCP in the sector.

  15. Implementation of Responsible Care in the chemical industry: Evidence from Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, K.I. [University of the Aegean, Department of Environment, University Hill, 81100, Mytilini (Greece); Nikolaou, I.E., E-mail: inikol@env.duth.gr [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Environmental Engineering, Vas. Sofias 12, 67100, Xanthi (Greece); Karagiannis, A. [General Chemical State Laboratory Division of Rhodos, Haritou Square 17, 85100, Rodos (Greece)

    2010-05-15

    The chemical industry can be held accountable for numerous large-scale accidents which have led to the release of dangerous hazardous materials, pollutants and toxic chemicals into the environment, two well-known examples being the Union Carbide Bhopal disaster and the Three Mile Island tragedy). To ensure environmental protection and the Health and Safety (H and S) of communities, the chemical industry has voluntarily adopted integrated management programs such as the Responsible Care Program. The theoretical body of relevant literature attempts to explain the origin of the Responsible Care Program (RCP) through socio-political and economic theories. At the same time, the empirical research examines the ways in which various factors affect the choice of the chemical industry in their adoption of the RCP. This paper contributes to the debate by examining the challenges and barriers faced by the Greek chemical industry when adopting RCP, the environmental and H and S issues that prevail and finally, the extent of participation of stakeholders in the planning of RCP in the sector.

  16. Implementation of responsible care in the chemical industry: evidence from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelinos, K I; Nikolaou, I E; Karagiannis, A

    2010-05-15

    The chemical industry can be held accountable for numerous large-scale accidents which have led to the release of dangerous hazardous materials, pollutants and toxic chemicals into the environment, two well-known examples being the Union Carbide Bhopal disaster and the Three Mile Island tragedy). To ensure environmental protection and the Health and Safety (H&S) of communities, the chemical industry has voluntarily adopted integrated management programs such as the Responsible Care Program. The theoretical body of relevant literature attempts to explain the origin of the Responsible Care Program (RCP) through socio-political and economic theories. At the same time, the empirical research examines the ways in which various factors affect the choice of the chemical industry in their adoption of the RCP. This paper contributes to the debate by examining the challenges and barriers faced by the Greek chemical industry when adopting RCP, the environmental and H&S issues that prevail and finally, the extent of participation of stakeholders in the planning of RCP in the sector. PMID:20097475

  17. Electrochemical Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Environmental Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured materials enable the development of miniature sensing devices that are compact, low-cost, low-energy-consumption, and easily integrated into field-deployable units. Recently we have successfully developed electrochemical sensors based on functionalized nanostructured materials for the characterization of metal ions. Specifically, glycinyl-urea self-assembled monolayer on nanoporous silica (Gly-UR SAMMS) has been incorporated in carbon paste electrodes for the detection of toxic metals such as lead, copper, and mercury based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry, while acetamide phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer on nanoporous silica (Ac-Phos SAMMS) has been used for the detection of uranium. Both electrochemical sensors yield reproducible measurements with excellent detection limits (at ppb level), are selective for target species, does not require the use of mercury film and chelating agents, and require little or no regeneration of electrode materials. The rigid, open, paralleled pore structure combined with suitable interfacial chemistry of SAMMS also results in fast responses of the electrochemical sensors

  18. Enzyme Specific Activity in Functionalized Nanoporous Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2008-03-26

    Enzyme specific activity can be increased or decreased to a large extent by changing protein loading density in functionalized nanoporous support, where organophosphorus hydrolase can display a constructive orientation and thus leave a completely open entrance for substrate even at higher protein loading density, but glucose oxidase can not.

  19. Nanoporous silica membranes with high hydrothermal stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Magnacca, Giualiana; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Despite the use of sol-gel derived nanoporous silica membranes in substitution of traditional separation processes is expected leading to vast energy savings, their intrinsic poor steam-stability hampers their application at an industrial level. Transition metal ions can be used as dopant to...

  20. Ultrafiltration by gyroid nanoporous polymer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Szewczykowski, Piotr Przemyslaw; Clausen, Lydia D.;

    2011-01-01

    Gyroid nanoporous cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene membranes with uniform pores were developed for ultrafiltration applications. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure pre-alignment. The effects of solvent and surface photo-hydrophilization on...

  1. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.B.; Roij, van R.; Bazant, M.Z.; Biesheuvel, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the classical problem of flow of electrolyte solutions through charged capillary nanopores or nanotubes as described by the capillary pore model (also called "space charge" theory). This theory assumes very long and thin pores and uses a one-dimensional flux-force formalism which relat

  2. Three-dimensional nanoporous Au films as high-efficiency enzyme-free electrochemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: Herein we develop an enzyme-free electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrazine (N2H4) by preparing three-dimensional nanoporous gold (NPG) supported on three dimensional Ni foam. The NPG@Ni foam hybrid electrode was prepared via electrodeposition of an AuSn alloy film on a Ni foam substrate, followed by a chemical dealloying process to leach the Sn component. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared NPG@Ni foam hybrid were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS). The as-prepared hybrid electrodes showed high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of both H2O2 and N2H4. The non-enzymatic sensor exhibits a linear response for H2O2 and N2H4 in the range of 20–9740 and 0.2–110.1 μM, with a sensitivity of 2.88 and 10.687 mA mM−1 cm−2, and a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 10 μM and 33 nM, respectively. The excellent sensitivity and selectivity make the NPG@Ni foam electrodes very attractive for electrochemical sensing applications

  3. Rectification and electroluminescence of nanostructured GaN/Si heterojunction based on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Yong; Yan, Ling-Ling; Li, Xin-Jian

    2015-10-01

    A GaN/Si nanoheterojunction is prepared through growing GaN nanocrystallites (nc-GaN) on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique at a relatively low temperature. The average size of nc-GaN is determined to be ˜10 nm. The spectral measurements disclose that the photoluminescence (PL) from GaN/Si-NPA is composed of an ultraviolet (UV) band and a broad band spanned from UV to red region, with the feature that the latter band is similar to that of electroluminescence (EL). The electron transition from the energy levels of conduction band and, or, shallow donors to that of deep acceptors of GaN is indicated to be responsible for both the broad-band PL and the EL luminescence. A study of the I-V characteristic shows that at a low forward bias, the current across the heterojunction is contact-limited while at a high forward bias it is bulk-limited, which follows the thermionic emission model and space-charge-limited current (SCLC) model, respectively. The bandgap offset analysis indicates that the carrier transport is dominated by electron injection from n-GaN into the p-Si-NPA, and the EL starts to appear only when holes begin to be injected from Si-NPA into GaN with biases higher than a threshold voltage. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176044).

  4. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose-response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  5. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibek, Susanne; Hagmeyer, Britta; Stett, Alfred; Stelzle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses. In an experimental setup microdroplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution traveled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose–response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively. Numerical modeling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 μm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 μM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined. PMID:21151808

  6. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  7. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: francopj@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  8. CMSMAP : oil, chemical, search and rescue, and marine emergency response crisis management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a newly developed Crisis Management System (CMS) which makes it possible to view oil and chemical spills on the seafloor. The CMS is designed to run in a network environment, so that multiple stations can be used cooperatively to respond to a spill incident. It was developed by the Maritime and Port Authority in Singapore and represents a singular integration of a ship's bridge simulator hardware and software. It incorporates numerical models and emergency response software. The CMS is installed in a specifically designed building at the Singapore Polytechnic University, and is integrated with two shipping bridge simulators. One user interface has access to models dealing with oil spills, chemical spills, search and rescues, marine emergencies, and nuclear disasters. The interface is linked to a response management system. The entire system is used to train response personnel to marine emergencies. The histories and costs of planned response activities are described and logged for reference purposes. Estimates of damages associated with spills can be obtained. Alternative response plans can also be determined. Further research in 2002 will focus on developing real time response. 3 refs., 6 figs

  9. Understanding improved osteoblast behavior on select nanoporous anodic alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Siyu Ni,1 Changyan Li,1 Shirong Ni,2 Ting Chen,1 Thomas J Webster3,4 1College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pathophysiology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 4Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The aim of this study was to prepare different sized porous anodic alumina (PAA and examine preosteoblast (MC3T3-E1 attachment and proliferation on such nanoporous surfaces. In this study, PAA with tunable pore sizes (25 nm, 50 nm, and 75 nm were fabricated by a two-step anodizing procedure in oxalic acid. The surface morphology and elemental composition of PAA were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The nanopore arrays on all of the PAA samples were highly regular. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggested that the chemistry of PAA and flat aluminum surfaces were similar. However, contact angles were significantly greater on all of the PAA compared to flat aluminum substrates, which consequently altered protein adsorption profiles. The attachment and proliferation of preosteoblasts were determined for up to 7 days in culture using field emission scanning electron microscopy and a Cell Counting Kit-8. Results showed that nanoporous surfaces did not enhance initial preosteoblast attachment, whereas preosteoblast proliferation dramatically increased when the PAA pore size was either 50 nm or 75 nm compared to all other samples (P<0.05. Thus, this study showed that one can alter surface energy of aluminum by modifying surface nano-roughness alone (and not changing chemistry through an anodization process to improve osteoblast density, and, thus, should be

  10. Pink noise of ionic conductance through single artificial nanopores revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasserit, C; Koutsioubas, A; Lairez, D; Zalczer, G; Clochard, M-C

    2010-12-31

    We report voltage-clamp measurements through single conical nanopore obtained by chemical etching of a single ion track in polyimide film. Special attention is paid to the pink noise of the ionic current (i.e., 1/f noise) measured with different filling liquids. The relative pink-noise amplitude is almost independent of concentration and pH for KCl solutions, but varies strongly using ionic liquids. In particular, we show that depending on the ionic liquid, the transport of charge carriers is strongly facilitated (low noise and higher conductivity than in the bulk) or jammed. These results show that the origin of the pink noise can be ascribed neither to fluctuations of the pore geometry nor to the pore wall charges, but rather to a cooperative effect on ions motion in confined geometry. PMID:21231637

  11. Contact irritant responses of Aedes aegypti Using sublethal concentration and focal application of pyrethroid chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortance Manda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated contact irritant and spatial repellent behaviors in Aedes aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentrations of chemicals. These sublethal actions are currently being evaluated in the development of a push-pull strategy for Ae. aegypti control. This study reports on mosquito escape responses after exposure to candidate chemicals for a contact irritant focused push-pull strategy using varying concentrations and focal application. METHODS: Contact irritancy (escape behavior, knockdown and 24 hour mortality rates were quantified in populations of female Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions and validated in the field (Thailand and Peru using experimental huts. Evaluations were conducted using varying concentrations and treatment surface area coverage (SAC of three pyrethroid insecticides: alphacypermethrin, lambacyhalothrin and deltamethrin. RESULTS: Under laboratory conditions, exposure of Ae. aegypti to alphacypermethrin using the standard field application rate (FAR resulted in escape responses at 25% and 50% SAC that were comparable with escape responses at 100% SAC. Significant escape responses were also observed at <100% SAC using ½FAR of all test compounds. In most trials, KD and 24 hour mortality rates were higher in mosquitoes that did not escape than in those that escaped. In Thailand, field validation studies indicated an early time of exit (by four hours and 40% increase in escape using ½FAR of alphacypermethrin at 75% SAC compared to a matched chemical-free control. In Peru, however, the maximum increase in Ae. aegypti escape from alphacypermethrin-treated huts was 11%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results presented here suggest a potential role for sublethal and focal application of contact irritant chemicals in an Ae. aegypti push-pull strategy to reduce human-vector contact inside treated homes. However, the impact of an increase in escape response on dengue virus transmission is

  12. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  13. Fabrication of beta-PVDF membranes by track etching and specific functionalization of nano-pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)(β-PVDF) nano-porous membranes were made by chemical revealing of tracks induced from swift heavy ions irradiation. Pore opening and radii can be varied in a controllable manner with the etching time. nano-pores size in nano-meter scale (from 12 nm to 50 nm) appears to be linearly dependent to the etching time. It was then necessary to adapt the characterization tools to these membranes. Consequently, we resorted to the use of structural analysis methods (Scanning Electron Microscopy, Small Angle Neutron Scattering) and developed evaluation methods of the membranes transport properties like gas permeation and ionic diffusion. Results obtained confirm the pores opening (break through) and the hydrophobicity of material, which we have modified with hydrophilic molecules. In this precise case, the grafting of acrylic acid was initiated by the radicals still remains after track-etching (called radio-grafting). This key result was obtained by a study of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The labelling of introduced chemical functionalities with fluorescent probes was a very effective mean to visualize very few amounts of molecules by confocal microscopy. The radio-grafting was found specifically localized inside etched tracks. The protocol offers the possibility to create a double functionality, the one localized inside the nano-pores and the other on the surface of membranes. The modification of radio-grafting parameters (the acrylic acid concentration, solvent nature, use of transfer agent) and the chemical properties of the nano-pore walls have a direct incidence on the transport properties. (author)

  14. Responses of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.G.; Howgate, S.; McBride, D.; Riach, C. (Inveresk Research International Limited, Musselburgh (Scotland)); Caspary, W.J. (National Inst. of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk{sup +}/tk{sup {minus}} mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 {mu}g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds.

  15. Fabrication and Optimization of a Nanoporous Platinum Electrode and a Non-enzymatic Glucose Micro-sensor on Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Kim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, optimal conditions for fabrication of nanoporous platinum (Pt were investigated in order to use it as a sensitive sensing electrode for silicon CMOS integrable non-enzymatic glucose micro-sensor applications. Applied charges, voltages, and temperatures were varied during the electroplating of Pt into the formed nonionic surfactant C16EO8 nano-scaled molds in order to fabricate nanoporous Pt electrodes with large surface roughness factor (RF, uniformity, and reproducibility. The fabricated nanoporous Pt electrodes were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM and electrochemical cyclic voltammograms. Optimal electroplating conditions were determined to be an applied charge of 35 mC/mm2, a voltage of -0.12 V, and a temperature of 25 °C, respectively. The optimized nanoporous Pt electrode had an electrochemical RF of 375 and excellent reproducibility. The optimized nanoporous Pt electrode was applied to fabricate non-enzymatic glucose micro-sensor with three electrode systems. The fabricated sensor had a size of 3 mm x 3 mm, air gap of 10 µm, working electrode (WE area of 4.4 mm2, and sensitivity of 37.5 µA•L/mmol•cm2. In addition, it showed large detection range from 0.05 to 30 mmolL-1 and stable recovery responsive to the step changes in glucose concentration.

  16. Roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing Xing; He, Xiao Lin; Jin, Chong Wei

    2016-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants but is not readily accessible in most calcareous soils. Although the adaptive responses of plants to iron deficiency have been well documented, the signals involved in the regulatory cascade leading to their activation are not well understood to date. Recent studies revealed that chemical compounds, including sucrose, auxin, ethylene and nitric oxide, positively regulated the Fe-deficiency-induced Fe uptake processes in a cooperative manner. Nevertheless, cytokinins, jasmonate and abscisic acid were shown to act as negative signals in transmitting the iron deficiency information. The present mini review is to briefly address the roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency based on the literatures published in recent years. PMID:27110729

  17. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  18. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México, D. F. 09340, México (Mexico); Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico); Vela, Alberto, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx, E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México, D. F. 07360, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  19. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures

  20. Mechanism of Aulacophora femoralis chinensis Weise feeding behavior and chemical response of host Cucumis sativus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Chuihua; LIANG Wenju; YANG Xiao; ZHANG Maoxin; HU Fei

    2004-01-01

    When beetle Aulacophora femoralis chinensis Weise fed on cucumber seedlings, it first chewed a circular trench on their leaves and then nibbled the leaf tissues isolated by the trench, but when it was fed with the detached fresh cotyledons of cucumber, such an interesting trenching behavior did not occur, which indicated that the feeding behavior of the beetle was obviously correlated with the chemical response of the cucumber to the herbivory. Within 60 min after feeding, the level of cucurbitacin C in fed cotyledons of the cucumber seedling increased 10 fold or more.Cucurbitacin I was also detected 15 min after feeding, which reached 75 μg/g within 60 min. The high levels of cucurbitacins C and Ⅰ in fed cotyledons could be maintained for at least 24 h. A. Femoralis chinensis was strongly stimulated to take food by cucurbitacin C at a concentration between 10and 250 μg/g, and the feeding deterrent activity was observed at >250 μg/g, while the feeding deterrent threshold of A.femoralis chinensis to cucurbitacin I was 50 μg/g. The mixture of cucurbitacins C and Ⅰ had a much stronger feeding deterrent activity than single cucurbitacin I. The results suggested that cucumber could elicit chemical response to the beetle herbivory, its leaf being induced to produce more kinds of cucurbitacins and make them reach the levels of feeding deterrent activity on the beetle, while the trenching behavior of A. Femoralis chinensis was its strategy to answer the chemical response of cucumber. The trenching behavior of the beetle not only stopped the cucurbitacins biosynthesis in cucumber leaf tissues, but also blocked the translocation of cucurbitacins to the feeding sites. The trenching behavior of the beetle and the chemical response of host cucumber were the mutual adaptive strategies for protecting the host plant and the beetle themselves.

  1. Corporate social responsibility and global standardization: sustainable environmental management in the chemical industry

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia R. TODD

    2009-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility and sustainable development are issues that been in the forefront of corporate strategy for several decades. The increase in the power of environmental groups, the ease of cross border information flow, and the rising concern of the public with regards to global impact of environmental issues are motivating factors resulting in the establishment of environmental management systems. Many multinational chemical companies, threatened with the possibility of the es...

  2. Chemical biology of mutagenesis and DNA repair: cellular responses to DNA alkylation

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastav, Nidhi; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of DNA-damaging agents with the genome results in a plethora of lesions, commonly referred to as adducts. Adducts may cause DNA to mutate, they may represent the chemical precursors of lethal events and they can disrupt expression of genes. Determination of which adduct is responsible for each of these biological endpoints is difficult, but this task has been accomplished for some carcinogenic DNA-damaging agents. Here, we describe the respective contributions of specific DNA les...

  3. Linking tumor mutations to drug responses via a quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map

    OpenAIRE

    Maria M. Martins; Zhou, Alicia Y.; Corella, Alexandra; Horiuchi, Dai; Yau, Christina; Rakshandehroo, Taha; Gordan, John D; Levin, Rebecca S.; Johnson, Jeff; Jascur, John; Shales, Mike; Sorrentino, Antonio; Cheah, Jaime; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need in oncology to link molecular aberrations in tumors with therapeutics that can be administered in a personalized fashion. One approach identifies synthetic-lethal genetic interactions or dependencies that cancer cells acquire in the presence of specific mutations. Using engineered isogenic cells, we generated a systematic and quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map that charts the influence of 51 aberrant cancer genes on 90 drug responses. The dataset strongly pr...

  4. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning. PMID:23719630

  5. Effects of timber harvest on river food webs: physical, chemical and biological responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Timothy Wootton

    Full Text Available I compared physical, chemical and biological characteristics of nine rivers running through three timber harvest regimes to investigate the effects of land use on river ecosystems, to determine whether these corresponded to changes linked with downstream location, and to compare the response of different types of indicator variables. Physical variables changed with downstream location, but varied little with timber harvest. Most chemical variables increased strongly with timber harvest, but not with downstream location. Most biological variables did not vary systematically with either timber harvest or downstream location. Dissolved organic carbon did not vary with timber harvest or downstream location, but correlated positively with salmonid abundance. Nutrient manipulations revealed no general pattern of nutrient limitation with timber harvest or downstream location. The results suggest that chemical variables most reliably indicate timber harvest impact in these systems. The biological variables most relevant to human stakeholders were surprisingly insensitive to timber harvest, however, apparently because of decoupling from nutrient responses and unexpectedly weak responses by physical variables.

  6. Application of response surface methodology to the chemical cleaning process of ultrafiltration membrane☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihong Wang; Aishu Wei; Hao Wu; Fangshu Qu; Weixiong Chen; Heng Liang; Guibai Li

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model was established to predict and optimise the chemical cleaning process of Polyvinylidene Fluo-ride (PVDF) Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes with the results from the experiment that applied the Response Sur-face Method (RSM) and Central Composite Design (CCD). The factors considered in the experimental design were sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration, sodium hypochlorite concentration (NaClO), citric acid concentration and cleaning duration. The interactions between the factors were investigated with the numerical model. Humic acid (20 mg·L−1) was used as the model foulant, and chemical enhanced backflush (CEB) was employed to sim-ulate the chemical cleaning process. The concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, citric acid and cleaning duration tested during the experiments were in the range of 0.1%–0.3%, 100–300 mg·L−1, 1%–3%and 0.5–1.5 h, respectively. Among the variables, the sodium hypochlorite concentration and the cleaning dura-tion showed a positive relationship involving the increased efficiency of the chemical cleaning. The chemical cleaning efficiency was hardly improved with increasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide. However, the data was sharply decreased when at a low level of sodium hydroxide concentration. In total, 54 sets of cleaning schemes with 80%to 100%cleaning efficiency were observed with the RSM model after calibration.

  7. DNA damage due to perfluorooctane sulfonate based on nano-gold embedded in nano-porous poly-pyrrole film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liping; Xu, Laihui; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2013-11-01

    DNA damage induced from perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was further developed on a nano-porous bionic interface. The interface was formed by assembling DNA on nano-gold particles which were embedded in a nano-porous overoxidized polypyrrole film (OPPy). Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscope and electrochemical investigations indicate that OPPy can be treated to form nano-pore structures. DNA damage due to PFOS was proved using electrochemistry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and was investigated by detecting differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) response of methylene blue (MB) which was used as electro-active indicator in the system. The current of MB attenuates obviously after incubation of DNA in PFOS. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrates that PFOS weakens DNA charge transport. The tentative binding ratio of PFOS: DNA base pair was obtained by analyzing XPS data of this system.

  8. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinyaev, Yurii V., E-mail: grn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Chertova, Nadezhda V., E-mail: chertova@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergei G., E-mail: sp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  9. Integrating nanopore sensors within microfluidic channel arrays using controlled breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvildari, Radin; Beamish, Eric; Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Godin, Michel

    2015-03-21

    Nanopore arrays are fabricated by controlled dielectric breakdown (CBD) in solid-state membranes integrated within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. This technique enables the scalable production of independently addressable nanopores. By confining the electric field within the microfluidic architecture, nanopore fabrication is precisely localized and electrical noise is significantly reduced. Both DNA and protein molecules are detected to validate the performance of this sensing platform. PMID:25631885

  10. Electrochemical Fabrication of Metallic Nanowires and Metal Oxide Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgai, Takeshi; Mizumoto, Masayuki; Nomura, Shigeki; Kagawa, Akio

    2007-01-01

    A nuclear track etched polycarbonate membrane filter with numerous cylindrical nanopores was applied as a nanoporous template for growing metallic nanowires. Nickel, cobalt, and iron nanowires were electrodeposited into the cylindrical nanopores. Cathodic polarization curves were measured to determine an optimum condition for growing nanowires. The shape of nanowires was observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the crystal structure was analyzed using transmission electron micros...

  11. Heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criado-Sancho, M. [Departamento de Ciencias y Técnicas Físicoquimicas, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 20040 Madrid (Spain); Jou, D., E-mail: David.Jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-02-04

    We study heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices; we show that, despite bulk/nanoporous devices may act as thermal rectifiers, the non-linear aspects of their joint thermal conductance are not strong enough to lead to a negative differential thermal resistance, necessary to allow bulk/nanoporous/bulk Si devices to act as thermal transistors. Furthermore, we explicitly study the effective thermal conductivity of the mentioned devices for several temperatures, geometries, porosities, and pore size.

  12. Giant enhancement of terahertz emission from nanoporous GaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrashchenko, A., E-mail: astron86@mail.ru; Korotchenkov, A.; Evtikhiev, V. P. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, 49 Kronverkskiy Ave., St. Petersburg 19701 (Russian Federation); Arlauskas, A.; Adomavičius, R.; Krotkus, A. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, 11 A. Goštauto, Vilnius LT-01108 (Lithuania); Ulin, V. P. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Belov, P. [ITMO University, 49 Kronverkskiy Ave., St. Petersburg 19701 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we have studied the emission of terahertz radiation from nanoporous semiconductor matrices of GaP excited by the femtosecond laser pulses. We observe 3–4 orders of magnitude increase of terahertz radiation emission from the nanoporous matrix compared to bulk material. The effect is mainly related to drastic increase of the sample surface and pinning of conducting electrons to surface states. This result opens up a promising way to create powerful sources of terahertz radiation using nanoporous semiconductors.

  13. Study of polymer molecules and conformations with a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchenko, Jene A.; Li, Jiali; Stein, Derek; Gershow, Marc H.

    2010-12-07

    The invention features methods for evaluating the conformation of a polymer, for example, for determining the conformational distribution of a plurality of polymers and to detect binding or denaturation events. The methods employ a nanopore which the polymer, e.g., a nucleic acid, traverses. As the polymer traverses the nanopore, measurements of transport properties of the nanopore yield data on the conformation of the polymer.

  14. Improved oil recovery in nanopores: NanoIOR

    OpenAIRE

    James Moraes de Almeida; Caetano Rodrigues Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Fluid flow through minerals pores occurs in underground aquifers, oil and shale gas reservoirs. In this work, we explore water and oil flow through silica nanopores. Our objective is to model the displacement of water and oil through a nanopore to mimic the fluid infiltration on geological nanoporous media and the displacement of oil with and without previous contact with water by water flooding to emulate an improved oil recovery process at nanoscale (NanoIOR). We have observed a barrier-les...

  15. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters

  16. Detection of biological analytes using nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy with a nanoporous microcantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The highly sensitive nanoporous cantilever beam without immobilized receptors was combined with highly selective mid-infrared (IR) spectroscopy for molecular recognition of analytes using characteristic molecular vibrations. Unlike conventional IR spectroscopy, in addition, the detection sensitivity and resolution are drastically enhanced by combining high power tunable quantum cascade laser with a nanoporous cantilever having large surface area, low modulus, and nanowell structures. Further, analytes can be easily loaded on the porous microcantilever without receptor due to nanowells. In addition, orthogonal signals, variations in the mass and IR spectrum, provide more reliable and quantitative results including physical as well as chemical information of samples. We have used this technique to rapidly identify single and double stranded DNA.

  17. Over-limiting Current and Control of Dendritic Growth by Surface Conduction in Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Bai, Peng; Bazant, Martin Z

    2014-01-01

    Understanding over-limiting current (faster than diffusion) is a long-standing challenge in electrochemistry with applications in desalination and energy storage. Known mechanisms involve either chemical or hydrodynamic instabilities in unconfined electrolytes. Here, it is shown that over-limiting current can be sustained by surface conduction in nano pores, without any such instabilities, and used to control dendritic growth during electrodeposition. Copper electrode posits are grown in anodized aluminum oxide membranes with polyelectrolyte coatings to modify the surface charge. At low currents, uniform electroplating occurs, unaffected by surface modification due to thin electric double layers, but the morphology changes dramatically above the limiting current. With negative surface charge, growth is enhanced along the nanopore surfaces, forming surface dendrites and nanotubes behind a deionization shock. With positive surface charge, dendrites avoid the surfaces and are either guided along the nanopore cen...

  18. Ion track symmetric and asymmetric nanopores in polyethylene terephthalate foils for versatile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Blonskaya, I. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Orelovich, O. L.; Sartowska, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this report we present several fabrication methods which allow production of ion track nanopore membranes with different pore configurations. Polymer foils, typically polyethylene terephthalate with a thickness of 5-23 μm, are irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (energy of 1-10 MeV/u) and then subjected to different physico-chemical treatments. Depending on the procedure, symmetric or asymmetric pores with nanoscale-sized narrowing are obtained. The asymmetric configurations include conical, funnel-like and bullet-like shapes. In electrolyte solutions the asymmetric nanopores exhibit diode-like properties which strongly depend on the pore shape. The peculiar features of such pores provide a basis for various applications.

