WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemically induced dynamic

  1. Chemical memory reactions induced bursting dynamics in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tianhai

    2013-01-01

    Memory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems in which the present system state is not entirely determined by the current conditions but also depends on the time evolutionary path of the system. Specifically, many memorial phenomena are characterized by chemical memory reactions that may fire under particular system conditions. These conditional chemical reactions contradict to the extant stochastic approaches for modeling chemical kinetics and have increasingly posed significant challenges to mathematical modeling and computer simulation. To tackle the challenge, I proposed a novel theory consisting of the memory chemical master equations and memory stochastic simulation algorithm. A stochastic model for single-gene expression was proposed to illustrate the key function of memory reactions in inducing bursting dynamics of gene expression that has been observed in experiments recently. The importance of memory reactions has been further validated by the stochastic model of the p53-MDM2 core module. Simulations showed that memory reactions is a major mechanism for realizing both sustained oscillations of p53 protein numbers in single cells and damped oscillations over a population of cells. These successful applications of the memory modeling framework suggested that this innovative theory is an effective and powerful tool to study memory process and conditional chemical reactions in a wide range of complex biological systems.

  2. Radiation-Induced Chemical Dynamics in Ar Clusters Exposed to Strong X-Ray Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Jurek, Zoltan; Xu, Weiqing; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Motomura, Koji; Iablonskyi, Denys; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Wada, Shin-ichi; Mondal, Subhendu; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Ito, Yuta; Sakai, Tsukasa; Matsunami, Kenji; Nishiyama, Toshiyuki; Umemoto, Takayuki; Nicolas, Christophe; Miron, Catalin; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Owada, Shigeki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Son, Sang-Kil; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2018-06-01

    We show that electron and ion spectroscopy reveals the details of the oligomer formation in Ar clusters exposed to an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) pulse, i.e., chemical dynamics triggered by x rays. With guidance from a dedicated molecular dynamics simulation tool, we find that van der Waals bonding, the oligomer formation mechanism, and charge transfer among the cluster constituents significantly affect ionization dynamics induced by an XFEL pulse of moderate fluence. Our results clearly demonstrate that XFEL pulses can be used not only to "damage and destroy" molecular assemblies but also to modify and transform their molecular structure. The accuracy of the predictions obtained makes it possible to apply the cluster spectroscopy, in connection with the respective simulations, for estimation of the XFEL pulse fluence in the fluence regime below single-atom multiple-photon absorption, which is hardly accessible with other diagnostic tools.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance in pulse radiolysis. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Johnson, K.W.; Lowers, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) were applied to the study of pulse radiolysis. Samples were irradiated with a 3-MeV electron beam from the Argonne Van de Graaff accelerator in an EPR magnet (approximately 4000 G) which had axial holes for beam access. A fast flow system transferred the irradiated solution to the rotating 5-mm NMR sample tube. The NMR spectra of mixtures of sodium acetate and methanol were presented to demonstrate the features of the CIDNP in pulse radiolysis

  4. Effects of ion-neutral chemical reactions on dynamics of lightning-induced electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2009-01-01

    Secondary lightning phenomena in the upper atmosphere called sprites attract interest from the viewpoint of atomic-molecular and plasma physics. Lightning-induced electric field accelerates the ionospheric electrons up to tens of electron-volts, inducing electrical breakdown as well as strong optical emissions, through electron impact ionization of molecules. A large-scale structure of sprites is constructed by collective dynamics of filamentary streamer discharges in a rarified gas, which in turn is controlled by the distribution of the background electric field. In this paper, we firstly reanalyze the relationship between quasi-static field formation and local ion chemistry with first-order perturbation techniques. Secondly, we investigate with a full ion chemical model the effects of electron attachment to oxygen molecules on its density in moderate cases of undervoltage lightning electric fields rather than the cases of intense ionization in streamers. We estimate the minimum values that are provided by the chemical balance with electron detachment from negative ions. We also investigate the recovery timescale of the electron density and find that the scale (≥1 s) is occasionally much larger than the interval of each lightning stroke (∼10 ms). We suggest that the subsequent sprite event as well as the field formation could be well affected by the ghost of the primary event. We discuss further the negative ion chemistry triggered by electron attachment in the nighttime mesosphere.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Study of Thermally Augmented Nanodroplet Motion on Chemical Energy Induced Wettability Gradient Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Monojit; Chowdhury, Anamika; Bhusan, Richa; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Droplet motion on a surface with chemical energy induced wettability gradient has been simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to highlight the underlying physics of molecular movement near the solid-liquid interface including the contact line friction. The simulations mimic experiments in a comprehensive manner wherein microsized droplets are propelled by the surface wettability gradient against forces opposed to motion. The liquid-wall Lennard-Jones interaction parameter and the substrate temperature are varied to explore their effects on the three-phase contact line friction coefficient. The contact line friction is observed to be a strong function of temperature at atomistic scales, confirming their experimentally observed inverse functionality. Additionally, the MD simulation results are successfully compared with those from an analytical model for self-propelled droplet motion on gradient surfaces.

  6. Chemically induced dynamic electron polarization. Pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Thurnauer, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The radical pair model of chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) is experimentally verified. Aqueous solutions of alcohols were irradiated with 3 MeV electrons and observed with time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Relative line intensities of the polarized EPR spectra of radicals from methanol and especially ethylene glycol, alone and in the presence of radicals from compounds containing halogens, illustrates the polarization dependence on the g-factor differences between the radical pair components. The observation of the relative polarization enhancement in the various lines of the multiline EPR spectra illustrates the polarization dependence on the hyperfine terms. Intrinsic enhancements are calculated and are shown to be proportional to the observed enhancement, showing that the radical pair model of CIDEP is qualitatively correct

  7. 1H chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in the photodecomposition of uranyl carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, S.V.; Khudyakov, I.V.; Skakovsky, E.D.; Burrows, H.D.; Formosinho, S.J.; Miguel, M. da G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization ( 1 H CIDNP) has been observed during photolysis of uranyl salts of pivalic, propionic, and acetic acids in D 2 O solution, [ 2 H 6 ]acetone, [ 2 H 4 ]methanol, or in some other solvent. The multiplet polarization of isobutene and isobutane protons has been found under photolysis of deoxygenated pivalate solution. The polarized compounds are formed in the triplet pairs of tert-butyl free radicals. 1 H Emission of the tert-butylperoxyl group and emission of 1 H from isobutene have been recorded under photolysis of air-saturated pivalate solutions. The CIDNP of butane protons stays as a multiplet. Such changes in the presence of air/oxygen have arisen apparently because of the formation of tert-butylperoxyl free radical and its reaction with tert-butyl radical products, i.e. hydroperoxide (peroxide) and isobutene. Isobutene probably forms a complex with molecular oxygen which has a very short proton relaxation time. During the photolysis of uranyl pivalate in the presence of p-benzoquinone (5 x 10 -2 -0.1 mol dm -3 ) we have not observed any CIDNP, whereas under p-benzoquinone concentrations of 10 -3 -10 -2 mol dm -3 the CIDNP from both hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone has been followed. Photolysis of uranyl propionate has led to CIDNP from butane protons. An emission from methyl group protons of a compound with an ethylperoxyl fragment in the presence of air/oxygen has been observed. The same polarization picture has arisen under interaction of photoexcited uranyl with propionic acid. During the photolysis of uranyl acetate at relatively low concentrations (10 -2 mol dm -3 ) a CIDNP very similar to that registered for uranyl propionate was recorded. The ethyl fragment is probably obtained in reactions for two methyl radicals formed from acetate with the parent uranyl acetate, namely hydrogen-atom abstraction and addition reactions. (author)

  8. Studies in Chemical Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Ho, Tak-San

    2003-01-01

    This final report draws together the research carried from February, 1986 through January, 2003 concerning a series of topics in chemical dynamics. The specific areas of study include molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, data inversion to extract potential energy surfaces, and model reduction of complex kinetic systems

  9. Amorphization induced by chemical disorder in crystalline NiZr2: A molecular-dynamics study based on an n-body potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massobrio, C.; Pontikis, V.; Martin, G.

    1989-01-01

    We present the first molecular-dynamics study of the amorphization of a crystalline alloy (NiZr 2 ) induced by chemical disorder. We used a n-body potential in conjunction with isobaric-isothermal molecular dynamics. The behavior of the pair distribution function suggests that the instability leading to the amorphous state is a first-order phase transformation

  10. Chemical-induced Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Chemical-induced depigmentation of the skin has been recognized for over 75 years, first as an occupational hazard but then extending to those using household commercial products as common as hair dyes. Since their discovery, these chemicals have been used therapeutically in patients with severe vitiligo to depigment their remaining skin and improve their appearance. The importance of recognizing this phenomenon was highlighted during an outbreak of vitiligo in Japan during the summer of 2013, when over 16,000 users of a new skin lightening cosmetic cream developed skin depigmentation at the site of contact with the cream and many in remote areas as well. Depigmenting chemicals appear to be analogs of the amino acid tyrosine that disrupt melanogenesis and result in autoimmunity and melanocyte destruction. Because chemical-induced depigmentation is clinically and histologically indistinguishable from non-chemically induced vitiligo, and because these chemicals appear to induce melanocyte autoimmunity, this phenomenon should be known as “chemical-induced vitiligo”, rather than less accurate terms that have been previously used. PMID:28317525

  11. Role of aromatic amino acids in carbohydrate binding of plant lectins : Laser photo chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization study of hevein domain-containing lectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebert, HC; vonderLieth, CW; Kaptein, R; Beintema, JJ; Dijkstra, K; vanNuland, N; Soedjanaatmadja, UMS; Rice, A; Vliegenthart, JFG; Wright, CS; Gabius, HJ

    Carbohydrate recognition by lectins often involves the side chains of tyrosine, tryptophan, and histidine residues. These moieties are able to produce chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) signals after laser irradiation in the presence of a suitable radical pair-generating dye.

  12. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in systems containing large hyperfine coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, H.D.; Hutton, R.S.; Hwang, Kuochu; Turro, N.J.; Welsh, K.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear spin polarization effects induced in radical pairs with one or more strong ( 13 C) hyperfine coupling constants have been evaluated. The pairs were generated by photoinduced α-cleavage or hydrogen abstraction reactions of carbonyl compounds. Several examples illustrate how changes in the magnetic field strength (H 0 ) and the g-factor difference (Δg) affect the general appearance of the resulting CIDNP multiplets. The results bear out an earlier caveat concerning the qualitative interpretation of CIDNP effects observed for multiplets

  13. Dynamic chemical communication between plants and bacteria through airborne signals: induced resistance by bacterial volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Zhang, Huiming; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-07-01

    Certain plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) and plant growth promotion in the absence of physical contact with plants via volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In this article, we review the recent progess made by research into the interactions between PGPR VOCs and plants, focusing on VOC emission by PGPR strains in plants. Particular attention is given to the mechanisms by which these bacterial VOCs elicit ISR. We provide an overview of recent progress in the elucidation of PGPR VOC interactions from studies utilizing transcriptome, metabolome, and proteome analyses. By monitoring defense gene expression patterns, performing 2-dimensional electrophoresis, and studying defense signaling null mutants, salicylic acid and ethylene have been found to be key players in plant signaling pathways involved in the ISR response. Bacterial VOCs also confer induced systemic tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought and heavy metals. A review of current analytical approaches for PGPR volatile profiling is also provided with needed future developments emphasized. To assess potential utilization of PGPR VOCs for crop plants, volatile suspensions have been applied to pepper and cucumber roots and found to be effective at protecting plants against plant pathogens and insect pests in the field. Taken together, these studies provide further insight into the biological and ecological potential of PGPR VOCs for enhancing plant self-immunity and/or adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses in modern agriculture.

  14. Conformational fluctuation dynamics of domain I of human serum albumin in the course of chemically and thermally induced unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Sen, Pratik

    2014-05-22

    The present study elucidates the involvement of conformational fluctuation dynamics during chemically and thermally induced unfolding of human serum albumin (HSA) by fluorescence correlation spectroscopic (FCS) study, time-resolved fluorescence measurements, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. Two fluorescent probes, tetramethylrhodamine-5-maleimide (TMR) and N-(7-dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin-3-yl) iodoacetamide (DACIA) were used to selectively label the domain I of HSA through the reaction with cys-34 for these studies. The guanidine hydrochloride (GnHCl) induced global structural change of HSA is monitored through its hydrodynamic radius (r(H)) and CD response, which is found to be two step in nature. In FCS experiment, along with the diffusion time component we have observed an exponential relaxation time component (τ(R)) that has been ascribed to the concerted chain dynamics of HSA. Unlike in the global structural change, we found that the τ(R) value changes in a different manner in the course of the unfolding. The dependence of τ(R) on the concentration of GnHCl was best fitted with a four state model, indicating the involvement of two intermediate states during the unfolding process, which were not observed through the CD response and r(H) data. The fluorescence lifetime measurement also supports our observation of intermediate states during the unfolding of HSA. However, no such intermediate states were observed during thermally induced unfolding of HSA.

  15. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Bryan, E-mail: bryan.robertson@mail.utoronto.ca; Kapral, Raymond, E-mail: rkapral@chem.utoronto.ca [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2015-04-21

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media.

  16. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Bryan; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media

  17. Dynamic changes in glucose metabolism of living rat brain slices induced by hypoxia and neurotoxic chemical-loading revealed by positron autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omata, N.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Waki, A.; Sadato, N.; Yano, R.; Yoshimoto, M.; Yonekura, Y.; Murata, T.; Yoshida, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fresh rat brain slices were incubated with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution at 36 degree C, and serial two-dimensional time-resolved images of [ 18 F]FDG uptake were obtained from these specimens on imaging plates. The fractional rate constant (= k3*) of [ 18 F]FDG proportional to the cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglc) was evaluated by applying the Gjedde-Patlak graphical method to the image data. With hypoxia loading (oxygen deprivation) or glucose metabolism inhibitors acting on oxidative phosphorylation, the k3* value increased dramatically suggesting enhanced glycolysis. After relieving hypoxia ≤10-min, the k3* value returned to the pre-loading level. In contrast, with ≥20-min hypoxia only partial or no recovery was observed, indicating that irreversible neuronal damage had been induced. However, after loading with tetrodotoxin (TTX), the k3* value also decreased but returned to the pre-loading level even after 70-min TTX-loading, reflecting a transient inhibition of neuronal activity. This technique provides a new means of quantifying dynamic changes in the regional CMRglc in living brain slices in response to various interventions such as hypoxia and neurotoxic chemical-loading as well as determining the viability and prognosis of brain tissues. (author)

  18. Level crossing analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization: Towards a common description of liquid-state and solid-state cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosnovsky, Denis V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L., E-mail: ivanov@tomo.nsc.ru [International Tomography Centre of SB RAS, Institutskaya 3a, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jeschke, Gunnar [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Matysik, Jörg [Institut für Analytische Chemie, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstr. 3, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Vieth, Hans-Martin [International Tomography Centre of SB RAS, Institutskaya 3a, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-14

    Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) is an efficient method of creating non-equilibrium polarization of nuclear spins by using chemical reactions, which have radical pairs as intermediates. The CIDNP effect originates from (i) electron spin-selective recombination of radical pairs and (ii) the dependence of the inter-system crossing rate in radical pairs on the state of magnetic nuclei. The CIDNP effect can be investigated by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods. The gain from CIDNP is then two-fold: it allows one to obtain considerable amplification of NMR signals; in addition, it provides a very useful tool for investigating elusive radicals and radical pairs. While the mechanisms of the CIDNP effect in liquids are well established and understood, detailed analysis of solid-state CIDNP mechanisms still remains challenging; likewise a common theoretical frame for the description of CIDNP in both solids and liquids is missing. Difficulties in understanding the spin dynamics that lead to the CIDNP effect in the solid-state case are caused by the anisotropy of spin interactions, which increase the complexity of spin evolution. In this work, we propose to analyze CIDNP in terms of level crossing phenomena, namely, to attribute features in the CIDNP magnetic field dependence to Level Crossings (LCs) and Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in a radical pair. This approach allows one to describe liquid-state CIDNP; the same holds for the solid-state case where anisotropic interactions play a significant role in CIDNP formation. In solids, features arise predominantly from LACs, since in most cases anisotropic couplings result in perturbations, which turn LCs into LACs. We have interpreted the CIDNP mechanisms in terms of the LC/LAC concept. This consideration allows one to find analytical expressions for a wide magnetic field range, where several different mechanisms are operative; furthermore, the LAC description gives a way to determine CIDNP sign

  19. molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and quantum chemical calculations for the adsorption of [2-(2-Henicos-10- .... electronic properties of molecule clusters, surfaces and ... The local reactivity was analyzed by determining the.

