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Sample records for chemically induced tumors

  1. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  2. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  3. H-2 restriction of the T cell response to chemically induced tumors: evidence from F1 → parent chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been well established that T cells that react to tumor antigen on virus-induced tumors must share H-2D or H-2K specificities with the tumor. It has been impossible to perform similar studies with chemically induced tumors because each chemically induced tumor expresses a unique tumor antigen that cannot be studied in association with other H-2 types. This study provies evidence that H-2 recognition is also necessary for recognition of chemically induced tumors. We have found that F1 → parent chimeras preferentially recognize chemically induced tumors of parental H-2 type. C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice were lethally irradiated and restored with (C3H x C57BL/6) F1 hybrid bone marrow. The F1 → C3H chimera but not the F1 → C57BL/6 chimera was able to respond to a C3H fibrosarcoma in mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell culture and also to neutralize the tumor in an in vivo tumor neutralization assay. On the other hand, the F1 → C57BL/6 chimera but not the F1 → C3H chimera was able to kill the C57BL/6 lymphoma EL4 in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Both chimeras were tolerant to C3H and C57BL/6 alloantigens but could respond normally to Con A and to BALB/c spleen cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures and cytotoxicity assay

  4. Overexpression and amplification of the c-myc gene in mouse tumors induced by chemical and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined expression of the c-myc gene by the dot blot hybridization of total cellular RNA from mouse primary tumors induced by chemicals and radiations. Expression of the c-myc gene was found to be elevated in 69 cases among 177 independently induced tumors of 12 different types. DNA from tumors overexpressing the myc gene was analyzed by Southern blotting. No case of rearrangement was detected. However, amplification of the c-myc gene was found in 7 cases of primary sarcomas. These included 4 cases out of 24 methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas and 3 cases out of 7 α-tocopherol-induced sacromas. We also analyzed 8 cases of sarcomas induced by radiations, but could not find changes in the gene structure of the c-myc gene. Thus, our data indicate tumor type specificity and agent specificity of c-myc gene amplification. (author)

  5. Modulatory influence of Phyllanthus niruri on oxidative stress, antioxidant defense and chemically induced skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Verma, Preeti; Goyal, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluates the modulatory potential of Phyllanthus niruri on chemically induced skin carcinogenesis, and its influence on oxidative stress and the antioxidant defense system. Oral administration of P. niruri extract (PNE), during peri- (Gr. III), post- (Gr. IV), or peri- and post- (Gr. V) initiational stages of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a) anthracene (DMBA)-croton oil–induced papillomagenesis considerably reduced tumor burden to 4.20, 4.00, and 3.33(positive control value 6.20); cumulative number of papillomas to 21, 16, and 10, respectively, (positive control value 62); and incidence of mice bearing papillomas to 50, 40, and 30%, respectively (positive control value 100%), but significantly increased the average latent period to 10.14, 10.62, and 11.60, and inhibition of tumor multiplicity to 66, 74,and 83%, respectively. Enzyme analysis of skin and liver showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05, ≤ 0.01, ≤ 0.001) elevation in antioxidant parameters such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, and vitamin C in PNE-treated groups (Gr. III–V) when compared with the carcinogen-treated control (Gr. II). The elevated level of lipid peroxidation in the carcinogen-treated positive control group was significantly (p ≤ 0.05, ≤ 0.01, ≤ 0.001) inhibited by PNE administration. These results indicate that P. niruri extract has potentiality to reduce skin papillomas by enhancing antioxidant defense system. PMID:21609315

  6. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  7. Targeted expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL in skin protects mice against chemical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gronemeyer Hinrich

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene ablation studies have revealed that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, Apo2L, TNFSF10 plays a crucial role in tumor surveillance, as TRAIL-deficient mice exhibit an increased sensitivity to different types of tumorigenesis. In contrast, possible tumor-protective effect of increased levels of endogenous TRAIL expression in vivo has not been assessed yet. Such models will provide important information about the efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies and potential toxicity in specific tissues. Methods To this aim, we engineered transgenic mice selectively expressing TRAIL in the skin and subjected these mice to a two-step chemical carcinogenesis protocol that generated benign and preneoplastic lesions. We were therefore able to study the effect of increased TRAIL expression at the early steps of skin tumorigenesis. Results Our results showed a delay of tumor appearance in TRAIL expressing mice compared to their wild-type littermates. More importantly, the number of tumors observed in transgenic animals was significantly lower than in the control animals, and the lesions observed were mostly benign. Interestingly, Wnt/β-catenin signaling differed between tumors of wild-type and TRAIL transgenics. Conclusion Altogether, these data reveal that, at least in this model, TRAIL is able on its own to act on pre-transformed cells, and reduce their tumorigenic potential.

  8. The phytoestrogenic Cyclopia extract, SM6Met, increases median tumor free survival and reduces tumor mass and volume in chemically induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Koch; Zierau, Oliver; Macejová, Dana; Goerl, Florian; Muders, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B; Vollmer, Günter; Louw, Ann

    2016-10-01

    SM6Met, a phytoestrogenic extract of Cyclopia subternata indigenous to the Western Cape province of South Africa, displays estrogenic attributes with potential for breast cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we report that SM6Met, in the presence of estradiol, induces a significant cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, in the N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis model, SM6Met increases tumor latency by 7days and median tumor free survival by 42 days, while decreasing palpable tumor frequency by 32%, tumor mass by 40%, and tumor volume by 53%. Therefore, the current study provides proof of concept that SM6Met has definite potential as a chemopreventative agent against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:27142456

  9. Anti-tumor activity of Phyllanthus niruri (a medicinal plant) on chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Priyanka; Goyal, P K

    2009-01-01

    Chemoprevention is an important strategy to control the process of carcinogenesis. The potential of using medicinal herbs as cancer chemopreventive nutraceuticals and functional food is promising. Thus, there is a need for exploring drugs/agents which act as chemopreventive agents. Phyllanthus niruri is a well known medicinal plant which has been used in Ayurvedic medicine as hepatoprotective, antiviral, antibacterial, analgesic, antispasmodic and antidiabetic. The present study was carried out to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of a hydro-alcoholic extract of the whole plant, in 7-9 week old male Swiss albino mice, on the two stage process of skin carcinogenesis induced by a single topical application of 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a)anthracene (100 microg/100 microl acetone) and two weeks later promoted by repeated application of croton oil (1% in acetone/three times a week) till the end of experiment (16 weeks). The oral administration of P. niruri at a dose of 1000 mg/kg/b.wt. at peri- (i.e. 7 days before and 7 days after DMBA application) and post- (i.e. starting from the croton oil application) initiational phase of papillomagenesis caused significant reduction in tumor incidence, tumor yield, tumor burden and cumulative number of papillomas as compared to carcinogen-treated controls. Furthermore, the average latent period was significantly increased in the PNE treated group. The results thus suggest that P. niruri extract exhibits significant anti-tumor activity, which supports the traditional medicinal utilization of this plant. PMID:20192590

  10. Effects of selenium and vitamin B-6 on growth of chemically- induced transplanted tumors in BALB/c inbred mice

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Stephanie A.

    1989-01-01

    Male weanling inbred, mice were inoculated with fibrosarcoma cells (hindquarter) originally produced by 2-methylcholanthrene. Before inoculation, mice were randomly divided into three groups of 24 and one of 12 (control). After a one week acclimation period, each group was fed a diet containing either suboptimal vitamin B-6, 0.5 mg/kg diet; adequate, 7.0 mg/kg diet; or excess, 100 mg/kg diet. Controls were fed the adequate vitamin. B-6 diet. Twenty-four hours after tumor cell inocula...

  11. The Possible Effect Of Tamoxifen Vs Whole Body Irradiation Treatment On Thyroid Hormones in Female Rats Bearing Mammary Tumors Chemically Induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in most developed and developing regions of the world. In women, this drug has tissuespecific effects, acting as an estrogen antagonist on the breast, and as an estrogen agonist on bone, lipid metabolism (increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and the endometrium. Thyroid hormones act on almost all organs throughout the body and regulate the basal metabolism of the organism. Thyroid hormone can also stimulate the proliferation in vitro of certain tumor cell lines. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the significant value of tamoxifen and/or irradiation treatment on thyroid hormones in breast cancer bearing female rats. Forty two female Sprague-Dawely rats randomly divided into seven groups and the effect of tamoxifen and post-irradiation was studied on breast cancer chemically induced. The results shows a T4 and estradiol levels not T3 were altered in different experimental groups. It could be concluded that irradiation-induced changes in the composition of the mammary microenvironment promote the expression of neoplastic potential by affecting both estradiol and thyroid hormones, and tamoxifen may alter the thyroid hormones. Irradiation and tamoxifen administration may have worth effects on T4 and estradiol levels and it is recommended to further studies towards the bystander effect of radiation and tamoxifen on the tissue culture and molecular biology scale.

  12. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Huang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh−/− tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh−/− mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh−/− mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth.

  13. Molecular analysis of radiation-induced experimental tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular analysis was made on mouse tumors induced by radiation and chemicals. Expression of oncogenes was studied in 12 types of 178 mouse tumors. Southern blotting was done on tumors in which overexpression of oncogenes was noted. Amplification of the myc oncogene was found in chemically induced sarcomas, but not those induced by radiations. Radiogenic thymomas were studied in detail. These thymomas were induced in two different ways. The first was thymomas induced by direct irradiation of F1 mice between C57BL/6NxC3H/He. Southern analysis of DNA revealed deletion of specific minisatellite bands in these tumors. DNA from directly induced thymomas induced focus formation when transfected into normal Golden hamster cells. The mouse K-ras oncogene was detected in these transformants. The second type of thymomas was induced by X-irradiation of thymectomized B10.thy1.2 mice in which normal thymus from congenic B10,thy1.1. mice was grafted. Thymomas of the donor origin was analysed by transfection and the transformants by DNA from those indirectly induced thymomas did not contain activated ras oncogenes. (author)

  14. Inducible chemical defences in animals

    OpenAIRE

    Heyttyey, Attila; Tóth, Zoltán; Buskirk, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is extremely widespread in the behaviour, morphology and life-history of animals. However, inducible changes in the production of defensive chemicals are described mostly in plants and surprisingly little is known about similar plasticity in chemical defences of animals. Inducible chemical defences may be common in animals because many are known to produce toxins, the synthesis of toxins is likely to be costly, and there are a few known cases of animals adjusting their t...

  15. Experimentally induced tumors used for angiographic estimation of embolisation and cytostatic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 12 rats tumors have been induced chemically by intraperitoneal application of dimethylnitrosamine. This method is simple and reliable and the effect of tumor embolisation can be followed easyly. Thymus aplastic nude mice with transplanted human tumors deserve strict care. Tumor microangiograms of 48 animals demonstrate a close similarity with angiograms of corresponding human tumors. The vascular pattern does not alterate after several transplantations, after cytostatic therapy a slight hypervascularisation developes. (orig.)

  16. Chemotherapy induces tumor clearance independent of apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guerriero, Jennifer L.; Ditsworth, Dara; Fan, Yongjun; Zhao, Fangping; Crawford, Howard C.; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of apoptosis is associated with the development of human cancer and resistance to anti-cancer therapy. The ultimate goal of cancer treatment is to selectively induce cancer cell death and overcome drug resistance. A deeper understanding of how a given chemotherapy affects tumor cell death is needed to develop strategically designed anti-cancer agents. Here we utilize a xenograft mouse tumor system generated from genetically defined cells deficient in apoptosis to examine the inv...

  17. Keratin expression in chemically induced mouse lung adenomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Gunning, W T; Goldblatt, P. J.; Stoner, G D

    1992-01-01

    Chemically induced mouse lung tumors exhibit distinctive growth patterns, characterized by an alveolar or solid appearance, a papillary appearance, or a combination of the two. Lung tumors induced in strain A/J mice by either benzo(a)pyrene (BP) or by N-nitrosoethylurea (ENU) were examined for expression of low- and high-molecular-weight cytokeratins. Simple cytokeratins (low molecular weight) were found in all epithelial cells of the normal mouse lung and in all tumor types, whereas higher-m...

  18. Laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A classical model for the interaction of laser radiation with a molecular system is derived. This model is used to study the enhancement of a chemical reaction via a collision induced absorption. It was found that an infrared laser will in general enhance the rate of a chemical reaction, even if the reactants are infrared inactive. Results for an illustrative analytically solvable model are presented, as well as results from classical trajectory studies on a number of systems. The collision induced absorption spectrum in these systems can be written as the Fourier transform of a particular dipole correlation function. This is used to obtain the collision induced absorption spectrum for a state-selected, mono-energetic reactive collision system. Examples treated are a one-dimensional barrier problem, reactive and nonreactive collisions of H + H2, and a modified H + H2 potential energy surface which leads to a collision intermediate. An extension of the classical model to treat laser-induced electronically nonadiabatic collision processes is constructed. The model treats all degrees of freedom, molecular, electronic and radiation, in a dynamically consistent framework within classical mechanics. Application is made to several systems. Several interesting phenomena are discovered including a Franck-Condon-like effect causing maxima in the reaction probability at energies much below the classical threshold, laser de-enhancement of chemical reactions and an isotope effect. In order to assess the validity of the classical model for electronically nonadiabatic process (without a laser field), a model problem involving energy transfer in a collinear atom-diatom system is studied, and the results compared to the available quantum mechanical calculation. The calculations are in qualitative agreement

  19. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost) were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation

  20. Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debien Emilie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Methods Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements. Results The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. Conclusion This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation.

  1. Evaluation of Elephantopus scaber on the inhibition of chemical carcinogenesis and tumor development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, B S; Latha, P G; Remani, P

    2010-03-01

    The effect of the active fraction of Elephantopus scaber L. (Asteraceae) (ES) on skin papillomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as an initiator and croton oil as promoter was studied in mice. The active fraction of E. scaber (100 mg/kg) on topical application delayed the onset of papilloma formation and reduced the mean number of papillomas and the mean weight of papillomas per mouse. The intraperitoneal administration of the active fraction of E. scaber also had a significant effect on subcutaneous injection of 20-methylcholanthrene (20-MCA)-induced soft tissue sarcomas in mice. It inhibited the incidence of sarcomas and reduced the tumor diameter compared to MCA-treated control animals. The subcutaneous administration of the active fraction of E. scaber significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously transplanted DLA and EAC solid tumors, delayed the onset of tumor formation, and increased the life span of tumor bearing mice. The present study thus indicates the tumor inhibitory activity of the active fraction of E. scaber against chemically induced tumors and its ability to inhibit the development of solid tumors. PMID:20645824

  2. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO2. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO2 in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy

  3. Brain tumors induced by radiation in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two out of four pubescent rhesus monkeys, which received 1,500 rads of supervoltage X-irradiation, showed malignant brain tumors afer the survival of 52 and 102 weeks each. Since the incidence of spontaneous developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literatures was quite low, the tumors in the present series may have been radiation induced. (author)

  4. 芥菜籽预防化学诱导小鼠大肠肿瘤的实验研究%The experimental study on chemopreventive effect of mustard seed on chemically induced colorectal tumor in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新艳; 郭文; 袁海锋; 邱恩祺; 袁葵

    2013-01-01

    目的 评价芥菜籽(MS)对氧化偶氮甲烷(AOM)诱导的小鼠大肠肿瘤的预防作用及其机制.方法 选择60只昆明种小鼠,随机均分为AOM模型组、AOM+5% MS干预组、AOM +10% MS干预组和正常对照组(生理盐水).记录各组小鼠有无肿瘤发生及发生数目、大小和位置,计算平均肿瘤数和肿瘤发生率;HE染色确定肿瘤的组织学类型;免疫组化染色检测肿瘤组织中PCNA蛋白的表达,计算增殖指数(PI);TUNEL染色检测肿瘤组织凋亡情况,计算凋亡指数(AI).结果 正常对照组小鼠无肿瘤发生,AOM模型组、5%MS干预组和10% MS干预组小鼠肿瘤发生率分别为86.7%、60.0%、41.7%,组间差异有统计学意义(P =0.048);5%MS干预组平均肿瘤数为1.07±1.10,10% MS干预组为0.67±0.89,均较AOM模型组的2.20±1.21少(P<0.05);10% MS干预组PI为32.0±3.9,均低于AOM模型组和5% MS干预组的59.9±4.4和41.7±4.9(P <0.05);10% MS干预组AI为15.0±2.4,均高于AOM模型组和5% MS干预组的6.9±1.4和9.3±1.5(P<0.05).结论 MS对AOM诱导的小鼠大肠肿瘤具有化学预防作用,其机制为抑制肿瘤细胞增殖和诱导肿瘤细胞凋亡.%Objective To investigate the chemopreventive effects of mustard seed (MS) on azoxymethane (AOM) induced colorectal tumor in mice and to explore its anticancer-related mechanisms. Methods A total of 60 mice of Kunming species were randomly divided into 4 groups of 15 each: AOM alone, AOM + 5% MS, AOM + 10% MS and the control group ( normal saline). Colorectal tumorigenesis was induced by injecting AOM 10 rag/kg, subcutaneously, once a week for three weeks. Different doses of MS were given in diet during the study. Thirty-six weeks later, mice were sacrificed under cervical dislocation. The large intestine was isolated and flushed with ice-cold normal saline. The site, size and number of tumors were recorded. The incidence, the average number anci the inhibitory rate of

  5. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  6. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors

  7. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  8. Chemically Induced Breast Tumors in Rats Are Detectable in Early Stages by Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging but Not by Changes in the Acute-Phase Reactants in Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onn Haji Hashim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to develop a rat model for monitoring the early development of breast cancer. Twelve female rats were divided into two groups of six rats that were either treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea to induce breast cancer or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide to induce inflammation. Serum samples taken from the rats prior to the treatment were used as controls. By the 14th week, presence of the tumor was detectable by contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by histopathology. When the serum proteins of the rats were examined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE, no difference could be detected in the profiles of all proteins before and 18 weeks after administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. However, higher expression of alpha-1B glycoprotein was detectable by 2-DE in serum samples of rats at the 18th week post-treatment with lipopolysaccharide.

  9. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  10. Control of mammalian cell mutagenesis and differentiation by chemicals which initiate or promote tumor formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C. A.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was developed to predict the potential carcinogenic hazard of some environmental chemicals. In this assay, Chinese hamster V79 cells, which are susceptible to mutagenesis, are co-cultivated with cells capable of metabolizing chemical carcinogens. Use of this assay made it possible to demonstrate a relationship between the degree of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of a series of polycyclic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines and to study the organ specificity exhibited by some chemical carcinogens. However, most short-term in vitro assays are designed to detect mutagenic activity and therefore do not detect tumor promoting agents which are devoid of this activity. By analyzing various markers of terminal differentiation in cultured human melanoma and myeloid leukemia cells, we have established a relationship between the activity of a series of tumor promoting phorbol diesters in the mouse skin and their ability to induce terminal differentiation. We suggest that measuring alterations in the differentiation characteristics of some cultured cells may represent an approach by which environmental tumor promoting agents can be studied and detected.

  11. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation

  12. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  13. The role of autophagy induced by tumor microenvironment in different cells and stages of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue; Yu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Fei; Jing, Ying-Ying; Han, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Kai; Liang, Lei; Hou, Jing; Li-xin WEI

    2015-01-01

    Development of a tumor is a very complex process, and invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors are hallmarks and are difficult problems to overcome. The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in controlling tumor fate and autophagy induced by the tumor microenvironment is attracting more and more attention. Autophagy can be induced by several stressors in the tumor microenvironment and autophagy modifies the tumor microenvironment, too. Autophagy has dual roles in tumor growth. In ...

  14. Selenium prevents tumor development in a rat model for chemical carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorkhem-Bergman, L.; Torndal, U. B.; Eken, S.;

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans have shown that selenium compounds can prevent cancer development. In this work we studied the tumor preventive effect of selenium supplementation, administrated as selenite, in the initiation, promotion and progression phases in a synchronized rat model for...... chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, the resistant hepatocyte model. Selenite in supra-nutritional but subtoxic doses (1 and 5 p.p.m.) was administrated to the animals through the drinking water. Such supplementation during the initiation phase did not have a tumor preventive effect. However, selenite...... treatment during the promotion phase decreased the volume fraction of pre-neoplastic liver nodules from 38% in control animals to 25 (1 p.p.m.) and 14% (5 p.p.m.) in the selenite-supplemented groups. In addition the cell proliferation within the nodules decreased from 42% in the control to 22 (1 p.p.m.) and...

  15. Tumors induce coordinate growth of artery, vein, and lymphatic vessel triads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors drive blood vessel growth to obtain oxygen and nutrients to support tumor expansion, and they also can induce lymphatic vessel growth to facilitate fluid drainage and metastasis. These processes have generally been studied separately, so that it is not known how peritumoral blood and lymphatic vessels grow relative to each other. The murine B16-F10 melanoma and chemically-induced squamous cell carcinoma models were employed to analyze large red-colored vessels growing between flank tumors and draining lymph nodes. Immunostaining and microscopy in combination with dye injection studies were used to characterize these vessels. Each peritumoral red-colored vessel was found to consist of a triad of collecting lymphatic vessel, vein, and artery, that were all enlarged. Peritumoral veins and arteries were both functional, as detected by intravenous dye injection. The enlarged lymphatic vessels were functional in most mice by subcutaneous dye injection assay, however tumor growth sometimes blocked lymph drainage to regional lymph nodes. Large red-colored vessels also grew between benign papillomas or invasive squamous cell carcinomas and regional lymph nodes in chemical carcinogen-treated mice. Immunostaining of the red-colored vessels again identified the clustered growth of enlarged collecting lymphatics, veins, and arteries in the vicinity of these spontaneously arising tumors. Implanted and spontaneously arising tumors induce coordinate growth of blood and lymphatic vessel triads. Many of these vessel triads are enlarged over several cm distance between the tumor and regional lymph nodes. Lymphatic drainage was sometimes blocked in mice before lymph node metastasis was detected, suggesting that an unknown mechanism alters lymph drainage patterns before tumors reach draining lymph nodes

  16. Molecular characterization of radon-induced rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon gas is a well known lung carcinogenic factor in human at high doses but the cancer risk at low doses is not established. Indeed, epidemiological studies at low doses are difficult to conduct because of the human exposure to other lung carcinogenic factors. These data underlined the necessity to conduct experiments on lung tumors developed on animal model. The aim of this work was to characterize rat lung tumors by working on a series of radon-induced tumors that included adenocarcinomas (A.C.), squamous cell carcinomas (S.C.C.) and adeno-squamous carcinomas (A.S.C.), that are mixed tumors with both A.C. and S.C.C. cellular components. A C.G.H. analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to define chromosomal recurrent unbalances and to target candidate genes potentially implicated in lung carcinogenesis, as p16Ink4a, p19Arf, Rb1, K-Ras or c-Myc. A more precise analysis of the p16Ink4a/Cdk4/Rb1 and p19Arf/Mdm2/Tp53 pathways was performed and indicated that the Rb1 pathway was frequently inactivated through an absence of p16Ink4a protein expression, indicating that it has a major role in rat lung carcinogenesis. Finally, a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to show for the first time that the complex tumors A.S.C. have a transcriptomic profile in accordance with their mixed nature but that they also display their own expression profiles specificities. This work allowed us to find molecular characteristics common to murine and human lung tumors, indicating that the model of lung tumors in rat is pertinent to search for radiation-induced lung tumors specificities and to help for a better molecular identification of this type of tumors in human. (author)

  17. Mammalian models of chemically induced primary malignancies exploitable for imaging-based preclinical theragnostic research

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yewei; YIN Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Huang, Gang; Liu, Jianjun; Song, Shaoli; Jiang, Yansheng; Xia, Qian; Swinnen, Johannes V; Bormans, Guy; Himmelreich, Uwe; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    Compared with transplanted tumor models or genetically engineered cancer models, chemically induced primary malignancies in experimental animals can mimic the clinical cancer progress from the early stage on. Cancer caused by chemical carcinogens generally develops through three phases namely initiation, promotion and progression. Based on different mechanisms, chemical carcinogens can be divided into genotoxic and non-genotoxic ones, or complete and incomplete ones, usually with an organ-spe...

  18. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    D. Liu; Pearlman, E.; Diaconu, E.; Guo, K.; Mori, H.; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorect...

  19. NNK-Induced Lung Tumors: A Review of Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hua-Chuan Zheng; Yasuo Takano

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has been remarkably increasing in recent years due to the introduction of filter cigarettes and secondary-hand smoking because the people are more exposed to higher amounts of nitrogen oxides, especially 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone(NNK), which is widely applied in animal model of lung tumors. In NNK-induced lung tumors, genetic mutation, chromosome instability, gene methylation, and activation of oncogenes have been found so as to disrup...

  20. Chemical bond cleavage induced by electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas emissions from titanium-metalloid compounds (titanium nitride and oxide) have been investigated to understand the effects of a microwave field on chemical reactions. We employed a high vacuum system (PO2 = 10−6 Pa) to observe in situ reductions. For titanium oxides, H-field heating significantly differed from conventional one in terms of oxygen emissions. For titanium nitride, the emissions were also induced by microwave heating. These tendencies were observed at temperatures above 1000 °C. A quantum chemical interpretation is provided to explain the emissions of the gases, and the experimental data is in good agreement with results predicted using the electronic energy band structure.

  1. Clinical evaluation of chemical ablation in treating metastatic tumors located at hepatic periphery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of chemical ablation in the treatment of metastatic tumors located at hepatic periphery. Methods: A total of 77 patients with metastatic tumors located at hepatic periphery received chemical ablation therapy. The inactivated degree, the volume and the related carcinoembryonic antigens of the tumors were estimated before and after the treatment. The results were analyzed and the preoperative data were compared with the postoperative ones. Results: Follow-up CT scanning was performed one month after the treatment. Of the 38 patients with hepatic subcapsular metastases, regression of the tumor was seen in 27, disappearance of the tumor in 2 and enlargement of the tumor in 9. For the tumors located at the hepatic portal, the lesions became smaller in 11 cases, unchanged in 3 cases and deterioration in 3 cases. Twenty-two patients had hepatic portal lymphatic metastases from gastric cancer. Of these 22 patients, the regression of the tumor was seen in 15, unchanged tumor in 3 and deterioration of the tumor in 9. The overall effective rate was 70%. Clinically, abdominal pain was markedly relieved in 30 patients. Biliary tract obstruction was obviously alleviated in 10 patients with a reduction of icteric index. After the chemical ablation the related carcinoembryonic antigens levels decreased significantly (P<0.01). Conclusion: For the treatment of metastatic tumors located at hepatic periphery, the chemical ablation technique is minimally-invasive, clinically-effective and economical. This therapy is especially suitable for the patients with advanced hepatic metastatic tumors. (authors)

  2. Osteomalacia inducida por tumor: hemangiopericitoma rinosinusal Tumor-induced osteomalacia: rhinosinusal hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enriqueta M. Serafini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available La osteomalacia inducida por tumor es una rara enfermedad del metabolismo óseo caracterizada por el aumento en la excreción de fosfato a nivel renal seguido de hipofosfatemia. Es causada por agentes fosfatúricos producidos por determinados tumores. La resección total del tumor resulta en la completa reversión de las anormalidades bioquímicas, la desaparición de las manifestaciones clínicas y los hallazgos en los estudios por imágenes. Presentamos el caso de un varón de 61 años con cuadro clínico y laboratorio compatibles con osteomalacia oncogénica inducida por tumor mesenquimático de localización rinosinusal. En nuestro caso el diagnóstico histológico correspondió a una neoplasia de tipo vascular: hemangiopericitoma.Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare disease of bone metabolism. The characteristic of this disease is an increase in phosphate excretion followed by hypophosphatemia, due to phosphaturic agents produced by different types of tumors. Tumor resection results in complete resolution of clinical, biochemical and radiological abnormalities. We present the case of a 61 year old man with signs, symptoms and laboratory findings consistent with oncogenic osteomalacia due to a rhino-sinusal mesenchymal tumor. The histological diagnosis showed a vascular neoplasm: hemangiopericytoma.

  3. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  4. Chemically modified heparins inhibit fibrinogen-bridged indirect adhesion between tumor cells and platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Sheng; Liu, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Min WEI; ZENG, XIANLU

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumor cells is critical for the hematogenous metastasis of tumor cells. We recently reported that fibrinogen was capable of bridging and enhancing the interaction of platelets and tumor cells under conditions of physical shear force. In the present study, we aimed to detect the effects of 8 chemically modified heparins on the binding of fibrinogen to platelets or tumor cells using flow cytometry assays, as well as the fibrinogen-bridged adhesion of platel...

  5. Hybrid modeling of tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Capasso, V.; Alvaro, M.; Carretero, M.

    2014-12-01

    When modeling of tumor-driven angiogenesis, a major source of analytical and computational complexity is the strong coupling between the kinetic parameters of the relevant stochastic branching-and-growth of the capillary network, and the family of interacting underlying fields. To reduce this complexity, we take advantage of the system intrinsic multiscale structure: we describe the stochastic dynamics of the cells at the vessel tip at their natural mesoscale, whereas we describe the deterministic dynamics of the underlying fields at a larger macroscale. Here, we set up a conceptual stochastic model including branching, elongation, and anastomosis of vessels and derive a mean field approximation for their densities. This leads to a deterministic integropartial differential system that describes the formation of the stochastic vessel network. We discuss the proper capillary injecting boundary conditions and include the results of relevant numerical simulations.

  6. Dichloroacetate induces tumor-specific radiosensitivity in vitro but attenuates radiation-induced tumor growth delay in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, F.; Roeder, F.; Debus, J.; Huber, P.E. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology; Kirsner, A.; Weber, K.J. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Peschke, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) by dichloroacetate (DCA) can shift tumor cell metabolism from anaerobic glycolysis to glucose oxidation, with activation of mitochondrial activity and chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis. In radiotherapy, DCA could thus potentially enhance the frequently moderate apoptotic response of cancer cells that results from their mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro and in a human tumor xenograft mouse model in vivo. Materials and methods: The interaction of DCA with photon beam radiation was investigated in the human tumor cell lines WIDR (colorectal) and LN18 (glioma), as well as in the human normal tissue cell lines HUVEC (endothelial), MRC5 (lung fibroblasts) and TK6 (lymphoblastoid). Apoptosis induction in vitro was assessed by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry; cell survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. The effect of DCA in vivo was investigated in WIDR xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on BALB/c-nu/nu mice, with and without fractionated irradiation. Histological examination included TUNEL and Ki67 staining for apoptosis and proliferation, respectively, as well as pinomidazole labeling for hypoxia. Results: DCA treatment led to decreased clonogenic survival and increased specific apoptosis rates in tumor cell lines (LN18, WIDR) but not in normal tissue cells (HUVEC, MRC5, TK6). However, this significant tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro was not reflected by the situation in vivo: The growth suppression of WIDR xenograft tumors after irradiation was reduced upon additional DCA treatment (reflected by Ki67 expression levels), although early tumor cell apoptosis rates were significantly increased by DCA. This apparently paradoxical effect was accompanied by a marked DCA-dependent induction of hypoxia in tumor-tissue. Conclusion: DCA induced tumor-specific radiosensitization in vitro but not in vivo

  7. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  8. Bone scintigraphic patterns in patients of tumor induced osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor induced osteomalacia (TIO) or oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare condition associated with small tumor that secretes one of the phosphaturic hormones, i.e., fibroblast growth factor 23, resulting in abnormal phosphate metabolism. Patients may present with non-specific symptoms leading to delay in the diagnosis. Extensive skeletal involvement is frequently seen due to delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The small sized tumor and unexpected location make the identification of tumor difficult even after diagnosis of osteogenic osteomalacia. The bone scan done for the skeletal involvement may show the presence of metabolic features and the scan findings are a sensitive indicator of metabolic bone disorders. We present the bone scan findings in three patients diagnosed to have TIO

  9. Computed tomography of virally induced monkey brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five (35) Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) were inoculated intracerebrally with chickembryo fibroblasts which were producing the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of the Rous sarcoma virus. These were then studied by means of computed tomography (CT) to detect brain tumors. Tumors were induced in 54.3% (19/35), with an average latency of 32.6 (15 - 43) days before a CT image appeared. The brains were sectioned into 5-mm slices, coplanar with the CT images. Various CT features, such as necrosis, hemorrhage, and peritumoral edema, correlated with the pathological findings. Contrast-enhanced CT detected tumors greater than 4-6 mm in diameter, and it was accurate within 2 mm in determining. Following brain tumors by CT in 6 monkeys revealed changes in the tumor size. One monkey was treated by differential hypothermia following craniectomy; the therapeutic effect and the tumor size, as subsequently evaluated for six months, revealed tumor regression during the initial 5 weeks, followed by stabilization and late (6 months) progression. The large brain size, 90-110 grams in adults, and the availability of these monkeys make them an excellent model system for neurological, neurosurgical, CT, and multimodality therapeutic experimentation. (author)

  10. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  11. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  12. Role of prolactin in induction of mammary tumors in rats with low dose radiations or of a chemical carcinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synergy of prolactin with x-ray, fast neutron, N-nitrosobutylurea (NBU), in an induction of mammary tumors was discussed, and the following results were obtained. Conversion of mammary epithelium to malignant tumors was induced in rats which were exposed to x-ray of a dose estimated to be below carcinogenic dose or which were given chemical substances. Cells converted to malignant tumors by carcinogenetic treatment survived for a fairly long term without proliferation, responded to proper stimulations, and formed macroscopical tumors. The effect of prolactin was showed at maximum under the presence of normal function of the ovary. RBE of 14.1 MeV fast neutron in an induction of mammary tumor in rats was about 1.3 - 1.5 times of 180 kVp x-ray. From the above-mentioned results, the author would like to point out and emphasize that at present, radiation used frequently for diagnosis and therapy although in small dose incurs the danger of inducing tumors under the specific circumstances where the host lives, and especially that easy treatments for atomic bomb survivors would bring double misfortunes to them in future. (Ueda, J.)

  13. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  14. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  15. Intra-operative visualization of brain tumors with 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Precise histopathological diagnosis of brain tumors is essential for the correct patient management. Furthermore, complete resection of brain tumors is associated with an improved patient prognosis. However, histopathological undergrading and incomplete tumor removal are not uncommon, especially due to insufficient intra-operative visualization of brain tumor tissue. The fluorescent dye 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is currently applied for fluorescence-guided resections of high-grade gliomas. The value of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence for intra-operative visualization of other tumors than high-grade gliomas remains unclear. Within the frame of this thesis, we found a significantly higher rate of complete resections of our high-grade gliomas as compared to control cases by using the newly established 5-ALA fluorescence technology at our department. Additionally, we showed that MRI spectroscopy-based chemical shift imaging (CSI) is capable to identify intratumoral high-grade glioma areas (= anaplastic foci) during navigation guided resections to avoid histopathological undergrading. However, the accuracy of navigation systems with integrated pre-operative imaging data such as CSI declines during resections due to intra-operative brainshift. In two further studies, we found that 5-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence is capable as a novel intra-operative marker to detect anaplastic foci within initially suspected low-grade gliomas independent of brainshift. Finally, we showed that the application of 5-ALA is also of relevance in needle biopsies for intra-operative identification of representative brain tumor tissue. These data indicate that 5-ALA is not only of major importance for resection of high-grade gliomas, but also for intra-operative visualization of anaplastic foci as well as representative brain tumor tissue in needle biopsies unaffected by brainshift. Consequently, this new technique might become a novel standard in brain tumor surgery that

  16. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  17. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals

  18. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  19. Chemically induced compaction bands in geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Compaction bands play an important role in oil production and may provide useful information on various geological processes. Various mechanisms can be involved at different scales: the micro scale (e.g. the grain scale), the meso scale (e.g. the Representative Element Volume) and the macro scale (e.g. the structure). Moreover, hydro-chemo-mechanical couplings might play an important role in triggering instabilities in the form of compaction bands. Compaction bands can be seen as an instability of the underneath mathematical problem leading to localization of deformation [1,2,3]. Here we explore the conditions of compaction banding in quartz-based geomaterials by considering the effect of chemical dissolution and precipitation [4,5]. In due course of the loading process grain crushing affects the residual strength, the porosity and the permeability of the material. Moreover, at the micro-level, grain crushing results in an increase of the grain specific surface, which accelerates the dissolution [6]. Consequently, the silica is removed more rapidly from the grain skeleton and the overall mechanical properties are degraded due to chemical factors. The proposed model accounts for these phenomena. In particular, the diffusion of the diluted in the water silica is considered through the mass balance equation of the porous medium. The reduction of the mechanical strength of the material is described through a macroscopic failure criterion with chemical softening. The grain size reduction is related to the total energy input [7]. A grain size and porosity dependent permeability law is adopted. These degradation mechanisms are coupled with the dissolution/precipitation reaction kinetics. The obtained hydro-chemo-mechanical model is used to investigate the conditions, the material parameters and the chemical factors inducing compaction bands formation. References [1] J.W. Rudnicki, and J.R. Rice. "Conditions for the Localization of Deformation in Pressure

  20. Experimental study of chemical embolus therapy combined with radiotherapy for VX2 bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Kazuo; Ishii, Yoshiaki [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    We conducted an experimental study, using a combination of coarse crystal cisplatin and radiotherapy for bone tumors, to evaluate the possibility of the clinical application of chemical embolus therapy in the field of orthopedic surgery. Experimental femoral bone tumors were produced, in rabbits, using VX2 carcinoma. The rabbits were allocated to five groups: untreated control, embolus, chemical embolus, irradiation alone, and chemical embolus and irradiation combination. These therapies were evaluated comparatively, in terms of local antitumor effects (including body weight, X-ray findings, angiography, and histopathology) and in terms of inhibition of pulmonary metastasis. Local antitumor effects, as evaluated by all parameters, except for body weight, were significantly greater for the chemical and irradiation combination group than for the chemical embolus, irradiation alone, untreated control, and embolus groups. There was no significant difference in the inhibition of pulmonary metastasis among the chemical embolus and irradiation combination, chemical embolus, and irradiation alone groups. These findings demonstrated the synergistic effect of the combination of chemical embolus therapy and radiotherapy. In this study, however, no significant difference was found between the chemical embolus therapy alone and the combination therapy groups in the inhibitory effect on pulmonary tumor metastasis, suggesting the need to conduct combination therapy repeatedly in the clinical setting. (author)

  1. Tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis induce mitotic chromosomal instability--an implication in aneuploid human tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Dai

    Full Text Available Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis--two tumor microenvironmental factors--could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy.

  2. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  3. Paclitaxel-induced macrophage activities in the tumor-bearing host: immunologic implications and therapeutic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mullins, David Warren

    1998-01-01

    Tumors induce immune dysfunction through the production of soluble factors that subvert macrophage (Mf) function to favor tumor growth. Previous studies suggested that tumor-induced immune cell dysfunction may be reversible through regimens that disrupt tumor cell suppressor mechanisms and concurrently promote tumoricidal activities. Because the antineoplastic agent paclitaxel (TAXOL) activates Mf function, we studied mechanisms of paclitaxel-mediated cytotoxic and immunostimulatory respons...

  4. The Liver is a Site for Tumor Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Accumulation and Immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkovitch, Dan; Lopez, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced immunosuppression plays a key role in tumor evasion of the immune system. A key cell population recognized as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contributes and helps orchestrate this immunosuppression. MDSC can interact with T cells, macrophages, and NK cells, to create an environment favorable for tumor progression. In various tumor models their presence at high levels has been reported in the bone marrow, blood, spleen, and tumor. We report for the first time that MDSC a...

  5. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies. PMID:26724680

  6. Inhibitory Effects of Chemical Compounds Isolated from the Rhizome of Smilax glabra on Nitric Oxide and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced RAW264.7 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-li Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rhizome of Smilax glabra has been used for a long time as both food and folk medicine in many countries. The present study focused on the active constituents from the rhizome of S. glabra, which possess potential anti-inflammatory activities. As a result, nine known compounds were isolated from the rhizome of S. glabra with the bioassay-guiding, and were identified as syringaresinol (1, lasiodiplodin (2, de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (3, syringic acid (4, 1,4-bis(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl-2,3-bis(hydroxymethyl-1,4-butanediol (5, lyoniresinol (6, trans-resveratrol (7, trans-caffeic acid methyl ester (8, and dihydrokaempferol (9. Among these compounds, 2 and 3 were isolated for the first time from S. glabra. In addition, the potential anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced RAW264.7 cells. Results indicated that 4 and 7 showed significant inhibitory effects on NO production of RAW264.7 cells, and 1, 2, 3, and 5 showed moderate suppression effects on induced NO production. 1, 7, and 5 exhibited high inhibitory effects on TNF-α production, with the IC50 values less than 2.3, 4.4, and 16.6 μM, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that compounds 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 9 were the potential anti-inflammatory active compositions of S. glabra.

  7. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization

  8. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Li, Ying-Yi [Cancer Research Institute, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Matsugo, Seiichi [School of Natural System Bioengineering Course, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sasaki, Soichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: mukaida@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  9. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yang, E-mail: yangshi_xz@126.com; Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-05-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation.

  10. Numerical simulation of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaiping Zhao; Jie Wu; Shixiong Xu; M. W. Collins; Quan Long; Carola S. K(o)nig; Yuping Jiang; Jian Wang; A. R. Padhani

    2007-01-01

    A coupled intravascular-transvascular-interstitial fluid flow model is developed to study the distributions of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on a tumor-induced microvascular network.This is generated from a 2D nine-point discrete mathematical model of tumor angiogenesis and contains two parent vessels.Blood flow through the microvascular network and interstitial fluid flow in tumor tissues are performed by the extended Poiseuille's law and Darcy's law, respectively, transvascular flow is described by Starling's law; effects of the vascular permeability and the interstitial hydraulic conductivity are also considered. The simulation results predict the heterogeneous blood supply, interstitial hypertension and low convectionon the inside of the tumor, which are consistent with physiological observed facts. These results may provide beneficial information for anti-angiogenesis treatment of tumor and further clinical research.

  11. Radiation as an inducer of in-situ autologous vaccine in the treatment of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy (RT) is conventionally used for local tumor control. Although local control of the primary tumor can prevent the development of subsequent systemic metastases, tumor irradiation is not effective in controlling pre-existing systemic disease. The concept of radiation-enhanced antigen presentation and immunomodulation allows the harnessing of tumor cell death induced by radiation as a potential source of tumor antigens for immunotherapy. Immunomodulation using RT is a novel strategy of in situ tumor vaccination where primary tumor irradiation can contribute to the control of pre-existing systemic metastatic disease. The absence of systemic immunosuppression (often associated with chemotherapy) and the generally lower toxicity makes radiation a desirable adjuvant regimen for immunotherapy and tumor vaccination strategies. Increased understanding of tumor immunology and the biology of radiation-mediated immune modulation should enhance the efficacy of combining these therapeutic modalities. Here we aim to provide an overview of the biology of radiation-induced immune modulation. (author)

  12. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  13. Tumor necrosis factor induced stimulation of granulopoiesis and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, TNF, was used to assess its ability to stimulate granulopoiesis and to protect mice against lethal irradiation, effects known to be inducable with TNF-rich postendotoxin serum from BCG infected mice (BCG/ET serum). Although the endotoxin contamination of this TNF preparation is extremely low its effects were compared in endotoxin low responder C3H/HeJ mice and susceptible NMRI mice. TNF is a potent inducer of serum colony stimulating activity, CSA, in both mouse strains. In peripheral blood a marked granulocytosis with a concomitant decrease in lymphocytes and monocytopenia occurs at 2 hours after injection of TNF. Moreover, TNF induces an increase in the number of splenic myelopoietic committed stem cells (GM-CFC, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells) determined five days after injection. The lethality rate, registered over 30 days after exposure to 660 cGy whole body X-irradiation is reduced to 40% in C3H/HeJ mice as compared to 75% in control animals. The reduction in lethality is observed both, when TNF was injected 24 hours before or after irradiation. In vitro, TNF significantly increases the number of colonies in the presence of CSA in bone marrow cultures. TNF per se does not effect colony growth. The studies reported here demonstrate that TNF is a myelopoiesis stimulating factor in mice which may be related to the reduction in lethality following whole body irradiation

  14. 1H chemical shift imaging characterization of human brain tumor and edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of metabolites in human brain tumor, peritumoral edema, and unaffected brain tissue were assessed from point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) 1H chemical shift imaging results at different repetition times (TR=1500 and 5000 ms; T1: n=19) and echo times (TE=135 and 270 ms; T2: n=7). Metabolite T1 and T2 relaxation times in unaffected brain tissue corresponded with those published for healthy volunteers. T2 relaxation times were reduced in tumor (choline, N-acetyl aspartate) and edema (choline, creatine) compared with unaffected brain tissue (p1H chemical shift imaging is most suited in the use of choline elevation as tumor marker. (orig.)

  15. MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, induces apoptosis in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Peng, Zhilan

    2013-03-01

    The balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis is critical for normal development and for the maintenance of homeostasis in adult organisms. Disruption of this balance has been implicated in a large number of disease processes, ranging from autoimmunity and neurodegenerative disorders to cancer. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, responsible for mediating the majority of intracellular proteolysis, plays a crucial role in the regulation of many normal cellular processes, including the cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. Apoptosis in cancer cells is closely connected with the activity of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The peptide-aldehyde proteasome inhibitor MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-leucine) induces the apoptosis of cells by a different intermediary pathway. Although the pathway of induction of apoptosis is different, it plays a crucial role in anti-tumor treatment. There are many cancer-related molecules in which the protein levels present in cells are regulated by a proteasomal pathway; for example, tumor inhibitors (P53, E2A, c-Myc, c-Jun, c-Fos), transcription factors (transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B, IκBα, HIFI, YYI, ICER), cell cycle proteins (cyclin A and B, P27, P21, IAP1/3), MG132 induces cell apoptosis through formation of reactive oxygen species or the upregulation and downregulation of these factors, which is ultimately dependent upon the activation of the caspase family of cysteine proteases. In this article we review the mechanism of the induction of apoptosis in order to provide information required for research. PMID:22897979

  16. Mechanisms of chemical-induced porphyrinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbergeld, E.K. Fowler, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 45 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic Regulation of the Heme Pathway; Porphyrins in Urine as an Indication of Exposure to Chlorinated Hydrocarbons; Mechanisms of PCB-induced Porphyria and Yusho Disease; and Lead-Induced Abnormalities of Porphyrin Metabolism: The Relationship with Iron Deficiency.

  17. Targeting tumor antigens to secreted membrane vesicles in vivo induces efficient antitumor immune responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelenberg, I.S.; Ostrowski, M.; Krumeich, S.; Bobrie, A.; Jancic, C.; Boissonnas, A.; Delcayre, A.; Pecq, JB Le; Combadiere, B.; Amigorena, S.; Thery, C.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of non-self antigens by tumors can induce activation of T cells in vivo, although this activation can lead to either immunity or tolerance. CD8+ T-cell activation can be direct (if the tumor expresses MHC class I molecules) or indirect (after the capture and cross-presentation of tumor an

  18. Photodynamic therapy with aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine induces necrosis and vascular damage in mice tongue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Lozzi, Silene Paulino; Simioni, Andreza Ribeiro; Morais, Paulo César; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we describe the efficacy of the liposomal-AlClPc (aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine) formulation in PDT study against Ehrlich tumor cells proliferation in immunocompetent swiss mice tongue. Experiments were conduced in sixteen tumor induced mice that were divided in three control groups: (1) tumor without treatment; (2) tumor with 100J/cm(2) laser (670nm) irradiation; and (3) tumor with AlClPc peritumoral injection; and a PDT experimental group when tumors received AlClPc injection followed by tumor irradiation. Control groups present similar macroscopically and histological patterns after treatments, while PDT treatment induced 90% of Ehrlich tumor necrosis after 24h of one single application, showing the efficacy of liposome-AlClPc (aluminum-chloro-phthalocyanine) mediated PDT on the treatment of oral cancer. PMID:19097802

  19. Overcoming Hypoxic-Resistance of Tumor Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Jin Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor is often exposed to hypoxic or anoxic conditions; thus, tumor cell responses to hypoxia are important for tumor progression as well as tumor therapy. Our previous studies indicated that tumor cells are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-induced cell apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. Melatonin inhibits cell proliferation in many cancer types and induces apoptosis in some particular cancer types. Here, we examined the effects of melatonin on hypoxic resistant cells against TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of melatonin in the hypoxic response. Melatonin treatment increased TRAIL-induced A549 cell death under hypoxic conditions, although hypoxia inhibited TRAIL-mediated cell apoptosis. In a mechanistic study, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 proteins, which increase following exposure to hypoxia, were dose-dependently down-regulated by melatonin treatment. Melatonin also blocked the hypoxic responses that reduced pro-apoptotic proteins and increased anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, melatonin treatment reduced TRAIL resistance by regulating the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and Bax translocation. Our results first demonstrated that melatonin treatment induces apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant hypoxic tumor cells by diminishing the anti-apoptotic signals mediated by hypoxia and also suggest that melatonin could be a tumor therapeutic tool by combining with other apoptotic ligands including TRAIL, particularly in solid tumor cells exposed to hypoxia.