  19. Growth of ZnCdS single crystals and prospects of their application as nanoporous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colibaba, G. V.; Monaico, E. V.; Goncearenco, E. P.; Nedeoglo, D. D.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Nielsch, K.

    2014-12-01

    Substrates of wide band-gap II-VI semiconductor compounds are considered feasible for the fabrication of nanoporous matrices (NM) needed for templated growth of nanowires and nanotubes of solid-state materials promising for applications in various fields. An accessible and cost-effective approach to fabricate NM is based on electrochemical etching (ECE) which, however, depends on the electrical conductivity of the substrates. In this paper, growth of homogeneous ZnxCd1-xS single crystals, with x varying from 0 to 1, is demonstrated and the influence of chemical composition on optical and electrical properties of the crystals is identified. The feasibility of using ZnxCd1-xS alloys with x = 0-0.6 for the growth of nanopore arrays with pore diameter down to 30 nm is shown. The perspectives and limitations of the use of these semiconductor alloys for the fabrication of NM by means of ECE are discussed.

  20. Nanopore-based Fourth-generation DNA Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanxiao Feng; Yuechuan Zhang; Cuifeng Ying; Deqiang Wang; Chunlei Du

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencers, as the fourth-generation DNA sequencing technology, have the potential to quickly and reliably sequence the entire human genome for less than $1000, and possibly for even less than$100. The single-molecule techniques used by this technology allow us to further study the interaction between DNA and protein, as well as between protein and protein. Nanopore analysis opens a new door to molecular biology investigation at the single-molecule scale. In this article, we have reviewed academic achievements in nanopore technology from the past as well as the latest advances, including both biological and solid-state nanopores, and discussed their recent and potential applications.

  1. Membrane platforms for biological nanopore sensing and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    In the past two decades, biological nanopores have been developed and explored for use in sensing applications as a result of their exquisite sensitivity and easily engineered, reproducible, and economically manufactured structures. Nanopore sensing has been shown to differentiate between highly similar analytes, measure polymer size, detect the presence of specific genes, and rapidly sequence nucleic acids translocating through the pore. Devices featuring protein nanopores have been limited in part by the membrane support containing the nanopore, the shortcomings of which have been addressed in recent work developing new materials, approaches, and apparatus resulting in membrane platforms featuring automatability and increased robustness, lifetime, and measurement throughput. PMID:26773300

  2. Hydrophilic nanoporous polystyrenes and 1,2-polybutadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Vigild, Martin Etchells;

    2008-01-01

    Nanoporous polymers from ordered block copolymers having hydrophilic cavity surfaces were successfully prepared by two methodologies: ' 1. Nanoporous polystyrenes fromPtBA-b-PS diblock or PDMS-b-PtBA-b-PS triblock copolymer precursors by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), or combination...... applying HF or TFA in one step. Thus both the di- and triblock copolymers after such a treatment resulted. in nanoporous polystyrenes with hexagonal cavities of different nanosizes (6-11 nm, Figure 1). 2. Nanoporous I,2-polybutadienes (I,2-PB) by grafting various acrylic monomers onto the pore. surfaces...

  3. Effects of rotational symmetry breaking in polymer-coated nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical theory of polymers tethered around the inner surface of a cylindrical channel has traditionally employed the assumption that the equilibrium density of the polymers is independent of the azimuthal coordinate. However, simulations have shown that this rotational symmetry can be broken when there are attractive interactions between the polymers. We investigate the phases that emerge in these circumstances, and we quantify the effect of the symmetry assumption on the phase behavior of the system. In the absence of this assumption, one can observe large differences in the equilibrium densities between the rotationally symmetric case and the non-rotationally symmetric case. A simple analytical model is developed that illustrates the driving thermodynamic forces responsible for this symmetry breaking. Our results have implications for the current understanding of the behavior of polymers in cylindrical nanopores

  4. Effects of rotational symmetry breaking in polymer-coated nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanović, D.; Hoogenboom, B. W.; Ford, I. J. [London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kerr-Winter, M.; Eccleston, R. C. [Centre for Mathematics, Physics and Engineering in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-21

    The statistical theory of polymers tethered around the inner surface of a cylindrical channel has traditionally employed the assumption that the equilibrium density of the polymers is independent of the azimuthal coordinate. However, simulations have shown that this rotational symmetry can be broken when there are attractive interactions between the polymers. We investigate the phases that emerge in these circumstances, and we quantify the effect of the symmetry assumption on the phase behavior of the system. In the absence of this assumption, one can observe large differences in the equilibrium densities between the rotationally symmetric case and the non-rotationally symmetric case. A simple analytical model is developed that illustrates the driving thermodynamic forces responsible for this symmetry breaking. Our results have implications for the current understanding of the behavior of polymers in cylindrical nanopores.

  5. Foraging and ingestive behaviors of whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, in response to chemical stimulus cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Alistair D M

    2015-02-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, display a number of behaviors that suggest these animals can locate food from afar, as well as identify and discriminate between food items. However, their intractably large size and relative rarity in the field has so far prevented direct studies of their behavior and sensory capability. A small population of aquarium-held whale sharks facilitated direct studies of behavior in response to chemical stimulus plumes. Whale sharks were exposed to plumes composed of either homogenized krill or simple aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is associated with krill aggregations and is used by several pelagic species as a food-finding stimulus. Whale sharks exhibited pronounced ingestive and search behaviors when exposed to both types of stimuli, compared to control trials. Ingestive behaviors included open mouth swimming and active surface feeding (gulping). These behaviors were stronger and more prevalent in response to krill homogenate plumes than to DMS plumes. Both chemical stimuli also increased visitation rate, and krill homogenate plumes additionally affected swimming speed. Whale sharks use chemosensory cues of multiple types to locate and identify palatable food, suggesting that chemical stimuli can help direct long-range movements and allow discrimination of different food items. There appears to be a hierarchy of responses: krill metabolites directly associated with food produced more frequent and intense feeding responses relative to DMS, which is indirectly associated with krill. DMS is used to find food by a number of pelagic species and may be an important signaling molecule in pelagic food webs. PMID:25745101

  6. Responses of the L5178Y mouse Lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, D B; Brown, A G; Howgate, S; McBride, D; Riach, C; Caspary, W J

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk+/tk- mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay using procedures based upon those described by McGregor et al. (McGregor DB, Martin R, Cattanach P, Edwards I, McBride D, Caspary WJ (1987): Environ Mol Mutagen 9:143-160). Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 micrograms/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde, o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds. Chemical not identified as mutagens were N-4-acetylaminofluorene, chlorpheniramine maleate, chloropropamide, 1,4-dioxane, endrin, ethylene glycol, iron dextran, methapyrilene, sodium(2-ethylhexyl)alcohol PMID:1902415

  7. Electrophoresis of a polyelectrolyte through a nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosal, S

    2006-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model for determining the electrophoretic speed of a polyelectrolyte through a nanopore is presented. It is assumed that the speed is determined by a balance of electrical and viscous forces arising from within the pore and that classical continuum electrostatics and hydrodynamics may be considered applicable. An explicit formula for the translocation speed as a function of the pore geometry and other physical parameters is obtained and is shown to be consistent with experimental measurements on DNA translocation through nanopores in silicon membranes. Experiments also show a weak dependence of the translocation speed on polymer length that is not accounted for by the present model. It is hypothesized that this is due to secondary effects that are neglected here.

  8. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Deforming nanoporous metal: Role of lattice coherency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoporous metals prepared by alloy corrosion may assume the form of monolithic, millimeter-sized bodies containing around 1015 nanoscale ligaments per cubic millimeter. Here, we report on the fabrication and mechanical behavior of macroscopic, crack-free nanoporous gold samples which exhibit excellent ductility in compression tests. Their yield stress is significantly lower than that expected based on scaling laws or on previous nanoindentation experiments. Electron backscatter diffraction imaging reveals a polycrystalline microstructure with grains larger than 10 μm which acquire a subdomain structure during plastic flow, but remain otherwise intact. We highlight the action of lattice dislocations which can travel over distances much larger than the ligament size. This results in a collective deformation of the many ligaments in each grain. Remarkably, the dislocation cores are partly located in the pore channels. The results suggest a critical view of the conversion between indentation hardness and yield stress in previous work.

  10. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  11. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  12. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao

    functionalities remains a great challenge due to the limitation of available polymer synthesis and the nanoscale confinement of the porous cavities. The main topic of this thesis is to develop methods for fabrication of functional nanoporous polymers from block copolymer precursors. A method has been developed......Abstract Self-assembly of block copolymers provides well-defined morphologies with characteristic length scales in the nanometer range. Nanoporous polymers prepared by selective removal of one block from self-assembled block copolymers offer great technological promise due to their many potential......, where living anionic polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) are combined to synthesize a polydimethylsiloxane-b-poly(tert-butyl acrylate)-b-polystyrene (PDMS-b-PtBA-b-PS) triblock copolymer precursor. By using either anhydrous hydrogen fluoride or trifluoroacetic acid, PtBA block...

  13. Gyroid Membranes made from Nanoporous Blck Copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szewczykowski, Piotr Plzemystaw; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Ndoni, Sokol;

    2007-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are interesting and exciting materials in view of their many potential applications, especially as ultrafiltration membranes. One way of preparing nanoporous polymeric materials is to use block copolymers. Block copolymers have the great advantage that they organize them......-selves into different morphologies on the nano scale. Block copolymer synthesis controls the molecular weight and volume fraction of blocks, which determine the resulting nano-structures. From a membrane application point of view one very suitable morphology is the bicontinuous gyroid. Mechanical stability of...... the membrane and its nanoporosity is e.g. obtained by cross-linking the majority blocks and selectively etching the minority blocks. Here we report on ultrafiltration membranes prepared from a 1,2-polybutadiene-b-polydimethylsiloxane diblock copolymer with gyroid structure. Different experimental...

  14. Formation of nanoporous aerogels from wheat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeyitogullari, Ali; Ciftci, Ozan N

    2016-08-20

    Biodegradable nanoporous aerogels were obtained from wheat starch using a simple and green method based on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) drying. Effects of processing parameters (temperature, wheat starch concentration and mixing rate during gelatinization; temperature, pressure, and flow rate of CO2, during SC-CO2 drying) on the aerogel formation were investigated, and optimized for the highest surface area and smallest pore size of the aerogels. At the optimized conditions, wheat starch aerogels had surface areas between 52.6-59.7m(2)/g and densities ranging between 0.05-0.29g/cm(3). The average pore size of the starch aerogels was 20nm. Starch aerogels were stable up to 280°C. Due to high surface area and nanoporous structure, wheat starch aerogels are promising carrier systems for bioactives and drugs in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27178916

  15. Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2011-07-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

  16. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Fengxiao

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Self-assembly of block copolymers provides well-defined morphologies with characteristic length scales in the nanometer range. Nanoporous polymers prepared by selective removal of one block from self-assembled block copolymers offer great technological promise due to their many potential applications as, e.g., membranes for separation and purification, templates for nanostructured materials, sensors, substrates for catalysis, low dielectric constant materials, photonic materials, and...

  17. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  18. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-01-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g., the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate "point-particle" analysis, we show analytically that -- owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall -- such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial "swimmers" exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change ...

  19. The mandible opening response: quantifying aggression elicited by chemical cues in ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrieri, Fernando J; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2008-01-01

    Social insects have evolved efficient recognition systems guaranteeing social cohesion and protection from enemies. To defend their territories and threaten non-nestmate intruders, ants open their mandibles as a first aggressive display. Albeit chemical cues play a major role in discrimination...... between nestmates and non-nestmates, classical bioassays based on aggressive behaviour were not particularly effective in disentangling chemical perception and behavioural components of nestmate recognition by means of categorical variables. We therefore developed a novel bioassay that accurately isolates...... genus have more similar profiles. The antennae of harnessed ants were touched with a glass rod coated with the cuticular extract of (a) nestmates, (b) non-nestmates of the same species, (c) another species of the same genus and (d) a species of a different genus. The mandible opening response (MOR) was...

  20. Tuneable graphene nanopores for single biomolecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Mohammed, Mahmood A; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Hossain, Faruque M; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-21

    Solid-state nanopores are promising candidates for next generation DNA and protein sequencing. However, once fabricated, such devices lack tuneability, which greatly restricts their biosensing capabilities. Here we propose a new class of solid-state graphene-based nanopore devices that exhibit a unique capability of self-tuneability, which is used to control their conductance, tuning it to levels comparable to the changes caused by the translocation of a single biomolecule, and hence, enabling high detection sensitivities. Our presented quantum simulation results suggest that the smallest amino acid, glycine, when present in water and in an aqueous saline solution can be detected with high sensitivity, up to a 90% change in conductance. Our results also suggest that passivating the device with nitrogen, making it an n-type device, greatly enhances its sensitivity, and makes it highly sensitive to not only the translocation of a single biomolecule, but more interestingly to intramolecular electrostatics within the biomolecule. Sensitive detection of the carboxyl group within the glycine molecule, which carries a charge equivalent to a single electron, is achieved with a conductance change that reaches as high as 99% when present in an aqueous saline solution. The presented findings suggest that tuneable graphene nanopores, with their capability of probing intramolecular electrostatics, could pave the way towards a new generation of single biomolecule detection devices. PMID:27171594

  1. Tuneable graphene nanopores for single biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Mohammed, Mahmood A.; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Hossain, Faruque M.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state nanopores are promising candidates for next generation DNA and protein sequencing. However, once fabricated, such devices lack tuneability, which greatly restricts their biosensing capabilities. Here we propose a new class of solid-state graphene-based nanopore devices that exhibit a unique capability of self-tuneability, which is used to control their conductance, tuning it to levels comparable to the changes caused by the translocation of a single biomolecule, and hence, enabling high detection sensitivities. Our presented quantum simulation results suggest that the smallest amino acid, glycine, when present in water and in an aqueous saline solution can be detected with high sensitivity, up to a 90% change in conductance. Our results also suggest that passivating the device with nitrogen, making it an n-type device, greatly enhances its sensitivity, and makes it highly sensitive to not only the translocation of a single biomolecule, but more interestingly to intramolecular electrostatics within the biomolecule. Sensitive detection of the carboxyl group within the glycine molecule, which carries a charge equivalent to a single electron, is achieved with a conductance change that reaches as high as 99% when present in an aqueous saline solution. The presented findings suggest that tuneable graphene nanopores, with their capability of probing intramolecular electrostatics, could pave the way towards a new generation of single biomolecule detection devices.

  2. Chemical fluxes in time through forest ecosystems in the UK - Soil response to pollution recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long term trend analysis of bulk precipitation, throughfall and soil solution elemental fluxes from 12 years monitoring at 10 ICP Level II forest sites in the UK reveal coherent national chemical trends indicating recovery from sulphur deposition and acidification. Soil solution pH increased and sulphate and aluminium decreased at most sites. Trends in nitrogen were variable and dependant on its form. Dissolved organic nitrogen increased in bulk precipitation, throughfall and soil solution at most sites. Nitrate in soil solution declined at sites receiving high nitrogen deposition. Increase in soil dissolved organic carbon was detected - a response to pollution recovery, changes in soil temperature and/or increased microbial activity. An increase of sodium and chloride was evident - a possible result of more frequent storm events at exposed sites. The intensive and integrated nature of monitoring enables the relationships between climate/pollutant exposure and chemical/biological response in forestry to be explored. - Forest soils are recovering from acid and sulphur pollution in the UK, but soil responses to nitrogen deposition and climatic changes are still uncertain.

  3. Responses to chemical cues from animal and plant foods by actively foraging insectivorous and omnivorous scincine lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W E; Al-Johany, A M; Vitt, L J; Habegger, J J

    2000-10-01

    If tongue-flicking is important to lizards to sample chemical cues permitting identification of foods, tongue-flicking and subsequent feeding responses should be adjusted to match diet. This hypothesis can be examined for plant foods because most lizards are insectivores, but herbivory/omnivory has evolved independently in many lizard taxa. Here we present experimental data on chemosensory responses to chemical cues from animal prey and palatable plants by three species of the scincine lizards. When tested with chemical stimuli presented on cotton swabs, the insectivorous Eumeces fasciatus responded strongly to prey chemicals but not to chemicals from plants palatable to omnivorous lizards or to pungent or odorless control stimuli. Two omnivorous species, E. schneideri and Scincus mitranus, responded more strongly to chemical cues from both prey and food plants than to the control chemicals. All available data for actively foraging lizards, including these skinks, show that they are capable of prey chemical discrimination, and insectivores do not exhibit elevated tongue-flicking or biting responses to chemical cues from palatable plants. In all of the several species of herbivores/omnivores tested, the lizards show elevated responses to both animal and plant chemicals. We suggest two independent origins of both omnivory and plant chemical discrimination that may account for the evolution of diet and food chemical discriminations in the eight species of skinks studied, five of which are omnivores. All data are consistent with the hypothesis that acquisition of omnivory is accompanied by acquisition of plant chemical discrimination, but data on a broad diversity of taxa are needed for a definitive comparative test of the evolutionary hypothesis. J. Exp. Zool. 287:327-339, 2000. PMID:10980491

  4. Solar response in tropical stratospheric ozone: a 3-D chemical transport model study using ERA reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhomse

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have used an off-line 3-D chemical transport model (CTM to investigate the 11-yr solar cycle response in tropical stratospheric ozone. The model is forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF (reanalysis (ERA-40/operational and ERA-Interim data for the 1979–2005 time period. We have compared the modelled solar response in ozone to observation-based data sets that are constructed using satellite instruments such as Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, Solar Backscatter UltraViolet instrument (SBUV, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE. A significant difference is seen between simulated and observed ozone during the 1980s, which is probably due to inhomogeneities in the ERA-40 reanalyses. In general, the model with ERA-Interim dynamics shows better agreement with the observations from 1990 onwards than with ERA-40. Overall both standard model simulations are partially able to simulate a "double peak"-structured ozone solar response with a minimum around 30 km, and these are in better agreement with HALOE than SAGE-corrected SBUV (SBUV/SAGE or SAGE-based data sets. In the tropical lower stratosphere (TLS, the modelled solar response with time-varying aerosols is amplified through aliasing with a volcanic signal, as the model overestimates ozone loss during high aerosol loading years. However, the modelled solar response with fixed dynamics and constant aerosols shows a positive signal which is in better agreement with SBUV/SAGE and SAGE-based data sets in the TLS. Our model simulations suggests that photochemistry contributes to the ozone solar response in this region. The largest model-observation differences occur in the upper stratosphere where SBUV/SAGE and SAGE-based data show a significant (up to 4% solar response whereas the standard model and HALOE do not. This is partly due to a positive solar response in the ECMWF upper stratospheric temperatures which

  5. Maximizing the dielectric response of molecular thin films via quantum chemical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-12-23

    Developing high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics is critical for advances in electronic circuitry based on unconventional semiconductors. While high-dielectric constant molecular substances are known, the mechanism of dielectric response and the fundamental chemical design principles are not well understood. Using a plane-wave density functional theory formalism, we show that it is possible to map the atomic-scale dielectric profiles of molecule-based materials while capturing important bulk characteristics. For molecular films, this approach reveals how basic materials properties such as surface coverage density, molecular tilt angle, and π-system planarity can dramatically influence dielectric response. Additionally, relatively modest molecular backbone and substituent variations can be employed to substantially enhance film dielectric response. For dense surface coverages and proper molecular alignment, conjugated hydrocarbon chains can achieve dielectric constants of >8.0, more than 3 times that of analogous saturated chains, ∼2.5. However, this conjugation-related dielectric enhancement depends on proper molecular orientation and planarization, with enhancements up to 60% for proper molecular alignment with the applied field and an additional 30% for conformations such as coplanarity in extended π-systems. Conjugation length is not the only determinant of dielectric response, and appended polarizable high-Z substituents can increase molecular film response more than 2-fold, affording estimated capacitances of >9.0 μF/cm2. However, in large π-systems, polar substituent effects are substantially attenuated. PMID:25415650

  6. Recognition of chemical compounds in contaminated water using time-dependent multiple dose cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dose- and time-dependent cellular responses are used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. ► The CI can reflect the cell number, cell viability, morphological change, etc. ► The CSVID can capture the dynamic information after cells exposed to toxins. ► The multi-class classification can distinguish the compounds using multi-doses. ► The majority vote strategy (fingerprint) can improve the classification accuracy. - Abstract: An early determination of toxicant compounds of water contaminations can gain critical time to protect citizens’ health and save substantial amounts of medical costs. To determine toxins in real time, a multi-dose classification algorithm using cellular state variable identification (CSVID) is developed in this paper. First, the dynamic cytotoxicity response profiles of living cells are measured using a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system. Changes in cell number expressed as cell index (CI) are recorded on-line as time series. Then CSVID, which reflects the cell killing, cell lysis and certain cellular pathological changes, is extracted from those dynamic cellular responses. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm based on CSVID is employed to classify chemical compounds and determine their analogous cellular response pathway. In order to increase the classification accuracy, a majority vote of the class labels is also proposed. Several validation studies demonstrate that CSVID-based classification algorithm has great potential in distinguishing the cytotoxicity response of the cells in the presence of toxins.

  7. Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Stress Responses Are Modulated in Distinct Touch and Chemical Inhibition Phases1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Aneta; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a range of transcription factors that modulate retrograde regulation of mitochondrial and chloroplast functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the relative importance of these regulators and whether they act downstream of separate or overlapping signaling cascades is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that multiple stress-related signaling pathways, with distinct kinetic signatures, converge on overlapping gene sets involved in energy organelle function. The transcription factor ANAC017 is almost solely responsible for transcript induction of marker genes around 3 to 6 h after chemical inhibition of organelle function and is a key regulator of mitochondrial and specific types of chloroplast retrograde signaling. However, an independent and highly transient gene expression phase, initiated within 10 to 30 min after treatment, also targets energy organelle functions, and is related to touch and wounding responses. Metabolite analysis demonstrates that this early response is concurrent with rapid changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and large changes in transcript abundance of genes encoding mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier proteins. It was further demonstrated that transcription factors AtWRKY15 and AtWRKY40 have repressive regulatory roles in this touch-responsive gene expression. Together, our results show that several regulatory systems can independently affect energy organelle function in response to stress, providing different means to exert operational control. PMID:27208304

  8. In Vivo Screening of Chemically Modified RNA duplexes for their Ability to Induce Innate Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen; Wengel, Jesper; Lorenzen, Niels

    Due to their sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form with...

  9. Chemical and transcriptional responses of Norway spruce genotypes with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion spp. infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsson Marie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] is one of the most important conifer species in Europe. The wood is economically important and infections by wood-rotting fungi cause substantial losses to the industry. The first line of defence in a Norway spruce tree is the bark. It is a very efficient barrier against infection based on its mechanical and chemical properties. Once an injury or an infection is recognized by the tree, induced defences are activated. In this study we examined transcriptional response, using 454-sequencing, and chemical profiles in bark of Norway spruce trees with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion annosum s.l. infection. The aim was to find associations between the transcriptome and chemical profiles to the level of susceptibility to Heterobasidion spp. in Norway spruce genotypes. Results Both terpene and phenol compositions were analysed and at 28 days post inoculation (dpi high levels of 3-carene was produced in response to H. annosum. However, significant patterns relating to inoculation or to genotypes with higher or lower susceptibility could only be found in the phenol fraction. The levels of the flavonoid catechin, which is polymerized into proanthocyanidins (PA, showed a temporal variation; it accumulated between 5 and 15 dpi in response to H. annosum infection in the less susceptible genotypes. The transcriptome data suggested that the accumulation of free catechin was preceded by an induction of genes in the flavonoid and PA biosynthesis pathway such as leucoanthocyanidin reductase. Quantitative PCR analyses verified the induction of genes in the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathway. The qPCR data also highlighted genotype-dependent differences in the transcriptional regulation of these pathways. Conclusions The varying dynamics in transcriptional and chemical patterns displayed by the less susceptible genotypes suggest that there is a genotypic variation in successful spruce defence

  10. Silica nanoporous membranes and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibullin, Amir

    This thesis describes the development of novel silica and hybrid nanoporous membranes. Nanoporous membranes are widely used in various applications. This thesis focuses on their potential applications in the energy area, such as fuel cells and lithium batteries, and in separations and ultrafiltration. We use silica colloidal spheres and polymer-modified silica spheres to prepare the membranes in a time-, cost- and material-efficient manner. First, we prepared novel silica nanoporous membranes by pressing silica colloidal spheres followed by sintering. The pore size, the thickness, and the area of the membrane are precisely controlled by experiment parameters. The resulting membranes are mechanically and thermally durable, crack-free, and capable of size-selective transport. Next, to demonstrate the utility of the pressed membranes, described above, the proton-conductive pore-filled silica colloidal membranes were prepared and the fuel cells were constructed using these membranes. We modified these membranes by filling the membrane pores with surface-attached proton-conductive polymer brushes and prepared membrane-electrode assemblies to test fuel cell performance. We studied the proton conductivity and fuel cell performance as a function of the amount of sulfonic groups in the membrane. We also prepared and characterized reversible hybrid nanoporous membranes, self-assembled from solution containing polymer-modified silica colloidal spheres. Here we applied the new concept of noncovalent membranes, where the material is held together via noncovalent interactions of polymer brushes. This enables so-called reversible assembly of the membranes, in which membrane can be assembled in one solvent and dissolved in other. This approach provides advantages in recycling and reusing of the material. This work is one of the first of its kind and it opens a whole new area of research on reversible membranes made of polymer-modified nanoparticles. Finally, we applied our

  11. Nanopore DNA sequencing and epigenetic detection with a MspA nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H.

    DNA forms the molecular basis for all known life. Widespread DNA sequencing has the potential to revolutionize healthcare and our understanding of the life sciences. Sequencing has already had a profound effect on our understanding of the molecular basis of life and underpinnings of disease. Current DNA sequencing technologies require costly reagents, can sequence only short DNA strands, and take too long to complete entire genomes. Furthermore, the required DNA sample size limits the types of experiments that can be run. For instance sequencing single cells is extremely difficult. New technologies are key to making DNA sequencing as cheap and accessible as possible and for making new experiments possible. One such new technology is nanopore sequencing. In nanopore sequencing, a thin membrane is used to divide a salt solution into two wells: cis and trans. This membrane contains a single nanometer sized hole that forms the only electrical connection between the two wells. When a voltage is applied across the membrane, ion current flows through the nanopore. This ion current is the primary signal for nanopore sequencing. DNA is negatively charged and can be pulled into the pore. When DNA is pulled into the pore, it occludes the pore and reduces the ion current that can pass through the pore. Individual DNA nucleotides along the DNA strand block the pore to varying degrees. One can measure the degree to which the pore is blocked as DNA passes through the pore and use the ion current signal to read off the DNA sequence. This thesis chronicles recent advances in the Gundlach laboratory in which I have played a leading role. It describes our work testing the biological nanopore Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A (MspA) for nanopore sequencing. The thesis consists of five chapters and three appendices which contain supplemental information for Chapters 2, 3, and 4. Chapter 1 begins with some motivation and defines the current challenges in DNA sequencing. I also introduce

  12. Egg albumen - a promising material for fabrication of nanoporous mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural protein, egg albumen, is used for fabrication of nanoporous mats by bubbfil electrospinning. In our experiment, starch is used as an additive. By suitable choices of the spinning conditions, a mat with nanopores can be produced, and the spinning process is tenable by controlling the thermodynamic properties of spun solution and spinning environment.

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis of oilsand bitumen over nanoporous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See-Hoon; Heo, Hyeon Su; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Yim, Jin-Heong; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Ko, Young Soo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Young-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic cracking of oilsand bitumen was performed over nanoporous materials at atmospheric conditions. The yield of gas increased with application of nanoporous catalysts, with the catalytic conversion to gas highest for Meso-MFI. The cracking activity seemed to correlate with pore size rather than weak acidity or surface area. PMID:21446540

  14. UV patterned nanoporous solid-liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Sagar, Kaushal Shashikant; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner;

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous Solid-Liquid core waveguides were prepared by UV induced surface modification of hydrophobic nanoporous polymers. With this method, the index contrast (delta n = 0.20) is a result of selective water infiltration. The waveguide core is defined by UV light, rendering the exposed part of a...