  20. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  1. Chemical Dynamics at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, T.; Berrah, N.; Fadley, C.; Moore, C.B.; Neumark, D.M.; Ng, C.Y.; Ruscic, B.; Smith, N.V.; Suits, A.G.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    A day-long retreat was held January 15, 1999 to chart the future directions for chemical dynamics studies at the Advanced Light Source. This represents an important period for the Chemical Dynamics Beamline, as the hardware is well-developed, most of the initial experimental objectives have been realized and the mission is now to identify the future scientific priorities for the beamline and attract users of the highest caliber. To this end, we have developed a detailed scientific program for the near term; identified and prioritized the long range scientific opportunities, identified essential new hardware, and outlined an aggressive outreach program to involve the chemical physics community

  2. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  3. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS ampersand D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species

  4. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  5. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  6. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  7. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x-y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  8. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. DNA-Encoded Dynamic Combinatorial Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddavide, Francesco V; Lin, Weilin; Lehnert, Sarah; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-06-26

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) explores the thermodynamic equilibrium of reversible reactions. Its application in the discovery of protein binders is largely limited by difficulties in the analysis of complex reaction mixtures. DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) technology allows the selection of binders from a mixture of up to billions of different compounds; however, experimental results often show low a signal-to-noise ratio and poor correlation between enrichment factor and binding affinity. Herein we describe the design and application of DNA-encoded dynamic combinatorial chemical libraries (EDCCLs). Our experiments have shown that the EDCCL approach can be used not only to convert monovalent binders into high-affinity bivalent binders, but also to cause remarkably enhanced enrichment of potent bivalent binders by driving their in situ synthesis. We also demonstrate the application of EDCCLs in DNA-templated chemical reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chemical Detection Based on Adsorption-Induced and Photo-Induced Stresses in MEMS Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, P.G.

    1999-04-05

    Recently there has been an increasing demand to perform real-time in-situ chemical detection of hazardous materials, contraband chemicals, and explosive chemicals. Currently, real-time chemical detection requires rather large analytical instrumentation that are expensive and complicated to use. The advent of inexpensive mass produced MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) devices opened-up new possibilities for chemical detection. For example, microcantilevers were found to respond to chemical stimuli by undergoing changes in their bending and resonance frequency even when a small number of molecules adsorb on their surface. In our present studies, we extended this concept by studying changes in both the adsorption-induced stress and photo-induced stress as target chemicals adsorb on the surface of microcantilevers. For example, microcantilevers that have adsorbed molecules will undergo photo-induced bending that depends on the number of absorbed molecules on the surface. However, microcantilevers that have undergone photo-induced bending will adsorb molecules on their surfaces in a distinctly different way. Depending on the photon wavelength and microcantilever material, the microcantilever can be made to bend by expanding or contracting the irradiated surface. This is important in cases where the photo-induced stresses can be used to counter any adsorption-induced stresses and increase the dynamic range. Coating the surface of the microstructure with a different material can provide chemical specificity for the target chemicals. However, by selecting appropriate photon wavelengths we can change the chemical selectivity due to the introduction of new surface states in the MEMS device. We will present and discuss our results on the use of adsorption-induced and photo-induced bending of microcantilevers for chemical detection.

  11. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE's environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous

  12. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  14. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  15. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  16. Geochemical induced degradation of environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlar, H

    1984-09-01

    Attempts to correlate the concentration of organic chemicals in the environment with their production figures have resulted in a large deficit; this includes environmental chemicals such as chlorinated hydrocarbons. It has been assumed that analytical errors accounted for this deficit. Another explanation, however, allows for reactions of compounds under biotic and abiotic conditions. Because of the biostability of many organic chemicals biological transformation mechanisms can bring about slight change only. By contrast, abiotic environmental factors such as the UV-irradiation or decomposition on natural surfaces contribute considerably to the transformation of this substance class. An investigation of such abiotic charges of organic chemicals must therefore pay particular attention to dynamic and catalytic effects primarily attributable to the respective molecular state and interactions with the environment. This paper deals with the photoinduced reactions of organic substances adsorbed on natural surfaces and their significance for the degradability of environmental chemicals.

  17. Cooperative unfolding of apolipoprotein A-1 induced by chemical denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D; Li-Blatter, X; Schönfeld, H-J; Heerklotz, H; Seelig, J

    2018-05-25

    Apolipoprotein A-1 (Apo A-1) plays an important role in lipid transfer and obesity. Chemical unfolding of α-helical Apo A-1 is induced with guanidineHCl and monitored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD spectroscopy. The unfolding enthalpy and the midpoint temperature of unfolding decrease linearly with increasing guanidineHCl concentration, caused by the weak binding of denaturant. At room temperature, binding of 50-60 molecules guanidineHCl leads to a complete Apo A-1 unfolding. The entropy of unfolding decreases to a lesser extent than the unfolding enthalpy. Apo A-1 chemical unfolding is a dynamic multi-state equilibrium that is analysed with the Zimm-Bragg theory modified for chemical unfolding. The chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts the denaturant binding constant K D and the protein cooperativity σ. Chemical unfolding of Apo A-1 is two orders of magnitude less cooperative than thermal unfolding. The free energy of thermal unfolding is ~0.2 kcal/mol per amino acid residue and ~1.0 kcal/mol for chemical unfolding at room temperature. The Zimm-Bragg theory calculates conformational probabilities and the chemical Zimm-Bragg theory predicts stretches of α-helical segments in dynamic equilibrium, unfolding and refolding independently and fast. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical-induced allergy and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulferink, Marty Bernardus Franciscus

    2001-01-01

    This thesis aims towards a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to chemical-induced adverse immune effects. We focussed thereby on the initial induction stage of the immune reaction that consists of three major steps: (i) formation of neoantigen, (ii) processing and presentation of the

  19. Application of synchrotron radiation in chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, P.; Koike, M.; Kung, A.H.; Ng, C.Y.; White, M.G.; Wodtke, A.

    1993-05-01

    In October 1992, funding was approved to begin construction of a beamline and two end stations to support chemical dynamics experiments at LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS). This workshop was organized to develop specifications and plans and to select a working team to design and supervise the construction project. Target date for starting the experiments is January 1995. Conclusions of the workshop and representative experiments proposed in earlier workshops to form the basis for beamline plans and end-station designs are summarized in this report. 6 figs

  20. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  1. Dynamic strain-induced transformation: An atomic scale investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Pradeep, K.G.; Mandal, S.; Ponge, D.; Springer, H.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformations provide the most versatile access to the design of complex nanostructured alloys in terms of grain size, morphology, local chemical constitution etc. Here we study a special case of deformation induced phase transformation. More specifically, we investigate the atomistic mechanisms associated with dynamic strain-induced transformation (DSIT) in a dual-phased multicomponent iron-based alloy at high temperatures. DSIT phenomena and the associated secondary phase nucleation were observed at atomic scale using atom probe tomography. The obtained local chemical composition was used for simulating the nucleation process which revealed that DSIT, occurring during load exertion, proceeds by a diffusion-controlled nucleation process

  2. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, J.C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  3. Coarse grain model for coupled thermo-mechano-chemical processes and its application to pressure-induced endothermic chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antillon, Edwin; Banlusan, Kiettipong; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We extend a thermally accurate model for coarse grain dynamics (Strachan and Holian 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 014301) to enable the description of stress-induced chemical reactions in the degrees of freedom internal to the mesoparticles. Similar to the breathing sphere model, we introduce an additional variable that describes the internal state of the particles and whose dynamics is governed both by an internal potential energy function and by interparticle forces. The equations of motion of these new variables are derived from a Hamiltonian and the model exhibits two desired features: total energy conservation and Galilean invariance. We use a simple model material with pairwise interactions between particles and study pressure-induced chemical reactions induced by hydrostatic and uniaxial compression. These examples demonstrate the ability of the model to capture non-trivial processes including the interplay between mechanical, thermal and chemical processes of interest in many applications. (paper)

  4. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  5. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  6. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-01-01

    A treatment of chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a

  7. Chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Here, several studies on fast neutron irradiation effects carried out at the reactor 'YAYOI' are presented. Some indicate a significant difference in the effect from those by γ-ray irradiation but others do not, and the difference changes from subject to subject which we observed. In general, chemical reactions induced by fast neutron irradiation expand in space and time, and there are many aspects. In the time region just after the deposition of neutron energy in the system, intermediates are formed densely and locally reflecting high LET of fast neutrons and, with time, successive reactions proceed parallel to dissipation of localized energy and to diffusion of the intermediates. Finally the reactions are completed in longer time region. If we pick up the effects which reserve the locality of the initial processes, a significant different effect between in fast neutron radiolysis and in γ-ray radiolysis would be derived. If we observe the products generated after dissipation and diffusion in longer time region, a clear difference would not be observed. Therefore, in order to understand the fast neutron irradiation effects, it is necessary to know the fundamental processes of the reactions induced by radiations. (author)

  8. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  9. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  10. Special Issue on Theoretical Chemistry/Chemical Dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-02

    Jul 2, 2017 ... This month's issue of the Journal of Chemical Sciences honours Professor Charusita Chakravarty, who has made immeasurable contributions to theoretical chemistry and chemical dynamics. The editors Biman Bagchi (FASc, FNA, FTWAS; Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India), David Clary (FRS; ...

  11. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that the imidazoline derivative molecules uses the imidazoline ring to effectively adsorb on the surface of iron, with the alkyl hydrophobic tail forming an n shape (canopy like covering) at geometry optimization and at 353 K. The n shape canopy like covering to a large extent may ...

  13. Chemical reaction dynamics using the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Blank, D.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.; Lin, J.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The recently commissioned Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley provides a high brightness, tunable VUV light source for chemical dynamics studies. A dedicated chemical dynamics beamline has been built at the ALS for studies of fundamental chemical processes. High flux (10(sup 16) photon/s with 2% bandwidth) VUV synchrotron radiation from 5 to 30 eV can be obtained from the beamline, whose source is the U8/10 undulator. Three endstations will be in operation for studies ranging from crossed beam reaction dynamics and photodissociation to high resolution photoionization dynamics and spectroscopy. A rotatable source crossed molecular beam apparatus (endstation one) has been established for unimolecular and bimolecular reactive scattering studies. Photodissociation of methylamine and ozone were carried out using VUV synchrotron radiation as the ionization detection technique at this endstation. Results show the advantages of the new endstation using VUV ionization as the detection scheme over similar machines using electron bombardment as the ionization source

  14. Chemical reaction dynamics using the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Blank, D.A.; Heimann, P.A.; Lee, Y.T.; Suits, A.G.; Lin, J.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    The recently commissioned Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley provides a high brightness, tunable VUV light source for chemical dynamics studies. A dedicated chemical dynamics beamline has been built at the ALS for studies of fundamental chemical processes. High flux (10 16 photon/s with 2% bandwidth) VUV synchrotron radiation from 5 to 30 eV can be obtained from the beamline, whose source is the U8/10 undulator. Three endstations will be in operation for studies ranging from crossed beam reaction dynamics and photodissociation to high resolution photoionization dynamics and spectroscopy. A rotatable source crossed molecular beam apparatus (endstation one) has been established for unimolecular and bimolecular reactive scattering studies. Photodissociation of methylamine and ozone were carried out using VUV synchrotron radiation as the ionization detection technique at this endstation. Results show the advantages of the new endstation using VUV ionization as the detection scheme over similar machines using electron bombardment as the ionization source

  15. Cluster dynamics transcending chemical dynamics toward nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua; Last, Isidore

    2006-07-11

    Ultrafast cluster dynamics encompasses femtosecond nuclear dynamics, attosecond electron dynamics, and electron-nuclear dynamics in ultraintense laser fields (peak intensities 10(15)-10(20) W.cm(-2)). Extreme cluster multielectron ionization produces highly charged cluster ions, e.g., (C(4+)(D(+))(4))(n) and (D(+)I(22+))(n) at I(M) = 10(18) W.cm(-2), that undergo Coulomb explosion (CE) with the production of high-energy (5 keV to 1 MeV) ions, which can trigger nuclear reactions in an assembly of exploding clusters. The laser intensity and the cluster size dependence of the dynamics and energetics of CE of (D(2))(n), (HT)(n), (CD(4))(n), (DI)(n), (CD(3)I)(n), and (CH(3)I)(n) clusters were explored by electrostatic models and molecular dynamics simulations, quantifying energetic driving effects, and kinematic run-over effects. The optimization of table-top dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of deuterium containing heteroclusters is realized for light-heavy heteroclusters of the largest size, which allows for the prevalence of cluster vertical ionization at the highest intensity of the laser field. We demonstrate a 7-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the yield of dd nuclear fusion driven by CE of light-heavy heteroclusters as compared with (D(2))(n) clusters of the same size. Prospective applications for the attainment of table-top nucleosynthesis reactions, e.g., (12)C(P,gamma)(13)N driven by CE of (CH(3)I)(n) clusters, were explored.

  16. Partial chemical equilibrium in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given for the flow of a multicomponent fluid in which an arbitrary number of chemical reactions may occur, some of which are in equilibrium while the others proceed kinetically. The primitive equations describing this situation are inconvenient to use because the progress rates omega-dot/sub s/ for the equilibrium reactions are determined implicitly by the associated equilibrium constraint conditions. Two alternative equivalent equation systems that are more pleasant to deal with are derived. In the first system, the omega-dot/sub s/ are eliminated by replacing the transport equations for the chemical species involved in the equilibrium reactions with transport equations for the basic components of which these species are composed. The second system retains the usual species transport equations, but eliminates the nonlinear algebraic equilibrium constraint conditions by deriving an explicit expression for the omega-dot/sub s/. Both systems are specialized to the case of an ideal gas mixture. Considerations involved in solving these equation systems numerically are discussed briefly

  17. Switching dynamics in reaction networks induced by molecular discreteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togashi, Yuichi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    To study the fluctuations and dynamics in chemical reaction processes, stochastic differential equations based on the rate equation involving chemical concentrations are often adopted. When the number of molecules is very small, however, the discreteness in the number of molecules cannot be neglected since the number of molecules must be an integer. This discreteness can be important in biochemical reactions, where the total number of molecules is not significantly larger than the number of chemical species. To elucidate the effects of such discreteness, we study autocatalytic reaction systems comprising several chemical species through stochastic particle simulations. The generation of novel states is observed; it is caused by the extinction of some molecular species due to the discreteness in their number. We demonstrate that the reaction dynamics are switched by a single molecule, which leads to the reconstruction of the acting network structure. We also show the strong dependence of the chemical concentrations on the system size, which is caused by transitions to discreteness-induced novel states

  18. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, E.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  19. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, Steve D; McDowell, Rod S

    2001-01-01

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and (3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems

  20. Dynamics of chemical equilibrium of hadronic matter close to Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noronha-Hostler, J.; Beitel, M.; Greiner, C.; Shovkovy, I.