  20. Radiation-induced chemical evolution of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical evolution in glycilglycine (Gly2) films irradiated with 146 nm vacuum ultraviolet light was studied. It is found that quantum efficiency of chemical evolution from Gly2 to glycilglycilglycine (Gly3) is smaller than that to glycilglycilglycilglycine (Gly4) due to the multiple step of reaction. Furthermore, we have carried out measurement of soft X-ray natural circular dichroism spectra for serine and alanine films in the energy region of oxygen 1s transition and we report the splitting of 1s→π* transitions.

  1. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  2. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine von Maltzan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results.

  3. Interferon-inducible protein-10 identified as a mediator of tumor necrosis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sgadari, Cecilia; Angiolillo, Anne L.; Cherney, Barry W.; Pike, Sandra E.; Farber, Joshua M.; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Vanguri, Padmavathy; Burd, Parris R.; Sheikh, Nasreen; Gupta, Ghanshyam; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Tosato, Giovanna

    1996-01-01

    Human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines give rise to progressively growing subcutaneous tumors in athymic mice. These tumors are induced to regress by inoculation of Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized normal human lymphocytes. In the present study, analysis of profiles of murine cytokine/chemokine gene expression in Burkitt tumor tissues excised from the nude mice showed that expression of the murine α-chemokine interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) was higher in the regressi...

  4. Hormonal relations of radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis seed was germinated, tumors appeared on hypocotyls and apical meristems of the resulting plants. Several tumors have been cultured on hormone free medium for over two years since excision from the plants. The tumor lines display a range of phenotypes suggestive of abnormal hormone balance. To determine whether hormone overproduction or hypersensitivity is involved in tumorigenesis, we are measuring hormone levels in the tumor lines and characterizing their response to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Growth of two tumor lines is stimulated by either NAA or BAP, one is stimulated by NAA only, two by BAP only, and one is stimulated by neither. Growth of all lines tested thus far is inhibited by gibberellic acid, ethephon and ACC. The tumor lines appear more sensitive to ACC than normal callus tissue. Most tumors studied to date appear unlikely to have arisen due to increased hormone sensitivity. Experiments are in progress to determine auxin and cytokinin levels in the tumor lines

  5. Transgenic CHD1L expression in mouse induces spontaneous tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amplification of 1q21 is the most frequent genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, which was detected in 58-78% of primary HCC cases by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Using chromosome microdissection/hybrid selection approach we recently isolated a candidate oncogene CHD1L from 1q21 region. Our previous study has demonstrated that CHD1L had strong oncogenic ability, which could be effectively suppressed by siRNA against CHD1L. The molecular mechanism of CHD1L in tumorigenesis has been associated with its role in promoting cell proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further investigate the in vivo oncogenic role of CHD1L, CHD1L ubiquitous-expression transgenic mouse model was generated. Spontaneous tumor formations were found in 10/41 (24.4% transgenic mice, including 4 HCCs, but not in their 39 wild-type littermates. In addition, alcohol intoxication was used to induce hepatocyte pathological lesions and results found that overexpression of CHD1L in hepatocytes could promote tumor susceptibility in CHD1L-transgenic mice. To address the mechanism of CHD1L in promoting cell proliferation, DNA content between CHD1L-transgenic and wildtype mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs was compared by flow cytometry. Flow cytometry results found that CHD1L could facilitate DNA synthesis and G1/S transition through the up-regulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4, and down-regulation of Rb, p27(Kip1, and p53. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data strongly support that CHD1L is a novel oncogene and plays an important role in HCC pathogenesis.

  6. Interferon-inducible protein-10 identified as a mediator of tumor necrosis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgadari, Cecilia; Angiolillo, Anne L.; Cherney, Barry W.; Pike, Sandra E.; Farber, Joshua M.; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Vanguri, Padmavathy; Burd, Parris R.; Sheikh, Nasreen; Gupta, Ghanshyam; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Tosato, Giovanna

    1996-01-01

    Human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines give rise to progressively growing subcutaneous tumors in athymic mice. These tumors are induced to regress by inoculation of Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized normal human lymphocytes. In the present study, analysis of profiles of murine cytokine/chemokine gene expression in Burkitt tumor tissues excised from the nude mice showed that expression of the murine α-chemokine interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) was higher in the regressing than in the progressive Burkitt tumors. We tested the effects of IP-10 on Burkitt tumor growth in nude mice. Inoculation of established Burkitt tumors either with crude preparations of murine IP-10 or with purified human IP-10 caused visible tumor necrosis in a proportion of the animals, although no complete tumor regressions were observed. Constitutive expression of murine IP-10 in Burkitt cells reduced their ability to grow as subcutaneous tumors, and caused visible tumor necrosis in a proportion of the animals. Histologically, IP-10-treated and IP-10-expressing Burkitt tumors had widespread evidence of tumor tissue necrosis and of capillary damage, including intimal thickening and vascular thrombosis. Thus, IP-10 is an antitumor agent that promotes damage in established tumor vasculature and causes tissue necrosis in human Burkitt lymphomas established subcutaneously in athymic mice. PMID:8943014

  7. 10B compound distribution in rat tissue of transplanted and ethylnitrosourea-induced brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of 10B compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate Na210B12H11SH, which is now in practical use for boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumors, was studied qualitatively and quantitatively using neutron-induced alpha autoradiography. Transplanted intracerebral tumors and brain tumors induced by ethylnitrosourea (ENU) in SD rats were used. 10B accumulated in the brain tumors in close relation to the actual tumor cells. The concentration of 10B in transplanted brain tumors was usually less in the central viable tumor tissue. The concentration and the distribution of 10B in ENU-induced gliomas varied with the size and histological type of the tumor and correlated to the permeability of vessels to horse-radish peroxidase and Evans blue. The tumor/blood concentration ratio of 10B increased with time after injection and reached 1, 12 and 7 hours after injection in the transplanted tumor and ENU-induced tumor, respectively. The tumor concentrations calculated at that time were 18 μg 10B/cm3 and 30 μg 10B/cm3, respectively. As for other tissues, a large amount of 10B was found in the pituitary gland, trigeminal ganglion, cornea, sclera and choroidea of the eyes and skin. This study clearly shows that the distribution of this 10B compound in brain tumors is roughly proportionate to the vascularity and to the vascular permeability of tumors and suggests that irradiation of thermal neutrons into the cranium in 7 to 12 hours after 10B injection should destroy the tumor tissue but yet inflict very little damage on normal tissue, and few untoward effects on pituitary gland and ganglia of nerves in rats. (J.P.N.)

  8. Reduction of DMH-induced colon tumors in rats fed psyllium husk or cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Andersen, J; Mehta, T; Wilson, R B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of feeding psyllium husk, a water-soluble fiber, and cellulose, a water-insoluble fiber, against chemically induced colon cancer was investigated in rats. Adult male rats were fed semipurified diets containing 20% fat, no fiber, or 10% psyllium husk or cellulose for 22 weeks. Tumors were induced in one-half of the rats fed each diet by the gastric intubation of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) during Weeks 3-11. In terms of the number of animals with tumors in each group, psyllium strongly reduced the tumorigenicity of DMH and cellulose moderately reduced tumorigenicity, whereas the two fibers did not differ significantly from each other with respect to tumorigenicity. Psyllium-fed rats had the highest fecal aerobic counts, lowest beta-glucuronidase, and highest 7-alpha-dehydroxylase activities. The psyllium diet also resulted in increased fecal output and percent moisture. Rats fed cellulose tended to have greater fecal bulk and lower beta-glucuronidase activity compared with rats fed no fiber and lower 7-alpha-dehydroxylase activity compared with rats fed psyllium husk. PMID:2819829

  9. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cerliani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  10. Growing tumors induce a local STING dependent Type I IFN response in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andzinski, Lisa; Spanier, Julia; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kröger, Andrea; Jin, Lei; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kalinke, Ulrich; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-09-15

    The importance of endogenous Type I IFNs in cancer immune surveillance is well established by now. Their role in polarization of tumor-associated neutrophilic granulocytes into anti-tumor effector cells has been recently demonstrated. Yet, the cellular source of Type I IFNs as well as the mode of induction is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-β is induced by growing murine tumors. Induction is mainly mediated via STING-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting tumor derived DNA as trigger. Transcription factors IRF3 and IRF5 were activated under these conditions which is consistent with tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) being the major cellular source of IFN-β at the tumor site. Besides DCs, tumor cells themselves are induced to contribute to the production of IFN-β. Taken together, our data provide further information on immune surveillance by Type I IFNs and suggest novel potent cellular targets for future cancer therapy. PMID:27116225

  11. Heat-shocked tumor cell lysate-pulsed dendritic cells induce effective anti-tumor immune response in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Qiu; Guo-Wei Li; Yan-Fang Sui; Hong-Ping Song; Shao-Yan Si; Wei Ge

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether heat-shocked tumor cells could enhance the effect of tumor cell lysate-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) in evoking anti-tumor immune response in vivo.METHODS: Mouse undifferentiated colon cancer cells(CT-26) were heated at 42℃ for 1 h and then frozenthawed. The bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with heatshocked CT-26 cell lysate (HSCT-26 DCs) were recruited to immunize syngeneic naive BALB/c mice. The cytotoxic activity of tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs)in mouse spleen was evaluated by IFN-enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) and LDH release assay. The immunoprophylactic effects induced by HSCT-26 DCs in mouse colon cancer model were compared to those induced by single CT-26 cell lysate-pulsed DCs (CT-26DCs) on tumor volume, peritoneal metastasis and survival time of the mice.RESULTS: Heat-treated CT-26 cells showed a higher hsp70 protein expression. Heat-shocked CT-26 cell lysate pulsing elevated the co-stimulatory and MHC-Ⅱ molecule expression of bone marrow-derived DCs as well as interleukin-12 p70 secretion. The IFN-γ secreting CTLs induced by HSCT-26 DCs were significantly more than those induced by CT-26 DCs (P= 0.002). The former CTLs' specific cytotoxic activity was higher than the latter CTLs' at a serial E/T ratio of 10:1, 20:1, and 40:1. Mouse colon cancer model showed that the tumor volume of HSCT-26 DC vaccination group was smaller than that of CT-26 DC vaccination group on tumor volume though there was no statistical difference between them(24 mm3 vs 8 mm3, P= 0.480). The median survival time of mice immunized with HSCT-26 DCs was longer than that of those immunized with CT-26 DCs (57 d vs 43 d,P= 0.0384).CONCLUSION: Heat-shocked tumor cell lysate-pulsed DCs can evoke anti-tumor immune response in vivo effectively and serve as a novel DC-based tumor vaccine.

  12. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in growth factor-reduced Matrigel to examine the angiogenic role of NO in a highly metastatic murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. This cell line, C3L5, expresses endothelial (e) NOS in vitro and in vivo, and inducible (i) NOS in vitro on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ. Female C3H/HeJ mice received subcutaneous implants of growth factor-reduced Matrigel inclusive of C3L5 cells on one side, and on the contralateral side, Matrigel alone; L-NAME and D-NAME (inactive enantiomer) were subsequently administered for 14 days using osmotic minipumps. Immediately after sacrifice, implants were removed and processed for immunolocalization of eNOS and iNOS proteins, and measurement of angiogenesis. Neovascularization was quantified in sections stained with Masson’s trichrome or immunostained for the endothelial cell specific CD31 antigen. While most tumor cells and endothelial cells expressed immunoreactive eNOS protein, iNOS was localized in endothelial cells and some macrophages within the tumor-inclusive implants. Measurable angiogenesis occurred only in implants containing tumor cells. Irrespective of the method of quantification used, tumor-induced neovascularization was significantly reduced in L-NAME-treated mice relative to those treated with D-NAME. The quantity of stromal tissue was lower, but the quantity of necrotic tissue higher in L-NAME relative to D-NAME-treated animals. The total mass of viable tissue (ie, stroma and tumor cells) was lower in L

  13. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL AGENTS ON BREAST TUMOR CELLS UNDER 24-HOUR INCUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Navruzov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of cytostatics is frequently limited due to their high toxicity and inadequate selectivity. This makes one search for adjuvant treat- ments to limit tumor growth and extent, to eliminate traditional chemotherapy sequels, and to ensure stable and prolonged remission. This investigation has revealed the specific features of using natural and recombinant cytokines in combination with chemical agents in therapy for malignancies. The findings open up new vistas for the treatment of malignancies with natural cytokines.

  14. Linking tumor mutations to drug responses via a quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map

    OpenAIRE

    Maria M. Martins; Zhou, Alicia Y.; Corella, Alexandra; Horiuchi, Dai; Yau, Christina; Rakshandehroo, Taha; Gordan, John D; Levin, Rebecca S.; Johnson, Jeff; Jascur, John; Shales, Mike; Sorrentino, Antonio; Cheah, Jaime; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need in oncology to link molecular aberrations in tumors with therapeutics that can be administered in a personalized fashion. One approach identifies synthetic-lethal genetic interactions or dependencies that cancer cells acquire in the presence of specific mutations. Using engineered isogenic cells, we generated a systematic and quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map that charts the influence of 51 aberrant cancer genes on 90 drug responses. The dataset strongly pr...

  15. Androgen via p21 Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α-induced JNK Activation and Apoptosis*

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Fangming; Kokontis, John; Lin, Yuting; Liao, Shutsung; Lin, Anning; Xiang, Jialing

    2009-01-01

    The male hormone androgen is a growth/survival factor for its target tissues or organs. Yet, the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. Here, we report that androgen via p21 inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Inhibition by androgen requires the transcription activity of androgen receptor (AR) and de novo protein synthesis. Androgen·AR induces expression of p21 that in turn inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK and apoptosis. Furthermore, ge...

  16. E2F1 Induces Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene (PTTG1) Expression in Human Pituitary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Cuiqi; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Bannykh, Serguei; Gutman, Shiri; Melmed, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Rb/E2F is dysregulated in murine and human pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG1), a securin protein, is required for pituitary tumorigenesis, and PTTG1 deletion attenuates pituitary tumor development in Rb+/− mice. E2F1 and PTTG1 were concordantly overexpressed in 29 of 46 Rb+/− murine pituitary tissues and also in 45 of 80 human pituitary tumors (P < 0.05). E2F1 specifically bound the hPTTG1 promoter as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotin-streptavidin p...

  17. Antioxidant intervention of smoking-induced lung tumor in mice by vitamin E and quercetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological and in vitro studies suggest that antioxidants such as quercetin and vitamin E (VE) can prevent lung tumor caused by smoking; however, there is limited evidence from animal studies. In the present study, Swiss mouse was used to examine the potential of quercetin and VE for prevention lung tumor induced by smoking. Our results suggest that the incidence of lung tumor and tumor multiplicity were 43.5% and 1.00 ± 0.29 in smoking group; Quercetin has limited effects on lung tumor prevention in this in vivo model, as measured by assays for free radical scavenging, reduction of smoke-induced DNA damage and inhibition of apoptosis. On the other hand, vitamin E drastically decreased the incidence of lung tumor and tumor multiplicity which were 17.0% and 0.32 ± 0.16, respectively (p < 0.05); and demonstrated prominent antioxidant effects, reduction of DNA damage and decreased cell apoptosis (p < 0.05). Combined treatment with quercetin and VE in this animal model did not demonstrate any effect greater than that due to vitamin E alone. In addition, gender differences in the occurrence of smoke induced-lung tumor and antioxidant intervention were also observed. We conclude that VE might prevent lung tumor induced by smoking in Swiss mice

  18. Cyclin D expression in plutonium-induced lung tumors in F344 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic mechanisms responsible for α-radiation-induced lung cancer in rats following inhalation of 239Pu is an ongoing area of research in our laboratory. Previous studies have examined the status of the p53 gene by immunohistochemistry. Only two tumors (2/26 squamous cell carcinomas) exhibited detectable levels of p53 products. Both were the result of mutations in codons 280 and 283. More recent studies of X-ray-induced lung tumors in rats showed a similar lack of involvement of p53. In conclusion, we found that α-radiation-induced rat lung tumors have a high incidence (31 of 39) of cyclin D1 overexpression

  19. Approaches to the evaluation of chemical-induced immunotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Krzystyniak, K; Tryphonas, H; Fournier, M

    1995-01-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in maintaining health; however, accumulating evidence indicates that this system can be the target for immunotoxic effects caused by a variety of chemicals including the environmental pollutants of polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, pesticides, and heavy metals. Adverse chemical-induced immunomodulation, which is studied within the discipline of immunotoxicology, may be expressed either as immunosuppression/immunodepression or immu...

  20. Topical application of silymarin reduces chemical-induced irritant contact dermatitis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mi Hwa; Yoon, Won Kee; Lee, Hyunju; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Kiho; Park, Song-Kyu; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon

    2007-12-15

    Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is a non-allergic local inflammatory reaction of a skin and one of the most frequent occupational health problems. Silymarin has been clinically used in Europe for a long time to treat liver diseases and also known to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we report that topical application of silymarin reduces chemical-induced ICD. Topical application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) induced an ear swelling in BALB/c mice and silymarin suppressed DNCB-induced increase in ear thickness. Prophylactic and therapeutic application of silymarin showed similar effect on DNCB-induced increase in ear thickness and skin water content. In addition, phobor ester- or croton oil-induced increase in ear thickness was also inhibited by silymarin treatment. Silymarin also blocked neutrophil accumulation into the ear induced by these irritants. Further study demonstrated that DNCB-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression in mouse ear was suppressed by silymarin. DNCB-induced expression of KC, one of the main attractors of neutrophil in mice, and adhesion molecules, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin in mouse ear were also inhibited by silymarin. Moreover, TNF-alpha-induced expression of cytokines, such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and a chemokine, IL-8, were suppressed by silymarin treatment in human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. Silymarin also blocked TNF-alpha- and DNCB-induced NF-kappaB activation in HaCaT. Collectively, these results demonstrate that topically applied silymarin inhibits chemical-induced ICD in mice and this might be mediated, at least in part, by blocking NF-kappaB activation and consequently inhibiting the expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules. PMID:17996674

  1. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma

  2. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, William W. [Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, Room S-321, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Fadaki, Niloofar; Leong, Stanley P., E-mail: leongsx@cpmcri.org [Department of Surgery and Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, 2340 Clay Street, 2nd floor, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  3. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Tseng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  4. Neuro-immune interactions in chemical-induced airway hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Fien C; Boonen, Brett; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Maes, Tania; Hox, Valérie; Seys, Sven; Pollaris, Lore; Liston, Adrian; Nemery, Benoit; Talavera, Karel; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2016-08-01

    Asthma may be induced by chemical sensitisers, via mechanisms that are still poorly understood. This type of asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and little airway inflammation. Since potent chemical sensitisers, such as toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), are also sensory irritants, it is suggested that chemical-induced asthma relies on neuro-immune mechanisms.We investigated the involvement of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) A1 and V1, major chemosensors in the airways, and mast cells, known for their ability to communicate with sensory nerves, in chemical-induced AHR.In vitro intracellular calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings in TRPA1- and TRPV1-expressing Chinese hamster ovarian cells showed that TDI activates murine TRPA1, but not TRPV1. Using an in vivo model, in which an airway challenge with TDI induces AHR in TDI-sensitised C57Bl/6 mice, we demonstrated that AHR does not develop, despite successful sensitisation, in Trpa1 and Trpv1 knockout mice, and wild-type mice pretreated with a TRPA1 blocker or a substance P receptor antagonist. TDI-induced AHR was also abolished in mast cell deficient Kit(Wsh) (/Wsh) mice, and in wild-type mice pretreated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, without changes in immunological parameters.These data demonstrate that TRPA1, TRPV1 and mast cells play an indispensable role in the development of TDI-elicited AHR. PMID:27126687

  5. Chemical changes induced by ultrasound in iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, G.; Calbucci, V.; Cardone, F.; Petrucci, A.; Ridolfi, F.

    2014-03-01

    The focus of this work is a careful chemical investigation of structural damage produced by the exposure of an iron bar to pressure waves generated using an ultrasound machine (called the R-1-S reactor). In addition to the emission of neutron bursts, the ultrasound treatment caused the appearance of zones of macroscopic damage (˜1 mm in size) on the exterior of the bar. Reflected-light optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) has shown that these external damage zones are characterized by microcraters and are covered by a thin layer of cracked amorphous material. Under back scattered electron (BSE) observation, this material shows a lower brightness than the intact ferrite surface. In addition, a zone with a high density of deformed cavities (˜1300 per mm2) with irregular walls and a maximum size of 10 μm was found inside the bar. These deformed microcavities are partially filled with a material composed of a chaotic assemblage of submicron-sized (most likely amorphous) particles. A careful compositional investigation of the chaotic material inside the microcavities using the semi-quantitative data obtained with the ESEM X-ray Energy Dispersive System (EDS) has shown that it is primarily composed of carbon, manganese and chromium. These elements are also found in lower amounts within the intact ferrite matrix. In contrast, the damaged surface surrounding the craters is characterized by elements not found in the ferrite at all (i.e., O, Cl, K, Cu); elements the presence of which cannot be attributed to the occurrence of non-metallic inclusions or to contamination during fabrication. These results are also difficult to explain using the generally accepted laws of physics; however, they do appear to agree with a recent theory predicting the deformation of the local spacetime and the violation of the Local Lorentz Invariance. Such a violation should occur following the collapse of micron-sized discontinuities internal to the materials

  6. Differential inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Havell, E A

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been implicated as a major mediator of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phenomena. Administration to mice of a polyclonal, monospecific antibody prepared against recombinant murine TNF alpha abolished detection of LPS-induced TNF alpha activity and significantly reduced levels of LPS-induced colony-stimulating factor but failed to reduce the production of LPS-induced interferon, corticosterone, or LPS-induced hypoglycemia.

  7. Tumor Induced Hepatic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Can Cause Moderate Liver Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Eggert, Tobias; Medina-Echeverz, José; Kapanadze, Tamar; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous tumors induce the accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) not only in blood and spleens, but also in livers of these animals. Unexpectedly, we observed a moderate increase in serum transaminases in mice with EL4 subcutaneous tumors, which prompted us to study the relationship of hepatic MDSC accumulation and liver injury. MDSC were the predominant immune cell population expanding in livers of all subcutaneous tumor models investigated (RIL175, B16, EL4, CT26 and B...

  8. Rethinking the Stalk Effect: A New Hypothesis Explaining Suprasellar Tumor-Induced Hyperprolactinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Donal C.

    2008-01-01

    The pars tuberalis is a distinct subdivision of the pituitary gland but its function remains poorly understood. Suprasellar tumors in this pars tuberalis region are frequently accompanied by hyperprolactinemia. As these tumors do not immunoreact for any of the established pituitary hormones, they are classified as non-secretory. It has been postulated that these suprasellar tumors induce hyperprolactinemia by compressing the pituitary stalk, resulting in impaired dopamine delivery to the pitu...

  9. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  10. Chemically and biologically synthesized CPP-modified gelonin for enhanced anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; David, Allan E; Trommer, Wolfgang E; Kwon, Young Min; Min, Kyoung Ah; Kim, Jin H; Yang, Victor C

    2013-11-28

    The ineffectiveness of small molecule drugs against cancer has generated significant interest in more potent macromolecular agents. Gelonin, a plant-derived toxin that inhibits protein translation, has attracted much attention in this regard. Due to its inability to internalize into cells, however, gelonin exerts only limited tumoricidal effect. To overcome this cell membrane barrier, we modified gelonin, via both chemical conjugation and genetic recombination methods, with low molecular weight protamine (LMWP), a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) which was shown to efficiently ferry various cargoes into cells. Results confirmed that gelonin-LMWP chemical conjugate (cG-L) and recombinant gelonin-LMWP chimera (rG-L) possessed N-glycosidase activity equivalent to that of unmodified recombinant gelonin (rGel); however, unlike rGel, both gelonin-LMWPs were able to internalize into cells. Cytotoxicity studies further demonstrated that cG-L and rG-L exhibited significantly improved tumoricidal effects, with IC50 values being 120-fold lower than that of rGel. Moreover, when tested against a CT26 s.c. xenograft tumor mouse model, significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed with rG-L doses as low as 2 μg/tumor, while no detectable therapeutic effects were seen with rGel at 10-fold higher doses. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of utilizing CPP-modified gelonin as a highly potent anticancer drug to overcome limitations of current chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:23973813

  11. Squaraine PDT induces oxidative stress in skin tumor of swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibin, T. R.; Gayathri, Devi D.; Ramaiah, D.; Abraham, Annie

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using a sensitizing drug is recognized as a promising medical technique for cancer treatment. It is a two step process that requires the administration of a photosensitizer followed by light exposure to treat a disease. Following light exposure the photosensitizer is excited to a higher energy state which generates free radicals and singlet oxygen. The present study was carried out to assess the oxidative damage induced by bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6- trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine in skin tumor tissues of mice with/ without light treatment. Skin tumor was induced using 7, 12-Dimethyl Benz(a)anthracene and croton oil. The tumor bearing mice were given an intraperitoneal injection with the squaraine dye. After 24h, the tumor area of a few animals injected with the dye, were exposed to visible light from a 1000 W halogen lamp and others kept away from light. All the mice were sacrificed one week after the PDT treatment and the oxidative profile was analyzed (TBARS, SOD, catalase, GSH, GPx and GR) in tumor/ skin tissues. The dye induces oxidative stress in the tumor site only on illumination and the oxidative status of the tumor tissue was found to be unaltered in the absence of light. The results of the study clearly shows that the tumor destruction mediated by PDT using bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6-trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine as a photosensitizer is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, produced by the light induced changes in the dye.

  12. Sensitivity of fibroblast growth factor 23 measurements in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imel, Erik A; Peacock, Munro; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit;

    2006-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome of hypophosphatemia, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, normal or low serum 1,25-dihydryxyvitamin-D concentration, myopathy, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic protein overexpressed in tumors...

  13. Noise-induced first-order transition in anti-tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Wei-Rong; Shao, Yuan-Zhi; He, Zhen-Hui

    2005-01-01

    We studied the single-variable dynamics model of the tumor growth. A first-order phase transition induced by an additive noise is shown to reproduce the main features of tumor growth under immune surveillance. The critical average cells population has a power-law function relationship with the immune coefficient.

  14. Increased bioprotein production in rats with tumors induced by radon inhalation and benzonaphtoflavone administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serial determinations of urinary biopterin were performed in rats during the development of lung tumors induced by radon inhalation and 5,6-benzonaphtoflavone administration. A striking increase in biopterin levels was observed in animals which developed single or multiple epidermoid carcinoma of the lung and this increase occurred several weeks before tumors could be detected radiographically. (author)

  15. Radiation-induced thyroid tumors in infant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hundred rad of x rays given to the neck region of 10-day-old rats led to the development of more thyroid tumors with a shorter latent period than the same dose of x rays given to the thyroid gland of adult animals. A subsequent treatment of irradiated animals with methylthiouracil significantly increased the number of thyroid adenomas and carcinomas and shortened the latent period. The thyroid tumors examined were predominantly of a follicular type. Papillary and medullary tumor variants were observed in a few animals only

  16. Physiology of Hormone Autonomous Tissue Lines Derived From Radiation-Induced Tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campell, B R; Town, C D

    1991-11-01

    gamma-Radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana L. have been produced as a novel approach to isolation of genes that regulate plant development. Tumors excised from irradiated plants are hormone autonomous in culture and have been maintained on hormone-free medium for up to 4 years. Five tumor tissue lines having different morphologies and growth rates were analyzed for auxin, cytokinin, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ethylene production, and response to exogenous growth regulators. Normal tissues and two crown gall tissue lines were analyzed for comparison. Rosettes and whole seedlings each contained approximately 30 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) free indoleacetic acid (IAA), 150 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) ester-conjugated IAA, and 10 to 20 micrograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) amide-conjugated IAA. The crown gall lines contained similar amounts of free and ester-conjugated IAA but less amide conjugates. Whereas three of the radiation-induced tumor lines had IAA profiles similar to normal tissues, one line had 10- to 100-fold more free IAA and three- to 10-fold less amide-conjugated IAA. The fifth line had normal free IAA levels but more conjugated IAA than control tissues. Whole seedlings contained approximately 2 nanograms. (gram fresh weight)(-1) of both zeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine. The crown gall lines had 100- to 1000-fold higher levels of each cytokinin. In contrast, the three radiation-induced tumor lines analyzed contained cytokinin levels similar to the control tissue. The radiation-induced tumor tissues produced very little ethylene, although each contained relatively high levels of ACC. Normal callus contained similar amounts of ACC but produced several times more ethylene than the radiation-induced tumor lines. Each of the radiation-induced tumor tissues displayed a unique set of responses to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Only one tumor line showed the same response as normal callus to

  17. Physiology of Hormone Autonomous Tissue Lines Derived From Radiation-Induced Tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campell, Bruce R.; Town, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    γ-Radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana L. have been produced as a novel approach to isolation of genes that regulate plant development. Tumors excised from irradiated plants are hormone autonomous in culture and have been maintained on hormone-free medium for up to 4 years. Five tumor tissue lines having different morphologies and growth rates were analyzed for auxin, cytokinin, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ethylene production, and response to exogenous growth regulators. Normal tissues and two crown gall tissue lines were analyzed for comparison. Rosettes and whole seedlings each contained approximately 30 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 free indoleacetic acid (IAA), 150 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 ester-conjugated IAA, and 10 to 20 micrograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 amide-conjugated IAA. The crown gall lines contained similar amounts of free and ester-conjugated IAA but less amide conjugates. Whereas three of the radiation-induced tumor lines had IAA profiles similar to normal tissues, one line had 10- to 100-fold more free IAA and three- to 10-fold less amide-conjugated IAA. The fifth line had normal free IAA levels but more conjugated IAA than control tissues. Whole seedlings contained approximately 2 nanograms· (gram fresh weight)−1 of both zeatin riboside and isopentenyladenosine. The crown gall lines had 100- to 1000-fold higher levels of each cytokinin. In contrast, the three radiation-induced tumor lines analyzed contained cytokinin levels similar to the control tissue. The radiation-induced tumor tissues produced very little ethylene, although each contained relatively high levels of ACC. Normal callus contained similar amounts of ACC but produced several times more ethylene than the radiation-induced tumor lines. Each of the radiation-induced tumor tissues displayed a unique set of responses to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Only one tumor line showed the same response as normal callus to

  18. DNA and RNA induced enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of DNA and RNA structures is their elegant chirality. Using these chiral structures to induce enantioselectivity in chemical synthesis is as enticing as it is challenging. In recent years, three general approaches have been developed to achieve this, including chirality transfer

  19. The Chemopreventive Effect of Tamoxifen Combined with Celecoxib on DMBA chemically-Induced Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxu Liu; Huafeng Kang; Xijing Wang; Zhijun Dai; Fengjie Xue; Xinghuan Xue

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the chemopreventive effect of tamoxifen combined with a COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib, on breast cancer in rats chemically induced by 7,12-dimethylben (a)anthracene (DMBA). Methods:DMBA was irrigated into the stomaches of SD female rats to build breast cancer model. A total of 120 rats were divided into four groups: control group, tamoxifen group, celecoxib group and combined group. The incidence rate, latent period, number and volume of breast cancer were detected and analyzed. Results:The tumor incidence rate of tamoxifen group (48.15%, 13/27) and celecoxib group (50.00%,14/28) were lower than that of control group (85.71%, 24/28), but higher than that of combined group (21.43%, 6/28). The tumor's latent period of tamoxifen group (97.54±1.85 d) and celecoxib group (96.79±2.89 d) were longer than that of control group (89.50±5.99 d), but shorter than that of combined group (103.67±3.39 d). The average tumor number of tamoxifen group (1.77±0.73) and celecoxib group (1.71±0.61) were less than that of control group (3.50±1.62), but more than that of combined group ( 1.17±0.42 ). The average tumor volume of tamoxifen group (1.78±0.71 cm3) and celecoxib group (2.05±1.04 cm3) were smaller than that of control group (6.42±3.96 cm3), but bigger than that of combined group (0.71±0.96 cm3) (P < 0.05 respectively).Conclusion:Celecoxib and tamoxifen are effective drugs in preventing the occurrence of rat breast cancer chemically induced by DMBA. Furthermore, combination of them has better chemopreventive effect.

  20. Glutamate Release by Primary Brain Tumors Induces Epileptic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Campbell, Susan L.; Haas, Brian R.; Montana, Vedrana; Robel, Stefanie; Ogunrinu, Toyin; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common and poorly understood co-morbidity for individuals with primary brain tumors. To investigate peritumoral seizure etiology, we implanted patient-derived glioma cells into scid mice. Within 14–18 days, glioma-bearing animals developed spontaneous, recurring abnormal EEG events consistent with epileptic activity that progressed over time. Acute brain slices from these animals showed significant glutamate release from the tumor mediated by the system xc − cystine/g...

  1. Non-invasive quantification of brain tumor-induced astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baird Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CNS injury including stroke, infection, and tumor growth lead to astrogliosis, a process that involves upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in astrocytes. However, the kinetics of astrogliosis that is related to these insults (i.e. tumor is largely unknown. Results Using transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the regulation of the GFAP promoter (GFAP-luc, we developed a model system to monitor astrogliosis upon tumor growth in a rapid, non-invasive manner. A biphasic induction of astrogliosis was observed in our xenograft model in which an early phase of activation of GFAP was associated with inflammatory response followed by a secondary, long-term upregulation of GFAP. These animals reveal GFAP activation with kinetics that is in parallel with tumor growth. Furthermore, a strong correlation between astrogliosis and tumor size was observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that non-invasive, quantitative bioluminescent imaging using GFAP-luc reporter animal is a useful tool to monitor temporal-spatial kinetics of host-mediated astrogliosis that is associated with glioma and metastatic brain tumor growth.

  2. Retrovirus particles in spontaneously occurring and radiation-induced tumors in ddy mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among spontaneously occurring tumors, pulmonary tumor, malignant lymphoma, mammary tumor, and ovarian tumor were the major ones in 232 ddY female mice. The former three tumors appeared significantly earlier and the latter one increased in incidence in 229 mice given 600 R whole or 800 R partial body (tunk) x-irradiation at the age of 10 weeks. Five tumors were examined electronmicroscopically from each tumor type of both the spontaneously occurring and radiation-induced tumors. C type virus particles were present only in the malignant lymphoma and B particles in the mammary, ovarian and pulmonary tumors, which are all of epithelial character. Thus, as far as we were concerned in this mouse strain, B particles were produced preferentially in epithelial cells and C particles in non-epithelial cells. The retrovirus particles were found in the same frequency, namely, 10 of 20 tumors examined in both the tumor groups. From our results, the intervention of virus in radiation carcinogenesis still remains in question. (author)

  3. Immunological response induced by alternated cooling and heating of breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiaxiang; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X

    2007-01-01

    A new in-situ thermal physical method combining both cryosurgery and local hyperthermia was used to treat mice bearing 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma. The induced anti-tumor immune response was investigated. The cryo/heat treatment resulted in stimulation of CTL response and attraction of immunocytes into the tumor debris, which correlated well to the tumor rejection in re-implantation. The results suggested that alternated cooling and heating had synergistic effect and might be developed into an alternative modality for tumor therapy. PMID:18002249

  4. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Shirakawa, Makoto; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-06-01

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT. PMID:24491681

  5. Intra-tumor distribution of metallofullerene using micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the intra tumor distribution of gadlinium containing fullerene (Gd@C82), micro particle induced X-ray emission (Micro-PIXE) analysis were performed. The tumor bearing BALB/c mice were injected Gd@C82 and subcutaneous tumors were taken from 48 h after the intravenous injection. Using the Micro-PIXE method, we could visualize Gd intra tumor distribution. Therefore our results indicate the possibility that Micro-PIXE is useful technique for imaging the bioditribution of Gd, and Gd@C82 is potentially useful Gd carrier for NCT

  6. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway Inhibition Resolves Tumor Hypoxia and Improves Local Tumor Control After Single-Dose Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the effects of BAY-84-7296, a novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activity, on hypoxia, microenvironment, and radiation response of tumors. Methods and Materials: UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-14 human squamous cell carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice. When tumors reached 4 mm in diameter BAY-84-7296 (Bayer Pharma AG) or carrier was daily administered to the animals. At 7 mm tumors were either excised for Western blot and immunohistologic investigations or were irradiated with single doses. After irradiation animals were randomized to receive BAY-84-7296 maintenance or carrier. Local tumor control was evaluated 150 days after irradiation, and the dose to control 50% of tumors (TCD50) was calculated. Results: BAY-84-7296 decreased nuclear HIF-1α expression. Daily administration of inhibitor for approximately 2 weeks resulted in a marked decrease of pimonidazole hypoxic fraction in UT-SCC-5 (0.5% vs 21%, P50, with an enhancement ratio of 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.72) in UT-SCC-5 and of 1.55 (95% CI 1.26-1.94) in UT-SCC-14. BAY-84-7296 maintenance after irradiation did not further decrease TCD50. Conclusions: BAY-84-7296 resulted in a marked decrease in tumor hypoxia and substantially reduced radioresistance of tumor cells with the capacity to cause a local recurrence after irradiation. The data suggest that reduction of cellular hypoxia tolerance by BAY-84-7296 may represent the primary biological mechanism underlying the observed enhancement of radiation response. Whether this mechanism contributes to the improved outcome of fractionated chemoradiation therapy warrants further investigation

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Regulation of a Prodrug-Activating Enzyme for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Shibata

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that tumor hypoxia could be exploited for cancer gene therapy. Using hypoxia-responsive elements derived from the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene, we have generated vectors expressing a bacterial nitroreductase. (20NTR gene that can activate the anticancer prodrug CB1954. Stable transfectants of human HT1080 tumor cells with hypoxia-inducible vectors were established with G418 selection. Hypoxic induction of NTR protein correlated with increased sensitivity to in vitro exposure of HT 1080 cells to the prodrug. Growth delay assays were performed with established tumor xenografts derived from the same cells to detect the in vivo efficacy of CB1954 conversion to its cytotoxic form. Significant antitumor effects were achieved with intraperitoneal injections of CB1954 both in tumors that express NTR constitutively or with a hypoxia-inducible promoter. In addition, respiration of 10% O2 increased tumor hypoxia in vivo and enhanced the antitumor effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible vectors may be useful for tumor-selective gene therapy, although the problem of delivery of the vector to the tumors, particularly to the hypoxic cells in the tumors, is not addressed by these studies.

  8. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@yahoo.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China); Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China)

    2012-04-30

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  9. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Constitutive active/androstane receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, and cytotoxicity are involved in oxadiazon-induced liver tumor development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-02-01

    Oxadiazon (OX) is a protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicide that induces porphyria and liver tumors in rodents. Although porphyria is generally considered to be a risk factor for liver tumor development, the mechanisms through which OX mediates tumor development are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the mechanisms of tumor development by focusing on constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), which is essential for the development of tumors in response to several chemicals. After 1, 4, or 13 weeks of dietary treatment with 1000 ppm OX, hepatic Cyp2b10 expression was induced in wild-type (WT) mice. However, this effect was blocked in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Hepatic Cyp4a10 expression, indicative of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activation, and cytotoxic changes in hepatocytes were also observed in both groups of mice. After initiation by diethylnitrosamine, 26-week treatment with OX resulted in an increase in proliferative lesions, including foci and adenomas, in both genotypes, and the incidence and multiplicity of proliferative lesions in CARKO mice were higher than those in control mice but lower than those in WT mice. These results suggested that CAR, PPARα activation, and cytotoxicity were involved in the development of liver tumors. Moreover, porphyrin was not apparently involved in OX-induced tumor development. PMID:26710982

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Luciana P; Peacock, Danielle L.; Majumdar, Debeshi; Ingels, Jesse F; Jensen, Laura C; Smith, Keisha D; Cushing, Richard C; Seagroves, Tiffany N

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although...

  12. The influence of septal lesions on sodium and water retention induced by Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guimarães

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on the effects of septal area lesions on neuroimmunomodulation and Walker 256 tumor development, it was observed that tumor-induced sodium and water retention was less marked in lesioned than in non-lesioned rats. In the present study possible mechanisms involved in this phenomenon were investigated. The experiments were performed in septal-lesioned (LW; N = 15 and sham-operated (SW; N = 7 8-week-old male Wistar rats, which received multifocal simultaneous subcutaneous (sc inoculations of Walker 256 tumor cells about 30 days after the stereotaxic surgery. Control groups (no tumor, sham-operated food-restricted (SFR, N = 7 and lesioned food-restricted (LFR, N = 10 were subjected to a feeding pattern similar to that observed in tumor-bearing animals. Multifocal inoculation of Walker 256 tumor rapidly induces anorexia, which is paradoxically accompanied by an increase in body weight, as a result of renal Na+ and fluid retention. These effects of the tumor were also seen in LW rats, although the rise in fractional sodium balance during the early clinical period was significantly smaller than in SW rats (day 4: SW = 47.6 ± 6.4% and LW = 13.8 ± 5.2%; day 5: SW = 57.5 ± 3.5% and LW = 25.7 ± 4.8%; day 6: SW = 54.4 ± 3.8% and LW = 32.1 ± 4.4%; P<0.05, suggesting a temporary reduction in tumor-induced sodium retention. In contrast, urine output was significantly reduced in SW rats and increased in LW rats (LW up to -0.85 and SW up to 4.5 ml/100 g body weight, with no change in osmolar excretion. These temporary changes in the tumor's effects on LW rats may reflect a "reversal" of the secondary central antidiuretic response induced by the tumor (from antidiuretic to diuretic.

  13. Studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-Peng; XIAO Dong; HAN Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    The apoptosis in human bone tumor cells induced by internal irradiation with 153Sm was studied. The morphological changes in bone tumor cells were observed by electronic and fluorescent microscopy, as well as DNA agarose gel eletrophoresis. DNA chain fragmentation, microautoradiographic tracing and the inhibition rate of proliferation in bone tumor cells exposed to 153Sm with different duration time were examined. It was demonstrated that the bone tumor cells exposed to 153Sm displayed nuclear fragmentation, pyknosis, margination of condensed chromatin, and formation of membrane bounded apoptotic bodies, whereas the percentage of DNA chain fragmentation of bone tumor cells increases in direct proportion to the duration of irradiation with 153Sm, as well as DNA ladder formation in apoptotic cells. Also a marked inhibition effect of proliferation in bone tumor cells after exposure with 153Sm was observed.

  14. Studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apoptosis in human bone tumor cells induced by internal irradiation with 153Sm was studied. The morphological changes in bone tumor cells were observed by electronic and fluorescent microscopy, as well as DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA chain fragmentation, microautoradiographic tracing and the inhibition rate of proliferation in bone tumor cells exposed to 153Sm with different duration time were examined. It was demonstrated that the bone tumor cells exposed to 153Sm displayed nuclear fragmentation, pyknosis, margination of condensed chromatin, and formation of membrane bounded apoptotic bodies, whereas the percentage of DNA chain fragmentation of bone tumor cells increases in direct proportion to the duration of irradiation with 153Sm, as well as DNA ladder formation in apoptotic cells. Also a marked inhibition effect of proliferation in bone tumor cells after exposure with 153Sm was observed. (authors)

  15. Production of Nitric Oxide and Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Ovarian Cystic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosekeila Simões Nomelini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor sections from nonneoplastic (n=15, benign (n=28, and malignant ovarian tumors (n=20 were obtained from 63 women. Immunohistochemistry of the tumor sections demonstrated that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression was increased in ovarian cancer samples compared to nonneoplastic or benign tumor samples. Using the Griess method, nitric oxide (NO metabolite levels were also found to be elevated in malignant tumor samples compared to benign tumor samples (P80 μM were more frequent than NO levels <80 μM, and iNOS expression in well-differentiated carcinomas was greater than in moderately/poorly differentiated carcinomas (P<.05. These data suggest an important role for NO in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  16. Galectin-3 disruption impaired tumoral angiogenesis by reducing VEGF secretion from TGFβ1-induced macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the role of galectin-3 in tumor angiogenesis associated with tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor parenchyma, the galectin-3 expression was reconstituted in Tm1 melanoma cell line that lacks this protein. Galectin-3-expressing cells (Tm1G3) and mock-vector transfected cells (Tm1N3) were injected into wild-type (WT) and galectin-3 knockout (KO) C57Bl/6 mice. Tumors originated from Tm1G3 were larger in tumor volume with enlarged functional vessels, decreased necrotic areas, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels. Galectin-3-nonexpressing-cells injected into WT and KO showed increased levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and, in WT animals this feature was also accompanied by increased VEGFR2 expression and its phosphorylation. In KO animals, tumors derived from galectin-3-expressing cells were infiltrated by CD68+-cells, whereas in tumors derived from galectin-3-nonexpressing-cells, CD68+ cells failed to infiltrate tumors and accumulated in the periphery of the tumor mass. In vitro studies showed that Tm1G3 secreted more VEGF than Tm1N3 cells. In the latter case, TGFβ1 induced VEGF production. Basal secretion of VEGF was higher in WT-bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) than in KO-BMDM. TGFβ1 induced secretion of VEGF only in WT-BMDM. Tm1G3-induced tumors had the Arginase I mRNA increased, which upregulated alternative macrophage (M2)/TAM induction. M2 stimuli, such as interleukin-4 (IL4) and TGFβ1, increased Arginase I protein levels and galectin-3 expression in WT- BMDM, but not in cells from KO mice. Hence, we report that galectin-3 disruption in tumor stroma and parenchyma decreases angiogenesis through interfering with the responses of macrophages to the interdependent VEGF and TGFβ1 signaling pathways

  17. Failure of the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) to induce tumors in the A/J mouse lung tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Kristiansen, E.; Meyer, Otto A.;

    1997-01-01

    We studied whether the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) or 4-(carboxy)phenylhydrazine (CP) induce lung adenomas in the A/J mouse lung tumor model. For 26 weeks female mice were fed a semisynthetic diet where 11 or 22% of the diet was replaced by freeze-dried mushrooms. The intake...... of the mushroom diets was equivalent to an intake of agaritine, the major phenylhydrazine derivative occurring in the mushroom, of 92 or 166 mg/kg body weight per day. The intake of CP was 106 mg/kg body weight per day. Neither the;freeze-dried mushroom nor CP induced statistically significant increased numbers...

  18. Apoptosis induced by norcantharidin in human tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Xiao Sun; Qing Wen Ma; Tian De Zhao; Yu Lin Wei; Guang Sheng Wang; Jia Shi Li

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The antitumor activity of norcantharidin (NCTD),the demethylated analogue of cantharidin, was studied in the early 1980s in China. NCTD has no side effects on urinary organs which cantharidin has shown and is easier to synthesize, and it can inhibit the proliferation of several tumor cell lines as well as transplanted tumors. Clinical trials with NCTD as a monotherapeutic agent indicated that NCTD had beneficial effects in patients with different kinds of digestive tract cancers, such as primary hepatoma,carcinomas of esophagus and gastric cancer, but no depressive effect on bone marrow cells. NCTD can increase the white blood cell count by stimulating the bone marrow and has some antagonistic effect against leukopenia caused by other agents. The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of NCTD on tumor cells have not yet been elucidated to date[1-3].