  15. DNA and ion transport through solid-state nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental work on a novel type of devices capable of detecting single-(bio)molecules; nanometer-sized pores, or nanopores. Individual nanopores are placed in between two electrolyte-filled liquid compartments and (bio)molecules are electrophoretically driven through them. Du

  16. Detection of meat-borne trimethylamine based on nanoporous colorimetric sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-wei; Li, Zhi-hua; Zou, Xiao-bo; Shi, Ji-yong; Mao, Han-ping; Zhao, Jie-wen; Hao, Li-min; Holmes, Mel

    2016-04-15

    Trimethylamine (TMA) is a key measurement indicator for meat spoilage. In order to develop simple, cheap, and sensitive sensors for TMA detection, a nanoporous colorimetric sensor array (NCSA) was developed. A sol-gel method has been used to obtain TiO2 nanoporous film as substrate material to improve the sensitivity and stability of the CSA. The sensor enabled the visual detection of TMA gas from the permissible exposure limits (PEL) 10 ppm to 60 ppb concentrations with significant response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the functional relationship between the color difference data and TMA concentrations. Furthermore, the NCSA was used to predict the presence of TMA in Yao-meat. A partial least square (PLS) prediction model was obtained with the correlation coefficients of 0.896 and 0.837 in calibration and prediction sets, respectively. This research suggested that the NCSA offers a useful technology for quality evaluation of TMA in meat. PMID:26617036

  17. Using PBPK guided “Body-on-a-Chip” Systems to Predict Mammalian Response to Drug and Chemical Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Jong Hwan; Srinivasan, Balaji; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; McLamb, William T.; Bernabini, Catia; Shuler, Michael L.; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The continued development of in vitro systems that accurately emulate human response to drugs or chemical agents will impact drug development, our understanding of chemical toxicity, and enhance our ability to respond to threats from chemical or biological agents. A promising technology is to build microscale replicas of humans that capture essential elements of physiology, pharmacology and/or toxicology (microphysiological systems). Here, we review progress on systems for microscale models o...

  18. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V. K.; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-07-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems.Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various

  19. Micellar nanotubes and AAO nanopores decorated with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated that anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) enables the fabrication of micellar nanotubes and nanopores decorated with nanoparticles. Block copolymer micelles containing precursors of nanoparticles were coated on the nanopores of AAO, from which we were able to select nanotubes containing nanoparticles or nanopores decorated with nanoparticles by removing the AAO template or the copolymer. Upon removal of the AAO, the micellar nanotubes with nanoparticles were produced, whereas the nanopores of AAO were decorated with nanoparticles by eliminating the copolymer. Since a variety of nanoparticles can be synthesized in addition to full control over the size and spacing of nanoparticles by the copolymer micellar approach, the methodology demonstrated here can allow fabricating functional nanotubes or nanopores with a selection of the type and size of nanoparticles.

  20. Universal Scaling Law for the Collapse of Viscous Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiakai; Yu, Jiayun; Corvalan, Carlos M

    2015-08-11

    Below a threshold size, a small pore nucleated in a fluid sheet will contract to minimize the surface energy. Such behavior plays a key role in nature and technology, from nanopores in biological membranes to nanopores in sensors for rapid DNA and RNA sequencing. Here we show that nanopores nucleated in viscous fluid sheets collapse following a universal scaling law for the pore radius. High-fidelity numerical simulations reveal that the scaling is largely independent of the initial conditions, including the size, shape, and thickness of the original nanopore. Results further show that the scaling law yields a constant speed of collapse as observed in recent experiments. Nanopores in fluid sheets of moderate viscosity also attain this constant terminal speed provided that they are sufficiently close to the singularity. PMID:26230279

  1. Composite fluorocarbon membranes by surface-initiated polymerization from nanoporous gold-coated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Carlos A; Zulkifli, Ahmad R; Faulkner, Christopher J; Trzeciak, Alex; Jennings, G Kane

    2012-02-01

    This manuscript describes the versatile fabrication and characterization of a novel composite membrane that consists of a porous alumina support, a 100 nm thick nanoporous gold coating, and a selective poly(5-(perfluorohexyl)norbornene) (pNBF6) polymer that can be grown exclusively from the nanoporous gold or throughout the membrane. Integration of the three materials is achieved by means of silane and thiol chemistry, and the use of surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization (SI-ROMP) to grow the pNBF6. The use of SI-ROMP allows tailoring of the extent of polymerization of pNBF6 throughout the structure by varying polymerization time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that the thin polymer films cover the structure entirely. Cross-sectional SEM images of the membrane not only corroborate growth of the pNBF6 polymer within both the porous alumina and the nanoporous gold coating but also show the growth of a pNBF6 layer between these porous substrates that lifts the nanoporous gold coating away from the alumina. Advancing contact angle (θ(A)) measurements show that the surfaces of these composite membranes exhibit both hydrophobic (θ(A) = 121-129)° and oleophobic (θ(A) = 69-74)° behavior due to the fluorocarbon side chains of the pNBF6 polymer that dominate the surface. Results from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirm that the membranes provide effective barriers to aqueous ions, as evidenced by a resistive impedance on the order of 1 × 10(7) Ω cm(2). Sulfonation of the polymer backbone substantially enhances ion transport through the composite membrane, as indicated by a 40-60 fold reduction in resistive impedance. Ion transport and selectivity of the membrane change by regulating the polymerization time. The fluorinated nature of the sulfonated polymer renders the membrane selective toward molecules with similar chemical characteristics. PMID:22195729

  2. Nanopore Analysis of Nucleic Acids: Single-Molecule Studies of Molecular Dynamics, Structure, and Base Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasagasti, Felix; Deamer, David W.

    Nucleic acids are linear polynucleotides in which each base is covalently linked to a pentose sugar and a phosphate group carrying a negative charge. If a pore having roughly the crosssectional diameter of a single-stranded nucleic acid is embedded in a thin membrane and a voltage of 100 mV or more is applied, individual nucleic acids in solution can be captured by the electrical field in the pore and translocated through by single-molecule electrophoresis. The dimensions of the pore cannot accommodate anything larger than a single strand, so each base in the molecule passes through the pore in strict linear sequence. The nucleic acid strand occupies a large fraction of the pore's volume during translocation and therefore produces a transient blockade of the ionic current created by the applied voltage. If it could be demonstrated that each nucleotide in the polymer produced a characteristic modulation of the ionic current during its passage through the nanopore, the sequence of current modulations would reflect the sequence of bases in the polymer. According to this basic concept, nanopores are analogous to a Coulter counter that detects nanoscopic molecules rather than microscopic [1,2]. However, the advantage of nanopores is that individual macromolecules can be characterized because different chemical and physical properties affect their passage through the pore. Because macromolecules can be captured in the pore as well as translocated, the nanopore can be used to detect individual functional complexes that form between a nucleic acid and an enzyme. No other technique has this capability.

  3. Chemical contamination assessment of Gulf of Mexico oysters in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W E; Kimbrough, K L; Lauenstein, G G; Christensen, J

    2009-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005 and caused widespread devastation along the central Gulf Coast states. Less than a month later Hurricane Rita followed a similar track slightly west of Katrina's. A coordinated multi-agency response followed to collect water, sediment and tissue samples for a variety of chemical, biological and toxicological indicators. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Status and Trends Program (NS&T) participated in this effort by measuring chemical contamination in sediment and oyster tissue as part of the Mussel Watch Program, a long-term monitoring program to assess spatial and temporal trends in a wide range of coastal pollutants. This paper describes results for contaminants measured in oyster tissue collected between September 29 and October 10, 2005 and discusses the results in the context of Mussel Watch and its 20-year record of chemical contamination in the region and the nation. In general, levels of metals in oyster tissue were higher then pre- hurricane levels while organic contaminants were at or near record lows. No contaminant reported here exceeded the FDA action level for food safety. PMID:19051046

  4. Rational Design of Photonic Dust from Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Films: A Versatile Photonic Nanotool for Visual Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Santos, Abel; Wang, Ye; Kumeria, Tushar; Ho, Daena; Li, Junsheng; Wang, Changhai; Losic, Dusan

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we present a systematic study on the development, optimisation and applicability of interferometrically coloured distributed Bragg reflectors based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA-DBRs) in the form of films and nanoporous microparticles as visual/colorimetric analytical tools. Firstly, we synthesise a complete palette of NAA-DBRs by galvanostatic pulse anodisation approach, in which the current density is altered in a periodic fashion in order to engineer the effective medium of the resulting photonic films in depth. NAA-DBR photonic films feature vivid colours that can be tuned across the UV-visible-NIR spectrum by structural engineering. Secondly, the effective medium of the resulting photonic films is assessed systematically by visual analysis and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) in order to establish the most optimal nanoporous platforms to develop visual/colorimetric tools. Then, we demonstrate the applicability of NAA-DBR photonic films as a chemically selective sensing platform for visual detection of mercury(II) ions. Finally, we generate a new nanomaterial, so-called photonic dust, by breaking down NAA-DBRs films into nanoporous microparticles. The resulting microparticles (μP-NAA-DBRs) display vivid colours and are sensitive towards changes in their effective medium, opening new opportunities for developing advanced photonic nanotools for a broad range of applications.

  5. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weili; He, Bin

    2015-07-01

    In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs) is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS) was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP) was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency. PMID:26184260

  6. Emergency Response System for Pollution Accidents in Chemical Industrial Parks, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Duan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to property damage and loss of lives, environment pollution, such as water pollution and air pollution caused by accidents in chemical industrial parks (CIPs is a significant issue in China. An emergency response system (ERS was therefore planned to properly and proactively cope with safety incidents including fire and explosions occurring in the CIPs in this study. Using a scenario analysis, the stages of emergency response were divided into three levels, after introducing the domino effect, and fundamental requirements of ERS design were confirmed. The framework of ERS was composed mainly of a monitoring system, an emergency command center, an action system, and a supporting system. On this basis, six main emergency rescue steps containing alarm receipt, emergency evaluation, launched corresponding emergency plans, emergency rescue actions, emergency recovery, and result evaluation and feedback were determined. Finally, an example from the XiaoHu Chemical Industrial Park (XHCIP was presented to check on the integrality, reliability, and maneuverability of the ERS, and the result of the first emergency drill with this ERS indicated that the developed ERS can reduce delays, improve usage efficiency of resources, and raise emergency rescue efficiency.

  7. Optimization of integrated chemical-biological degradation of a reactive azo dye using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrated chemical-biological degradation combining advanced oxidation by UV/H2O2 followed by aerobic biodegradation was used to degrade C.I. Reactive Azo Red 195A, commonly used in the textile industry in Australia. An experimental design based on the response surface method was applied to evaluate the interactive effects of influencing factors (UV irradiation time, initial hydrogen peroxide dosage and recirculation ratio of the system) on decolourisation efficiency and optimizing the operating conditions of the treatment process. The effects were determined by the measurement of dye concentration and soluble chemical oxygen demand (S-COD). The results showed that the dye and S-COD removal were affected by all factors individually and interactively. Maximal colour degradation performance was predicted, and experimentally validated, with no recirculation, 30 min UV irradiation and 500 mg H2O2/L. The model predictions for colour removal, based on a three-factor/five-level Box-Wilson central composite design and the response surface method analysis, were found to be very close to additional experimental results obtained under near optimal conditions. This demonstrates the benefits of this approach in achieving good predictions while minimising the number of experiments required

  8. High-throughput optical sensing of nucleic acids in a nanopore array

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shuo; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Castell, Oliver K.; Bayley, Hagan; Wallace, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Protein nanopores such as α-hemolysin and MspA can potentially be used to sequence long strands of DNA quickly and at low cost. In order to provide high-speed sequencing, large arrays of nanopores are required that allow the nanopores to individually addressed, but current nanopore sequencing methods rely on ionic current measurements and such methods are likely to prove difficult to scale up. Here, we show that, by optically encoding the ionic flux through protein nanopores, the discriminati...

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanoporous Alumina Films and their Application to Nanorod Array Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani Monfared, Negar

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize and characterize the nanoporous structures that can be obtained by the anodization of thin film aluminum sputter deposited on a silicon wafer substrate. This study also investigated the application of nanoporous alumina to fabricate nanorod arrays by using preceramic polymers. Although there are many studies on the effect of anodizing conditions on anodized alumina, there are a few studies on anodizing of thin film aluminum. Anodized thin film of aluminum supported on silicon could have several applications that involve integrating the nanoporous structures into chemical and biological sensors and as templates for creating hierarchically complex nanostructures that are integrated with microelectronic circuits. In this study the different attributes of anodizing parameters in the synthesis of nanoporous structures on thin film aluminum compared to the results of studies on aluminum bulk is investigated. These differences can be due to attributes of the material, the resistance of the substrate and the reactions of substrate during anodizing. In this study the effects of different anodizing parameters and the contribution of each parameter were investigated using statistical approaches for quantification of pore sizes, their distributions and pore densities. This approach has never been previously used for studying the aluminum anodization. Until now, studies have always been based on average of the structure parameters with the hypothesis of homogeneity and uniformity of the structure which is not the case for anodization of thin film aluminum. To investigate the relative effect of each parameter, the Taguchi method and signal-to-noise calculation were applied. A new fabrication method for making nanorod arrays was introduced. In this method, nanoporous alumina was used as a casting mold for being filled by a preceramic polymer. KDT Ceraset polysilazane 20 (PSZ) and KDT Ceraset polyureasilazane (PUSZ) were two preceramic

  10. Integrated solid-state nanopore platform for nanopore fabrication via dielectric breakdown, DNA-speed deceleration and noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yusuke; Yanagi, Itaru; Matsui, Kazuma; Yokoi, Takahide; Takeda, Ken-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    The practical use of solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing requires easy fabrication of the nanopores, reduction of the DNA movement speed and reduction of the ionic current noise. Here, we report an integrated nanopore platform with a nanobead structure that decelerates DNA movement and an insulating polyimide layer that reduces noise. To enable rapid nanopore fabrication, we introduced a controlled dielectric breakdown (CDB) process into our system. DNA translocation experiments revealed that single nanopores were created by the CDB process without sacrificing performance in reducing DNA movement speed by up to 10 μs/base or reducing noise up to 600 pArms at 1 MHz. Our platform provides the essential components for proceeding to the next step in the process of DNA sequencing.

  11. A variational approach to the liquid-vapor phase transition for hardcore ions in the bulk and in nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Loubet, Bastien; Palmeri, John

    2016-01-01

    We employ a field-theoretical variational approach to study the behavior of ionic solutions in the grand canonical ensemble. To describe properly the hardcore interactions between ions, we use a cutoff in Fourier space for the electrostatic contribution of the grand potential and the Carnahan-Starling equation of state with a modified chemical potential for the pressure one. We first calibrate our method by comparing its predictions at room temperature with Monte Carlo results for excess chemical potential and energy. We then validate our approach in the bulk phase by describing the classical "ionic liquid-vapor" phase transition induced by ionic correlations at low temperature, before applying it to electrolytes at room temperature confined to nanopores embedded in a low dielectric medium and coupled to an external reservoir of ions. The ionic concentration in the nanopore is then correctly described from very low bulk concentrations, where dielectric exclusion shifts the transition up to room temperature fo...

  12. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    refereeing process, and Ms Natalia Goehring for the beautiful cover artwork. Finally, to the readers, we hope you find this special issue a valuable source of information and insight into the field of nanopores. New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications contents Mathematical modeling and simulation of nanopore blocking by precipitation M-T Wolfram, M Burger and Z S Siwy Protein conducting nanopores Anke Harsman, Vivien Krüger, Philipp Bartsch, Alf Honigmann, Oliver Schmidt, Sanjana Rao, Christof Meisinger and Richard Wagner Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores Mikiembo Kukwikila and Stefan Howorka Electrical characterization of DNA-functionalized solid state nanopores for bio-sensing V Mussi, P Fanzio, L Repetto, G Firpo, P Scaruffi, S Stigliani, M Menotta, M Magnani, G P Tonini and U Valbusa Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets J L Poulos, S A Portonovo, H Bang and J J Schmidt Critical assessment of OmpF channel selectivity: merging information from different experimental protocols M L López, E García-Giménez, V M Aguilella and A Alcaraz Chemically modified solid state nanopores for high throughput nanoparticle separation Anmiv S Prabhu, Talukder Zaki N Jubery, Kevin J Freedman, Rafael Mulero, Prashanta Dutta and Min Jun Kim Changes in ion channel geometry resolved to sub-ångström precision via single molecule mass spectrometry Joseph W F Robertson, John J Kasianowicz and Joseph E Reiner Entropic transport of finite size particles W Riefler, G Schmid, P S Burada and P Hänggi Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel Philip A Gurnev, Daniel Harries, V Adrian Parsegian and Sergey M Bezrukov Detection of urea-induced internal denaturation of dsDNA using solid-state nanoporesn Alon Singer, Heiko Kuhn, Maxim Frank-Kamenetskii and Amit Meller Translocation events in a single-walled carbon nanotube Jin He, Hao Liu, Pei Pang

  13. Behavioural responses of Odontophrynus americanus tadpoles (Anura: Leptodactylidae to fish chemical cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarabotti, Pablo A.

    2007-02-01

    laboratory experiments to evaluate whether O. americanus tadpoles respond behaviourally to a chemical stimulus of the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus. We evaluated behavioural responses by observing changes in activity level, refuge use and spatial distribution of the tadpoles. In the presence of the fish chemical stimulus, tadpoles reduced their activity by 27% and increased refuge use approximately five-fold, but they did not exhibit spatial avoidance from the predator stimulus. The behavioural responses of the tadpoles of this species may reduce the rate of encounter and attack by predators.

  14. Recognition of chemical compounds in contaminated water using time-dependent multiple dose cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T.H., E-mail: thpan@ujs.edu.cn [School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G6 (Canada); Huang, B., E-mail: biao.huang@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G6 (Canada); Xing, J.Z., E-mail: jzxing@ualberta.ca [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada); Zhang, W.P., E-mail: weiping.zhang@gov.ab.ca [Alberta Health and Wellness, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1S6 (Canada); Gabos, S., E-mail: stephan.gabos@gov.ab.ca [Alberta Health and Wellness, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1S6 (Canada); Chen, J., E-mail: jchen@ece.ualberta.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada)

    2012-04-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose- and time-dependent cellular responses are used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CI can reflect the cell number, cell viability, morphological change, etc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSVID can capture the dynamic information after cells exposed to toxins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multi-class classification can distinguish the compounds using multi-doses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The majority vote strategy (fingerprint) can improve the classification accuracy. - Abstract: An early determination of toxicant compounds of water contaminations can gain critical time to protect citizens' health and save substantial amounts of medical costs. To determine toxins in real time, a multi-dose classification algorithm using cellular state variable identification (CSVID) is developed in this paper. First, the dynamic cytotoxicity response profiles of living cells are measured using a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system. Changes in cell number expressed as cell index (CI) are recorded on-line as time series. Then CSVID, which reflects the cell killing, cell lysis and certain cellular pathological changes, is extracted from those dynamic cellular responses. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm based on CSVID is employed to classify chemical compounds and determine their analogous cellular response pathway. In order to increase the classification accuracy, a majority vote of the class labels is also proposed. Several validation studies demonstrate that CSVID-based classification algorithm has great potential in distinguishing the cytotoxicity response of the cells in the presence of toxins.

  15. Role of environmental stress in the physiological response to chemical toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental physiology is the study of the physiological mechanisms that allow animals to cope with and adapt to changes in temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, and other natural factors of their physical environment. Nearly all toxicological and pharmacological studies are performed in resting (i.e., non exercising) experimental animals acclimatized to standard environmental conditions that are usually considered ideal to the animal's physiological well-being. These ideal test conditions are clearly not representative of the fluctuations in the natural environment encountered by humans and other animals on a day-to-day basis. It behooves the toxicologist, especially those interested in extrapolating experimental data from laboratory animals to humans, to consider how variations in the natural environment will alter physiological responses to toxicants. Temperature and exercise are the two most well-studied parameters in the fields of environmental physiology and toxicology. In general, high temperatures exacerbate the toxic effects of many environmental toxicants. Moreover, exercising subjects are generally more vulnerable to airborne toxic agents. The prospect of global warming also warrants a better assessment of how higher environmental temperatures may impact on the response of humans and other species to toxic chemicals. Hence, this paper and accompanying papers from the proceedings of a symposium focus on the salient aspects of the interaction between environmental stress and physiological response to toxic agents with particular emphasis on temperature and exercise

  16. Dual-tracer method to estimate coral reef response to a plume of chemically modified seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaren, J. K.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new method, based on measurement of seawater samples, to estimate the response of a reef ecosystem to a plume of an additive (for example, a nutrient or other chemical). In the natural environment, where there may be natural variability in concentrations, it can be difficult to distinguish between changes in concentrations that would occur naturally and changes in concentrations that result from a chemical addition. Furthermore, in the unconfined natural environment, chemically modified water can mix with waters that have not been modified, making it difficult to distinguish between effects of dilution and effects of chemical fluxes or transformations. We present a dual-tracer method that extracts signals from observations that may be affected by both natural variability and dilution. In this dual-tracer method, a substance (in our example case, alkalinity) is added to the water in known proportion to a passive conservative tracer (in our example case, Rhodamine WT dye). The resulting plume of seawater is allowed to flow over the study site. Two transects are drawn across the plume at the front and back of the study site. If, in our example, alkalinity is plotted as a function of dye concentration for the front transect, the slope of the resulting mixing line is the ratio of alkalinity to dye in the added fluid. If a similar mixing line is measured and calculated for the back transect, the slope of this mixing line will indicate the amount of added alkalinity that remains in the water flowing out of the study site per unit of added dye. The ratio of the front and back slopes indicates the fraction of added alkalinity that was taken up by the reef. The method is demonstrated in an experiment performed on One Tree Reef (Queensland, Australia) aimed at showing that ocean acidification is already affecting coral reef growth. In an effort to chemically reverse some of the changes to seawater chemistry that have occurred over the past 200 years, we added

  17. Nanoporous aerogel as a bacteria repelling hygienic material for healthcare environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun Kyun; Kohli, Nandita; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Min, Younjin; Jayaraman, Arul; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Akbulut, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) caused by pathogenic bacteria are a worldwide problem and responsible for numerous cases of morbidity and mortality. Exogenous cross-contamination is one of the main mechanisms contributing to such infections. This work investigates the potential of hydrophobically modified nanoporous silica aerogel as an antiadhesive hygienic material that can inhibit exogenous bacterial contamination. Nanoporous silica aerogels were synthesized via sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate and hydrophobized using trimethylsilyl chloride. Bacterial adhesion characteristics were evaluated via dip-inoculation in suspensions of Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The attachment of E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus to hydrophobic nanoporous silica aerogel (HNSA) was found to be significantly lower than that to hydrophilic and hydrophobic nonporous silica materials: 99.91% (E. coli O157:H7) and 99.93% (S. aureus) reduction in comparison to hydrophilic nonporous silica, and 82.95% (E. coli O157:H7) and 84.90% (S. aureus) reduction in comparison to hydrophobic nonporous silica. These results suggest that the use of HNSA as surfaces that come into contact with bacterial pathogens in the healthcare environment can improve bacterial hygiene, and therefore may reduce the rate of HAIs.

  18. Nanoporous aerogel as a bacteria repelling hygienic material for healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun Kyun; Kohli, Nandita; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Min, Younjin; Jayaraman, Arul; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; Akbulut, Mustafa

    2016-02-26

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) caused by pathogenic bacteria are a worldwide problem and responsible for numerous cases of morbidity and mortality. Exogenous cross-contamination is one of the main mechanisms contributing to such infections. This work investigates the potential of hydrophobically modified nanoporous silica aerogel as an antiadhesive hygienic material that can inhibit exogenous bacterial contamination. Nanoporous silica aerogels were synthesized via sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate and hydrophobized using trimethylsilyl chloride. Bacterial adhesion characteristics were evaluated via dip-inoculation in suspensions of Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The attachment of E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus to hydrophobic nanoporous silica aerogel (HNSA) was found to be significantly lower than that to hydrophilic and hydrophobic nonporous silica materials: 99.91% (E. coli O157:H7) and 99.93% (S. aureus) reduction in comparison to hydrophilic nonporous silica, and 82.95% (E. coli O157:H7) and 84.90% (S. aureus) reduction in comparison to hydrophobic nonporous silica. These results suggest that the use of HNSA as surfaces that come into contact with bacterial pathogens in the healthcare environment can improve bacterial hygiene, and therefore may reduce the rate of HAIs. PMID:26821348

  19. Capillary Rise of Liquids in Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick; Kityk, Andriy V

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements on the spontaneous imbibition (capillary rise) of water, a linear hydrocarbon (n-C16H34) and a liquid crystal (8OCB) into the pore space of monolithic, nanoporous Vycor glass (mean pore radius 5 nm). Measurements on the mass uptake of the porous hosts as a function of time, m(t), are in good agreement with the Lucas-Washburn square root of time prediction, typical of imbibition of liquids into porous hosts. The relative capillary rise velocities scale as expected from the bulk fluid parameters.

  20. Lipid Bilayer Membrane Perturbation by Embedded Nanopores: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fandiño, Rebeca; Piñeiro, Ángel; Trick, Jemma L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-03-22

    A macromolecular nanopore inserted into a membrane may perturb the dynamic organization of the surrounding lipid bilayer. To better understand the nature of such perturbations, we have undertaken a systematic molecular dynamics simulation study of lipid bilayer structure and dynamics around three different classes of nanopore: a carbon nanotube, three related cyclic peptide nanotubes differing in the nature of their external surfaces, and a model of a β-barrel nanopore protein. Periodic spatial distributions of several lipid properties as a function of distance from the nanopore were observed. This was especially clear for the carbon nanotube system, for which the density of lipids, the bilayer thickness, the projection of lipid head-to-tail vectors onto the membrane plane, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficients exhibited undulatory behavior as a function of the distance from the surface of the channel. Overall, the differences in lipid behavior as a function of the nanopore structure reveal local adaptation of the bilayer structure and dynamics to different embedded nanopore structures. Both the local structure and dynamic behavior of lipids around membrane-embedded nanopores are sensitive to the geometry and nature of the outer surface of the macromolecule/molecular assembly forming the pore. PMID:26943498

  1. Nanoparticle mechanics: deformation detection via nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Armin; Goyal, Gaurav; Aneja, Rachna; Sundaram, Ramalingam V K; Lee, Kidan; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Ki-Bum; Vlahovska, Petia M; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-08-14

    Solid-state nanopores have been widely used in the past for single-particle analysis of nanoparticles, liposomes, exosomes and viruses. The shape of soft particles, particularly liposomes with a bilayer membrane, can greatly differ inside the nanopore compared to bulk solution as the electric field inside the nanopores can cause liposome electrodeformation. Such deformations can compromise size measurement and characterization of particles, but are often neglected in nanopore resistive pulse sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation of various liposomes inside nanopores. We observed a significant difference in resistive pulse characteristics between soft liposomes and rigid polystyrene nanoparticles especially at higher applied voltages. We used theoretical simulations to demonstrate that the difference can be explained by shape deformation of liposomes as they translocate through the nanopores. Comparing our results with the findings from electrodeformation experiments, we demonstrated that the rigidity of liposomes can be qualitatively compared using resistive pulse characteristics. This application of nanopores can provide new opportunities to study the mechanics at the nanoscale, to investigate properties of great value in fundamental biophysics and cellular mechanobiology, such as virus deformability and fusogenicity, and in applied sciences for designing novel drug/gene delivery systems. PMID:27321911

  2. Super-sensitive Molecule-hugging Graphene Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Garaj, Slaven; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, Jene A

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal resolution and lateral sensitivity are decisive characteristics that determine the suitability of a nanopore sensor for sequencing a strand of DNA as well as other important polymers. Previous modeling of DNA induced ionic current blockades in single atom thick graphene nanopores has shown these nanopores to have sufficient longitudinal resolution to distinguish individual nucleobases along the length of a DNA molecule. Here we experimentally focus on the sensitivity to small changes in DNA diameter that can be discerned with graphene nanopores. We show that remarkably large sensitivities (0.5 nA/A)are obtained when the nanopore is tailored to have a diameter close to that of the polymer of interest. Our results have been obtained with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Smaller graphene nanopores that can be tuned to the diameter of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for sequencing have only recently been demonstrated. Our results indicate that nanopore sensors based on such pores will provide excellent resol...