    2010-01-01

    Quick chemical equilibration times of hadrons (specifically, pp-bar, KK-bar, ΛΛ-bar, and ΩΩ-bar pairs) within a hadron gas are explained dynamically using Hagedorn states, which drive particles into equilibrium close to the critical temperature. Within this scheme, we use master equations and derive various analytical estimates for the chemical equilibration times. We compare our model to recent lattice results and find that for both T c =176 MeV and T c =196 MeV, the hadrons can reach chemical equilibrium almost immediately, well before the chemical freeze-out temperatures found in thermal fits for a hadron gas without Hagedorn states. Furthermore, the ratios p/π, K/π, Λ/π, and Ω/π match experimental values well in our dynamical scenario.

  1. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellos, Christos

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the formal lectures and contributed papers presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on. the Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics. The meeting convened at the city of Iraklion, Crete, Greece on 25 August 1985 and continued to 7 September 1985. The material presented describes the fundamental and recent advances in experimental and theoretical aspects of, reaction dynamics. A large section is devoted to electronically excited states, ionic species, and free radicals, relevant to chemical sys­ tems. In addition recent advances in gas phase polymerization, formation of clusters, and energy release processes in energetic materials were presented. Selected papers deal with topics such as the dynamics of electric field effects in low polar solutions, high electric field perturbations and relaxation of dipole equilibria, correlation in picosecond/laser pulse scattering, and applications to fast reaction dynamics. Picosecond transient Raman spectroscopy which has been used for the elucidati...

  2. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaft, A. J.; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-04-01

    A treatment of a chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption, the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a very simple derivation of a number of key results in the chemical reaction network theory, and which directly relates to the thermodynamics and port-Hamiltonian formulation of the system. Central in this formulation is the definition of a balanced Laplacian matrix on the graph of chemical complexes together with a resulting fundamental inequality. This immediately leads to the characterisation of the set of equilibria and their stability. Furthermore, the assumption of complex balancedness is revisited from the point of view of Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem. Both the form of the dynamics and the deduced behaviour are very similar to consensus dynamics, and provide additional perspectives to the latter. Finally, using the classical idea of extending the graph of chemical complexes by a 'zero' complex, a complete steady-state stability analysis of mass action kinetics reaction networks with constant inflows and mass action kinetics outflows is given, and a unified framework is provided for structure-preserving model reduction of this important class of open reaction networks.

  3. Chronic nitrogen deposition influences the chemical dynamics ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition induces a forest carbon sink across broad parts of the Northern Hemisphere; this carbon sink may partly result from slower litter decomposition. Although microbial responses to experimental nitrogen deposition have been well-studied, evidence linking these microbial responses to changes in the degradation of specific compounds in decaying litter is sparse. We used wet chemistry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) methodologies to study the effects of chronic simulated nitrogen deposition on leaf litter and fine root chemistry during a three-year decomposition experiment at four northern hardwood forests in the north-central USA. Leaf litter and fine roots were highly different in initial chemistry such as concentrations of acid-insoluble fraction (AIF, or Klason lignin) and condensed tannins (CTs). These initial differences persisted over the course of decomposition. Results from gravimetrically-defined AIF and lignin/carbohydrate reference IR peak ratios both provide evidence that lignin in fine roots was selectively preserved under simulated nitrogen deposition. Lignin/carbohydrate peak ratios were strongly correlated with AIF, suggesting that AIF is a good predictor of lignin. Because AIF is abundant in fine roots, slower AIF degradation was the major driver of the slower fine root decomposition under nitrogen enrichment, explaining 73.9 % of the additional root mass retention. Nitrogen enrichment also slowed the

  4. Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed chemical-induced oxidative stress in occupational exposure in Nigerians. JI Anetor, SA Yaqub, GO Anetor, AC Nsonwu, FAA Adeniyi, S Fukushima. Abstract. Exposure to single chemicals and associated disorders in occupational environments has received significant attention. Understanding these events holds ...

  5. Fractal sets generated by chemical reactions discrete chaotic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontar, V.; Grechko, O.

    2007-01-01

    Fractal sets composed by the parameters values of difference equations derived from chemical reactions discrete chaotic dynamics (DCD) and corresponding to the sequences of symmetrical patterns were obtained in this work. Examples of fractal sets with the corresponding symmetrical patterns have been presented

  6. Control of chemical dynamics by lasers: theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondorskiy, Alexey; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2010-06-03

    Theoretical ideas are proposed for laser control of chemical dynamics. There are the following three elementary processes in chemical dynamics: (i) motion of the wave packet on a single adiabatic potential energy surface, (ii) excitation/de-excitation or pump/dump of wave packet, and (iii) nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections of potential energy surfaces. A variety of chemical dynamics can be controlled, if we can control these three elementary processes as we desire. For (i) we have formulated the semiclassical guided optimal control theory, which can be applied to multidimensional real systems. The quadratic or periodic frequency chirping method can achieve process (ii) with high efficiency close to 100%. Concerning process (iii) mentioned above, the directed momentum method, in which a predetermined momentum vector is given to the initial wave packet, makes it possible to enhance the desired transitions at conical intersections. In addition to these three processes, the intriguing phenomenon of complete reflection in the nonadiabatic-tunneling-type of potential curve crossing can also be used to control a certain class of chemical dynamics. The basic ideas and theoretical formulations are provided for the above-mentioned processes. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these controlling methods, numerical examples are shown by taking the following processes: (a) vibrational photoisomerization of HCN, (b) selective and complete excitation of the fine structure levels of K and Cs atoms, (c) photoconversion of cyclohexadiene to hexatriene, and (d) photodissociation of OHCl to O + HCl.

  7. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  9. A survey of chemicals inducing lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H

    1987-01-01

    A great number of drugs and chemicals are reviewed which have been shown to stimulate lipid peroxidation in any biological system. The underlying mechanisms, as far as known, are also dealt with. Lipid peroxidation induced by iron ions, organic hydroperoxides, halogenated hydrocarbons, redox cycling drugs, glutathione depleting chemicals, ethanol, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and a number of miscellaneous compounds, e.g. hydrazines, pesticides, antibiotics, are mentioned. It is shown that lipid peroxidation is stimulated by many of these compounds. However, quantitative estimates cannot be given yet and it is still impossible to judge the biological relevance of chemical-induced lipid peroxidation.

  10. Laser-induced chemical vapor deposition reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teslenko, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of investigation of chemical reactions of deposition of different substances from the gas phase when using the energy of pulse quasicontinuous and continuous radiation of lasers in the wave length interval from 0.193 to 10.6 μm are generalized. Main attetion is paid to deposition of inorganic substances including nonmetals (C, Si, Ge and others), metals (Cu, Au, Zn, Cd, Al, Cr, Mo, W, Ni) and some simple compounds. Experimental data on the effect of laser radiation parameters and reagent nature (hydrides, halogenides, carbonyls, alkyl organometallic compounds and others) on the deposition rate and deposit composition are described in detail. Specific features of laser-chemical reactions of deposition and prospects of their application are considered

  11. DYNSIR; A dynamic simulator for the chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Byeon, Kee Hoh; Park, Jeong Hwa; Park, Seong Won

    1990-03-01

    A program code for dynamic simulation of arbitrary chemical process, called DYNSIR, is developed. The code can simulate rather arbitrary arrangements of individual chemical processing units whose models are described by ordinary differential equations. The code structure to handle input/output, memory and data management, numerical interactive or predetermined changes in parameter values during the simulation. Individual model is easy to maintain since the modular approach is used. The integration routine is highly effective because of the development of algorithm for modular integration method using the cubic spline. DYNSIR's data structures are not the index but the pointer structure. This pointer structure allows the dynamic memory allocation for the memory management. The dynamic memory allocation methods is to minimize the amount of memories and to overcome the limitation of the number of variables to be used. Finally, it includes various functions, such as the input preprocessor, the effective error processing, and plotting and reporting routines. (author)

  12. Disorder-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massobrio, C. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique Experimentale); Pontikis, V.; Doan, N.V.; Martin, G. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires)

    The reaction of the crystalline compound NiZr{sub 2} to imposed chemical disorder has been studied by molecular dynamics in the isobaric canonical ensemble. The cohesive energy used is inspired by the second moment apporoximation of the local density of states in the tight binding model. Imposed chemical disorder induced swelling (3% for full disorder, 1% for 10% disorder). Above 10% disorder, the crystalline structure athermally collapses to an amorphous state which retains much of the local chemical order. (orig.).

  13. Disorder-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massobrio, C.; Pontikis, V.; Doan, N.V.; Martin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of the crystalline compound NiZr 2 to imposed chemical disorder has been studied by molecular dynamics in the isobaric canonical ensemble. The cohesive energy used is inspired by the second moment apporoximation of the local density of states in the tight binding model. Imposed chemical disorder induced swelling (3% for full disorder, 1% for 10% disorder). Above 10% disorder, the crystalline structure athermally collapses to an amorphous state which retains much of the local chemical order. (orig.)

  14. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  15. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  16. Dynamics of prebiotic RNA reproduction illuminated by chemical game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Jessica A M; Hilbe, Christian; Zwick, Martin; Nowak, Martin A; Lehman, Niles

    2016-05-03

    Many origins-of-life scenarios depict a situation in which there are common and potentially scarce resources needed by molecules that compete for survival and reproduction. The dynamics of RNA assembly in a complex mixture of sequences is a frequency-dependent process and mimics such scenarios. By synthesizing Azoarcus ribozyme genotypes that differ in their single-nucleotide interactions with other genotypes, we can create molecules that interact among each other to reproduce. Pairwise interplays between RNAs involve both cooperation and selfishness, quantifiable in a 2 × 2 payoff matrix. We show that a simple model of differential equations based on chemical kinetics accurately predicts the outcomes of these molecular competitions using simple rate inputs into these matrices. In some cases, we find that mixtures of different RNAs reproduce much better than each RNA type alone, reflecting a molecular form of reciprocal cooperation. We also demonstrate that three RNA genotypes can stably coexist in a rock-paper-scissors analog. Our experiments suggest a new type of evolutionary game dynamics, called prelife game dynamics or chemical game dynamics. These operate without template-directed replication, illustrating how small networks of RNAs could have developed and evolved in an RNA world.

  17. Dynamics of prebiotic RNA reproduction illuminated by chemical game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Jessica A. M.; Hilbe, Christian; Zwick, Martin; Nowak, Martin A.; Lehman, Niles

    2016-01-01

    Many origins-of-life scenarios depict a situation in which there are common and potentially scarce resources needed by molecules that compete for survival and reproduction. The dynamics of RNA assembly in a complex mixture of sequences is a frequency-dependent process and mimics such scenarios. By synthesizing Azoarcus ribozyme genotypes that differ in their single-nucleotide interactions with other genotypes, we can create molecules that interact among each other to reproduce. Pairwise interplays between RNAs involve both cooperation and selfishness, quantifiable in a 2 × 2 payoff matrix. We show that a simple model of differential equations based on chemical kinetics accurately predicts the outcomes of these molecular competitions using simple rate inputs into these matrices. In some cases, we find that mixtures of different RNAs reproduce much better than each RNA type alone, reflecting a molecular form of reciprocal cooperation. We also demonstrate that three RNA genotypes can stably coexist in a rock–paper–scissors analog. Our experiments suggest a new type of evolutionary game dynamics, called prelife game dynamics or chemical game dynamics. These operate without template-directed replication, illustrating how small networks of RNAs could have developed and evolved in an RNA world. PMID:27091972

  18. Dynamics and Control of Chemical Reactors-Selectively Surveyed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.; Jensen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical reactor or bioreactor is physically at a central position in a process, and often with a decisive role on the overall technical and economical performance. Even though application of feedback control on reactors is gaining momentum and on-line optimization has been implemented....... For bioreactors the theory and practice of reactor design, dynamics and control have to be adapted to the peculiarities of the biological catalysts. Enzymes, the protein catalysts, are the simplest ones, which have many common features with chemical catalysts. The living cells are much more complex, these growing...... in industry, many reactor control problems are still left unsolved or only partly solved using open loop strategies where disturbance rejection and model inaccuracies have to be handled through manual reactor control and feedback control of raw material preprocessing and product purification operations...

  19. Modeling dynamics of biological and chemical components of aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassiter, R.R.

    1975-05-01

    To provide capability to model aquatic ecosystems or their subsystems as needed for particular research goals, a modeling strategy was developed. Submodels of several processes common to aquatic ecosystems were developed or adapted from previously existing ones. Included are submodels for photosynthesis as a function of light and depth, biological growth rates as a function of temperature, dynamic chemical equilibrium, feeding and growth, and various types of losses to biological populations. These submodels may be used as modules in the construction of models of subsystems or ecosystems. A preliminary model for the nitrogen cycle subsystem was developed using the modeling strategy and applicable submodels. (U.S.)

  20. Chemical elements dynamic in the fermentation process of ethanol producing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepomuceno, N.; Nadai Fernandes, E.A. de; Bacchi, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides useful information about the dynamics of chemical elements analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and, found in the various segments of the fermentation process of producing ethanol from sugar cane. For this, a mass balance of Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Sm, and Th, terrigenous elements, as well as Br, K, Rb, and Zn, sugar cane plant elements, has been demonstrated for the fermentation vats in industrial conditions of ethanol production. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  1. DYNSYL: a general-purpose dynamic simulator for chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, G.K.; Rozsa, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is conducting a safeguards program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The goal of the Material Control Project of this program is to evaluate material control and accounting (MCA) methods in plants that handle special nuclear material (SNM). To this end we designed and implemented the dynamic chemical plant simulation program DYNSYL. This program can be used to generate process data or to provide estimates of process performance; it simulates both steady-state and dynamic behavior. The MCA methods that may have to be evaluated range from sophisticated on-line material trackers such as Kalman filter estimators, to relatively simple material balance procedures. This report describes the overall structure of DYNSYL and includes some example problems. The code is still in the experimental stage and revision is continuing

  2. A model for chemically-induced mechanical loading on MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiot, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain, and displac......The development of full displacement field measurements as an alternative to the optical lever technique to measure the mechanical response for microelectro-mechanical systems components in their environment calls for a modeling of chemically-induced mechanical fields (stress, strain...... of the system free energy and its dependence on the surface amount. It is solved in the cantilever case thanks to an asymptotic analysis, and an approached closed-form solution is obtained for the interfacial stress field. Finally, some conclusions regarding the transducer efficiency of cantilevers are drawn...

  3. On the Chemical Mixing Induced by Internal Gravity Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T. M. [School of Mathematics, Statistics and Physics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); McElwaine, J. N. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    Detailed modeling of stellar evolution requires a better understanding of the (magneto)hydrodynamic processes that mix chemical elements and transport angular momentum. Understanding these processes is crucial if we are to accurately interpret observations of chemical abundance anomalies, surface rotation measurements, and asteroseismic data. Here, we use two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the generation and propagation of internal gravity waves in an intermediate-mass star to measure the chemical mixing induced by these waves. We show that such mixing can generally be treated as a diffusive process. We then show that the local diffusion coefficient does not depend on the local fluid velocity, but rather on the wave amplitude. We then use these findings to provide a simple parameterization for this diffusion, which can be incorporated into stellar evolution codes and tested against observations.

  4. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinandus

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing. A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects.

  5. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandus; Arai, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Suzuki, Madoka; Sato, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action) and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing). A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects.