  19. Histological type of Thorotrast-induced liver tumors associated with the translocation of deposited radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to internally deposited radionuclides is known to induce malignant tumors of various histological types. Thorotrast, a colloidal suspension of radioactive Thorium dioxide (232ThO2) that emits alpha-particles, was used as a radiographic contrast during World War II. Thorotrast is known to induce liver tumors, particularly intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and angiosarcoma (AS), decades after injection. Therefore, patients injected with Thorotrast comprise a suitable study group to understand biological effects of internal ionizing radiation injury. Autoradiography and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) were carried out on non-tumorous liver sections from Thorotrast-induced ICC (T-ICC) and Thorotrast-induced AS (T-AS). Autoradiography revealed that the slope of the regression line of the number of alpha tracks for the amount of deposited Thorium (232Th) was higher in non-tumorous parts of the liver with T-ICC than those with T-AS. XRF showed that the intensity ratio of Radium (Ra) to Thorium (Th) in non-tumorous liver tissue with T-ICC was significantly higher than that with T-AS. Furthermore, the mean 228Ra/232Th radioactivity ratio at the time of death calculated was also significantly higher in T-ICC cases than in T-AS cases. These suggest that the metabolic behavior of radionuclides such as relocation and excretion, as well as the content of deposited radionuclides, is a major factor in determining the histological type of Thorotrast-induced liver tumors. (author)

  20. Metastasis-inducing S100A4 and RANTES cooperate in promoting tumor progression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Forst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tumor microenvironment has been described as a critical milieu determining tumor growth and metastases. A pivotal role of metastasis-inducing S100A4 in the development of tumor stroma has been proven in animal models and verified in human breast cancer biopsies. Expression and release of S100A4 has been shown in various types of stroma composing cells, including fibroblasts and immune cells. However, the events implicated in upstream and downstream pathways regulating the activity of the extracellular S100A4 protein in the tumor milieu remain unsolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the interplay between the tumor cell-derived cytokine regulated-upon-activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCL5 and S100A4 which were shown to be critical factors in tumor progression. We found that RANTES stimulates the externalization of S100A4 via microparticle shedding from the plasma membrane of tumor and stroma cells. Conversely, the released S100A4 protein induces the upregulation of fibronectin (FN in fibroblasts and a number of cytokines, including RANTES in tumor cells as well as stimulates cell motility in a wound healing assay. Importantly, using wild type and S100A4-deficient mouse models, we demonstrated a substantial influence of tumor cell-derived RANTES on S100A4 release into blood circulation which ultimately increases the metastatic burden in mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, the data presented strongly validate the pro-metastatic function of S100A4 in the tumor microenvironment and define how the tumor cell-derived cytokine RANTES acts as a critical regulator of S100A4-dependent tumor cell dissemination. Additionally, for the first time we demonstrated the mechanism of S100A4 release associated with plasma membrane microparticle shedding from various cells types.

  1. Immunotherapy-induced CD8+ T Cells Instigate Immune Suppression in the Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGray, A J Robert; Hallett, Robin; Bernard, Dannie; Swift, Stephanie L; Zhu, Ziqiang; Teoderascu, Florentina; VanSeggelen, Heather; Hassell, John A; Hurwitz, Arthur A; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    Despite clear evidence of immunogenicity, cancer vaccines only provide a modest clinical benefit. To evaluate the mechanisms that limit tumor regression following vaccination, we have investigated the weak efficacy of a highly immunogenic experimental vaccine using a murine melanoma model. We discovered that the tumor adapts rapidly to the immune attack instigated by tumor-specific CD8+ T cells in the first few days following vaccination, resulting in the upregulation of a complex set of biological networks, including multiple immunosuppressive processes. This rapid adaptation acts to prevent sustained local immune attack, despite continued infiltration by increasing numbers of tumor-specific T cells. Combining vaccination with adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells produced complete regression of the treated tumors but did not prevent the adaptive immunosuppression. In fact, the adaptive immunosuppressive pathways were more highly induced in regressing tumors, commensurate with the enhanced level of immune attack. Examination of tumor infiltrating T-cell functionality revealed that the adaptive immunosuppression leads to a progressive loss in T-cell function, even in tumors that are regressing. These novel observations that T cells produced by therapeutic intervention can instigate a rapid adaptive immunosuppressive response within the tumor have important implications for clinical implementation of immunotherapies. PMID:24196579

  2. A model for chemically-induced mechanical loading on MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiot, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain, and...... displacements). As these phenomena usually arise from species adsorption, adsorbate modification or surface reconstruction, they are surface-related by nature and thus require some dedicated mechanical modeling. The accompanying mechanical modeling proposed herein is intended to represent the chemical part of...... drawn from the energy balance in the accompanying model, highlighting the role of surface functionalization parameters in micromechanical sensors engineering....

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced enhancement of cryosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Raghav; Paciotti, Guilio F.; Bischof, John C.

    2008-02-01

    Local recurrence of cancer after cryosurgery is related to the inability to monitor and predict destruction of cancer (temperatures > -40°C) within an iceball. We previously reported that a cytokine adjuvant TNF-α could be used to achieve complete cancer destruction at the periphery of an iceball (0 to -40°C). This study is a further development of that work in which cryosurgery was performed using cryoprobes operating at temperatures > -40°C. LNCaP Pro 5 tumor grown in a dorsal skin fold chamber (DSFC) was frozen at -6°C after TNF-α incubation for 4 or 24 hours. Tumors grown in the hind limb were frozen with a probe tip temperature of -40°C, 4 or 24 hours after systemic injection with TNF-α. Both cryosurgery alone or TNF-α treatment alone caused only a minimal damage to the tumor tissue at the conditions used in the study. The combination of TNF-α and cryosurgery produced a significant damage to the tumor tissue in both the DSFC and the hind limb model system. This augmentation in cryoinjury was found to be time-dependent with 4-hour time period between the two treatments being more effective than 24-hour. These results suggests the possibility of cryotreatment at temperatures > -40°C with the administration of TNF-α.

  4. HPMA Copolymer-Bound Doxorubicin Induces Immunogenic Tumor Cell Death

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šírová, Milada; Kabešová, Martina; Kovář, Lubomír; Etrych, Tomáš; Strohalm, Jiří; Ulbrich, Karel; Říhová, Blanka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 38 (2013), s. 4815-4826. ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1254 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Anti-tumor immune response * calreticulin * heat shock proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.715, year: 2013

  5. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  6. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

  7. Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor binding in plutonium-induced lung tumors from dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to examine and characterize epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) binding in inhaled plutonium-induced canine lung-tumor tissue and to compare it with that in normal canine lung tissue. Crude membrane preparations from normal and lung-tumor tissue from beagle dogs were examined in a radioreceptor assay, using 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a ligand. Specific EGF receptor binding was determined in the presence of excess unlabeled EGF. We have examined EGF receptor binding in eight lung-tumor samples obtained from six dogs. Epidermal growth factor receptor binding was significantly greater in lung-tumor samples (31.38%) compared with that in normal lung tissue (3.76%). Scatchard plot analysis from the displacement assay revealed that there was no statistical difference in the binding affinity but significantly higher concentration of EGF-R sites in the lung-tumor tissue (619 fmol/mg) than in normal lung tissue (53 fmol/mg). The increase in EGF-R number in plutonium-induced dog lung tumors does not seem to correlate with increase in the initial lung burden exposure to plutonium. Our results demonstrate that there is a significant increase in EGF-R binding in inhaled plutonium-induced dog lung tumors

  8. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  9. Study of radiation-induced tumors in the Ohita Prefectural Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An epidemiological study on radiation induced tumor was carried out in the Ohita Prefectural Hospital in 1989. Radiation induced tumors were chosen among 62,831 surgical or biopsy specimens examined since 1968 to 1988. These tumors were defined as following conditions such as having a history of radiation therapy, occurring in the same field of irradiation, and having a latent period over five years. Total of eleven malignant tumors were selected with the average age of 64.2 years old, and the average latency of 16.4 years. All of them were female and seven cases belonged to A-1 group according to the reliability classification. The first tumor was all malignant and consisted of 9 uterus cancers and one rectal cancer. The second tumor included three rectal cancers, three vaginal cancers, two ureto-bladder cancers, one uterine body cancer, and one lymphangiosarcoma. Histological study showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in two rectal cancers in which this type was unusual as rectal cancer. Others were common histological types identical to the location. Delayed effects of irradiation was confirmed in a background of some tumors. For instance, marked fibrosis, atypical fibroblast, and thickening of blood vessel were nominated. Total amount of irradiation ranged form 24 to 92 grey, and the year of irradiation concentrated in 1969 to 1973 (75%) and the year of discovery concentrated in 1983 to 1988 (75%). This study suggested the necessity of further investigation in other medical institutions and accumulation of the tumors. (author)

  10. Nanovectorized radiotherapy, a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ClaireVanpouille-Box

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radio-therapy. However, clinically-apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nano-devices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immuno-stimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome.

  11. Laser-Induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Silicon Carbonitride

    OpenAIRE

    Besling, W.; van der Put, P.; Schoonman, J.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of silicon carbonitride coatings and powders has been investigated using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and ammonia as reactants. An industrial CW CO2-laser in parallel configuration has been used to heat up the reactant gases. HMDS dissociates in the laser beam and reactive radicals are formed which increase rapidly in molecular weight by an addition mechanism. Dense polymer-like silicon carbonitride thin films and nanosized powders are formed depending ...

  12. Potent inhibition of tumoral hypoxia-inducible factor 1α by albendazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poruchynsky Marianne S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging reports suggest resistance, increased tumor invasiveness and metastasis arising from treatment with drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. It is believed that increased tumoral hypoxia plays a prominent role in the development of these phenomena. Inhibition of tumoral hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α is thus becoming an increasingly attractive therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. We hypothesized that the anti-VEGF effect of albendazole (ABZ could be mediated through inhibition of tumoral HIF-1α. Method In vitro, the effects of ABZ on HIF-1α levels in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 were investigated using hypoxic chamber or desferrioxamine (DFO induced-hypoxia. In vivo, the effects of ABZ (150 mg/kg, i.p., single dose on the tumor levels of HIF-1α and VEGF protein and mRNA were investigated by western blotting, RT-PCR and real time-PCR. Results In vitro, ABZ inhibited cellular HIF-1α protein accumulation resulting from placement of cells under hypoxic chamber or exposure to DFO. In vivo, tumors excised from vehicle treated mice showed high levels of both HIF-1α and VEGF. Whereas, tumoral HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were highly suppressed in ABZ treated mice. Tumoral VEGFmRNA (but not HIF-1αmRNA was also found to be highly suppressed by ABZ. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time the effects of an acute dose of ABZ in profoundly suppressing both HIF-1α and VEGF within the tumor. This dual inhibition may provide additional value in inhibiting angiogenesis and be at least partially effective in inhibiting tumoral HIF-1α surge, tumor invasiveness and metastasis.

  13. Equine estrogen-induced mammary tumors in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Yoshinori; Liu, Xiaoping; Suzuki, Naomi; OKAMOTO, KANAKO; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Santosh Laxmi, Y. R.; Sayama, Kazutoshi; Shibutani, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Long-term hormone replacement therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancers in women. Equine estrogens are a principal component of hormone replacement therapy; however, their tumorigenic potential toward mammary tissue and reproductive organs has not been extensively explored. A pellet containing equilin was inserted under the skin of female ACI rats and the development of mammary tumors was monitored. Histological examination revealed premalignant l...

  14. Impacts of autophagy-inducing ingredient of areca nut on tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    Full Text Available Areca nut (AN is a popular carcinogen used by about 0.6-1.2 billion people worldwide. Although AN contains apoptosis-inducing ingredients, we previously demonstrated that both AN extract (ANE and its 30-100 kDa fraction (ANE 30-100K predominantly induce autophagic cell death in both normal and malignant cells. In this study, we further explored the action mechanism of ANE 30-100K-induced autophagy (AIA in Jurkat T lymphocytes and carcinoma cell lines including OECM-1 (mouth, CE81T/VGH (esophagus, SCC25 (tongue, and SCC-15 (tongue. The results showed that chemical- and small hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK resulted in the attenuation of AIA in Jurkat T but not in OECM-1 cells. Knockdown of Atg5 and Beclin 1 expressions ameliorated AIA in OECM-1/CE81T/VGH/Jurkat T and OECM-1/SCC25/SCC-15, respectively. Furthermore, ANE 30-100K could activate caspase-3 after inhibition of Beclin 1 expression in OECM-1/SCC25/SCC15 cells. Meanwhile, AMPK was demonstrated to be the upstream activator of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK in Jurkat T cells, and inhibition of MEK attenuated AIA in Jurkat T/OECM-1/CE81T/VGH cells. Finally, we also found that multiple myeloma RPMI8226, lymphoma U937, and SCC15 cells survived from long-term non-cytotoxic ANE 30-100K treatment exhibited stronger resistance against serum deprivation through upregulated autophagy. Collectively, our studies indicate that Beclin-1 and Atg5 but not AMPK are commonly required for AIA, and MEK/ERK pathway is involved in AIA. Meanwhile, it is also suggested that long-term AN usage might increase the resistance of survived tumor cells against serum-limited conditions.

  15. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  16. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p 3H]-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-[β-γ-imino]triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables

  17. Dysfunction of Murine Dendritic Cells Induced by Incubation with Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengguang Gao; Xin Hui; Xianghuo He; Dafang Wan; Jianren Gu

    2008-01-01

    In vivo studies showed that dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction occurred in tumor microcnvironment. As tumors were composed of many kinds of cells, the direct effects of tumor cells on immature DCs (imDCs) are needed for further studies in vitro. In the present study, bone marrow-derived imDCs were incubated with lymphoma, hepatoma and menaloma cells in vitro and surface molecules in imDCs were determined by flow cytometry. Then, imDCs incubated with tumor cells or control imDCs were further pulsed with tumor lysates and then incubated with splenocytes to perform mixed lymphocyte reaction. The DC-dependent tumor antigen-specific T cell proliferation,and IL-12 secretion were determined by flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively.Finally, the DC-dependent tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL was determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The results showed that tumor cell-DC incubation down-regulated the surface molecules in imDCs, such as CD80, CD54, CDllb, CD11a and MHC class Ⅱ molecules. The abilities of DC-dependent antigen-specific T cell proliferation and IL-12 secretion were also decreased by tumor cell incubation in vitro. Most importantly, the ability for antigenic-specific CTL priming of DCs was also decreased by incubation with tumor cells. In the present in vitro study demonstrated that the defective abilities of DCs induced by tumor cell co-incubation and the co-incubation system might be useful for future study of tumor-immune cells direct interaction and for drug screen of immune-modulation.

  18. Use of a chemically induced-colon carcinogenesis-prone Apc-mutant rat in a chemotherapeutic bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapeutic bioassay for colorectal cancer (CRC) with a rat model bearing chemically-induced CRCs plays an important role in the development of new anti-tumor drugs and regimens. Although several protocols to induce CRCs have been developed, the incidence and number of CRCs are not much enough for the efficient bioassay. Recently, we established the very efficient system to induce CRCs with a chemically induced-colon carcinogenesis-prone Apc-mutant rat, Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rat. Here, we applied the KAD rat to the chemotherapeutic bioassay for CRC and showed the utility of the KAD rat. The KAD rat has been developed by the ENU mutagenesis and carries a homozygous nonsense mutation in the Apc gene (S2523X). Male KAD rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of AOM (20 mg/kg body weight) at 5 weeks of age. Starting at 1 week after the AOM injection, they were given 2% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. Tumor-bearing KAD rats were divided into experimental and control groups on the basis of the number of tumors observed by endoscopy at week 8. The 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was administrated intravenously a dose of 50 or 75 mg/kg weekly at week 9, 10, and 11. After one-week interval, the 5-FU was given again at week 13, 14, and 15. At week 16, animals were sacrificed and tumor number and volume were measured macroscopically and microscopically. In total 48 tumors were observed in 27 KAD rats with a 100% incidence at week 8. The maximum tolerated dose for the KAD rat was 50 mg/kg of 5-FU. Macroscopically, the number or volume of tumors in the 5-FU treated rats was not significantly different from the control. Microscopically, the number of adenocarcinoma in the 5-FU treated rats was not significantly different (p < 0.02) from that of the control. However, the volume of adenocarcinomas was significantly lower than in the control. Anticancer effect of the 5-FU could be obtained only after the 16 weeks of experimental period. The use of the AOM/DSS-treated tumor

  19. Intratumoral administration of dendritic cells combined with hyperthermia induces both local and systemic antitumor effect in murine tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined whether intratumoral (i.t.) administration of dendritic cells (DCs) into a treated tumor could induce local and systemic antitumor effects in a mouse tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c in the right and left thighs with MCA-102 fibrosarcoma cells on day 0 and on day 7, respectively. On day 7, the tumors (usually 6 mm in diameter) on the right thigh were heated by immersing the tumor-bearing leg in a circulating water bath at 43 .deg. C for 30 min; thereafter, the immature DCs were i.t. administered to the right thigh tumors. This immunization procedure was repeated on days 7, 14 and 21. The tumors in both the right and left thighs were measured every 7 days and the average sizes were determined by applying the following formula, tumor size = 0.5 x (length + width). Cytotoxicity assay was done to determine tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity. Hyperthermia induced apoptosis and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in tumor occurred maximally after 6 hr. For the local treated tumor, Hyperthermia (HT) alone inhibited tumor growth compared with the untreated tumors (ρ < 0.05), and furthermore, the i.t. administered DCs combined with hyperthermia (HT + DCs) additively inhibited tumor growth compared with HT alone (ρ < 0.05). On the distant untreated tumor, HT alone significantly inhibited tumor growth (ρ < 0.05), and also HT + DCs potently inhibited tumor growth (ρ < 0.001); however, compared with HT alone, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, HT + DCs induced strong cytotoxicity of the splenocytes against tumor cells compared to DCs or HT alone. HT + DCs induced apoptosis and increased the expression of HSPs, and so this induced a potent local and systemic antitumor response in tumor-bearing mice. This regimen may be beneficial for the treatment of human cancers

  20. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Aaes, Tania Løve; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Delvaeye, Tinneke; De Craene, Bram; De Koker, Stefaan; Heyndrickx, Liesbeth; Delrue, Iris; Taminau, Joachim; Wiernicki, Bartosz; De Groote, Philippe; Garg, Abhishek; Leybaert, Luc; Grooten, Johan; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns ...

  1. [Role of HIF-induced EMT in invasion and
metastasis of tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Shi, Yan; Dai, Guanghai

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia plays a vital role in tumor metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis via hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process to metastasis, which could be triggered by hypoxia. EMT could be regulated by HIF via multiple pathways including TGF-β, Notch, and Wnt/β-catenin. It has been shown that anti-HIF drugs combined with anti-EMT therapies could be a promising strategy for tumor therapy. PMID:27600018

  2. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy induced by gastric carcinoma: Morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of six autopsy cases

    OpenAIRE

    Shinozaki Minoru; Sasai Daisuke; Hiruta Nobuyuki; Abe Fumihito; Yokose Tomoyuki; Nemoto Tetsuo; Kitahara Kanako; Wakayama Megumi; Okubo Yoichiro; Nakayama Haruo; Ishiwatari Takao; Shibuya Kazutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) has been known as a rare and serious cancer-related pulmonary complication. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this debilitating condition still remains obscure and no effective management was recommended. The present study aims to elucidate the pathophysiology of PTTM. Methods Autopsy records were searched to extract cases of pulmonary tumor embolism induced by metastasis of gastric carcinoma in the Toho Univ...

  3. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of tumor cells, and that this treatment may

  4. Atm-haploinsufficiency enhances susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shu; Shen, Kate; Wang, Yaolin; Santner, Steven J.; Chen, Jie; Brooks, S. C.; Wang, Y. Alan

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers of exposure & effect:: validationBiomarker: A-T carriersExposure/effect represented: DMBAStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): Atm male miceMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure): administration by oral gavageMethod of analysis: PCRDose-response: Nearly twice as many Atm heterozygotes developed mammary tumors (64.7%) as the wild-type mice (37.5%). RR for DMBA-induced mammary tumors is 1.7 for Atm heterozygotesAtm heterozygotes developed mammary tumors wi...

  5. CCL11-induced eosinophils inhibit the formation of blood vessels and cause tumor necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanjiang; Tian, Yijun; Kurosawa, Takamasa; Matsui, Sayaka; Touma, Maki; Yanai, Takanori; Wu, Qiong; Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2016-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that IL-18 and CCL11 were highly expressed in an NFSA tumor cell line that showed limited angiogenesis and severe necrosis. However, IL-18 was not responsible for the immune cell accumulation and necrosis. Here, we attempted to clarify the relevance of CCL11 in angiogenesis and tumor formation. We established CCL11-overexpressing MS-K cell clones (MS-K-CCL11) to assess the role of CCL11 in immune cell accumulation and angiogenesis. The MS-K-CCL11 cells did not form tumors in mice. MS-K-CCL11-conditioned medium (CM) and recombinant CCL11 induced macrophage and eosinophil differentiation from bone marrow cells. The MS-K-CCL11-CM effectively recruited the differentiated eosinophils. Furthermore, the eosinophils damaged the MS-K, NFSA and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of an antagonist of CCR3, a CCL11 receptor, to NFSA tumor-bearing mice restored the blood vessel formation and blocked the eosinophil infiltration into the NFSA tumors. Furthermore, other CCL11-overexpressing LM8 clones were established, and their tumor formation ability was reduced compared to the parental LM8 cells, accompanied by increased eosinophil infiltration, blockade of angiogenesis and necrosis. These results indicate that CCL11 was responsible for the limited angiogenesis and necrosis by inducing and attracting eosinophils in the tumors. PMID:27169545

  6. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2 contributes to liver resection-induced acceleration of hepatic metastatic tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Otto Kollmar; Michael D Menger; Martin K Schilling

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in liver resection-induced acceleration of tumor growth in a mouse model of hepatic metastasis.METHODS: After a 50% hepatectomy, 1×105 CT26.WT cells were implanted into the left liver lobe of syngeneic balb/c mice (PHx). Additional animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody (MAB452) neutralizing MIP-2(PHx+mAB). Non-resected and non-mAB-treated mice (Con) served as controls. After 7 d, tumor angiogenesis and microcirculation as well as cell proliferation, tumor growth, and CXCR-2 expression were analyzed using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry.RESULTS: Partial hepatectomy increased (P<0.05) the expression of the MIP-2 receptor CXCR-2 on tumor cells when compared with non-resected controls, and markedly accelerated (P<0.05) angiogenesis and metastatic tumor growth. Neutralization of MIP-2 by MAB452 treatment significantly (P<0.05) depressed CXCR-2 expression. Further, the blockade of MIP-2 reduced the angiogenic response (P<0.05) and inhibited tumor growth (P< 0.05). Of interest, liver resection-induced hepatocyte proliferation was not effected by anti-MIP-2 treatment.CONCLUSION: MIP-2 significantly contributes to liver resection-induced acceleration of colorectal CT26.WT hepatic metastasis growth.

  7. Attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus expressing oncofetal antigen (tumor-associated antigen) 5T4 induces active therapy of established tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulryan, Kate; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Shaw, David; Wang, Who; Kingsman, Susan M; Stern, Peter L; Carroll, Miles W

    2002-10-01

    The human oncofetal antigen 5T4 (h5T4) is a transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by a wide spectrum of cancers, including colorectal, ovarian, and gastric, but with a limited normal tissue expression. Such properties make 5T4 an excellent putative target for cancer immunotherapy. The murine homologue of 5T4 (m5T4) has been cloned and characterized, which allows for the evaluation of immune intervention strategies in "self-antigen" in vivo tumor models. We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses based on the highly attenuated and modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA strain), expressing h5T4 (MVA-h5T4), m5T4 (MVA-m5T4), and Escherichia coli LacZ (MVA-LacZ). Immunization of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with MVA-h5T4 and MVA-m5T4 constructs induced antibody responses to human and mouse 5T4, respectively. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice vaccinated with MVA-h5T4 were challenged with syngeneic tumor line transfectants, B16 melanoma, and CT26 colorectal cells that express h5T4. MVA-h5T4-vaccinated mice showed significant tumor retardation compared with mice vaccinated with MVA-LacZ or PBS. In active treatment studies, inoculation with MVA-h5T4 was able to treat established CT26-h5T4 lung tumor and to a lesser extent B16.h5T4 s.c. tumors. Additionally, when C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 were challenged with B16 cells expressing m5T4, resulting growth of the tumors was significantly retarded compared with control animals. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with MVA-m5T4 showed no signs of autoimmune toxicity. These data support the use of MVA-5T4 for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:12481437

  8. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway Inhibition Resolves Tumor Hypoxia and Improves Local Tumor Control After Single-Dose Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbig, Linda [OncoRay–National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Koi, Lydia [OncoRay–National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Konsortium für Translationale Krebsforschung, Site Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Brüchner, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Radiooncology Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Gurtner, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Unterschemmann, Kerstin [Global Drug Discovery, Bayer Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pruschy, Martin [Radiation Oncology, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of BAY-84-7296, a novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activity, on hypoxia, microenvironment, and radiation response of tumors. Methods and Materials: UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-14 human squamous cell carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice. When tumors reached 4 mm in diameter BAY-84-7296 (Bayer Pharma AG) or carrier was daily administered to the animals. At 7 mm tumors were either excised for Western blot and immunohistologic investigations or were irradiated with single doses. After irradiation animals were randomized to receive BAY-84-7296 maintenance or carrier. Local tumor control was evaluated 150 days after irradiation, and the dose to control 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}) was calculated. Results: BAY-84-7296 decreased nuclear HIF-1α expression. Daily administration of inhibitor for approximately 2 weeks resulted in a marked decrease of pimonidazole hypoxic fraction in UT-SCC-5 (0.5% vs 21%, P<.0001) and in UT-SCC-14 (0.3% vs 19%, P<.0001). This decrease was accompanied by a significant increase in fraction of perfused vessels in UT-SCC-14 but not in UT-SCC-5. Bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 labeling indices were significantly reduced only in UT-SCC-5. No significant changes were observed in vascular area or necrosis. BAY-84-7296 before single-dose irradiation significantly decreased TCD{sub 50}, with an enhancement ratio of 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.72) in UT-SCC-5 and of 1.55 (95% CI 1.26-1.94) in UT-SCC-14. BAY-84-7296 maintenance after irradiation did not further decrease TCD{sub 50}. Conclusions: BAY-84-7296 resulted in a marked decrease in tumor hypoxia and substantially reduced radioresistance of tumor cells with the capacity to cause a local recurrence after irradiation. The data suggest that reduction of cellular hypoxia tolerance by BAY-84-7296 may represent the primary biological mechanism underlying the observed enhancement of

  9. Cyclin D expression in plutonium-induced lung tumors in F344 rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.; Kelly, G. [SouthWest Scientific Resources, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The genetic mechanisms responsible for {alpha}-radiation-induced lung cancer in rats following inhalation of {sup 239}Pu is an ongoing area of research in our laboratory. Previous studies have examined the status of the p53 gene by immunohistochemistry. Only two tumors (2/26 squamous cell carcinomas) exhibited detectable levels of p53 products. Both were the result of mutations in codons 280 and 283. More recent studies of X-ray-induced lung tumors in rats showed a similar lack of involvement of p53. In conclusion, we found that {alpha}-radiation-induced rat lung tumors have a high incidence (31 of 39) of cyclin D{sub 1} overexpression.

  10. Chemical mapping of tumor progression by FT-IR imaging: towards molecular histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibois, Cyril; Déléris, Gérard

    2006-10-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectro-imaging enables global analysis of samples, with resolution close to the cellular level. Recent studies have shown that FT-IR imaging enables determination of the biodistribution of several molecules of interest (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins) for tissue analysis without pre-analytical modification of the sample such as staining. Molecular structure information is also available from the same analysis, notably for protein secondary structure and fatty acyl chain peroxidation level. Thus, several cancer markers can be identified from FT-IR tissue images, enabling accurate discrimination between healthy and tumor areas. FT-IR imaging applications are now able to provide unique chemical and morphological information about tissue status. With the fast image acquisition provided by modern mid-infrared imaging systems, it is now envisaged to analyze cerebral tumor exereses in delays compatible with neurosurgery. Accordingly, we propose to take FT-IR imaging into consideration for the development of new molecular histopathology tools. PMID:16935373

  11. Tumors induce a subset of inflammatory monocytes with immunosuppressive activity on CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Giovanna; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Santo, Carmela De; Marigo, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Brombacher, Frank; Borrello, Ivan; Zanovello, Paola; Bicciato, Silvio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the efficacy of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. While tumor-recruited CD11b+ myeloid cells are known mediators of tumor-associated immune dysfunction, the true nature of these suppressive cells and the fine biochemical pathways governing their immunosuppressive activity remain elusive. Here we describe a population of circulating CD11b+IL-4 receptor α+ (CD11b+IL-4Rα+), inflammatory-type monocytes that is elicited by growing tumors and activated by IFN-γ released from T lymphocytes. CD11b+IL-4Rα+ cells produced IL-13 and IFN-γ and integrated the downstream signals of these cytokines to trigger the molecular pathways suppressing antigen-activated CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analogous immunosuppressive circuits were active in CD11b+ cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These suppressor cells challenge the current idea that tumor-conditioned immunosuppressive monocytes/macrophages are alternatively activated. Moreover, our data show how the inflammatory response elicited by tumors had detrimental effects on the adaptive immune system and suggest novel approaches for the treatment of tumor-induced immune dysfunctions. PMID:17016559

  12. Immunohistochemical Study Effects of Spirulina Algae on the Induced Mammary Tumor in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aimed at investigating the protective effects of Spirulina platensis on the induced mammary tumor in rats by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and the proliferation of the tumor cells by using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). At 50 days of age, group 1 remained untreated, group 2 treated with 2% Spirulina platenesis in food, group 3 received 50 mg/kg DMBA i.p. groupe 4 received 50 mg/kg DMBA i.p and fed on 2% spirulina. Rats were killed when the largest mammary tumor reached 1-2 cm in diameter or after 6 months of animal>s age. All the tumors produced by DMBA were ductal carcinoma in 100% of group 3, but in group 4 two rats had mammary tumor. The groups 1 and 2 had no tumor and have the same histological and immunostaining features, but in group 4, 13/15 rats had no tumor except formation of some cysts and hyperplasia in epithelial cells. The conclusion of this work suggests that Spirulina platnesis could be considered as a chemotherapeutic agent that causes apoptosis to tumor cells by reducing the number of malignant cells and resists cancer formation. (author)

  13. Chemoprevention with Acetylsalicylic Acid, Vitamin D and Calcium Reduces Risk of Carcinogen-induced Lung Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, J; Raskov, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor.......Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor....

  14. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Colette J; Sharma, Ashish; Vuong, Dinh-Van;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta and matrix metallop......BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta and matrix...

  15. PIXE and PIXE-induced XRF for chemical specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wavelength dispersive X-ray spectra with fine structures in the PIXE and PIXE-induced XRF spectra have been proved to be very much useful for chemical specification of condensed matters. The fine structures have been reproduced theoretically by introducing molecular orbital calculations, the shake-off and resonant orbital rearrangement (ROR) processes, together with the direct Coulomb interaction between projectiles and target atoms, and the self-absorption of emitted X-rays through the targets. Comparison between observed and theoretical spectra is given here for F and S atoms

  16. Chemical modification of polyurethanes by radiation-induced grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic methods of radiation-induced modification of polyurethanes for biomedical applications and of their characterization are briefly described. The most important works found in literature on radiation grafting of polyurethanes are discussed. The radiation grafting of polyetherurethane films and tubings by the preswelling method using various monomers and their physico-chemical characterization are discussed in detail with respect to the antithrombogenic properties of the materials. Novel applications for radiation-modified polyurethanes as drug delivery systems or antiinfectious materials are briefly mentioned. 52 references

  17. TRIADIMEFON INDUCES RAT THYROID TUMORS THROUGH A NON-TSH MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as agricultural and pharmaceutical products which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Members of this class are hepatotoxic and cause mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. Triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumor...

  18. Identification and localization of transformed cells in agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced plant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezmer; Schlichting; Wachter; Ullrich

    1999-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-induced tumors of dicotyledonous plants consist of well-defined vascular bundle-like structures originating from transformed cells. The current view that 25% of the tumor cells are transformed has been re-investigated by using beta-glucuronidase (gus)-gene-containing wild-type bacteria (A281 p35S gus-int). Regularly growing stem and leaf tumors showed irregular GUS-staining patterns in the different plant species, Ricinus communis L., Cucurbita maxima L., Vicia faba L. and Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier. Variable staining and inconsistency between staining and tumor growth suggested an inhibition of gus expression. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses it became evident that gus is also integrated into the DNA of unstainable tumor parts but not expressed. These results and area calculations of tissues unable to contain the bacterial transferred-DNA with gus provide strong evidence that in A. tumefaciens-induced tumors most cells, or even all, are transformed, i.e. ca. 100%. PMID:10550620

  19. Pyruvate induces transient tumor hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption and potentiates the anti-tumor effect of a hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Takakusagi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP of bromo isophosphoramide mustard that is selectively activated within hypoxic regions in solid tumors. Our recent study showed that intravenously administered bolus pyruvate can transiently induce hypoxia in tumors. We investigated the mechanism underlying the induction of transient hypoxia and the combination use of pyruvate to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of TH-302. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: The hypoxia-dependent cytotoxicity of TH-302 was evaluated by a viability assay in murine SCCVII and human HT29 cells. Modulation in cellular oxygen consumption and in vivo tumor oxygenation by the pyruvate treatment was monitored by extracellular flux analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oxygen imaging, respectively. The enhancement of the anti-tumor effect of TH-302 by pyruvate treatment was evaluated by monitoring the growth suppression of the tumor xenografts inoculated subcutaneously in mice. TH-302 preferentially inhibited the growth of both SCCVII and HT29 cells under hypoxic conditions (0.1% O2, with minimal effect under aerobic conditions (21% O2. Basal oxygen consumption rates increased after the pyruvate treatment in SCCVII cells in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that pyruvate enhances the mitochondrial respiration to consume excess cellular oxygen. In vivo EPR oxygen imaging showed that the intravenous administration of pyruvate globally induced the transient hypoxia 30 min after the injection in SCCVII and HT29 tumors at the size of 500-1500 mm(3. Pretreatment of SCCVII tumor bearing mice with pyruvate 30 min prior to TH-302 administration, initiated with small tumors (∼ 550 mm(3, significantly delayed tumor growth. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our in vitro and in vivo studies showed that pyruvate induces transient hypoxia by enhancing mitochondrial oxygen consumption in tumor cells. TH-302 therapy can be potentiated by pyruvate pretreatment if started at the

  20. Second primary tumor and radiation induced neoplasma in the uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Tomoyasu; Nishio, Masamichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Narimatsu, Naoto; Kanemoto, Toshitaka (National Hospital of Sapporo (Japan))

    1984-09-01

    This report is concerned with multiple primary cancers developing in invasive uterine cancer. Second primary tumors were recorded 27 women with a total of 30 non-uterine cancer (exception of radiation-induced cancer). 17 patients of radiation-induced neoplasm were observed (Rectal cancer 4, soft part sarcoma 4, cancer of urinary bladder 3, bone tumor 3, uterin cancer 2 and cancer of Vulva 1). One case is 4 legions (corpus, sigma, thymoma and stomach), 2 cases are 3 lesions (uterine cervix, stomach and maxillay siuis: uterine cervix, thyroidal gland and radiation-induced soft part sarcoma). Only 5 of these 17 patients were known irradiated dose (50 Gy--55 Gy), however others unknown. The mean latent periods of 17 cases of radiation induced neoplasms are 19.4 years. 16 patients of late second cancers of the cervix appearing from 11 to 36 years (average 19.5 years) after initial radiotherapy were recorded.

  1. Role of Acid Sphingomyelinase-Induced Signaling in Melanoma Cells for Hematogenous Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Carpinteiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematogenous metastasis of malignant tumor cells is a multistep process that requires release of tumor cells from the local tumor mass, interaction of the tumor cells with platelets in the blood, and adhesion of either the activated tumor cells or the complexes of platelets and tumor cells to the endothelial cells of the target organ. We have previously shown that the interaction of melanoma cells with platelets results in the release of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm from activated platelets. Secreted platelet-derived Asm acts on malignant tumor cells to cluster and activate integrins; such clustering and activation are necessary for tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells and for metastasis. Methods: We examined the response of tumor cells to treatment with extracellular sphingomyelinase or co-incubation with wild-type and Asm-deficient platelets. We determined the phosphorylation and activation of several intracellular signaling molecules, in particular p38 kinase (p38K, phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ, ezrin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Results: Incubation of B16F10 melanoma cells with Asm activates p38 MAP kinase (p38K, phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ, ezrin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Co-incubation of B16F10 melanoma cells with wild-type or Asm-deficient platelets showed that the phosphorylation/activation of p38K is dependent on Asm. Pharmacological blockade of p38K prevents activation of β1 integrin and adhesion in vitro. Most importantly, inhibition of p38K activity in B16F10 melanoma cells prevents tumor cell adhesion and metastasis to the lung in vivo, a finding indicating the importance of p38K for metastasis. Conclusions: Asm, secreted from activated platelets after tumor cell-platelet contact, induces p38K phosphorylation in tumor cells. This in turn stimulates β1 integrin activation that is necessary for adhesion and subsequent metastasis of tumor cells. Thus, inhibition of p38K might be a novel

  2. Inhibition of autophagy stimulate molecular iodine-induced apoptosis in hormone independent breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Molecular iodine (I2) causes non-apoptotic cell death in MDA-MB231 breast tumor cells. ► Autophagy is activated as a survival mechanism in response to I2 in MDA-MB231. ► Autophagy inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to I2-induced apoptotic cell death. ► Autophagy inhibitor potentiates apoptosis and tumor regressive effects of I2 in mice. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor negative (ER−ve) and p53 mutant breast tumors are highly aggressive and have fewer treatment options. Previously, we showed that molecular Iodine (I2) induces apoptosis in hormone responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and non-apoptotic cell death in ER−ve–p53 mutant MDA-MB231 cells (Shrivastava, 2006). Here we show that I2 (3 μM) treatment enhanced the features of autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. Since autophagy is a cell survival response to most anti-cancer therapies, we used both in vitro and in vivo systems to determine whether ER−ve mammary tumors could be sensitized to I2-induced apoptosis by inhibiting autophagy. Autophagy inhibition with chloroquine (CQ) and inhibitors for PI3K (3MA, LY294002) and H+/ATPase (baflomycin) resulted in enhanced cell death in I2 treated MDA-MB231 cells. Further, CQ (20 μM) in combination with I2, showed apoptotic features such as increased sub-G1 fraction (∼5-fold), expression of cleaved caspase-9 and -3 compared to I2 treatment alone. Flowcytometry of I2 and CQ co-treated cells revealed increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability (p 2 treatment. For in vivo studies ICRC mice were transplanted subcutaneously with MMTV-induced mammary tumors. A significant reduction in tumor volumes, as measured by MRI, was found in I2 and CQ co-treated mice relative to I2 or vehicle treated mice. These data indicate that inhibition of autophagy renders ER−ve breast tumor cells more sensitive to I2 induced apoptosis. Thus, I2 together with autophagy inhibitor could have a potential tumorostatic role in ER−ve aggressive breast tumors that may be

  3. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  4. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@mail.nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-01-31

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  5. Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy Induced by Ureteral Carcinoma: A Necropsy Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Marumo, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; TERANISHI, TAKASHI; HIGAMI, YUICHI; Koshimo, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Motokazu

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal cancer-related pulmonary complication with rapidly progressing dyspnea and pulmonary hypertension that occasionally induces sudden death. We report the first case of PTTM induced by ureter carcinoma. Case Presentation The patient was an 80-year-old Japanese female with chief complaints of dry cough and dyspnea. An echocardiogram revealed severe pulmonary hypertension. A chest radiograph showed ground glass opacity of bila...

  6. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed

  7. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  8. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolinario Rosa M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP, vault poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022. Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003. Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed.

  9. Correlation of drug-induced sister chromatid exchanges in vitro with in vivo tumor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spontaneous hepatocarcinoma (HCa) grown in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was used to investigate the ability of the in vitro sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay to predict in vivo tumor sensitivity to 3 chemotherapeutic agents: melphalan, cis-Platinum, and BCNU. For HCa cells grown in monolayer culture, melphalan was the most efficient at inducing SCEs, followed by cis-Platinum, with BCNU inducing the least. According to in vitro cell survival curves, HCa was most sensitive to melphalan, less sensitive to cis-Platinum, and essentially resistant to BCNU. The relative antineoplastic effects of melphalan, cis-Platinum, and BCNU in vivo were compared by the response of artificial and spontaneous pulmonary metastases and solid tumors to these agents. BCNU had no effect on the number of artificial metastases, while there was a dose-dependent decrease in the number of lung nodules in mice treated with melphalan or cis-Platinum, with melphalan being the more effective. Spontaneous pulmonary metastases generated from HCa leg tumors were reduced in those mice treated with melphalan, unaffected by cis-Platinum, and increased by BCNU. In HCa leg tumors (5 to 6 mm in diameter), melphalan induced the longest growth delay, with cis-Platinum inducing less, and BCNU the least. Thus, the relative effects produced by these 3 drugs in vivo were the same as predicted by SCE assay in vitro

  10. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKCδ in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKCδ in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKCδ, ERK1/2 and p38.

  11. Obesity decreases serum selenium levels in DMBA-induced mammary tumor using Obese Zucker Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we reported that obese Zucker rats had increased susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors compared to lean Zucker rats. Several studies suggest that lower serum selenium may play an important role in increasing the risk of several types of cancers (e.g, colon, breast and prostate canc...

  12. Occurrence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene in X-ray-induced rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene alterations have been found in human lung cancers. However, there is no information on the factors inducing EGFR mutations. In rodents, K-ras mutations are frequently found in many lung carcinogenesis models, but hitherto, Egfr mutations have not been reported. Their presence was therefore investigated in representative lung carcinogenesis models with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MelQx) and ethyl carbamate (urethane), as well as X-ray irradiation. With the chemical carcinogenesis models, no mutations were detected in Egfr, which is in clear contrast to the high rates observed in either codon 12 or 61 of K-ras (21/23 of the lung tumors induced with NNK, 4/5 with MelQx, 1/4 with urethane and 7/18 with BHP). However, in the X-ray-induced lung tumors, Egfr mutations with amino acid substitution were observed in exons 18 and 21 (4/12, 33%), but no activating mutation of K-ras was detected. In addition, one and four silent mutations were identified in K-ras (exon 1) and Egfr (exons 18, 20 and 21), respectively. Most mutations in both Egfr and K-ras were G/C→A/T transitions (7/8, 88% and 31/34, 91%, respectively). Although, the mutational patterns in equivalent human lesions were not completely coincident, this first report of Egfr mutations in an experimental lung tumor model suggests that X-rays or other factors producing oxygen radicals could cause EGFR mutations in some proportion of lung cancers in humans. (author)

  13. Tumor associated macrophages protect colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through IL-1beta-dependent stabilization of Snail in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kaler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1beta, which in turn inactivates GSK3beta and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1beta by neutralizing IL-1beta antibody, or silencing of IL-1beta in macrophages inhibited their ability to counter TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, IL-1beta was sufficient to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL-induced collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta psi and activation of caspases were prevented by macrophages or by recombinant IL-1beta. Pharmacological inhibition of IL-1beta release from macrophages by vitamin D(3, a potent chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer, restored the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis of tumor cells cultured with macrophages. Macrophages and IL-1beta failed to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells expressing dnIkappaB, dnAKT or dnTCF4, confirming that they oppose TRAIL-induced cell death through induction of Wnt signaling in tumor cells. We showed that macrophages and IL-1beta stabilized Snail in tumor cells in an NF-kappaB/Wnt dependent manner and that Snail deficient tumor cells were not protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis by macrophages or by IL-1beta, demonstrating a crucial role of Snail in the resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL. SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified a positive feedback loop between tumor cells and macrophages that propagates the growth and promotes the survival of colon cancer cells: tumor cells stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1beta, which in turn, promotes Wnt signaling and stabilizes Snail in tumor cells, conferring resistance to TRAIL. Vitamin D(3 halts this amplifying loop by interfering with the release of IL-1beta from macrophages

  14. Combretastatin A4 phosphate induces rapid regression of tumor neovessels and growth through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Loïc; Kermani, Pouneh; Young, Lauren M.; Cheng, Joseph; Zhang, Fan; Shido, Koji; Lam, George; Bompais-Vincent, Heidi; Zhu, Zhenping; Hicklin, Daniel J.; Bohlen, Peter; Chaplin, David J.; May, Chad; Rafii, Shahin

    2005-01-01

    The molecular and cellular pathways that support the maintenance and stability of tumor neovessels are not well defined. The efficacy of microtubule-disrupting agents, such as combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), in inducing rapid regression of specific subsets of tumor neovessels has opened up new avenues of research to identify factors that support tumor neoangiogenesis. Herein, we show that CA4P selectively targeted endothelial cells, but not smooth muscle cells, and induced regression of u...

  15. Treatment of injuries induced by radiotherapy of malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of treatment of delayed and early radiation injuries induced by ionizing radiations therapy of oncologic patients are considered. It is shown that in planning radio therapy its delayed effects sometimes are under-estimated. Changes in blood and lymphatic vessels exposed to irradiation lead to clinical manifestation of the delayed radiation injury. These pathologic processes can aggravate in patients with accompanying changes in endocrine background and different somatic diseases. Timely and intensive treatment of local radiation injuries of different organs and tissues permits to fight successfully with the radiotherapy complications

  16. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SudinBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, “Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy”. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular “virtual tissue” model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  17. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebel Urban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148.

  18. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sung

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde, tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Methods Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Results Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative

  19. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8+ T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of diverse cancers

  20. The microtubule stabilizer patupilone counteracts ionizing radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity and tumor cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) in combination with microtubule stabilizing agents (MSA) is a promising combined treatment modality. Supra-additive treatment responses might result from direct tumor cell killing and cooperative indirect, tumor cell-mediated effects on the tumor microenvironment. Here we investigated deregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, as an important component of the tumor microenvironment, by the combined treatment modality of IR with the clinically relevant MSA patupilone. Expression, secretion and activity of MMPs and related tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were determined in cell extracts and conditioned media derived from human fibrosarcoma HT1080 and human glioblastoma U251 tumor cells in response to treatment with IR and the MSA patupilone. Treatment-dependent changes of the invasive capacities of these tumor cell lines were analysed using a Transwell invasion assay. Control experiments were performed using TIMP-directed siRNA and TIMP-directed inhibitory antibodies. Enzymatic activity of secreted MMPs was determined after treatment with patupilone and irradiation in the human fibrosarcoma HT1080 and the human glioblastoma U251 tumor cell line. IR enhanced the activity of secreted MMPs up to 2-fold and cellular pretreatment with low dose patupilone (0.05-0.2 nM) counteracted specifically the IR-induced MMP activity. The cell invasive capacity of HT1080 and U251 cells was increased after irradiation with 2 Gy by 30% and 50%, respectively, and patupilone treatment completely abrogated IR-induced cell invasion. Patupilone did not alter the level of MMP expression, but interestingly, the protein level of secreted TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 was lower after combined treatment than after irradiation treatment alone. Furthermore, siRNA depletion of TIMP-1 or TIMP-2 prevented IR-mediated induction of MMP activity and cell invasion. These results indicate that patupilone counteracts an IR-induced MMP activation process by the

  1. Involvement of Mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Acifluorfen-Induced Liver Injury and Subsequent Tumor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Shibutani, Makoto; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-06-01

    Acifluorfen (ACI), a protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PROTOX) inhibitor herbicide, promotes the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), and induces tumors in the rodent liver. Porphyria is a risk factor for liver tumors in humans; however, the specific mechanisms through which ACI induces hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents are unclear. Here, we investigated the mode of action of ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, focusing on constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which is essential for the development of rodent liver tumors in response to certain cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducers. Dietary treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for up to 13 weeks increased Cyp2b10 expression in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Microscopically, ACI treatment-induced cytotoxic changes, including hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation, and caused regenerative changes accompanied by prolonged increases in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatocytes in WT mice. In contrast, these cytotoxic and regenerative changes in hepatocytes were significantly attenuated, but still observed, in CARKO mice. ACI treatment also increased liver PPIX levels similarly in both genotypes; however, no morphological evidence of porphyrin deposition was found in hepatocytes from either genotype. Treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for 26 weeks after initiation with diethylnitrosamine increased the incidence and multiplicities of altered foci and adenomas in hepatocytes from WT mice; these effects were significantly reduced in CARKO mice. These results indicated that prolonged cytotoxicity in the liver was a key factor for ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and that CAR played an important role in ACI-induced liver injury and tumor development in mice. PMID:26928356

  2. Chemically Induced and Light-Independent Cryptochrome Photoreceptor Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gesa Rosenfeldt; Rafael Mu(n)oz Viana; Henning D.Mootz; Albrecht G.Von Arnim; Alfred Batschauer

    2008-01-01

    The cryptochrome photoreceptors of higher plants are dimeric proteins. Their N-terminal photosensory domain mediates dimerization, and the unique C-terminal extension (CCT) mediates signaling. We made use of the human FK506-binding protein (FKBP) that binds with high affinity to rapamycin or rapamycin analogs (rapalogs). The FKBP-rapamycin complex is recognized by another protein, FRB, thus allowing rapamycin-induced dimerization of two target proteins. Here we demonstrate by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays the applicability of this regulated dimerization system to plants. Furthermore, we show that fusion proteins consisting of the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 fused to FKBP and FRB and coexpressed in Arabidopsis cells specifically induce the expression of cryptochrome-controlled reporter and endogenous genes in darkness upon incubation with the rapalog. These results demonstrate that the activation of cryptochrome signal transduction can be chemically induced in a dose-dependent fashion and uncoupled from the light signal, and provide the groundwork for gain-of-function experiments to study specifically the role of photoreceptors in darkness or in signaling cross-talk even under light conditions that activate members of all photoreceptor families.