  3. Biological responses to the chemical recovery of acidified fresh waters in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report biological changes at several UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network lakes and streams that are spatially consistent with the recovery of water chemistry induced by reductions in acid deposition. These include trends toward more acid-sensitive epilithic diatom and macroinvertebrate assemblages, an increasing proportional abundance of macroinvertebrate predators, an increasing occurrence of acid-sensitive aquatic macrophyte species, and the recent appearance of juvenile (<1 year old) brown trout in some of the more acidic flowing waters. Changes are often shown to be directly linked to annual variations in acidity. Although indicative of biological improvement in response to improving water chemistry, 'recovery' in most cases is modest and very gradual. While specific ecological recovery endpoints are uncertain, it is likely that physical and biotic interactions are influencing the rate of recovery of certain groups of organisms at particular sites. - Recently observed changes in the species composition of UK lakes and streams are consistent with chemical recovery from acidification

  4. Water confined in carbon nanotubes: Magnetic response and proton chemical shieldings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Patrick; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2009-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) provide a well-defined environment for the study of confined water, whose behavior can differ markedly from bulk water. The application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to probe the local water structure and dynamics in these cases is hindered by ambiguities in the interpretation of the NMR spectra. We employ linear response theory to evaluate the ^1H chemical shieldings of liquid water in semiconducting CNTs, where the electronic structure is derived from density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions. The shieldings are sampled from trajectories generated via first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at ambient conditions, for water in CNTs with diameters d=11 åand 14.9 å@. We find a large (˜-23 ppm) upfield shift relative to bulk liquid water, which is a consequence of strongly anisotropic magnetic fields induced in the CNT by the applied magnetic field.

  5. Physical and chemical response of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Virk; P S Chandi; A K Srivastava

    2001-10-01

    Physical and chemical responses of 70 MeV carbon ion irradiated Kapton-H polymer were studied by using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques. The ion fluences ranging from 9.3 × 1011–9 × 1013 ions cm–2 were used. Recorded UV-visible spectra clearly showed a decrease in absorption initially with fluence, but for the higher fluences it showed a recovery characteristic. A decrease in band-gap energy of 0.07 eV was observed. The FTIR analysis indicated the high resistance to radiation induced degradation of polymer. The diffraction pattern of Kapton-H indicates that this polymer is semi-crystalline in its nature. In case of irradiated one, there was an average increase of crystallite size by 20%, but diffuse pattern indicates that there was a decrease in crystallinity, which may be attributed to the formation of complex structure induced by the cross-linking of the polymeric chains.

  6. Effect of three biological response modifiers on chemical carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović, Z; Culo, F; Marusić, M

    1993-01-01

    The modulation of chemical carcinogenesis by three biological response modifiers was assessed in a mouse model. CBA mice given 20-methylcholanthrene s.c. were treated with peptidoglycan monomer, azure B and indomethacin for one month, either from day 0 or 75 after methylcholanthrene injection to assess their effects on tumor incidence (on days 150 and 300), time of tumor appearance, time of death, and duration and dynamics of tumor growth. All three agents significantly influenced some of the parameters of tumor growth, except tumor incidence on day 300. Highly significant sex differences in tumor appearance and growth were observed. Tumors with late appearance grew faster in comparison to tumors with early appearance. The data presented indicate that the effectiveness of anti-cancer body defense mechanisms can be best defined by the time of tumor appearance. PMID:8272149

  7. Broadband 10-300 GHz stimulus-response sensing for chemical and biological entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By illuminating the sample with a broadband 10-300 GHz stimulus and coherently detecting the response, we obtain reflection and transmission spectra of common powdered substances, and compare them as a starting point for distinguishing concealed threats in envelopes and on personnel. Because these samples are irregular and their dielectric properties cannot be modulated, however, the spectral information we obtain is largely qualitative. To show how to gain quantitative information on biological species at micro- and millimetre-wave frequencies, we introduce thermal modulation of a globular protein in solution, and show that changes in single-wavelength microwave reflections coincide with accepted visible absorption spectra, pointing the way towards gaining quantitative chemical and biological spectra from broadband terahertz systems

  8. Response of mechanical properties of glasses to their chemical, thermal and mechanical histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    glass fibers are dependent on the thermal history (measured as fictive temperature), tension, chemical composition and redox state. However, the fictive temperature affects the hardness of bulk glass in a complicated manner, i.e., the effect does not exhibit a clear regularity in the range of the......, surface, thermal history or excess entropy of the final glass state. Here I review recent progresses in understanding of the responses of mechanical properties of oxide glasses to the compositional variation, thermal history and mechanical deformation. The tensile strength, elastic modulus and hardness of...... fictive temperatures that we have measured so far. It depends on type of glass systems. This complicated effect is discussed in terms of glass structure, dynamics and relaxation behavior. Our recent experimental findings indicate that for oxide glass fibers the tensile strength, elastic modulus and...

  9. Optimization and Modelling of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal by ANAMMOX Process Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jalilzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic model for chemical oxygen demand (COD removal using the ANAMMOX (Anaerobic AMMonium OXidation process was provided based on an experimental design. At first, the experimental data was collected from a combined biological aerobic/anaerobic reactor. For modelling and optimization of COD removal, the main parameters were considered, such as COD loading, ammonium, pH, and temperature. From the models, the optimum conditions were determined as COD 97.5 mg/L, ammonium concentration equal to 28.75 mg-N/L, pH 7.72, and temperature 31.3°C. Finally, the analysis of the optimum conditions, performed by the response surface method, predicted COD removal efficiency of 81.07% at the optimum condition.

  10. A Label-Free Impedimetric DNA Sensor Based on a Nanoporous SnO2 Film: Fabrication and Detection Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Hai Le

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous SnO2 thin films were elaborated to serve as sensing electrodes for label-free DNA detection using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Films were deposited by an electrodeposition process (EDP. Then the non-Faradic EIS behaviour was thoroughly investigated during some different steps of functionalization up to DNA hybridization. The results have shown a systematic decrease of the impedance upon DNA hybridization. The impedance decrease is attributed to an enhanced penetration of ionic species within the film volume. Besides, the comparison of impedance variations upon DNA hybridization between the liquid and vapour phase processes for organosilane (APTES grafting on the nanoporous SnO2 films showed that vapour-phase method is more efficient. This is due to the fact that the vapour is more effective than the solution in penetrating the nanopores of the films. As a result, the DNA sensors built from vapour-treated silane layer exhibit a higher sensitivity than those produced from liquid-treated silane, in the range of tested target DNA concentration going to 10 nM. Finally, the impedance and fluorescence response signals strongly depend on the types of target DNA molecules, demonstrating a high selectivity of the process on nanoporous SnO2 films.

  11. On-chip interdigitated supercapacitor based on nano-porous gold/manganese oxide nanowires hybrid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid development of micro-sized electronics has aroused demand for on-chip energy storage devices of high reliability, stability and performance. Micro fabrication technology has now enabled planar supercapacitors (SCs), based on various electrode materials, to be prepared onto a chip for a variety of applications. Nano-porous metal/manganese oxide hybrid electrode with enhanced conductivity and capacitive performance has been proven to be a promising candidate for SCs but has not yet been utilized for interdigitated on-chip energy storage. Herein, we demonstrate a scalable preparation of nano-porous gold/manganese oxide nanowires thin film electrode material, which can be further fabricated to on-chip interdigitated all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon wafers so that they can be integrated with MEMS or CMOS. Also the nucleation and growth mechanism of manganese oxide nanowires on nano-porous gold has been investigated. Remarkably, the miniaturized SCs based on the nano-porous gold/manganese oxide nanowires hybrid material exhibits excellent cycle stability and superior frequency response (4 ms) and demonstrates energy density of 55 μWh cm−3 and power density of 3.4 W cm−3, which is relatively high compared with other manganese oxide based supercapacitors

  12. A Hybrid Semi-Digital Transimpedance Amplifier With Noise Cancellation Technique for Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Lun; Jiang, Haowei; Venkatesh, A G; Hall, Drew A

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, nanopores have been a promising technology for next generation deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing. Here, we present a hybrid semi-digital transimpedance amplifier (HSD-TIA) to sense the minute current signatures introduced by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocating through a nanopore, while discharging the baseline current using a semi-digital feedback loop. The amplifier achieves fast settling by adaptively tuning a DC compensation current when a step input is detected. A noise cancellation technique reduces the total input-referred current noise caused by the parasitic input capacitance. Measurement results show the performance of the amplifier with 31.6 M Ω mid-band gain, 950 kHz bandwidth, and 8.5 fA/ √Hz input-referred current noise, a 2× noise reduction due to the noise cancellation technique. The settling response is demonstrated by observing the insertion of a protein nanopore in a lipid bilayer. Using the nanopore, the HSD-TIA was able to measure ssDNA translocation events. PMID:26595927

  13. Effect of MWCNT surface and chemical modification on in vitro cellular response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with diameter in the range of 10–30 nm) before and after chemical surface functionalisation on macrophages response. The study has shown that the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this particular form of carbon nanomaterial is a crucial issue to interpret properly its impact on the cellular response. Effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) characteristics, including purity, dispersity, chemistry and dimension upon the nature of the cell environment–material interaction were investigated. Various techniques involving electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the materials. The results demonstrate that the way of CNT preparation prior to biological tests has a fundamental impact on their behavior, cell viability and the nature of cell–nanotube interaction. Chemical functionalisation of CNTs in an acidic ambient (MWCNT-Fs) facilitates interaction with cells by two possible mechanisms, namely, endocytosis/phagocytosis and by energy-independent passive process. The results indicate that MWCNT-F in macrophages may decrease the cell proliferation process by interfering with the mitotic apparatus without negative consequences on cell viability. On the contrary, the as-prepared MWCNTs, without any surface treatment produce the least reduction in cell proliferation with reference to control, and the viability of cells exposed to this sample was substantially reduced with respect to control. A possible explanation of such a phenomenon is the presence of MWCNT’s agglomerates surrounded by numerous cells releasing toxic substances.

  14. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles: a new approach in using a nanoporous membrane in conjunction with ultrasonication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Kiani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction of HAuCl4 inside the pores of a polycarbonate-based membrane followed by dissolving the membrane in dichloromethane and further sonication. Sonication time as the main affecting factor on the nanoparticle size was investigated. The characterization by transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of gold nanoparticles with diameters less than 20 nm and a uniform distribution of the nanoparticle size. This template method is particularly interesting, because it allows including metallic constituents inside the voids of nanoporous host materials resulting in monodisperse diameter nanomaterials.

  15. Investigating the Nanoporous Structure of Aluminosilicate Geopolymers with Small Angle Scattering and Imaging Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Rowles and O'Connor optimised the compressive strength of a geopolymer produced by sodium silicate-activation of metakaolinite, and found that this material may have a greater compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement. It has been observed that similar metakaolin-based geopolymers have a multiscale structure that consists of partially dissolved metakaolinite embedded in a nanoporous matrix. The characteristics of the nanostructure within this matrix influence the physical properties of the geopolymer. An investigation, using small-angle neutron scattering and imaging techniques, into how the matrix nanostructure varies with chemical composition of the starting material has been undertaken. The results of this investigation will be reported. (authors)

  16. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Jong-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  17. High-Content and Semi-Automated Quantification of Responses to Estrogenic Chemicals Using a Novel Translucent Transgenic Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jon M; Metz, Jeremy; Lee, Okhyun; Trznadel, Maciej; Takesono, Aya; Brown, A Ross; Owen, Stewart F; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-06-21

    Rapid embryogenesis, together with genetic similarities with mammals, and the desire to reduce mammalian testing, are major incentives for using the zebrafish model in chemical screening and testing. Transgenic zebrafish, engineered for identifying target gene expression through expression of fluorophores, have considerable potential for both high-content and high-throughput testing of chemicals for endocrine activity. Here we generated an estrogen responsive transgenic zebrafish model in a pigment-free "Casper" phenotype, facilitating identification of target tissues and quantification of these responses in whole intact fish. Using the ERE-GFP-Casper model we show chemical type and concentration dependence for green fluorescent protein (GFP) induction and both spatial and temporal responses for different environmental estrogens tested. We also developed a semiautomated (ArrayScan) imaging and image analysis system that we applied to quantify whole body fluorescence responses for a range of different estrogenic chemicals in the new transgenic zebrafish model. The zebrafish model developed provides a sensitive and highly integrative system for identifying estrogenic chemicals, their target tissues and effect concentrations for exposures in real time and across different life stages. It thus has application for chemical screening to better direct health effects analysis of environmental estrogens and for investigating the functional roles of estrogens in vertebrates. PMID:27227508

  18. Dynamic Characteristics of Gas Transport in Nanoporous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special flow mechanism and percolation characteristics for gas transport are presented in nanoporous media, which cannot be explained by the traditional motion equation of Darcy's law. On the basis of theoretical analysis, we establish a low velocity nonlinear transfer equation of gas in nanoporous media and a mathematical model of gas volume flow in multi-scale porous media. By utilizing nonlinear numerical calculation methodology, a detailed quantitative analysis of the diffusion and convective rate of gas flow is presented, providing a theoretical foundation for the development of nanoporous media

  19. The interplay between habitat structure and chemical contaminants on biotic responses of benthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Pinto, Mariana; Matias, Miguel G; Coleman, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    Habitat structure influences the diversity and distribution of organisms, potentially affecting their response to disturbances by either affecting their 'susceptibility' or through the provision of resources that can mitigate impacts of disturbances. Chemical disturbances due to contamination are associated with decreases in diversity and functioning of systems and are also likely to increase due to coastal urbanisation. Understanding how habitat structure interacts with contaminants is essential to predict and therefore manage such effects, minimising their consequences to marine systems. Here, we manipulated two structurally different habitats and exposed them to different types of contaminants. The effects of contamination and habitat structure interacted, affecting species richness. More complex experimental habitats were colonized by a greater diversity of organisms than the less complex habitats. These differences disappeared, however, when habitats were exposed to contaminants, suggesting that contaminants can override effects of habitats structure at small spatial scales. These results provide insight into the complex ways that habitat structure and contamination interact and the need to incorporate evidence of biotic responses from individual disturbances to multiple stressors. Such effects need to be taken into account when designing and planning management and conservation strategies to natural systems. PMID:27168991

  20. Responses to prey chemicals by a lacertid lizard,Podarcis muralis: Prey chemical discrimination and poststrike elevation in tongue-flick rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W E

    1991-05-01

    The ability to discriminate prey chemicals from control substances and the presence of a poststrike elevation in tongue-flicking (PETF) rate are experimentally demonstrated in the lacertid lizard,Podarcis muralis, The tongue-flick attack score, a composite index of response strength, was significantly higher in response to integumental chemicals from cricket than to cologne or distilled water. The cricket chemicals additionally elicited a significantly greater rate of tongue-flicking and higher proportion of attacks by the lizards than did control stimuli. PETF combined with apparent searching movements strongly suggest the presence of strike-induced chemosensory searching (SICS). Experimental evidence indicates that both PETF and SICS occur in insectivorous representatives of three families of actively foraging autarchoglossan lizards, suggesting their widespread occurrence in such lizards. The adaptive roles of chemosensory behavior in the foraging behavior of P.Muralis are discussed. It is proposed that these lizards may form chemical search images and that PETF and SICS may have been present in the lacertilian ancestors of snakes. PMID:24259071

  1. Cross-Talk Between Ionic and Nanoribbon Current Signals in Graphene Nanoribbon-Nanopore Sensors for Single-Molecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Matthew; Balan, Adrian; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Danda, Gopinath; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Parkin, William; Drndić, Marija

    2015-12-16

    Nanopores are now being used not only as an ionic current sensor but also as a means to localize molecules near alternative sensors with higher sensitivity and/or selectivity. One example is a solid-state nanopore embedded in a graphene nanoribbon (GNR) transistor. Such a device possesses the high conductivity needed for higher bandwidth measurements and, because of its single-atomic-layer thickness, can improve the spatial resolution of the measurement. Here measurements of ionic current through the nanopore are shown during double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) translocation, along with the simultaneous response of the neighboring GNR due to changes in the surrounding electric potential. Cross-talk originating from capacitive coupling between the two measurement channels is observed, resulting in a transient response in the GNR during DNA translocation; however, a modulation in device conductivity is not observed via an electric-field-effect response during DNA translocation. A field-effect response would scale with GNR source-drain voltage (Vds), whereas the capacitive coupling does not scale with Vds . In order to take advantage of the high bandwidth potential of such sensors, the field-effect response must be enhanced. Potential field calculations are presented to outline a phase diagram for detection within the device parameter space, charting a roadmap for future optimization of such devices. PMID:26500023

  2. Rectification of nanopores in aprotic solvents - transport properties of nanopores with surface dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plett, Timothy; Shi, Wenqing; Zeng, Yuhan; Mann, William; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Baker, Lane A.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopores have become a model system to understand transport properties at the nanoscale. We report experiments and modeling of ionic current in aprotic solvents with different dipole moments through conically shaped nanopores in a polycarbonate film and through glass nanopipettes. We focus on solutions of the salt LiClO4, which is of great importance in modeling lithium based batteries. Results presented suggest ion current rectification observed results from two effects: (i) adsorption of Li+ ions to the pore walls, and (ii) a finite dipole moment rendered by adsorbed solvent molecules. Properties of surfaces in various solvents were probed by means of scanning ion conductance microscopy, which confirmed existence of an effectively positive surface potential in aprotic solvents with high dipole moments.Nanopores have become a model system to understand transport properties at the nanoscale. We report experiments and modeling of ionic current in aprotic solvents with different dipole moments through conically shaped nanopores in a polycarbonate film and through glass nanopipettes. We focus on solutions of the salt LiClO4, which is of great importance in modeling lithium based batteries. Results presented suggest ion current rectification observed results from two effects: (i) adsorption of Li+ ions to the pore walls, and (ii) a finite dipole moment rendered by adsorbed solvent molecules. Properties of surfaces in various solvents were probed by means of scanning ion conductance microscopy, which confirmed existence of an effectively positive surface potential in aprotic solvents with high dipole moments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06340j

  3. Nanopores in suspended WS2 membranes for DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danda, Gopinath; Masih Das, Paul; Chou, Yung-Chien; Mlack, Jerome; Naylor, Carl; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Lin, Zhong; Fulton, Laura Beth; Terrones, Mauricio; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Drndic, Marija

    Recent advances in solid-state nanopore sensor systems for DNA detection and analysis have been supported by using increasingly thinner materials to the point of utilizing atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as graphene and MoS2. However, these materials still have issues with pore wettability and signal-to-noise ratios displayed in DNA translocation measurements. Recently, the fabrication and operation of nanopores in MoS2 have been demonstrated, but the wetting properties and signal-to-noise ratios of transition metal dichalcogenides are yet to be understood and further improved. Here we fabricate suspended WS2 nanopore devices with sub-10 nm pore diameters using a novel nanomaterial transfer method and TEM nanosculpting to study and better understand nanopore wetting properties and performance in DNA translocation measurements.

  4. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Surface of Alumina with Nanoporous Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) is a well-defined nano-porous template to produce ordered pillar patterns or rod-type nano-structures, because the pore size, depth and ordering regime of the resulting pattern can be tuned in the nanometer scale. Fabrication of organized molecular assembly (self-assembled monolayer, SAM) on a micro- or nano-scale structured surface with a low free energy material is an effective approach for obtaining a hydrophobic or a superhydrophobic surface. One technical detail that should be considered in the coating of a SAM on nanoporous surface is the dehydration of nanopores. Because the AAOs are obtained from acidic aqueous solutions and the pore-depth to diameter aspect ratio strongly affects the hysteresis in the permeability and capillary pressure, dehydration of the water-filled nanopores is crucial for fabricating a well-defined SAM in the pores

  5. Developing scaling relations for the yield strength of nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briot, Nicolas J.; Balk, T. John

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the applicability of Gibson and Ashby's porous scaling relations to nanoporous metals is discussed, and an updated equation is proposed for relating the yield strength of nanoporous gold to the yield strength of individual gold ligaments that form the porous structure. This new relation is derived from experimental measurements obtained by small-scale tensile testing and by nanoindentation, and incorporates the average ligament diameter. Nanoindentation data, obtained experimentally by the authors as well as reported by others in the literature, are reconciled with tensile test measurements previously reported by the present authors. The values of ligament yield strength calculated with the new scaling relation are found to agree with data reported from mechanical testing of nanowires, and the scaling relation thus represents a bridge between nanowire and nanoporous metal behaviour. In addition, calculations of yield strength for nanoporous gold samples with various ligament size and relative density are consistent with the experimentally determined values.

  6. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Yinghua; Chen, Weiyu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qiyan; Chen, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    Porous graphene has high mechanical strength and atomic layer thickness, which make it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solution are a kind of strong long-range interaction which may have great influence on the fluid transport through nanopores. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through a 1.05-nm-in-diameter monolayer graphene nanopore with its edge charge-modified. From the results, it is found that the nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonously decrease. The co-ions rejection can reach 75% and 90% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. Cl ions current increases and reaches a plateau, and Na+ current decreases with the charge amount in the systems where they act as counterions. Beside...

  7. Salinity gradient power: influences of temperature and nanopore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Li, Yu-Ming; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Salinity gradient power is a promising, challenging, and readily available renewable energy. Among various methods for harvesting this clean energy, nanofluidic reverse electrodialysis (NRED) is of great potential. Since ionic transport depends highly on the temperature, so is the efficiency of the associated power generated. Here, we conduct a theoretical analysis on the influences of temperature and nanopore size on NRED, focusing on the temperature and nanopore size. The results gathered reveal that the maximum power increases with increasing temperature, but the conversion efficiency depends weakly on temperature. In general, the smaller the nanopore radius or the longer the nanopore, the better the ion selectivity. These results provide desirable and necessary information for improving the performance of NRED as well as designing relevant units in renewable energy plants.

  8. Joint action of chemicals in algal toxicity tests: Influence of response level and dose-response regression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E.R.; Chen, D.; Nyholm, Niels;

    2001-01-01

    response parameter was growth rate based on biomass, and several response levels were used. Dose–response curves were developed for dilution series using fixed ratios between concentrations in toxic units of the compounds. Probit and Weibull dose–response curves were then determined by nonlinear regression...

  9. Efficient biocatalyst by encapsulating lipase into nanoporous gold

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xueying; Li, Yufei; Wu, Chao; Wang, Xia; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Lipases are one of the most important biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Immobilization is an efficient method to increase the stability and reusability of lipases. In this study, nanoporous gold (NPG), a new kind of nanoporous material with tunable porosity and excellent biocompatibility, was employed as an effective support for lipase immobilization. The pore size of NPG and adsorption time played key roles in the construction of lipase-NPG biocomposites. The morphology and com...

  10. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the

  11. Eco-friendly synthesis for MCM-41 nanoporous materials using the non-reacted reagents in mother liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eng-Poh; Goh, Jia-Yi; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoporous materials such as Mobil composite material number 41 (MCM-41) are attractive for applications such as catalysis, adsorption, supports, and carriers. Green synthesis of MCM-41 is particularly appealing because the chemical reagents are useful and valuable. We report on the eco-friendly synthesis of MCM-41 nanoporous materials via multi-cycle approach by re-using the non-reacted reagents in supernatant as mother liquor after separating the solid product. This approach was achieved via minimal requirement of chemical compensation where additional fresh reactants were added into the mother liquor followed by pH adjustment after each cycle of synthesis. The solid product of each successive batch was collected and characterized while the non-reacted reagents in supernatant can be recovered and re-used to produce subsequent cycle of MCM-41. The multi-cycle synthesis is demonstrated up to three times in this research. This approach suggests a low cost and eco-friendly synthesis of nanoporous material since less waste is discarded after the product has been collected, and in addition, product yield can be maintained at the high level.

  12. Biomolecular conjugation inside synthetic polymer nanopores viaglycoprotein-lectin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Mafe, Salvador; Siwy, Zuzanna; Neumann, Reinhard; Tremel, Wolfgang; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate the supramolecular bioconjugation of concanavalin A (Con A) protein with glycoenzymehorseradish peroxidase (HRP) inside single nanopores, fabricated in heavy ion tracked polymermembranes. Firstly, the HRP-enzyme was covalently immobilized on the inner wall of the pores using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The immobilized HRP-enzyme molecules bear sugar (mannose) groups available for the binding of Con A protein. Secondly, the bioconjugation of Con A on the pore wall was achieved through its biospecific interactions with the mannose residues of the HRP enzyme. The immobilization of biomolecules inside the nanopore leads to the reduction of the available area for ionic transport, and this blocking effect can be exploited to tune the conductance and selectivity of the nanopore in aqueous solution. Both cylindrical and conical nanopores were used in the experiments. The possibility of obtaining two or more conductance states (output), dictated by the degree of nanopore blocking resulted from the different biomolecules in solution (input), as well as the current rectification properties obtained with the conical nanopore, could also allow implementing information processing at the nanometre scale. Model simulations based on the transport equations further verify the feasibility of the sensing procedure that involves concepts from supramolecular chemistry, molecular imprinting, recognition, and nanotechnology.

  13. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. ► Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. ► Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  14. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications. PMID:27157717

  15. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, S.A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Bayati, M.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Petrochenko, P.E. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Stafslien, S.; Daniels, J.; Cilz, N. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Comstock, D.J.; Elam, J.W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Narayan, R.J., E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.com [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  16. Transfer of Direct and Moiré Patterns by Reactive Ion Etching Through Ex Situ Fabricated Nanoporous Polymer Masks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvets, Violetta; Hentschel, Thomas; Schulte, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    the cylinder axis. Finally, we demonstrate the first transfer of moire patterns from block copolymer masks to substrate. The nanoporous masks prepared ex situ show outstanding long-range order and can be applied directly onto any flat substrate, eliminating the need for topographic and chemical...... substrates' surface properties. The masks are prepared by microtoming of prealigned nanoporous polymer monoliths of hexagonal morphology at controlled angles; they appear as 30-60 nm thick films of typical dimensions 100 mu m x 200 mu m. Masks cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis show monocrystalline...... hexagonal packing of 10 nm pores with a principal period of 20 nm. We demonstrate the transfer of the hexagonal pattern onto silicon by means of reactive ion etching through the masks. In addition, patterns elliptic and slit-like holes on silicon are obtained by utilizing masks cut at 45 degrees relative to...