  6. Chemical determination of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, M

    1991-01-01

    Free radical-induced damage to DNA in vivo can result in deleterious biological consequences such as the initiation and promotion of cancer. Chemical characterization and quantitation of such DNA damage is essential for an understanding of its biological consequences and cellular repair. Methodologies incorporating the technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have been developed in recent years for measurement of free radical-induced DNA damage. The use of GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM) facilitates unequivocal identification and quantitation of a large number of products of all four DNA bases produced in DNA by reactions with hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron, and H atom. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA-protein cross-links in mammalian chromatin, and products of the sugar moiety in DNA are also unequivocally identified and quantitated. The sensitivity and selectivity of the GC/MS-SIM technique enables the measurement of DNA base products even in isolated mammalian chromatin without the necessity of first isolating DNA, and despite the presence of histones. Recent results reviewed in this article demonstrate the usefulness of the GC/MS technique for chemical determination of free radical-induced DNA damage in DNA as well as in mammalian chromatin under a vast variety of conditions of free radical production.

  7. Redox Active Transition Metal ions Make Melanin Susceptible to Chemical Degradation Induced by Organic Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Pilat, Anna; Sarna, Michal; Pawlak, Anna; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2017-12-01

    With aging, retinal pigment epithelium melanosomes, by fusion with the age pigment lipofuscin, form complex granules called melanolipofuscin. Lipofuscin granules may contain oxidized proteins and lipid hydroperoxides, which in melanolipofuscin could chemically modify melanin polymer, while transition metal ions present in melanin can accelerate such oxidative modifications. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of selected transition metal ions on melanin susceptibility to chemical modification induced by the water-soluble tert-butyl hydroperoxide used as an oxidizing agent. Synthetic melanin obtained by DOPA autooxidation and melanosomes isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium were analyzed. To monitor tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative changes of DMa and BMs, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry were employed. These measurements revealed that both copper and iron ions accelerated chemical degradation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, while zinc ions had no effect. Strong prooxidant action was detected only in the case of melanosomes and melanin degraded in the presence of iron. It can be postulated that similar chemical processes, if they occur in situ in melanolipofuscin granules of the human retinal pigment epithelium, would modify antioxidant properties of melanin and its reactivity.

  8. In situ analysis of chemical components induced by steaming between fresh ginseng, steamed ginseng, and red ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyo In

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: This study elucidates the dynamic changes in the chemical components of P. ginseng when the steaming process was induced. These results are thought to be helpful for quality control and standardization of herbal drugs using P. ginseng and they also provide a scientific basis for pharmacological research of processed ginseng (Red ginseng.

  9. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R., E-mail: mundy.william@epa.gov

    2011-11-15

    cultures were more sensitive to neurite outgrowth inhibitors, they also had a lower dynamic range for detecting chemical-induced neurite outgrowth inhibition and greater variability from culture-to-culture as compared to rat primary cortical cultures.

  10. Comparative sensitivity of human and rat neural cultures to chemical-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrill, Joshua A.; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Robinette, Brian L.; Mundy, William R.

    2011-01-01

    cultures were more sensitive to neurite outgrowth inhibitors, they also had a lower dynamic range for detecting chemical-induced neurite outgrowth inhibition and greater variability from culture-to-culture as compared to rat primary cortical cultures.

  11. Mechanisms of shock-induced dynamic friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, R E; Ball, G J; Keightley, P T

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism of shock-induced dynamic friction has been explored through an integrated programme of experiments and numerical simulations. A novel experimental technique has been developed for observing the sub-surface deformation in aluminium when sliding against a steel anvil at high velocity and pressure. The experimental observations suggest that slight differences in conditions at the interface between the metals affect frictional behaviour even at the very high-velocity, high-pressure regime studied here. However, a clear finding from the experimental work is the presence of two distinct modes of deformation termed deep and shallow. The deep deformation is observed in a region of the aluminium specimen where the interfacial velocity is relatively low and the shallow deformation is observed in a region where the interfacial velocity is higher. A 1D numerical treatment is presented which predicts the existence of two mechanisms for dynamic friction termed 'asymptotic melting' and 'slide-then-lock'. In both modes there is a warm-up phase in which the interface temperature is increased by frictional heating. For high initial sliding velocity, this is followed by the onset of the asymptotic melting state, in which the temperature is almost constant and melting is approached asymptotically. This mechanism produces low late-time frictional stress and shallow deformation. For lower initial sliding velocity, the warm-up terminates in a violent work hardening event that locks the interface and launches a strong plastic shear wave into the weaker material. This slide-then-lock mechanism is characterized by sustained high frictional stress and deep plastic deformation. These predicted mechanisms offer a plausible and consistent explanation for the abrupt transitions in the depth of sub-surface deformation observed in the experiments. A key conclusion arising from the current work is that the frictional stress does not vary smoothly with pressure or sliding velocity

  12. Moisture-induced solid state instabilities in α-chymotrypsin and their reduction through chemical glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solá Ricardo J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein instability remains the main factor limiting the development of protein therapeutics. The fragile nature (structurally and chemically of proteins makes them susceptible to detrimental events during processing, storage, and delivery. To overcome this, proteins are often formulated in the solid-state which combines superior stability properties with reduced operational costs. Nevertheless, solid protein pharmaceuticals can also suffer from instability problems due to moisture sorption. Chemical protein glycosylation has evolved into an important tool to overcome several instability issues associated with proteins. Herein, we employed chemical glycosylation to stabilize a solid-state protein formulation against moisture-induced deterioration in the lyophilized state. Results First, we investigated the consequences of moisture sorption on the stability and structural conformation of the model enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT under controlled humidity conditions. Results showed that α-CT aggregates and inactivates as a function of increased relative humidity (RH. Furthermore, α-CT loses its native secondary and tertiary structure rapidly at increasing RH. In addition, H/D exchange studies revealed that α-CT structural dynamics increased at increasing RH. The magnitude of the structural changes in tendency parallels the solid-state instability data (i.e., formation of buffer-insoluble aggregates, inactivation, and loss of native conformation upon reconstitution. To determine if these moisture-induced instability issues could be ameliorated by chemical glycosylation we proceeded to modify our model protein with chemically activated glycans of differing lengths (lactose and dextran (10 kDa. The various glycoconjugates showed a marked decrease in aggregation and an increase in residual activity after incubation. These stabilization effects were found to be independent of the glycan size. Conclusion Water sorption leads to

  13. Dynamic Chemically Driven Dewetting, Spreading, and Self-Running of Sessile Droplets on Crystalline Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arscott, Steve

    2016-12-06

    A chemically driven dewetting effect is demonstrated using sessile droplets of dilute hydrofluoric acid on chemically oxidized silicon wafers. The dewetting occurs as the thin oxide is slowly etched by the droplet and replaced by a hydrogen-terminated surface; the result of this is a gradual increase in the contact angle of the droplet with time. The time-varying work of adhesion is calculated from the time-varying contact angle; this corresponds to the changing chemical nature of the surface during dewetting and can be modeled by the well-known logistic (sigmoid) function often used for the modeling of restricted growth, in this case, the transition from an oxidized surface to a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. The observation of the time-varying contact angle allows one to both measure the etch rate of the silicon oxide and estimate the hydrogenation rate as a function of HF concentration and wafer type. In addition to this, at a certain HF concentration, a self-running droplet effect is observed. In contrast, on hydrogen-terminated silicon wafers, a chemically induced spreading effect is observed using sessile droplets of nitric acid. The droplet spreading can also be modeled using a logistical function, where the restricted growth is the transition from hydrogen-terminated to a chemically induced oxidized silicon surface. The chemically driven dewetting and spreading observed here add to the methods available to study dynamic wetting (e.g., the moving three-phase contact line) of sessile droplets on surfaces. By slowing down chemical kinetics of the wetting, one is able to record the changing profile of the sessile droplet with time and gather information concerning the time-varying surface chemistry. The data also indicates a chemical interface hysteresis (CIH) that is compared to contact angle hysteresis (CAH). The approach can also be used to study the chemical etching and deposition behavior of thin films using liquids by monitoring the macroscopic

  14. Direct single-molecule dynamic detection of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jianxin; Jia, Chuancheng; Li, Yanwei; Liu, Zitong; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Zhongyue; Gu, Chunhui; Su, Dingkai; Houk, Kendall N; Zhang, Deqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule detection can reveal time trajectories and reaction pathways of individual intermediates/transition states in chemical reactions and biological processes, which is of fundamental importance to elucidate their intrinsic mechanisms. We present a reliable, label-free single-molecule approach that allows us to directly explore the dynamic process of basic chemical reactions at the single-event level by using stable graphene-molecule single-molecule junctions. These junctions are constructed by covalently connecting a single molecule with a 9-fluorenone center to nanogapped graphene electrodes. For the first time, real-time single-molecule electrical measurements unambiguously show reproducible large-amplitude two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on solvent environments in a nucleophilic addition reaction of hydroxylamine to a carbonyl group. Both theoretical simulations and ensemble experiments prove that this observation originates from the reversible transition between the reactant and a new intermediate state within a time scale of a few microseconds. These investigations open up a new route that is able to be immediately applied to probe fast single-molecule physics or biophysics with high time resolution, making an important contribution to broad fields beyond reaction chemistry.

  15. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    of the exchanging species can be determined independently of the relaxation rates. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by a detailed analysis of the conformational exchange processes previously observed in the reduced form of the blue copper protein, plastocyanin from the cyanobacteria Anabaena......An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  16. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabitz, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  17. Kinetics of electrically and chemically induced swelling in polyelectrolyte gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, P. E.; Nussbaum, J. H.; Grodzinsky, A. J.; Yarmush, M. L.

    1990-09-01

    Controlled swelling and shrinking of polyelectrolyte gels is useful for regulating the transport of solutes into, out of, and through these materials. A macroscopic continuum model is presented to predict the kinetics of swelling in polyelectrolyte gel membranes induced by augmentation of electrostatic swelling forces arising from membrane fixed charge groups. The model accounts for ionic transport within the membrane, electrodiffusion phenomena, dissociation of membrane charge groups, intramembrane fluid flow, and mechanical deformation of the membrane matrix. Model predictions are compared with measurements of chemically and electrically induced swelling and shrinking in crosslinked polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) membranes. Large, reversible changes in PMAA membrane hydration were observed after changing the bath pH or by applying an electric field to modify the intramembrane ionic environment and fixed charge density. A relatively slow swelling process and more rapid shrinking for both chemical and electrical modulation of the intramembrane pH are observed. The model indicates that retardation of membrane swelling is dominated by diffusion-limited reaction of H+ ions with membrane charge groups, and that the more rapid shrinking is limited primarily by mechanical processes.

  18. EXAFS characterization of supported metal catalysts in chemically dynamic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robota, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Characterization of catalysts focuses on the identification of an active site responsible for accelerating desirable chemical reactions. The identification, characterization, and selective modification of such sites is fundamental to the development of structure-function relationships. Unfortunately, this goal is far from realized in nearly all catalysts, and particularly in catalysts comprised of small supported metal particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has had a dramatic effect on our understanding of supported metal particles in their resting state. However, the performance of a catalyst can not be assessed from such simple resting state measurements. Among the factors which influence catalyst performance are the exact catalyst composition, including the support and any modifiers; particle size; catalyst finishing and pretreatment conditions; pressure, composition, and temperature of the operating environment; time. Gaining an understanding of how the structure of a catalytic site can change with such an array of variables requires that we begin to develop measurement methods which are effective under chemically dynamic conditions. Ideally, it should be possible to obtain a full X-ray absorption spectrum of each element thought to have a causal relationship with observed catalyst properties. From these spectra, we can optimally extract only a relatively limited amount of information which we must then piece together with information derived from other characterization methods and intuition to arrive at a hypothetical structure of the operating catalyst. Information about crystallinity, homogeneity, and general disorder can be obtained from the Debye-Waller factor. Finally, through analogy with known compounds, the electronic structure of the active atoms can be inferred from near edge absorption features

  19. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  20. Geometric origin of dynamically induced freezing of quantum evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos-Abiague, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of dynamical, field-induced freezing of quantum evolution is discussed. It occurs when a time-dependent state is dynamically driven in such a way that the evolution of the corresponding wave function is effectively localized within a small region in the projective Hilbert space. As a consequence, the dynamics of the system is frozen and the expectation values of all physical observables hardly change with time. Necessary and sufficient conditions for inducing dynamical freezing are inferred from a general analysis of the geometry of quantum evolution. The relevance of the dynamical freezing for a sustainable in time, dynamical control is discussed and exemplified by a study of the coherent control of the kicked rotor motion

  1. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  2. Formation dynamics of UV and EUV induced hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolgov, A.A.; Lee, Christopher James; Yakushev, O.; Lopaev, D.V.; Abrikosov, A.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Zotovich, A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-01-01

    The comparative study of the dynamics of ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) induced hydrogen plasma was performed. It was shown that for low H2 pressures and bias voltages, the dynamics of the two plasmas are significantly different. In the case of UV radiation, the plasma above the

  3. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  4. Chemical-induced disease relation extraction with various linguistic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinghang; Qian, Longhua; Zhou, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relations between chemicals and diseases is crucial in various biomedical tasks such as new drug discoveries and new therapy developments. While manually mining these relations from the biomedical literature is costly and time-consuming, such a procedure is often difficult to keep up-to-date. To address these issues, the BioCreative-V community proposed a challenging task of automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease (CID) relations in order to benefit biocuration. This article describes our work on the CID relation extraction task on the BioCreative-V tasks. We built a machine learning based system that utilized simple yet effective linguistic features to extract relations with maximum entropy models. In addition to leveraging various features, the hypernym relations between entity concepts derived from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)-controlled vocabulary were also employed during both training and testing stages to obtain more accurate classification models and better extraction performance, respectively. We demoted relation extraction between entities in documents to relation extraction between entity mentions. In our system, pairs of chemical and disease mentions at both intra- and inter-sentence levels were first constructed as relation instances for training and testing, then two classification models at both levels were trained from the training examples and applied to the testing examples. Finally, we merged the classification results from mention level to document level to acquire final relations between chemicals and diseases. Our system achieved promisingF-scores of 60.4% on the development dataset and 58.3% on the test dataset using gold-standard entity annotations, respectively. Database URL:https://github.com/JHnlp/BC5CIDTask. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Chemically induced and light-independent cryptochrome photoreceptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Gesa; Viana, Rafael Muñoz; Mootz, Henning D; von Arnim, Albrecht G; Batschauer, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The cryptochrome photoreceptors of higher plants are dimeric proteins. Their N-terminal photosensory domain mediates dimerization, and the unique C-terminal extension (CCT) mediates signaling. We made use of the human FK506-binding protein (FKBP) that binds with high affinity to rapamycin or rapamycin analogs (rapalogs). The FKBP-rapamycin complex is recognized by another protein, FRB, thus allowing rapamycin-induced dimerization of two target proteins. Here we demonstrate by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays the applicability of this regulated dimerization system to plants. Furthermore, we show that fusion proteins consisting of the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 fused to FKBP and FRB and coexpressed in Arabidopsis cells specifically induce the expression of cryptochrome-controlled reporter and endogenous genes in darkness upon incubation with the rapalog. These results demonstrate that the activation of cryptochrome signal transduction can be chemically induced in a dose-dependent fashion and uncoupled from the light signal, and provide the groundwork for gain-of-function experiments to study specifically the role of photoreceptors in darkness or in signaling cross-talk even under light conditions that activate members of all photoreceptor families.

  6. Dynamical chaos and induced nuclear fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotin, Yu L; Krivoshej, I V

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the exponential instability of trajectories, which arises at negative curvature of the potential energy surface, leads to diffusion of the image point through the barrier and determines real time delays in induced nuclear fission.