  3. Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E2-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E2 pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E2-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E2-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E2 group relative to those in the E2 group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E2-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E2-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E2-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E2 and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E2 and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E2-induced breast tumors in female

  4. Allelic losses in mouse skin tumors induced by {gamma}-irradiation of p53 heterozygotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Tomonori; Sato, Hiroki; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Kominami, Ryo [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences; Kitagawa, Tomoyuki [Cancer Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Skin tumors were induced by {gamma}-irradiation in F{sub 1} mice between C3H/He or BALB/c and MSM carrying a p53-deficient allele. The incidence was 39.1% (34/87) in p53(KO/+) mice of the C3H/MSM genetic background and 14.3% (19/133) in those of the BALB/MSM background. Interestingly, most of the tumors (82%) lost the wild-type p53 allele and no skin tumor was found in p53(+/+) F{sub 1} mice. This suggests a requirement of p53 loss for the skin cancer development. Genome scan localized a chromosomal locus showing frequent allelic losses near D12Mit2, which may harbor a tumor suppressor gene. In addition, 23 loci distributed on 13 chromosomes exhibited allelic losses at frequencies of more than 20%. The genome-wide occurrence of allelic losses suggests that genomic instability of the skin tumors may be implicated in radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The present study is the first to report a mouse model system useful for the analysis of radiation induction of skin cancer in man. (author)

  5. MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy in recurrent extrahepatic abdominal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, M.G.; Straub, R.; Eichler, K.; Boettger, M.; Woitaschek, D.; Vogl, T.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Roggan, A. [LMTB GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MR-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for treatment of recurrent extrahepatic abdominal tumors. In 11 patients (6 women and 5 men; mean age 53 years, age range 29-67 years) with 14 lesions the following tumors were treated in this study: paravertebral recurrence of hypernephroma (n=1); recurrence of uterus carcinoma (n=1); recurrence of chondrosarcoma of the pubic bone (n=1); presacral recurrence of rectal carcinoma (n=1); recurrent anal cancer (n=1); metastases in the abdominal wall (n=1); and lymph node metastases from colorectal cancer (n=8). A total of 27 laser applications were performed. A fast low-angle shot 2D sequence (TR/TE/flip angle=102 ms/8 ms/70 ) was used for nearly real-time monitoring during treatment. All patients had no other treatment option. Seventeen LITT sessions were performed using a conventional laser system with a mean laser power of 5.2 W (range 4.5-5.7 W), and 10 LITT session were performed using a power laser system with a mean laser power of 28.0 W. In 10 lesions total destruction could be achieved. In the remaining recurrent tumors, significant reduction of tumor volume by 60-80% was obtained. All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anesthesia. No complications occurred during treatment. Laser-induced thermotherapy is a practicable, minimally invasive, well-tolerated technique that can produce large areas of necrosis within recurrent tumors, substantially reducing active tumor volume if not resulting in outright destruction of tumor. (orig.)

  6. Tumor-induced rickets in a child with a central giant cell granuloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Cruz-Rojo, Jaime; Gallego, Carmen; Romance, Ana Isabel; Mosqueda-Peña, Rocio; Almaden, Yolanda; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with a tumor-producing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We present a child with symptoms of rickets as the first clinical sign of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) with high serum levels of FGF23, a hormone associated with decreased phosphate resorption. A 3-year-old boy presented with a limp and 6 months later with painless growth of the jaw. On examination gingival hypertrophy and genu varum were observed. Investigations revealed hypophosphatemia, normal 1,25 and 25 (OH) vitamin D, and high alkaline phosphatase. An MRI showed an osteolytic lesion of the maxilla. Radiographs revealed typical rachitic findings. Incisional biopsy of the tumor revealed a CGCG with mesenchymal matrix. The CGCG was initially treated with calcitonin, but the lesions continued to grow, making it necessary to perform tracheostomy and gastrostomy. One year after onset the hyperphosphaturia worsened, necessitating increasing oral phosphate supplements up to 100 mg/kg per day of elemental phosphorus. FGF23 levels were extremely high. Total removal of the tumor was impossible, and partial reduction was achieved after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency, local instillation of triamcinolone, and oral propranolol. Compassionate use of cinacalcet was unsuccessful in preventing phosphaturia. The tumor slowly regressed after the third year of disease; phosphaturia improved, allowing the tapering of phosphate supplements, and FGF23 levels normalized. Tumor-induced osteomalacia/rickets is uncommon in children and is challenging for physicians to diagnose. It should be suspected in patients with intractable osteomalacia or rickets. A tumor should be ruled out if FGF23 levels are high. PMID:26009620

  7. The p75NTR tumor suppressor induces cell cycle arrest facilitating caspase mediated apoptosis in prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a death receptor which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family of membrane proteins. This study shows that p75NTR retarded cell cycle progression by induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a reduction in the S phase of the cell cycle. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain deleted (ΔDD) dominant-negative antagonist of p75NTR showed that the death domain transduced anti-proliferative activity in a ligand-independent manner. Conversely, addition of NGF ligand rescued retardation of cell cycle progression with commensurate changes in components of the cyclin/cdk holoenzyme complex. In the absence of ligand, p75NTR-dependent cell cycle arrest facilitated an increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation of the prostate cancer cells. Apoptosis of p75NTR expressing cells occurred via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway leading to a sequential caspase-9 and -7 cascade. Since the death domain deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75NTR rescued intrinsic caspase associated apoptosis in PC-3 cells, this shows p75NTR was integral to ligand independent induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the ability of ligand to ameliorate the p75NTR-dependent intrinsic apoptotic cascade indicates that NGF functioned as a survival factor for p75NTR expressing prostate cancer cells

  8. Poly I:C enhances cycloheximide-induced apoptosis of tumor cells through TLR3 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a critical component of the innate immune response to dsRNA viruses, which was considered to be mainly expressed in immune cells and some endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated the expression and proapoptotic activity of TLR3 in human and murine tumor cell lines. RT-PCR and FACS analysis were used to detect expression of TLR3 in various human and murine tumor cell lines. All tumor cell lines were cultured with poly I:C, CHX, or both for 12 h, 24 h, 72 h, and then the cell viability was analyzed with CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution, the apoptosis was measured by FACS with Annexin V and PI staining. Production of Type I IFN in poly I:C/CHX mediated apoptosis were detected through western blotting. TLR3 antibodies and IFN-β antibodies were used in Blockade and Neutralization Assay. We show that TLR3 are widely expressed on human and murine tumor cell lines, and activation of TLR3 signaling in cancerous cells by poly I:C made Hela cells (human cervical cancer) and MCA38 cells (murine colon cancer) become dose-dependently sensitive to protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX)-induced apoptosis. Blockade of TLR3 recognition with anti-TLR3 antibody greatly attenuated the proapoptotic effects of poly I:C on tumor cells cultured with CHX. IFN-β production was induced after poly I:C/CHX treatment and neutralization of IFN-β slightly reduced poly I:C/CHX -induced apoptosis. Our study demonstrated the proapoptotic activity of TLR3 expressed by various tumor cells, which may open a new range of clinical applications for TLR3 agonists as an adjuvant of certain cancer chemotherapy

  9. Radiation induced oxidative stress: I. Studies in Ehrlich solid tumor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, A; Choudhary, D; Upreti, M; Rath, P C; Kale, R K

    2001-07-01

    Understanding the response of tumors to ionizing radiation might potentially lead to improvement in tumor control and patient morbidity. Since the antioxidant status is likely to be linked to radioresponse, its modulation needs to be examined. Therefore, Swiss albino male mice (7-8 weeks old) with Ehrlich solid tumors were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays (0-9 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.0153 Gy/s; and enzymes involved in antioxidant functions were determined in the tumors. Radiation effects in terms of oxidative damage, LDH, nitric oxide and DNA fragmentation were also examined. In tumors, the specific activity of SOD was increased with dose but declined 6 Gy onwards. GST, DTD and GSH showed an almost progressive increase. These enhanced activities might have resulted from the increased protein expression. This possibility was supported by the Western Blot analysis for GST protein. These changes might be closely linked to the radiation-induced oxidative stress as reflected by the enhanced levels of peroxidative damage, DNA fragmentation, LDH activity and nitric oxide levels. These findings may have relevance to radiation therapy of cancer as the elevated antioxidant status of irradiated tumors is likely to limit the effectiveness of radiation dose and adversely affect the therapeutic gain. PMID:11681724

  10. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-03-22

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  11. miR-137 Modulates a Tumor Suppressor Network-Inducing Senescence in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Neault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating K-Ras mutations occurs frequently in pancreatic cancers and is implicated in their development. Cancer-initiating events, such as oncogenic Ras activation, lead to the induction of cellular senescence, a tumor suppressor response. During senescence, the decreased levels of KDM4A lysine demethylase contribute to p53 activation, however, the mechanism by which KDM4A is downregulated is unknown. We show that miR-137 targets KDM4A mRNA during Ras-induced senescence and activates both p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Restoring the KDM4A expression contributed to bypass of miR-137-induced senescence and inhibition of endogenous miR-137 with an miRNA sponge-compromised Ras-induced senescence. miR-137 levels are significantly reduced in human pancreatic tumors, consistent with previous studies revealing a defective senescence response in this cancer type. Restoration of miR-137 expression inhibited proliferation and promoted senescence of pancreatic cancer cells. These results suggest that modulating levels of miR-137 may be important for triggering tumor suppressor networks in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Clinical experiences with a chemical radioprotector in tumor radiotherapy: WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since cysteine was found to protect lethally irradiated rats, sulfhydryl compounds that provide protection of laboratory animals against lethal doses of ionizing radiations have also been given much attention. The SH compounds have been the most extensively investigated, and β-aminoethylisothiouronium (AET) and cysteamine have been selected as being representative of those drugs that are highly protective. However, clinical application is limited, as the toxicity of these compounds is high. In a series of experiments to reevaluate radioprotective agents with low toxicity, the authors found that 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) and adrenochrome monoguangylhydrazone methanesulfonate (AMM) have a potent radioprotector effect in a dose far below their toxic doses in both mice and humans. Recently, the development of effective thiophosphate derivatives of cysteamine, namely WR-2721 [S-2-(3-amino-propylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate] by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Commands, led to a reevaluation of these compounds and their potential in radiotherapy. Initial investigations indicated that WR-2721 provided a considerable degree of radioprotection to normal tissues. This compound provided excellent protection for normal tissues (DMF = 2-2.5) but little protection for the transplanted tumor. Thus this drug may have a differential protection in vivo and may be useful for improving the therapeutic ratio in cancer radiotherapy. The results of animal and chemical experiments in Japan are summarized herein

  13. Platycodin D exerts anti-tumor efficacy in H22 tumor-bearing mice via improving immune function and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Tian, Yu-Hong; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zi; Tang, Shan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Platycodin D (PD), a major saponin derived and isolated from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum, exerts potent growth inhibition and strong cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor efficacy of PD on H22 hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to explore the anti-hepatoma activity in vivo and the underlying mechanism of PD in H22 tumor-bearing mice. The results revealed that PD could considerably suppress tumor growth with no significant side effects on immune organs and body weight. Further investigations showed that the levels of serum cytokines, including interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), were enhanced by PD administration. On the other hand, PD inhibited the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in serum of H22 tumor mice. Additionally, the observations from H&E and Hoechst 33258 staining results demonstrated that PD noticeably induced apoptosis in H22 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Importantly, immunohistochemical analysis showed that PD treatment increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 and VEGF expression of H22 tumor tissues in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, the findings in the present investigation clearly demonstrated that the PD markedly suppressed the tumor growth of H22 transplanted tumor in vivo at least partly via improving the immune functions, inducing apoptosis, and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:27193733

  14. Cks1 Is Required for Tumor Cell Proliferation but Not Sufficient to Induce Hematopoietic Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Kratzat, Susanne; Nikolova, Viktoriya; Miething, Cornelius; Hoellein, Alexander; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Gorka, Oliver; Pietschmann, Elke; Illert, Anna-Lena; Ruland, Jürgen; Peschel, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Duyster, Justus; Keller, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The Cks1 component of the SCFSkp2 complex is necessary for p27Kip1 ubiquitylation and degradation. Cks1 expression is elevated in various B cell malignancies including Burkitt lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We have previously shown that loss of Cks1 results in elevated p27Kip1 levels and delayed tumor development in a mouse model of Myc-induced B cell lymphoma. Surprisingly, loss of Skp2 in the same mouse model also resulted in elevated p27Kip1 levels but exhibited no impact on tumor onset. T...

  15. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P

    2003-03-15

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  16. Quantum measurement corrections to chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2013-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization has emerged as a universal signature of spin order in photosynthetic reaction centers. Such polarization, significantly enhanced above thermal equilibrium, is known to result from the nuclear spin sorting inherent in the radical pair mechanism underlying long-lived charge-separated states in photosynthetic reaction centers. We will here show that the recently understood fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions open up a new and completely unexpected venue towards obtaining CIDNP signals. The fundamental decoherence mechanism inherent in the recombination process of radical pairs is shown to produce nuclear spin polarizations on the order of $10^4$ times or more higher than thermal equilibrium values at low fields relevant to natural photosynthesis in earth's magnetic field. This opens up the possibility of a fundamentally new exploration of the biological significance of high nuclear polarizations in photosynthesis.

  17. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  18. Ion beam induced conductivity in chemically vapor deposited diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond films deposited by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique onto quartz substrates have been irradiated with 100 keV C and 320 keV Xe ions at room temperature and at 200 degree C. The dose dependence of the electrical conductivity measured in situ exhibited complicated, nonmonotonic behavior. High doses were found to induce an increase of up to ten orders of magnitude in the electrical conductivity of the film. The dose dependence of the conductivity for the CVD films was found to be very similar to that measured for natural, type IIa, single-crystal diamonds irradiated under identical conditions. This result suggests that the conduction mechanism in ion beam irradiated polycrystalline CVD diamond films is not dominated by grain boundaries and graphitic impurities as one might have expected, but rather is determined by the intrinsic properties of diamond itself

  19. Tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and irradiated tumor cells induces long-term antitumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerkovnik Petra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ideal tumor vaccine should activate both effector and memory immune response against tumor-specific antigens. Beside the CD8+ T cells that play a central role in the generation of a protective immune response and of long-term memory, dendritic cells (DCs are important for the induction, coordination and regulation of the adaptive immune response. The DCs can conduct all of the elements of the immune orchestra and are therefore a fundamental target and tool for vaccination. The present study was aimed at assessing the ability of tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated melanoma tumor cells B16F1 followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs to induce the generation of a functional long-term memory response in experimental tumor model in mice (i.p. B16F1. Results It has been shown that the functional memory response in vaccinated mice persists for at least 60 days after the last vaccination. Repeated vaccination also improves the survival of experimental animals compared to single vaccination, whereas the proportion of animals totally protected from the development of aggressive i.p. B16F1 tumors after vaccination repeated three times varies between 88.9%-100.0%. Additionally, the long-term immune memory and tumor protection is maintained over a prolonged period of time of at least 8 months. Finally, it has been demonstrated that following the vaccination the tumor-specific memory cells predominantly reside in bone marrow and peritoneal tissue and are in a more active state than their splenic counterparts. Conclusions In this study we demonstrated that tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated tumor cells followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs induces a long-term immunity against aggressive B16F1 tumors.

  20. Melatonin Prevents Chemical-Induced Haemopoietic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MEL, a methoxyindole synthesized by the pineal gland, is a powerful antioxidant in tissues as well as within cells, with a fundamental role in ameliorating homeostasis in a number of specific pathologies. It acts both as a direct radical scavenger and by stimulating production/activity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. In this work, some chemical triggers, with different mechanisms of action, have been chosen to induce cell death in U937 hematopoietic cell line. Cells were pre-treated with 100 µM MEL and then exposed to hydrogen peroxide or staurosporine. Morphological analyses, TUNEL reaction and Orange/PI double staining have been used to recognize ultrastructural apoptotic patterns and to evaluate DNA behavior. Chemical damage and potential MEL anti-apoptotic effects were quantified by means of Tali® Image-Based Cytometer, able to monitor cell viability and apoptotic events. After trigger exposure, chromatin condensation, micronuclei formation and DNA fragmentation have been observed, all suggesting apoptotic cell death. These events underwent a statistically significant decrease in samples pre-treated with MEL. After caspase inhibition and subsequent assessment of cell viability, we demonstrated that apoptosis occurs, at least in part, through the mitochondrial pathway and that MEL interacts at this level to rescue U937 cells from death.

  1. Eugenol precludes cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis in mouse by preventing oxidative stress and inflammation and by inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2010-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the protective efficacy of eugenol against skin cancer and probe into the mechanistic aspects. Skin tumors were initiated by applying 160 nmol DMBA and promoted by twice weekly applications of 8.5 nmol TPA for 28 wk. All mice developed tumors by 13 wk of promotion. However, in mice pretreated with 30 microL eugenol, no tumors were detected until 8 wk (following anti-initiation protocol) and until 14 wk (following antipromotion protocol) of tumor promotion. PCNA and TUNEL immunohistochemistry of tumors revealed eugenol to ameliorate cell proliferation and elevate apoptosis respectively. The effect of eugenol was assessed on specific stages of carcinogenesis. Initiation with DMBA led to a significant upregulation of p53 expression with a concomitant increase in p21(WAF1) levels in epidermal cells indicating induction of damage to the DNA. However, pretreatment with eugenol led to overexpression of these genes, which probably helped stimulate apoptosis of the initiated cells. To ascertain the molecular mechanisms implicated in the antitumor promoting activity of eugenol, its effect was investigated on markers of tumor promotion and inflammation: ODC activity and iNOS and COX-2 expression, and on levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-alpha, and PGE(2)). Eugenol markedly inhibited all. Eugenol also inhibited the upstream signaling molecule: NF-kappaB, which regulates the expression of these genes. TPA-induced depletion of cutaneous GSH and antioxidant enzymes armory was also precluded by eugenol. From these results, it could be concluded that eugenol markedly protects against chemically induced skin cancer and acts possibly by virtue of its antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities. PMID:20043298

  2. Selenium Induces an Anti-tumor Effect Via Inhibiting Intratumoral Angiogenesis in a Mouse Model of Transplanted Canine Mammary Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyu; Guo, Mengyao; Liu, Yuzhu; Mu, Weiwei; Deng, Ganzhen; Li, Chengye; Qiu, Changwei

    2016-06-01

    Selenium (Se) has been widely reported to possess anti-tumor effects. Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels and is required to supply oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors for tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. To explore whether the anti-tumor effect of Se was associated with angiogenesis in vivo, we studied the effects of sodium selenite (Sel) and methylseleninic acid (MSA) on tumors induced by canine mammary tumor cells (CMT1211) in mice; cyclophosphamide (CTX) served as a positive control. The results showed that the Se content was significantly increased in the Sel and MSA groups. Se significantly inhibited the tumor weights and volumes. Large necrotic areas and scattered and abnormal small necrotic areas were observed in the Se treatment group. Immunofluorescence double staining showed a reduction in the microvessel density (MVD) and increment in the vessel maturation index (VMI) compared with the untreated control group. As expected, the protein and mRNA levels of the angiogenesis factors angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were decreased in the Se-treated tumors by IHC, as shown by western blotting and RT-QPCR. We also found that organic Se MSA provided stronger inhibition of tumor growth compared with inorganic sodium selenite (Sel). Altogether, our results indicated that Se exerted anti-tumor effects in vivo at least partially by inhibiting angiogenic factors. PMID:26507439

  3. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun; Ling, D. C.; Li, L. J.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  4. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M;

    2001-01-01

    clinical signs of autoimmune reactions were observed. Thus, it appears possible to evaluate the entire metabolism of any given tumor and use this information rationally to identify multiple epitopes of value in the generation of tumor-specific immunotherapy. We expect that human tumors express similar......Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...... examined for gene expression by mRNA microarray scanning. This analysis revealed heterogeneity of the tumors in agreement with the assumption that they represent different tumorigenic events. Several genes were overexpressed in one or more of the tumors. To examine whether overexpressed genes might be used...

  5. Sapodilla plum (Achras sapota) induces apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  6. Advances of radioiodine therapy of tumor induced by sodium iodide symporter gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a kind of membrane protein that mainly mediates iodide transport into thyroid follicular cells, sodium iodide symporter (NIS) plays a key role in radioiodine therapy of both thyroid and other cancers. Studies show that decreased NIS expression level or intracellular localization in thyroid carcinomas lead to low iodine uptake. So NIS gene therapy is a new method to overcome this problem. To be therapeutically effective, radioiodine has to be remained in the tumor cells for sufficient long time; this is still a problem which reduces therapeutic effect. It should increase iodide retention and decrease iodide efflux in tumor cells to optimize therapeutic scheme. This article reviews the studies on advances of radioiodine therapy of tumor induced by sodium iodide symporter gene. (authors)

  7. Mediastinal Yolk Sac Tumor Producing Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonist-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Noriyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Isosaka, Mai; Mita, Hiroaki; Takagi, Hideyasu; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Yoshifumi; Masumori, Naoya; Endo, Takao; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Extragonadal yolk sac tumors (YSTs) are rare. We herein report the case of a 66-year-old man with mediastinal, lung and liver tumors. The largest mass was located in the liver and contained a high concentration of protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) and alpha-fetoprotein. Therefore, the lesion was difficult to distinguish from hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, YST was diagnosed based on the results of a liver biopsy. Although chemotherapy was effective, the patient died of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed primary mediastinal YST. In the current report, we describe this case of PIVKA-II-producing YST and review previous cases of PIVKA-II-producing tumors other than hepatoma. PMID:26073245

  8. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Løve Aaes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tatenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS. The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studies dealing with the influence of PPARs on treatment of tumor cells in vitro. Remarkably, studies examining the effects of these drugs in vivo are just beginning to emerge. However, the agonists of PPARs, in particular the thiazolidinediones, seem to be promising candidates for new approaches in human CNS tumor therapy.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rehman, Muneeb U.; Mir Tahir, Farrah Ali; Wajhul Qamar; Rehan Khan; Abdul Quaiyoom Khan; Abdul Lateef; Oday-O-Hamiza; Sarwat Sultana

    2012-01-01

    In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine) initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen ...

  11. The influence of patients age, type of tumor growth, hematocrit, and radiation-induced tumor regression on the prognosis of advanced uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The age of patients, type of tumor growth, pretreatment hematocrit, and radiation-induced tumor regression were evaluated as possible prognostic factors in 222 patients with advanced cervical cancer treated at the Institute of Clinical Oncology in Bratislava in the period from 1960 through 1980. The five-year disease-free survival rate for Stage IIb patients was 50%, for Stage III patients 23.1%, and for Stage IV patients 13%. Radiatoin-induced tumor regression and type of tumor growth were noted to be a significant prognostic factor with regard to the control of disease in the pelvis. Age of the patients and pretreatment hematocrit were found to be a weak prognostic factor. (author). 4 figs., 6 tabs., 25 refs

  12. Tumor-induced osteomalacia with elevated fibroblast growth factor 23: a case of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor mixed with connective tissue variants and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ke Hu; Fang Yuan; Cheng-Ying Jiang; Da-Wei Lv; Bei-Bei Mao; Qiang Zhang; Zeng-Qiang Yuan; Yan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO),or oncogenic osteomalacia (OOM),is a rare acquired paraneoplastic disease characterized by renal phosphate wasting and hypophosphatemia.Recent evidence shows that tumor-overexpressed fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is responsible for the hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia.The tumors associated with TIO are usually phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor mixed connective tissue variants (PMTMCT).Surgical removal of the responsible tumors is clinically essential for the treatment of TIO.However,identifying the responsible tumors is often difficult.Here,we report a case of a TIO patient with elevated serum FGF23 levels suffering from bone pain and hypophosphatemia for more than three years.A tumor was finally located in first metacarpal bone by octreotide scintigraphy and she was cured by surgery.After complete excision of the tumor,serum FGF23 levels rapidly decreased,dropping to 54.7% of the preoperative level one hour after surgery and eventually to a little below normal.The patient's serum phosphate level rapidly improved and returned to normal level in four days.Accordingly,her clinical symptoms were greatly improved within one month after surgery.There was no sign of tumor recurrence during an 18-month period of follow-up.According to pathology,the tumor was originally diagnosed as “glomangioma” based upon a biopsy sample,“proliferative giant cell tumor of tendon sheath” based upon sections of tumor,and finally diagnosed as PMTMCT by consultation one year after surgery.In conclusion,although an extremely rare disease,clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the existence of TIO and PMTMCT,respectively.

  13. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

    OpenAIRE

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemica...

  14. Soy isoflavone exposure through all life stages accelerates 17β-estradiol-induced mammary tumor onset and growth, yet reduces tumor burden, in ACI rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Frank Josef; Pemp, Daniela; Soukup, Sebastian T; Wende, Kathleen; Zhang, Xiajie; Zierau, Oliver; Muders, Michael H; Bosland, Maarten C; Kulling, Sabine E; Lehmann, Leane; Vollmer, Günter

    2016-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether the intake of soy-derived isoflavones (sISO) mediates beneficial or adverse effects with regard to breast cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated whether nutritional exposure to a sISO-enriched diet from conception until adulthood impacts on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced carcinogenesis in the rat mammary gland (MG). August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats were exposed to dietary sISO from conception until postnatal day 285. Silastic tubes containing E2 were used to induce MG tumorigenesis. Body weight, food intake, and tumor growth were recorded weekly. At necropsy, the number, position, size, and weight of each tumor were determined. Plasma samples underwent sISO analysis, and the morphology of MG was analyzed. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were reduced by 20 and 56 %, respectively, in the sISO-exposed rats compared to the control rats. Time-to-tumor onset was shortened from 25 to 20 weeks, and larger tumors developed in the sISO-exposed rats. The histological phenotype of the MG tumors was independent of the sISO diet received, and it included both comedo and cribriform phenotypes. Morphological analyses of the whole-mounted MGs also showed no diet-dependent differences. Lifelong exposure to sISO reduced the overall incidence of MG carcinomas in ACI rats, although the time-to-tumor was significantly shortened. PMID:26861028

  15. [Viral transfer of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wędrowska, Ewelina; Wandtke, Tomasz; Dyczek, Andrzej; Woźniak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces carcinoma cell death through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Preclinical trials of gene therapy have been conducted using viral transfer of the TRAIL transgene into prostate, bladder, breast, kidney, liver, non-small cell lung cancer and also glioblastoma cells. Experiments in vitro demonstrated the extensive apoptosis of target cells as well as frequent disease regression or remission. TRAIL transfer did not show any side effects, opposite to chemotherapy. Encouraging results of TRAIL-related gene therapy were observed in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (AdV) encoding TRAIL are the most promising tool in anti-tumor therapy. They have undergone numerous modifications by increasing transfection efficiency and transgene expression in target cells. However, only one clinical phase I trial has been performed. AdV encoding the TRAIL transgene caused local inflammation and apoptosis in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27259213

  16. HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells induce NO production in macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2013-02-01

    High fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) provides a new stimulator to trigger cell apoptosis, and it is well known that apoptotic cells provide antigens to effectively trigger recognition by the immune system. In order to investigate the effect of HF-LPLI on the professional antigen-presenting cell (APC) function, in our primary study, we focused our attention on the effect of HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells on macrophages phagocytosis and NO production. Both confocal microscopy and flowcytometry analysis showed that HF-LPLI (120 J/cm2) induced significantly EMT6 death. Further experiments showed that HF-LPLI-treated EMT6 cells could be phagocyted by the murine macrophage cells RAW264.7, and could induce NO production in macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that HF-LPLI-treated tumor cells effectively regulated the immune system. The HF-LPLI effect on the APC function needs to be further studied.

  17. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  18. Suppression of tumor growth by designed dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine targeting hypoxia-inducible transcription factor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Ramin; Levin, Michael D; Szabo, Lajos Z; Laszlo, Csaba F; Kushal, Swati; Singh, Jason B; Oh, Philip; Schnitzer, Jan E; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z

    2013-03-20

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors, is associated with local invasion, metastatic spread, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and is an independent, negative prognostic factor for a diverse range of malignant neoplasms. The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily mediated by a family of transcription factors, among which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) plays a major role. Under normoxia, the oxygen-sensitive α subunit of HIF1 is rapidly and constitutively degraded but is stabilized and accumulates under hypoxia. Upon nuclear translocation, HIF1 controls the expression of over 100 genes involved in angiogenesis, altered energy metabolism, antiapoptotic, and pro-proliferative mechanisms that promote tumor growth. A designed transcriptional antagonist, dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine (ETP 2), selectively disrupts the interaction of HIF1α with p300/CBP coactivators and downregulates the expression of hypoxia-inducible genes. ETP 2 was synthesized via a novel homo-oxidative coupling of the aliphatic primary carbons of the dithioacetal precursor. It effectively inhibits HIF1-induced activation of VEGFA, LOX, Glut1, and c-Met genes in a panel of cell lines representing breast and lung cancers. We observed an outstanding antitumor efficacy of both (±)-ETP 2 and meso-ETP 2 in a fully established breast carcinoma model by intravital microscopy. Treatment with either form of ETP 2 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid regression of tumor growth that lasted for up to 14 days. These results suggest that inhibition of HIF1 transcriptional activity by designed dimeric ETPs could offer an innovative approach to cancer therapy with the potential to overcome hypoxia-induced tumor growth and resistance. PMID:23448368

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) as Potential Inducers of Antineoplastic Effects in CNS Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Tatenhorst; Eric Hahnen; Heneka, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-inducible transcription factors which belong to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. In recent years it turned out that natural as well as synthetic PPAR agonists exhibit profound antineoplastic as well as redifferentiation effects in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). The molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is still emerging, with partially controverse findings reported by a number of studie...

  20. Simultaneous Targeting of Tumor Antigens and the Tumor Vasculature using T Lymphocyte Transfer Synergize to Induce Regression of Established Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Tran, Eric; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Most systemic cancer therapies target tumor cells directly though there is increasing interest in targeting the tumor stroma that can comprise a substantial portion of the tumor mass. We report here a synergy between two T cell therapies, one directed against the stromal tumor vasculature and the other directed against antigens expressed on the tumor cell. Simultaneous transfer of genetically engineered syngeneic T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor targeting the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2; KDR) that is over expressed on tumor vasculature and T cells specific for the tumor antigens gp100 (PMEL), TRP-1 (TYRP1), or TRP-2 (DCT) synergistically eradicated established B16 melanoma tumors in mice and dramatically increased the tumor-free survival of mice compared to treatment with either cell type alone or T cells coexpressing these two targeting molecules. Host lymphodepletion prior to cell transfer was required to mediate the anti-tumor effect. The synergistic antitumor response was accompanied by a significant increase in the infiltration and expansion and/or persistence of the adoptively transferred tumor antigen-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment and thus enhanced their anti-tumor potency. The data presented here emphasize the possible beneficial effects of combining anti-angiogenic with tumor-specific immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of patients with cancer. PMID:23633494

  1. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in ...

  2. Agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody induces melanoma tumor immunity in mice by altering regulatory T cell stability and intra-tumor accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Cohen

    Full Text Available In vivo GITR ligation has previously been shown to augment T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity, yet the underlying mechanisms of this activity, particularly its in vivo effects on CD4+ foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, have not been fully elucidated. In order to translate this immunotherapeutic approach to the clinic it is important gain better understanding of its mechanism(s of action. Utilizing the agonist anti-GITR monoclonal antibody DTA-1, we found that in vivo GITR ligation modulates regulatory T cells (Tregs directly during induction of melanoma tumor immunity. As a monotherapy, DTA-1 induced regression of small established B16 melanoma tumors. Although DTA-1 did not alter systemic Treg frequencies nor abrogate the intrinsic suppressive activity of Tregs within the tumor-draining lymph node, intra-tumor Treg accumulation was significantly impaired. This resulted in a greater Teff:Treg ratio and enhanced tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell activity. The decreased intra-tumor Treg accumulation was due both to impaired infiltration, coupled with DTA-1-induced loss of foxp3 expression in intra-tumor Tregs. Histological analysis of B16 tumors grown in Foxp3-GFP mice showed that the majority of GFP+ cells had lost Foxp3 expression. These "unstable" Tregs were absent in IgG-treated tumors and in DTA-1 treated TDLN, demonstrating a tumor-specific effect. Impairment of Treg infiltration was lost if Tregs were GITR(-/-, and the protective effects of DTA-1 were reduced in reconstituted RAG1(-/- mice if either the Treg or Teff subset were GITR-negative and absent if both were negative. Our results demonstrate that DTA-1 modulates both Teffs and Tregs during effective tumor treatment. The data suggest that DTA-1 prevents intra-tumor Treg accumulation by altering their stability, and as a result of the loss of foxp3 expression, may modify their intra-tumor suppressive capacity. These findings provide further support for the continued development of agonist

  3. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  4. Expression profile of microRNAs in c-Myc induced mouse mammary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yuan; Wu, Jack; Wu, Si-hung; Thakur, Archana; Bollig, Aliccia; Huang, Yong; Liao, D. Joshua

    2008-01-01

    c-Myc is a transcription factor overexpression of which induces mammary cancer in transgenic mice. To explore whether certain microRNAs (mirRNA) mediate c-Myc induced mammary carcinogenesis, we studied mir-RNA expression profile in mammary tumors developed from MMTV-c-myc transgenic mice, and found 50 and 59 mirRNAs showing increased and decreased expression, respectively, compared with lactating mammary glands of wild type mice. Twenty-four of these mirRNAs could be grouped into eight cluste...

  5. Cellular Mechanism of Newly Synthesized Indoledione Derivative-induced Immunological Death of Tumor Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Su-Jin; Ryu, Chung-Kyu; Baek, So-Young; Lee, Hyunah

    2011-01-01

    Background EY-6 is one of the newly synthesized indoledione derivatives to induce tumor cell-specific cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of immunological death induced by EY-6 at mouse colon cancer cell as well as at the normal immune cell represented by dendritic cell. Methods C57BL/6 mouse syngeneic colon cancer cell MC38 was treated with EY-6, and analyzed by MTT for viability test, flow cytometry for confirming surface expressing molecules and ELISA for detection of ...

  6. Novel interferon-λs induce antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) is used for biotherapy of neuroendocrine carcinomas. The interferon-λs (IL-28A/B and IL-29) are a novel group of interferons. In this study, we investigated the effects of the IFN-λs IL-28A and IL-29 on human neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Similar to IFN-α, incubation of BON1 cells with IL-28A (10 ng/ml) and IL-29 (10 ng/ml) induced phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3, significantly decreased cell numbers in a proliferation assay, and induced apoptosis as demonstrated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-cleavage, caspase-3-cleavage, and DNA-fragmentation. Stable overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins (SOCS1 and SOCS3) completely abolished the aforementioned effects indicating that SOCS proteins act as negative regulators of IFN-λ signaling in BON1 cells. In conclusion, the novel IFN-λs IL-28A and IL-29 potently induce STAT signaling and antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Thus, IFN-λs may hint a promising new approach in the antiproliferative therapy of neuroendocrine tumors

  7. ANTICANCER EFFECTS OF CARICA PAPAYA IN EXPERIMENTAL INDUCED MAMMARY TUMORS IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudatta M, Deshmukh YA, Naikwadi A A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anticancer effect of Carica papaya in DMBA induced mammary tumors in rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided in to five groups (n=6, Group-I (Normal control administered vehicle olive oil, Group-II, Group-III ,Group-IV and V induced mammary tumors by administering single dose of DMBA (7,12 Dimethyl benz(Aanthracene orally 65 mg/kg. Group-III was administered aqueous leaf extract of Carica papaya (ALQECP in a dose of 200 mg/kg body wt for a period of 3 months, group-IV has given ALQECP 200 mg/kg body wt for a period of 21 days post 3 months of tumor induction, group-V rats were administered a small dose of Carica papaya extract intra tumor locally in the region of tumor. Results: Values of CA15-3 were increased in group-II rats (tumor control significantly, whereas in group-III (prevention group the levels of CA15-3 were found to be reduced substantially and the P value < 0.001. Similarly, CA-15-3 levels were reduced significantly in group-IV (treatment groupand P<0.005. The levels of LDH were seen to be increased in group-II, where as in group-III LDH levels were decreased and P<0.001.similarly group-IV LDH levels also reduced significantly but not to the level of group-III. Conclusion: Among the various markers for the detection of cancer antigen-15(CA15-3 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH are important biochemical parameters that give a clear understanding of the progression and proliferation of cancer cells. In this study it was found that there is increase in the levels of markers such as CA15-3 and LDH and also the tumor volume in tumor control, these marker levels were decreased by the administration of aqueous leaf extract of Carica papaya in a dose of 200 mg/kg body wt. ALQECP not only prevented the progression of cancer growth but also has significant effect in reducing the both CA15-3 and LDH levels in treatment group.

  8. Chemical induction of skin tumors in hairless (Skh-1) mice in view of photochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Edwidge; Parache, Robert M.; Notter, Dominique; Vigneron, C.; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a classic two-stage carcinogenesis protocol on the formation of skin tumors in hairless female SKH-1 mice were studied in order to carry out photochemotherapy on the mice bearing tumors later. Mice were initiated with a single application of 100 nmol of 7,12- dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in 0.1 ml acetone and promoted one week later, twice weekly with topical applications of 1.8 nmol (first protocol) or 5 nmol (second protocol) 12-o- tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in 0.1 ml acetone. The first tumors occurred between 4 and 6 weeks after the beginning of the promotion process depending on the protocol and the percentage of mice bearing tumors increased and reached 41% and 100% at the end of the treatment respectively for the first and the second protocol. Depending on the protocol, the tumor yield was 0.8 for the first one and approximately 10 for the second one whereas we expected 3 tumors per mouse. Histology of some skin tumors revealed that all were papillomas, hence benign tumors. These papillomatous lesions seem characteristic of a viral attack as seen in other strains of mammals including humans.

  9. Tumor-promoting macrophages induce the expression of the macrophage-specific receptor CD163 in malignant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Steiniche, Torben; Borre, Michael; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Holger Jon

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a distinct malignancy-promoting phenotype suggested to play a key role in tumor formation and metastasis. We aimed to investigate the expression of the monocyte/macrophage-restricted receptor CD163 in bladder tumor biopsies and assess the potential...... and histologically advanced disease. In 39% of the biopsies, CD163 immunoreactivity was also observed in tumor cells, and CD163-expressing metastatic cells were identified in lymph node biopsies (n = 8). Bladder cancer cell lines did not express CD163; however, when cocultured with macrophages the...... expressed by a significant portion of the malignant cells in both tumors and lymph nodes. CD163 expressing tumor cells may constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells with a phenotypic shift associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and increased metastatic activity induced by TAMs....

  10. Influence of gold nanoparticle tagged snake venom protein toxin NKCT1 on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) and EAC induced solid tumor bearing male albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Tanmoy; Saha, Partha Pratim; DasGupta, Anjan Kumar; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Earlier the conjugation of gold nanoparticle (GNP) and snake venom protein toxin NKCT1 was reported and primary characterization was performed. In the present communication, further characterizations of GNP-NKCT1 were done with SEM, EDS, XRD and Raman spectra for its physio-chemical nature and bonding. SEM showed the formation of gold nanoparticles, whereas EDS and XRD confirmed 60-90% gold nanoparticles in the solution. Raman shift corresponding to (C=O), (N-H), (C-N) confirmed the proper conjugation of GNP with NKCT1. GNP-NKCT1 showed anticancer effect both in vivo and in vitro in EAC cell and antitumor effect in EAC induced mice. In in vivo studies, GNPNKCT1 increased MST 108.30% and decreased viable EAC cell count 51.39%. Fluorescent micrograph showed signs of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, membrane disruption). Decreased level of IL-10 and low incorporation of BrdU showed decreased proliferation of EAC induced by GNP-NKCT1. With upregulation of Bax, down regulation of Bcl2 and increased expression of caspase 3/9, it was confirmed that GNP-NKCT1 induced caspase dependent apoptosis pathway in EAC cell. In in vitro studies, GNP-NKCT1 increased the late apoptotic stage of cell and arrested cell cycle division at G0/G1 state. GNP-NKCT1 also decreased the tumor volume and tumor weight in EAC induced tumor in male albino mice. It inhibited angiogenesis, which was confirmed by lower percentage of expression of VEGF. This study indicated the capability of gold nanoparticles which enhanced the tumor uptake of NKCT1 and also suggested that GNP-NKCT1 might be a good source for anti-carcinoma and anti-tumor agents. PMID:24827982

  11. Effects of 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals on DMBA-induced mammary tumors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da; Shen, Yonghao; Kuster, Niels; Fu, Yiti; Chiang, Huai

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether exposure to 900 MHz GSM wireless communication signals enhances mammary tumor development and growth induced by low-dose DMBA. Five hundred female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with a single dose of 35 mg/kg DMBA and then divided into five groups in a blinded fashion: one cage control group and four exposure groups, including three microwave exposure groups and one sham exposure with specific absorption rates (SARs) of 4.0, 1.33, 0.44 and 0 W/kg, respectively. Exposure started on the day after DMBA administration and lasted 4 h/day, 5 days/week for 26 weeks. Rats were weighed and palpated weekly for the presence of tumors and were killed humanely at the end of the 26-week exposure period. All mammary glands were examined histologically. There were no statistically significant differences in body weight between sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. No significant differences in overall mammary tumor incidence, latency to tumor onset, tumor multiplicity, or tumor size were observed between microwave- and sham-exposed groups. There was a tendency for reduction of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence in the lowest microwave exposure group (0.44 W/ kg) compared with the sham-exposed group (P = 0.058). Additionally, a higher incidence of adenocarcinoma was noticed in the 4.0 W/kg group from the 15th to 26th weeks, especially in the 19th week (P = 0.358 compared to sham). However, neither tendency was statistically significant; thus this study does not provide evidence that GSM microwave exposure promotes mammary tumor development in rats. In the present study there were significant differences between the cage controls and the experimental groups (sham and exposure). Body weight and mammary tumor (malignant plus benign) incidence in the cage control group were significantly higher than in the sham- and GSM microwave-exposed groups. The latency to the mammary tumor onset was significantly shorter in the cage control

  12. Host genetic influence on papillomavirus-induced tumors in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Elizabeth A; Tseng, Chia T; Miller, Donald; Cassano, Jennifer M; Nasir, Lubna; Garrick, Dorian; Brooks, Samantha A; Antczak, Douglas F

    2016-08-15

    The common equine skin tumors known as sarcoids have been causally associated with infection by bovine papillomavirus (BPV). Additionally, there is evidence for host genetic susceptibility to sarcoids. We investigated the genetic basis of susceptibility to sarcoid tumors on a cohort of 82 affected horses and 270 controls genotyped on a genome-wide platform and two custom panels. A Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) identified candidate regions on six chromosomes. Bayesian probability analysis of the same dataset verified only the regions on equine chromosomes (ECA) 20 and 22. Fine mapping using custom-produced SNP arrays for ECA20 and ECA22 regions identified two marker loci with high levels of significance: SNP BIEC2-530826 (map position 32,787,619) on ECA20 in an intron of the DQA1 gene in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II region (p = 4.6e-06), and SNP BIEC2-589604 (map position 25,951,536) on ECA22 in a 200 kb region containing four candidate genes: PROCR, EDEM2, EIF6 and MMP24 (p = 2.14e-06). The marker loci yielded odds ratios of 5.05 and 4.02 for ECA20 and ECA22, respectively. Associations between genetic MHC class II variants and papillomavirus-induced tumors have been reported for human papillomavirus and cottontail rabbit papillomavirus infections. This suggests a common mechanism for susceptibility to tumor progression that may involve subversion of the host immune response. This study also identified a genomic region other than MHC that influenced papillomavirus-induced tumor development in the studied population. PMID:27037728

  13. Immunological and viral aspects of radiation-induced tumors. Third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have attempted to induce bone sarcoma with FBJ virus in a total of 140 newborn mice. FBJ tumors have developed in CF1 mice, but not in mice of the other strains. Attempts to transplant FBJ tumors in CF1 mice have failed, since these mice are random bred. Because C57BL/6 mice are healthy, long-lived mice that have a low incidence of spontaneous tumors, we have used them for our initial work on strontium-90 carcinogenesis. The last of nine mice injected at the beginning of the study with 0.5 μc/gm body weight of strontium-90 has now died. Two of these mice developed bone sarcoma, of which one has been transplanted isogenically through eight transplant generations. Immunological experiments to test the antigenicity of this transplantable tumor are in progress. An extensive experiment in which 700 C57BL/6 female mice were divided into nineteen groups is now in its second year. Mice were given the following treatments: 0, 0.032, 0.01, 0.32, 1.0 and 2.0 μc/gm of strontium-90, 0, 0.032, 0.01, 0.32 and 1.0 μc/gm of strontium-90 plus 300 rad total body cesium-137 irradiation; and injection of active FBJ virus, inactive FBJ virus, and irradiated (10,000 rad) transplantable strontium-90-induced C57BL/6 osteosarcoma, all three modes of treatment given to groups that did and that did not receive prior injection of 1.0 μc/gm of strontium-90. To date, we have serially transplanted four osteogenic sarcomas that developed in these mice. We have also in serial passage a lymphoma that developed in a control C57BL/6 mouse that received no treatment. All these transplantable C57BL/6 tumor lines are intended for use in immunological experiments

  14. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies. (paper)

  15. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  16. Dexamethasone-induced enhancement of resistance to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Dexamethasone-induced changes in radioresistance have previously been observed by several authors. Here, we examined effects of dexamethasone on resistance to ionizing radiation in 10 additional human cell lines and strains, and on resistance to carboplatin and paclitaxel in 13 fresh tumor samples. Material and Methods: Eight human carcinoma cell lines, a glioblastoma cell line and a strain of normal human diploid fibroblasts were arbitrarily chosen for these in-vitro studies. Effects on radiosensitivity were assessed using a conventional colony formation assay. Effects on resistance to the drugs were investigated prospectively (ATP cell viability assay) using 13 fresh tumor samples from consecutive patients operated for ovarian cancer within the context of a Swiss nation-wide randomized prospective clinical trial (SAKK 45/94). Results: Dexamethasone promoted proliferation of 1 of the cell lines without affecting radiosensitivity, while it completely inhibited proliferation of another cell line (effects on radiosensitivity could thus not be examined). Furthermore, dexamethasone induced enhanced radioresistance in 1 of the 8 carcinoma cell lines examined. In the glioblastoma cell line, there was no effect on growth or radioresistance, nor in the fibroblasts. Treatment with dexamethasone enhanced resistance of the malignant cells to carboplatin in 4 of the 13 fresh tumor samples examined, while no enhancement in resistance to paclitaxel was observed. Conclusions: In agreement with previous reports, we found that dexamethasone may induce radioresistance in human carcinoma cells. Including the published data from the literature, dexamethasone induced enhancement in radioresistance in 4 of 12 carcinoma cell lines (33%), but not in 3 glioblastoma cell lines, nor in 3 fibroblast strains. Dexamethasone also induced enhanced resistance to carboplatin with a similar probability in fresh samples of ovarian cancer evaluated prospectively (in 4 of 13 samples; 31

  17. Frequency filtering based analysis on the cardiac induced lung tumor motion and its impact on the radiotherapy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/objectives: Lung tumor motion may be impacted by heartbeat in addition to respiration. This study seeks to quantitatively analyze heart-motion-induced tumor motion and to evaluate its impact on lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods/materials: Fluoroscopy images were acquired for 30 lung cancer patients. Tumor, diaphragm, and heart were delineated on selected fluoroscopy frames, and their motion was tracked and converted into temporal signals based on deformable registration propagation. The clinical relevance of heart impact was evaluated using the dose volumetric histogram of the redefined target volumes. Results: Correlation was found between tumor and cardiac motion for 23 patients. The heart-induced motion amplitude ranged from 0.2 to 2.6 mm. The ratio between heart-induced tumor motion and the tumor motion was inversely proportional to the amplitude of overall tumor motion. When the heart motion impact was integrated, there was an average 9% increase in internal target volumes for 17 patients. Dose coverage decrease was observed on redefined planning target volume in simulated SBRT plans. Conclusions: The tumor motion of thoracic cancer patients is influenced by both heart and respiratory motion. The cardiac impact is relatively more significant for tumor with less motion, which may lead to clinically significant uncertainty in radiotherapy for some patients

  18. Radiation induced chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of radiation induced chemical reactions of CO-H2 mixture have revealed that the yields of oxygen containing products were larger than those of hydrocarbons. In the present study, methane was added to CO-H2 mixture in order to increase further the yields of the oxygen containing products. The yields of most products except a few products such as formaldehyde increased with the addition of small amount of methane. Especially, the yields of trioxane and tetraoxane gave the maximum values when CO-H2 mixture containing 1 mol% methane was irradiated. When large amounts of methane were added to the mixture, the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids having more than two carbon atoms increased, whereas those of trioxane and tetraoxane decreased. From the study at reaction temperature over the range of 200 to 473 K, it was found that the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids showed maxima at 323 K. The studies on the effects of addition of cationic scavenger (NH3) and radical scavenger (O2) on the products yields were also carried out on the CO-H2-CH4 mixture. (author)

  19. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE INDUCES EXPRESSION OF A NOVEL TRYPTOPHAN TRANSPORTER IN MOUSE AND HUMAN TUMOR CELLS1

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Jonathan D.; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C. A. Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO positive tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion.