  17. In Situ Fabrication of PtCo Alloy Embedded in Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Nanopores as Synergistic Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xing; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Hu; Qin, Yingying; Xu, Wenlei; Jiang, Yu; Sun, Youyi; Shi, Zheqi; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jian-guo

    2015-11-23

    A novel PtCo alloy in situ etched and embedded in graphene nanopores (PtCo/NPG) as a high-performance catalyst for ORR was reported. Graphene nanopores were fabricated in situ while forming PtCo nanoparticles that were uniformly embedded in the graphene nanopores. Given the synergistic effect between PtCo alloy and nanopores, PtCo/NPG exhibited 11.5 times higher mass activity than that of the commercial Pt/C cathode electrocatalyst. DFT calculations indicated that the nanopores in NPG cannot only stabilize PtCo nanoparticles but can also definitely change the electronic structures, thereby change its adsorption abilities. This enhancement can lead to a favorable reaction pathway on PtCo/NPG for ORR. This study showed that PtCo/NPG is a potential candidate for the next generation of Pt-based catalysts in fuel cells. This study also offered a promising alternative strategy and enabled the fabrication of various kinds of metal/graphene nanopore nanohybrids with potential applications in catalysts and potential use for other technological devices. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the National Basic Research Program (973 program, No. 2013CB733501), Zhejiang Provincial Education Department Research Program (Y201326554) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21306169, 21101137, 21136001, 21176221 and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  18. A chemical screen to identify inducers of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that inhibition of the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans causes inhibition of protein prenylation, developmental arrest and lethality. We also showed that constitutive activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, UPR(mt), is an effective way for C. elegans to become resistant to the negative effects of mevalonate pathway inhibition. This was an important finding since statins, a drug class prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in patients, act by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway, and it is therefore possible that some of their undesirable side effects could be alleviated by activating the UPR(mt). Here, we screened a chemical library and identified 4 compounds that specifically activated the UPR(mt). One of these compounds, methacycline hydrochloride (a tetracycline antibiotic) also protected C. elegans and mammalian cells from statin toxicity. Methacycline hydrochloride and ethidium bromide, a known UPR(mt) activator, were also tested in mice: only ethidium bromide significantly activate the UPR(mt) in skeletal muscles. PMID:27123370

  19. Chemical residues and biochemical responses in wild and cultured European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured and wild sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) from the Arade Estuary were sampled in summer and winter and the degree of exposure to metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) assessed, together with some biochemical responses against those and other pollutants. The highest levels of copper (up to 997 μg g-1 dry weight) and cadmium (up to 4.22 μg g-1 dry weight) were detected in the liver and kidney of cultured specimens, whereas the highest exposure to PAHs was observed in wild fish. Significant alterations in some biochemical markers were detected and associated to pollutant exposure. Thus, metallothionein concentrations were higher in the tissues of cultured fish and positively correlated with metal residues. The activity 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase ranged from 28 pmol/min/mg protein in cultured fish to 83 pmol/min/mg protein in wild fish collected near a marina area. Cultured fish and wild fish from the marina area had depressed acetylcholinesterase in muscle tissue and a parasitic infection in the gonads. The obtained results support the usefulness of the combined use of chemical and biochemical markers to assess the impact of anthropogenic pollutants in both wild and cultured fish

  20. Multilayer Nanoporous Graphene Membranes for Water Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Lin, Li-Chiang; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-02-10

    While single-layer nanoporous graphene (NPG) has shown promise as a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination membrane, multilayer graphene membranes can be synthesized more economically than the single-layer material. In this work, we build upon the knowledge gained to date toward single-layer graphene to explore how multilayer NPG might serve as a RO membrane in water desalination using classical molecular dynamic simulations. We show that, while multilayer NPG exhibits similarly promising desalination properties to single-layer membranes, their separation performance can be designed by manipulating various configurational variables in the multilayer case. This work establishes an atomic-level understanding of the effects of additional NPG layers, layer separation, and pore alignment on desalination performance, providing useful guidelines for the design of multilayer NPG membranes. PMID:26806020

  1. Analysis of electrolyte transport through charged nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, P B; Bazant, M Z; Biesheuvel, P M

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the classical problem of the flow of an electrolyte solution through charged capillaries (nanopores). In the limit where the length of the capillary is much larger than its radius, the problem can be simplified to a one-dimensional averaged flux-force formalism that relates the relevant fluxes (electrical current, salt flux, fluid velocity) to their respective driving forces (difference in electric potential, salt concentration, pressure). Calculations in literature mainly consider the limit of non-overlapping electrical double layers (EDLs) in the pores and the absence of salt concentration gradients in the axial direction. In the present work these simplifications are relaxed and we discuss the general case with overlapping EDLs and nonzero axial salt concentration gradients. The 3x3 matrix that relates these quantities exhibits Onsager symmetry and for one of the cross coefficients we report a new significant simplification. We describe how Onsager symmetry is preserved under change of variables...

  2. Synthetic Nanopores: Biological Analogues and Nanofluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Matthew W.

    Nanoscopic pores in biological systems -- cells, for example -- are responsible for regulating the transport of ionic and molecular species between physiologically distinct compartments maintained by thin plasma membranes. These biological pores are proteinaceous structures: long, contorted chains of chemical building blocks called amino acids. Protein pores have evolved to span a staggering range of shapes, sizes and chemical properties, each crucial to a pore's unique functionality. Protein pores have extremely well-defined jobs. For instance, pores called ion channels only transport ions. Within this family, there are pores designated to selectively transport specific ions, such as sodium channels for sodium, chloride channels for chloride and so on. Further subdivisions exist within each type of ion channel, resulting in a pantheon of specialized proteins pores. Specificity and selectivity are bestowed upon a pore through its unique incorporation and arrangement of its amino acids, which in turn have their own unique chemical and physical properties. With hundreds of task-specific pores, deciphering the precise relationship between form and function in these protein channels is a critical, but daunting task. In this thesis, we examine an alternative for probing the fundamental mechanisms responsible for transport on the nanoscale. Solid-state membranes offer well-defined structural surrogates to directly address the science underlying pore functionality. Numerous protein pores rely on electronic interactions, size exclusion principles and hydrophobic effects to fulfill their duties, regardless of their amino acid sequence. Substituting an engineered and well-characterized pore, we strive to achieve and, thus, understand the hallmarks of biological pore function: analyte recognition and selective transport. While we restrict our study to only two readily available membrane materials -- one a polymer and the other a ceramic -- nanofabrication techniques give us

  3. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  4. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  5. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  6. MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO IN SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION, SIX-PHASE HEATING, AND STEAM INJECTION REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES IN GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The evaluation of microbial responses to three in situ source removal remedial technologies including permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), six-phase heating (SPH), and steam injection (SI) was performed at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Florida. The investigatio...

  7. Profiling Environmental Chemicals for Activity in the Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway Using a High-Throughput Screening Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1 ABSTRACT 2 3 BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety 4 of diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration, highlighti.ng the need to identify 5 chemicals that can induce this effect. The antioxidant response element (ARE)...

  8. Electrically tunable pore morphology in nanoporous gold thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana S. Dorofeeva; Erkin Seker

    2015-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (np-Au) is an emerging nanostructured material that exhibits many desirable properties, including high electrical and thermal conductivity, high surface area-to-volume ratio, tunable pore morphology well-established surface-binding chemistry, and compatibility with microfabrication. These features make np-Au a popular material for use in fuel cells, optical and electrical biosensors, drug delivery vehicles, neural electrode coatings, and as a model system for nanoscale mechanics. In each of its many applications, np-Au morphology plays an essential role in the overall device operation. Therefore, precise morphological control is necessary to attain optimal device performance. Traditionally thermal treatment by furnaces and hot plates is used to obtain np-Au with self-similar but coarser morphologies. However, this approach lacks the ability to create different morphologies on a single substrate and requires high temperatures (〉 250 ℃) incompatible with most plastic substrates. Herein, we report electro-annealing as a novel method that permits control of the extent and location of pore coarsening on a single substrate in one fast treatment step. The electro-annealing entails much lower temperatures (〈 150 ℃) than traditional thermal treatment, putatively due to electrically assisted phenomena contributing to the thermally activated surface diffusion of gold atoms, responsible for coarsening. Overall, this approach is easily scaled to display multiple pore morphologies on a single chip, therefore enabling high-throughput screening of optimal nanostructures for specific applications.

  9. Potential-dependent dynamic fracture of nanoporous gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaofeng; Chen, Xiying; Badwe, Nilesh; Sieradzki, Karl

    2015-09-01

    When metallic alloys are exposed to a corrosive environment, porous nanoscale morphologies spontaneously form that can adversely affect the mechanical integrity of engineered structures. This form of stress-corrosion cracking is responsible for the well-known `season cracking’ of brass and stainless steel components in nuclear power generating stations. One explanation for this is that a high-speed crack is nucleated within the porous layer, which subsequently injects into non-porous parent-phase material. We study the static and dynamic fracture properties of free-standing monolithic nanoporous gold as a function electrochemical potential using high-speed photography and digital image correlation. The experiments reveal that at electrochemical potentials typical of porosity formation these structures are capable of supporting dislocation-mediated plastic fracture at crack velocities of 200 m s-1. Our results identify the important role of high-speed fracture in stress-corrosion cracking and are directly applicable to the behaviour of monolithic dealloyed materials at present being considered for a variety of applications.

  10. Potential-dependent dynamic fracture of nanoporous gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaofeng; Chen, Xiying; Badwe, Nilesh; Sieradzki, Karl

    2015-09-01

    When metallic alloys are exposed to a corrosive environment, porous nanoscale morphologies spontaneously form that can adversely affect the mechanical integrity of engineered structures. This form of stress-corrosion cracking is responsible for the well-known 'season cracking' of brass and stainless steel components in nuclear power generating stations. One explanation for this is that a high-speed crack is nucleated within the porous layer, which subsequently injects into non-porous parent-phase material. We study the static and dynamic fracture properties of free-standing monolithic nanoporous gold as a function electrochemical potential using high-speed photography and digital image correlation. The experiments reveal that at electrochemical potentials typical of porosity formation these structures are capable of supporting dislocation-mediated plastic fracture at crack velocities of 200 m s(-1). Our results identify the important role of high-speed fracture in stress-corrosion cracking and are directly applicable to the behaviour of monolithic dealloyed materials at present being considered for a variety of applications. PMID:26099111

  11. Temperature response of litter and soil organic matter decomposition is determined by chemical composition of organic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Sparrman, Tobias; Haei, Mahsa; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Hedenström, Mattias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B

    2013-12-01

    The global soil carbon pool is approximately three times larger than the contemporary atmospheric pool, therefore even minor changes to its integrity may have major implications for atmospheric CO2 concentrations. While theory predicts that the chemical composition of organic matter should constitute a master control on the temperature response of its decomposition, this relationship has not yet been fully demonstrated. We used laboratory incubations of forest soil organic matter (SOM) and fresh litter material together with NMR spectroscopy to make this connection between organic chemical composition and temperature sensitivity of decomposition. Temperature response of decomposition in both fresh litter and SOM was directly related to the chemical composition of the constituent organic matter, explaining 90% and 70% of the variance in Q10 in litter and SOM, respectively. The Q10 of litter decreased with increasing proportions of aromatic and O-aromatic compounds, and increased with increased contents of alkyl- and O-alkyl carbons. In contrast, in SOM, decomposition was affected only by carbonyl compounds. To reveal why a certain group of organic chemical compounds affected the temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition in litter and SOM, a more detailed characterization of the (13) C aromatic region using Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC) was conducted. The results revealed considerable differences in the aromatic region between litter and SOM. This suggests that the correlation between chemical composition of organic matter and the temperature response of decomposition differed between litter and SOM. The temperature response of soil decomposition processes can thus be described by the chemical composition of its constituent organic matter, this paves the way for improved ecosystem modeling of biosphere feedbacks under a changing climate. PMID:23907960

  12. Nanometer-thin solid-state nanopores by cold ion beam sculpting

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent work on protein nanopores indicates that single molecule characterization (including DNA sequencing) is possible when the length of the nanopore constriction is about a nanometer. Solid-state nanopores offer advantages in stability and tunability, but a scalable method for creating nanometer-thin solid-state pores has yet to be demonstrated. Here we demonstrate that solid-state nanopores with nanometer-thin constrictions can be produced by “cold ion beam sculpting,” an original method ...

  13. Differentiation of Short Single-Stranded DNA Homopolymers in Solid-State Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Venta, Kimberly; Shemer, Gabriel; Puster, Matthew; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Balan, Adrian; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Ken; Drndić, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, new techniques that monitor ionic current modulations as single molecules pass through a nanoscale pore have enabled numerous single-molecule studies. While biological nanopores have recently shown the ability to resolve single nucleotides within individual DNA molecules, similar developments with solid-state nanopores have lagged, due to challenges both in fabricating stable nanopores of similar dimensions as biological nanopores and in achieving sufficiently low-noi...

  14. Control and Reversal of the Electrophoretic Force on DNA in a Charged Nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    Electric field-driven transport of DNA through solid-state nanopores is the key process in nanopore-based DNA sequencing that promises dramatic reduction of genome sequencing costs. A major hurdle in the development of this sequencing method is that DNA transport through the nanopores occurs too quickly for the DNA sequence to be detected. By means of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate in this communication that velocity of DNA transport through a nanopore can be controll...

  15. Membranes from nanoporous 1D and 2D materials: A review of opportunities, developments, and challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Wun-gwi

    2013-12-01

    Membranes utilizing nanoporous one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials are emerging as attractive candidates for applications in molecular separations and related areas. Such nanotubular and nanolayered materials include carbon nanotubes, metal oxide nanotubes, layered zeolites, porous layered oxides, layered aluminophosphates, and porous graphenes. By virtue of their unique shape, size, and structure, they possess transport properties that are advantageous for membrane and thin film applications. These materials also have very different chemistry from more conventional porous 3D materials, due to the existence of a large, chemically active, external surface area. This feature also necessitates the development of innovative strategies to process these materials into membranes and thin films with high performance. This work provides the first comprehensive review of this emerging area. We first discuss approaches for the synthesis and structural characterization of nanoporous 1D and 2D materials. Thereafter, we elucidate different approaches for fabrication of membranes and thin films from these materials, either as multiphase (composite/hybrid) or single-phase membranes. The influence of surface chemistry and processing techniques on the membrane morphology is highlighted. We then discuss the applications of such membranes in areas relating to molecular transport and separation, e.g. gas and liquid-phase separations, water purification, and ion-conducting membranes. The review concludes with a discussion of the present outlook and some of the key scientific challenges to be addressed on the path to industrially applicable membranes containing nanoporous 1D and 2D materials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. High density group IV semiconductor nanowire arrays fabricated in nanoporous alumina templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwing, Joan M.; Dilts, Sarah M.; Lew, Kok-Keong; Cranmer, Alexana E.; Mohney, Suzanne E.

    2005-11-01

    The fabrication of high density arrays of semiconductor nanowires is of interest for nanoscale electronics, chemical and biological sensing and energy conversion applications. We have investigated the synthesis, intentional doping and electrical characterization of Si and Ge nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method in nanoporous alumina membranes. Nanoporous membranes provide a convenient platform for nanowire growth and processing, enabling control of wire diameter via pore size and the integration of contact metals for electrical testing. For VLS growth in nanoporous materials, reduced pressures and temperatures are required in order to promote the diffusion of reactants into the pore without premature decomposition on the membrane surface or pore walls. The effect of growth conditions on the growth rate of Si and Ge nanowires from SiH 4 and GeH 4 sources, respectively, was investigated and compared. In both cases, the measured activation energies for nanowire growth were substantially lower than activation energies typically reported for Si and Ge thin film deposition under similar growth conditions, suggesting that gold plays a catalytic role in the VLS growth process. Intentionally doped SiNW arrays were also prepared using trimethylboron (TMB) and phosphine (PH 3) as p-type and n-type dopant sources, respectively. Nanowire resistivities were calculated from plots of the array resistance as a function of nanowire length. A decrease in resistivity was observed for both n-type and p-type doped SiNW arrays compared to those grown without the addition of a dopant source.

  17. Regulating Current Rectification and Nanoparticle Transport Through a Salt Gradient in Bipolar Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2015-09-16

    Tuning of ion and nanoparticle transport is validated through applying a salt gradient in two types of nanopores: the inner wall of a nanopore has bipolar charges and its outer wall neutral (type I), and both the inner and outer walls of a nanopore have bipolar charges (type II). The ion current rectification (ICR) behavior of these nanopores can be regulated by an applied salt gradient: if it is small, the degree of ICR in type II nanopore is more significant than that in type I nanopore; a reversed trend is observed at a sufficiently large salt gradient. If the applied salt gradient and electric field have the same direction, type I nanopore exhibits two significant features that are not observed in type II nanopore: (i) a cation-rich concentration polarization field and an enhanced funneling electric field are present near the cathode side of the nanopore, and (ii) the magnitude of the axial electric field inside the nanopore is reduced. These features imply that applying a salt gradient to type I nanopore is capable of simultaneously enhancing the nanoparticle capture into the nanopore and reducing its translocation velocity inside, so that high sensing performance and resolution can be achieved. PMID:26148458

  18. The stress response in gametes and embryos after paternal chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing concern that paternal exposure to toxic chemicals impacts negatively on progeny outcome. Exposure of male rats to a model male-mediated developmental toxicant and anticancer alkylating agent, cyclophosphamide, resulted in increased pre- and post-implantation loss, as well as in malformations. We hypothesize that the stage specificity of the effects of paternal cyclophosphamide exposure on progeny depends on the ability of germ cells to respond to stress, repair DNA or undergo apoptosis. Acute high dose exposure of male rats to cyclophosphamide increased the expression of heat shock proteins and DNA repair genes, predominantly in round spermatids. In contrast, chronic low dose treatment dramatically decreased the expression of stress response genes in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids, but not in elongated spermatids; this reduced ability to respond to stress may allow damage to accumulate, resulting in altered sperm function. Increased DNA damage was maximal 3 weeks after drug exposure, during spermiogenesis, a key point in sperm chromatin remodelling. Drug exposure for 9 weeks increased the frequency of spermatozoa with chromosome 4 disomy and nullisomy. DNA damage found in cyclophosphamide-exposed spermatozoa was imparted to the newly fertilized zygote. Drug-exposed spermatozoa decondensed more rapidly than control spermatozoa and male pronuclear formation was earlier. RNA synthesis was higher in 1-cell embryos sired by drug-treated fathers than in controls. Significantly, the profile of gene expression was altered in embryos sired by drug-treated males as early as the 1-cell stage. Thus, exposure of male rats to cyclophosphamide altered male germ cell quality with a consequent temporal and spatial disruption of the zygotic genome activation

  19. Harvesting candidate genes responsible for serious adverse drug reactions from a chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genetic factors responsible for serious adverse drug reaction (SADR is of critical importance to personalized medicine. However, genome-wide association studies are hampered due to the lack of case-control samples, and the selection of candidate genes is limited by the lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms of SADRs. We hypothesize that drugs causing the same type of SADR might share a common mechanism by targeting unexpectedly the same SADR-mediating protein. Hence we propose an approach of identifying the common SADR-targets through constructing and mining an in silico chemical-protein interactome (CPI, a matrix of binding strengths among 162 drug molecules known to cause at least one type of SADR and 845 proteins. Drugs sharing the same SADR outcome were also found to possess similarities in their CPI profiles towards this 845 protein set. This methodology identified the candidate gene of sulfonamide-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN: all nine sulfonamides that cause TEN were found to bind strongly to MHC I (Cw*4, whereas none of the 17 control drugs that do not cause TEN were found to bind to it. Through an insight into the CPI, we found the Y116S substitution of MHC I (B*5703 enhances the unexpected binding of abacavir to its antigen presentation groove, which explains why B*5701, not B*5703, is the risk allele of abacavir-induced hypersensitivity. In conclusion, SADR targets and the patient-specific off-targets could be identified through a systematic investigation of the CPI, generating important hypotheses for prospective experimental validation of the candidate genes.

  20. Chiral selection of single helix formed by diblock copolymers confined in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hanlin; Qiang, Yicheng; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Weihua; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-21

    Chiral selection has attracted tremendous attention from the scientific communities, especially from biologists, due to the mysterious origin of homochirality in life. The self-assembly of achiral block copolymers confined in nanopores offers a simple but useful model of forming helical structures, where the helical structures possess random chirality selection, i.e. equal probability of left-handedness and right-handedness. Based on this model, we study the stimulus-response of chiral selection to external conditions by introducing a designed chiral pattern onto the inner surface of a nanopore, aiming to obtain a defect-free helix with controllable homochirality. A cell dynamics simulation based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory is carried out to demonstrate the tuning effect of the patterned surface on the chiral selection. Our results illustrate that the chirality of the helix can be successfully controlled to be consistent with that of the tailored surface patterns. This work provides a successful example for the stimulus response of the chiral selection of self-assembled morphologies from achiral macromolecules to external conditions, and hence sheds light on the understanding of the mechanism of the stimulus response. PMID:27536966

  1. Spectroscopic analyses of chemical adaptation processes within microalgal biomass in response to changing environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Microalgae transform large quantities of inorganics into biomass. • Microalgae interact with their growing environment and adapt their chemical composition. • Sequestration capabilities are dependent on cells’ chemical environments. • We develop a chemometric hard-modeling to describe these chemical adaptation dynamics. • This methodology will enable studies of microalgal compound sequestration. - Abstract: Via photosynthesis, marine phytoplankton transforms large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass. This has considerable environmental impacts as microalgae contribute for instance to counter-balancing anthropogenic releases of the greenhouse gas CO2. On the other hand, high concentrations of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem can lead to harmful algae blooms. In previous investigations it was found that the chemical composition of microalgal biomass is strongly dependent on the nutrient availability. Therefore, it is expected that algae’s sequestration capabilities and productivity are also determined by the cells’ chemical environments. For investigating this hypothesis, novel analytical methodologies are required which are capable of monitoring live cells exposed to chemically shifting environments followed by chemometric modeling of their chemical adaptation dynamics. FTIR-ATR experiments have been developed for acquiring spectroscopic time series of live Dunaliella parva cultures adapting to different nutrient situations. Comparing experimental data from acclimated cultures to those exposed to a chemically shifted nutrient situation reveals insights in which analyte groups participate in modifications of microalgal biomass and on what time scales. For a chemometric description of these processes, a data model has been deduced which explains the chemical adaptation dynamics explicitly rather than empirically. First results show that this approach is feasible and derives information about the chemical biomass adaptations

  2. Spectroscopic analyses of chemical adaptation processes within microalgal biomass in response to changing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Frank, E-mail: fvogt@utk.edu; White, Lauren

    2015-03-31

    Highlights: • Microalgae transform large quantities of inorganics into biomass. • Microalgae interact with their growing environment and adapt their chemical composition. • Sequestration capabilities are dependent on cells’ chemical environments. • We develop a chemometric hard-modeling to describe these chemical adaptation dynamics. • This methodology will enable studies of microalgal compound sequestration. - Abstract: Via photosynthesis, marine phytoplankton transforms large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass. This has considerable environmental impacts as microalgae contribute for instance to counter-balancing anthropogenic releases of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. On the other hand, high concentrations of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem can lead to harmful algae blooms. In previous investigations it was found that the chemical composition of microalgal biomass is strongly dependent on the nutrient availability. Therefore, it is expected that algae’s sequestration capabilities and productivity are also determined by the cells’ chemical environments. For investigating this hypothesis, novel analytical methodologies are required which are capable of monitoring live cells exposed to chemically shifting environments followed by chemometric modeling of their chemical adaptation dynamics. FTIR-ATR experiments have been developed for acquiring spectroscopic time series of live Dunaliella parva cultures adapting to different nutrient situations. Comparing experimental data from acclimated cultures to those exposed to a chemically shifted nutrient situation reveals insights in which analyte groups participate in modifications of microalgal biomass and on what time scales. For a chemometric description of these processes, a data model has been deduced which explains the chemical adaptation dynamics explicitly rather than empirically. First results show that this approach is feasible and derives information about the chemical biomass

  3. A reference electrode based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) polymer for decentralized chemical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinovart, Tomàs [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Crespo, Gastón A. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 30, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Rius, F. Xavier [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Andrade, Francisco J., E-mail: franciscojavier.andrade@urv.cat [Departament de Química Orgànica i Química Analítica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcellí Domingo s/n 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A disposable solid-contact reference electrode for potentiometry is presented. • The device shows unsensitivity to most ions, redox potential and light. • Low-cost and good stability, ideal to build disposable potentiometric sensors. • Nanopores formed in the membrane control the flux of ions with the solution. Abstract: A new solid-state reference electrode using a polymeric membrane of polyvinyl butyral (PVB), Ag/AgCl and NaCl to be used in decentralized chemical measurements is presented. The electrode is made by drop-casting the membrane cocktail onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate. A stable potential (less than 1 mV dec⁻¹ over a wide range of concentrations for the several chemical species tested is obtained. No significant influence to changes in redox potential, light and pH are observed. The response of this novel electrode shows good correlation when compared with a conventional double-junction reference electrode. Also good long-term stability (90 ± 33 μV/h) and a lifetime of approximately 4 months are obtained. Aspects related to the working mechanisms are discussed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) studies reveal the presence of nanopores and channels on the surface, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of optimized electrodes show low bulk resistances, usually in the kΩ range, suggesting that a nanoporous polymeric structure is formed in the interface with the solution. Future applications of this electrode as a disposable device for decentralized measurements are discussed. Examples of the utilization on wearable substrates (tattoos, fabrics, etc) are provided.

  4. A reference electrode based on polyvinyl butyral (PVB) polymer for decentralized chemical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A disposable solid-contact reference electrode for potentiometry is presented. • The device shows unsensitivity to most ions, redox potential and light. • Low-cost and good stability, ideal to build disposable potentiometric sensors. • Nanopores formed in the membrane control the flux of ions with the solution. - Abstract: A new solid-state reference electrode using a polymeric membrane of polyvinyl butyral (PVB), Ag/AgCl and NaCl to be used in decentralized chemical measurements is presented. The electrode is made by drop-casting the membrane cocktail onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate. A stable potential (less than 1 mV dec−1) over a wide range of concentrations for the several chemical species tested is obtained. No significant influence to changes in redox potential, light and pH are observed. The response of this novel electrode shows good correlation when compared with a conventional double-junction reference electrode. Also good long-term stability (90 ± 33 μV/h) and a lifetime of approximately 4 months are obtained. Aspects related to the working mechanisms are discussed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) studies reveal the presence of nanopores and channels on the surface, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of optimized electrodes show low bulk resistances, usually in the kΩ range, suggesting that a nanoporous polymeric structure is formed in the interface with the solution. Future applications of this electrode as a disposable device for decentralized measurements are discussed. Examples of the utilization on wearable substrates (tattoos, fabrics, etc) are provided

  5. Electric double-layer capacitors based on highly graphitized nanoporous carbons derived from ZIF-67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torad, Nagy L; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Li, Yunqi; Hamoudi, Hicham; Imura, Masataka; Sakka, Yoshio; Hu, Chi-Chang; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-23

    Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have large specific surface areas, good electrical and thermal conductivity, and both chemical and mechanical stability, which facilitate their use in energy storage device applications. In the present study, highly graphitized NPCs are synthesized by one-step direct carbonization of cobalt-containing zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67). After chemical etching, the deposited Co content can be completely removed to prepare pure NPCs with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and intrinsic electrical conductivity (high content of sp(2) -bonded carbons). A detailed electrochemical study is performed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. Our NPC is very promising for efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications. A maximum specific capacitance of 238 F g(-1) is observed at a scan rate of 20 mV s(-1) . This value is very high compared to previous works on carbon-based electric double layer capacitors. PMID:24788922

  6. Low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses for endocrine active chemicals: Science to practice workshop: Workshop summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beausoleil, Claire; Ormsby, Jean-Nicolas; Gies, Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    A workshop was held in Berlin September 12–14th 2012 to assess the state of the science of the data supporting low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses (“low dose hypothesis”) for chemicals with endocrine activity (endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs). This workshop consisted of lectu...... consensus was reached the robust discussions were helpful to inform both basic scientists and risk assessors on all the issues. There were a number of important ideas developed to help continue the discussion and improve communication over the next few years....