  7. Development of a quantum chemical molecular dynamics tribochemical simulator and its application to tribochemical reaction dynamics of lubricant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, T; Tsuboi, H; Hatakeyama, N; Endou, A; Miyamoto, A; Miura, R; Takaba, H; Suzuki, A; Kubo, M

    2010-01-01

    Tribology at the atomistic and molecular levels has been theoretically studied by a classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. However, this method inherently cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics because it does not consider the electrons in nature. Although the first-principles based MD method has recently been used for understanding the chemical reaction dynamics of several molecules in the tribology field, the method cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system including solid surfaces and interfaces due to its huge computation costs. On the other hand, we have developed a quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator on the basis of a hybrid tight-binding quantum chemical/classical MD method. In the simulator, the central part of the chemical reaction dynamics is calculated by the tight-binding quantum chemical MD method, and the remaining part is calculated by the classical MD method. Therefore, the developed tribochemical simulator realizes the study on tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system, which cannot be treated by using the conventional classical MD or the first-principles MD methods. In this paper, we review our developed quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator and its application to the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a few lubricant additives

  8. Shock-induced hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in PETN containing a spherical void

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Thompson, Aidan P

    2014-01-01

    We present results of reactive molecular dynamics simulations of hotspot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shock-induced compression of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) with the ReaxFF reactive force field. A supported shockwave is driven through a PETN crystal containing a 20 nm spherical void at a sub-threshold impact velocity of 2 km/s. Formation of a hotspot due to shock-induced void collapse is observed. During void collapse, NO 2 is the dominant species ejected from the upstream void surface. Once the ejecta collide with the downstream void surface and the hotspot develops, formation of final products such as N 2 and H 2 O is observed. The simulation provides a detailed picture of how void collapse and hotspot formation leads to initiation at sub-threshold impact velocities.

  9. Self-induced temperature gradients in Brownian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Jack; Jack, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    Brownian systems often surmount energy barriers by absorbing and emitting heat to and from their local environment. Usually, the temperature gradients created by this heat exchange are assumed to dissipate instantaneously. Here we relax this assumption to consider the case where Brownian dynamics on a time-independent potential can lead to self-induced temperature gradients. In the same way that externally imposed temperature gradients can cause directed motion, these self-induced gradients affect the dynamics of the Brownian system. The result is a coupling between the local environment and the Brownian subsystem. We explore the resulting dynamics and thermodynamics of these coupled systems and develop a robust method for numerical simulation. In particular, by focusing on one-dimensional situations, we show that self-induced temperature gradients reduce barrier-crossing rates. We also consider a heat engine and a heat pump based on temperature gradients induced by a Brownian system in a nonequilibrium potential.

  10. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Chemical industrial areas and their dynamic danger behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Genserik L L; Audenaert, Amaryllis; Dullaert, W.; Soudan, K.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical industrial areas or so-called chemical clusters consist of various companies situated next to each other. Such areas are composed of hundreds of chemical installations exhibiting danger to a certain degree for initiating or continuing knock-on effects. In this paper, a methodology to model

  12. Dynamic Processes of Conceptual Change: Analysis of Constructing Mental Models of Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Hung; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2002-01-01

    Investigates students' mental models of chemical equilibrium using dynamic science assessments. Reports that students at various levels have misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. Involves 10th grade students (n=30) in the study doing a series of hands-on chemical experiments. Focuses on the process of constructing mental models, dynamic…

  13. Thermodiffusion as a means to manipulate liquid film dynamics on chemically patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpathy, Sreeram K; Shreyes, Amrita Ravi

    2017-06-07

    The model problem examined here is the stability of a thin liquid film consisting of two miscible components, resting on a chemically patterned solid substrate and heated from below. In addition to surface tension gradients, the temperature variations also induce gradients in the concentration of the film by virtue of thermodiffusion/Soret effects. We study the stability and dewetting behaviour due to the coupled interplay between thermal gradients, Soret effects, long-range van der Waals forces, and wettability gradient-driven flows. Linear stability analysis is first employed to predict growth rates and the critical Marangoni number for chemically homogeneous surfaces. Then, nonlinear simulations are performed to unravel the interfacial dynamics and possible locations of the film rupture on chemically patterned substrates. Results suggest that appropriate tuning of the Soret parameter and its direction, in conjunction with either heating or cooling, can help manipulate the location and time scales of the film rupture. The Soret effect can either potentially aid or oppose film instability depending on whether the thermal and solutal contributions to flow are cooperative or opposed to each other.

  14. Chemical changes in titanate surfaces induced by Ar+ ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.; Fernandez, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Munuera, G.; Sanz, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The reduction effects and compositional changes induced by 3.5 keV Ar + bombardment of several titanates (i.e. SrTiO 3 , Al 2 TiO 5 and NiTiO 3 ) have been quantitatively investigated by XPS. In all the samples studied here the original Ti 4+ species were reduced to lower oxidation states (i.e. Ti 3+ and Ti 2+ ), although to a lesser extent than in pure TiO 2 . On the contrary, whereas Sr 2+ and Al 3+ seem to remain unaffected by Ar + bombardment, in agreement with the behaviour of the respective oxides (i.e. SrO and Al 2 O 3 ), Ni 2+ appears more easily reducible to Ni o in NiTiO 3 than in NiO. In addition, other specific differences were observed between the titanates, which reveal the existence of interesting chemical effects related to the presence of the different counter-ions in the titanates. In the case of Al 2 TiO 5 , its Ar + -induced decomposition to form TiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 could be followed by XPS. (Author)

  15. Chemical reactions induced and probed by positive muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuo

    1990-01-01

    The application of μ + science, collectively called μSR, but encompassing a variety of methods including muon spin rotation, muon spin relaxation, muon spin repolarization, muon spin resonance and level-crossing resonance, to chemistry is introduced emphasizing the special aspects of processes which are 'induced and probed' by the μ + itself. After giving a general introduction to the nature and methods of muon science and a short history of muon chemistry, selected topics are given. One concerns the usefulness of muonium as hydrogen-like probes of chemical reactions taking polymerization of vinyl monomers and reaction with thiosulphate as examples. Probing solitons in polyacetylene induced and probed by μ + is also an important example which shows the unique nature of muonium. Another important topic is 'lost polarization'. Although this term is particular to muonium. Another important topic is 'lost polarization'. Although this term is particular to muon chemistry, the chemistry underlining the phenomenon of lost polarization has an importance to both radiation and hot atom chemistries. (orig.)

  16. Current-induced magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertotti, G.; Serpico, C.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Bonin, R.; D'Aquino, M.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the various approaches that have been proposed for the interpretation of spin-transfer-driven magnetization dynamics. Models of critical currents and critical fields for switching as well as for the onset of magnetization oscillations are discussed, together with methods for the construction of field-current stability diagrams. Finally, the role of thermal fluctuations is analyzed. Particular emphasis is given to the study of uniformly magnetized nanomagnets, which represents an essential step before moving to the numerical computation of more complex micromagnetic configurations

  17. Current-induced magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertotti, G. [INRIM-Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: g.bertotti@inrim.it; Serpico, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Universita degli Studi Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bonin, R. [INRIM-Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); D' Aquino, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Universita degli Studi Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    An overview is given of the various approaches that have been proposed for the interpretation of spin-transfer-driven magnetization dynamics. Models of critical currents and critical fields for switching as well as for the onset of magnetization oscillations are discussed, together with methods for the construction of field-current stability diagrams. Finally, the role of thermal fluctuations is analyzed. Particular emphasis is given to the study of uniformly magnetized nanomagnets, which represents an essential step before moving to the numerical computation of more complex micromagnetic configurations.

  18. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  19. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Caretta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440  GeV/c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ∼45  μm diameter spheres (not compacted reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45  μm grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250  μm mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  20. New model for surface fracture induced by dynamical stress

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, J. V.; Lewis, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a model where an isotropic, dynamically-imposed stress induces fracture in a thin film. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study how the integrated fragment distribution function depends on the rate of change and magnitude of the imposed stress, as well as on temperature. A mean-field argument shows that the system becomes unstable for a critical value of the stress. We find a striking invariance of the distribution of fragments for fixed ratio of temperature and rate of ch...

  1. Quantifying seismic anisotropy induced by small-scale chemical heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, C.; Bodin, T.; Ricard, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Debayle, E.; Montagner, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy are usually used as a proxy for lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of anisotropic minerals in the Earth's mantle. In this way, seismic anisotropy observed in tomographic models provides important constraints on the geometry of mantle deformation associated with thermal convection and plate tectonics. However, in addition to LPO, small-scale heterogeneities that cannot be resolved by long-period seismic waves may also produce anisotropy. The observed (i.e. apparent) anisotropy is then a combination of an intrinsic and an extrinsic component. Assuming the Earth's mantle exhibits petrological inhomogeneities at all scales, tomographic models built from long-period seismic waves may thus display extrinsic anisotropy. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the amplitude of seismic heterogeneities and the level of induced S-wave radial anisotropy as seen by long-period seismic waves. We generate some simple 1-D and 2-D isotropic models that exhibit a power spectrum of heterogeneities as what is expected for the Earth's mantle, that is, varying as 1/k, with k the wavenumber of these heterogeneities. The 1-D toy models correspond to simple layered media. In the 2-D case, our models depict marble-cake patterns in which an anomaly in shear wave velocity has been advected within convective cells. The long-wavelength equivalents of these models are computed using upscaling relations that link properties of a rapidly varying elastic medium to properties of the effective, that is, apparent, medium as seen by long-period waves. The resulting homogenized media exhibit extrinsic anisotropy and represent what would be observed in tomography. In the 1-D case, we analytically show that the level of anisotropy increases with the square of the amplitude of heterogeneities. This relation is numerically verified for both 1-D and 2-D media. In addition, we predict that 10 per cent of chemical heterogeneities in 2-D marble-cake models can

  2. Dynamic Behavior of Fault Slip Induced by Stress Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-an Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault slip burst is a serious dynamic hazard in coal mining. A static and dynamic analysis for fault slip was performed to assess the risk of rock burst. A numerical model FLAC3D was established to understand the stress state and mechanical responses of fault rock system. The results obtained from the analysis show that the dynamic behavior of fault slip induced by stress waves is significantly affected by mining depth, as well as dynamic disturbance intensity and the distance between the stope and the fault. The isolation effect of the fault is also discussed based on the numerical results with the fault angle appearing to have the strongest influence on peak vertical stress and velocity induced by dynamic disturbance. By taking these risks into account, a stress-relief technology using break-tip blast was used for fault slip burst control. This technique is able to reduce the stress concentration and increase the attenuation of dynamic load by fracturing the structure of coal and rock. The adoption of this stress-relief method leads to an effective reduction of fault slip induced rock burst (FSIRB occurrence.

  3. Noise-induced effects in population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Bernardo; Cirone, Markus; La Barbera, Antonino; de Pasquale, Ferdinando

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of noise in the nonlinear relaxation of two ecosystems described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of multiplicative noise. Specifically we study two cases: (i) an ecosystem with two interacting species in the presence of periodic driving; (ii) an ecosystem with a great number of interacting species with random interaction matrix. We analyse the interplay between noise and periodic modulation for case (i) and the role of the noise in the transient dynamics of the ecosystem in the presence of an absorbing barrier in case (ii). We find that the presence of noise is responsible for the generation of temporal oscillations and for the appearance of spatial patterns in the first case. In the other case we obtain the asymptotic behaviour of the time average of the ith population and discuss the effect of the noise on the probability distributions of the population and of the local field.

  4. Fusion dynamics in 40Ca induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, E.; Hinde, D.J.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of superheavy elements (SHEs) and investigation of their properties are among the most challenging research topics in modern science. A non-compound nuclear process called quasi fission is partly responsible for the very low production cross sections of SHEs. The formation and survival probabilities of the compound nucleus (CN) strongly depend on the competition between fusion and quasi fission. A clear understanding of these processes and their dynamics is required to make reliable predictions of the best reactions to synthesise new SHEs. All elements beyond Nh are produced using hot fusion reactions and beams of 48 Ca were used in most of these experiments. In this context a series of fission measurements have been carried out at the Australian National University (ANU) using 40;48 Ca beams on various targets ranging from 142 Nd to 249 Cf. Some of the 40 Ca reactions will be discussed in this symposium

  5. Dynamics of current induced nano-skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Rajamani, Amuda, E-mail: amuacademics@gmail.com; Arumugam, Brinda

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • We have revised and organised section II. • The expression for H{sub eff} is now expressed clearly. • We have added Appendix which explains the derivation of the solution and the occurrence of the oscillatory factor. - Abstract: The dynamics of magnetic skyrmions is investigated in a composite free layer spin valve nano pillar for different coupling mechanisms in the absence of Dzyaloshinski-Moriya Interaction (DMI). Nano meter sized skyrmions and anti skyrmions are trapped with different helices in the free layer. The spin polarised current under specific choice of system parameters changes the droplet solitons into skyrmions and anti skyrmions. The current driven dynamics is studied and the condition at which an isolated skyrmion exists, is reported. We have optimised the current density (J) and spin wave vector (k) for which Skyrmion Hall Effect (SHE) completely vanishes and as a result the velocity, size and shape of skyrmions are preserved. When the coupling between the composite free layers is changed, skyrmion-anti skyrmion pair and radial skyrmion-chiral skyrmion pair emerge. For the specific values of ‘J’ and ‘k’ these pairs show coupled motion along the layer and hence these pairs could also be used as a bit in the data processing and storage devices. Our investigation ascertains that a single material can host all the localised magnetic structures if the current density, spin wave vector and coupling constant are suitably chosen and tuned. This study would really be of fundamental importance owing to the possible applications in information processing and data storage in skyrmion based logic circuits and magnetic sensors.

  6. Dynamically induced many-body localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonwon; Abanin, Dmitry A.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2018-03-01

    We show that a quantum phase transition from ergodic to many-body localized (MBL) phases can be induced via periodic pulsed manipulation of spin systems. Such a transition is enabled by the interplay between weak disorder and slow heating rates. Specifically, we demonstrate that the Hamiltonian of a weakly disordered ergodic spin system can be effectively engineered, by using sufficiently fast coherent controls, to yield a stable MBL phase, which in turn completely suppresses the energy absorption from external control field. Our results imply that a broad class of existing many-body systems can be used to probe nonequilibrium phases of matter for a long time, limited only by coupling to external environment.