  20. Manipulation of gene expression by an ecdysone-inducible gene switch in tumor xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulding Kathryn M

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available abstract Background Rapid, robust and reversible induction of transgene expression would significantly facilitate cancer gene therapy as well as allow the in vivo functional study of newly discovered genes in tumor formation and progression. The popularity of the ecdysone inducible gene switch system has led us to investigate whether such a system can successfully regulate gene expression in a syngeneic tumor system in vivo. Results MBT-2 and Panc02 carcinoma cells were transfected with components of a modification of the ecdysone switch system driving firefly luciferase (F-Luc. In vitro luciferase expression ± ecdysone analog GS-E indicated a robust induction with minimal baseline activity and complete decay after 24 hours without drug. In vitro selection of MBT-2 transfected cell clones which had complete absence of F-Luc expression in the absence of stimulation but which expressed this gene at high levels in response to GS-E were chosen for in vivo evaluation. Tumors from engineered MBT-2 cells were grown to 5 mm in diameter prior to GS-E administration, animals euthanized and tumors removed at 6, 12 and 24 hours after GS-E administration and assayed for F-Luc activity. GS-E resulted in a maximal induction of F-Luc activity at 6 hours in tumor tissue with almost complete reversion to control levels by 12 hours. Conclusions This study is the first demonstration that robust and reversible transgene expression in tumors is feasible using the ecdysone system, allowing future rapid in vivo functional characterization of gene function or gene therapy applications.

  1. Aloe vera non-decolorized whole leaf extract-induced large intestinal tumors in F344 rats share similar molecular pathways with human sporadic colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiri, Arun R; Sills, Robert C; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Peddada, Shyamal D; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Flake, Gordon P; Malarkey, David E; Olson, Greg R; Pogribny, Igor P; Walker, Nigel J; Boudreau, Mary D

    2011-12-01

    Aloe vera is one of the most commonly used botanicals for various prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. Recently, NTP/NCTR has demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in large intestinal tumors in F344 rats chronically exposed to Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) non-decolorized whole leaf extract (AVNWLE) in drinking water. The morphological and molecular pathways of AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in the F344 rats were compared to human colorectal cancer (hCRC) literature. Defined histological criteria were used to compare AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors with hCRC. The commonly mutated genes (Kras, Ctnnb1, and Tp53) and altered signaling pathways (MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β) important in hCRC were evaluated within AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors. Histological evaluation of the large intestinal tumors indicated eight of twelve adenomas (Ads) and four of twelve carcinomas (Cas). Mutation analysis of eight Ads and four Cas identified point mutations in exons 1 and 2 of the Kras gene (two of eight Ads, two of four Cas), and in exon 2 of the Ctnnb1 gene (three of eight Ads, one of four Cas). No Tp53 (exons 5-8) mutations were found in Ads or Cas. Molecular pathways important in hCRC such as MAPK, WNT, and TGF-β signaling were also altered in AVNWLE-induced Ads and Cas. In conclusion, the AVNWLE-induced large intestinal tumors in F344 rats share several similarities with hCRC at the morphological and molecular levels. PMID:21937742

  2. Anti-ganglioside antibody-induced tumor cell death by loss of membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; de León, Joel; Rodríguez, Sandra; Toledo, Carlos; Carr, Adriana; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Pérez, Rolando

    2008-07-01

    Gangliosides have been involved in multiple cellular processes such as growth, differentiation and adhesion, and more recently as regulators of cell death signaling pathways. Some of these molecules can be considered as tumor-associated antigens, in particular, N-glycolyl sialic acid-containing gangliosides, which are promising candidates for cancer-targeted therapy because of their low expression in normal human tissues. In this study, we provided the molecular and cellular characterization of a novel cell death mechanism induced by the anti-NGcGM3 14F7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in L1210 murine tumor cell line but not in mouse normal cells (B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes) that expressed the antigen. Impairment of ganglioside synthesis in tumor cells abrogated the 14F7 mAb cytotoxic effect; however, exogenous reincorporation of the ganglioside did not restore tumor cell sensitivity to 14F7 mAb-induced cytotoxicity. 14F7 F(ab')(2) but not Fab fragments retained the cytotoxic capacity of the whole mAb. By contrary, other mAb, which recognizes N-glycolylated gangliosides, did not show any cytotoxic effect. These mAbs showed quite different capacities to bind NGcGM3-positive cell lines measured by binding inhibition experiments. Interestingly, this complement-independent cell death mechanism did not resemble apoptosis, because no DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, or Fas mediation were observed. However, NGcGM3 ganglioside-mediated 14F7 mAb-induced cell death was accompanied by cellular swelling, membrane lesion formation, and cytoskeleton activation, suggesting an oncosis-like phenomenon. This novel mechanism of cell death lets us to support further therapeutic approaches using NGcGM3 as a molecular target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18645013

  3. Xanthine crystals induced by topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats, cause transitional cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimo, Takeo; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Iwanaga, Takashi; Saito, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of transitional cell tumors found in the carcinogenicity testing of topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in which topiroxostat was orally given to F344 rats at 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg for 2 years. In the urinary bladder, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas were seen in males receiving 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg (1/49, 3/49, and 10/50, respectively). In the kidney, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas in the pelvis were seen in 2/50 males and 1/50 females receiving 3 mg/kg. In the mechanistic study by 52-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 3 mg/kg to F344 male rats, with and without citrate, simple and papillary transitional cell hyperplasias of the urinary bladder epithelium were observed in 5/17 in the topiroxostat-alone treatment group, along with xanthine-induced nephropathy, in contrast to neither xanthine crystals nor lesions in urinary organs by co-treatment group with citrate. As for sex differences of urinary bladder tumors, the BrdU labeling index for epithelial cells of the urinary bladder by 5-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 10 mg/kg to F344 rats was increased in males only, showing consistency with histopathological findings. Therefore, the present study indicates that transitional cell tumors induced by topiroxostat in rats were due to physical stimulation to transitional cells of xanthine crystals/calculi and provides that other factors were not implicated in this tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that such tumors do not predict for humans since topiroxostat-induced xanthine deposition is a rodent-specific event. PMID:24448833

  4. M-CSF from Cancer Cells Induces Fatty Acid Synthase and PPARβ/δ Activation in Tumor Myeloid Cells, Leading to Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghanne Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate crosstalk between cancer cells and stromal myeloid cells. We find that Lewis lung carcinoma cells significantly induce PPARβ/δ activity in myeloid cells in vitro and in vivo. Myeloid cell-specific knockout of PPARβ/δ results in impaired growth of implanted tumors, and this is restored by adoptive transfer of wild-type myeloid cells. We find that IL-10 is a downstream effector of PPARβ/δ and facilitates tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis. This observation is supported by the finding that the CD11blowIL-10+ pro-tumoral myeloid cell is scarcely detected in tumors from myeloid-cell-specific PPARβ/δ knockout mice, where vessel densities are also decreased. Fatty acid synthase (FASN is shown to be an upstream regulator of PPARβ/δ in myeloid cells and is induced by M-CSF secreted from tumor cells. Our study gives insight into how cancer cells influence myeloid stromal cells to get a pro-tumoral phenotype.

  5. A dicyanotriterpenoid induces cytoprotective enzymes and reduces multiplicity of skin tumors in UV-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inducible phase 2 enzymes constitute a primary line of cellular defense. The oleanane dicyanotriterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-onitrile (TP-225) is a very potent inducer of these systems. Topical application of TP-225 to SKH-1 hairless mice increases the levels of NAD(P)H-quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and protects against UV radiation-induced dermal thickening. Daily topical treatments of 10 nmol of TP-225 to the backs of mice that were previously subjected to low-level chronic UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm2/session, twice a week for 17 weeks), led to 50% reduction in multiplicity of skin tumors. In addition, the total tumor burden of squamous cell carcinomas was reduced by 5.5-fold. The identification of new agents for protection against UV radiation-induced skin cancer and understanding of their mechanism(s) of action is especially important in view of the fact that human skin cancers represent a significant source of increasing morbidity and mortality

  6. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms tumor suppressor WT1 requires association with the inducible chaperone Hsp70

    OpenAIRE

    Maheswaran, Shyamala; Englert, Christoph; Zheng, Gang; Lee, Sean Bong; Wong, Jenise; Harkin, D Paul; Bean, James; Ezzell, Robert; Garvin, A. Julian; McCluskey, Robert T.; DeCaprio, James A.; Haber, Daniel A.

    1998-01-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor WT1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is expressed in glomerular podocytes during a narrow window in kidney development. By immunoprecipitation and protein microsequencing analysis, we have identified a major cellular protein associated with endogenous WT1 to be the inducible chaperone Hsp70. WT1 and Hsp70 are physically associated in embryonic rat kidney cells, in primary Wilms tumor specimens and in cultured cells with inducible expression of WT1. Co...

  7. [Management of metabolic disorders induced by everolimus in patients with differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: expert proposals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Vergès, Bruno; Coriat, Romain; N'guyen, Thierry; François, Eric; Hammel, Pascal; Niccoli, Patricia; Hentic, Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Medical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has recently been improved by new molecules of which the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. If digestive neuroendocrine tumors are rare, the incidence is in constant increase and the prevalence in digestive cancers put them right behind colorectal cancers. Everolimus has demonstrated efficacy in unresectable and progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, by doubling the median progression free survival (11 versus 4.6 months), with a median time of exposure to everolimus of nine months. Everolimus is generally maintained until progression or intolerance and some patients are treated during several years. Potential metabolic disorders induced by everolimus (dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia) in patients with life expectancy of several years, justify monitoring of these parameters and accurate treatment management algorithm. These will avoid worsening patient's prognostic, but also prematurely discontinue potentially effective treatment or contraindicate other therapeutic weapons, in a pathology in which there are multiple therapeutic options in metastatic phase. We propose a standard practice in terms of initial assessment, monitoring, care threshold, and therapeutic objectives to manage metabolic disorders, fitted to our patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24557872

  8. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami; Kaneda, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Saiki, Yuriko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Gondo, Yoichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1-4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14-17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. PMID:27131742

  9. Reprogramming of Melanoma Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehito Saito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from somatic cells of patients hold great promise for autologous cell therapies. One of the possible applications of iPSCs is to use them as a cell source for producing autologous lymphocytes for cell-based therapy against cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs that express programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1 are tumor-reactive T cells, and adoptive cell therapy with autologous TILs has been found to achieve durable complete response in selected patients with metastatic melanoma. Here, we describe the derivation of human iPSCs from melanoma TILs expressing high level of PD-1 by Sendai virus-mediated transduction of the four transcription factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. TIL-derived iPSCs display embryonic stem cell-like morphology, have normal karyotype, express stem cell-specific surface antigens and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, and have the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in vivo. A wide variety of T cell receptor gene rearrangement patterns in TIL-derived iPSCs confirmed the heterogeneity of T cells infiltrating melanomas. The ability to reprogram TILs containing patient-specific tumor-reactive repertoire might allow the generation of patient- and tumor-specific polyclonal T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Volume changes of A-Mel 3 tumor cells induced by photodynamic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PhotoDynamic Therapy has shown promising results in treatment of super-ficial malignant T1/T2 tumors through combining systematically administered photosensitizing HematoPorhyrin-Derivative and local application of light. Mechanisms leading to tumor destruction during PDT are still not completely understood. Generation of singlet oxygen by a type II photochemical reaction is reported to be primarily responsible for the cytotoxicity induced by PDT. Besides significant effects on microcirculation damage to plasma membranes, cytoplasmic organelles and enzymes, as well as to nuclear structures and enzymes, was observed following exposure cells to PDT. A phenomenon probably proceeding these events might be cell swelling. Already Meyer-Betz showed that a time- and dose-dependent swelling and edema formation of healthy skin occurs after PDT. Direct correlation between ear swelling response of albino mice and the concentration of Photofrin II in the blood at the same time of light exposure has been reported recently. Various studies indicating tumor tissue swelling following PDT without being able to discriminate if this is due to cell swelling or interstitial fluid accumulation. Therefore the influence was studied of treatment with HPD and laser light on volume changes of tumor cells and its relation to cell viability. (author). 20 refs

  11. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS) in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Erica M. [Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, New Jersey Medical School-Cancer Center, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States); Barnes, Betsy J., E-mail: barnesbe@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, New Jersey Medical School-Cancer Center, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)

    2014-04-23

    Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin{sup ®}) and rituximab (Rituxan{sup ®})) and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge{sup ®} (sipuleucel-T), investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response.

  12. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS) in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin®) and rituximab (Rituxan®)) and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge® (sipuleucel-T), investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response

  13. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. Pimenta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin® and rituximab (Rituxan® and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge® (sipuleucel-T, investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response.

  14. Ursolic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles induce potent anti-angiogenesis in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Wu, Chaomin; Cheng, Xueli; Bai, Haihua; Huang, Dan; Jiang, Jinhuan; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis provides necessary nutrients and oxygen for tumor growth and metastasis; thus, every stage of angiogenesis process is the potential target for cancer therapies. Ursolic acid (UA) is reported to decrease tumor burden through anti-angiogenesis pathway, but its poor water solubility greatly limits its efficiency and clinical application. Here, a simple method for preparing UA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CH-UA-NPs) with anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity was demonstrated. In vitro, CH-UA-NPs could significantly inhibit the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). After uptake by HUVECs, CH-UA-NPs were mainly localized in lysosomes and mitochondria, but not nuclei. CH-UA-NPs induced the destruction of lysosome membrane integrity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and reorganization of cell cytoskeleton. All these changes led to the apoptosis or necrosis in HUVECs. In vivo, CH-UA-NPs could inhibit the angiogenesis in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and H22 xenograft model. Notably, comparing with free UA, such synthesized CH-UA-NPs could save about tenfold of UA doses, implying that this could significantly decrease the side effects induced by high doses of UA in biological organism. Our data showed that CH-UA-NPs and this nanoparticle-based drug delivery system could be as a potential drug candidate for anti-angiogenesis treatment. PMID:26883344

  15. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of radon-induced lung tumors in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas. This radioelement, which is an α-particle emitter, is omnipresent in the environment. Inhalation of atmospheric radon is the major exposure route in man of natural radioactivity which results in respiratory tract contamination. An increased lung cancer risk associated with radon inhalation has been shown both in humans and animals by epidemiological and experimental studies, respectively. In rats, characterization of dose-effect relationships has led to the construction of statistical models that may help theoretically in the prediction of human health involvements of both occupational and domestic chronic exposure to radon. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis. In the laboratory, a model of lung cancers induced in rats after radon inhalation is available. This model represents a good tool to identify and characterize the genetic events contributing to the development of radon-induced lung tumors. Carrying out a global approach based on the combined use of classical and molecular cytogenetic methods, the analysis of 17 neoplasms allowed the identification of chromosomal regions frequently altered in these tumors. Numerous similarities have been found between our results and the cytogenetic data for human lung cancers, suggesting common underlying genetic molecular mechanisms for lung cancer development in both species. Moreover, our study has allowed to point to tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes potentially involved in radon-induced lung carcinogenesis. Thus, our results may aid further molecular studies aimed either at confirming the role of these candidate genes or at demonstrating the involvement of yet to be identified genes. (author)

  16. Novel molecular and computational methods improve the accuracy of insertion site analysis in Sleeping Beauty-induced tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Brett

    Full Text Available The recent development of the Sleeping Beauty (SB system has led to the development of novel mouse models of cancer. Unlike spontaneous models, SB causes cancer through the action of mutagenic transposons that are mobilized in the genomes of somatic cells to induce mutations in cancer genes. While previous methods have successfully identified many transposon-tagged mutations in SB-induced tumors, limitations in DNA sequencing technology have prevented a comprehensive analysis of large tumor cohorts. Here we describe a novel method for producing genetic profiles of SB-induced tumors using Illumina sequencing. This method has dramatically increased the number of transposon-induced mutations identified in each tumor sample to reveal a level of genetic complexity much greater than previously appreciated. In addition, Illumina sequencing has allowed us to more precisely determine the depth of sequencing required to obtain a reproducible signature of transposon-induced mutations within tumor samples. The use of Illumina sequencing to characterize SB-induced tumors should significantly reduce sampling error that undoubtedly occurs using previous sequencing methods. As a consequence, the improved accuracy and precision provided by this method will allow candidate cancer genes to be identified with greater confidence. Overall, this method will facilitate ongoing efforts to decipher the genetic complexity of the human cancer genome by providing more accurate comparative information from Sleeping Beauty models of cancer.

  17. Immunogenic Cell Death Induced by Ginsenoside Rg3: Significance in Dendritic Cell-based Anti-tumor Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Keum-Joo; Choi, Ki Ryung; Lee, Seog Jae; Lee, Hyunah

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide; therefore there is a need to discover new therapeutic modules with improved efficacy and safety. Immune-(cell) therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intractable cancers. The effectiveness of certain chemotherapeutics in inducing immunogenic tumor cell death thus promoting cancer eradication has been reported. Ginsenoside Rg3 is a ginseng saponin that has antitumor and immunomodulatory activity. In this study, we treated tumor cells with Rg3 to verify the significance of inducing immunogenic tumor cell death in antitumor therapy, especially in DC-based immunotherapy. Rg3 killed the both immunogenic (B16F10 melanoma cells) and non-immunogenic (LLC: Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells) tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. Surface expression of immunogenic death markers including calreticulin and heat shock proteins and the transcription of relevant genes were increased in the Rg3-dying tumor. Increased calreticulin expression was directly related to the uptake of dying tumor cells by dendritic cells (DCs): the proportion of CRT(+) CD11c(+) cells was increased in the Rg3-treated group. Interestingly, tumor cells dying by immunogenic cell death secreted IFN-γ, an effector molecule for antitumor activity in T cells. Along with the Rg3-induced suppression of pro-angiogenic (TNF-α) and immunosuppressive cytokine (TGF-β) secretion, IFN-γ production from the Rg3-treated tumor cells may also indicate Rg3 as an effective anticancer immunotherapeutic strategy. The data clearly suggests that Rg3-induced immunogenic tumor cell death due its cytotoxic effect and its ability to induce DC function. This indicates that Rg3 may be an effective immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:26937234

  18. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29hi/CD49fhi/CD24hi markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance

  19. Mitochondrial-derived ROS in edelfosine-induced apoptosis in yeasts and tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHANG; Consuelo GAJATE; Li-ping YU; Yun-xiang FANG; Faustino MOLLINEDO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether a similar process mediates cytotoxicity of 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET- 18-OCH3, edelfosine) in both yeasts and human tumor cells.Methods: A modified version of a previously described assay for the intracellular conversion of nitro blue tetrazolium to formazan by superoxide anion was used to measure the generation of reactive oxygen spe-cies (ROS). Apoptotic yeast cells were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. DNA fragmenta-tion and the generation of ROS were measured by cytofluorimetric analysis in Jurkat cells.Results: Edelfosine induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae,as assessed by TUNEL assay. Meanwhile, edelfosine induced a time- and con-centration-dependent generation of ROS in yeasts. Rotenone, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, prevented ROS generation and apoptosis in response to edelfosine in S cerevisiae, α-Tocopherol abrogated the edelfosine-induced generation of intracellular ROS and apoptosis. Edelfosine also induced an increase of ROS in human leukemic cells that preceded apoptosis. The overexpression of Bcl-2 by gene transfer abrogated both ROS generation and apoptosis induced by edelfosine in leukemic cells. Changes in the relative mito-chondrial membrane potential were detected in both yeasts and Jurkat cells.Conclusion: These results indicate that edelfosine induces apoptosis in yeasts in addition to human tumor cells, and this apoptotic process involves mitochondria,likely through mitochondrial-derived ROS. These data also suggest that yeasts can be used as a suitable cell model in elucidating the antitumor mechanism of action of edelfosine.

  20. Coupling of discrete random walks and continuous modeling for three-dimensional tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Guillermo; Colominas, Ignasi; Gomez, Hector

    2014-03-01

    The growth of new vascular networks from pre-existing capillaries (angiogenesis) plays a pivotal role in tumor development. Mathematical modeling of tumor-induced angiogenesis may help understand the underlying biology of the process and provide new hypotheses for experimentation. Here, we couple an existing deterministic continuum theory with a discrete random walk, proposing a new model that accounts for chemotactic and haptotactic cellular migration. We propose an efficient numerical method to approximate the solution of the model. The accuracy, stability and effectiveness of our algorithms permitted us to perform large-scale three-dimensional simulations which, in contrast to two-dimensional calculations, show a topological complexity similar to that found in experiments. Finally, we use our model and simulations to investigate the role of haptotaxis and chemotaxis in the mobility of tip endothelial cells and its influence in the final vascular patterns.

  1. Active adjoint modeling method in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Zhao, Zhiqin; Wang, Jinguo; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-07-01

    To improve the model-based inversion performance of microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography for breast tumor imaging, an active adjoint modeling (AAM) method is proposed. It aims to provide a more realistic breast acoustic model used for tumor inversion as the background by actively measuring and reconstructing the structural heterogeneity of human breast environment. It utilizes the reciprocity of acoustic sensors, and adapts the adjoint tomography method from seismic exploration. With the reconstructed acoustic model of breast environment, the performance of model-based inversion method such as time reversal mirror is improved significantly both in contrast and accuracy. To prove the advantage of AAM, a checkerboard pattern model and anatomical realistic breast models have been used in full wave numerical simulations. PMID:24956614

  2. Electron microscopic observations and DNA chain fragmentation studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm—EDTMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuShou-Peng; XiaoDong; 等

    1997-01-01

    The morphological changes observed by electron microscopy indicate that after internal irradiation with 153Sm-ESTMP bone tumor cells displayed feature of apoptosis,such as margination of condensed chromatin,chromatin fragmentation.as well as the membranebouded apoptotic bodies formation.THe quantification analysis of fragmentation DNA for bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP shows that the DNA fragmentation is enhanced with the prolongation of internally irradiated time.These characteristics suggest that 153Sm-EDTMP internal irradiation could induce bone tumor cells to go9 to apoptosis.

  3. Electron microscopic observations and DNA chain fragmentation studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological changes observed by electron microscopy indicate that after internal irradiation with 153Sm-EDTMP bone tumor cells displayed feature of apoptosis, such as margination of condensed chromatin, chromatin fragmentation, as well as the membrane bounded apoptotic bodies formation. The quantification analysis of fragmentation DNA for bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP shows that the DNA fragmentation is enhanced with the prolongation of internally irradiated time. These characteristics suggest that 153Sm-EDTMP internal irradiation could induce bone tumor cells to go to apoptosis

  4. Advances in identification and application of tumor antigen inducing anti-cancer responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor antigen is one of the important bases of tumor immunotherapy[1]. With the discovery of novel tumor antigens, interest in specific immunotherapy for treatment of malignancies has increased substantially. Nowadays more and more scientists paid close attention to various tumor antigens with their roles or/and applications in anti-cancer immune responses, immune tolerance, tumor markers, tumor immunotherapy and so on. Here we discussed the classification of tumor antigens and summarized the technologies of identification and application of tumor antigens.

  5. Comparison of bone tumors induced by beta-emitting or alpha-emitting radionuclides: Schemes of pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life-span studies in Beagle dogs have documented the occurrence of bone tumors following exposure to bone-seeking alpha- or beta-emitting radionuclides administered by different routes of exposure. Bone tumors from dogs in four different life-span studies were analyzed according to tumor phenotype, tumor location, radiographic appearance, incidence of metastasis, and association with radiation osteodystrophy. Marked differences in these parameters were observed that did not correlate with differences in radionuclide type, route of exposure, or duration of radionuclide uptake. Radiation osteodystrophy, which is postulated to be a preneoplastic lesion, was not a significant component in one of the studies. Analysis of the data from these four studies suggests that at least two different mechanisms of bone tumor pathogenesis occur for radiation-induced bone tumors. (author)

  6. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell injury by cycloheximide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent polypeptide mediator released by activated monocytes and macrophages, has a number of proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells. TNF is cytotoxic to tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, but TNF-induced toxicity to endothelial cells is less well established. We now report that cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, renders endothelial cells highly susceptible to TNF-induced lysis. TNF alone did not change the overall rate of protein synthesis by endothelial cells, whereas the addition of CHX completely abolished protein synthesis. Endothelial cells incubated in TNF alone in high concentrations (up to 1,000 U/ml) showed minimal rounding up and release of 51Cr. Likewise, CHX alone (5 micrograms/ml) had no significant effect on endothelial cell morphology and release of 51Cr. However, incubation of endothelial cells in both CHX and TNF caused injury in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological evidence of cell retraction, rounding, and detachment began within 2 h, but specific 51Cr release did not begin to rise until after 4 h. These changes were not observed when endothelial cells were incubated with TNF/CHX at 4 degrees C. The combination of TNF/CHX was lethal to all endothelial cells tested (bovine pulmonary artery, human umbilical vein, and human aorta), with human aortic cells showing the most pronounced changes. We conclude that healthy endothelial cells are resistant to TNF-induced lysis, but inhibition of their ability to make protein renders them highly susceptible

  7. Cks1 is required for tumor cell proliferation but not sufficient to induce hematopoietic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzat, Susanne; Nikolova, Viktoriya; Miething, Cornelius; Hoellein, Alexander; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Gorka, Oliver; Pietschmann, Elke; Illert, Anna-Lena; Ruland, Jürgen; Peschel, Christian; Nilsson, Jonas; Duyster, Justus; Keller, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The Cks1 component of the SCF(Skp2) complex is necessary for p27(Kip1) ubiquitylation and degradation. Cks1 expression is elevated in various B cell malignancies including Burkitt lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We have previously shown that loss of Cks1 results in elevated p27(Kip1) levels and delayed tumor development in a mouse model of Myc-induced B cell lymphoma. Surprisingly, loss of Skp2 in the same mouse model also resulted in elevated p27(Kip1) levels but exhibited no impact on tumor onset. This raises the possibility that Cks1 could have other oncogenic activities than suppressing p27(Kip1). To challenge this notion we have targeted overexpression of Cks1 to B cells using a conditional retroviral bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. Despite potent ectopic overexpression, Cks1 was unable to promote B cell hyperproliferation or B cell malignancies, indicating that Cks1 is not oncogenic when overexpressed in B cells. Since Skp2 overexpression can drive T-cell tumorigenesis or other cancers we also widened the quest for oncogenic activity of Cks1 by ubiquitously expressing Cks1 in hematopoetic progenitors. At variance with c-Myc overexpression, which caused acute myeloid leukemia, Cks1 overexpression did not induce myeloproliferation or leukemia. Therefore, despite being associated with a poor prognosis in various malignancies, sole Cks1 expression is insufficient to induce lymphoma or a myeloproliferative disease in vivo. PMID:22624029

  8. A case of radiation-induced mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung following radiotherapy for pulmonary metastasis of Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the main therapeutic methods for malignant tumors, but on the other hand it can also induce new malignant tumors. Recently, we experienced a case of a 22-year-old woman with triple cancers (Wilms' tumor, thyroid cancer and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung). She had been treated repeatedly for right-sided pulmonary metastases from the Wilms' tumor. The last cancer arose from a different organ in the field irradiated to treat the first cancer, after a latent period of about 20 years. Therefore, this case is classified as highly probable radiation-induced cancer (A-I group) by the diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced cancer proposed by Sakai et al. Second cancers (radiation-induced cancers) mainly consist of soft tissue sarcomas, leukemias, skin cancers, urinary bladder cancers, large bowel cancers and other tumors. The occurrence of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lung as a radiation-induced tumor had not been reported. This patient also showed poor growth of the right breast and marked deformity of the right side of the thorax as late damage from irradiation. We must make efforts to decrease late damage from radiotherapy for pediatric cancers. (author)

  9. Oncogene amplification detected by in situ hybridization in radiation induced rat skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncogene activation may play an important role in radiation induced carcinogenesis. C-myc oncogene amplification was detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas. In situ hybridization was performed with a biotinylated human c-myc third exon probe, visualized with an avidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphate detection system. No c-myc oncogene amplification was detected in normal rat skin at very early times after exposure to ionizing radiation, which is consistent with the view that c-myc amplification is more likely to be related to carcinogenesis than to normal cell proliferation. The incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the DNA of rat skin cells showed that the proliferation of epidermal cells reached a peak on the seventh day after exposure to ionizing radiation and then decreased. No connection between the proliferation of epidermal cell and c-myc oncogene amplification in normal or irradiated rat skin was found. The results indicated that c-myc amplification as measured by in situ hybridization was correlated with the Southern bolt results, but only some of the cancer cells were amplified. The c-myc positive cells were distributed randomly within regions of the tumor and exhibited a more uniform nuclear structure in comparison to the more vacuolated c-myc negative cells. No c-myc signal was detected in unirradiated normal skin or in irradiated skin cells near the tumors. C-myc amplification appears to be cell or cell cycle specific within radiation-induced carcinomas. 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of the metabolic state of c-MYC-induced mammary tumor with the cryo-imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Min Z.; Blessington, Dana M.; Zhou, Lanlan; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Zheng, Gang; Chance, Britton

    2003-07-01

    This study imaged the metabolic state of a growing tumor and the relationship between energy metabolism and the ability of glucose uptake in whole tumor tissue with cryo-imaging at 77° K. A MTB/TOM mouse model, bearing c-MYC-induced mammary tumor, was very rapidly freeze-trapped 2 hrs post Pyro-2DG injection. The fluorescence signals of oxidized flavoprotein (Fp), reduced pyridine nucleotide (PN), pyro-2DG, and the reflection signal of deoxy-hemoglobin were imaged every 100 μm from the top surface to the bottom of the tumor sequentially, 9 sections in total. Each of the four signals was constructed into 3D images with Amira software. Both Fp and PN signals could be detected in the growing tumor regions, and a higher reduction state where was shown in the ratio images. The necrotic tumor regions displayed a very strong Fp signal and weak PN signal. In the bloody extravasation regions, Fp and PN signals were observably diminished. Therefore, the regions of high growth and necrosis in the tumor could be determined according to the Fp and PN signals. The content of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) in the tumor was positively correlated with the reduced PN signal. Pyro-2DG signal was only evident in the growing condition region in the tumor. Normalized 3D cross-correlation showed that Pyro-2DG signal was similar to the redox ratio. The results indicated that glucose uptake in the tumor was consistent with the redox state of the tumor. And both Pyro-2DG and mitochondrial NADH fluorescence showed bimodal histograms suggesting that the two population of c-MYC induced mammary tumor, one of which could be controlled by c-MYC transgene.

  11. The inducible costimulator augments Tc17 cell responses to self and tumor tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Kundimi, Sreenath; Bowers, Jacob S.; Rogers, Carolyn E.; Huff, Logan W.; Schwartz, Kristina M.; Thyagarajan, Krishnamurthy; Little, Elizabeth C.; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Cole, David J.; Rubinstein, Mark P.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The inducible costimulator (ICOS) plays a key role in CD4+ Th17 cell development, but its role in CD8+ Tc17 cell development and self/tumor immunity remains unknown. We found that ICOS co-stimulation was important for the functional maintenance but not differentiation of Tc17 cells in vitro. Blocking the ICOS pathway using an antagonist antibody or by using mice genetically deficient in the ICOS ligand (ICOSL) reduced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred Tc17 cells. Conversely, ac...

  12. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the characte

  13. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian-Hong; Liu, Meng-Hua; Zhang, Xu-Lin; He, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa) Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography-diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight) obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones. PMID:26580602

  14. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hong Ye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography -diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones.

  15. Tumor Associated Macrophages Protect Colon Cancer Cells from TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis through IL-1β- Dependent Stabilization of Snail in Tumor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kaler, Pawan; Galea, Vincent; Augenlicht, Leonard; Klampfer, Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Background We recently reported that colon tumor cells stimulate macrophages to release IL-1β, which in turn inactivates GSK3β and enhances Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells, generating a self-amplifying loop that promotes the growth of tumor cells. Principal Findings Here we describe that macrophages protect HCT116 and Hke-3 colon cancer cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Inactivation of IL-1β by neutralizing IL-1β antibody, or silencing of IL-1β in macrophages inhibited their ability to ...

  16. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rohit B. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Wang, Qingde [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Khillan, Jaspal S., E-mail: khillan@pitt.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  17. Chemically and temperature-induced phase transformations of metal vanadates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patridge, Christopher James

    Metal vanadates contain a diverse family of compounds due to the facile accessibility of different vanadium oxidation states and local coordination environments. Though these systems present a number of applications in catalysis and electronics, there may exist untapped physical phenomena that only reveal themselves when scaling these materials to nanoscale dimensions. Finite-size effects result from a number of factors including surface energy structural instabilities, nanostructure "self-purification," and physical constraints on mechanistic or conductive pathways. The MxV2O 5 bronze materials possess non-stoichiometry and this interesting property has hindered synthetic techniques to procure perfect crystalline material which is needed to expose the true physical properties. Through hydrothermal synthesis methods, pseudo one---dimensional nanostructures of Mx V2O5 display fascinating new properties and may be model systems for studying fundamentals associated with correlated electron dynamics in solid-state physics. Electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction reveal the near-perfect crystalline nanostructures. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies show strong evidence for the localization of electron density and long-range crystal structure alignment of the nanowires. Single-nanowire electron transport measurements for the beta'-CuxV2O5 and the delta-KxV2O5 data shows novel temperature-induced reversible metal---insulator transition (MIT) near room temperature. The unprecedented magnitude (˜105) and discontinuous nature of the MIT suggests a mechanism closely associated with correlated electron motion. Additionally, the MIT can be induced by voltage ramping. The simultaneous temperature/voltage studies of single-nanowire transport support the existence of a critical threshold to overcome in order to facilitate instability in the insulating phase and transition to a metallic phase for the delta-KxV2O5 bronze. The MIT transition magnitudes of several

  18. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of...... two laser beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  19. Role of isothiocyanate conjugate of pterostilbene on the inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation and tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring pterostilbene (PTER) and isothiocyanate (ITC) attract great attention due to their wide range of biological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-leukemic, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. A novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by introducing an ITC moiety on PTER backbone was evaluated for its anti-cancer efficacy in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in vitro and Ehrlich ascitic tumor bearing mice model in vivo. The novel hybrid molecule showed significant in vitro anti-cancer activity (IC50=25±0.38) when compared to reference compound PTER (IC50=65±0.42). The conjugate molecule induced both S and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest as indicated by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, the conjugate induced cell death was characterized by changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, activation of caspase-9, release of cytochrome-c into cytosol and increased Bax: Bcl-2 ratio. The conjugate also suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. The conjugate induced cell death was significantly increased in presence of A6730 (a potent Akt1/2 kinase inhibitor) and PD98059 (a specific ERK inhibitor). Moreover, the conjugated PTER inhibited tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice as observed by reduction in tumor volume compared to untreated animals. Collectively, the pro-apoptotic effect of conjugate is mediated through the activation of caspases, and is correlated with the blockade of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Conjugate was prepared by appending isothiocyanate moiety on pterostilbene backbone. • Conjugate showed anticancer effects at comparatively lower dose than pterostilbene. • Conjugate caused blockage of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. • Conjugate significantly reduced solid tumor volume as compared to pterostilbene

  20. Role of isothiocyanate conjugate of pterostilbene on the inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation and tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Chakraborty, Ajanta [Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, Uttarakhand (India); Bodipati, Naganjaneyulu; Krishna Peddinti, Rama [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, Uttarakhand (India); Roy, Partha, E-mail: paroyfbs@iitr.ernet.in [Molecular Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2014-01-15

    Naturally occurring pterostilbene (PTER) and isothiocyanate (ITC) attract great attention due to their wide range of biological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-leukemic, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. A novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by introducing an ITC moiety on PTER backbone was evaluated for its anti-cancer efficacy in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in vitro and Ehrlich ascitic tumor bearing mice model in vivo. The novel hybrid molecule showed significant in vitro anti-cancer activity (IC{sub 50}=25±0.38) when compared to reference compound PTER (IC{sub 50}=65±0.42). The conjugate molecule induced both S and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest as indicated by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, the conjugate induced cell death was characterized by changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, activation of caspase-9, release of cytochrome-c into cytosol and increased Bax: Bcl-2 ratio. The conjugate also suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. The conjugate induced cell death was significantly increased in presence of A6730 (a potent Akt1/2 kinase inhibitor) and PD98059 (a specific ERK inhibitor). Moreover, the conjugated PTER inhibited tumor growth in Ehrlich ascitic cell induced tumor bearing mice as observed by reduction in tumor volume compared to untreated animals. Collectively, the pro-apoptotic effect of conjugate is mediated through the activation of caspases, and is correlated with the blockade of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Conjugate was prepared by appending isothiocyanate moiety on pterostilbene backbone. • Conjugate showed anticancer effects at comparatively lower dose than pterostilbene. • Conjugate caused blockage of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways in MCF-7 cells. • Conjugate significantly reduced solid tumor volume as compared to pterostilbene.

  1. Human tumor-derived genomic DNA transduced into a recipient cell induces tumor-specific immune responses ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Gambotto, Andrea; Albers, Andreas; Stanson, Joanna; Cohen, Edward P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a DNA-based vaccination strategy evaluated ex vivo with human cells. The vaccine was prepared by transferring tumor-derived genomic DNA to PCI-13 cells, a highly immunogenic tumor cell line (“recipient cell”), which had been genetically modified to secrete IL-2 (PCI-13/IL-2). PCI-13 cells expressed class I MHC determinants (HLA-A2) shared with the tumor from which the DNA was obtained as well as allogeneic determinants. DNA from a gp100+ melanoma ce...

  2. Tumoral calcinosis: seasonal biochemical studies and chemical studies of eyelid lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, D E; Boskey, A L; Lieb, W; Conway, B P; Savory, J; Wills, M R

    1989-01-01

    We recently described (Arch Ophthalmol 1988; 106:725-6) the presence of unique calcific lesions in the eyelids of a young woman with a history of hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis. Here we document that no immediate family members showed similar lesions and that none was hyperphosphatemic. Dental roentgenography revealed characteristic abnormalities in the patient that confirmed the clinical diagnosis of tumoral calcinosis. Seasonal biochemical studies demonstrated persistently increased concentrations of phosphorus and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in her serum. A calcific eyelid excrescence removed from the patient, studied by x-ray diffraction, was found to consist of crystals of hydroxyapatite. Microprobe analysis indicated the major elements in the deposit to be Ca, P, S, and Cl, just as in the periarticular deposits found in tumoral calcinosis. The Ca concentration in the patient's tear fluid, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, was within the range found in tears of healthy volunteers. Phosphorus was undetectable (less than 30 mumol/L) in tears of the patient and the volunteers. These findings suggest that the eyelid lesions represent a new manifestation of the pathological process that produces the characteristic periarticular calcific masses of tumoral calcinosis. PMID:2535974

  3. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  4. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  5. Granuloma induced by sustained-release fluorouracil implants misdiagnosed as a hepatic tumor: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dou-Sheng; Jin, Sheng-Jie; He, Rong; Jiang, Guo-Qing; Yao, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Sustained-release fluorouracil (FU) implants have been extensively used in peritoneal interstitial chemotherapy, and during surgery for gastrointestinal tumors, breast cancer and hepatic tumors. Currently, studies regarding the complications associated with sustained-release FU implants are rare. The present study describes the case of a 61-year-old male who presented with a space-occupying lesion of the left lobe of the liver six months after undergoing a radical total gastrectomy. Thus, laparoscopic exploration was performed to remove the tumor. Postoperative histological examination demonstrated that the lesion in the left lobe comprised of necrotic tissue with granulation tissue hyperplasia. Based on the surgical and postoperative histological findings, the mass was proposed to be due to a high concentration of local sustained-release FU implants. Furthermore, the drug was partially surrounded and had been insufficiently metabolized over a long time period, which was proposed to have caused necrosis, proliferation and fibrillation, and induced granuloma. In conclusion, local high concentrations of sustained-release FU implants may be associated with granuloma and this finding may enable improved management of sustained-release FU implants during surgery. PMID:25013494

  6. Genotype tunes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissue tension to induce matricellular fibrosis and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laklai, Hanane; Miroshnikova, Yekaterina A; Pickup, Michael W; Collisson, Eric A; Kim, Grace E; Barrett, Alex S; Hill, Ryan C; Lakins, Johnathon N; Schlaepfer, David D; Mouw, Janna K; LeBleu, Valerie S; Roy, Nilotpal; Novitskiy, Sergey V; Johansen, Julia S; Poli, Valeria; Kalluri, Raghu; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wood, Laura D; Hebrok, Matthias; Hansen, Kirk; Moses, Harold L; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-05-01

    Fibrosis compromises pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) treatment and contributes to patient mortality, yet antistromal therapies are controversial. We found that human PDACs with impaired epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling have high epithelial STAT3 activity and develop stiff, matricellular-enriched fibrosis associated with high epithelial tension and shorter patient survival. In several KRAS-driven mouse models, both the loss of TGF-β signaling and elevated β1-integrin mechanosignaling engaged a positive feedback loop whereby STAT3 signaling promotes tumor progression by increasing matricellular fibrosis and tissue tension. In contrast, epithelial STAT3 ablation attenuated tumor progression by reducing the stromal stiffening and epithelial contractility induced by loss of TGF-β signaling. In PDAC patient biopsies, higher matricellular protein and activated STAT3 were associated with SMAD4 mutation and shorter survival. The findings implicate epithelial tension and matricellular fibrosis in the aggressiveness of SMAD4 mutant pancreatic tumors and highlight STAT3 and mechanics as key drivers of this phenotype. PMID:27089513

  7. Latent period and antigenicity of murine tumors induced in C3H mice by short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin tumors were induced in C3H/HeNCr1BR mice with chronic short-wavelength ultraviolet (UVC) irradiation using a germicidal lamp (254 nm). Fifty percent of mice had developed tumors by 9 1/2 months (range 8-12 months). With progressive irradiation, mice developed multiple tumors on the back reaching a mean of 2.9 tumors/mouse at 11 1/2 months. No tumors developed on the ears. Of 83 lesions examined histologically 66 (80%) were squamous cell carcinomas, 6 (7%) were fibrosarcomas, and 10 (12%) were proliferative squamous lesions without evident invasion. Twenty-two squamous cell carcinomas were transplanted s.c. into normal syngeneic mice and into mice immunosuppressed by adult thymectomy, lethal x-irradiation, and bone marrow or neonatal liver reconstitution. Transplantation of squamous cell carcinomas was successful in a total of 17/22 (77%) cases. Only 11/22 (50%) tumors grew progressively in normal mice. Six of 22 (27%) tumors grew progressively in immunosuppressed mice but not normal syngeneic recipients. Three fibrosarcomas were also transplanted. All 3 grew progressively in immunosuppressed hosts but failed to grow in normal syngeneic recipients. Two fibrosarcomas that were induced by a germicidal lamp were found to grow significantly better in UVB-irradiated (280-320 nm) mice than in normal mice. Conversely, a UVB-induced fibrosarcoma showed enhanced growth in UVC-irradiated mice compared to growth in normal, age-matched controls

  8. Detection of irradiation-induced, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in mouse tumors using Hsp70 Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The major stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in highly aggressive tumors, and elevated intracellular Hsp70 levels mediate protection against apoptosis. Following therapeutic intervention, such as ionizing irradiation, translocation of cytosolic Hsp70 to the plasma membrane is selectively increased in tumor cells and therefore, membrane Hsp70 might serve as a therapy-inducible, tumor-specific target structure. Materials and methods: Based on the IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) cmHsp70.1, we produced the Hsp70-specific recombinant Fab fragment (Hsp70 Fab), as an imaging tool for the detection of membrane Hsp70 positive tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Results: The binding characteristics of Hsp70 Fab towards mouse colon (CT26) and pancreatic (1048) carcinoma cells at 4 deg. C were comparable to that of cmHsp70.1 mAb, as determined by flow cytometry. Following a temperature shift to 37 deg. C, Hsp70 Fab rapidly translocates into subcellular vesicles of mouse tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice Cy5.5-conjugated Hsp70 Fab, but not unrelated IN-1 control Fab fragment (IN-1 ctrl Fab), gradually accumulates in CT26 tumors between 12 and 55 h after i.v. injection. Conclusions: In summary, the Hsp70 Fab provides an innovative, low immunogenic tool for imaging of membrane Hsp70 positive tumors, in vivo.