  7. Can ionophobic nanopores enhance the energy storage capacity of electric-double-layer capacitors containing nonaqueous electrolytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Cheng; Liu, Honglai; Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-10-19

    The ionophobicity effect of nanoporous electrodes on the capacitance and the energy storage capacity of nonaqueous-electrolyte supercapacitors is studied by means of the classical density functional theory (DFT). It has been hypothesized that ionophobic nanopores may create obstacles in charging, but they store energy much more efficiently than ionophilic pores. In this study, we find that, for both ionic liquids and organic electrolytes, an ionophobic pore exhibits a charging behavior different from that of an ionophilic pore, and that the capacitance-voltage curve changes from a bell shape to a two-hump camel shape when the pore ionophobicity increases. For electric-double-layer capacitors containing organic electrolytes, an increase in the ionophobicity of the nanopores leads to a higher capacity for energy storage. Without taking into account the effects of background screening, the DFT predicts that an ionophobic pore containing an ionic liquid does not enhance the supercapacitor performance within the practical voltage ranges. However, by using an effective dielectric constant to account for ion polarizability, the DFT predicts that, like an organic electrolyte, an ionophobic pore with an ionic liquid is also able to increase the energy stored when the electrode voltage is beyond a certain value. We find that the critical voltage for an enhanced capacitance in an ionic liquid is larger than that in an organic electrolyte. Our theoretical predictions provide further understanding of how chemical modification of porous electrodes affects the performance of supercapacitors. PMID:27546561

  8. Evolution of nanoporous Pt-Fe alloy nanowires by dealloying and their catalytic property for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Jiang-Lan; Chen, Chen; Li, James C.M. [Material Science Program, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2011-09-09

    The short life and high cost of carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts (Pt/C) are two main problems with proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Porous Pt alloy nanowires have more durability and catalytic activity than Pt/C. Dealloying is a facile way to make nanoporous Pt. However, the process of porosity formation is difficult to control. In this paper, electrospinning and chemical dealloying techniques are used to make long, thin and yet nanoporous Pt-Fe alloy nanowires. The evolution of nanoporosity is observed and studied. It is found that non-uniform composition in the precursor PtFe{sub 5} alloy nanowires helps the formation of nanoporous structure. The overall wire diameter is about 10-20 nm and the ligament diameter only 2-3 nm. These porous long nanowires interweave to form a self-supporting network with a high specific activity, 2.3 times that of conventional Pt/C catalysts, and also have better durability. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Fabrication of a high-density nano-porous structure on polyimide by using ultraviolet laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong-Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Lee, Sang-Mae; Shin, Bo Sung

    2016-03-01

    A new approach for fabricating a high-density nano-porous structure on polyimide (PI) by using a 355-nm UV laser is presented here. When PI was irradiated by using a laser, debris that had electrical conductivity was generated. Accordingly, that debris caused electrical defects in the field of electronics. Thus, many researchers have tried to focus on a clean processing without debris. However, this study focused on forming a high density of debris so as to fabricate a nano-porous structure consisting of nanofibers on the PI film. A PI film with closed pores and open pores was successfully formed by using a chemical blowing agent (azodicarbonamide, CBA) in an oven. Samples were precured at 130 °C and cured at 205 °C in sequence so that the closed pores might not coalesce in the film. When the laser irradiated the PI film with closed pores, nanofibers were generated because polyimide was not completely decomposed by photochemical ablation. Our results indicated that a film with micro-closed pores, in conjunction with a 355-nm pulsed laser, can facilitate the fabrication of a high-density nano-porous structure.

  10. Fast fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio, self-ordered nanoporous alumina membrane by using high-field anodization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of processes for the fast fabrication of nanoporous anodic alumina membranes with high-aspect-ratio, self-ordered pore arrays was developed based on a high-field 2-step anodization in a 0.3 M oxalic electrolyte. The dielectric breakdown commonly driven by the high electric field was circumvented by using a linear sweep of the initial voltage from 0 to 140 V, followed by a constant voltage of 140 V for the first step and by using a controlled growth rate that was adjusted by varying the electrolyte concentration while applying an instantaneous constant voltage of 140 V for the second step. A thick nanoporous film of about 120 um was grown within 2 hours with an average interpore distance of 310 nm and an average pore size of 50 nm, where the aspect ratio of the pores was over 2000. In order to overcome the problems associated with a thick barrier layer formed during the high-field anodization, we applied a pulsed electrochemical detachment technique to remove the base Al metal. A through-hole membrane with a pore size of about 210 nm was fabricated after widening the pores through a chemical etching of the pore walls. These novel processes ensure reliable fabrication of a high-field nanoporous anodic alumina membrane and provide a new template for nano-scale research.

  11. Fabrication and Modification of Nanoporous Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mauro; Liu, Xuewu

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-based nanoporous particles as biodegradable drug carriers are advantageous in permeation, controlled release, and targeting. The use of biodegradable nanoporous silicon and silicon dioxide, with proper surface treatments, allows sustained drug release within the target site over a period of days, or even weeks, due to selective surface coating. A variety of surface treatment protocols are available for silicon-based particles to be stabilized, functionalized, or modified as required. Coated polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains showed the effective depression of both plasma protein adsorption and cell attachment to the modified surfaces, as well as the advantage of long circulating. Porous silicon particles are micromachined by lithography. Compared to the synthesis route of the nanomaterials, the advantages include: (1) the capability to make different shapes, not only spherical particles but also square, rectangular, or ellipse cross sections, etc.; (2) the capability for very precise dimension control; (3) the capacity for porosity and pore profile control; and (4) allowance of complex surface modification. The particle patterns as small as 60 nm can be fabricated using the state-of-the-art photolithography. The pores in silicon can be fabricated by exposing the silicon in an HF/ethanol solution and then subjecting the pores to an electrical current. The size and shape of the pores inside silicon can be adjusted by the doping of the silicon, electrical current application, the composition of the electrolyte solution, and etching time. The surface of the silicon particles can be modified by many means to provide targeted delivery and on-site permanence for extended release. Multiple active agents can be co-loaded into the particles. Because the surface modification of particles can be done on wafers before the mechanical release, asymmetrical surface modification is feasible. Starting from silicon wafers, a treatment, such as KOH dipping or reactive ion

  12. Nanostructural Engineering of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Ferré-Borrull

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Modifying the diameter of the pores in nanoporous anodic alumina opens new possibilities in the application of this material. In this work, we review the different nanoengineering methods by classifying them into two kinds: in situ and ex situ. Ex situ methods imply the interruption of the anodization process and the addition of intermediate steps, while in situ methods aim at realizing the in-depth pore modulation by continuous changes in the anodization conditions. Ex situ methods permit a greater versatility in the pore geometry, while in situ methods are simpler and adequate for repeated cycles. As an example of ex situ methods, we analyze the effect of changing drastically one of the anodization parameters (anodization voltage, electrolyte composition or concentration. We also introduce in situ methods to obtain distributed Bragg reflectors or rugate filters in nanoporous anodic alumina with cyclic anodization voltage or current. This nanopore engineering permits us to propose new applications in the field of biosensing: using the unique reflectance or photoluminescence properties of the material to obtain photonic barcodes, applying a gold-coated double-layer nanoporous alumina to design a self-referencing protein sensor or giving a proof-of-concept of the refractive index sensing capabilities of nanoporous rugate filters.

  13. Sensing applications based on plasmonic nanopores: The hole story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Andreas B

    2015-07-21

    A review of sensing applications based on plasmonic nanopores is given. Many new types of plasmonic nanopores have recently been fabricated, including pores penetrating multilayers of thin films, using a great variety of fabrication techniques based on either serial nanolithography or self-assembly. One unique advantage with nanopores compared to other plasmonic sensors is that sample liquids can flow through the surface, which increases the rate of binding and improves the detection limit under certain conditions. Also, by utilizing the continuous metal films, electrical control can be implemented for electrochemistry, dielectrophoresis and resistive heating. Much effort is still spent on trying to improve sensor performance in various ways, but the literature uses inconsistent benchmark parameters. Recently plasmonic nanopores have been used to analyse targets of high clinical or academic interest. Although this is an important step forward, one should probably reflect upon whether the same results could have been achieved with another optical technique. Overall, this critical review suggests that the research field would benefit by focusing on applications where plasmonic nanopores truly can offer unique advantages over similar techniques. PMID:25675146

  14. Sensing of protein molecules through nanopores: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state nanopores have been shown to be suitable for single molecule detection. While numerous modeling investigations exist for DNA within nanopores, there are few simulations of protein translocations. In this paper, we use atomistic molecular dynamics to investigate the translocation of proteins through a silicon nitride nanopore. The nanopore dimensions and profile are representative of experimental systems. We are able to calculate the change in blockade current and friction coefficient for different positions of the protein within the pore. The change in ionic current is found to be negligible until the protein is fully within the pore and the current is lowest when the protein is in the pore center. Using a simple theory that gives good quantitative agreement with the simulation results we are able to show that the variation in current with position is a function of the pore shape. In simulations that guide the protein through the nanopore we identify the effect that confinement has on the friction coefficient of the protein. This integrated view of translocation at the nanoscale provides useful insights that can be used to guide the design of future devices. (paper)

  15. Biomimetic novel nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauline, S. Anne; Rajendran, N., E-mail: nrajendran@annauniv.edu

    2014-01-30

    Niobium oxide was synthesized by sol–gel methodology and a crystalline, nanoporous and adherent coating of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was deposited on 316L SS using the spin coating technique and heat treatment. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The coating was characterized using attenuated total reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Mechanical studies confirmed that the coating has excellent adherence to the substrate and the hardness value of the coating was excellent. Contact angle analysis showed increased hydrophilicity for the coated substrate. In vitro bioactivity test confirmed that the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating with nanoporous morphology facilitated the growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp). This was further confirmed by the solution analysis test where increased uptake of calcium and phosphorous ions from simulated body fluid (SBF) was observed. Electrochemical evaluation of the coating confirmed that the crystalline coating is insulative and protective in nature and offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS. Thus, this study confirmed that the nanoporous crystalline Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating conferred bioactivity and enhanced corrosion resistance on 316L SS.

  16. Antibacterial hemostatic dressings with nanoporous bioglass containing silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Gangfeng Hu,1 Luwei Xiao,2 Peijian Tong,2 Dawei Bi,1 Hui Wang,1 Haitao Ma,1 Gang Zhu,1 Hui Liu21The First People’s Hospital of Xiaoshan, Hangzhou, China; 2Zhejiang Traditional Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, ChinaAbstract: Nanoporous bioglass containing silver (n-BGS was fabricated using the sol-gel method, with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template. The results showed that n-BGS with nanoporous structure had a surface area of 467 m2/g and a pore size of around 6 nm, and exhibited a significantly higher water absorption rate compared with BGS without nanopores. The n-BGS containing small amounts of silver (Ag had a slight effect on its surface area. The n-BGS containing 0.02 wt% Ag, without cytotoxicity, had a good antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, and its antibacterial rate reached 99% in 12 hours. The n-BGS’s clotting ability significantly decreased prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, indicating n-BGS with a higher surface area could significantly promote blood clotting (by decreasing clotting time compared with BGS without nanopores. Effective hemostasis was achieved in skin injury models, and bleeding time was reduced. It is suggested that n-BGS could be a good dressing, with antibacterial and hemostatic properties, which might shorten wound bleeding time and control hemorrhage.Keywords: antibacterial, bioglass, cytotoxicity, dressing, hemostasis, nanopore, silver

  17. Proximal Capture Dynamics for a Single Biological Nanopore Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Emmanuel D; Barbalas, Jonathan; Drown, Bryon S; Culbertson, Michael J; Keranen Burden, Lisa M; Kasianowicz, John J; Burden, Daniel L

    2015-08-20

    Single nanopore sensors enable capture and analysis of molecules that are driven to the pore entry from bulk solution. However, the distance between an analyte and the nanopore opening limits the detection efficiency. A theoretical basis for predicting particle capture rate is important for designing modified nanopore sensors, especially for those with covalently tethered reaction sites. Using the finite element method, we develop a soft-walled electrostatic block (SWEB) model for the alpha-hemolysin channel that produces a vector map of drift-producing forces on particles diffusing near the pore entrance. The maps are then coupled to a single-particle diffusion simulation to probe capture statistics and to track the trajectories of individual particles on the μs to ms time scales. The investigation enables evaluation of the interplay among the electrophoretic, electroosmotic, and thermal driving forces as a function of applied potential. The findings demonstrate how the complex drift-producing forces compete with diffusion over the nanoscale dimensions of the pore. The results also demonstrate the spatial and temporal limitations associated with nanopore detection and offer a basic theoretical framework to guide both the placement and kinetics of reaction sites located on, or near, the nanopore cap. PMID:26203555

  18. Biomimetic novel nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niobium oxide was synthesized by sol–gel methodology and a crystalline, nanoporous and adherent coating of Nb2O5 was deposited on 316L SS using the spin coating technique and heat treatment. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The coating was characterized using attenuated total reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of crystalline Nb2O5 coating with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Mechanical studies confirmed that the coating has excellent adherence to the substrate and the hardness value of the coating was excellent. Contact angle analysis showed increased hydrophilicity for the coated substrate. In vitro bioactivity test confirmed that the Nb2O5 coating with nanoporous morphology facilitated the growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp). This was further confirmed by the solution analysis test where increased uptake of calcium and phosphorous ions from simulated body fluid (SBF) was observed. Electrochemical evaluation of the coating confirmed that the crystalline coating is insulative and protective in nature and offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS. Thus, this study confirmed that the nanoporous crystalline Nb2O5 coating conferred bioactivity and enhanced corrosion resistance on 316L SS.

  19. Fabricating Nanodots using Lift-Off of a Nanopore Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Ramsey, Christopher R.; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    A process for fabricating a planar array of dots having characteristic dimensions of the order of several nanometers to several hundred nanometers involves the formation and use of a thin alumina nanopore template on a semiconductor substrate. The dot material is deposited in the nanopores, then the template is lifted off the substrate after the dots have been formed. This process is expected to be a basis for development of other, similar nanofabrication processes for relatively inexpensive mass production of nanometerscale optical, optoelectronic, electronic, and magnetic devices. Alumina nanopore templates are self-organized structures that result from anodization of aluminum under appropriate conditions. Alumina nanopore templates have been regarded as attractive for use in fabricating the devices mentioned above, but prior efforts to use alumina nanopore templates for this purpose have not been successful. One reason for the lack of success is that the aspect ratios (ratios between depth and diameter) of the pores have been too large: large aspect ratios can result in blockage of deposition and/or can prevent successful lift-off. The development of the present process was motivated partly by a requirement to reduce aspect ratios to values (of the order of 10) for which there is little or no blockage of deposition and attempts at lift-off are more likely to be successful. The fabrication process is outlined.

  20. Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon electrode material for highly selective determination of nitrite in physiological and environmental systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon (HONC) was obtained from a mesoporous silica template through a nano-replication method using furfuryl alcohol as the carbon source. The structure and morphology of HONC were characterized and analyzed in detail by X-ray diffraction, N2-sorption, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. HONC was then demonstrated as active electrode material for selective determination of nitrite in either physiological or environmental system. Well separated oxidation peaks of ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid and nitrite were observed in physiological system, and simultaneous discrimination of catechol, hydroquinone, resorcinol and nitrite in environmental system was also accomplished. Distinctly improved performances for selective determination of nitrite (such as significantly fast and sensitive current response with especially high selectivity) coexisted with ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid in the physiological system, as well as with catechol, hydroquinone and resorcinol in the environmental system were achieved at HONC electrode material. The excellent discriminating ability and high selectivity for NO2− determination were ascribed to the good electronic conductivity, unique hemi-ordered porous structure, large surface area and large number of edge plane defect sites contained on the surface of nanopore walls of HONC. Results in this work demonstrated that HONC is one of the promising catalytic electrode materials for nitrite sensor fabrication. - Highlights: • Hemi-ordered nanoporous carbon as an active electrode material • Good discriminating ability towards NO2− from physiological or environmental system • Highly selective determination of nitrite with fast and sensitive current response

  1. Optical chemical sensors for atmospheric pollutants based on nano porous materials: application to the formaldehyde and the other carbonyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formaldehyde, a well-identified indoor pollutant, was recently classified as carcinogenic. New regulations for the air quality are expected and therefore there is a need for low-cost sensors, sensitive and selective with a fast response time for the detection of formaldehyde at ppb level. In the present work, we had developed a chemical sensor based on nano-porous matrices doped with Fluoral-P and optical methods of detection. The nano-porous matrices, elaborated via the Sol-Gel process, display nano-pores whose cavity is tailored for the trapping of the targeted pollutant. They provide a first selectivity with the discrimination of the pollutants by their size. A second selectivity is obtained with a molecular probe, Fluoral-P, which reacts specifically with formaldehyde leading to the 3,5- di-acetyl-1,4-dihydro-lutidine (DDL). The kinetics of formation of DDL was studied as function of many parameters such as the concentration of Fluoral-P in the matrix, the pollutant content in gas mixture, the flow rate, the relative humidity of the gas mixtures and interference with other carbonylated compounds. The present chemical sensor can detect, via absorbance measurements, 2 ppb of formaldehyde within 30 min over a O to 60% relative humidity range. Moreover, to detect the total carbonylated compounds, we also explored the potentiality of a chemical sensor using, as a probe molecule, the 2'4-dinitro-phenyl-hydrazine which forms with these compounds the corresponding hydrazones derivatives. A patent was deposited for these two sensors. We have also developed a semi-miniaturized prototype for demonstration, using a flow cell, a miniaturized spectrophotometer, a light source and a lap-top. (author)

  2. An ultrasensitive bio-surrogate for nanoporous filter membrane performance metrology directed towards contamination control in microlithography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farhan; Mish, Barbara; Qiu, Jian; Singh, Amarnauth; Varanasi, Rao; Bedford, Eilidh; Smith, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Contamination tolerances in semiconductor manufacturing processes have changed dramatically in the past two decades, reaching below 20 nm according to the guidelines of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. The move to narrower line widths drives the need for innovative filtration technologies that can achieve higher particle/contaminant removal performance resulting in cleaner process fluids. Nanoporous filter membrane metrology tools that have been the workhorse over the past decade are also now reaching limits. For example, nanoparticle (NP) challenge testing is commonly applied for assessing particle retention performance of filter membranes. Factors such as high NP size dispersity, low NP detection sensitivity, and high NP particle-filter affinity impose challenges in characterizing the next generation of nanoporous filter membranes. We report a novel bio-surrogate, 5 nm DNA-dendrimer conjugate for evaluating particle retention performance of nanoporous filter membranes. A technique capable of single molecule detection is employed to detect sparse concentration of conjugate in filter permeate, providing >1000- fold higher detection sensitivity than any existing 5 nm-sized particle enumeration technique. This bio-surrogate also offers narrow size distribution, high stability and chemical tunability. This bio-surrogate can discriminate various sub-15 nm pore-rated nanoporous filter membranes based on their particle retention performance. Due to high bio-surrogate detection sensitivity, a lower challenge concentration of bio-surrogate (as compared to other NPs of this size) can be used for filter testing, providing a better representation of customer applications. This new method should provide better understanding of the next generation filter membranes for removing defect-causing contaminants from lithography processes.

  3. Pore-size reduction protocol for SiN membrane nanopore using the thermal reflow in nanoimprinting for nanobio-based sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Sik; Song, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Jung, Mun Youn

    2014-05-01

    Micro- and nano-fabrication methods facilitate the use of nanostructures for the separation of collections of particles and nanobio-based optical and electrochemical sensing. We have presented an easy and simple nanopore size reduction method of a low-stressed silicon nitride (SiN) membrane nanosieve (100×100 μ) using a nanoimprinting method based on a natural thermal reflow of the contact imprinting polymer, possibly maintaining compatibility with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor integrated circuit processes. The nanopore pattern size of this nanosieve membrane was precisely patterned by a nanoimprinting process using an electron beam patterned silicon master, to about 30-nm diameter. By employing mainly an electron beam resist reflow phenomena after a nanoimprinting process and anisotropic reactive ion etch, the etch holes' size was fabricated to be the same with nanopatterns on the polymer. The contact imprinting master can be used continually for the generation of nanopore patterns simply and easily. It can endure harsh conditions like high temperature up to 800°C, and it is inert to many aggressive and strong chemicals. Also, this would be a low-cost, simple, and easy fabrication method for the precise and reliable size-reduction control of nanopores for mass production of nanobio sensors or chips.

  4. Nanoporous Carbide-Derived Carbon Material-Based Linear Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janno Torop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Devices using electroactive polymer-supported carbon material can be exploited as alternatives to conventional electromechanical actuators in applications where electromechanical actuators have some serious deficiencies. One of the numerous examples is precise microactuators. In this paper, we show for first time the dilatometric effect in nanocomposite material actuators containing carbide-derived carbon (CDC and polytetrafluoroetylene polymer (PTFE. Transducers based on high surface area carbide-derived carbon electrode materials are suitable for short range displacement applications, because of the proportional actuation response to the charge inserted, and high Coulombic efficiency due to the EDL capacitance. The material is capable of developing stresses in the range of tens of N cm-2. The area of an actuator can be dozens of cm2, which means that forces above 100 N are achievable. The actuation mechanism is based on the interactions between the high-surface carbon and the ions of the electrolyte. Electrochemical evaluations of the four different actuators with linear (longitudinal action response are described. The actuator electrodes were made from two types of nanoporous TiC-derived carbons with surface area (SA of 1150 m2 g-1 and 1470 m2 g-1, respectively. Two kinds of electrolytes were used in actuators: 1.0 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4 solution in propylene carbonate and pure ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (EMITf. It was found that CDC based actuators exhibit a linear movement of about 1% in the voltage range of 0.8 V to 3.0 V at DC. The actuators with EMITf electrolyte had about 70% larger movement compared to the specimen with TEABF4 electrolyte.

  5. Enhanced electrochemical supercapacitance of binder-free nanoporous ternary metal oxides/metal electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J J; Qiu, H-J; Wen, Y R; Chiang, F-K; Wang, Y

    2016-07-15

    Free-standing nanoporous Ni-Cu-Mn mixed metal oxides on metal with a high surface area was fabricated by chemically dealloying a Ni8Cu12Mn80 single-phase precursor, followed by electrochemical oxidation in an alkaline solution. Electrochemical analysis shows that first Cu and Mn-based metal oxides formed by the electrochemical oxidation. Ni-based oxides grow later with the increase of electrochemical CV cycles and mix with the Cu/Mn oxides, forming a relatively stable mixed metal oxides thin film on metal ligament network. Due to the different electrochemical properties of each metal and the synergetic effect between them, the mixed ternary metal oxides formed on metal nano-ligament can operate stably between a wide potential window (1.5V) in 1.0M KOH aqueous solution when tested as a free-standing supercapacitor electrode. Due to the high volumetric surface area, wide operating potential window and excellent conductivity, the nanoporous metal oxides@metal composite exhibits a high volumetric capacitance (∼500Fcm(-3)), high energy density (∼38mWhcm(-3)) and good cycling stability. PMID:27089016

  6. Fabrication and electron field-emission of carbon nanofibers grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbon nanofibers were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array by a CVD method.► Low turn-on field, high density and stable FE current were obtained in CNTs/Si-NPA.► Defects in CNTs and Si array substrate contributes the excellent FE property. - Abstract: Random orientation carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method with acetylene (C2H2) as carbon precursor and Ni as the catalyst. The synthesized CNFs were mainly composed of amorphous carbon and disordered graphite layers with a core–shell like structure. And, the tangled CNFs and the regular silicon-pillar array formed a nanometer-micron hierarchy structure. The electron field-emission (FE) property of CNFs/Si-NPA was measured and low turn-on field, high-density and stable FE current, high enhancement factor were obtained. The outstanding FE performance of the CNFs/Si-NPA emitters was attributed to the random orientation and defects of CNFs, the undulate surface of the Si-NPA substrate.

  7. Plasmon-enhanced nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes for efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jiayong; Bangalore Rajeeva, Bharath; Wu, Zilong; Penley, Daniel; Liang, Chaolun; Tong, Yexiang; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-06-01

    Conversion of solar irradiation into chemical fuels such as hydrogen with the use of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell is an attractive strategy for green energy. The promising technique of incorporating metal nanoparticles (NPs) in the photoelectrodes is being explored to enhance the performance of the photoelectrodes. In this work, we developed Au-NPs-functionalized nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and utilized the plasmonic effects of Au NPs to enhance the photoresponse. The plasmonic enhancement leads to an AM 1.5 photocurrent of 5.1 ± 0.1 mA cm‑2 at 1.23 V versus a reverse hydrogen electrode. We observed an enhancement of five times with respect to pristine BiVO4 in the photocurrent with long-term stability and high energy-conversion efficiency. The overall performance enhancement is attributed to the synergy between the nanoporous architecture of BiVO4 and the plasmonic effects of Au NPs. Our further study reveals that the commendable photoactivity arises from the different plasmonic effects and co-catalyst effects of Au NPs.

  8. Transport and Retention of Engineered Nanoporous Particles in Porous Media: Effects of Concentration and Flow Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming

    2013-01-20

    Engineered nanoporous particles are an important class of nano-structured materials that can be functionalized in their internal surfaces for various applications including groundwater contaminant sequestration. This paper reported a study of transport and retention of engineered nanoporous silicate particles (ENSPs) that are designed for treatment and remediation of contaminants such as uranium in groundwater and sediments. The transport and retention of ENSPs were investigated under variable particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions in a synthetic groundwater that mimics field groundwater chemical composition. The dynamic flow condition was achieved using a flow-interruption (stop-flow) approach with variable stop-flow durations to explore particle retention and release kinetics. The results showed that the ENSPs transport was strongly affected by the particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions. A lower injected ENSPs concentration and longer stop-flow duration led to a more particle retention. The experimental data were used to evaluate the applicability of various kinetic models that were developed for colloidal particle retention and release in describing ENSPs transport. Model fits suggested that the transport and retention of ENSPs were subjected to a complex coupling of reversible attachment/detachment and straining/liberation processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that dynamic groundwater flow condition is an important parameter to be considered in exploring and modeling engineered particle transport in subsurface porous media.

  9. Theoretical and experimental study of nanoporous silicon photonic microcavity optical sensor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the theoretical and experimental study of one-dimensional (1D) multilayer nanoporous silicon (NPS) photonic band gap (PBG) microcavity (MC) structures for optical sensor device applications. A theoretical framework to model the reflectance spectra relying on the Bruggeman's effective medium approximation (BEMA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) was established for the 1D nanoporous silicon microcavity (1D-NPSMC) optical sensor device structures. Based on the theoretical background, 1D-NPSMC sensor device structures were fabricated using electrochemical dissolution of silicon wafer in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The refractive index of the 1D-NPSMC structures was tuned by changing current density and the thickness was tuned by changing the etching time. Wavelength shifts (Δλ) in the measured reflectance spectra were analyzed for the detection of the analyte in the porous structure. The sensing device performance was tested by different organic solvents, which showed good linear relation between the refractive index of analyte inside the pores and the wavelength shift. The application of proposed structures can be extended for the optical sensing of chemicals, gas, environmental pollutants, pathogens etc. (paper)

  10. Swelling, Functionalization, and Structural Changes of the Nanoporous Layered Silicates AMH-3 and MCM-22

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Wun-gwi

    2011-06-21

    Nanoporous layered silicate materials contain 2D-planar sheets of nanoscopic thickness and ordered porous structure. In comparison to porous 3D-framework materials such as zeolites, they have advantages such as significantly increased surface area and decreased diffusion limitations because the layers can potentially be exfoliated or intercalated into polymers to form nanocomposite materials. These properties are particularly interesting for applications as materials for enhancing molecular selectivity and throughput in composite membranes. In this report, the swelling and surface modification chemistry of two attractive nanoporous layered silicate materials, AMH-3 and MCM-22, were studied. We first describe a method, using long-chain diamines instead of monoamines, for swelling of AMH-3 while preserving its pore structure to a greater extent during the swelling process. Then, we describe a stepwise functionalization method for functionalizing the layer surfaces of AMH-3 and MCM-22 via silane condensation reactions. The covalently attached hydrocarbon chain molecules increased the hydrophobicity of AMH-3 and MCM-22 layer surfaces and therefore allow the possibility of effectively dispersing these materials in polymer matrices for thin film/membrane applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes for efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jiayong; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Wu, Zilong; Penley, Daniel; Liang, Chaolun; Tong, Yexiang; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-06-10

    Conversion of solar irradiation into chemical fuels such as hydrogen with the use of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell is an attractive strategy for green energy. The promising technique of incorporating metal nanoparticles (NPs) in the photoelectrodes is being explored to enhance the performance of the photoelectrodes. In this work, we developed Au-NPs-functionalized nanoporous BiVO4 photoanodes, and utilized the plasmonic effects of Au NPs to enhance the photoresponse. The plasmonic enhancement leads to an AM 1.5 photocurrent of 5.1 ± 0.1 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus a reverse hydrogen electrode. We observed an enhancement of five times with respect to pristine BiVO4 in the photocurrent with long-term stability and high energy-conversion efficiency. The overall performance enhancement is attributed to the synergy between the nanoporous architecture of BiVO4 and the plasmonic effects of Au NPs. Our further study reveals that the commendable photoactivity arises from the different plasmonic effects and co-catalyst effects of Au NPs. PMID:27119335

  12. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Translocation through an α-Hemolysin Nanopore

    KAUST Repository

    Di Marino, Daniele

    2015-08-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Nanopore sensing is attracting the attention of a large and varied scientific community. One of the main issues in nanopore sensing is how to associate the measured current signals to specific features of the molecule under investigation. This is particularly relevant when the translocating molecule is a protein and the pore is sufficiently narrow to necessarily involve unfolding of the translocating protein. Recent experimental results characterized the cotranslocational unfolding of Thioredoxin (Trx) passing through an α-hemolisin pore, providing evidence for the existence of a multistep process. In this study we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the same system. Our data indicate that Trx translocation involves two main barriers. The first one is an unfolding barrier associated with a translocation intermediate where the N-terminal region of Trx is stuck at the pore entrance in a conformation that strongly resembles the native one. After the abrupt unfolding of the N-terminal region, the Trx enters the α-hemolisin vestibule. During this stage, the constriction is occupied not only by the translocating residue but also by a hairpin-like structure forming a tangle in the constriction. The second barrier is associated with the disentangling of this region.