  7. Concepts in causality: chemically induced human urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower, G.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A significant portion of the incidence of human urinary bladder cancer can be attributed to occupational and cultural (tobacco smoking) situations associated with exposures to various arylamines, many of which represent established human carcinogens. A brief historical overview of research in bladder cancer causality indicates that the identification of causal agents and causal mechanism has been approached and rests upon information gathered at the organismal (geographical/historical), cellular, and molecular levels of biologic organization. This viewpoint speaks of a natural evolution within the biomedical sciences; a natural evolution from descriptive approaches to mechanistic approaches; and a natural evolution from more or less independent discipline-oriented approaches to hierarchically organized multidisciplinary approaches. Available information relevant to bladder cancer causality can be readily integrated into general conceptual frameworks to yield a hierarchial view of the natural history of urinary bladder cancer, a view consistent with contemporary natural systems and information theory and perhaps relevant also to other chemically induced epithelial cancers. Such frameworks are useful in appreciating the spatial and temporal boundaries and interrelationships in causality and the conceptual interrelationships within the biomedical sciences. Recent approaches in molecular epidemiology and the assessment of relative individual susceptibility to bladder cancer indicate that such frameworks are useful in forming hypotheses

  8. Radiation induced chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Shun-ichi; Nishii, Masanobu

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies of radiation induced chemical reactions of CO-H 2 mixture have revealed that the yields of oxygen containing products were larger than those of hydrocarbons. In the present study, methane was added to CO-H 2 mixture in order to increase further the yields of the oxygen containing products. The yields of most products except a few products such as formaldehyde increased with the addition of small amount of methane. Especially, the yields of trioxane and tetraoxane gave the maximum values when CO-H 2 mixture containing 1 mol% methane was irradiated. When large amounts of methane were added to the mixture, the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids having more than two carbon atoms increased, whereas those of trioxane and tetraoxane decreased. From the study at reaction temperature over the range of 200 to 473 K, it was found that the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids showed maxima at 323 K. The studies on the effects of addition of cationic scavenger (NH 3 ) and radical scavenger (O 2 ) on the products yields were also carried out on the CO-H 2 -CH 4 mixture. (author)

  9. Inducible Laryngeal Obstruction: Excessive Dynamic Airway Collapse vs. Inducible Laryngeal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-20

    REPORT TYPE 10/20/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inducible Laryngeal Obstrnction: Excessive Dynamic Airway Collapse vs. Inducible Laryngeal...REPORT b.ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE ABSTRACT OF PAGES 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  10. Dynamically induced Planck scale and inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannike, Kristjan [NICPB,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Hütsi, Gert [Tartu Observatory,Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia); Pizza, Liberato [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa and INFN,Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Racioppi, Antonio [NICPB,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Raidal, Martti [NICPB,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu,Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Salvio, Alberto [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid andInstituto de Física Teórica IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Strumia, Alessandro [NICPB,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa and INFN,Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-13

    Theories where the Planck scale is dynamically generated from dimensionless interactions provide predictive inflationary potentials and super-Planckian field variations. We first study the minimal single field realisation in the low-energy effective field theory limit, finding the predictions n{sub s}≈0.96 for the spectral index and r≈0.13 for the tensor-to-scalar ratio, which can be reduced down to ≈0.04 in presence of large couplings. Next we consider agravity as a dimensionless quantum gravity theory finding a multifield inflation that converges towards an attractor trajectory and predicts n{sub s}≈0.96 and 0.003

  11. Photocatalytic oxidation dynamics of acetone on TiO2: tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Chen; Wang Xiaojing; Agalya, Govindasamy; Koyama, Michihisa; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    The clarification of the excited states dynamics on TiO 2 surface is important subject for the design of the highly active photocatalysts. In the present study, we applied our novel tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method to the investigation on the photocatalytic oxidation dynamics of acetone by photogenerated OH radicals on the hydrated anatase TiO 2 surface. The elucidated photocatalytic reaction mechanism strongly supports the previous experimental proposal and finally the effectiveness of our new approach for the clarification of the photocatalytic reaction dynamics employing the large simulation model was confirmed

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopy-nuclear hyperfine technique for studying dynamic chemical states of iron complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A brief introduction of Moessbauer spectroscopy will be presented, followed by a discussion of the Moessbauer parameters, isomer shifts, quadrupole splittings, and spectral shapes of complexes in the presence of relaxation of the electronic states of the iron atoms. The usefulness of Moessbauer spectroscopy to demonstrate the dynamic phenomena of electronic states will be discussed in this lecture. (1) The Moessbauer spectra of mixed valence dinuclear and trinuclear iron complexes will be discussed in connection with the chemical structure of the complexes: The values of the quadrupole splittings and isomer shifts of [Fe II Fe III (bpmp) (ppa) 2 ](BF 4 ) 2 increase on raising the temperature, where Hbpmp represents 2,6-bis[bis(2- pyridylmethyl)aminoethyl]-4-methylphenol and ppa is 3-n-phenylpropionic acid. The spectra can be accounted for by postulating intramolecular electron exchange between two energetically inequivalent vibronic states Fe A 2+ Fe B 3+ and Fe A 3+ Fe B 2+ : The apparent time averaged valence states of the iron atoms are 2.2 and 2.8 on the Moessbauer time scale at 293 K. (2) The Moessbauer spectra of iron(III) spin-crossover complexes will be discussed in connection with the spin-transition rate and chemical structure of the complexes. The Moessbauer spectra of spin-crossover iron(III) complexes with LIESST (Light Induced Electronic Spin-State Transition) and of metallomesogens will be discussed to illustrate the extension of this research area by the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  13. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swasey, Steven M; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson–Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag + , as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag + –DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag + -induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2–24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag + can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag + -mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg 2+ , higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag + -mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag + -mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’. (paper)

  14. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...... be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system. © 2011 Lü et al....... carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...

  15. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  16. Study on the identification method of chemical warfare agents with spectroscopy of neutron induced γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Boxue; Li Yun; Li Xiangbao

    1996-01-01

    The paper briefly describes some non-destructive verification technologies of chemical warfare agents in-site, and some application of neutron induced gamma ray analysis, such as multi-elements analysis of coal, hidden explosive detection and identification of chemical agents. It also describes some problems in developing the portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy for non-destructive evaluation of chemical warfare agents

  17. Evidence for Dynamic Chemical Kinetics at Individual Molecular Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2018-02-05

    Catalytic cycles are typically depicted as possessing time-invariant steps with fixed rates. Yet the true behavior of individual catalysts with respect to time is unknown, hidden by the ensemble averaging inherent to bulk measurements. Evidence is presented for variable chemical kinetics at individual catalysts, with a focus on ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by the second-generation Grubbs' ruthenium catalyst. Fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the chemical kinetics of the reaction because the technique possesses sufficient sensitivity for the detection of single chemical reactions. Insertion reactions in submicron regions likely occur at groups of many (not single) catalysts, yet not so many that their unique kinetic behavior is ensemble averaged. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Development of tight-binding, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator for combinatorial computational chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Momoji; Ando, Minako; Sakahara, Satoshi; Jung, Changho; Seki, Kotaro; Kusagaya, Tomonori; Endou, Akira; Takami, Seiichi; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a new concept called 'combinatorial computational chemistry' to realize a theoretical, high-throughput screening of catalysts and materials. We have already applied our combinatorial, computational-chemistry approach, mainly based on static first-principles calculations, to various catalysts and materials systems and its applicability to the catalysts and materials design was strongly confirmed. In order to realize more effective and efficient combinatorial, computational-chemistry screening, a high-speed, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method is essential. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator, which has an enough high-speed ability to perform a high-throughput screening. In the present study, we have succeeded in the development of a chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on our original, tight-binding, quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method, which is more than 5000 times faster than the regular first-principles, molecular-dynamics method. Moreover, its applicability and effectiveness to the atomistic clarification of the methanol-synthesis dynamics at reaction temperature were demonstrated

  19. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…

  20. Design of multi-phase dynamic chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenrui; Tan, Junjun; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Pan, Ting; Goodwin, Jay T.; Mehta, Anil K.; Grover, Martha A.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Template-directed polymerization reactions enable the accurate storage and processing of nature's biopolymer information. This mutualistic relationship of nucleic acids and proteins, a network known as life's central dogma, is now marvellously complex, and the progressive steps necessary for creating the initial sequence and chain-length-specific polymer templates are lost to time. Here we design and construct dynamic polymerization networks that exploit metastable prion cross-β phases. Mixed-phase environments have been used for constructing synthetic polymers, but these dynamic phases emerge naturally from the growing peptide oligomers and create environments suitable both to nucleate assembly and select for ordered templates. The resulting templates direct the amplification of a phase containing only chain-length-specific peptide-like oligomers. Such multi-phase biopolymer dynamics reveal pathways for the emergence, self-selection and amplification of chain-length- and possibly sequence-specific biopolymers.

  1. Vegetation dynamics induced by phreatophyte--aquifer interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Luca; D'Odorico, Paolo; Laio, Francesco

    2007-09-21

    The dynamics of phreatophyte vegetation are strongly coupled to those of the shallow phreatic aquifers from which phreatophytes extract water. Vegetation is able to influence the depth of the water table, which, in turn, can induce stress in vegetation. These interactions are likely to affect the composition and structure of phreatophyte plant communities, as well as their successional dynamics. Despite the environmental and economical value of many wetland plant ecosystems around the world, the impact of vegetation-water table interactions on ecosystem succession and interspecies competition in phreatophyte plant communities remains poorly understood. This study develops a minimalistic modelling framework to investigate the dynamics of two phreatophyte species, and their interactions with the water table. In spite of its simplicity, the model exhibits a remarkable variety of dynamical behaviors, especially when the water table depth is forced by external drivers. It is shown that, even when one of the two species is dominant with respect to the other, these two species can coexist showing periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamics. Moreover, in the presence of a random environmental forcing, noise-induced coexistence may emerge.

  2. Glutamate Induced Thermal Equilibrium Intermediate and Counteracting Effect on Chemical Denaturation of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumalla, Bramhini; Prabhu, N Prakash

    2018-01-25

    When organisms are subjected to stress conditions, one of their adaptive responses is accumulation of small organic molecules called osmolytes. These osmolytes affect the structure and stability of the biological macromolecules including proteins. The present study examines the effect of a negatively charged amino acid osmolyte, glutamate (Glu), on two model proteins, ribonuclease A (RNase A) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA), which have positive and negative surface charges at pH 7, respectively. These proteins follow two-state unfolding transitions during both heat and chemical induced denaturation processes. The addition of Glu stabilizes the proteins against temperature and induces an early equilibrium intermediate during unfolding. The stability is found to be enthalpy-driven, and the free energy of stabilization is more for α-LA compared to RNase A. The decrease in the partial molar volume and compressibility of both of the proteins in the presence of Glu suggests that the proteins attain a more compact state through surface hydration which could provide a more stable conformation. This is also supported by molecule dynamic simulation studies which demonstrate that the water density around the proteins is increased upon the addition of Glu. Further, the intermediates could be completely destabilized by lower concentrations (∼0.5 M) of guanidinium chloride and salt. However, urea subverts the Glu-induced intermediate formed by α-LA, whereas it only slightly destabilizes in the case of RNase A which has a positive surface charge and could possess charge-charge interactions with Glu. This suggests that, apart from hydration, columbic interactions might also contribute to the stability of the intermediate. Gdm-induced denaturation of RNase A and α-LA in the absence and the presence of Glu at different temperatures was carried out. These results also show the Glu-induced stabilization of both of the proteins; however, all of the unfolding transitions followed two

  3. Cancellation Effects in CSR Induced Bunch Transverse Dynamics in Bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R.

    2002-01-01

    The partial cancellation between the effect of centrifugal space charge force on transverse bunch dynamics and the potential energy effect has been a long-standing controversial issue in the study of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced bunch dynamics in bends. In this paper, we clarify our definition of the ''centrifugal space charge force,'' and discuss the meaning of the ''cancellation effect'' and its general application. We further use simulation to demonstrate the cancellation in both steady state and transient regimes, and show the behavior of the effective transverse force

  4. Protonation-induced ultrafast torsional dynamics in 9-anthrylbenzimidazole: a pH activated molecular rotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Amitabha; Kushwaha, Archana; Das, Dipanwita; Ghosh, Rajib

    2018-03-07

    We report the photophysical properties and excited state dynamics of 9-anthrylbenzimidazole (ANBI) which exhibits protonation-induced molecular rotor properties. In contrast to the highly emissive behavior of neutral ANBI, protonation of the benzimidazole group of ANBI induces efficient nonradiative deactivation by ultrafast torsional motion around the bond connecting the anthracene and benzimidazole units, as revealed by ultrafast transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Contrary to viscosity-independent fluorescence of neutral dyes, protonated ANBI is shown to display linear variation of emission yield and lifetime with solvent viscosity. The protonation-induced molecular rotor properties in the studied system are shown to be driven by enhanced charge transfer and are corroborated by quantum chemical calculations. Potential application as a microviscosity sensor of acidic regions in a heterogeneous environment by these proton-activated molecular rotor properties of ANBI is discussed.

  5. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  6. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.; Allen, J.W.; Green, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of two chemically-induced colitis-models in adult zebrafish, using optical projection tomography and novel transcriptional markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Simon; Kania, Per Walter; Holm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , induced by the haptenizing agents oxazolone and TNBS. In addition, goblet cell dynamics in the scales and intestine and 5-HT (serotonin) in intestinal tissues were investigated through optical projection tomography. Gene expression studies revealed a distinct and significant upregulation...... of proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase reactants and metalloprotease 9 in both chemical models, primarily after 72 hours. In comparison, transcription factors and cytokines associated with Th1 and Th17 (Crohn’s) and Th2 (ulcerative colitis) were mainly not affected in this acute setting. However, elevated...... transcript levels were detected in Foxp3, IL-10 and T-bet, which are linked with tolerance and Tregs in mammals. Goblet cells in scales were depleted in both chemical models and in the intestine of oxazolone-treated fish. A marked 5-HT signal was noted in intestinal tissue of some chemically treated...

  9. Fluctuation induced critical behavior at nonzero temperature and chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splittorff, K.; Lenaghan, J.T.; Wirstam, J.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss phase transitions in relativistic systems as a function of both the chemical potential and temperature. The presence of a chemical potential explicitly breaks Lorentz invariance and may additionally break other internal symmetries. This introduces new subtleties in the determination of the critical properties. We discuss separately three characteristic effects of a nonzero chemical potential. First, we consider only the explicit breaking of Lorentz invariance using a scalar field theory with a global U(1) symmetry. Second, we study the explicit breaking of an internal symmetry in addition to Lorentz invariance using two-color QCD at nonzero baryonic chemical potential. Finally, we consider the spontaneous breaking of a symmetry using three-color QCD at nonzero baryonic and isospin chemical potential. For each case, we derive the appropriate three-dimensional effective theory at criticality and study the effect of the chemical potential on the fixed point structure of the β functions. We find that the order of the phase transition is not affected by the explicit breaking of Lorentz invariance but is sensitive to the breaking of additional symmetries by the chemical potential

  10. Dynamics of rain-induced pollutographs of solubles in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutsch, M; Müller, I; Krebs, P

    2005-01-01

    When looking at acute receiving water impacts due to combined sewer overflows the characteristics of the background diurnal sewage flux variation may influence the peak loads from combined sewer overflows (CSO) and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent significantly. In this paper, effects on the dynamic compounds transported in the sewer, on CSO discharges and WWTP loading are evaluated by means of hydrodynamic simulations. The simulations are based on different scenarios for diurnal dry-weather flow variations induced by different infiltration rates.

  11. Dynamics of the chemical composition of rainwater throughout Hurricane Irene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Mullaugh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential sampling of rainwater from Hurricane Irene was carried out in Wilmington, NC, USA on 26 and 27 August 2011. Eleven samples were analyzed for pH, major ions (Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, NH4+, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Hurricane Irene contributed 16% of the total rainwater and 18% of the total chloride wet deposition received in Wilmington NC during all of 2011. This work highlights the main physical factors influencing the chemical composition of tropical storm rainwater: wind speed, wind direction, back trajectory and vertical mixing, time of day and total rain volume. Samples collected early in the storm, when winds blew out of the east, contained dissolved components indicative of marine sources (salts from sea spray and low DOC. The sea-salt components in the samples had two maxima in concentration during the storm the first of which occurred before the volume of rain had sufficiently washed out sea salt from the atmosphere and the second when back trajectories showed large volumes of marine surface air were lifted. As the storm progressed and winds shifted to a westerly direction, the chemical composition of the rainwater became characteristic of terrestrial storms (high DOC and NH4+ and low sea salt. This work demonstrates that tropical storms are not only responsible for significant wet deposition of marine components to land, but terrestrial components can also become entrained in rainwater, which can then be delivered to coastal waters via wet deposition. This study also underscores why analysis of one composite sample can lead to an incomplete interpretation of the factors that influence the chemically divergent analytes in rainwater during extreme weather events.