  9. Detection of fat in lipomatous tumors of the myometrium by means of computed tomography and chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging; Deteccion de grasa en tumores lipomatosos del miometrio mediante TC y RM con tecnica de Desplazamiento Quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, S.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Delgado, F.; Ripolles, T. [Hospital Universitario Doctor Peset. Valencia (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Lipomatous tumors of the myometrium are rare lesions composed of varying amounts of mature fatty tissue. Our objective was to assess the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance MR findings associated with these tumors and determine the utility of the chemical shift imaging technique in the detection of fact within these focal uterine masses. Lipomatous focal uterine lesions were detected in three women by means of ultrasound. The patients underwent CT and MR using the chemical shift imaging technique and in-phase and opposed phase T1-weighted gradient-echo images. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the results were carried out, based on the attenuations and relations of signal intensity. The tumors were hypoattenuated in CT seans and hyperintense in T1-weighted images, showing a decreased signal in opposed phase T1-weighted images when compared with in-phase images. The percentage change (between 2% and 3%) is probably proportional to the differing proportions of fact and muscle elements present in these lipoleiomyomas. Lipomatous tumors of the myometrium are uterine lesions with a varying proportion of fact. Their fat composition can be detected by CT and MR. The chemical shift imaging technique reveals the variations in the proportions of fat in these tumors. Since the presence of fat within uterine lesions is virtually diagnostic of the myometrial lipomatous tumor, the chemical shift imaging technique contributes to the characterization of these lesions. (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Pertussis toxin inhibits somatostatin-induced K+ conductance in human pituitary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pertussis toxin on somatostatin-induced K+ current was examined in dissociated human pituitary tumor cells obtained from two acromegalic patients. Somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization or K+ current was observed in 20 of 23 cells in adenoma 1 and 10 of 11 cells in adenoma 2. After treatment with pertussis toxin for 24 h, these responses were completely suppressed (0/14 in adenoma, 1, 0/10 in adenoma 2). Spontaneous action potentials, K+, Na+, and Ca2+ currents were well preserved after pertussis toxin treatment. When crude membrane fraction was incubated with [32P]NAD, a 41K protein was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin. Hormone release was inhibited by somatostatin and this inhibition was blocked by pertussis toxin treatment

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha expression increases during colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is involved in processes promoting carcinogenesis of many tumors. However, its role in the development of colorectal cancer is unknown. To investigate the significance of HIF-1α during colorectal carcinogenesis and progression we examined its expression in precursor lesions constituting the conventional and serrated pathways, as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot is used to analyse HIF-1α expression in normal colonic mucosa, hyperplastic polyps (HPP), sessile serrated adenomas (SSA), low-grade (TA-LGD) and high-grade (TA-HGD) traditional adenomas as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. Eight colorectal carcinoma cell lines are tested for their HIF-1α inducibility after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation using western blot and immunocytochemistry. In normal mucosa, HPP and TA-LGD HIF-1α was not expressed. In contast, perinuclear protein accumulation and nuclear expression of HIF-1α were shown in half of the examined SSA and TA-HGD. In all investigated colorectal carcinomas a significant nuclear HIF-1α overexpression compared to the premalignant lesions was observed but a significant correlation with the metastatic status was not found. Nuclear HIF-1α expression was strongly accumulated in perinecrotic regions. In these cases HIF-1α activation was seen in viable cohesive tumor epithelia surrounding necrosis and in dissociated tumor cells, which subsequently die. Enhanced distribution of HIF-1α was also seen in periiflammatory regions. In additional in vitro studies, treatment of diverse colorectal carcinoma cell lines with the potent pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to HIF-1α expression and nuclear translocation. We conclude that HIF-1α expression occurs in early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and achieves a maximum in the invasive stage independent of the metastatic status. Perinecrotic

  12. INDUCEMENT OF ANTITUMOR-IMMUNITY BY DC ACTIVATED BY HSP70-H22 TUMOR ANTIGEN PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯作化; 黄波; 张桂梅; 李东; 王洪涛

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of decreasing the dosage of tumor antigen peptides by dendritic cell (DC)-presenting and the characteristics of modification of DC by heat shock protein (Hsp70) and antigen peptides. Methods: Peptides were bound to Hsp70 and used to modify DC in vitro. The metabolism of the modified DC and the cytokines secreted by the modified DC were determined. The activation of lymphocytes by the modified DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. The cytotoxicity of the activated lymphocytes to H22 tumor cells was analyzed. The inhibitory effect of tumor in mice by the injection of DC and Hsp70-H22 peptides was tested. Results: 0.15μg of H22 peptides bound with Hsp70 could make 2×105 DC mature. 4×103 matured DC could activate 2×106 lymphocytes. The same amount of lymphocytes could be activated to produce similar cytotoxicity to tumor cells by either DC modified by 0.003μg of peptides bound with Hsp70 or by direct stimulation with 0.15μg of peptides bound with Hsp70. The dosage of peptides could be reduced by about 50 folds if the modified DC was used for injection instead of Hsp70-peptides. Peptides from normal hepatocytes, bound with Hsp70, could not make DC mature, nor activate lymphocytes through DC. Conclusion: The dosage of Hsp70-H22 peptides can be reduced significantly by DC-presenting to activate lymphocytes. Peptides from normal cells could not activate lymphocytes by either Hsp70-presenting or DC-presenting and they have little chance to induce autoimmunity.

  13. AKT1E17K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6–2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype. PMID:26859676

  14. N,N'-dimethylnitrosourea-induced tumors in mice and Syrian hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1974-10-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenic effect of N, N'-dimethylnitrosourea (DMNU on mice and hamsters was studied. Repeated subcutaneous injections of DMNU resulted in the induction of malignant lymphomas with an incidence of 100 per cent in adult C3HjBifBjKi mice and induced malignant tumors of forestomach, mammary gland and uterus with a high incidence in adult hamsters. Control animals showed no pathological changes. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of murine type C virus particles in some of the tissues examined. Many type C virus particles were found in a transplant of DMNU.induced malig. nant lymphoma. Some type C virus particles were shown in malignant lymphomas and lymph nodes of malignant lymphoma-bearing mice. A very small number of type C virus particles were observed in thymus of control mice and bone marrow of a malignant lymphoma.bearing mouse. A few particles, quite similar to murine type C virus particles, were detected in DMNU.induced mammary adenocarcinoma of hamster. No virus-like particles were seen in mammary glands of control hamsters. Whether these particles are merely passengers or are playing a significant role in the carcinogenesis of these tumors remains to be determined.

  15. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition induces endoplasmic-reticulum-stress response in human colorectal tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Zeindl-Eberhart

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are stressed by unfavorable environmental conditions like hypoxia or starvation. Driven by the resulting cellular stress tumor cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Additionally, cellular stress is accompanied by endoplasmic reticulum-stress which induces an unfolded protein response. It is unknown if epithelial-mesenchymal transition and endoplasmic reticulum-stress are occurring as independent parallel events or if an interrelationship exists between both of them. Here, we show that in colorectal cancer cells endoplasmic reticulum-stress depends on the induction of ZEB-1, which is a main factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In the absence of ZEB-1 colorectal cancer cells cannot mount endoplasmic reticulum-stress as a reaction on cellular stress situations like hypoxia or starvation. Thus, our data suggest that there is a hierarchy in the development of cellular stress which starts with the presence of environmental stress that induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition which allows finally endoplasmic reticulum-stress. This finding highlights the central role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition during the process of tumorigenesis as epithelial-mesenchymal transition is also associated with chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Consequently, endoplasmic reticulum-stress might be a well suited target for chemotherapy of colorectal cancers.

  16. Type-1-cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibition to induce tumor growth arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquavella, Nicolas; Clever, David; Yu, Zhiya; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Palmer, Douglas C.; Xi, Liqiang; Pflicke, Holger; Ji, Yun; Gros, Alena; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Goldlust, Ian S.; Mehta, Gautam U.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Morrow, James J.; Franco, Zulmarie; Gattinoni, Luca; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Raffeld, Mark; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Both targeted inhibition of oncogenic driver mutations and immune-based therapies show efficacy in treatment of patients with metastatic cancer but responses can be either short-lived or incompletely effective. Oncogene inhibition can augment the efficacy of immune-based therapy but mechanisms by which these two interventions might cooperate are incompletely resolved. Using a novel transplantable BRAFV600E-mutant murine melanoma model (SB-3123), we explore potential mechanisms of synergy between the selective BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib and adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy. We found that vemurafenib cooperated with ACT to delay melanoma progression without significantly affecting tumor infiltration or effector function of endogenous or adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells as previously observed. Instead, we found that the T-cell cytokines IFNγ and TNFα synergized with vemurafenib to induce cell-cycle arrest of tumor cells in vitro. This combinatorial effect was recapitulated in human melanoma-derived cell lines and was restricted to cancers bearing a BRAFV600E-mutation. Molecular profiling of treated SB-3123 indicated that the provision of vemurafenib promoted the sensitization of SB-3123 to the anti-proliferative effects of T-cell effector cytokines. The unexpected finding that immune cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibitors to induce growth arrest have major implications for understanding cancer biology at the intersection of oncogenic and immune signaling and provides a basis for design of combinatorial therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:25358764

  17. Lentivirus-Mediated Oncogene Introduction into Mammary Cells In Vivo Induces Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K. Siwko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the introduction of oncogene-expressing avian retroviruses into somatic mammary cells in mice susceptible to infection by transgenic expression of tva, encoding the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis-sarcoma virus (ALSV. Because ALSV-based vectors poorly infect nondividing cells, they are inadequate for studying carcinogenesis initiated from nonproliferative cells (e.g., stem cells. Lentivirus pseudotyped with the envelope protein of ALSV infects nondividing TVA-producing cells in culture but has not previously been tested for introducing genes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that these vectors infected mammary cells in vivo when injected into the mammary ductal lumen of mice expressing tva under the control of the keratin 19 promoter. Furthermore, intraductal injection of this lentiviral vector carrying the polyoma middle T antigen gene induced atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ-like premalignant lesions in 30 days and palpable invasive tumors at a median latency of 3.3 months. Induced tumors were a mixed epithelial/myoepithelial histologic diagnosis, occasionally displayed squamous metaplasia, and were estrogen receptor-negative. This work demonstrates the first use of a lentiviral vector to introduce oncogenes for modeling cancer in mice, and this vector system may be especially suitable for introducing genetic alterations into quiescent cells in vivo.

  18. Clonal T cell expansion induced by interleukin 2 therapy in blood and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Farace, F; Gaudin, C; Triebel, F

    1996-01-01

    In a phase I clinical trial on the effects of preoperative adjuvant IL-2 therapy given to patients undergoing hepatic resection of colorectal adenocarcinoma metastases, we monitored the putative induction of T cell clonal expansion in both tissues and blood. The presence of T cell clonotypes was analyzed with a PCR-based method that determines V-D-J junction size patterns in T cell receptor (TCR) V beta subfamilies in samples before and after a 5-d IL-2 infusion. This high resolution method analyzing CDR3 sizes of TCR transcripts was used in conjunction with FACS analysis of the corresponding T cell subpopulations with TCR V beta-specific mAb. At time of surgery (day 8 after starting IL-2), we found in the three patients analyzed with V beta-C beta primers multiple dominant T cell clonotypes in the tumor and peritumoral tissues which had probably expanded as a result of therapy. In three control patients not treated with IL-2, multiple oligoclonal patterns were not observed with this set of primers. In the fourth control patient a unique V beta 21-C beta CDR3 pattern which corresponds to two dominant clonotypes was found in the tumor. The same dominant clonotypes identified in the tumor after IL-2 were also detectable in the blood and comparison of the profiles obtained before and after IL-2 therapy indicates that they were induced by IL-2. The relative expansion of the corresponding T cell subpopulations was maintained for varying periods of time after surgery (4-7 d and almost 2 yr in one case). Together, these results indicate that IL-2 induces marked expansion of several T cell clones. Systemic IL-2 administration may represent, either alone or as a vaccine adjuvant, an appropriate way of boosting antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:8636433

  19. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug-disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed fromhttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr The online CD-REST demonstration system is available athttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL:http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr;http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. PMID:27016700

  20. Repercussion of mitochondria deformity induced by anti-Hsp90 drug 17AAG in human tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vishal, Chaturvedi

    2011-06-07

    Inhibiting Hsp90 chaperone roles using 17AAG induces cytostasis or apoptosis in tumor cells through destabilization of several mutated cancer promoting proteins. Although mitochondria are central in deciding the fate of cells, 17AAG induced effects on tumor cell mitochondria were largely unknown. Here, we show that Hsp90 inhibition with 17AAG first affects mitochondrial integrity in different human tumor cells, neuroblastoma, cervical cancer and glial cells. Using human neuroblastoma tumor cells, we found the early effects associated with a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, elongation and engorgement of mitochondria because of an increased matrix vacuolization. These effects are specific to Hsp90 inhibition as other chemotherapeutic drugs did not induce similar mitochondrial deformity. Further, the effects are independent of oxidative damage and cytoarchitecture destabilization since cytoskeletal disruptors and mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors also do not induce similar deformity induced by 17AAG. The 1D PAGE LC MS/ MS mitochondrial proteome analysis of 17AAG treated human neuroblastoma cells showed a loss of 61% proteins from membrane, metabolic, chaperone and ribonucleoprotein families. About 31 unmapped protein IDs were identified from proteolytic processing map using Swiss-Prot accession number, and converted to the matching gene name searching the ExPASy proteomics server. Our studies display that Hsp90 inhibition effects at first embark on mitochondria of tumor cells and compromise mitochondrial integrity. the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd.

  1. Electron microscopic morphology and DNA chain fragmentation studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the apoptosis and fraction of DNA chain fragmentation in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP. Methods: Apoptosis in bone tumor cells exposed to different time periods of 153Sm-EDTMP internal irradiation was observed by electron microscopic morphology and DNA chain fragmentation studies. Results: It was demonstrated that the bone tumor cells internally exposed to 153Sm-EDTMP displayed nuclear fragmentation, margination of condensed chromatin, and formation of membrane bounded apoptotic bodies. The study showed that the percentage of DNA chain fragmentation increases in direct proportion to the duration of internal exposure to 153Sm-EDTMP. Conclusion: Apoptosis induced by 153Sm-EDTMP in bone tumor cells was dependent on the time of 153Sm-EDTMP exposure

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is induced in fibroblasts in polyomavirus middle T antigen-driven mammary carcinoma without influencing tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye S; Egeblad, Mikala; Rank, Fritz;

    2008-01-01

    intraepithelial neoplasias. To determine if MMP13 plays a role in tumor progression, we crossed MMTV-PyMT mice with Mmp13 deficient mice. The absence of MMP13 did not influence tumor growth, vascularization, progression to more advanced tumor stages, or metastasis to the lungs, and the absence of MMP13 was not......Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13 (collagenase 3) is an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme that is induced in myofibroblasts during the earliest invasive stages of human breast carcinoma, suggesting that it is involved in tumor progression. During progression of mammary carcinomas in the...... polyoma virus middle T oncogene mouse model (MMTV-PyMT), Mmp13 mRNA was strongly upregulated concurrently with the transition to invasive and metastatic carcinomas. As in human tumors, Mmp13 mRNA was found in myofibroblasts of invasive grade II and III carcinomas, but not in benign grade I and II mammary...

  3. The tumor suppressor gene RBM5 inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cell growth and induces apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of tumor suppressor gene (TSG function is a critical step in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. RBM5 (RNA-binding motif protein 5, also named H37/LUCA-15 gene from chromosome 3p21.3 demonstrated tumor suppressor activity. However, the role of RBM5 played in the occurrence and development of lung cancer is still not well understood. Method Paired non-tumor and tumor tissues were obtained from 30 adenocarcinomas. The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. A549 cell line was used to determine the apoptotic function of RBM5 in vitro. A549 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5. AnnexinV analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Expression of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PAPP proteins in A549 lung cancer cells and the A549 xenograft BALB/c nude mice model was determined by Western blot. Tumor suppressor activity of RBM5 was also examined in the A549 xenograft model treated with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 plasmid carried by attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a. Result The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was decreased significantly in adenocarcinoma tissues compared to that in the non-tumor tissues. In addition, as compared to the vector control, a significant growth inhibition of A549 lung cancer cells was observed when transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 as determined by cell proliferation assay. We also found that overexpression of RBM5 induced both early and late apoptosis in A549 cells using AnnexinV/PI staining as determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased, whereas the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP proteins was significantly increased in the RBM5 transfected cells; similarly, expression of decreased Bcl-2 and increased cleaved caspase-3 proteins was also examined in the A549 xenograft model. More importantly, we showed that accumulative and stable overexpression of RBM5 in the A549 xenograft BALB

  4. Hypoxia induced HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA interactions mediate tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through Toll Like Receptor 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Yan, Wei; Tohme, Samer; Chen, Man; Fu, Yu; Tian, Dean; Lotze, Michael; Tang, Daolin; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The mechanisms of hypoxia-induced tumor growth remain unclear. Hypoxia induces intracellular translocation and release of a variety of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as nuclear HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In inflammation, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 activation by DNA-containing immune complexes has been shown to be mediated by HMGB1. We thus hypothesize that HMGB1 binds mtDNA in the cytoplasm of hypoxic tumor cells and promotes tumor growth through activating TLR9 signaling pathways. Methods C57BL6 mice were injected with Hepa1-6 cancer cells. TLR9 and HMGB1 were inhibited using shRNA or direct antagonists. Huh7 and Hepa1-6 cancer cells were investigated in vitro to investigate how the interaction of HMGB1 and mtDNA activates TLR9 signaling pathways. Results During hypoxia, HMGB1 translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol and binds to mtDNA released from damaged mitochondria. This complex subsequently activates TLR9 signaling pathways to promote tumor cell proliferation. Loss of HMGB1 or mtDNA leads to a defect in TLR9 signaling pathways in response to hypoxia, resulting in decreased tumor cell proliferation. Also, the addition of HMGB1 and mtDNA leads to the activation of TLR-9 and subsequent tumor cell proliferation. Moreover, TLR9 is overexpressed in both hypoxic tumor cells in vitro and in human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) specimens; and, knockdown of either HMGB1 or TLR9 from HCC cells suppressed tumor growth in vivo after injection in mice. Conclusions Our data reveals a novel mechanism by which the interactions of HMGB1 and mtDNA activate TLR9 signaling during hypoxia to induce tumor growth. PMID:25681553

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the pelvic soft tissue presenting with symptomatic hypoglycemia: A case report and brief review of current literature of non-islet cell tumor-induced hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Kathleen; Hsieh, Jessica; Morosky, Christopher; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    ► Presentation of a rare case of pelvic gastrointestinal stromal tumor. ► Non-islet cell induced hypoglycemia causing severe hypoglycemia. ► The pathogenesis of non-islet cell induced hypoglycemia due to over-production of precursors of insulin-like growth factor-II. ► Complete resolution of hypoglycemia following resection of the tumor.

  6. Carcinogenic alterations in murine liver, lung, and uterine tumors induced by in utero exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumniczky, K; Antal, S; Unger, E; Wunderlich, L; Hidvégi, E J; Sáfrány, G

    1998-02-01

    The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl raised the question of prenatal sensitivity to ionizing radiation-induced cancer. In this study, mice were exposed to single doses of gamma-radiation (0.2-2.0 Gy) at different embryonic stages. The tumor incidence increased with dose from 15% in control mice to 35% in mice irradiated with 2.0 Gy on 18 d of prenatal life. Various oncogenic events were investigated in lymphoid, liver, lung, and uterine tumors. We observed threefold to fivefold increases in myc expression in 25% of the lymphomas, and the expression of Ha-ras and p53 genes decreased in 40% and 60% of the lung tumors by twofold to fivefold. Point mutations were tissue specific: Ha-ras codon 61 mutations were found in about 40% of the liver adenocarcinomas, Ki-ras codon 12 mutations in about 17% of lung tumors, and p53 mutations in about 15% of the lymphomas. Amplification and rearrangement of the p53, myc, and Ha-, Ki- and N-ras genes were not detected. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 4 at the multiple tumor suppressor 1 and 2 genes was observed in all types of malignancies. Allelic losses on chromosome 11 at the p53 locus were found in lymphoid, liver, and lung tumors, but they were absent from uterine tumors. Multiple oncogenic changes were often detected. The frequency of carcinogenic alterations was similar in spontaneous and radiation-induced lymphoid, liver, and uterine tumors. In radiation-induced lung adenocarcinomas, however, the incidences of many oncogenic changes were different from those found in their spontaneous counterparts. This suggests that different oncogenic pathways are activated during spontaneous and in utero gamma-radiation-induced murine lung carcinogenesis. PMID:9496910

  7. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  8. Experimental study on radiation-inducible expression and anti-tumor effect of pEgr-IFN γ recombinant plasmid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the radiation-inducible expression and the anti-tumor effect of pEgr-IFN γ recombinant plasmid in mice bearing melanoma. Methods: The pEgr-IFN γ plasmid was injected locally into the tumor in the mice, and the tumors were irradiated with X-rays 36 hours later. The tumor growth rate at different times and mean survival period of the mice were observed. The IFN γmRNA level in the tumor was detected with RT-PCR, 3 days after irradiation, and the concentration of IFNγ in the serum of the mice was detected by ELISA 1, 3 and 5 days after irradiation. Results: The IFNγ mRNA level in the tumor of mice in the gene-radiotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the recombinant plasmid group 3 days after irradiation. The IFNγ concentration in the serum of mice in the gene-radiotherapy group was higher than that in the recombinant plasmid group and the control group 1 and 3 days after irradiation. The tumor growth rate in the group of plasmid injection followed by 5 Gy irradiation for four times was significantly lower than that in the group of plasmid injection followed by 20 Gy irradiation 9-15 days after irradiation, and the mean survival period was also longer. Conclusions: The anti-tumor effect of plasmid injection followed by lower dose irradiation for several times is better than that by higher dose irradiation. By inducing higher expression of IFNγ gene in the tumor, pEgr-IFN γ gene-radiotherapy could increase the concentration of IFNγ in the serum, and therefore the body's immunologic function and anti-tumor ability are enhanced

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  10. Comparison of Skeletal Effects of Ovariectomy Versus Chemically Induced Ovarian Failure in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Laura E; Christian, Patricia J.; Rivera, Zelieann; Van Alstine, William G.; L Funk, Janet; L Bouxsein, Mary; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2008-01-01

    Bone loss associated with menopause leads to an increase in skeletal fragility and fracture risk. Relevant animal models can be useful for evaluating the impact of ovarian failure on bone loss. A chemically induced model of menopause in which mice gradually undergo ovarian failure yet retain residual ovarian tissue has been developed using the chemical 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). This study was designed to compare skeletal effects of VCD-induced ovarian failure to those associated wit...

  11. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Down-regulation of HSP27 sensitizes TRAIL-resistant tumor cell to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Hongqin; Jiang, Weiwei; Cheng, Wei;

    2010-01-01

    oxygen species or anticancer drugs. Their elevated expressions facilitate cells to survive in stress circumstances. The HSP27 expression is enhanced in many tumor cells, implying that it is involved in tumor progression and the development of treatment resistance in various tumors, including lung cancer...... HSP27 siRNA on drug sensitization of A549 cells to TRAIL treatment. The results showed that treatment of A549 cells with HSP27 siRNA down-regulated HSP27 expression but did not induce significant apoptosis. However, combination of HSP27 siRNA with TRAIL-induced significant apoptosis in TRAIL......-resistant A549 cells. In addition to inducing caspases activation and apoptosis, combined treatment with HSP27 siRNA and TRAIL also increased JNK and p53 expression and activity. Collectively, these findings provide a conclusion that siRNA targeting of the HSP27 gene specifically down-regulated HSP27...

  13. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  14. IR Laser-induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Polyselenocarbosilane Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Pola, Josef

    - : -, 2006, s. 1-2. [Reunión Nacional de Espectroscopia (RNE) y IV Congresso Ibérico de Espectroscopia (CIE) /20./. Ciúdad Real (ES), 10.09.2006-14.09.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : chemical vapour deposition Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry

  15. Microarray analysis of tumor necrosis factor α induced gene expression in U373 human glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prüllage Maria

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF is able to induce a variety of biological responses in the nervous system including inflammation and neuroprotection. Human astrocytoma cells U373 have been widely used as a model for inflammatory cytokine actions in the nervous system. Here we used cDNA microarrays to analyze the time course of the transcriptional response from 1 h up to 12 h post TNF treatment in comparison to untreated U373 cells. TNF activated strongly the NF-κB transcriptional pathway and is linked to other pathways via the NF-κB target genes JUNB and IRF-1. Part of the TNF-induced gene expression could be inhibited by pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB with pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC. NF-κB comprises a family of transcription factors which are involved in the inducible expression of genes regulating neuronal survival, inflammatory response, cancer and innate immunity. Results In this study we show that numerous genes responded to TNF (> 880 from 7500 tested with a more than two-fold induction rate. Several novel TNF-responsive genes (about 60% of the genes regulated by a factor ≥ 3 were detected. A comparison of our TNF-induced gene expression profiles of U373, with profiles from 3T3 and Hela cells revealed a striking cell-type specificity. SCYA2 (MCP-1, CCL2, MCAF was induced in U373 cells in a sustained manner and at the highest level of all analyzed genes. MCP-1 protein expression, as monitored with immunofluorescence and ELISA, correlated exactly with microarray data. Based on these data and on evidence from literature we suggest a model for the potential neurodegenerative effect of NF-κB in astroglia: Activation of NF-κB via TNF results in a strongly increased production of MCP-1. This leads to a exacerbation of neurodegeneration in stoke or Multiple Sclerosis, presumably via infiltration of macrophages. Conclusions The vast majority of genes regulated more than 3-fold were previously not linked to

  16. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  17. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaña, Fabián [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Faini, Francesca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kemmerling, Ulrike [Anatomy and Developmental Biology Program, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Parra, Eduardo [Laboratory of Experimental Biomedicine, University of Tarapaca, Campus Esmeralda, Iquique (Chile); Ferreira, Jorge, E-mail: jferreir@med.uchile.cl [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  18. Adrenomedullin mediates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced responses in dorsal root ganglia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yajuan; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Yuanhui; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pain peptide. This study investigated the possible involvement of AM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced responses contributing to neuronal plasticity in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Exposure of the DRG explant cultures to TNF-α (5nM) for 48h upregulated the expression of AM mRNA. The treatment with TNF-α also increased the level of CGRP, CCL-2 and MMP-9 mRNA in the cultured DRG. This increase was attenuated by the co-treatment with the selective AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (2μM). The blockade of AM receptors inhibited TNF-α-induced increase of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and nuclear factor kappa B (pNF-κB) proteins. On the other hand, the treatment with the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (10nM) for 96h induced an increase in the level of GFAP, IL-1β, pCREB and pNF-κB proteins. The inhibition of AM activity did not change TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (pERK) while the treatment with AM1-50 still increased the level of pERK in the cultured DRG. Immunofluorescence assay showed the colocalization of AM-like immunoreactivity (IR) with TNF-α-IR in DRG neurons. The present study suggests that the increased AM receptor signaling mediated the many, but not all, TNF-α-induced activities, contributing to peripheral sensitization in neuropathic pain. PMID:27184601

  19. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific

  20. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    to identify TAA, mice were immunized with mixtures of peptides representing putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from one of the gene products. Indeed, such immunized mice were partially protected against subsequent tumor challenge. Despite being immunized with bona fide self antigens, no...

  1. Surface expressed nucleolin is constantly induced in tumor cells to mediate calcium-dependent ligand internalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara G Hovanessian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleolin is one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, but it is also expressed on the cell surface where is serves as a binding protein for variety of ligands implicated in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that the cell-surface expressed nucleolin is a strategic target for an effective and nontoxic cancer therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By monitoring the expression of nucleolin mRNA, and by measuring the level of nucleolin protein recovered from the surface and nucleus of cells, here we show that the presence of nucleolin at the cell surface is dependent on the constant induction of nucleolin mRNA. Indeed, inhibitors of RNA transcription or translation block expression of surface nucleolin while no apparent effect is observed on the level of nucleolin in the nucleus. The estimated half-life of surface nucleolin is less than one hour, whereas that of nuclear nucleolin is more than 8 hours. Nucleolin mRNA induction is reduced markedly in normal fibroblasts that reach confluence, while it occurs continuously even in post-confluent epithelial tumor cells consistent with their capacity to proliferate without contact inhibition. Interestingly, cold and heat shock induce nucleolin mRNA concomitantly to enhanced mRNA expression of the heat shock protein 70, thus suggesting that surface nucleolin induction also occurs in response to an environmental insult. At the cell surface, one of the main functions of nucleolin is to shuttle specific extracellular ligands by an active transport mechanism, which we show here to be calcium dependent. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that the expression of surface nucleolin is an early metabolic event coupled with tumor cell proliferation and stress response. The fact that surface nucleolin is constantly and abundantly expressed on the surface of tumor cells, makes them a preferential target for the inhibitory action of anticancer agents that target

  2. Sequence tags of provirus integration sites in DNAs of tumors induced by the murine retrovirus SL3-3.

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, A B; Duch, M.; Amtoft, H W; Jørgensen, P; Pedersen, F S

    1996-01-01

    The murine retrovirus SL3-3 is a potent inducer of T-cell lymphomas when inoculated into susceptible newborn mice. The proviral integration site sequences were surveyed in tumor DNAs by a simple two-step PCR method. From 20 SL3-3-induced tumors a total of 39 provirus-host junctions were amplified and sequenced. Seven showed homology to known sequences. These included the known common integration site c-myc as well as genes not previously identified as targets of provirus integration, namely N...

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Ototoxicity in Mouse Cochlear Organotypic Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wu

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α is a cytokine involved in acute inflammatory phase reactions, and is the primary upstream mediator in the cochlear inflammatory response. Treatment of the organ of Corti with TNF-α can induce hair cell damage. However, the resulting morphological changes have not been systematically examined. In the present study, cochlear organotypic cultures from neonatal mice were treated with various concentrations and durations of TNF-α to induce inflammatory responses. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the condition of hair cells and supporting cells following immunohistochemical staining. In addition, the ultrastructure of the stereocilia bundle, hair cells, and supporting cells were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. TNF-α treatment resulted in a fusion and loss of stereocilia bundles in hair cells, swelling of mitochondria, and vacuolation and degranulation of the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of tight junctions between hair cells and supporting cells was also observed at high concentrations. Hair cell loss was preceded by apoptosis of Deiters' and pillar cells. Taken together, these findings detail the morphological changes in the organ of Corti after TNF-α treatment, and provide an in vitro model of inflammatory-induced ototoxicity.

  4. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  5. Fer tyrosine kinase oligomer mediates and amplifies Src-induced tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneyama, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Ninomiya, Y; Iino, T; Tsukita, S; Okada, M

    2016-01-28

    c-Src is upregulated in various human cancers, suggesting its role in malignant progression. However, the molecular circuits of c-Src oncogenic signaling remain elusive. Here we show that Fer tyrosine kinase oligomer mediates and amplifies Src-induced tumor progression. Previously, we showed that transformation of fibroblasts is promoted by the relocation of c-Src to non-raft membranes. In this study, we identified Fer and ezrin as non-raft c-Src targets. c-Src directly activated Fer by initiating its autophosphorylation, which was further amplified by Fer oligomerization. Fer interacted with active c-Src at focal adhesion membranes and activated Fer-phosphorylated ezrin to induce cell transformation. Fer was also crucial for cell transformation induced by v-Src or epidermal growth-factor receptor activation. Furthermore, Fer activation was required for tumorigenesis and invasiveness in some cancer cells in which c-Src is upregulated. We propose that the Src-Fer axis represents a new therapeutic target for treatment of a subset of human cancers. PMID:25867068

  6. Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri induces tumor cell specific cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Richard A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Originating from Africa, India, and the Middle East, frankincense oil has been important both socially and economically as an ingredient in incense and perfumes for thousands of years. Frankincense oil is prepared from aromatic hardened gum resins obtained by tapping Boswellia trees. One of the main components of frankincense oil is boswellic acid, a component known to have anti-neoplastic properties. The goal of this study was to evaluate frankincense oil for its anti-tumor activity and signaling pathways in bladder cancer cells. Methods Frankincense oil-induced cell viability was investigated in human bladder cancer J82 cells and immortalized normal bladder urothelial UROtsa cells. Temporal regulation of frankincense oil-activated gene expression in bladder cancer cells was identified by microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Results Within a range of concentration, frankincense oil suppressed cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells but not in UROtsa cells. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that frankincense oil activates genes that are responsible for cell cycle arrest, cell growth suppression, and apoptosis in J82 cells. However, frankincense oil-induced cell death in J82 cells did not result in DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis. Conclusion Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis proposed multiple pathways that can be activated by frankincense oil to induce bladder cancer cell death. Frankincense oil might represent an alternative intravesical agent for bladder cancer treatment.

  7. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  8. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase accelerates postoperative tumor growth by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Novel role for an old enemy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tumor removal remains the principal treatment modality in the management of solid tumors. The process of tumor removal may potentiate the resurgent growth of residual neoplastic tissue. Herein, we describe a novel murine model in which flank tumor cytoreduction is followed by accelerated local tumor recurrence. This model held for primary and recurrent tumors generated using a panel of human and murine (LS174T, DU145, SW480, SW640, and 3LL) cell lines and replicated accelerated tumor growth following excisional surgery. In investigating this further, epithelial cells were purified from LS174T primary and corresponding recurrent tumors for comparison. Baseline as well as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis were significantly reduced in recurrent tumor epithelia. Primary and recurrent tumor gene expression profiles were then compared. This identified an increase and reduction in the expression of p110gamma and p85alpha class Ia phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) subunits in recurrent tumor epithelia. These changes were further confirmed at the protein level. The targeting of PI3K ex vivo, using LY294002, restored sensitivity to TRAIL in recurrent tumor epithelia. In vivo, adjuvant LY294002 prolonged survival and significantly attenuated recurrent tumor growth by greatly enhancing apoptosis levels. Hence, PI3K plays a role in generating the antiapoptotic and chemoresistant phenotype associated with accelerated local tumor recurrence.

  9. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  10. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis

  11. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing. PMID:24746511

  12. Staphylococcal Superantigen-like 10 Inhibits CXCL12-Induced Human Tumor Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M.E. Walenkamp

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Tumor cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. CXCR4 is the most widely expressed chemokine receptor in many different types of cancer and has been linked to tumor dissemination and poor prognosis. Several CXCR4 antagonists have been synthesized. A totally novel approach to discover chemokine receptor antagonists is the use of bacteria. Bacteria produce chemokine receptor inhibitors to prevent neutrophil extravasation and migration toward the infection site to escape clearance by innate immune cells. The aim of the current study was to find and identify the mechanism of a bacterial protein that specifically targets CXCR4, a chemokine receptor shared by neutrophils and cancer cells. Experimental Design: Several staphylococcal proteins were screened for their capacity to prevent binding of a function-blocking antibody against CXCR4. Results: Staphylococcal superantigen-like 10 was found to bind CXCR4 expressed on human T acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma, and cervical carcinoma cell lines. It potently inhibited CXCL12-induced calcium mobilization and cell migration. Conclusions: Staphylococcal superantigen-like 10 is a potential lead in the development of new anticancer compounds preventing metastasis by targeting CXCR4.

  13. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  14. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy

  15. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Frongia, Céline; Eichwald, Olivier; Ducommun, Bernard; Merbahi, Nofel; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy.

  16. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2013-11-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  17. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Terumi Itako

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L−1, fluazinam (0.25 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L−1 + 2.2 g.L−1, copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L−1, mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L−1 + 0.60 g.L−1, and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L−1 on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  18. Sophoridinol derivative 05D induces tumor cells apoptosis by topoisomerase1-mediated DNA breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao W

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wuli Zhao, Caixia Zhang, Chongwen Bi, Cheng Ye, Danqing Song, Xiujun Liu, Rongguang Shao Key Laboratory of Antibiotic Bioengineering, Ministry of Health, Laboratory of Oncology, Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Sophoridine is a quinolizidine natural product of Sophora alopecuroides and has been applied for treatment of malignant trophoblastic tumors. Although characterized by low toxicity, the limited-spectrum antitumor activity hinders its further applications. 05D, a derivative of sophoridine, exhibits a better anticancer activity on diverse cancer cells, including solid tumors, and hematologic malignancy. It could inhibit topoisomerase 1 (top1 activity by stabilizing DNA–top1 complex and induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis by promoting DNA single- and double-strand breakage mediated by top1. Also, 05D induced HCT116 cells arrest at G1 phase by inactivating CDK2/CDK4–Rb–E2F and cyclinD1–CDK4–p21 checkpoint signal pathways. 05D suppressed the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR activation and decreased 53BP level, which contributed to DNA damage repair, suggesting that the novel compound 05D might be helpful to improve the antitumor activity of DNA damaging agent by repressing ATM and ATR activation and 53BP level. In addition, the priorities in molecular traits and druggability, such as a simple structure and formulation for oral administration, further prove 05D to be a promising targeting topoisomerase agent. Keywords: topoisomerase inhibitor, topoisomerase 1, DNA breakage, sophoridinol, anticancer, apoptosis, cell cycle

  19. Noise-induced multistability in chemical systems: Discrete versus continuum modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew; Liao, Shuohao; Vejchodský, Tomáš; Erban, Radek; Grima, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    The noisy dynamics of chemical systems is commonly studied using either the chemical master equation (CME) or the chemical Fokker-Planck equation (CFPE). The latter is a continuum approximation of the discrete CME approach. It has recently been shown that for a particular system, the CFPE captures noise-induced multistability predicted by the CME. This phenomenon involves the CME's marginal probability distribution changing from unimodal to multimodal as the system size decreases below a critical value. We here show that the CFPE does not always capture noise-induced multistability. In particular we find simple chemical systems for which the CME predicts noise-induced multistability, whereas the CFPE predicts monostability for all system sizes. PMID:25974443

  20. How to Use MR-Contrast Agent in Tumor Induced Epilepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Aliakbar Ameri; Mohammad Shirazi; Hamid Mohammadpour; Ali Noroozi; Jalal Jalalshokouhi

    2010-01-01

    By year of 1990, second MRI revolution has hap-pened in the diagnosis of infection and tumor assessment "first revolution was made by clinical MRI invention in the early 1980's"."nTumor-associated epilepsis is an important contributor to morbidity in patients with brain tumors. Perilesional tissue changes play a vital role in the generation of tumor-associated seizures.Tumor-associated seizure is usually focal with secondary generalization and often resistant to antiepileptic drugs....

  1. Tumor Growth Inhibition via Occlusion of Tumor Vasculature Induced by N-Terminally PEGylated Retargeted Tissue Factor tTF-NGR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline; Fröhlich, Max; Ring, Janine; Schliemann, Christoph; Kessler, Torsten; Mantke, Verena; König, Simone; Lücke, Martin; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schwöppe, Christian

    2015-10-01

    tTF-NGR retargets the extracellular domain of tissue factor via a C-terminal peptide GNGRAHA, a ligand of the surface protein aminopeptidase N (CD13) and upon deamidation of integrin αvβ3, to tumor vasculature. tTF-NGR induces tumor vascular infarction with consecutive antitumor activity against xenografts and selectively inhibits tumor blood flow in cancer patients. Since random PEGylation resulted in favorable pharmacodynamics of tTF-NGR, we performed site-directed PEGylation of PEG units to the N-terminus of tTF-NGR to further improve the antitumor profile of the molecule. Mono-PEGylation to the N-terminus did not change the procoagulatory activity of the tTF-NGR molecule as measured by Factor X activation. Experiments to characterize pharmacokinetics in mice showed a more than 1 log step higher mean area under the curve of PEG20k-tTF-NGR over tTF-NGR. Acute (24 h) tolerability upon intravenous application for the mono-PEGylated versus non-PEGylated tTF-NGR compounds was comparable. PEG20k-tTF-NGR showed clear antitumor efficacy in vivo against human tumor xenografts when systemically applied. However, site-directed mono-PEGylation to the N-terminus does not unequivocally improve the therapeutic profile of tTF-NGR. PMID:26310827

  2. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  3. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient's own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  4. Relationship of doxorubicin- and radiation-induced apoptosis with Ki-67 labeling index in human tumors in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the use of doxorubicin and radiation for treatment of human malignant tumors in vivo, the relationship between treatment-induced apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling index was investigated. Four human tumor xenografts (ependymoblastoma, NNE; primitive neuroectodermal tumor, YKP; small cell lung carcinoma, GLS; glioblastoma, KYG) were transplanted under the skin of thigh of the nude mice (BALB/cA JcL-nu). The mice were given a single radiation dose of 1 Gy, or doxorubicin alone intraperitoneally at a dose of 8 mg/kg. After treatment, sections of tumor specimens were prepared from paraffin-embedded tissues. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, TUNEL staining, and immunohistochemical analysis of Ki-67 were performed. In NNE, apoptotic cells appeared most frequently after treatment compared with all other tumors, and the incidence of apoptosis in the radiation-treated group was much higher than in the doxorubicintreated group. As the incidence of apoptosis in NNE increased, the Ki-67 labeling index tended to decrease. In GLS and KYG, there was a low incidence of treatment-induced apoptosis, although the Ki-67 labeling index decreased transiently after treatment. In YKP, few apoptotic cells appeared and Ki-67 the labeling index was unchanged throughout the time course after treatment. Ki-67 labeling index in malignant tumors after treatment may be affected by various kinds of cell deaths and treatment methods. (author)

  5. Survivin selective inhibitor YM155 induce apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yan-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. YM155, a novel molecular targeted agent, suppresses survivin, which is overexpressed in many tumor types. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of YM155 in SK-NEP-1 cells. Methods SK-NEP-1 cell growth in vitro and in vivo was assessed by MTT and nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometric analysis was used to detect apoptosis in cell culture. Then gene expression profile of tumor cells treated with YM155 was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We then analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results YM155 treatment resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V assay, cell cycle, and activation of caspase-3 demonstrates that YM155 induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells. YM155 significantly inhibited growth of SK-NEP-1 xenografts (YM155 5 mg/kg: 1.45 ± 0.77 cm3; YM155 10 mg/kg: 0.95 ± 0.55 cm3 compared to DMSO group (DMSO: 3.70 ± 2.4 cm3 or PBS group cells (PBS: 3.78 ± 2.20 cm3, ANOVA P Conclusions The present study demonstrates that YM155 treatment resulted in apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1cells. YM155 had significant role and little side effect in the treatment of SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors. Real-time PCR array analysis firstly showed expression profile of genes dyes-regulated after YM155 treatment. IPA analysis also represents new molecule mechanism of YM155 treatment, such as NR3C1 and dexamethasone may be new target of YM155. And our results may provide new clues of molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by YM155.

  6. Dendritic cells loaded with killed breast cancer cells induce differentiation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early clinical trials, mostly in the setting of melanoma, have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing tumor antigens induce some immune responses and some clinical responses. A major difficulty is the extension to other tumors, such as breast carcinoma, for which few defined tumor-associated antigens are available. We have demonstrated, using both prostate carcinoma and melanoma as model systems, that DCs loaded with killed allogeneic tumor cell lines can induce CD8+ T cells to differentiate into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for shared tumor antigens. The present study was designed to determine whether DCs would capture killed breast cancer cells and present their antigens to autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We show that killed breast cancer cells are captured by immature DCs that, after induced maturation, can efficiently present MHC class I and class II peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. The elicited CTLs are able to kill the target cells without a need for pretreatment with interferon gamma. CTLs can be obtained by culturing the DCs loaded with killed breast cancer cells with unseparated peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that the DCs can overcome any potential inhibitory effects of breast cancer cells. Loading DCs with killed breast cancer cells may be considered a novel approach to breast cancer immunotherapy and to identification of shared breast cancer antigens

  7. Sesquiterpene lactones isolated from indigenous Middle Eastern plants inhibit tumor promoter-induced transformation of JB6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikali Melody

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sesquiterpene lactones (SL are plant secondary metabolites that are known for their anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor properties. Considering that several SL-derived drugs are currently in cancer clinical trials, we have tested two SL molecules, 3-β-methoxy-iso-seco-tanapartholide (β-tan isolated from Achillea falcata and salograviolide A (Sal A isolated from Centaurea ainetensis, for their anti-tumor properties. We used the mouse epidermal JB6P + cells as a model for tumor promotion and cellular transformation. Key players that are involved in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis are the AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors; therefore, we assessed how β-tan and Sal A modulate their signaling pathways in JB6P + cells. Methods The effects of β-tan and Sal A on the growth of normal and neoplastic keratinocytes and on the tumor promotion-responsive JB6P + cells were determined using the MTT assay. Anchorage-independent cell growth transformation assays were used to evaluate the anti-tumor promoting properties of these SL molecules in JB6P + cells and dual luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis were used to investigate their effects on tumor promoter-induced AP-1 and NF-κB activities and protein levels of key AP-1 and NF-кB target genes. Results β-tan and Sal A selectively inhibited tumor promoter-induced cell growth and transformation of JB6P + cells at concentrations that do not affect JB6P + and primary keratinocytes basal cell growth. In addition, both molecules reduced basal and tumor promoter-induced NF-κB transcriptional activities, differentially regulated basal and tumor promoter-induced AP-1 transcriptional activities, and modulated key players of the AP-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways. Conclusions These results highlight the anti-tumor promoting properties of β-tan and Sal A. These SL molecules isolated from two plant species native to

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Tumor Cells Downregulates NCAM (CD56: A Novel Mechanism for Virus-Induced Tumor Invasiveness'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman A. Blaheta

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic data indicate that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection might be associated with the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. However, no definitive evidence of a causal link between HCMV infection and cancer dissemination has been established to date. This study describes the modulation of the invasive behavior of NCAM-expressing tumor cell lines by HCMV. Neuroblastoma (NB cells, persistently infected with the HCMV strain AD169 (UKF-NB-4AD169 and MHH-NB-11AD169, were added to endothelial cell monolayers and adhesion and penetration kinetics were measured. The 140- and 180-kDa isoforms of the adhesion receptor NCAM were evaluated by flow cytometry, Western blot, and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The relevance of NCAM for tumor cell binding was proven by treating NB with NCAM antisense oligonucleotides or NCAM transfection. HCMV infection profoundly increased the number of adherent and penetrated NB, compared to controls. Surface expression of NCAM was significantly lower on UKF-NB-4AD169 and MHH-NB-11AD169, compared to mock-infected cells. Western-blot and RT-PCR demonstrated reduced protein and RNA levels of the 140- and 180-kDa isoform. An inverse correlation between NCAM expression and adhesion capacity of NB has been shown by antisense and transfection experiments. We conclude that HCMV infection leads to downregulation of NCAM receptors, which is associated with enhanced tumor cell invasiveness.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HEMODYNAMICS IN THE HOST BLOOD VESSEL AND MICROVASCULAR NETWORK GENERATED FROM TUMOR-INDUCED ANGIOGENESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gai-ping; WU Jie; XU Shi-xiong; COLLINS M.W.; JIANG Yu-ping; WANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of hemodynamics under the combined effects of both the host blood vessel and the microvascular network,which is based on a 2-D tumor inside and outside vascular network generated from a discrete mathematical model of tumor-induced angiogenesis, is performed systemically. And a "microvascular network-transport across microvascular network-flow in interstitium" model is developed to study the flow in solid tumor. Simulations are carried out to examine the effects of the variations of the inlet Reynolds number in the host blood vessel, the hydraulic conductivity of the microvascular wall, and interstitial hydraulic conductivity coefficient on the fluid flow in tumor microcirculation. The results are consistent with data obtained in terms of physiology. These results may provide some theoretical references and the bases for further clinical experimental research.