  13. Multiple Approaches to Characterizing Nano-Pore Structure of Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Gao, Z.; Ewing, R. P.; Dultz, S.; Kaufmann, J.; Hamamoto, S.; Webber, B.; Ding, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microscopic characteristics of porous media - pore shape, pore-size distribution, and pore connectivity - control fluid flow and mass transport. This presentation discusses various approaches to investigating nano-pore structure of Barnett shale, with its implications in gas production behavior. The innovative approaches include imbibition, tracer diffusion, edge-accessible porosity, porosimetry (mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen and water vapor sorption isotherms, and nuclear magnetic resonance cyroporometry), and imaging (Wood's metal impregnation followed with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, and small angle neutron scattering). Results show that the shale pores are predominantly in the nm size range, with measured median pore-throat diameters about 5 nm. But small pore size is not the major contributor to low gas recovery; rather, the low mass diffusivity appears to be caused by low pore connectivity of Barnett shale. Chemical diffusion in sparsely-connected pore spaces is not well described by classical Fickian behavior; anomalous behavior is suggested by percolation theory, and confirmed by results of imbibition and diffusion tests. Our evolving complementary approaches, with their several advantages and disadvantages, provide a rich toolbox for tackling the nano-pore structure characteristics of shales and other natural rocks.

  14. Electrodeposition of hierarchical manganese oxide on metal nanoparticles decorated nanoporous gold with enhanced supercapacitor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pt-NPs decorated NPG as current collector for electrodeposition of MnOx nanosheets. • Pt-NPs facilitate the formation of MnOx nanosheets and improve the conductivity. • MnOx/Pt@NPG electrode shows low contact resistance and excellent cycling stability. • Nanosized subunits in hybrid electrode can improve the electrochemical performance. - Abstract: A novel three dimensional nanoarchitecture of manganese oxide nanosheets/Pt@nanoporous gold (MnOx/Pt@NPG) was designed and synthesized by galvanostatic electrodepositon for supercapacitors application. Nanoporous gold (NPG) membrane was fabricated by a dealloying method as a current collector and discontinuous platinum nanoparticles were pulse electrodeposited on NPG. The morphology and chemical composition of the MnOx/Pt@NPG products were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical properties of the as-prepared MnOx as an electrode material for supercapacitor were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. Importantly, the optimized MnOx/Pt@NPG hybrid electrodes obtain a maximum specific capacitance of 775 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 (about two times larger than that of MnOx/NPG electrodes with 404 F g−1), about half of the internal resistance of MnOx/NPG electrodes and excellent cycling stability, making it a promising candidate for supercapacitors

  15. Dielectric property-microstructure relationship for nanoporous silica based thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dielectric constant silica based films which incorporate a large amount of nanometer sized pores are attractive candidates as interlayer dielectrics in future gigascale integrated circuits chip technology. Nanoporous silica based films were deposited by surfactant templated self-assembly spin-on deposition (SOD). Other low-k materials with relatively low density silica based films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and some silica films were deposited by a CVD process. The SOD films have a higher porosity, compared to the PECVD/CVD films, as measured by x-ray reflectivity, Rutherford back scattering, and ellipsometry measurements. The SOD films have lower dielectric constants compared to the PECVD/CVD films, as derived from electrical (1 MHz) and optical (5x1014 Hz) measurements. The correlation between the dielectric constant and the porosity for the SOD films fits well to the lower prediction of the Lorentz-Lorenz model, and the PECVD/CVD films agree with the higher prediction of the Rayleigh model. These results suggest that the dielectric constant of the inhomogeneous two phase nanoporous silica based films deposited by SOD is significantly lowered by forming air voids, whereas the PECVD/CVD films consist of a homogeneous low density loose microstructure originating from the bonding nature alone, and therefore their dielectric constant is lowered to a smaller extent

  16. NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration: Historical Oil and Chemical Spill Incidents Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Historical Incidents database contains reports and images from oil and chemical spills that occurred between 1968 and 2002. The database includes reports on...

  17. Nanoporous gold supported cobalt oxide microelectrodes as high-performance electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Xing-You; Fu, Hong-Ying; Hou, Chao; Han, Gao-Feng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous demands for electrochemical biosensors with high sensitivity and reliability, fast response and excellent selectivity have stimulated intensive research on developing versatile materials with ultrahigh electrocatalytic activity. Here we report flexible and self-supported microelectrodes with a seamless solid/nanoporous gold/cobalt oxide hybrid structure for electrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. As a result of synergistic electrocatalytic activity of the gold skeleton and cobalt oxide nanoparticles towards glucose oxidation, amperometric glucose biosensors based on the hybrid microelectrodes exhibit multi-linear detection ranges with ultrahigh sensitivities at a low potential of 0.26 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The sensitivity up to 12.5 mA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² with a short response time of less than 1 s gives rise to ultralow detection limit of 5 nM. The outstanding performance originates from a novel nanoarchitecture in which the cobalt oxide nanoparticles are incorporated into pore channels of the seamless solid/nanoporous Au microwires, providing excellent electronic/ionic conductivity and mass transport for the enhanced electrocatalysis. PMID:23851924

  18. Oxytocin antagonist disrupts male mouse medial amygdala response to chemical-communication signals

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelsen, Chad L.; Meredith, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The male mouse medial amygdala is an important site for integration of main and accessory olfactory information. Exposure to biologically relevant chemical signals from the same species (conspecific) results in a general pattern of immediate early gene (IEG) expression in medial amygdala different from that elicited by chemical signals from other species (heterospecific), of no demonstrable biological relevance. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) in the medial amygdala has been shown to be necess...

  19. [Chemical risk in operating rooms and technical progress: the obligations and responsibilities of law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We are going to consider the specific applications of the new legal system and of the most recent body of laws to those work environments of particular risk, such as healthcare facilities and in particular operating rooms. In such environments, volatile chemicals classified as "dangerous" are used with consequent exposure to "chemical risk", both of those persons professionally involved, depending on the type of activity, and of the patients to whom such activities are addressed in the same environment. Once the chemical risk is framed in the existing regulatory system, it must be specifically evaluated the application of the same principle to the particular chemical risk arising from the use of anesthetic agents in the operating room, for example sevoflurane and desflurane, being careful to test wether and how much this risk can be eliminated or reduced to minimum in relation to the new achievements of the technical progress. So, as soon as the quality of "dangerous chemical agent" of the "volatile chemicals" and of the "volatile liquid anesthetic" (sevoflurane and desflurane) as well--which are characterized by a lower degree of toxicity and for this reason are mostly used in current chemical practice, preferable to some anesthetic gases such as nitrous oxide--is legally verified, it is necessary to relate the scientific and technical data which result from the current "state of art" also to the other binding regulations that are imposed for the "prevention and protection from chemical agents", according to the relative Title IX of the TUSL (Unique text for Safety and Health at Work). PMID:24640081

  20. Feeding response of sport fish after electrical immobilization, chemical sedation, or both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Ambrose, Ryan D.; Jackan, Leanna M.; Wise, Jeremy K.

    2012-01-01

    Fishery managers frequently capture wild fish for a variety of fishery management activities. Though some activities can be accomplished without immobilizing the fish, others are accomplished more readily, humanely, and safely (for both the handler and the fish) when fish are immobilized by physical (e.g., electrical immobilization) or chemical sedation. A concern regarding the use of chemical sedatives is that chemical residues may remain in the fillet tissue after the fish recovers from sedation. If those residues are harmful to humans, there is some risk that a postsedated fish released to public waters may be caught and consumed by an angler. To characterize this risk, a series of four trials were conducted. Three trials assessed feeding activity after hatchery-reared fish were electrically immobilized, chemically sedated, or both, and one trial assessed the likelihood of an angler catching a wild fish that had been electrically immobilized and chemically sedated. Results from the first trial indicated that the feeding activity of laboratory habituated fish was variable among and within species after electrical immobilization, chemical sedation, or both. Results from the second trial indicated that the resumption of feeding activity was rapid after being mildly sedated for 45 min. Results from the third trial indicated that the feeding activity of outdoor, hatchery-reared fish was relatively aggressive after fish had been chemically sedated. Results from the fourth trial indicated that the probability of capturing wild fish in a more natural environment by angling after fish had been electrically immobilized and chemically sedated is not likely, i.e., in a group of five fish caught, 3 out of 100 times one would be a fish that had been sedated.

  1. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  2. Electrochemical Attachment of Diazonium-Generated Films on Nanoporous Gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christine L; Landis, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-11

    Nanoporous gold provides a high surface area platform for further chemistry, but the stability of the molecular linkages to the surface will limit applications. We attached aryl molecular layers to nanoporous gold electrodes through electrochemical reduction of the corresponding aryl-diazonium salt and studied the properties and stability of the resulting films in varied attachment conditions. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to confirm the presence of the molecular layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the molecular layer is thick and that attachment conditions can form multilayers. However, cyclic voltammetry shows that the multilayers do not block electrochemical activity at the nanoporous gold surface. The molecular layers are resistant to replacement by alkane-thiol chains and exhibit some stability with respect to applied potential. These results indicate that a thick but highly defective molecular film forms with a mixture of strongly and weakly bound molecules. PMID:26186600

  3. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-11-14

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  4. Detecting and identifying small molecules in a nanopore flux capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Samuel; McClure, Ethan; Zhang, Guigen

    2016-02-01

    A new method of molecular detection in a metallic-semiconductor nanopore was developed and evaluated with experimental and computational methods. Measurements were made of the charging potential of the electrical double layer (EDL) capacitance as charge-carrying small molecules translocated the nanopore. Signals in the charging potential were found to be correlated to the physical properties of analyte molecules. From the measured signals, we were able to distinguish molecules with different valence charge or similar valence charge but different size. The relative magnitude of the signals from different analytes was consistent over a wide range of experimental conditions, suggesting that the detected signals are likely due to single molecules. Computational modeling of the nanopore system indicated that the double layer potential signal may be described in terms of disruption of the EDL structure due to the size and charge of the analyte molecule, in agreement with Huckel and Debye’s analysis of the electrical atmosphere of electrolyte solutions.

  5. Solid-State Nanopore-Based DNA Sequencing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing technology is becoming more and more attractive for its brand new future in gene detection field. The challenges that need to be addressed are diverse: the effective methods to detect base-specific signatures, the control of the nanopore’s size and surface properties, and the modulation of translocation velocity and behavior of the DNA molecules. Among these challenges, the realization of the high-quality nanopores with the help of modern micro/nanofabrication technologies is a crucial one. In this paper, typical technologies applied in the field of solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing have been reviewed.

  6. Theory of Sorption Hysteresis in Nanoporous Solids: II. Molecular condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynami...

  7. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuga, Hiroki; Kawano, Ryuji; Takinoue, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yutaro; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs "1" and "0" as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is or is not translocated through a nanopore; unlabeled DNA was detected electrically. A negative-AND (NAND) operation was successfully conducted within approximately 10 min, which is rapid compared with previous studies using unlabeled DNA. In addition, this operation was executed in a four-droplet network. DNA molecules and associated information were transferred among droplets via biological nanopores. This system would facilitate linking of molecules and electronic interfaces. Thus, it could be applied to molecular robotics, genetic engineering, and even medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26890568

  8. Synthesis of nanoporous silicon carbide ceramics by thermal evaporation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jian

    2010-09-01

    New nanoporous β-SiC ceramics were synthesized by a simple thermal evaporation method with commercial silicon powder and activated carbon fragments. The results of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that the microstructure of the β-SiC nanoporous ceramics was uniform and consistent with the pore size of 50-100 nm. The β-SiC nanocrystal grains of 50-200 nm were accumulated together to form a nanopore network. The formation mechanism was attributed to a template synthesis process, in which activated carbon fragments were employed as the template and they reacted with vaporized silicon through a vapor-solid way.

  9. Synthesis of nanoporous silicon carbide ceramics by thermal evaporation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nanoporous β-SiC ceramics were synthesized by a simple thermal evaporation method with commercial silicon powder and activated carbon fragments. The results of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that the microstructure of the β-SiC nanoporous ceramics was uniform and consistent with the pore size of 50-100 nm. The β-SiC nanocrystal grains of 50-200 nm were accumulated together to form a nanopore network. The formation mechanism was attributed to a template synthesis process, in which activated carbon fragments were employed as the template and they reacted with vaporized silicon through a vapor-solid way.

  10. Structure of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) in nanoporous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: On the basis of theoretical calculations using TD/CEP-31G method we found and interpreted the complexation mechanism of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) incorporated in nanoporous materials. - Abstract: In this work the effects of solvent polarity and conformation changing on the electronic characteristics of poly(di-n-hexylsilane) incorporated in the nanoporous materials are calculated. The dependence of energy levels of electronic-excited states of investigated compounds is analyzed as a function of the Si-Si-Si-Si twist angle and length of Si-Si and Si-C bonds. The possibility of complex formation between silicon atom of polymer and oxygen ions of nanoporous materials is shown.

  11. Optical observation of DNA translocation through Al2O3 sputtered silicon nanopores in porous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hirohito; Ito, Shintaro; Esashika, Keiko; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Nanopore sensors are being developed as a platform for analyzing single DNA, RNA, and protein. In nanopore sensors, ionic current measurement is widely used and proof-of-concept of nanopore DNA sequencing by it has been demonstrated by previous studies. Recently, we proposed an alternative platform of nanopore DNA sequencing that incorporates ultraviolet light and porous silicon membrane to perform high-throughput measurement. In the development of our DNA sequencing platform, controlling nanopore size in porous silicon membrane is essential but remains a challenge. Here, we report on observation of DNA translocation through Al2O3 sputtered silicon nanopores (Al2O3 nanopores) by our optical scheme. Electromagnetic wave simulation was performed to analyze the excitation volume on Al2O3 nanopores generated by focused ultraviolet light. In the experiment, DNA translocation time through Al2O3 nanopores was compared with that of silicon nanopores and we examined the effect of nanopore density and thickness of membrane by supplementing the static electric field simulation.

  12. Rapid Hydrogen Peroxide release from the coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding and in response to chemical and physical stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, Rachel; Schneider, Avi; Sher, Daniel; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-01-01

    Corals make use of different chemical compounds during interactions with prey, predators and aggressors. Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is produced and released by a wide range of organisms as part of their defense against grazers or pathogens. In coral reefs, the large fluxes and relatively long half-life of H2O2, make it a potentially important info-chemical or defense molecule. Here we describe a previously unstudied phenomenon of rapid H2O2 release from the reef-building coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding on zooplankton and in response to chemical and physical stimuli. Following stimuli, both symbiotic and bleached corals were found to rapidly release H2O2 to the surrounding water for a short period of time (few minutes). The H2O2 release was restricted to the site of stimulus, and an increase in physical stress and chemical stimuli concentration resulted in elevated H2O2 release. Omission of calcium (a key regulator of exocytotic processes) from the experimental medium inhibited H2O2 release. Hence we suggest that H2O2 is actively released in response to stimuli, rather than leaking passively from the coral tissue. We estimate that at the site of stimulus H2O2 can reach concentrations potentially high enough to deter predators or motile, potentially pathogenic, bacteria. PMID:26875833

  13. Enzyme specific activity in functionalized nanoporous supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu Jun; Ackerman, Eric J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)], E-mail: Eric.Ackerman@pnl.gov

    2008-03-26

    Here we reveal that enzyme specific activity can be increased substantially by changing the protein loading density (P{sub LD}) in functionalized nanoporous supports so that the enzyme immobilization efficiency (I{sub e}, defined as the ratio of the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme to the specific activity of the free enzyme in solution) can be much higher than 100%. A net negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOX) and a net positively charged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were entrapped spontaneously in NH{sub 2}- and HOOC-functionalized mesoporous silica (300 A, FMS) respectively. The specific activity of GOX entrapped in FMS increased with decreasing P{sub LD}. With decreasing P{sub LD}, I{sub e} of GOX in FMS increased from<35% to>150%. Unlike GOX, OPH in HOOC-FMS showed increased specific activity with increasing P{sub LD}. With increasing P{sub LD}, the corresponding I{sub e} of OPH in FMS increased from 100% to>200%. A protein structure-based analysis of the protein surface charges directing the electrostatic interaction-based orientation of the protein molecules in FMS demonstrates that substrate access to GOX molecules in FMS is limited at high P{sub LD}, consequently lowering the GOX specific activity. In contrast, substrate access to OPH molecules in FMS remains open at high P{sub LD} and may promote a more favorable confinement environment that enhances the OPH activity.

  14. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kim

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD. However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up.

  15. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven; Feinberg, Benjamin; Kant, Rishi; Chui, Benjamin; Goldman, Ken; Park, Jaehyun; Moses, Willieford; Blaha, Charles; Iqbal, Zohora; Chow, Clarence; Wright, Nathan; Fissell, William H; Zydney, Andrew; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD). However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up. PMID:27438878

  16. Multistep protein unfolding during nanopore translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-04-01

    Cells are divided into compartments and separated from the environment by lipid bilayer membranes. Essential molecules are transported back and forth across the membranes. We have investigated how folded proteins use narrow transmembrane pores to move between compartments. During this process, the proteins must unfold. To examine co-translocational unfolding of individual molecules, we tagged protein substrates with oligonucleotides to enable potential-driven unidirectional movement through a model protein nanopore, a process that differs fundamentally from extension during force spectroscopy measurements. Our findings support a four-step translocation mechanism for model thioredoxin substrates. First, the DNA tag is captured by the pore. Second, the oligonucleotide is pulled through the pore, causing local unfolding of the C terminus of the thioredoxin adjacent to the pore entrance. Third, the remainder of the protein unfolds spontaneously. Finally, the unfolded polypeptide diffuses through the pore into the recipient compartment. The unfolding pathway elucidated here differs from those revealed by denaturation experiments in solution, for which two-state mechanisms have been proposed.

  17. Biodegradable nanoporous nanoparticles for human serum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern medicine and biology search for new powerful tool for biomarkers discovery, appears one of the most promising approaches for early cancer diagnosis. Nowadays, the low molecular weight fraction of human serum is the most informative source of biomarkers, but their study and identification are very difficult due to the incredible complexity of the raw human serum. In this work we describe a novel tool for the filtration of crude human serum or other bio-fluid based on water soluble nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a pore size of about 2-3 nm, and diameters of 200 nm were obtained by ultrasonication of nanoporous silicon. The porous nanoparticles act as a nanosieve able to exclusively harvest the low molecular weight fraction of the fluid thanks to a controllable pore size. After a short incubation, the infiltrated nanosieves can be extracted from the starting fluid by means of centrifugation, and dissolved in water in a few minutes to give the captured molecules back in their native state, without degradation and contamination. The raw fluid is so split in two components of high and low molecular weight, that are both available for further analyses with any other investigation technique. Here, fluorescence spectroscopy, 2D-gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry are exploited to show the split of different bio-fluids under physiological condition. A cut-off (or split level) of 13 kDa is demonstrated also for human serum.

  18. Environmental Green Chemistry Applications of Nanoporous Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, J.; Garcia, A; Poon, P

    2010-01-01

    Influence of surface properties of nanoporous carbons on activity and selectivity during the photooxidation of 4-chlorophenol on UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} was performed. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy confirm the presence of a contact interface between both solids and suggest the coordination of some functional organic groups of the carbon surface, mainly ethers and carboxylic acids, to metallic centre Ti{sup +4} in TiO{sub 2}. Changes in surface pH of carbons from basic to neutral or acid remarkably increase the production of 4-chlorocathecol by a factor of 22 on TiO{sub 2}-Carbon in comparison of TiO{sub 2} alone. A scheme of interaction between TiO{sub 2} and carbon is proposed to the increased photoactivity of TiO{sub 2} and a reaction mechanism for the different intermediate products detected is also proposed. Results showed that TiO{sub 2}-Carbon can be used as an alternative photocatalyst for environmental green chemistry and selective organic synthesis applications.

  19. Enzyme specific activity in functionalized nanoporous supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we reveal that enzyme specific activity can be increased substantially by changing the protein loading density (PLD) in functionalized nanoporous supports so that the enzyme immobilization efficiency (Ie, defined as the ratio of the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme to the specific activity of the free enzyme in solution) can be much higher than 100%. A net negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOX) and a net positively charged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were entrapped spontaneously in NH2- and HOOC-functionalized mesoporous silica (300 A, FMS) respectively. The specific activity of GOX entrapped in FMS increased with decreasing PLD. With decreasing PLD, Ie of GOX in FMS increased from150%. Unlike GOX, OPH in HOOC-FMS showed increased specific activity with increasing PLD. With increasing PLD, the corresponding Ie of OPH in FMS increased from 100% to>200%. A protein structure-based analysis of the protein surface charges directing the electrostatic interaction-based orientation of the protein molecules in FMS demonstrates that substrate access to GOX molecules in FMS is limited at high PLD, consequently lowering the GOX specific activity. In contrast, substrate access to OPH molecules in FMS remains open at high PLD and may promote a more favorable confinement environment that enhances the OPH activity

  20. Diffusive Silicon Nanopore Membranes for Hemodialysis Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Steven; Feinberg, Benjamin; Kant, Rishi; Chui, Benjamin; Goldman, Ken; Park, Jaehyun; Moses, Willieford; Blaha, Charles; Iqbal, Zohora; Chow, Clarence; Wright, Nathan; Fissell, William H.; Zydney, Andrew; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis using hollow-fiber membranes provides life-sustaining treatment for nearly 2 million patients worldwide with end stage renal disease (ESRD). However, patients on hemodialysis have worse long-term outcomes compared to kidney transplant or other chronic illnesses. Additionally, the underlying membrane technology of polymer hollow-fiber membranes has not fundamentally changed in over four decades. Therefore, we have proposed a fundamentally different approach using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques to create thin-flat sheets of silicon-based membranes for implantable or portable hemodialysis applications. The silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) have biomimetic slit-pore geometry and uniform pores size distribution that allow for exceptional permeability and selectivity. A quantitative diffusion model identified structural limits to diffusive solute transport and motivated a new microfabrication technique to create SNM with enhanced diffusive transport. We performed in vitro testing and extracorporeal testing in pigs on prototype membranes with an effective surface area of 2.52 cm2 and 2.02 cm2, respectively. The diffusive clearance was a two-fold improvement in with the new microfabrication technique and was consistent with our mathematical model. These results establish the feasibility of using SNM for hemodialysis applications with additional scale-up. PMID:27438878

  1. Mass loss and chemical structures of wheat and maize straws in response to ultraviolet-B radiation and soil contact

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Guixiang; Zhang, Jiabao; Mao, Jingdong; Zhang, Congzhi; Chen, Lin; Xin, Xiuli; Zhao, Bingzi

    2015-01-01

    The role of photodegradation, an abiotic process, has been largely overlooked during straw decomposition in mesic ecosystems. We investigated the mass loss and chemical structures of straw decomposition in response to elevated UV-B radiation with or without soil contact over a 12-month litterbag experiment. Wheat and maize straw samples with and without soil contact were exposed to three radiation levels: a no-sunlight control, ambient solar UV-B, and artificially elevated UV-B radiation. A b...

  2. Fabrication of symmetric sub-5 nm nanopores using focused ion and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanopores fabricated in solid-state membranes have previously been used for the rapid electrical detection and characterization of single biopolymer molecules. Various methods for producing solid-state nanopores have been reported, but fabricating nanopores of desired sizes controllably is still challenging. Here we report a fabrication technique which uses a focused ion beam (FIB) system to engineer nanopores precisely. This technique provides visual feedback over the formation process. The present method can produce highly symmetrical nanopores with diameters smaller than ∼5 nm and can be used to create an array of multiple nanopores simultaneously. In addition, nanopores produced using the focused ion beam sculpting technique can be tailored down to less than 1 nm in diameter using high-energy electron radiation

  3. Electrochemical protection of thin film electrodes in solid state nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid state nanopores are a core element of next-generation single molecule tools in the field of nano-biotechnology. Thin film electrodes integrated into a pore can interact with charges and fields within the pore. In order to keep the nanopore open and thus functional electrochemically induced surface alteration of electrode surfaces and bubble formation inside the pore have to be eliminated. This paper provides electrochemical analyses of nanopores drilled into TiN membranes which in turn were employed as thin film electrodes. We studied physical pore integrity and the occurrence of water decomposition yielding bubble formation inside pores by applying voltages between - 4.5 and + 4.5 V to membranes in various protection stages continuously for up to 24 h. During potential application pores were exposed to selected electrolyte-solvent systems. We have investigated and successfully eliminated electrochemical pore oxidation and reduction as well as water decomposition inside nanopores of various diameters ranging from 3.5 to 25 nm in 50 nm thick TiN membranes by passivating the nanopores with a plasma-oxidized layer and using a 90% solution of glycerol in water as KCl solvent. Nanopore ionic conductances were measured before and after voltage application in order to test for changes in pore diameter due to electrochemical oxidation or reduction. TEM imaging was used to confirm these observations. While non-passivated pores were electrochemically oxidized, neither electrochemical oxidation nor reduction was observed for passivated pores. Bubble formation through water decomposition could be detected in non-passivated pores in KCl/water solutions but was not observed in 90% glycerol solutions. The use of a protective self-assembled monolayer of hexadecylphosphonic acid (HDPA) was also investigated.