  12. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods...... such as electron(7-10) or X-ray diffraction(11) and X-ray absorption(12) yield complementary information about the atomic motions. Time-resolved methods that are directly sensitive to both valence-electron dynamics and atomic motions include photoelectron spectroscopy(13-15) and high-harmonic generation(16......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  13. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  14. Aggregation-induced chemical reactions: acid dissociation in growing water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbert, Harald; Masia, Marco; Kaczmarek-Kedziera, Anna; Nair, Nisanth N; Marx, Dominik

    2011-03-23

    Understanding chemical reactivity at ultracold conditions, thus enabling molecular syntheses via interstellar and atmospheric processes, is a key issue in cryochemistry. In particular, acid dissociation and proton transfer reactions are ubiquitous in aqueous microsolvation environments. Here, the full dissociation of a HCl molecule upon stepwise solvation by a small number of water molecules at low temperatures, as relevant to helium nanodroplet isolation (HENDI) spectroscopy, is analyzed in mechanistic detail. It is found that upon successive aggregation of HCl with H(2)O molecules, a series of cyclic heteromolecular structures, up to and including HCl(H(2)O)(3), are initially obtained before a precursor state for dissociation, HCl(H(2)O)(3)···H(2)O, is observed upon addition of a fourth water molecule. The latter partially aggregated structure can be viewed as an "activated species", which readily leads to dissociation of HCl and to the formation of a solvent-shared ion pair, H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(3)Cl(-). Overall, the process is mostly downhill in potential energy, and, in addition, small remaining barriers are overcome by using kinetic energy released as a result of forming hydrogen bonds due to aggregation. The associated barrier is not ruled by thermal equilibrium but is generated by athermal non-equilibrium dynamics. These "aggregation-induced chemical reactions" are expected to be of broad relevance to chemistry at ultralow temperature much beyond HENDI spectroscopy.

  15. Nuclear dynamics in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Heavy ion induced fission and fission-like reactions evolve through a complex nuclear dynamics encountered in the medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. In the recent years, measurements of the fragment-neutron and fragment-charged particle angular correlations in heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions, have provided new information on the dynamical times of nuclear deformations of the initial dinuclear complex to the fission saddle point and the scission point. From the studies of fragment angular distributions in heavy ion induced fission it has been possible to infer the relaxation times of the dinuclear complex in the K-degree of freedom and our recent measurements on the entrance channel dependence of fragment anisotropies have provided an experimental signature of the presence of fissions before K-equilibration. This paper reviews recent experimental and theoretical status of the above studies with particular regard to the questions relating to dynamical times, nuclear dissipation and the effect of nuclear dissipation on the K-distributions at the fission saddle in completely equilibrated compound nucleus. (author). 19 refs., 9 figs

  16. Concurrency-Induced Transitions in Epidemic Dynamics on Temporal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Gleeson, James P; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-09-08

    Social contact networks underlying epidemic processes in humans and animals are highly dynamic. The spreading of infections on such temporal networks can differ dramatically from spreading on static networks. We theoretically investigate the effects of concurrency, the number of neighbors that a node has at a given time point, on the epidemic threshold in the stochastic susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on temporal network models. We show that network dynamics can suppress epidemics (i.e., yield a higher epidemic threshold) when the node's concurrency is low, but can also enhance epidemics when the concurrency is high. We analytically determine different phases of this concurrency-induced transition, and confirm our results with numerical simulations.

  17. Concurrency-Induced Transitions in Epidemic Dynamics on Temporal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Gleeson, James P.; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    Social contact networks underlying epidemic processes in humans and animals are highly dynamic. The spreading of infections on such temporal networks can differ dramatically from spreading on static networks. We theoretically investigate the effects of concurrency, the number of neighbors that a node has at a given time point, on the epidemic threshold in the stochastic susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on temporal network models. We show that network dynamics can suppress epidemics (i.e., yield a higher epidemic threshold) when the node's concurrency is low, but can also enhance epidemics when the concurrency is high. We analytically determine different phases of this concurrency-induced transition, and confirm our results with numerical simulations.

  18. Parvovirus induced alterations in nuclear architecture and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu O Ihalainen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analysis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications.

  19. Current-induced atomic dynamics, instabilities, and Raman signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegard, Per

    2012-01-01

    We derive and employ a semiclassical Langevin equation obtained from path integrals to describe the ionic dynamics of a molecular junction in the presence of electrical current. The electronic environment serves as an effective nonequilibrium bath. The bath results in random forces describing Joule...... heating, current-induced forces including the nonconservative wind force, dissipative frictional forces, and an effective Lorentz-type force due to the Berry phase of the nonequilibrium electrons. Using a generic two-level molecular model, we highlight the importance of both current-induced forces...... and Joule heating for the stability of the system. We compare the impact of the different forces, and the wide-band approximation for the electronic structure on our result. We examine the current-induced instabilities (excitation of runaway "waterwheel" modes) and investigate the signature...

  20. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan; Cowburn, David, E-mail: cowburn@cowburnlab.org, E-mail: David.cowburn@einstein.yu.edu [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder.

  1. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jeroen J; van Dam, Nicole M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Smilde, Age K

    2009-12-16

    Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  2. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smilde Age K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. Results This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Conclusions Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  3. Memory-induced nonlinear dynamics of excitation in cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landaw, Julian; Qu, Zhilin

    2018-04-01

    Excitable cells, such as cardiac myocytes, exhibit short-term memory, i.e., the state of the cell depends on its history of excitation. Memory can originate from slow recovery of membrane ion channels or from accumulation of intracellular ion concentrations, such as calcium ion or sodium ion concentration accumulation. Here we examine the effects of memory on excitation dynamics in cardiac myocytes under two diseased conditions, early repolarization and reduced repolarization reserve, each with memory from two different sources: slow recovery of a potassium ion channel and slow accumulation of the intracellular calcium ion concentration. We first carry out computer simulations of action potential models described by differential equations to demonstrate complex excitation dynamics, such as chaos. We then develop iterated map models that incorporate memory, which accurately capture the complex excitation dynamics and bifurcations of the action potential models. Finally, we carry out theoretical analyses of the iterated map models to reveal the underlying mechanisms of memory-induced nonlinear dynamics. Our study demonstrates that the memory effect can be unmasked or greatly exacerbated under certain diseased conditions, which promotes complex excitation dynamics, such as chaos. The iterated map models reveal that memory converts a monotonic iterated map function into a nonmonotonic one to promote the bifurcations leading to high periodicity and chaos.

  4. Multicharged Ion-induced simple molecule fragmentation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarisien, M.

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of swift multicharged ion-induced fragmentation of diatomic (CO) and triatomic (CO 2 ) molecules. Performed at the GANIL facility, this study used the Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (RIMS), which consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, coupled with a multi-hit capability position sensitive detector (delay line anode). The high-resolution measurement of the kinetic energy distribution released (KER) during the CO fragmentation points out the limitation of the Coulomb Explosion Model, revealing, for example, the di-cation CO 2 + electronic state contribution in the case of C + /O + fragmentation pathway. Furthermore, the multi-ionization cross section dependence with the orientation of the internuclear axis of CO is compared with a geometrical model calculation. Finally, different behaviours are observed for the dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule (CO 2 ). While triple ionization leads mainly to a synchronous concerted fragmentation dynamics, a weak fraction of dissociating molecule follows a sequential dynamics involving CO 2 + metastable states. In the case of double ionization, (CO 2 ) 2+ di-cation dissociation dynamics is asynchronously concerted and has been interpreted using a simple model involving an asymmetrical vibration of the molecule. (author)

  5. Source characterization and dynamic fault modeling of induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, S. K. Y.; Young, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years there are increasing concerns worldwide that industrial activities in the sub-surface can cause or trigger damaging earthquakes. In order to effectively mitigate the damaging effects of induced seismicity, the key is to better understand the source physics of induced earthquakes, which still remain elusive at present. Furthermore, an improved understanding of induced earthquake physics is pivotal to assess large-magnitude earthquake triggering. A better quantification of the possible causes of induced earthquakes can be achieved through numerical simulations. The fault model used in this study is governed by the empirically-derived rate-and-state friction laws, featuring a velocity-weakening (VW) patch embedded into a large velocity-strengthening (VS) region. Outside of that, the fault is slipping at the background loading rate. The model is fully dynamic, with all wave effects resolved, and is able to resolve spontaneous long-term slip history on a fault segment at all stages of seismic cycles. An earlier study using this model has established that aseismic slip plays a major role in the triggering of small repeating earthquakes. This study presents a series of cases with earthquakes occurring on faults with different fault frictional properties and fluid-induced stress perturbations. The effects to both the overall seismicity rate and fault slip behavior are investigated, and the causal relationship between the pre-slip pattern prior to the event and the induced source characteristics is discussed. Based on simulation results, the subsequent step is to select specific cases for laboratory experiments which allow well controlled variables and fault parameters. Ultimately, the aim is to provide better constraints on important parameters for induced earthquakes based on numerical modeling and laboratory data, and hence to contribute to a physics-based induced earthquake hazard assessment.

  6. Application of dynamic Bayesian network to risk analysis of domino effects in chemical infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakzad, Nima

    2015-01-01

    A domino effect is a low frequency high consequence chain of accidents where a primary accident (usually fire and explosion) in a unit triggers secondary accidents in adjacent units. High complexity and growing interdependencies of chemical infrastructures make them increasingly vulnerable to domino effects. Domino effects can be considered as time dependent processes. Thus, not only the identification of involved units but also their temporal entailment in the chain of accidents matter. More importantly, in the case of domino-induced fires which can generally last much longer compared to explosions, foreseeing the temporal evolution of domino effects and, in particular, predicting the most probable sequence of accidents (or involved units) in a domino effect can be of significance in the allocation of preventive and protective safety measures. Although many attempts have been made to identify the spatial evolution of domino effects, the temporal evolution of such accidents has been overlooked. We have proposed a methodology based on dynamic Bayesian network to model both the spatial and temporal evolutions of domino effects and also to quantify the most probable sequence of accidents in a potential domino effect. The application of the developed methodology has been demonstrated via a hypothetical fuel storage plant. - Highlights: • A Dynamic Bayesian Network methodology has been developed to model domino effects. • Considering time-dependencies, both spatial and temporal evolutions of domino effects have been modeled. • The concept of most probable sequence of accidents has been proposed instead of the most probable combination of accidents. • Using backward analysis, the most vulnerable units have been identified during a potential domino effect. • The proposed methodology does not need to identify a unique primary unit (accident) for domino effect modeling

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation-induced amorphization of the ordered compound NiZr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We have studied the electron irradiation-induced amorphization of the ordered intermetallic compound NiZr 2 by molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with embedded-atom potentials. Randomly chosen Frenkel pairs and chemical disorder were introduced into the system in separate processes. In both cases, the energy and volume of the system rose above the corresponding levels of a quenched liquid and the calculated diffraction patterns indicated the occurrence of a crystalline-to-amorphous transition. In addition, the average shear elastic constant fell to about 50% of its value in the perfect crystal and the system became elastically isotropic. These results indicate that NiZr 2 can be amorphized by chemical disorder as well as Frenkel pairs and are in good agreement with experimental observations

  8. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping for Cell Isolation Using Tapered Fiber Probe by Dynamic Chemical Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K; Okada, J; Nomura, Y; Tamura, K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemically etched fiber probe was proposed for laser trapping and manipulation of cells. We fabricated tapered fiber probe by dynamic chemical etching technique. Three-Dimensional optical trap of a yeast cell dispersed in water solution could be formed by the fiber tip with 17deg tip. Optical forces were sufficient to move the yeast cell for trapping and manipulation. From these experimental results, it was found that our proposed tapered fiber tip was a promising tool for cell isolation.

  9. Dynamical constraints and adiabatic invariants in chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, J C

    2007-08-23

    For long-range electrostatic potentials and, more generally, when the topography of the potential energy surface is locally simple, the reaction path coordinate is adiabatically separable from the perpendicular degrees of freedom. For the ion-permanent dipole and ion-quadrupole interactions, the Poisson bracket of the adiabatic invariant decreases with the interfragment distance more rapidly than the electrostatic potential. The smaller the translational momentum, the moment of inertia of the neutral fragment, and the dipole or quadrupole moments are, the more reliable the adiabatic approximation is, as expected from the usual argumentation. Closed-form expressions for an effective one-dimensional potential in an adiabatic Hamiltonian are given. Connection with a model where the decoupling is exact is obtained in the limit of an infinitely heavy dipole. The dynamics is also constrained by adiabatic invariance for a harmonic valley about a curved reaction path, as shown by the reaction path Hamiltonian method. The maximum entropy method reveals that, as a result of the invariance properties of the entropy, constraints whose validity has been demonstrated locally only subsist in all parts of phase space. However, their form varies continuously, and they are not necessarily expressed in simple terms as they are in the asymptotic region. Therefore, although the influence of adiabatic invariance has been demonstrated at asymptotically large values of the reaction coordinate only, it persists in more interesting ranges.

  10. Intraluminal bubble dynamics induced by lithotripsy shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Bai, Jiaming; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been the first option in the treatment of calculi in the upper urinary tract since its introduction. ESWL-induced renal injury is also found after treatment and is assumed to associate with intraluminal bubble dynamics. To further understand the interaction of bubble expansion and collapse with the vessel wall, the finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate intraluminal bubble dynamics and calculate the distribution of stress in the vessel wall and surrounding soft tissue during cavitation. The effects of peak pressure, vessel size, and stiffness of soft tissue were investigated. Significant dilation on the vessel wall occurs after contacting with rapid and large bubble expansion, and then vessel deformation propagates in the axial direction. During bubble collapse, large shear stress is found to be applied to the vessel wall at a clinical lithotripter setting (i.e. 40 MPa peak pressure), which may be the mechanism of ESWL-induced vessel rupture. The decrease of vessel size and viscosity of soft tissue would enhance vessel deformation and, consequently, increase the generated shear stress and normal stresses. Meanwhile, a significantly asymmetric bubble boundary is also found due to faster axial bubble expansion and shrinkage than in radial direction, and deformation of the vessel wall may result in the formation of microjets in the axial direction. Therefore, this numerical work would illustrate the mechanism of ESWL-induced tissue injury in order to develop appropriate counteractive strategies for reduced adverse effects.

  11. Neuroproteomics and Environmental Chemical-induced Adverse Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technological advances in science have aided the field of neuroproteomics with refined tools for the study of the expression, interaction, and function of proteins in the nervous system. With the aid of bioinformatics, neuroproteomics can reveal the organization of dynamic, funct...

  12. Understanding Chemical-induced Adverse Effects with Neuroproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technological advances in science have aided the field of neuroproteomics with refined tools for the study of the expression, interaction, and function of proteins in the nervous system. With the aid of bioinformatics, neuroproteomics can reveal the organization of dynamic, funct...

  13. Magnetization dynamics induced by Rashba effect in a Permalloy nanodisk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanan; Hua, Zhong, E-mail: jiyonghnli@126.com; Li, Dongfei

    2017-02-15

    Magnetic vortex dynamics mediated by spin-polarized ac current of different amplitudes and frequencies are investigated by micromagnetic simulations in a system lacking structure inversion symmetry. Micromagnetic calculations reveal that the critical current density required to induce vortex core reversal may be decreased to below 10{sup 10} A m{sup −2} due to strong transverse magnetic field by Rashba effect. We also find the spin torque of ac current plays a trivial role in magnetic vortex dynamics in a broken inversion symmetry system when the current density is on the order of 10{sup 10} A m{sup −2} and the current with frequency close to the vortex eigenfrequency is the most efficient for reversal.