  10. Hypoxia-inducible miR-210 regulates the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Buart, Stéphanie; Romero, Pedro; Ketari, Sami; Janji, Bassam; Mari, Bernard; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2012-09-15

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment plays a central role in the evolution of immune escape mechanisms by tumor cells. In this study, we report the definition of miR-210 as a miRNA regulated by hypoxia in lung cancer and melanoma, documenting its involvement in blunting the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). miR-210 was induced in hypoxic zones of human tumor tissues. Its attenuation in hypoxic cells significantly restored susceptibility to autologous CTL-mediated lysis, independent of tumor cell recognition and CTL reactivity. A comprehensive approach using transcriptome analysis, argonaute protein immunoprecipitation, and luciferase reporter assay revealed that the genes PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 were miR-210 target genes regulated in hypoxic cells. In support of their primary importance in mediating the immunosuppressive effects of miR-210, coordinate silencing of PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 dramatically decreased tumor cell susceptibility to CTL-mediated lysis. Our findings show how miR-210 induction links hypoxia to immune escape from CTL-mediated lysis, by providing a mechanistic understanding of how this miRNA mediates immunosuppression in oxygen-deprived regions of tumors where cancer stem-like cells and metastatic cellular behaviors are known to evolve. PMID:22962263

  11. Accurate sequential detection of primary tumor and metastatic lymphatics using a temperature-induced phase transition nanoparticulate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh KS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Keun Sang Oh,1 Ji Young Yhee,2 Dong-Eun Lee,3 Kwangmeyung Kim,2 Ick Chan Kwon,2 Jae Hong Seo,4 Sang Yoon Kim,5 Soon Hong Yuk1,4 1College of Pharmacy, Korea University, Sejong, 2Biomedical Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 3Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeonbuk, 4Biomedical Research Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, 5Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: Primary tumor and tumor-associated metastatic lymphatics have emerged as new targets for anticancer therapy, given that these are difficult to treat using traditional chemotherapy. In this study, docetaxel-loaded Pluronic nanoparticles with Flamma™ (FPR-675, fluorescence molecular imaging dye; DTX/FPR-675 Pluronic NPs were prepared using a temperature-induced phase transition for accurate detection of metastatic lymphatics. Significant accumulation was seen at the primary tumor and in metastatic lymph nodes within a short time. Particle size, maximum drug loading capacity, and drug encapsulation efficiency of the docetaxel-loaded Pluronic NPs were approximately 10.34±4.28 nm, 3.84 wt%, and 94±2.67 wt%, respectively. Lymphatic tracking after local and systemic delivery showed that DTX/FPR-675 Pluronic NPs were more potent in tumor-bearing mice than in normal mice, and excised mouse lymphatics showed stronger near-infrared fluorescence intensity on the tumor-bearing side than on the non-tumor-bearing side at 60 minutes post-injection. In vivo cytotoxicity and efficacy data for the NPs demonstrated that the systemically administered NPs caused little tissue damage and had minimal side effects in terms of slow renal excretion and prolonged circulation in tumor-bearing mice, and rapid renal excretion in non-tumor-bearing mice using an in vivo real-time near-infrared fluorescence imaging system. These results

  12. PPARδ INDUCES CELL PROLIFERATION BY A CYCLIN E1-DEPENDENT MECHANISM AND IS UPREGULATED IN THYROID TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Lingchun; Geng, Yan; Tretiakova, Maria; Yu, Xuemei; Sicinski, Peter; Kroll, Todd G.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are lipid sensing nuclear receptors that have been implicated in multiple physiologic processes including cancer. Here, we determine that PPARδ induces cell proliferation through a novel cyclin E1-dependent mechanism and is upregulated in many human thyroid tumors. The expression of PPARδ was induced coordinately with proliferation in primary human thyroid cells by activation of serum, TSH/cAMP/pKa or EGF/MEK/ERK mitogenic signaling pathways...

  13. High-fat-diet-induced obesity causes an inflammatory and tumor-promoting microenvironment in the rat kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Stemmer; Diego Perez-Tilve; Gayathri Ananthakrishnan; Anja Bort; Seeley, Randy J.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Dietrich, Daniel R.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity and concomitant comorbidities have emerged as public health problems of the first order. For instance, obese individuals have an increased risk for kidney cancer. However, direct mechanisms linking obesity with kidney cancer remain elusive. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity (DIO) promotes renal carcinogenesis by inducing an inflammatory and tumor-promoting microenvironment. We compared chow-fed lean Wistar rats with those that were sensitive (DIOsens) or partially r...

  14. Effect of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor activity in thioglycolate-treated mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, T.; Ogata, M.; Koga, K.; Shigematsu, A

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effect of peripheral and central benzodiazepine receptor ligands on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity in mouse macrophages, three types of ligands, 4'-chlorodiazepam (pure peripheral), midazolam (mixed), and clonazepam (pure central), were compared. Midazolam and 4'-chlorodiazepam significantly suppressed LPS (1-microgram/ml)-induced TNF activity in thioglycolate-elicited mouse macrophages. In every concentration examined (0.001 to 100 mi...

  15. ANTI-TUMOR ACTIVITY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HUMAN CANCER-ASSOCIATED MUCIN CORE PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yunguo; Yuan Mei; Fei Lihua; Li Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune responses induced by apomucin which is a mixture of mucin core peptide, in mice for elucidating the role of mucin core peptide in the modulation of cancers. Methods:Apomucin was isolated from human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The mice were immunized with this apomucin (10μg/time×6) plus DETOX. Results: When immunized, all mice developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) after challenged with apomucin or synthetic peptide MUC-2 or MUC-3, while the mice immunized with apomucin alone did not develop DTH.No antibodies were detected by ELISA after immunization. When the spleen cells of vaccinated mice were cocultured with this apomucin (10-50μg/ml) and rhIL-2(50U/ml) in vitro, the proliferated lymphocytes showed cytotoxicity against human cancer cells, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukemia as measured by Cr-51 release assay. Antibodies against MUC-2 and MUC-3 could block the cytotoxicity. Conclusion: It was identified that a vaccine combined of apomucin and immune adjuvant DETOX can induce cellular immune response and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in mice.

  16. Bone tumors induced by inhalation of 238PuO2 in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium-238, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, is used as a heat source in thermoelectric power generators such as have been employed on lunar expeditions of communications satellites and in cardiac pacemakers. It has an 86.4 year half-life and emits 5.5 MeV alpha particles. Beagle dogs were given single 10 to 30 minute exposures to 238PuO2 aerosols to study the long-term translocation of plutonium and biologicl effects. Dogs with a terminal body burden ranging from 7 to 260 MuCi were euthanized due to respiratory insufficiency related to plutonium-induced pneumonitis during the first 3 years after exposure. Nine of the 11 dogs euthanized during the 4 to 6 year postexposure period had osteosarcomas. The terminal plutonium body burden in the tumor-bearing dogs ranged from 0.5 to 2.6 muCi with 30 to 55 percent of the plutonium in the skeleton. Experiments are in progress to further define the dose-effect relationship of inhaled 238PuO2 and investigate the mechanisms of plutonium-induced neoplasia

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  18. Chemical consequences of laser-induced breakdown in molecular gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babánková, Dagmar; Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2-3 (2006), s. 75-88. ISSN 0079-6727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1278; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk LC528; GA MŠk 1P04LA235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser spark * laser-induced dielectric breakdown * laser-plasma chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.500, year: 2006

  19. Novel Principles of Gamma-Retroviral Insertional Transcription Activation in Murine Leukemia Virus-induced End-stage Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Martin; Wabl, Matthias; Rius Ruiz, Irene; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2014-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has b...... understanding fundamental cellular regulatory principles and retroviral biology....

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin Induce Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Expression by Normal Mouse and Human Osteoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Emily H; Bento, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Francis M.; Marriott, Ian; Hudson, Michael C.; Bost, Kenneth L

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin invade osteoblasts and are causative agents of human bone disease. In the present study, we examined the ability of S. aureus and Salmonella serovar Dublin to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by normal osteoblasts. Normal mouse and human osteoblasts were cocultured with S. aureus or Salmonella serovar Dublin at different multiplicities of infection. Following initial incubation...

  1. The relationship of bone-tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression to mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity in intact female and ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeester, B A; O'Brien, E E; Michlitsch, K S; Lee, J-H; Beitz, A J

    2016-06-01

    Recently, our group established a relationship between tumor-induced spinal cord astrocyte activation and aromatase expression and the development of bone tumor nociception in male mice. As an extension of this work, we now report on the association of tumor-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and cold hypersensitivity to changes in spinal cord dorsal horn GFAP and aromatase expression in intact (INT) female mice and the effect of ovariectomy on these parameters. Implantation of fibrosarcoma cells produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia in INT animals, while ovariectomized (OVX) females had significantly less mechanical hyperalgesia. Cold hypersensitivity was apparent by post-implantation day 7 in INT and OVX females compared to their saline-injected controls and increased throughout the experiment. The decrease in mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX females was mirrored by significant decreases in spinal astrocyte activity in laminae I-II, III-IV, V-VI and X and aromatase expression in laminae V-VI and X in the dorsal horn of tumor-bearing animals. Administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole reduced tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT females only suggesting that the tumor-induced increase in aromatase expression and its associated increase in spinal estrogen play a role in the development of bone tumor-induced hyperalgesia. Finally, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of 17β-estradiol caused a significant increase in tumor-induced hyperalgesia in INT tumor-bearing females. Since i.t. 17β-estradiol increases tumor pain and ovariectomy significantly decreases tumor pain, as well as spinal aromatase, estrogen may play a critical role in the spinal cord response to the changing tumor environment and the development of tumor-induced nociception. PMID:26995084

  2. Spin Manipulation in Graphene by Chemically Induced Pseudospin Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Roche, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Spin manipulation is one of the most critical challenges to realize spin-based logic devices and spintronic circuits. Graphene has been heralded as an ideal material to achieve spin manipulation, but so far new paradigms and demonstrators are limited. Here we show that certain impurities such as fluorine adatoms, which locally break sublattice symmetry without the formation of strong magnetic moment, could result in a remarkable variability of spin transport characteristics. The impurity resonance level is found to be associated with a long-range sublattice pseudospin polarization, which by locally decoupling spin and pseudospin dynamics provokes a huge spin lifetime electron-hole asymmetry. In the dilute impurity limit, spin lifetimes could be tuned electrostatically from 100 ps to several nanoseconds, providing a protocol to chemically engineer an unprecedented spin device functionality.

  3. Altered Acer Rubrum Fecundity Induced By Chemical Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforest, J. L.; Peters, A.

    2014-12-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) is becoming the most dominating tree in North American eastern deciduous forests. Concurrently, human activities have altered the chemical climate of terrestrial ecosystems via acidic deposition, which increases the available of nitrogen (N), while decreasing phosphorus (P) availability. Once a minor forest component prior to European settlement, the abundance of red maple may be a symptom of the modern age. The current paradigm explaining red maple's rise to prominence concerns fire suppression that excludes competitors. However, this still does not explain why red maple is unique compared to other functionally similar trees. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactive influence of acid rain mitigation on the fecundity of red maple. Objectives were achieved by measuring flowering, seed production, germination, and growth from red maple on plots that have been experimentally manipulated to increase soil pH, P, or both in three unglaciated eastern deciduous hardwood forests. At least 50% of the red maple population is seed bearing in our control soils, however the median percent of seed-bearing trees declined to zero when mitigating soils from acidic deposition. This can be explained by the curious fact that red maple is polygamodioecious, or has labile sex-expression, in which an individual tree can change its sex-expression in response to the environment. Furthermore, seed-bearing trees in the mitigated plots grew less, produced less seeds, and germinated at lower rates than their counterparts in control soils. Our results provide evidence that chemical climate change could be the primary contributing factor accelerating the dominance of red maple in eastern North American forests. Our observations can provide a boarder conceptual framework for understanding how nutrient limitations can be applied beyond plant productivity towards explaining distribution changes in vegetation.

  4. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  5. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain

  6. In vitro generation of cytotoxic lymphocytes against radiation-and radiation leukemia virus-induced tumors. III. Suppression of anti-tumor immunity in vitro by lymphocytes of mice undergoing radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult C57BL/6 mice exposed to fractionated irradiation or inoculated with the radiation leukemia virus (RadLV), develop high incidence (80 to 100%) of lymphatic leukemias within 3 to 6 months. RadLV-induced lymphomas can elicit cytotoxic responses in vitro in lymphocytes of preimmunized syngeneic mice. As soon as 5 d after RadLV inoculation, and during the entire leukemogenic process, suppressor T cells are detectable in the spleen that are capable of specifically abrogating generation of syngeneic anti-tumor cytotoxic cells in vitro. Mice exposed to fractionated x irradiation do not develop suppressor cells. These findings suggest that although RadLV has been isolated from radiation-induced leukemias, x-ray- and RadLV-induced leukemogenesis do not seem to involve a common viral etilogy, and that induction of suppressor cells during RadLV leukemogenesis may be essential for tumor progression

  7. 5α-reductase inhibition suppresses testosterone-induced initial regrowth of regressed xenograft prostate tumors in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Nelson, Joel B; Parikh, Rahul A; Wang, Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  8. BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors

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    Samuelson Emma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of breast cancer is a multistage process influenced by hormonal and environmental factors as well as by genetic background. The search for genes underlying this malignancy has recently been highly productive, but the etiology behind this complex disease is still not understood. In studies using animal cancer models, heterogeneity of the genetic background and environmental factors is reduced and thus analysis and identification of genetic aberrations in tumors may become easier. To identify chromosomal regions potentially involved in the initiation and progression of mammary cancer, in the present work we subjected a subset of experimental mammary tumors to cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Methods Mammary tumors were induced with DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrazene in female rats from the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and from crosses and backcrosses between this strain and the resistant WKY strain. We first produced a general overview of chromosomal aberrations in the tumors using conventional kartyotyping (G-banding and Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH analyses. Particular chromosomal changes were then analyzed in more details using an in-house developed BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome CGH-array platform. Results Tumors appeared to be diploid by conventional karyotyping, however several sub-microscopic chromosome gains or losses in the tumor material were identified by BAC CGH-array analysis. An oncogenetic tree analysis based on the BAC CGH-array data suggested gain of rat chromosome (RNO band 12q11, loss of RNO5q32 or RNO6q21 as the earliest events in the development of these mammary tumors. Conclusions Some of the identified changes appear to be more specific for DMBA-induced mammary tumors and some are similar to those previously reported in ACI rat model for estradiol-induced mammary tumors. The later group of changes is more interesting, since they may represent anomalies that involve

  9. BAC CGH-array identified specific small-scale genomic imbalances in diploid DMBA-induced rat mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of breast cancer is a multistage process influenced by hormonal and environmental factors as well as by genetic background. The search for genes underlying this malignancy has recently been highly productive, but the etiology behind this complex disease is still not understood. In studies using animal cancer models, heterogeneity of the genetic background and environmental factors is reduced and thus analysis and identification of genetic aberrations in tumors may become easier. To identify chromosomal regions potentially involved in the initiation and progression of mammary cancer, in the present work we subjected a subset of experimental mammary tumors to cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Mammary tumors were induced with DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthrazene) in female rats from the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and from crosses and backcrosses between this strain and the resistant WKY strain. We first produced a general overview of chromosomal aberrations in the tumors using conventional kartyotyping (G-banding) and Comparative Genome Hybridization (CGH) analyses. Particular chromosomal changes were then analyzed in more details using an in-house developed BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) CGH-array platform. Tumors appeared to be diploid by conventional karyotyping, however several sub-microscopic chromosome gains or losses in the tumor material were identified by BAC CGH-array analysis. An oncogenetic tree analysis based on the BAC CGH-array data suggested gain of rat chromosome (RNO) band 12q11, loss of RNO5q32 or RNO6q21 as the earliest events in the development of these mammary tumors. Some of the identified changes appear to be more specific for DMBA-induced mammary tumors and some are similar to those previously reported in ACI rat model for estradiol-induced mammary tumors. The later group of changes is more interesting, since they may represent anomalies that involve genes with a critical role in mammary tumor development. Genetic

  10. Survivin selective inhibitor YM155 induce apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. YM155, a novel molecular targeted agent, suppresses survivin, which is overexpressed in many tumor types. The aim of this study was to determine the antitumor activity of YM155 in SK-NEP-1 cells. SK-NEP-1 cell growth in vitro and in vivo was assessed by MTT and nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometric analysis was used to detect apoptosis in cell culture. Then gene expression profile of tumor cells treated with YM155 was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We then analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. YM155 treatment resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V assay, cell cycle, and activation of caspase-3 demonstrates that YM155 induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells. YM155 significantly inhibited growth of SK-NEP-1 xenografts (YM155 5 mg/kg: 1.45 ± 0.77 cm3; YM155 10 mg/kg: 0.95 ± 0.55 cm3) compared to DMSO group (DMSO: 3.70 ± 2.4 cm3) or PBS group cells (PBS: 3.78 ± 2.20 cm3, ANOVA P < 0.01). YM155 treatment decreased weight of tumors (YM155 5 mg/kg: 1.05 ± 0.24 g; YM155 10 mg/kg: 0.72 ± 0.17 g) compared to DMSO group (DMSO: 2.06 ± 0.38 g) or PBS group cells (PBS: 2.36 ± 0.43 g, ANOVA P < 0.01). Real-time PCR array analysis showed between Test group and control group there are 32 genes significantly up-regulated and 54 genes were significantly down-regulated after YM155 treatment. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) showed cell death was the highest rated network with 65 focus molecules and the significance score of 44. The IPA analysis also groups the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms that are related to cell death

  11. Berberine suppresses tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inhibiting STAT3 activation induced by tumor associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortidis rhizoma (Huanglian) and its major therapeutic component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention in recent years for their anti-cancer properties. Growth inhibitory effects of berberine on multiple types of human cancer cells have been reported. Berberine inhibits invasion, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells. The anti-inflammatory property of berberine, involving inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, has also been documented. In this study, we have examined the effects of berberine on tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and their relationship to STAT3 signaling using both in vivo and in vitro models. Berberine effectively inhibited the tumorigenicity and growth of an EBV-positive NPC cell line (C666-1) in athymic nude mice. Inhibition of tumorigenic growth of NPC cells in vivo was correlated with effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells inside the tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. In vitro, berberine inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Inhibition of STAT3 activation by berberine induced growth inhibition and apoptotic response in NPC cells. Tumor-associated fibroblasts were found to secret IL-6 and the conditioned medium harvested from the fibroblasts also induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Furthermore, STAT3 activation by conditioned medium of tumor-associated fibroblasts could be blocked by berberine or antibodies against IL-6 and IL-6R. Our observation that berberine effectively inhibited activation of STAT3 induced by tumor-associated fibroblasts suggests a role of berberine in modulating the effects of tumor stroma on the growth of NPC cells. The effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells by berberine supports its potential use in the treatment of NPC

  12. Expression of tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand receptor in glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongling Gao; Zhongwei Zhao; Hongxin Zhang; Lan Zhang; Kuisheng Chen; Yunhan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Receptors for tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) include death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2. Activation of death receptor 4 and 5 selectively kills tumor cells.OBJECTIVE: To detect TRAIL receptor expression in glioblastoma by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR and to compare this expression to that in normal brain tissue.DESIGN: Observational analysis.SETTING: Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University; Henan Tumor Pathology Key Laboratory.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five patients (17 males and 8 females) who received glioblastoma resection were selected from the Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, between September 2003 to June 2004. All glioblastoma samples were diagnosed pathologically. Twenty patients (12 males and 8 females) with craniocerebral injury who received normal brain tissue resection were selected in the same time period. There were no significant differences in sex and age between glioblastoma patients or between craniocerebral injury patients (P>0.05). All patients and appropriate relatives provided informed consent, and this study was approved by the local research ethics committee.METHODS: Polyclonal antibody against TRAIL receptors and an immunohistochemical kit (batch number: 200502) were purchased from Boster Company, Wuhan. Immunohistochemistry: Expression of death receptor 4, death receptor 5, decoy receptor 1, and decoy receptor 2 were observed in both glioblastoma and normal brain tissue. The experiment was performed according to the kit instructions, and positive staining was brown-yellow. Assessment: There were no positive signals (-); weakly positive signals, positive cells75% (++++). Evaluation: Expression levels of TRAIL receptors were estimated in both normal brain tissue and glioblastoma. Expression of decoy receptor 1 and decoy receptor 2 mRNA in glioblastoma were detected by reverse transcription polymerase

  13. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy induced by gastric carcinoma: Morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of six autopsy cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinozaki Minoru

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM has been known as a rare and serious cancer-related pulmonary complication. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this debilitating condition still remains obscure and no effective management was recommended. The present study aims to elucidate the pathophysiology of PTTM. Methods Autopsy records were searched to extract cases of pulmonary tumor embolism induced by metastasis of gastric carcinoma in the Toho University Omori Medical Center from 2000 to 2006. And then, tissue sections of extracted cases were prepared for not only light microscopic observation but morphometric analysis with the use of selected PTTM cases. Results Six autopsies involved PTTM and clinicopathological data of them were summarized. There was a significant negative association between pulmonary arterial diameter and stenosis rate in four cases. Although all cases showed an increase of stenosis rate to some degree, the degree of stenosis rate varied from case to case. Significant differences were found for average stenosis rate between the under 100 micrometer group or the 100 to 300 micrometer group and the 300 micrometer group in four cases. However, no significant differences were found for average stenosis rate between the under 100 micrometer group and the 100 to 300 micrometer group in all cases. Meanwhile, all cases showed positive reactivity for tissue factor (TF, five showed positive reactivity for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and three showed positive reactivity for osteopontin (OPN. Conclusions In the present study, we revealed that the degree of luminal narrowing of the pulmonary arteries varied from case to case, and our results suggested that pulmonary hypertension in PTTM occurs in selected cases which have a widespread pulmonary lesion with severe luminal narrowing in the smaller arteries. Furthermore, our immunohistochemical examination indicated that gastric

  14. Expression of dynamin immunoreactivity in experimental pancreatic tumors induced in rat by mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentich, M A; Cook, T; Urrutia, R

    1996-04-19

    Dynamins are GTPases which support receptor-mediated endocytosis and bind to several tyrosine kinase receptor-associated proteins known to mediate cell proliferation and differentiation. We have recently established that dynamin expression correlates with normal neuronal (Torre et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 32411-32417) and acinar pancreatic cell differentiation (Cook et al., Mol. Biol. Cell, 6 (1995) 405a). To begin to understand the role of dynamin in neoplastic pancreatic cell differentiation, we have followed the expression of this protein by immunohistochemistry during the development of pancreatic tumors in a mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-based carcinogenesis model recently developed in our laboratory (Monis and Valentich, Carcinogenesis, 14 (1993) 929-933). After a single intraperitoneal injection (50 mg/g body wt) of this carcinogen, rats fed with mancozeb develop pancreatic focal acinar hyperplasia (FACH), dysplastic foci (DYF) displaying acinar-like and ductular-like structures, and ductular-like carcinoma in situ (CIS). After histochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-dynamin antibody, high levels of this protein are consistently observed in well-differentiated acinar tumors (FACH). In contrast, dynamin immunoreactivity is almost undetectable in more advanced lesions showing a ductular-like phenotype (ductular-like DYF and CIS). This change in the expression pattern of dynamin during the progression of acinar into ductular-like DYF and CIS lesions correlates with recent findings from our laboratory showing a differential expression pattern for dynamin in pancreatic cells during embryonic development, with ductular-like precursor cells expressing low levels of this protein. Based upon these results, we conclude that more advanced ductular-like neoplastic cells induced by the carcinogen NMU in rat pancreas behave phenotypically like pancreatic precursor cells in their pattern of expression for dynamin. PMID:8603375

  15. Hygienic grooming is induced by contact chemicals in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Aya Yanagawa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In social insects, grooming is considered as a behavioral defense against pathogen and parasite infections since it contributes to remove microbes from their cuticle. However, stimuli which trigger this behavior are not well characterized yet. We examined if activating contact chemoreceptive sensilla could trigger grooming activities in Drosophila melanogaster. We monitored the grooming responses of decapitated flies to compounds known to activate the immune system e.g. dead Escherichia coli (Ec and lipopolysaccharides (LPS, and to tastants such as quinine, sucrose, and salt. LPS, quinine and Ec were quite effective in triggering grooming movements when touching the distal border of the wings and the legs, while sucrose had no effect. Contact chemoreceptors are necessary and sufficient to elicit such responses, as grooming could not be elicited by LPS in poxn mutants deprived of external taste sensilla, and as grooming was elicited by light when a channel rhodopsin receptor was expressed in bitter-sensitive cells expressing Gr33a. Contact chemoreceptors distributed along the distal border of the wings respond to these tastants by an increased spiking activity, in response to quinine, Ec, LPS, sucrose and KCl. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial compounds trigger grooming activities in D. melanogaster, and indicate that contact chemoreceptors located on the wings participate to the detection of such chemicals.

  16. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. PMID:25407640

  17. Chemical Changes Induced by Irradiation in Meats and Meat Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceptability of meats preserved by irradiation has been hampered by the formation of an irradiation flavour and odour. This flavour and odour is believed to be due to the volatile chemical compounds produced by radiation impact on the protein and lipid molecules. The analysis of the volatile compounds has been accomplished, employing programmed cryogenic temperature gas chromatography for separation of the complex mixtures obtained, and rapid scanning mass spectrometry for identification of the individually separated components. Comprehensive analyses of the volatiles from irradiated ground beef, pork, mutton, lamb, and veal, as well as the volatile irradiation degradation products of several amino acids and proteins, animal fats, methyl esters of fatty acids, and triglycerides have been made. The results of the analysis of the irradiated component meat substances are compared with those obtained from the irradiation of meat itself, and of separate meat fractions, thus establishing the contribution of each fraction to the total. Mechanisms are postulated for the formation of the volatile components from each fraction and for interactions among intermediates from different fractions. (author)

  18. Methylation of the estrogen receptor CpG island distinguishes spontaneous and plutonium-induced tumors from nitrosamine-induced lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Baylin, S.B.; Issa, J.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    CpG islands located in the promoter region of genes constitute one mechanism for regulating transcription. These islands are normally free of methylation, regardless of the expression state of the gene. Hypermethylation of CpG islands, the addition of a methyl group to the internal cytosine within CpG dinucleotides, can cause silencing of a gene. Hypermethylation has been detected as an early event at specific chromosome loci during the development of colon cancer and represents one mechanism used by neoplatic cells to inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Recent studies have demonstrated this mechanism in inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor gene in 19% of sporadic renal tumors and the p16 {sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in 30% of non-small cell lung cancers. A recent report indicates that the estrogen receptor gene could also be inactivated through methylation. In addition, estrogen receptor CpG island methylation arises as a direct function of age in normal colonic mucosa and is present in virtually all colonic tumors. In cultured colon cancer cells, methylation-associated loss of expression of the estrogen receptor gene results in deregulated growth, suggesting a role for the estrogen receptor in colon cancer development. These results provide further evidence that gene silencing through methylation could be a predominant epigenetic mechanism underlying the development of many different types of cancer. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether estrogen receptor CpG island methylation is involved in the development of lung cancer. The frequency for methylation of the estrogen receptor CpG island in rodent lung tumors is summarized.

  19. Electron microscopic features of a brain tumor induced in hamster by BK virus, a human papova virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuboi,Masahiro

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to locate the target cells for malignant transformation by BK virus (a human papova virus in hamster brain, electron microscopic observation of tumor originally induced in hamster brain by BK virus was performed. With light microscopy, the BK virus-induced tumor (Vn 17 bore a close resemblance to human malignant ependymoma. Under the electron microscope, numerous microvilli and few cilia were visible on the surface of the tumor cells. These tumor cells were joined to each other by desmosomes. Gap junctions were not observed. Multilayered cuboidal cells were observed around the lumen and blood vessels in the tumor. With regard to fine structure, three types of Vn 17 cells were recognized; ependymal like cells, tanycytes with prominent cell processes, and undifferentiated cells with few cytoplasmic organelles. There was no basal lamina between the ependymal cells and the connective tissue stroma. The Vn 17 cells showed some similarity to the ultrastructural features of the epemdymal cells of newborn rabbits, suggesting that the target cells for Vn 17 may be cells related to ependyma. Malignant transformation of the cells would be initiated in the early stages after BK virus inoculation into the brain of newborn hamsters.

  20. Metabolic changes detected by in vivo magnetic resonance studies of HEPA-1 wild-type tumors and tumors deficient in hypoxia-inducible factor-1beta (HIF-1beta): evidence of an anabolic role for the HIF-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, John R; McSheehy, Paul M J; Robinson, Simon P; Troy, Helen; Chung, Yuen-Li; Leek, Russell D; Williams, Kaye J; Stratford, Ian J; Harris, Adrian L; Stubbs, Marion

    2002-02-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates many pathways potentially important for tumor growth, including angiogenesis and glycolysis. Most attention has focused on its role in the response to hypoxia, but HIF-1 is also constitutively expressed in many tumors. To analyze the role of this pathway in vivo, we used magnetic resonance (MR) methods and complementary techniques to monitor metabolic changes in tumors derived from HEPA-1 mouse hepatoma lines that were either wild type (WT) or deficient in hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1beta (c4). The c4 tumors grew significantly more slowly than the WT tumors (P < 0.05), but were examined at a similar size (0.4-0.6 g). At the tumor size used in these studies, no differences in vascularity were observed, and MR parameters measured that related to tumor blood flow, vascularity, and oxygenation demonstrated no significant differences between the two tumor types. Unexpectedly, the ATP content of the c4 tumor was approximately 5 times less than in the WT tumor [measured in tumor extracts (P < 0.001) and by metabolic imaging (P < 0.05)]. Noninvasive (31)P MR spectroscopy showed that the nucleoside triphosphate/P(i) ratio of the two tumor types was similar, so the low ATP content of the c4 tumors was not caused by (or a cause of) impaired cellular bioenergetics. Rather, glycine, an essential precursor for de novo purine formation, was significantly lower in the c4 tumors (P < 0.05), suggesting that ATP synthesis was impaired in the mutant tumor cells. Supporting evidence for this hypothesis came from the significantly lower concentrations of betaine, phosphocholine, and choline in the c4 tumors (P < 0.05); these are intermediates in an alternative pathway for glycine synthesis. No significant differences were seen in lactate or glucose content. MR resonances from phosphodiesters, which relate to the metabolic turnover of phospholipid membranes, were significantly lower in the WT tumors than in the c4 tumors, both

  1. Bio-molecular alterations induced by a chemical or radiating stress in isolated human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled some aspects of radiobiology (effects of ionizing radiations, molecular targets of radiations, cellular responses with respect to the radiation), the author discusses various aspects of radio-sensitivity: intrinsic radio-sensitivity of tumoral and normal cells, DNA injuries and in vitro radio-sensitivity, genes of susceptibility to ionizing radiations, clustered injuries. Then she reports investigations performed by infrared micro-spectroscopy: characterization of pathological lines, of biological processes, of oxidative injuries induced by xenobiotics, of injuries induced by ionizing radiations

  2. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneeb U Rehman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen peroxide generation with reduction in renal glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phase-II metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase. It also enhances blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Fe-NTA also lead to increase in levels of some inflammatory markers viz NO and MPO and some proinflammatory cytokines viz PGE-2 and TNF-1. The chemopreventive efficacy of Quercus infectoria was studied in terms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities, LPO, redox status, serum toxicity markers, inflammatory and proinflammatory markers and cell proliferation in the kidney tissue. Oral administration of Quercus infectoria at doses of 75 and 150 mg/kg b wt effectively suppressed renal oxidative stress, inflammation and tumor incidence. Chemopreventive effects of Quercus infectoria were associated with up-regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities and down regulation of serum toxicity markers. Present study supports Quercus infectoria as a potent chemopreventive agent and suppresses Fe-NTA-induced renal carcinogenesis and oxidative and inflammatory response in Wistar rat.

  3. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer

  4. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: zgliu@helix.nih.gov [Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80{sup +} macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206{sup +} TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  5. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  6. Chemical and radiation-induced mutagenesis of the rat liver chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that radiation and chemical mutagenesis in rat liver cells is determined chiefly by long-lived premutational potential changes. The intensification of intrachromosomal processes under the action of an inducer of gene activity - phenobarbital - does not modify the yield of chromosome aberrations, both under the action of radiation and under the action of an alkylating agent -dipin. The facts obtained support the hypothesis that the chemical nature of the premutational changes differs from the primary molecular damages to DNA. (author)

  7. Increased capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger;

    2011-01-01

    the underlying cause of pathophysiological mechanisms triggering multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) remains disputed.Recently, alterations in the central nervous system, for example,central sensitization, similar to various chronic pain disorders, have been suggested. Capsaicin is used in...... experimental pain models to provoke peripheral and central sensitization. In patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia and temporal summation were assessed as markers for abnormal central nociceptive processing together with neurogenic inflammation (flare)....

  8. Participation of the NO/cGMP/K+ATP pathway in the antinociception induced by Walker tumor bearing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implantation of Walker 256 tumor decreases acute systemic inflammation in rats. Inflammatory hyperalgesia is one of the most important events of acute inflammation. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP/K+ATP pathway has been proposed as the mechanism of peripheral antinociception mediated by several drugs and physical exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of the NO/cGMP/K+ATP pathway in antinociception induced in Walker 256 tumor-bearing male Wistar rats (180-220 g). The groups consisted of 5-6 animals. Mechanical inflammatory hypernociception was evaluated using an electronic version of the von Frey test. Walker tumor (4th and 7th day post-implantation) reduced prostaglandin E2- (PGE2, 400 ng/paw; 50 µL; intraplantar injection) and carrageenan-induced hypernociception (500 µg/paw; 100 µL; intraplantar injection). Walker tumor-induced analgesia was reversed (99.3% for carrageenan and 77.2% for PGE2) by a selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME; 90 mg/kg, ip) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg, ip), which prevented (80% for carrageenan and 65% for PGE2) the effect of L-NAME. Treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (100% for carrageenan and 95% for PGE2; 8 µg/paw) and the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) blocker glibenclamide (87.5% for carrageenan and 100% for PGE2; 160 µg/paw) reversed the antinociceptive effect of tumor bearing in a statistically significant manner (P < 0.05). The present study confirmed an intrinsic peripheral antinociceptive effect of Walker tumor bearing in rats. This antinociceptive effect seemed to be mediated by activation of the NO/cGMP pathway followed by the opening of KATP channels

  9. The anti-tumor effect of shikonin on osteosarcoma by inducing RIP1 and RIP3 dependent necroptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor, notorious for its lung metastasis. Shikonin, an effective constituent extracted from Chinese medicinal herb, was demonstrated to induce necroptosis in some cancers. MTT assay was performed to detect cell survival rate in vitro. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and cell death. Western blot was performed to determine the expression levels of RIP1, RIP3, caspase-3, caspase-6 and PARP. The tibial primary and lung metastatic osteosarcoma models were used to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of shikonin in vivo. The cell survival rate was decreased in a dose and time dependent manner when treated with shikonin. No major change in cell cycle was observed after shikonin treatment. The cell death induced by shikonin could be mostly rescued by specific necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1, but not by general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. The number of necrotic cells caused by shikonin was decreased after being pretreated with Nec-1 detected by flow cytometry in K7 cells. After 8-hour treatment of shikonin, the expression levels of RIP1 and RIP3 were increased while caspase-3, caspase-6 and PARP were not activated in K7 and U2OS cells determined by Western blot. Size of primary tumor and lung metastasis in shikonin treated group were significantly reduced. The protein levels of RIP1 and RIP3 in primary tumor tissues were increased by shikonin. The overall survival of lung metastatic models was longer compared with control group (p < 0.001). Shikonin had prompt but profound anti-tumor effect on both primary and metastatic osteosarcoma, probably by inducing RIP1 and RIP3 dependent necroptosis. Shikonin would be a potential anti-tumor agent on the treatment of primary and metastatic osteosarcoma

  10. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Chan [Department of Plastic Surgery, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Sup, E-mail: jsjung@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  11. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. ► The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-β signaling. ► Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-β increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  12. Down-expression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Hong Jiang; Yoshiharu Motoo; Stéphane Garcia; Juan Lucio Iovanna; Marie-Josèphe Pébusque; Norio Sawabu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Overexpression of tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) induces G1 cell cycle arrest and increases p53-mediated apoptosis. To clarify the clinical importance of TP53INP1, we analyzed TP53INP1and p53 expression in gastric cancer.METHODS: TP53INP1 and p53 expression were examined using immunohistochemistry in 142 cases of gastric cancer. The apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was analyzed using the TUNEL method. The relationship between the expression of TP53INP1 and clinicopathological factors was statistically analyzed.RESULTS: TP53INP1 was expressed in 98% (139/142cases) of non-cancerous gastric tissues and was downexpressed in 64% (91/142 cases) of gastric cancer lesions from the same patients. TP53INP1 expression was significantly decreased (43.9%) in poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma compared with well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (81.6%).Cancers invading the submucosa or deeper showed lower positively (59.1%) compared with mucosal cancers (85.2%). Decrease or loss of TP53INP1 expression was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion (54.3%vs 82.0% without lymphatic invasion) and node-positive patients (31.3% vs 68.3% in node-negative patients).P53 was expressed in 68 (47.9%) patients of gastric cancer, whereas it was absent in normal gastric tissues.A significant association was also observed between TP53INP1 status and the level of apoptosis in tumor cells: the apoptotic index in TP53INP1-positive tissues was significantly higher than that in TP53INP1-negative portions. Finally, when survival data were analyzed,loss of TP53INP1 expression had a significant effect in predicting a poor prognosis (P= 0.0006).CONCLUSION: TP53INP1-positive rate decreases with the progression of gastric cancer. TP53INP1 protein negativity is significantly associated with aggressive pathological phenotypes of gastric cancer. TP53INP1is related to the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. The decreased expression of the TP53INP1 protein may

  13. Berberine Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Colon Tumor Cells through Activation of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Lihong Wang; Liping Liu; Yan Shi; Hanwei Cao; Rupesh Chaturvedi; M Wade Calcutt; Tianhui Hu; Xiubao Ren; Wilson, Keith T.; Brent Polk, D.; Fang Yan

    2012-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants, is a traditional medicine for treating bacterial diarrhea and intestinal parasite infections. Although berberine has recently been shown to suppress growth of several tumor cell lines, information regarding the effect of berberine on colon tumor growth is limited. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of berberine on regulating the fate of colon tumor cells, specifically the mouse immorto-Min colonic epithelial (IM...

  14. Chemically-induced Jahn-Teller ordering on manganite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Zheng; Lin, Wenzhi; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.; Fuchigami, K.; Shen, Jian; Snijders, P. C.; Ward, T. Z.; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Physical and electrochemical phenomena at the surfaces of transition metal oxides and their coupling to local functionality remains one of the enigmas of condensed matter physics. Understanding the emergent physical phenomena at surfaces requires the capability to probe the local composition, map order parameter fields, and establish their coupling to electronic properties. Here we demonstrate that measuring the sub 30 pm displacements of atoms from high-symmetry positions in the atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) allows the physical order parameter fields to be visualized in real space on the single atom level. Here, this local crystallographic analysis is applied to the in-situ grown manganite surfaces. In particular, using direct bond-angle mapping we report direct observation of structural domains on manganite surfaces, and trace their origin to surface-chemistry-induced stabilization of ordered Jahn-Teller displacements. Density functional calculations provide insight into the intriguing interplay between the various degrees of freedom now resolved on the atomic level. Research was supported by MSED and CNMS, which are sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  16. Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis after tumor lysis syndrome in a case of advanced yolk sac tumor treated with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Mihoko; Okamoto, Yohei; Yamauchi, Masami; Naitou, Hiroyuki; Shinozaki, Katsunori

    2012-10-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumor (YST) is a highly aggressive malignancy arising in young women. Chemotherapy has dramatically improved the prognosis, and bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) combination chemotherapy appears to be the most effective combination regimen. A 23-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with worsening abdominal distention and a lower abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with a stage IIIc pure YST of the right ovary, and right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed; there were numerous disseminated peritoneal tumors within the abdominal cavity. A few days postoperatively, massive ascites developed, and right hydronephrosis occurred. Chemotherapy with BEP was started, and after 24 h of administration, oliguria and tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) developed. Continuous hemodiafiltration was started, and hemodialysis was initiated following full-dose standard cisplatin and etoposide on days 2-5 of the 1st cycle. After the electrolyte abnormalities and the elevation of creatinine became normal, the patient received an additional three cycles of BEP and achieved complete remission. However, she also suffered from severe non-hematological toxicities, including grade 3 left ventricular dysfunction and grade 4 pulmonary fibrosis. In the case of rapidly progressing and high-volume YST treated with BEP chemotherapy, special attention should be paid to bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity following TLS. Further study is required to optimize drug exposure to ensure efficacy and reduce the risk of side effects in this population. PMID:22127348

  17. THE NADPH OXIDASE INHIBITOR VAS2870 IMPAIRS CELL GROWTH AND ENHANCES TGF-?-INDUCED APOPTOSIS OF LIVER TUMOR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Sancho, Patricia; Fabregat, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Liver tumor cells show several molecular alterations which favor pro-survival signaling. Among those, we have proposed the NADPH oxidase NOX1 as a prosurvival signal for liver tumor cells. On the one side, we have described that FaO rat hepatoma cells show NOX1-dependent partial resistance to apoptosis induced by Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-?). On the other side, we have shown that FaO cells, as well as different human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, ar...

  18. Study of arsenic trioxide-induced vascular shutdown and enhancement with radiation in solid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been reported to be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and, recently, anti-tumor effect has been demonstrated in solid tumors. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of the ATO effect on solid tumor. We investigated the anti-vascular effect of ATO and the potential of combining ATO with radiation therapy. We studied the anti-vascular effect of ATO and radiosensitization of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII murine tumors of C3H mice. The anti-vascular effect was examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and radiosensitivity was studied by clonogenic assay and tumor growth delay. Histopathological changes of the tumors after various treatments were also observed with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining. Necrosis and blood flow changes in the central region of tumors in the hind limbs of the animals were observed on T2-weighted imaging after an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 8 mg/kg of ATO alone. ATO exposure followed by radiation decreased the clonogenic survival of SCC VII cells compared with either treatment alone. Tumor growth delay after 10-20 Gy of radiation alone was increased slightly compared with control tumors, but the combination of ATO injection 2 hours before exposure to 20 Gy of radiation significantly prolonged tumor growth delay by almost 20 days. The results suggest that ATO and radiation can enhance the radiosensitivity of solid tumor. (author)

  19. Distinct malignant behaviors of mouse myogenic tumors induced by different oncogenetic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eHettmer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS are heterogeneous cancers with myogenic differentiation features. The cytogenetic and mutational aberrations in RMS are diverse. This study examined differences in the malignant behavior of two genetically distinct and disease-relevant mouse myogenic tumor models. Kras; p1619null myogenic tumors, initiated by expression of oncogenic Kras in p16p19null mouse satellite cells, were metastatic to the lungs of the majority of tumor-bearing animals and repopulated tumors in 7 of 9 secondary recipients. In contrast, SmoM2 tumors, initiated by ubiquitous expression of a mutant Smoothened allele, did not metastasize and repopulated tumors in 2 of 18 recipients only. In summary, genetically distinct myogenic tumors in mice exhibit marked differences in malignant behavior.

  20. Transcription-coupled repair: Impact on UV-induced mutagenesis in cultured rodent cells and mouse skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are removed with accelerated speed from the transcribed strand of expressed genes in cultured mammalian cells by a process called transcription-coupled repair (TCR). It has been previously shown that this phenomenon has consequences for the molecular nature of the mutations induced by UV-light. Here, we review these data and show that TCR has not only a clear impact on UV-induced mutations in cultured mammalian cells but also on genes involved in tumor formation in the skin of UV-exposed mice. Mutations observed in the p53 gene in UV-induced squamous cell carcinoma are predominantly found at sites of dipyrimidines in the non-transcribed strand. In contrast, in UVC-irradiated Csb -/- Chinese hamster cells and in UVB-induced tumors in the Csb -/- mouse, almost all mutations are at positions of dipyrimidine sites in the transcribed strand of the mutated gene. Csb -/- mice appear to be susceptible to UVB-induced skin cancer in contrast to the human CSB patients. We speculate that the UVB-induced cancer susceptibility of Csb -/- mice is related to the absence of TCR as well as to a lack of a compensating global genome repair system for CPDs in mice

  1. Preparation Of Polystyrene Nanoparticles Using Both GAMMA Radiation And Chemical Induced Emulsion Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized by radiation-induced polymerization and chemical emulsion polymerization. Compared with the chemical emulsion polymerization, the radiation process easily prepared the polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles at room temperature and without the pollutant of chemical initiator. The effects of various polymerization parameters in both systems such as total dose for radiation polymerization, monomer concentration, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stabilizer content on the particle size and size distribution were systematically investigated. The diameter of a polymer particle and its distribution were measured on a Marvern Zetasizer. Monomer conversion was studied gravimetric ally and the structure of PS was analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrophotometer

  2. Mutagenic efficiency of radiations and chemical mutagens in inducing viable mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of radiations (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and chemical mutagens (EMS and NMU) in inducing viable mutations in rice. Radiations were more effective than chemical mutagens, the most effective being fast neutrons. Mutagenic efficiency when estimated on the basis of lethality was higher for radiations but when based on sterility was higher for chemical mutagens. Fast neutrons, more effective than gamma rays, were less efficient. NMU was more effective but less efficient than EMS. (author)

  3. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  4. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsuneyama, Koichi [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Sugitani, Toyama 930‐0194 (Japan); Endo, Shinya [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Yamane, Hidaka 350‐1241 (Japan); Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Yokoi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tyokoi@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  5. Chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by T17M rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Haibo; Xiong, Siqi; Xia, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin mutations are associated with the autosomal dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa. T17M mutation in rhodopsin predisposes cells to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces cell death. This study aimed to examine whether chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents ER stress induced by rhodopsin T17M. Results ARPE-19 cells were transfected with myc-tagged wild-type (WT) and T17M rhodopsin constructs. Turnover of WT and T17M rhodopsin was measured by cycloheximide chas...

  6. Physico-chemical study of the focused electron beam induced deposition process

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, Tristan; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    The focused electron beam induced deposition process is a promising technique for nano and micro patterning. Electrons can be focused in sub-angström dimensions, which allows atomic-scale resolution imaging, analysis, and processing techniques. Before the process can be used in controlled applications, the precise nature of the deposition mechanism must be described and modelled. The aim of this research work is to present a physical and chemical description of the focused electron beam induc...

  7. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor expression in patients with cervical human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira Padovani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The progression of human papillomavirus (HPV infection in the anogenital tract has been associated with the involvement of cells with regulatory properties. Evidence has shown that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR is an important surface molecule for the characterization of these cells and proposes that GITR ligand may constitute a rational treatment for many cancer types. We aimed to detect the presence of GITR and CD25 in cervical stroma cells with and without pathological changes or HPV infection to better understand the immune response in the infected tissue microenvironment. Methods We subjected 49 paraffin-embedded cervical tissue samples to HPV DNA detection and histopathological analysis, and subsequently immunohistochemistry to detect GITR and CD25 in lymphocytes. Results We observed that 76.9% of all samples with high GITR expression were HPV-positive regardless of histopathological findings. High GITR expression (77.8% was predominant in samples with ≥1,000 RLU/PCB. Of the HPV-positive samples negative for intraepithelial lesion and malignancy, 62.5% had high GITR expression. High GITR expression was observed in both carcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL samples (p = 0.16. CD25 was present in great quantities in all samples. Conclusions The predominance of high GITR expression in samples with high viral load that were classified as HSIL and carcinoma suggests that GITR+ cells can exhibit regulatory properties and may contribute to the progression of HPV-induced cervical neoplasia, emphasizing the importance of GITR as a potential target for immune therapy of cervical cancer and as a disease evolution biomarker.

  8. Heat-inducible translationally controlled tumor protein of Trichinella pseudospiralis: cloning and regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, C H; Poon, M W; Lun, H M; Kwok, P Y; Ko, R C

    2007-04-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of inducing translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) in stress adaptation of adenophorean nematodes, the complete coding sequence of TCTP of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella pseudospiralis was characterized. Two cDNA clones with different 3' untranslated region were identified. Tp-TCTP contained an open reading frame of 534 bp encoding 177 residues. The gene with five introns was expressed as histidine-tagged fusion protein having a molecular mass of 17.5 kDa. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that TCTP RNA was not accumulated when the infective-stage larvae were heat-shocked for 1 h at 45 or 60 degrees C. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and antiserum against the fusion protein, the expression of TCTP was found to be up-regulated at the translational level. The data suggest that translational regulation of TCTP may play an important role in the early heat-stress adaptation of the trichinellid. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the TCTP sequence of T. pseudospiralis is closely related to that of T. spiralis, but is diverged from the secernentean species. PMID:17149606

  9. Epidermal growth factor, like tumor promoters, enhances viral and radiation-induced cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polypeptide hormone epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to enhance adenovirus type 5 transformation of a cloned culture of rat embryo cells (CREF) and X-ray or u.v.-light induced transformation of 10T1/2 mouse embryo cells. In both systems, the degree of enhancement was quantitatively similar to that observed in treated cells grown in the presence of the potent tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An increase in viral transformation was also observed in cells continuously exposed to phorbol esters with known promoting activity on mouse skin, but not structurally related analogs, inactive or weakly active in the two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis assay. In addition, the appearance of transformed foci was accelerated and colonies tended to be larger in cultures grown in the presence of EGF or TPA. These studies suggest the possibility that EGF may function as an endogenous promoter of carcinogenesis and further indicates that in vitro cell transformation systems may prove useful in identifying such agents. (author)

  10. Epidermal growth factor, little tumor promoters, enhances viral and radiation-induced cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polypeptide hormone epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to enhance adenovirus type 5 transformation of a cloned culture of rat embryo cells (CREF) and X-ray or u.v.-light induced transformation of 10T1/2 mouse embryo cells. In both systems, the degree of enhancement was quantitatively similar to that observed in treated rats grown in the presence of the potent tumor promoting agent 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An increase in viral transformation was also observed in cells continuously exposed to phorbol esters with known promoting activity on mouse skin, but not structurally related analogs, inactive or weakly active in the two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis assay. In addition, the appearance of transformed foci was accelerated and colonies tended to be larger in cultures grown in the presence of EGF or TPA. The present studies suggest the possibility that EGF may function as an endogenous promoter of carcinogenesis and further indicates that in vitro cell transformation systems may prove useful in identifying such agents

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 1 and immunity to hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie C Lin; Nikki P Lee; Ning Zheng; Pai-Hao Yang; Oscar G Wong; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Chee-Kin Hui; John M Luk; George Ka-Kit Lau

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the gene expression profile in a pair of HBV-infected twins.METHODS: The gene expression profile was compared in a pair of HBV-infected twins.RESULTS: The twins displayed different disease outcomes. One acquired natural immunity against HBV,whereas the other became a chronic HBV carrier. Eightyeight and forty-six genes were found to be up- or downregulated in their PBMCs, respectively. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 1 (TNF-αIP1) that expressed at a higher level in the HBV-immune twins was identified and four pairs of siblings with HBV immunity by RTPCR. However, upon HBV core antigen stimulation,TNF-αIP1 was downregulated in PBMCs from subjects with immunity, whereas it was slightly upregulated in HBV carriers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed a K+channel tetramerization domain in TNF-αIP1 that shares a significant homology with some human, mouse, and C elegan proteins.CONCLUSION: TNF-αIP1 may play a role in the innate immunity against HBV.