  4. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plant-soil systems: Plant responses to a chemical stress in the root zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoylman, A.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Ecology; Walton, B.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under laboratory conditions selected to maximize root uptake, plant tissue distribution of PAH-derived {sup 14}C was largely limited to root tissue of Malilotus alba. These results suggest that plant uptake of PAHs from contaminated soil via roots, and translocation to aboveground plant tissues (stems and leaves), is a limited mechanism for transport into terrestrial food chains. However, these data also indicate that root surface sorption of PAHs may be important for plants grown in soils containing elevated concentration PAHs. Root surface sorption of PAHs may be an important route of exposure for plants in soils containing elevated concentrations of PAHS. Consequently, the root-soil interface may be the site of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. In this study, evidence of a shift in carbon allocation to the root zone of plants exposed to phenanthrene and corresponding increases in soil respiration and heterotrophic plate counts provide evidence of a plant-microbial response to a chemical stress. The results of this study establish the importance of the root-soil interface for plants growing in PAH contaminated soil and indicate the existence of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. These results may provide new avenues of inquiry for studies of plant toxicology, plant-microbial interactions in the rhizosphere, and environmental fates of soil contaminants. In addition, the utilization of plants to enhance the biodegradation of soil contaminants may require evaluation of plant physiological changes and plant shifts in resource allocation.

  5. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended

  6. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  7. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels. PMID:27019385

  8. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be achieved by modulating the nanopores under tensile strain. The water permeability can be improved by two orders of magnitude compared to RO membranes, which offers a promising approach to the global water shortage solution.

  9. Physisorption of SDS in a Hydrocarbon Nanoporous Polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Wang, Yanwei; Vigild, Martin Etchells;

    2010-01-01

    (XPS). The SDS adsorption isotherm can be well described by the Langmuir model, consistent with a monolayer adsorption onto the pore walls. The surface modified by the surfactant clearly showed water wettability, in contrast to the original hydrophobic nanoporous 1,2-PB. We also looked at the release...... process of SDS out of the nanopores in the presence of excess of water or methanol. A discussion of the very different time scales of release in the two media is presented at the end of the paper....

  10. Direct laser writing for nanoporous liquid core laser sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Peterson, Jeffrey;

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous liquid core lasers via direct laser writing based on two-photon absorption in combination with thiolene-chemistry. As gain medium Rhodamine 6G was embedded in the nanoporous polybutadiene matrix. The lasing devices with thresholds of 19 µJ/mm2 were measured...... to have bulk refractive index sensitivities of 169 nm/RIU at a laser wavelength of 600 nm, demonstrating strongly increased overlap of the modes with the analyte in comparison to solid state evanescent wave sensors....

  11. Coarsening by network restructuring in model nanoporous gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using atomistic modeling, we show that restructuring of the network of interconnected ligaments causes coarsening in a model of nanoporous gold. The restructuring arises from the collapse of some ligaments onto neighboring ones and is enabled by localized plasticity at ligaments and nodes. This mechanism may explain the occurrence of enclosed voids and reduction in volume in nanoporous metals during their synthesis. An expression is developed for the critical ligament radius below which coarsening by network restructuring may occur spontaneously, setting a lower limit to the ligament dimensions of nanofoams.

  12. Nanoporous Ag and Pd foam: Redox induced fabrication using electrochemically deposited nanoporous Cu foam with no need to any additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, rapid and green method for fabrication of nanoporous metal (Ag and Pd) foams using electrochemically deposited nanoporous copper foam is presented. Ideally direct electrochemical formation of Ag and Pd foam structures without any additive reagent does not lead to a desired result; however, indirect fabrication starting from electrochemically fabricated Cu foam seems promising. Highly porous copper foam is fabricated electrochemically at a copper sheet and in turn serves as a hard template and a redox inducer for the deposition of Ag or Pd. The redox induced replacement of copper foam with Ag or Pd is done via simple immersion of as-fabricated nanoporous copper foam in cation aqueous solutions of Ag or Pd. The surface morphology of the as-fabricated foam is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX and X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen evolution reaction is investigated as an example to demonstrate the electrocatalytic ability of as-fabricated foams.

  13. Theoretical analysis of selectivity mechanisms in molecular transport through channels and nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selectivity is one of the most fundamental concepts in natural sciences, and it is also critically important in various technological, industrial, and medical applications. Although there are many experimental methods that allow to separate molecules, frequently they are expensive and not efficient. Recently, a new method of separation of chemical mixtures based on utilization of channels and nanopores has been proposed and successfully tested in several systems. However, mechanisms of selectivity in the molecular transport during the translocation are still not well understood. Here, we develop a simple theoretical approach to explain the origin of selectivity in molecular fluxes through channels. Our method utilizes discrete-state stochastic models that take into account all relevant chemical transitions and can be solved analytically. More specifically, we analyze channels with one and two binding sites employed for separating mixtures of two types of molecules. The effects of the symmetry and the strength of the molecular-pore interactions are examined. It is found that for one-site binding channels, the differences in the strength of interactions for two species drive the separation. At the same time, in more realistic two-site systems, the symmetry of interaction potential becomes also important. The most efficient separation is predicted when the specific binding site is located near the entrance to the nanopore. In addition, the selectivity is higher for large entrance rates into the channel. It is also found that the molecular transport is more selective for repulsive interactions than for attractive interactions. The physical-chemical origin of the observed phenomena is discussed

  14. Theoretical analysis of selectivity mechanisms in molecular transport through channels and nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-01-01

    Selectivity is one of the most fundamental concepts in natural sciences, and it is also critically important in various technological, industrial, and medical applications. Although there are many experimental methods that allow to separate molecules, frequently they are expensive and not efficient. Recently, a new method of separation of chemical mixtures based on utilization of channels and nanopores has been proposed and successfully tested in several systems. However, mechanisms of selectivity in the molecular transport during the translocation are still not well understood. Here, we develop a simple theoretical approach to explain the origin of selectivity in molecular fluxes through channels. Our method utilizes discrete-state stochastic models that take into account all relevant chemical transitions and can be solved analytically. More specifically, we analyze channels with one and two binding sites employed for separating mixtures of two types of molecules. The effects of the symmetry and the strength of the molecular-pore interactions are examined. It is found that for one-site binding channels, the differences in the strength of interactions for two species drive the separation. At the same time, in more realistic two-site systems, the symmetry of interaction potential becomes also important. The most efficient separation is predicted when the specific binding site is located near the entrance to the nanopore. In addition, the selectivity is higher for large entrance rates into the channel. It is also found that the molecular transport is more selective for repulsive interactions than for attractive interactions. The physical-chemical origin of the observed phenomena is discussed.

  15. Formation of highly adherent nano-porous alumina on Ti-based substrates: a novel bone implant coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, E P; Walpole, A R; Wilshaw, P R; Karlsson, M; Pålsgård, E

    2004-09-01

    Thin, nano-porous, highly adherent layers of anodised aluminium formed on the surface of titanium alloys are being developed as coatings for metallic surgical implants. The layers are formed by anodisation of a 1-5 microm thick layer of aluminium which has been deposited on substrate material by electron beam evaporation. The surface ceramic layer so produced is alumina with 6-8 wt % phosphate ions and contains approximately 5 x 10(8) cm(-2) pores with a approximately 160 nm average diameter, running perpendicular to the surface. Mechanical testing showed the coatings' shear and tensile strength to be at least 20 and 10 MPa, respectively. Initial cell/material studies show promising cellular response to the nano-porous alumina. A normal osteoblastic growth pattern with cell number increasing from day 1 to 21 was shown, with slightly higher proliferative activity on the nano-porous alumina compared to the Thermanox control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the cells on the porous alumina membrane showed normal osteoblast morphology. Flattened cells with filopodia attaching to the pores and good coverage were also observed. In addition, the pore structure produced in these ceramic coatings is expected to be suitable for loading with bioactive material to enhance further their biological properties. PMID:15448410

  16. The chemical-in-plug bacterial chemotaxis assay is prone to false positive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Mandy J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical-in-plug assays are commonly used to study bacterial chemotaxis, sometimes in the absence of stringent controls. Results We report that non-chemotactic and non-motile mutants in two distinct bacterial species (Shewanella oneidensis and Helicobacter pylori show apparent zones of accumulation or clearing around test plugs containing potential attractants or repellents, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that the chemical-in-plug assay should be used with caution, that non-motile or non-chemotactic mutants should be employed as controls, and that results should be confirmed with other types of assays.

  17. Distribution of Fish in the Upper Citarum River: an Adaptive Response to Physico-Chemical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    SUNARDI; KEUKEU KANIAWATI; TEGUH HUSODO; DESAK MADE MALINI; ANNISA JOVIANI ASTARI

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of fish in river is controlled by physico-chemical properties of the water which is affected by land-use complexity and intensity of human intervention. A study on fish distribution was carried out in the upper Citarum River to map the effects of physio-chemical properties on habitat use. A survey was conducted to collect fish and to measure the water quality both on dry and rainy season. The result showed that distribution of the fish, in general, represented their adaptive resp...

  18. ADAPTATION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL BIOFILM COMMUNITIES IN RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL STRESSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of this work will help improve our understanding of how subsurface biofilm communities respond to chemical stressors that are likely to be present at hazardous waste sites. Ultimately, these results can be used to determine more effective ways to insure proper envir...

  19. An orthologous transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related chemicals in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides are structurally diverse chemicals that inhibit plant-specific targets, however their off-target and potentially differentiating side-effects are less well defined. In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix AtH1 arrays was used to identify dis...

  20. Most oxidative stress response in water samples comes from unknown chemicals: the need for effect-based water quality trigger values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; van Daele, Charlotte; Dutt, Mriga; Tang, Janet Y M; Altenburger, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    The induction of adaptive stress response pathways is an early and sensitive indicator of the presence of chemical and non-chemical stressors in cells. An important stress response is the Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway where electrophilic chemicals or chemicals that cause the formation of reactive oxygen species initiate the production of antioxidants and metabolic detoxification enzymes. The AREc32 cell line is sensitive to chemicals inducing oxidative stress and has been previously applied for water quality monitoring of organic micropollutants and disinfection byproducts. Here we propose an algorithm for the derivation of effect-based water quality trigger values for this end point that is based on the combined effects of mixtures of regulated chemicals. Mixture experiments agreed with predictions by the mixture toxicity concept of concentration addition. The responses in the AREc32 and the concentrations of 269 individual chemicals were quantified in nine environmental samples, ranging from treated effluent, recycled water, stormwater to drinking water. The effects of the detected chemicals could explain less than 0.1% of the observed induction of the oxidative stress response in the sample, affirming the need to use effect-based trigger values that account for all chemicals present. PMID:23432033

  1. Transient Chemical Denudation Rates in Soils and Saprolites: Responses to Channel Incision in Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, B. A.; Yoo, K.; Mudd, S. M.; Hurst, M. D.; Maher, K.

    2012-12-01

    Here we explore soil and saprolite weathering along a denudation gradient (~40-400 mm kyr-1) in the Feather River catchment of northwestern California. By comparing the geochemical differences in soils and saprolites along three hillslopes--located above, at, and below a knickpoint--we can discern the impact of a propagating incision signal on the geochemical evolution of the catchment's saprolites and soil. Specifically, we couple mass balance geochemistry with soil and saprolite turnover times to determine rates of chemical weathering of soils and saprolites at the hillslope scale. Soil turnover time was determined by dividing the average soil thickness (L) with the rate of denudation (LT-1). For the catchment scale, we used 10Be-based denudation rates (Riebe et al., 2001; Hurst et al., 2012). For hilltops where accelerated channel incision signal has not yet reached, LiDAR-based hilltop curvature is used for calculating total denudation rates (Hurst et al., 2012). Lastly, for the steepest hillslope base adjacent to channels, we used a nonlinear slope-dependent sediment transport law to estimate denudation (Roering et al., 2007). Turnover times, soil bulk density, and elemental chemistry were then used to estimate the rates of chemical weathering (ML-2T-1) experienced in the soils and saprolites. Our results indicate that, for transient landscapes, both hilltop curvature and the bottom-most slope should be used to capture a range of chemical denudation occurring along adjusting hillslopes. This is because soils and saprolites are undergoing variable rates of physical and chemical denudation along a single hillform: total chemical denudation (of both soils and saprolites) tends to be ~4x's larger at the bottommost part of the hillslope, nearest to the channel. Along the denudation gradient, soils along steeper hillslopes are chemically denuding faster than more gently sloped hillslopes, at rates of ~50 vs. 10t/km2/yr, respectively. Overall, our analysis suggests

  2. Dynamic Control of Nanopore Wetting in Water and Saline Solutions under an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzo, Davide; Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2015-07-23

    Field-induced nanopore wetting by aqueous solutions, including electrolytes, provides opportunities for a variety of applications. Conflicting porosity requirements have so far precluded direct implementations of a two-way control: the pores have to be sufficiently wide to allow water infiltration at experimentally relevant voltages but should not exceed the kinetic threshold for spontaneous expulsion in the absence of the field. Applicable widths are restricted below a few nanometers. Only a narrow window of fields and pore geometries can simultaneously satisfy both of the above requirements. Accurate accounts of wetting equilibria and dynamics at nanoscale porosity require molecular level descriptions. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to study dynamic, field-controlled transitions between nanoconfined liquid and vapor phases in contact with an unperturbed aqueous or electrolyte environment. In nanopores wetted by electrolyte solutions, we observe depletion of salt compared to the bulk phase. The application of a local electric field enhances the uptake of water and ions in the confinement. In systems prone to capillary evaporation, the process can be reversed at sufficient strength of the electric field. For alternating displacement field, we identify the conditions where O (ns) responses of the reversible infiltration/expulsion cycle can be secured for experimentally realizable field strengths, porosity, and salinity of the solution. PMID:25184307

  3. Plasma membrane nanoporation as a possible mechanism behind infrared excitation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Hope T.; Tolstykh, Gleb P.; Musick, Joshua D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses have been used to stimulate action potentials in neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon has remained elusive. In vitro studies have found that pulsed IR exposure generates a nearly instant change in capacitance in the plasma membrane, characterized by inward rectification, a common feature in pore-forming exposures, such as electrical pulses and acoustic shock waves. Based on this similarity, we hypothesize that the mechanism of IR stimulation is the formation of short-lived nanopores in the plasma membrane. These transient, small-diameter pores allow the influx of extracellular ions that lead to action potential generation, possibly through activation of secondary messenger pathways or depolarization of the cell membrane resulting in activation of voltage-gated ion channels. Approach. A variety of fluorescent markers are used to observe the cell response to IR stimulation to monitor for effects indicative of nanoporation in other modalities. Main results. We observe rapid, transient rises in intracellular Ca2+, influx of YO-PRO-1 and propidium iodide into the cell signifying membrane permeabilization, cellular blebbing and swelling, and activation of the intracellular phosphoinositides lipid signaling pathway. Significance. This conclusion better explains the experimental observations and limitations of IR-induced neurological stimulation and represents a distinct theoretical shift in the understanding of the mechanism of IR-induced stimulation.

  4. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3) and sp3/sp2+sp2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp3/sp2+sp3 bonding fractions

  5. Nanoporous copper oxide ribbon assembly of free-standing nanoneedles as biosensors for glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shaodong; Sun, Yuexia; Chen, Anran; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Yang, Zhimao

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by a sequential hydrolysis-precipitation mechanism, morphology-controllable hierarchical cupric oxide (CuO) nanostructures are facilely fabricated by a green water/ethanol solution-phase transformation of Cu(x)(OH)(2x-2)(SO4) precursors in the absence of any organic capping agents and without annealing treatment in air. Antlerite Cu3(OH)4(SO4) precursors formed in a low volume ratio between water and ethanol can transform into a two-dimensional (2D) hierarchical nanoporous CuO ribbon assembly of free-standing nanoneedle building blocks and hierarchical nanoneedle-aggregated CuO flowers. Brochantite Cu4(OH)6(SO4) precursors formed in a high volume ratio between water and ethanol can transform into hierarchical nanoplate-aggregated CuO nanoribbons and nanoflowers. Such 2D hierarchical nanoporous CuO ribbons serving as a promising electrode material for nonenzymatic glucose detection show high sensitivity, a low detection limit, fast amperometric response and good selectivity. Significantly, this green water-induced precursor-hydrolysis method might be used to control effectively the growth of other metal oxide micro-/nanostructures. PMID:26057132

  6. Field Trial Assessment of Biological, Chemical, and Physical Responses of Soil to Tillage Intensity, Fertilization, and Grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Gil, Silvina; Becker, Analia; Oddino, Claudio; Zuza, Mónica; Marinelli, Adriana; March, Guillermo

    2009-08-01

    Soil microbial populations can fluctuate in response to environmental changes and, therefore, are often used as biological indicators of soil quality. Soil chemical and physical parameters can also be used as indicators because they can vary in response to different management strategies. A long-term field trial was conducted to study the effects of different tillage systems (NT: no tillage, DH: disc harrow, and MP: moldboard plough), P fertilization (diammonium phosphate), and cattle grazing (in terms of crop residue consumption) in maize ( Zea mays L.), sunflower ( Heliantus annuus L.), and soybean ( Glycine max L.) on soil biological, chemical, and physical parameters. The field trial was conducted for four crop years (2000/2001, 2001/2002, 2002/2003, and 2003/2004). Soil populations of Actinomycetes, Trichoderma spp., and Gliocladium spp. were 49% higher under conservation tillage systems, in soil amended with diammonium phosphate (DAP) and not previously grazed. Management practices also influenced soil chemical parameters, especially organic matter content and total N, which were 10% and 55% higher under NT than under MP. Aggregate stability was 61% higher in NT than in MP, 15% higher in P-fertilized soil, and also 9% higher in not grazed strips, bulk density being 12% lower in NT systems compared with MP. DAP application and the absence of grazing also reduced bulk density (3%). Using conservation tillage systems, fertilizing crops with DAP, and avoiding grazing contribute to soil health preservation and enhanced crop production.

  7. Electrochemical Reaction in Single Layer MoS2: Nanopores Opened Atom by Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, J; Liu, K; Graf, M; Lihter, M; Bulushev, R D; Dumcenco, D; Alexander, D T L; Krasnozhon, D; Vuletic, T; Kis, A; Radenovic, A

    2015-05-13

    Ultrathin nanopore membranes based on 2D materials have demonstrated ultimate resolution toward DNA sequencing. Among them, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows long-term stability as well as superior sensitivity enabling high throughput performance. The traditional method of fabricating nanopores with nanometer precision is based on the use of focused electron beams in transmission electron microscope (TEM). This nanopore fabrication process is time-consuming, expensive, not scalable, and hard to control below 1 nm. Here, we exploited the electrochemical activity of MoS2 and developed a convenient and scalable method to controllably make nanopores in single-layer MoS2 with subnanometer precision using electrochemical reaction (ECR). The electrochemical reaction on the surface of single-layer MoS2 is initiated at the location of defects or single atom vacancy, followed by the successive removals of individual atoms or unit cells from single-layer MoS2 lattice and finally formation of a nanopore. Step-like features in the ionic current through the growing nanopore provide direct feedback on the nanopore size inferred from a widely used conductance vs pore size model. Furthermore, DNA translocations can be detected in situ when as-fabricated MoS2 nanopores are used. The atomic resolution and accessibility of this approach paves the way for mass production of nanopores in 2D membranes for potential solid-state nanopore sequencing. PMID:25928894

  8. From Block Copolymers to Nano-porous Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigild, Martin Etchells; Ndoni, Sokol; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative etching of the polydimethylsiloxane block in a series of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-PDMS) block copolymers is reported. Reacting the block copolymer with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) renders a nanoporous material with the remaining PS maintaining the original morphology...

  9. Ergodicity of a single particle confined in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, S.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Frascolli, F.; Todd, Billy; Dettmann, Carl

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a gas particle moving through a nanopore of adjustable width with particular emphasis on ergodicity. We give a measure of the portion of phase space that is characterized by quasiperiodic trajectories which break ergodicity. The interactions between particle and wall at...

  10. Decoding long nanopore sequencing reads of natural DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrew H; Derrington, Ian M; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Adey, Andrew; Nova, Ian C; Craig, Jonathan M; Langford, Kyle W; Samson, Jenny Mae; Daza, Riza; Doering, Kenji; Shendure, Jay; Gundlach, Jens H

    2014-08-01

    Nanopore sequencing of DNA is a single-molecule technique that may achieve long reads, low cost and high speed with minimal sample preparation and instrumentation. Here, we build on recent progress with respect to nanopore resolution and DNA control to interpret the procession of ion current levels observed during the translocation of DNA through the pore MspA. As approximately four nucleotides affect the ion current of each level, we measured the ion current corresponding to all 256 four-nucleotide combinations (quadromers). This quadromer map is highly predictive of ion current levels of previously unmeasured sequences derived from the bacteriophage phi X 174 genome. Furthermore, we show nanopore sequencing reads of phi X 174 up to 4,500 bases in length, which can be unambiguously aligned to the phi X 174 reference genome, and demonstrate proof-of-concept utility with respect to hybrid genome assembly and polymorphism detection. This work provides a foundation for nanopore sequencing of long, natural DNA strands. PMID:24964173

  11. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  12. Interaction of surfactants with hydrophobic surfaces in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumaru, Claudiu; Geng, Maxwell L

    2010-12-21

    Surfactant-induced wetting of hydrophobic nanopores is investigated. SDS micelles interact with the C18 layer on the nanopore walls with their hydrophobic tails, creating a charged wall lining with their head groups and inducing a breakthrough of the aqueous solution to wet the pores. The surface coverage of the surfactant molecules is evaluated electrophoretically. A surprising discovery is that pore wetting is achieved with 0.73 μmol/m(2) coverage of SDS surfactant, corresponding to only 18% of a monolayer on the walls of the nanopores. Clearly, the surfactant molecules cannot organize as a compact uninterrupted monolayer. Instead, formation of hemimicelles is thermodynamically favored. Modeling shows that, to be consistent with the experimental observations, the aggregation number of hemimicelles is lower than 25 and the size of hemimicelle is limited to a maximum radius of 11.7 Å. The hydrophobic tails of SDS thus penetrate into and intercalate with the C18 layer. The insight gained in the C18-surfactant interactions is essential in the surfactant-induced solubilization of hydrophobic nanoporous particles. The results have bearing on the understanding of the nature of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21043464

  13. Gate modulation of proton transport in a nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lanju; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Qian, Shizhi

    2016-03-01

    Proton transport in confined spaces plays a crucial role in many biological processes as well as in modern technological applications, such as fuel cells. To achieve active control of proton conductance, we investigate for the first time the gate modulation of proton transport in a pH-regulated nanopore by a multi-ion model. The model takes into account surface protonation/deprotonation reactions, surface curvature, electroosmotic flow, Stern layer, and electric double layer overlap. The proposed model is validated by good agreement with the existing experimental data on nanopore conductance with and without a gate voltage. The results show that the modulation of proton transport in a nanopore depends on the concentration of the background salt and solution pH. Without background salt, the gated nanopore exhibits an interesting ambipolar conductance behavior when pH is close to the isoelectric point of the dielectric pore material, and the net ionic and proton conductance can be actively regulated with a gate voltage as low as 1 V. The higher the background salt concentration, the lower is the performance of the gate control on the proton transport. PMID:26899280

  14. Design of nanoporous materials with optimal sorption capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2015-06-01

    Modern technological advances have enabled one to manufacture nanoporous materials with a prescribed pore structure. This raises a possibility of using controllable pore-scale parameters (e.g., pore size and connectivity) to design materials with desired macroscopic properties (e.g., diffusion coefficient and adsorption capacity). By relating these two scales, the homogenization theory (or other upscaling techniques) provides a means of guiding the experimental design. To demonstrate this approach, we consider a class of nanoporous materials whose pore space consists of nanotunnels interconnected by nanotube bridges. Such hierarchical nanoporous carbons with mesopores and micropores have shown high specific electric double layer capacitances and high rate capability in an organic electrolyte. We express the anisotropic diffusion coefficient and adsorption coefficient of such materials in terms of the tunnels' properties (pore radius and inter-pore throat width) and their connectivity (spacing between the adjacent tunnels and nanotube-bridge density). Our analysis is applicable for solutes that undergo a non-equilibrium Langmuir adsorption reaction on the surfaces of fluid-filled pores, but other homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions can be handled in a similar fashion. The presented results can be used to guide the design of nanoporous materials with optimal permeability and sorption capacity.

  15. Preparation and application of cellular and nanoporous carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Hoffmann, Claudia; Oschatz, Martin; Mammitzsch, Lars; Petasch, Uwe; Herrmann, Mathias; Kaskel, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    A tutorial review on cellular as well as nanoporous carbides covering their structure, synthesis and potential applications. Especially new carbide materials with a hierarchical pore structure are in focus. As a central theme silicon carbide based materials are picked out, but also titanium, tungsten and boron carbides, as well as carbide-derived carbons, are part of this review. PMID:22344324

  16. Improved oil recovery in nanopores: NanoIOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, James Moraes; Miranda, Caetano Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Fluid flow through minerals pores occurs in underground aquifers, oil and shale gas reservoirs. In this work, we explore water and oil flow through silica nanopores. Our objective is to model the displacement of water and oil through a nanopore to mimic the fluid infiltration on geological nanoporous media and the displacement of oil with and without previous contact with water by water flooding to emulate an improved oil recovery process at nanoscale (NanoIOR). We have observed a barrier-less infiltration of water and oil on the empty (vacuum) simulated 4 nm diameter nanopores. For the water displacement with oil, we have obtained a critical pressure of 600 atm for the oil infiltration, and after the flow was steady, a water layer was still adsorbed to the surface, thus, hindering the direct contact of the oil with the surface. In addition, oil displacement with water was assessed, with and without an adsorbed water layer (AWL). Without the AWL, the pressure needed for oil infiltration was 5000 atm, whereas, with the AWL the infiltration was observed for pressures as low as 10 atm. Hence, the infiltration is greatly affected by the AWL, significantly lowering the critical pressure for oil displacement. PMID:27319357

  17. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  18. Nanofluidic control by nanoporous materials using electrocapillary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yahui; Duan, Huiling; Markmann, Juergen; Huber, Patrick; Weissmueller, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    Electrocapillary techniques exhibit great advantages in nonmechanical electrofluidic manipulation, e.g., flow actuation in micro-/nano-channels. One issue of interest is the spontaneous imbibition of fluids in bodies with a nanoscale pores size. Contrary to previous studies we here use a metallic nanoporous body. This allows us to control the electrode potential at the solid-fluid interface. Nanoporous gold (NPG) with uniform pore- and ligament size of 45 nm was fabricated by dealloying an Ag75Au25 alloy. Spontaneous imbibition of aqueous electrolytes obeys the Lucas-Washburn law. Interestingly, the estimated tortuosity has the low value of 3.2 (3 is expected for an isotropic sponge). Electrocapillary effects were then used to manipulate the imbibition dynamics. As a result of the enhanced wetting by the electrocapillary effects, we observed an acceleration of the imbibition by 30%. When air as the pore fluid is replaced with cyclohexane, we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid-liquid interfacial tension. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for fluid/ionic transport render nanoporous gold a versatile, accurately controllable electrocapillary pump and flow sensor for minute amounts of liquids with exceptionally low operating voltages.

  19. Fabrication and properties of nanoporous GaN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanopore arrays with pore diameters of approximately 75 nm were fabricated in GaN films by inductively coupled plasma etching using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films as etch masks. Nanoporous AAO films were formed on the GaN surface by evaporating an Al film onto a GaN epilayer and subsequently anodizing the aluminum. To minimize plasma-induced damage, the template was exposed to CF4-based plasma conditions. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that the diameter and the periodicity of the nanopores in the GaN were directly transferred from the original anodic alumina template. The pore diameter in the AAO film can be easily controlled by tuning the anodization conditions. Atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and micro-Raman techniques were employed to assess the etched GaN nanopore surface. This cost-effective, nonlithographic method to produce nano-patterned GaN templates is expected to be useful for growth and fabrication of nitride-based nanostructures and photonic band gap materials

  20. Аnodic formation of nanoporous crystalline niobium oxide

    OpenAIRE

    LEONID SKATKOV; LARISA LYASHOK; VALERIY GOMOZOV; IRINA TOKAREVА; BORIS ВAYRACHNIY

    2014-01-01

    The research results of anodic deposition of crystalline niobium oxide are presented in this work. The factors that have an impact on crystalline phase nucleation and its primary growth are revealed. Dependence of morphology and properties of nanoporous niobium oxide on modes of its formation is shown.