  12. A histological evaluation and in vivo assessment of intratumoral near infrared photothermal nanotherapy-induced tumor regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green HN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hadiyah N Green,1,2 Stephanie D Crockett,3 Dmitry V Martyshkin,1 Karan P Singh,2,4 William E Grizzle,2,5 Eben L Rosenthal,2,6 Sergey B Mirov11Department of Physics, Center for Optical Sensors and Spectroscopies, 2Comprehensive Cancer Center, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Facility, 5Department of Pathology, 6Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAPurpose: Nanoparticle (NP-enabled near infrared (NIR photothermal therapy has realized limited success in in vivo studies as a potential localized cancer therapy. This is primarily due to a lack of successful methods that can prevent NP uptake by the reticuloendothelial system, especially the liver and kidney, and deliver sufficient quantities of intravenously injected NPs to the tumor site. Histological evaluation of photothermal therapy-induced tumor regression is also neglected in the current literature. This report demonstrates and histologically evaluates the in vivo potential of NIR photothermal therapy by circumventing the challenges of intravenous NP delivery and tumor targeting found in other photothermal therapy studies.Methods: Subcutaneous Cal 27 squamous cell carcinoma xenografts received photothermal nanotherapy treatments, radial injections of polyethylene glycol (PEG-ylated gold nanorods and one NIR 785 nm laser irradiation for 10 minutes at 9.5 W/cm2. Tumor response was measured for 10–15 days, gross changes in tumor size were evaluated, and the remaining tumors or scar tissues were excised and histologically analyzed.Results: The single treatment of intratumoral nanorod injections followed by a 10 minute NIR laser treatment also known as photothermal nanotherapy, resulted in ~100% tumor regression in ~90% of treated tumors, which was statistically significant in a

  13. Evidence that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) inhibits angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its related ligands TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand (FasL) play roles in the regulation of vascular responses, but their effect on the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is unclear. Therefore, we have examined the effects of these ligands on angiogenesis modeled with primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To examine angiogenesis in the context of the central nervous system, we have also modeled cerebral angiogenesis with the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Parameters studied were bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and cell number (MTT) assay (to assess endothelial proliferation), scratch assay (migration) and networks on Matrigel (tube formation). In our hands, neither TRAIL nor FasL (1, 10, and 100 ng/ml) had an effect on parameters of angiogenesis in the HUVEC model. In hCMEC/D3 cells by contrast, TRAIL inhibited all parameters (10-100 ng/ml, 24 h). This was due to apoptosis, since its action was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVADfmk (5 x 10-5 mol/l) and TRAIL increased caspase-3 activity 1 h after application. However FasL (100 ng/ml) increased BrdU uptake without other effects. We conclude that TRAIL has different effects on in vitro angiogenesis depending on which model is used, but that FasL is generally ineffective when applied in vitro. The data suggest that TRAIL primarily influences angiogenesis by the induction of vascular endothelial apoptosis, leading to vessel regression.

  14. Over-expression of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 1 (ANT1) Induces Apoptosis and Tumor Regression in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the exchange of mitochondrial ATP for cytosolic ADP. ANT has been known to be a major component of the permeability transition pore complex of mitochondria and contributes to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Human ANT has four isoforms (ANT1, ANT2, ANT3, and ANT4), and the expression of the ANT isoforms is variable depending on the tissue and cell type, developmental stage, and proliferation status. Among the isoforms, ANT1 is highly expressed in terminally-differentiated tissues, but expressed in low levels in proliferating cells, such as cancer cells. In particular, over-expression of ANT1 induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. We applied an ANT1 gene transfer approach to induce apoptosis and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of ANT1 in a nude mouse model. We demonstrated that ANT1 transfection induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, inactivated NF-κB activity, and increased Bax expression. ANT1-inducing apoptosis was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and the activation of caspases-9 and -3. Moreover, ANT1 transfection significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that ANT1 transfection may be a useful therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer

  15. Over-expression of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase 1 (ANT1 Induces Apoptosis and Tumor Regression in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chul-Woo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the exchange of mitochondrial ATP for cytosolic ADP. ANT has been known to be a major component of the permeability transition pore complex of mitochondria and contributes to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Human ANT has four isoforms (ANT1, ANT2, ANT3, and ANT4, and the expression of the ANT isoforms is variable depending on the tissue and cell type, developmental stage, and proliferation status. Among the isoforms, ANT1 is highly expressed in terminally-differentiated tissues, but expressed in low levels in proliferating cells, such as cancer cells. In particular, over-expression of ANT1 induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. Methods We applied an ANT1 gene transfer approach to induce apoptosis and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of ANT1 in a nude mouse model. Results We demonstrated that ANT1 transfection induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, inactivated NF-κB activity, and increased Bax expression. ANT1-inducing apoptosis was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and the activation of caspases-9 and -3. Moreover, ANT1 transfection significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Our results suggest that ANT1 transfection may be a useful therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Boosting high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced anti-tumor immunity using a sparse-scan strategy that can more effectively promote dendritic cell maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Pei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conventional treatment protocol in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy utilizes a dense-scan strategy to produce closely packed thermal lesions aiming at eradicating as much tumor mass as possible. However, this strategy is not most effective in terms of inducing a systemic anti-tumor immunity so that it cannot provide efficient micro-metastatic control and long-term tumor resistance. We have previously provided evidence that HIFU may enhance systemic anti-tumor immunity by in situ activation of dendritic cells (DCs inside HIFU-treated tumor tissue. The present study was conducted to test the feasibility of a sparse-scan strategy to boost HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response by more effectively promoting DC maturation. Methods An experimental HIFU system was set up to perform tumor ablation experiments in subcutaneous implanted MC-38 and B16 tumor with dense- or sparse-scan strategy to produce closely-packed or separated thermal lesions. DCs infiltration into HIFU-treated tumor tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. DCs maturation was evaluated by IL-12/IL-10 production and CD80/CD86 expression after co-culture with tumor cells treated with different HIFU. HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response was evaluated by detecting growth-retarding effects on distant re-challenged tumor and tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in HIFU-treated mice. Results HIFU exposure raised temperature up to 80 degrees centigrade at beam focus within 4 s in experimental tumors and led to formation of a well-defined thermal lesion. The infiltrated DCs were recruited to the periphery of lesion, where the peak temperature was only 55 degrees centigrade during HIFU exposure. Tumor cells heated to 55 degrees centigrade in 4-s HIFU exposure were more effective to stimulate co-cultured DCs to mature. Sparse-scan HIFU, which can reserve 55 degrees-heated tumor cells surrounding the separated lesions, elicited an

  17. Targeting the lactate transporter MCT1 in endothelial cells inhibits lactate-induced HIF-1 activation and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Sonveaux

    Full Text Available Switching to a glycolytic metabolism is a rapid adaptation of tumor cells to hypoxia. Although this metabolic conversion may primarily represent a rescue pathway to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferating tumor cells, it also creates a gradient of lactate that mirrors the gradient of oxygen in tumors. More than a metabolic waste, the lactate anion is known to participate to cancer aggressiveness, in part through activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 pathway in tumor cells. Whether lactate may also directly favor HIF-1 activation in endothelial cells (ECs thereby offering a new druggable option to block angiogenesis is however an unanswered question. In this study, we therefore focused on the role in ECs of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 that we previously identified to be the main facilitator of lactate uptake in cancer cells. We found that blockade of lactate influx into ECs led to inhibition of HIF-1-dependent angiogenesis. Our demonstration is based on the unprecedented characterization of lactate-induced HIF-1 activation in normoxic ECs and the consecutive increase in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF expression. Furthermore, using a variety of functional assays including endothelial cell migration and tubulogenesis together with in vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis through intravital microscopy and immunohistochemistry, we documented that MCT1 blockers could act as bona fide HIF-1 inhibitors leading to anti-angiogenic effects. Together with the previous demonstration of MCT1 being a key regulator of lactate exchange between tumor cells, the current study identifies MCT1 inhibition as a therapeutic modality combining antimetabolic and anti-angiogenic activities.

  18. Anti-tumor effect of pEgr-1-endostatin-TNF-α recombinant plasmid expression induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effects of pEgr-1-endostatin-TNF-α gene-radiotherapy on mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, and to explore the mechanism involved. Methods: 240 mice with Lewis lung carcinoma were randomly divided into four groups, including control group, irradiation group, liposome group, and liposome combined irradiation group. The plasmids packed by liposome were injected locally into the tumors of the mice, and the tumors of liposome combined irradiation group were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays 24 h later. The expression levels of TNF-α and endostatin in mouse serum were measured by ELISA. Then the tumor growth rates at different time were observed. Tumor angiogenesis density were estimated on frozen sections stained with CD31 by using the Chalkley counting method to vessel hot-spots. The tumor inhibition rates were also calculated. Results: Radiation induced the expression of pEgr-1-endostatin-TNFα. The endostatin and TNF-α were expressed steadily for about 4 weeks. The highest levels of expression of the endostatin and TNF-α were (52.64±4.19) and (12.01±0.87) ng/ml at 2 week. The expression levels of TNF-α and endostatin were higher in combined therapy group than those in other groups (F=29.726, P3, F=16.415, P<0.05]. Conclusions: The expression of pEgr-1-endostatin-TNFα could be induced by irradiation in dose- and time- dependent manner. The effect of antitumor and angiogenesis inhibition may be more significant than irradiation. (authors)

  19. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Serganova, Inna [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the {sup 124}I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 124}I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped {sup 124}I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of {sup 124}I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that {sup 124}I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future

  20. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the 124I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (124I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped 124I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of 124I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that 124I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between 124I-FIAU and 18F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. (orig.)

  1. Supramolecular chemical shift reagents inducing conformational transitions: NMR analysis of carbohydrate homooligomer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beeren, Sophie; Meier, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of supramolecular chemical shift reagents as a tool to improve signal resolution for the NMR analysis of homooligomers. Non-covalent interactions with the shift reagent can constrain otherwise flexible analytes inducing a conformational transition that results in signal...

  2. A review on chemical effects in aqueous solution induced by plasma with glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical effects in different aqueous solutions induced by plasma with glow discharge electrolysis (GDE) and contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE) are described. The experimental and discharge characteristics are also reviewed. These are followed by a discussion of their mechanisms of both anodic and cathodic CGDE

  3. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA-Cisplatin complexes induced by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical bond transformation of cisplatin-DNA complexes can be probed efficiently by XPS which provides a concomitant X-ray irradiation source as well. The presence to Pt could considerably increase formation of the SE induced by X-ray and that the further interaction of these LEE with DNA leads to the enhancement of bond cleavages.

  4. Biomarkers of DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents and discusses results from the studies on various biomarkers of the DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation. Results of the biomonitoring studies have shown that particularly in the condition of Poland, health hazard from radiation exposure is overestimated in contradistinction to the environmental hazard

  5. Tumor Lymphangiogenesis and Metastasis to Lymph Nodes Induced by Cancer Cell Expression of Podoplanin

    OpenAIRE

    Cueni, Leah N.; Hegyi, Ivan; Shin, Jay W.; Albinger-Hegyi, Andrea; Gruber, Silke; Kunstfeld, Rainer; Moch, Holger; Detmar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The membrane glycoprotein podoplanin is expressed by several types of human cancers and might be associated with their malignant progression. Its exact biological function and molecular targets are unclear, however. Here, we assessed the relevance of tumor cell expression of podoplanin in cancer metastasis to lymph nodes, using a human MCF7 breast carcinoma xenograft model. We found that podoplanin expression promoted tumor cell motility in vitro and, unexpectedly, increased tumor lymphangiog...

  6. Defective TGFβ signaling in bone marrow-derived cells prevents Hedgehog-induced skin tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Qipeng; Gu, Dongsheng; Liu, Hailan; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yoder, Mervin C.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Xie, Jingwu

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in cancer cells drives changes in the tumor microenvironment that are incompletely understood. Here we report that Hh- driven tumors exhibit an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and a decrease in T cells, indicative of an immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. This change was associated with activated TGFβ signaling in several cell types in BCCs. We determined that TGFβ signaling in bone marrow (BM)-derived cells, not keratinocytes, regulates MDSC...

  7. A case of virilization induced by a Krukenberg tumor from gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schlitt Hans-Jürgen; Schubert Thomas; Vogel Peter; Hornung Matthias; Bolder Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The Krukenberg tumor represents ovarian metastases associated with gastric cancer or other gastrointestinal malignancies. Histology shows typical mucus-production and numerous signet-ring cells. Occasionally Krukenberg tumors have endocrine function and, as a consequence, some patients demonstrate hirsutism and virilization. Case presentation Here we report a case of virilization associated with an extensive gastric adenocarcinoma and Krukenberg tumor in a premenopausal wo...

  8. Effects of extraction methods on the yield, chemical structure and anti-tumor activity of polysaccharides from Cordyceps gunnii mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Dong, Fengying; Liu, Xiaocui; Lv, Qian; YingYang; Liu, Fei; Chen, Ling; Wang, Tiantian; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-04-20

    This study was to investigate the effects of different extraction methods on the yield, chemical structure and antitumor activity of polysaccharides from Cordyceps gunnii (C. gunnii) mycelia. Five extraction methods were used to extract crude polysaccharides (CPS), which include room-temperature water extraction (RWE), hot-water extraction (HWE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and cellulase-assisted extraction (CAE). Then Sephadex G-100 was used for purification of CPS. As a result, the antitumor activities of CPS and PPS on S180 cells were evaluated. Five CPS and purified polysaccharides (PPS) were obtained. The yield of CPS by microwave-assisted extraction (CPSMAE) was the highest and its anti-tumor activity was the best and its macromolecular polysaccharide (3000-1000kDa) ratio was the largest. The PPS had the same monosaccharide composition, but their obvious difference was in the antitumor activity and the physicochemical characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, specific rotation, scanning electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectra. PMID:26876874

  9. Stochastic resonance in the growth of a tumor induced by correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Weirong; SHAO Yuanzhi; HE Zhenhui

    2005-01-01

    Multiplicative noise is found to divide the growth law of tumors into two parts in a logistic model, which is driven by additive and multiplicative noises simultaneously. The Fokker-Planck equation was also derived to explain the fact that the influence of the intensity of multiplicative noise on the growth of tumor cells has a stochastic resonance-like characteristic. An appropriate intensity of multiplicative noise is benefit to the growth of the tumor cells. The correlation between two sorts of noises weakens the stochastic resonance-like characteristic. Homologous noises promote the growth of the tumor cells.

  10. Imprint Control of BaTiO3 Thin Films via Chemically Induced Surface Polarization Pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungwoo; Kim, Tae Heon; Patzner, Jacob J; Lu, Haidong; Lee, Jung-Woo; Zhou, Hua; Chang, Wansoo; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Gruverman, Alexei; Eom, Chang-Beom

    2016-04-13

    Surface-adsorbed polar molecules can significantly alter the ferroelectric properties of oxide thin films. Thus, fundamental understanding and controlling the effect of surface adsorbates are crucial for the implementation of ferroelectric thin film devices, such as ferroelectric tunnel junctions. Herein, we report an imprint control of BaTiO3 (BTO) thin films by chemically induced surface polarization pinning in the top few atomic layers of the water-exposed BTO films. Our studies based on synchrotron X-ray scattering and coherent Bragg rod analysis demonstrate that the chemically induced surface polarization is not switchable but reduces the polarization imprint and improves the bistability of ferroelectric phase in BTO tunnel junctions. We conclude that the chemical treatment of ferroelectric thin films with polar molecules may serve as a simple yet powerful strategy to enhance functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions for their practical applications. PMID:26901570

  11. Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH; HINE, R. JEAN; STANLEY, JOSEPH S.; RAMANI, VISHNU PRAKASH; CARCEL-TRULLOLS, JAIME; WHITEHEAD, TRACY L.; KELLY, THOMAS; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; ARTAUD, CECILE; SHAAF, SAEID; SAHA, RINKU; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; HENRY-TILLMAN, RONDA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells, and certain glycan structures are well-known markers for tumor progression. Availability and composition of sugars in the microenvironment may affect cell glycosylation. Recent studies of human breast tumor cell lines indicate their ability to take up and utilize fructose. Here we tested the hypothesis that adding fructose to culture as a carbon source induces phenotypic changes in cultured human breast tumor cells that are associated with metastatic disease. MDA-MB-468 cells were adapted to culture media in which fructose was substituted for glucose. Changes in cell surface glycan structures, expression of genes related to glycan assembly, cytoskeleton F-actin, migration, adhesion and invasion were determined. Cells cultured in fructose expressed distinct cell-surface glycans. The addition of fructose affected sialylation and fucosylation patterns. Fructose feeding also increased binding of leukoagglutinating Phaseolus vulgaris isolectin, suggesting a possible rise in expression of branching β-1, 6 GlcNAc structures. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining revealed an altered F-actin cytoskeletal system. Fructose accelerated cellular migration and increased invasion. These data suggest that changing the carbon source of the less aggressive MDA-MB-468 cell line induced characteristics associated with more aggressive phenotypes. These data could be of fundamental importance due to the markedly increased consumption of sweeteners containing free fructose in recent years, as they suggest that the presence of fructose in nutritional micro-environment of tumor cells may negatively affect the outcome for some breast cancer patients. PMID:20664930

  12. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Expression for Outcome After Radiotherapy in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a heterogeneous group of patients in terms of subsite, treatment, and biology. Currently most management decisions are based on clinical parameters with little appreciation of patient differences in underlying tumor biology. We investigated the prognostic significance of clinicopathologic features and tumor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in a homogeneous series of patients who underwent radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: An audit identified 133 consecutive patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil or tongue base. All patients received primary radiotherapy between 1996 and 2001. Tumor HIF-1α expression was examined in 79 patients. Results: Features associated with poor locoregional control were low Hb level (p = 0.05) and advancing T (p = 0.008), N (p = 0.03), and disease (p = 0.008) stage. HIF-1α expression was a more significant adverse prognostic factor in the tonsil (hazard ratio [HR], 23.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]. 3.04-176.7) than the tongue-base tumor (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.14-7.19) group (p = 0.03, test for interaction). High tumor HIF-1α expression was associated with low blood Hb levels (p = 0.03). In a multivariate analysis HIF-1α expression retained prognostic significance for locoregional control (HR, 7.10; 95% CI, 3.07-16.43) and cancer-specific survival (HR, 9.19; 95% CI, 3.90-21.6). Conclusions: There are significant differences in radiation therapy outcome within a homogeneous subsite of the oropharynx related to molecular marker expression. The work highlights the importance of studying homogeneous groups of patients in HNSCC, and the complex interrelationships between tumor biology and clinicopathologic factors. The establishment of tumor-type specific markers would represent a major advance in this area

  13. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Stress-Induced Angiogenesis in MCF7 Human Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman-Haran, Edna; Margalit, Raanan; Grobgeld, Dov; Degani, Hadassa

    1996-06-01

    The mechanism of contrast enhancement of tumors using magnetic resonance imaging was investigated in MCF7 human breast cancer implanted in nude mice. Dynamic contrast-enhanced images recorded at high spatial resolution were analyzed by an image analysis method based on a physiological model, which included the blood circulation, the tumor, the remaining tissues, and clearance via the kidneys. This analysis enabled us to map in rapidly enhancing regions within the tumor, the capillary permeability factor (capillary permeability times surface area per voxel volume) and the fraction of leakage space. Correlation of these maps with T2-weighted spin echo images, with histopathology, and with immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells demonstrated the presence of dense permeable microcapillaries in the tumor periphery and in intratumoral regions that surrounded necrotic loci. The high leakage from the intratumoral permeable capillaries indicated an induction of a specific angiogenic process associated with stress conditions that cause necrosis. This induction was augmented in tumors responding to tamoxifen treatment. Determination of the distribution and extent of this stress-induced angiogenic activity by contrast-enhanced MRI might be of diagnostic and of prognostic value.

  14. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis In Vivo Primarily by Inhibiting VEGF Expression and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Frost

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We found that rapalog mTOR inhibitors induce G1 arrest in the PTEN-null HS Sultan B-cell lymphoma line in vitro, but that administration of rapalogs in a HS Sultan xenograft model resulted in significant apoptosis, and that this correlated with induction of hypoxia and inhibition of neoangiogenesis and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, rapalogs prevent cap-dependent translation, but studies have shown that cap-independent, internal ribosome entry site (IRES-mediated translation of genes, such as c-myc and cyclin D, can provide a fail-safe mechanism that regulates tumor survival. Therefore, we tested if IRES-dependent expression of VEGF could likewise regulate sensitivity of tumor cells in vivo. To achieve this, we developed isogenic HS Sultan cell lines that ectopically express the VEGF ORF fused to the p27 IRES, an IRES sequence that is insensitive to AKT-mediated inhibition of IRES activity and effective in PTEN-null tumors. Mice challenged with p27-VEGF transfected tumor cells were more resistant to the antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects of the rapalog, temsirolimus, and active site mTOR inhibitor, pp242. Our results confirm the critical role of VEGF expression in tumors during treatment with mTOR inhibitors and underscore the importance of IRES activity as a resistance mechanism to such targeted therapy.

  15. Radiation-induced intracerebral cavernous angiomas in children with malignant brain tumors. A report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavernous angiomas forming in the brain after radiation therapy for pediatric brain tumors have recently attracted special interest as a late complication of radiation therapy. We report here on two children with malignant brain tumors who developed intracerebral cavernous angiomas 4 to 5 years after radiation therapy. A 14-year-old girl with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor developed a cavernous angioma in the hypothalamus after being irradiated with 55 Gy 4 years ago. The second case, 13-year-old boy with a pineal mixed germ cell tumor showed a cavernous angioma at the thalamus 5 years after receiving radiation therapy with a dose of 60 Gy. Both patients did not show any abnormal symptoms and the cavernous angiomas diagnoses were made with MRI findings. A review of 20 reported cases of radiation-induced cavernous angiomas in the brain revealed some characteristic findings. Eighteen of the 20 cases were children, fourteen cases developed hemorrhage, the radiation dose administered was distributed between 18-60 Gy (median dose of 43.5 Gy), and the median latent period was 7.5 years (range: 2-21 years). As a differential diagnosis for the recurrent tumor is guite difficult in most cases, it is necessary to observe patients who developed angioma-like lesions in the irradiated area carefully. (author)

  16. Porous Silicon Microparticle Potentiates Anti-Tumor Immunity by Enhancing Cross-Presentation and Inducing Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanometer-size particles have become popular candidates for cancer vaccine adjuvants. However, the mechanism by which such particles enhance immune responses remains unclear. Here, we report a porous silicon microparticle (PSM-based cancer vaccine that greatly enhances cross-presentation and activates type I interferon (IFN-I response in dendritic cells (DCs. PSM-loaded antigen exhibited prolonged early endosome localization and enhanced cross-presentation through both proteasome- and lysosome-dependent pathways. Phagocytosis of PSM by DCs induced IFN-I responses through a TRIF- and MAVS-dependent pathway. DCs primed with PSM-loaded HER2 antigen produced robust CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity in mice bearing HER2+ mammary gland tumors. Importantly, this vaccination activated the tumor immune microenvironment with elevated levels of intra-tumor IFN-I and MHCII expression, abundant CD11c+ DC infiltration, and tumor-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. These findings highlight the potential of PSM as an immune adjuvant to potentiate DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  17. The dissociation of tumor-induced weight loss from hypoglycemia in a transplantable pluripotent rat islet tumor results in the segregation of stable alpha- and beta-cell tumor phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O D; Karlsen, C; Nielsen, E;

    1993-01-01

    We previously established pluripotent transformed rat islet cell lines, MSL-cells, of which certain clones have been used to study processes of islet beta-cell maturation, including the transcriptional activation of the insulin gene induced by in vivo passage. Thus, successive sc transplantation in...... phenotype. Tumor necrosis factor (cachectin) was not produced by any of the tumors. Proglucagon was processed as in the fetal islet to products representative of both pancreatic alpha-cell and intestinal L-cell phenotypes, with glucagon and Glp-1 (7-36)amide as the major extractable products. In contrast to...... derived from a common clonal origin of pluripotent MSL cells, thus supporting the existence of a cell lineage relationship between islet alpha- and beta-cell during ontogeny; and 2) that our glucagonomas release an anorexigenic substance(s) of unknown nature that causes a severe weight loss comparable to...

  18. Chemically induced mouse liver tumors are resistant to treatment with atorvastatin

    OpenAIRE

    Braeuning, Albert; Bucher, Philip; Hofmann, Ute; Buchmann, Albrecht; Schwarz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Atorvastatin is a potent inhibitor of the mevalonate pathway and widely used as a hypolipidemic drug. Some epidemiological studies and animal experiments indicate that the long-term use of atorvastatin and structurally related drugs might be associated with a reduced risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common hepatocellular malignancy in humans. However, the potential of atorvastatin to inhibit HCC formation is controversially discussed. Methods Hepatocellul...

  19. Chemical prevention of light-induced degradation in amorphous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hikaru; Kasama, Yoshiko; Fujinaga, Tetsushi; Takahashi, Masao; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2002-07-01

    The most serious problem for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells is light induced-degradation due to the formation of defect states. A simple room temperature chemical method, i.e. the immersion of a-Si:H in crown-ether-containing KCN solutions under a positive bias, has been found to prevent light-induced deterioration of a-Si:H films. The prevention is attributed to the selective reaction of cyanide ions (CN -) with defect and defect precursor states. The inclusion of crown-ether completely prevents contamination of a-Si:H by K + ions, and the applied positive bias enhances inward migration of CN - ions. The experimental results suggest that this chemical reaction is useful to block the light-induced degradation of a-Si:H solar cells and systems.

  20. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the skin in patients with symptoms induced by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger; Serup, Jørgen; Elberling, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal injection of capsaicin induces the axonal release of neuropeptides, vasodilatation and flare, e.g. neurogenic inflammation. The spatial profile of neurogenic inflammation in the skin has been studied in various experimental models. Polarization spectroscopy imaging introduced recently...

  1. Disrupted sleep without sleep curtailment induces sleepiness and cognitive dysfunction via the tumor necrosis factor-α pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Vijay; Nair Deepti; Zhang Shelley X L; Hakim Fahed; Kaushal Navita; Kayali Foaz; Wang Yang; Li Richard C; Carreras Alba; Gozal David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Sleepiness and cognitive dysfunction are recognized as prominent consequences of sleep deprivation. Experimentally induced short-term sleep fragmentation, even in the absence of any reductions in total sleep duration, will lead to the emergence of excessive daytime sleepiness and cognitive impairments in humans. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has important regulatory effects on sleep, and seems to play a role in the occurrence of excessive daytime sleepiness in children who...

  2. Inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 enzymes block the secretagogue-induced release of corticotropin in mouse pituitary tumor cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Luini, A G; Axelrod, J

    1985-01-01

    A mouse pituitary tumor cell line (AtT-20) releases corticotropin (ACTH) in response to a number of secretagogues, including corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), beta-adrenergic agents, N6,O2'-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (Bt2 cAMP), and potassium. The stimulation of ACTH secretion induced by the secretagogues can be blocked by inhibitors of the enzymes that generate (phospholipase A2) and metabolize (lipoxygenase and epoxygenase) arachidonic acid. The phospholipase A2 block...

  3. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1: MDSC and ROS in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head ...

  4. JNK inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence via Bcl-2/ROS/DDR signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premature senescence is considered as a cellular defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Although recent evidences demonstrate that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is involved in the senescence process, the target and exact mechanism of JNK signaling in the regulation of cell proliferation has yet to be defined. In this study, we investigated the role of JNK in premature senescence and demonstrated JNK inhibition sensitized tumor cells to radiation-induced premature senescence

  5. Hypodipsic hypernatremia with intact AVP response to non-osmotic stimuli induced by hypothalamic tumor: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, M. J.; Yoon, K. H.; S. S. Lee; Lee, J. M.; Ahn, Y. B.; Chang, S. A.; Kang, M. I.; Cha, B. Y.; Lee, K.W.; Son, H. Y.; Kang, S K; Hong, Y K

    2001-01-01

    Anatomical lesions of hypothalamic area associated with hypodipsic hypernatremia have been reported only rarely. We report here a case of hypodipsic hypernatremia induced by a hypothalamic lesion. A 25-yr-old man, who had been treated with radiation for hypothalamic tumor 5-yr before, was admitted for evaluation of hypernatremia and hypokalemia. He never felt thirst despite the elevated plasma osmolality and usually refused to drink intentionally. Plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level was n...

  6. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  7. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florea, Ana-Maria [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf (Germany); Büsselberg, Dietrich, E-mail: dib2015@qatar-med.cornell.edu [Weil Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation-Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha (Qatar)

    2011-03-15

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  8. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs. PMID:23053530

  9. Exposure to chromium (VI) in the drinking water increases susceptibility to UV-induced skin tumors in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is a well known-human carcinogen with exposures occurring in both occupational and environmental settings. Although lung carcinogenicity has been well documented for occupational exposure via inhalation, the carcinogenic hazard of drinking water exposure to Cr (VI) has yet to be established. We used a hairless mouse model to study the effects of K2CrO4 in the drinking water on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin tumors. Hairless mice were unexposed or exposed to UVR alone (1.2 kJ/m2), K2CrO4 alone at 2.5 and 5.0 ppm, or the combination of UVR and K2CrO4 at 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 ppm. Mice were observed on a weekly basis for the appearance of skin tumors larger than 2 mm. All the mice were euthanized on day 182. The skin tumors were excised and subsequently analyzed microscopically for malignancy by histopathology. There was a total absence of observable skin tumors in untreated mice and in mice exposed to chromate alone. However, there was a dose-dependent increase in the number of skin tumors greater than 2 mm in mice exposed to K2CrO4 and UV compared with mice exposed to UV alone. The increase in tumors larger than 2 mm was statistically significant (P 2CrO4 at the two highest K2CrO4 doses (2.5 and 5.0 ppm), and there was a statistically significant increase in the numbers of malignant tumors per mouse in the UVR plus K2CrO4 (5 ppm) group compared with UV alone. The data presented here indicate that K2CrO4 increases the number of UV-induced skin tumors in a dose-dependent manner, and these results support the concern that regulatory agencies have relative to the carcinogenic health hazards of widespread human exposure to Cr (VI) in drinking water

  10. Activation of Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Bα by Methylene-Substituted Diindolylmethanes in Bladder Cancer Cells Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor GrowthS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Dae Cho, Sung; Lee, Syng-Ook; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Abdelrahim, Maen; Khan, Shaheen; Yoon, Kyungsil; Kamat, Ashish M.; Safe, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) genes are orphan nuclear receptors, and NGFI-Bα (Nur77, TR3) is overexpressed in bladder tumors and bladder cancer cells compared with nontumorous bladder tissue. 1,1-Bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-methoxyphenyl)-methane (DIM-C-pPhOCH3) and 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-phenyl)methane have previously been identified as activators of Nur77, and both compound...

  11. A case of virilization induced by a Krukenberg tumor from gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlitt Hans-Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Krukenberg tumor represents ovarian metastases associated with gastric cancer or other gastrointestinal malignancies. Histology shows typical mucus-production and numerous signet-ring cells. Occasionally Krukenberg tumors have endocrine function and, as a consequence, some patients demonstrate hirsutism and virilization. Case presentation Here we report a case of virilization associated with an extensive gastric adenocarcinoma and Krukenberg tumor in a premenopausal woman. Virilization occurred three months after diagnosis of gastric cancer and the ovarian tumors. Palliative chemotherapy was initiated as primary therapy, but gastric outlet obstruction required a gastrojejunostomy. In addition, oopherectomy was performed to relieve abdominal tension and to abate hormonal effects. It is likely that virilization of the patient could have been prevented by earlier oopherectomy prior to development of hormone production. Conclusion Despite the limitation in survival time early oopherectomy should be considered to prevent the development of virilization even in palliative situations if a Krukenberg tumor is diagnosed with gastric cancer.

  12. Exenatide Reduces Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Apoptosis in Cardiomyocytes by Alleviating Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Cao; Zhang-Wei Chen; Yan-Hua Gao; Xing-Xu Wang; Jian-Ying Ma; Shu-Fu Chang; Ju-Ying Qian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in progressive contractile dysfunction in several cardiac diseases.The cytotoxic effects of TNF-α are suggested to be partly mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its analogue exhibits protective effects on the cardiovascular system.The objective of the study was to assess the effects of exenatide, a GLP-1 analogue, on oxidative stress, and apoptosis in TNF-c-treated cardiomyocytes in vitro.Methods: Isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were divided into three groups: Control group, with cells cultured in normal conditions without intervention;TNF-α group, with cells incubated with TNF-c (40 ng/ml) for 6, 12, or 24 h without pretreatment with exenatide;and exenatide group, with cells pretreated with exenatide (100 nmol/L) 30 mins before TNF-α (40 ng/ml) stimulation.We evaluated apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry, measured ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by specific the fluorescent probes, and assessed the levels of proteins by Western blotting for all the groups.Results: Exenatide pretreatment significantly reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis as measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay at 12 h and 24 h.Also, exenatide inhibited excessive ROS production and maintained MMP.Furthermore, declined cytochrome-c release and cleaved caspase-3 expression and increased bcl-2 expression with concomitantly decreased Bax activation were observed in exenatide-pretreated cultures.Conclusion: These results suggested that exenatide exerts a protective effect on cardiomyocytes, preventing TNF-α-induced apoptosis;the anti-apoptotic effects may be associated with protection of mitochondrial function.

  13. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ... Tumors Oligoastrocytoma Oligodendroglioma Pineal Tumor Pituitary Tumor PNET Schwannoma Risk Factors Brain Tumor Facts Brain Tumor Dictionary ...

  14. Inducible and transmissible genetic events and pediatric tumors of the nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors of the nervous system most often occur in both children and adults as sporadic events with no family history of the disease, but they are also among the clinical manifestations of a significant number of familial cancer syndromes, including familial retinoblastoma, neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, tuberous sclerosis, and Cowden, Turcot, Li-Fraumeni and nevoid basal cell carcinoma (Gorlin) syndromes. All of these syndromes involve transmissible genetic risk resulting from loss of a functional allele, or inheritance of a structurally defective allele, of a specific gene. These genes include RB1, NF1, NF2, TSC1, TSC2, TP53, PTEN, APC, hMLH1, hPSM2, and PTCH, most of which function as tumor suppressor genes. The same genes are also observed in mutated and inactive forms, or are deleted, in tumor cells in sporadic cases of the same tumors. The nature of the mutational events that give rise to these inactivated alleles suggests a possible role of environmental mutagens in their causation. However, only external ionizing radiation at high doses is clearly established as an environmental cause of brain, nerve and meningeal tumors in humans. Transplacental carcinogenesis studies in rodents and other species emphasize the extraordinary susceptibility of the developing mammalian nervous system to carcinogenesis, but the inverse relationship of latency to dose suggests that low transplacental exposures to genotoxicants are more likely to result in brain tumors late in life, rather than in childhood. While not all neurogenic tumor-related genes in humans have similar effects in experimental rodents, genetically engineered mice (GEM) increasingly provide useful insights into the combined effects of multiple tumor suppressor genes and of gene-environment interactions in the genesis of brain tumors, especially pediatric brain tumors such as medulloblastoma. (author)

  15. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells

  16. NI-49SMART SUCKER: NEXT GENERATION SMART SURGICAL TOOL FOR INTRAOPERATIVE BRAIN TUMOR RESECTION USING TIME RESOLVED LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Kittle, David S.; Butte, Pramod V.; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G.; Black, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are highly lethal tumors where surgical resection is the primary treatment of choice. It has been shown that survival rate is directly related to the extent of tumor resection. In order to aid the surgeon in achieving near-complete resection, novel technologies are required. Time-resolved laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS) promises to be one such technology, where the tissue is excited using an ultra-short laser and the corresponding fluorescence intensity d...

  17. Metabolic effects of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor are modified by site of production. Cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-secreting tumor in skeletal muscle induces chronic cachexia, while implantation in brain induces predominantly acute anorexia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tracey, K J; Morgello, S; Koplin, B; Fahey, T J; Fox, J; Aledo, A; Manogue, K. R.; Cerami, A

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a murine model of wasting by injecting intracerebrally cells which continuously secrete h-cachectin/TNF (CHO-TNF) to: (a) determine the effects of cachectin/TNF produced continuously in the central nervous system (CNS), and (b) compare the metabolic effects of cachectin/TNF-secreting tumor in the brain to the cachexia caused by CHO-TNF tumor in peripheral tissue (IM). Intracerebral CHO-TNF tumors produced increased serum h-cachectin/TNF levels with lethal hypophagia and weig...

  18. Noble metal nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress modulates tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) from an M2 to M1 phenotype: An in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Ramkrishna; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Nath, Anupam; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Ali, Mohammed; Rahman, Dewan Shahidur; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Basu, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Baral, Rathindranath; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosis of cancer and photothermal therapy using optoelectronic properties of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has established a new therapeutic approach for treating cancer. Here we address the intrinsic properties of noble metal NPs (gold and silver) as well as the mechanism of their potential antitumor activity. For this, the study addresses the functional characterization of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from murine fibrosarcoma induced by a chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). We have previously shown antitumor activity of both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) in vivo in a murine fibrosarcoma model. In the present study, it has been seen that AuNPs and AgNPs modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production, suppressing the antioxidant system of cells (TAMs). Moreover, the antioxidant-mimetic action of these NPs maintain the ROS and RNS levels in TAMs which act as second messengers to activate the proinflammatory signaling cascades. Thus, while there is a downregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the TAMs, the proinflammatory cytokine Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is upregulated resulting in a polarization of TAMs from M2 (anti-inflammatory) to M1 (pro-inflammatory) nature. PMID:27344639

  19. Anti-Tumor Action, Clinical Biochemistry Profile and Phytochemical Constituents of a Pharmacologically Active Fraction of S. crispus in NMU-Induced Rat Mammary Tumour Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Soriani Yaacob

    Full Text Available Cancer patients seek alternative remedies such as traditional medicinal plants for safe and effective treatment and help overcome the side effects of conventional therapy. Current knowledge indicates that extracts of Strobilanthes crispus of the Acanthaceae family exhibit potent anticancer properties in vitro and are non-toxic in vivo. S. crispus was also reported to be protective against chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously showed that a bioactive fraction of S. crispus leaves also synergized with tamoxifen to cause apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines without damaging non-malignant epithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor effect of S. crispus dichloromethane fraction (F3 using N-methyl-N-Nitrosourea (NMU-induced rat mammary tumor model. Tumor regression was observed in 75% of the rats following 8-week oral administration of F3 with no secondary tumour formation and no signs of anemia or infection. However, no improvement in the liver and renal function profiles was observed. Major constituents of F3 were identified as lutein, 131-hydroxy-132-oxo-pheophytin a, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, pheophytin a and 132-hydroxy-pheophytin a. These compounds however, may not significantly contribute to the antitumor effect of F3.

  20. Radium-induced malignant tumors of the mastoid and paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the records of 5,058 persons with therapeutic or occupational exposure to radium, 21 patients with carcinoma of the mastoid and 11 with malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses were identified. Tumor induction times were 21 to 50 years for mastoid tumors (median, 33) and 19 to 52 years for paranasal sinus tumors (median, 34). Dosimetric data are given for the patients whose body burdens of radium have been measured. We found a high proportion of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, comprising 38% of the mastoid and 36% of the paranasal sinus tumors. Three patients had antecedent bone sarcoma at 20, 11, and 5 years, respectively, and a bone sarcoma was discovered at autopsy in a fourth patient. Radiographic changes in the mastoid and paranasal sinuses were similar to those seen in nonradium malignant tumors. More than 800 known persons exposed to radium before 1930 and another group of unknown size who received radium water or injections of radium from physicians are still alive and at risk of developing malignant tumors of the mastoid and paranasal sinuses

  1. Electrochemically induced chemical sensor properties in graphite screen-printed electrodes: The case of a chemical sensor for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostaki, Vasiliki T.; Florou, Ageliki B. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Prodromidis, Mamas I., E-mail: mprodrom@cc.uoi.gr [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 451 10 Ioannina (Greece)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > Electrochemical treatment endows analytical characteristics to SPEs. > A sensitive chemical sensor for uranium is described. > Performance is due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. > The amount of the solvent controls the achievable sensitivity. - Abstract: We report for the first time on the possibility to develop chemical sensors based on electrochemically treated, non-modified, graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). The applied galvanostatic treatment (5 {mu}A for 6 min in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) is demonstrated to be effective for the development of chemical sensors for the determination of uranium in aqueous solutions. A detailed study of the effect of various parameters related to the fabrication of SPEs on the performance of the resulting sensors along with some diagnostic experiments on conventional graphite electrodes showed that the inducible analytical characteristics are due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. Indeed, the amount of the latter onto the printed working layer controls the achievable sensitivity. The preconcentration of the analyte was performed in an electroless mode in an aqueous solutions of U(VI), pH 4.6, and then, the accumulated species was reduced by means of a differential pulse voltammetry scan in 0.1 M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, pH 3. Under selected experimental conditions, a linear calibration curve over the range 5 x 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M U(VI) was constructed. The 3{sigma} limit of detection at a preconcentration time of 30 min, and the relative standard deviation of the method were 4.5 x 10{sup -9} M U(VI) and >12% (n = 5, 5 x 10{sup -8} M U(VI)), respectively. The effect of potential interferences was also examined.

  2. Physical and chemical effects of red cells in the shear-induced aggregation of human platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, H L; Bell, D N; Braovac, S; Steinberg, A.; McIntosh, F

    1995-01-01

    Both chemical and physical effects of red cells have been implicated in the spontaneous aggregation of platelets in sheared whole blood (WB). To determine whether the chemical effect is due to ADP leaking from the red cells, a previously described technique for measuring the concentration and size of single platelets and aggregates was used to study the shear-induced aggregation of platelets in WB flowing through 1.19-mm-diameter polyethylene tubing in the presence and absence of the ADP scav...

  3. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesper, M.J. (Univ. of Dayton, OH (USA)); Cross, J.W. (Sogetal, Inc., Hayward, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  4. Knock-down of hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases IX and XII radiosensitizes tumor cells by increasing intracellular acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eDoyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between acidosis within the tumor microenvironment and radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells remains unclear. Previously we reported that hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases CAIX and CAXII constitute a robust pHi-regulating system that confers a survival advantage on hypoxic human colon carcinoma LS174Tr cells in acidic microenvironments. Here we investigate the role of acidosis, CAIX and CAXII knock-down in combination with ionizing radiation. Fibroblasts cells (-/+ CAIX and LS174Tr cells (inducible knock-down for ca9/ca12 were analyzed for cell cycle phase distribution and survival after irradiation in extracellular pHo manipulations and hypoxia (1% O2 exposure. Radiotherapy was used to target ca9/ca12-silenced LS174Tr tumors grown in nude mice. We found that diminishing the pHi-regulating capacity of fibroblasts through inhibition of NHE-1 sensitize cells to radiation-induced cell death. Secondly, the pHi-regulating function of CAIX plays a key protective role in irradiated fibroblasts in an acidic environment as accompanied by a reduced number of cells in the radiosensitive phases of the cell cycle. Thirdly, we demonstrate that irradiation of LS174Tr spheroids, silenced for either ca9 or both ca9/ca12, showed a respective 50% and 75% increase in cell death as a result of a decrease in cell number in the radioresistant S phase and a disruption of CA-mediated pHi regulation. Finally, LS174Tr tumor progression was strongly decreased when ca9/ca12 silencing was combined with irradiation in vivo. These findings highlight the combinatory use of radiotherapy with targeting of the pHi-regulating carbonic anhydrases as an anti-cancer strategy.

  5. Interleukin-15-induced CD56(+) myeloid dendritic cells combine potent tumor antigen presentation with direct tumoricidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  6. Radium-induced malignant tumors of the mastoid and paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the records of 5058 persons with therapeutic or occupational exposure to radium, 21 patients with carcinoma of the mastoid and 11 with malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses were identified. Induction time for mastoid tumors was 21 to 50 years, median 33; for paranasal sinus tumors it was 10 to 52 years, median 34. Dosimetric data are given for the patients whose body burdens of radium have been measured. Observations and theoretical considerations strongly suggest that radon in the air of sinuses may be an important or perhaps a major factor in the induction of paranasal sinus malignancies in the radium cases

  7. Pure Multiplicative Noises Induced Population Extinction in an Anti-tumor Model under Immune Surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamical characters of a theoretical anti-tumor model under immune surveillance subjected to a pure multiplicative noise are investigated. The effects of pure multiplicative noise on the stationary probability distribution (SPD) and the mean first passage time (MFPT) are analysed based on the approximate Fokker-Planck equation of the system in detail. For the anti-tumor model, with the multiplicative noise intensity D increasing, the tumor population move towards to extinction and the extinction rate can be enhanced. Numerical simulations are carried out to check the approximate theoretical results. Reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  8. Metabolic effects of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor are modified by site of production. Cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-secreting tumor in skeletal muscle induces chronic cachexia, while implantation in brain induces predominantly acute anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, K J; Morgello, S; Koplin, B; Fahey, T J; Fox, J; Aledo, A; Manogue, K R; Cerami, A

    1990-12-01

    We have developed a murine model of wasting by injecting intracerebrally cells which continuously secrete h-cachectin/TNF (CHO-TNF) to: (a) determine the effects of cachectin/TNF produced continuously in the central nervous system (CNS), and (b) compare the metabolic effects of cachectin/TNF-secreting tumor in the brain to the cachexia caused by CHO-TNF tumor in peripheral tissue (IM). Intracerebral CHO-TNF tumors produced increased serum h-cachectin/TNF levels with lethal hypophagia and weight loss (mean survival time of 11 d); these changes were not observed in association with nonsecretory control brain tumors. The metabolic consequences of intracerebral cachectin/TNF production were indistinguishable from acute, lethal starvation: whole-body lipid content was decreased significantly but protein was conserved. Although intramuscular cachectin/TNF-secreting tumors caused similar increases of serum h-cachectin/TNF levels, profound anorexia did not develop; wasting developed after a longer period of tumor burden (50 d) with classical signs of cachexia (i.e., anemia and depletion of both protein and lipid). These studies provide a reproducible animal model of site-specific cytokine production and suggest that, regardless of serum levels, cachectin/TNF produced locally in brain influences both the rate of development of wasting and its net metabolic effects. PMID:2254457

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Background Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. Methodology/Principal Findings A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant–pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stim