  14. A Grid-Based Cyber Infrastructure for High Performance Chemical Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadka Prashant

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical dynamics simulation is an effective means to study atomic level motions of molecules, collections of molecules, liquids, surfaces, interfaces of materials, and chemical reactions. To make chemical dynamics simulations globally accessible to a broad range of users, recently a cyber infrastructure was developed that provides an online portal to VENUS, a popular chemical dynamics simulation program package, to allow people to submit simulation jobs that will be executed on the web server machine. In this paper, we report new developments of the cyber infrastructure for the improvement of its quality of service by dispatching the submitted simulations jobs from the web server machine onto a cluster of workstations for execution, and by adding an animation tool, which is optimized for animating the simulation results. The separation of the server machine from the simulation-running machine improves the service quality by increasing the capacity to serve more requests simultaneously with even reduced web response time, and allows the execution of large scale, time-consuming simulation jobs on the powerful workstation cluster. With the addition of an animation tool, the cyber infrastructure automatically converts, upon the selection of the user, some simulation results into an animation file that can be viewed on usual web browsers without requiring installation of any special software on the user computer. Since animation is essential for understanding the results of chemical dynamics simulations, this animation capacity provides a better way for understanding simulation details of the chemical dynamics. By combining computing resources at locations under different administrative controls, this cyber infrastructure constitutes a grid environment providing physically and administratively distributed functionalities through a single easy-to-use online portal

  15. Hazard classification of chemicals inducing haemolytic anaemia: An EU regulatory perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Andre; Jacobsen, Helene; Healy, Edel; McMickan, Sinead; Istace, Fréderique; Blaude, Marie-Noëlle; Howden, Peter; Fleig, Helmut; Schulte, Agnes

    2006-01-01

    Haemolytic anaemia is often induced following prolonged exposure to chemical substances. Currently, under EU Council Directive 67/548/EEC, substances which induce such effects are classified as dangerous and assigned the risk phrase R48 'Danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure.'

  16. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  17. Modeling of laser induced air plasma and shock wave dynamics using 2D-hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; S, Sai Shiva; Chelikani, Leela; Ikkurthi, Venkata Ramana; C. D., Sijoy; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Acrhem, University Of Hyderabad Team; Computational Analysis Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam Team

    2017-06-01

    The laser induced air plasma dynamics and the SW evolution modeled using the two dimensional hydrodynamic code by considering two different EOS: ideal gas EOS with charge state effects taken into consideration and Chemical Equilibrium applications (CEA) EOS considering the chemical kinetics of different species will be presented. The inverse bremsstrahlung absorption process due to electron-ion and electron-neutrals is considered for the laser-air interaction process for both the models. The numerical results obtained with the two models were compared with that of the experimental observations over the time scales of 200 - 4000 ns at an input laser intensity of 2.3 ×1010 W/cm2. The comparison shows that the plasma and shock dynamics differ significantly for two EOS considered. With the ideas gas EOS the asymmetric expansion and the subsequent plasma dynamics have been well reproduced as observed in the experiments, whereas with the CEA model these processes were not reproduced due to the laser energy absorption occurring mostly at the focal volume. ACRHEM team thank DRDO, India for funding.

  18. Feeder cells support the culture of induced pluripotent stem cells even after chemical fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Shan Yue

    Full Text Available Chemically fixed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, instead of live feeder cells, were applied to the maintenance of mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS cells. Formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde were used for chemical fixation. The chemically fixed MEF feeders maintained the pluripotency of miPS cells, as well as their undifferentiated state. Furthermore, the chemically fixed MEF feeders were reused several times without affecting their functions. These results indicate that chemical fixation can be applied to modify biological feeders chemically, without losing their original functions. Chemically fixed MEF feeders will be applicable to other stem cell cultures as a reusable extracellular matrix candidate that can be preserved on a long-term basis.

  19. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Terumi Itako

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L−1, fluazinam (0.25 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L−1 + 2.2 g.L−1, copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L−1, mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L−1 + 0.60 g.L−1, and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L−1 on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  20. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itako, Adriana Terumi; Tolentino Júnior, João Batista; Silva Júnior, Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da; Soman, José Marcelo; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L(-1)), fluazinam (0.25 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L(-1) + 2.2 g.L(-1)), copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L(-1)), mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L(-1) + 0.60 g.L(-1)), and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L(-1))) on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease) was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  1. Dynamics of chemical reactions of multiply-charged cations: Information from beam scattering experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 378, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 113-126 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Multiply-charged ions * Dynamics of chemical reactions * Beam scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  2. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  3. Characterization of the Environmentally Induced Chemical Transformations of Uranium Tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellons, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    A key challenge with nuclear safeguards environmental sampling is identification of the materials post release due to subsequent chemical reactions with ambient water and oxygen. Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF4) is of interest as an intermediate in both the upstream and downstream portions of uranium feedstock and metal production processes used in nuclear fuel production; however minimal published research exists relating to UF4 hydrolysis. FY16 efforts were dedicated to in-situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization of UF4 during exposure to various relative humidity conditions. This effort mapped several hydrolysis reaction pathways and identified both intermediate, and terminal progeny species.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Induced Sterilization and Chemical Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Eusebio; Evans, Kirk; Gornostaeva, Olga; Alexeff, Igor; Lock Kang, Weng; Wood, Thomas K.

    1998-11-01

    We are studying chemical neutralization and surface decontamination using atmospheric pressure plasma discharges. The plasma is produced by corona discharge from an array of pins and a ground plane. The array is constructed so that various gases, like argon or helium, can be flowed past the pins where the discharge is initiated. The pin array can be biased using either DC, AC or pulsed discharges. Results indicate that the atmospheric plasma is effective in sterilizing surfaces with biological contaminants like E-coli and bacillus subtilus cells. Exposure times of less than four minutes in an air plasma result in a decrease in live colony counts by six orders of magnitude. Greater exposure times result in a decrease of live colony counts of up to ten orders of magnitude. The atmospheric pressure discharge is also effective in decomposing organic phosphate compounds that are simulants for chemical warfare agents. Details of the decomposition chemistry, by-product formation, and electrical energy consumption of the system will be discussed.

  5. Involvement of MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by chemicals and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Marples, Brian; Thomas, Robert A.; Tucker, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have examined bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation, however few have evaluated the ability of chemicals to induce similar effects. We previously reported the ability of two chemicals, mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin (PHL) to induce bystander effects in normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The focus of the current study was to determine the involvement of the MAPK proteins in bystander effects induced by physical and chemical DNA damaging agents and to evaluate the effects of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activation. The phosphorylation levels of the MAPK proteins ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, were measured from 1 to 24 h following direct or bystander exposure to MMC, PHL or radiation. We observed transient phosphorylation, at early time points, of all 3 proteins in bystander cells. We also evaluated the effect of MAPK inhibition on bystander-induced caspase 3/7 activity to determine the role of MAPK proteins in bystander-induced apoptosis. We observed bystander-induced activation of caspase 3/7 in bystander cells. Inhibition of MAPK proteins resulted in a decrease in caspase 3/7 activity at the early time points, and the caspase activity increased (in the case of ERK inhibition) or returned to basal levels (in the case of JNK or p38 inhibition) between 12 and 24 h. PHL is considered to be a radiomimetic agent, however in the present study PHL behaved more like a chemical and not like radiation in terms of MAPK phosphorylation. These results point to the involvement of MAPK proteins in the bystander effect induced by radiation and chemicals and provide additional evidence that this response is not limited to radiation but is a generalized stress response in cells.

  6. Ab Initio Studies of Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions of Inter-Metallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava; Hanagud, Sathya

    2009-06-01

    Shock-induced and shock assisted chemical reactions of intermetallic mixtures are studied by many researchers, using both experimental and theoretical techniques. The theoretical studies are primarily at continuum scales. The model frameworks include mixture theories and meso-scale models of grains of porous mixtures. The reaction models vary from equilibrium thermodynamic model to several non-equilibrium thermodynamic models. The shock-effects are primarily studied using appropriate conservation equations and numerical techniques to integrate the equations. All these models require material constants from experiments and estimates of transition states. Thus, the objective of this paper is to present studies based on ab initio techniques. The ab inito studies, to date, use ab inito molecular dynamics. This paper presents a study that uses shock pressures, and associated temperatures as starting variables. Then intermetallic mixtures are modeled as slabs. The required shock stresses are created by straining the lattice. Then, ab initio binding energy calculations are used to examine the stability of the reactions. Binding energies are obtained for different strain components super imposed on uniform compression and finite temperatures. Then, vibrational frequencies and nudge elastic band techniques are used to study reactivity and transition states. Examples include Ni and Al.

  7. Dynamical photo-induced electronic properties of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltako, K.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Raymond, L.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices and machines are emerging as promising functional elements, naturally flexible and efficient, for next-generation technologies. A deeper understanding of carrier dynamics in molecular junctions is expected to benefit many fields of nanoelectronics and power devices. We determine time-resolved charge current flowing at the donor-acceptor interface in molecular junctions connected to metallic electrodes by means of quantum transport simulations. The current is induced by the interaction of the donor with a Gaussian-shape femtosecond laser pulse. Effects of the molecular internal coupling, metal-molecule tunneling, and light-donor coupling on photocurrent are discussed. We then define the time-resolved local density of states which is proposed as an efficient tool to describe the absorbing molecule in contact with metallic electrodes. Non-equilibrium reorganization of hybridized molecular orbitals through the light-donor interaction gives rise to two phenomena: the dynamical Rabi shift and the appearance of Floquet-like states. Such insights into the dynamical photoelectronic structure of molecules are of strong interest for ultrafast spectroscopy and open avenues toward the possibility of analyzing and controlling the internal properties of quantum nanodevices with pump-push photocurrent spectroscopy.

  8. Sub-nanometer glass surface dynamics induced by illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Illumination is known to induce stress and morphology changes in opaque glasses. Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has a smaller bandgap than the crystal. Thus, we were able to excite with 532 nm light a 1 μm amorphous surface layer on a SiC crystal while recording time-lapse movies of glass surface dynamics by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Photoexcitation of the a-SiC surface layer through the transparent crystal avoids heating the STM tip. Up to 6 × 10 4 s, long movies of surface dynamics with 40 s time resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution were obtained. Clusters of ca. 3-5 glass forming units diameter are seen to cooperatively hop between two states at the surface. Photoexcitation with green laser light recruits immobile clusters to hop, rather than increasing the rate at which already mobile clusters hop. No significant laser heating was observed. Thus, we favor an athermal mechanism whereby electronic excitation of a-SiC directly controls glassy surface dynamics. This mechanism is supported by an exciton migration-relaxation-thermal diffusion model. Individual clusters take ∼1 h to populate states differently after the light intensity has changed. We believe the surrounding matrix rearranges slowly when it is stressed by a change in laser intensity, and clusters serve as a diagnostic. Such cluster hopping and matrix rearrangement could underlie the microscopic mechanism of photoinduced aging of opaque glasses

  9. Thermal, chemical and pH induced unfolding of turmeric root lectin: modes of denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Biswas

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, of non-seed origin having antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, forms a homodimer with high thermal stability as well as acid tolerance. Size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show it to be a dimer at pH 7, but it converts to a monomer near pH 2. Circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence emission maxima are virtually indistinguishable from pH 7 to 2, indicating secondary and tertiary structures remain the same in dimer and monomer within experimental error. The tryptophan environment as probed by acrylamide quenching data yielded very similar data at pH 2 and pH 7, implying very similar folding for monomer and dimer. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a transition at 350.3 K for dimer and at 327.0 K for monomer. Thermal unfolding and chemical unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride for dimer are both reversible and can be described by two-state models. The temperatures and the denaturant concentrations at which one-half of the protein molecules are unfolded, are protein concentration-dependent for dimer but protein concentration-independent for monomer. The free energy of unfolding at 298 K was found to be 5.23 Kcal mol-1 and 14.90 Kcal mol-1 for the monomer and dimer respectively. The value of change in excess heat capacity upon protein denaturation (ΔCp is 3.42 Kcal mol-1 K-1 for dimer. The small ΔCp for unfolding of CLA reflects a buried hydrophobic core in the folded dimeric protein. These unfolding experiments, temperature dependent circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering for the dimer at pH 7 indicate its higher stability than for the monomer at pH 2. This difference in stability of dimeric and monomeric forms highlights the contribution of inter-subunit interactions in the former.

  10. Chemical consequences of laser-induced breakdown in molecular gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babánková, Dagmar; Civiš, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2-3 (2006), s. 75-88 ISSN 0079-6727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1278; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk LC528; GA MŠk 1P04LA235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser spark * laser-induced dielectric breakdown * laser-plasma chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.500, year: 2006

  11. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  12. Material Cycles and Chemicals: Dynamic Material Flow Analysis of Contaminants in Paper Recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Laner, David; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2016-01-01

    material source-segregation and collection was the least effective strategy for reducing chemical contamination, if the overall recycling rates should be maintained at the current level (approximately 70% for Europe). The study provides a consistent approach for evaluating contaminant levels in material......This study provides a systematic approach for assessment of contaminants in materials for recycling. Paper recycling is used as an illustrative example. Three selected chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOHs), are evaluated within the paper...... cycle. The approach combines static material flow analysis (MFA) with dynamic material and substance flow modeling. The results indicate that phasing out of chemicals is the most effective measure for reducing chemical contamination. However, this scenario was also associated with a considerable lag...

  13. Detailed balance method for chemical potential determination in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, P.J.; Ray, J.R.; Wolf, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new, nondestructive, method for determining chemical potentials in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The method estimates a value for the chemical potential such that one has a balance between fictitious successful creation and destruction trials in which the Monte Carlo method is used to determine success or failure of the creation/destruction attempts; we thus call the method a detailed balance method. The method allows one to obtain estimates of the chemical potential for a given species in any closed ensemble simulation; the closed ensemble is paired with a ''natural'' open ensemble for the purpose of obtaining creation and destruction probabilities. We present results for the Lennard-Jones system and also for an embedded atom model of liquid palladium, and compare to previous results in the literature for these two systems. We are able to obtain an accurate estimate of the chemical potential for the Lennard-Jones system at higher densities than reported in the literature

  14. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  15. Reaction Ensemble Molecular Dynamics: Direct Simulation of the Dynamic Equilibrium Properties of Chemically Reacting Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brennan, J.K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, K.E.; Rice, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2004), 0611031-0611034 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/1588 Grant - others:NSF(US) CTS-0211792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : reacting systems * simulation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  16. Characterization of Chemically-Induced Bacterial Ghosts (BGs Using Sodium Hydroxide-Induced Vibrio parahaemolyticus Ghosts (VPGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jung Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acellular bacterial ghosts (BGs are empty non-living bacterial cell envelopes, commonly generated by controlled expression of the cloned lysis gene E of bacteriophage PhiX174. In this study, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ghosts (VPGs were generated by chemically-induced lysis and the method is based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of sodium hydroxide (NaOH, acetic acid, boric acid, citric acid, maleic acid, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid. The MIC values of the respective chemicals were 3.125, 6.25, <50.0, 25.0, 6.25, 1.56, and 0.781 mg/mL. Except for boric acid, the lysis efficiency reached more than 99.99% at 5 min after treatment of all chemicals. Among those chemicals, NaOH-induced VPGs appeared completely DNA-free, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Besides, lipopolysaccharides (LPS extracted from the NaOH-induced VPGs showed no distinctive band on SDS-PAGE gel after silver staining. On the other hand, LPS extracted from wild-type bacterial cells, as well as the organic acids-induced VPGs showed triple major bands and LPS extracted from the inorganic acids-induced VPGs showed double bands. It suggests that some surface structures in LPS of the NaOH-induced VPGs may be lost, weakened, or modified by the MIC of NaOH. Nevertheless, Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay revealed that there is no significant difference in endotoxic activity between the NaOH-induced VPGs and wild-type bacterial cells. Macrophages exposed to the NaOH-induced VPGs at 0.5 × 106 CFU/mL showed cell viability of 97.9%, however, the MIC of NaOH did not reduce the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Like Escherichia coli LPS, the NaOH-induced VPGs are an excellent activator of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and iNOS, anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10, and dual activities (IL-6 in the stimulated macrophage cells. On the other hand, the induction of TNF-α mRNA was remarkable in the macrophages exposed with wild-type cells. Scanning

  17. Nonequilibrium Chemical Effects in Single-Molecule SERS Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Apra, Edoardo; Govind, Niranjan; Hess, Wayne P.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-02-03

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have paved the way for achieving significant advances in the realm of single molecule chemical detection, imaging, and dynamics. In particular, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful analytical technique that is now routinely used to identify the chemical identity of single molecules. Understanding how nanoscale physical and chemical processes affect single molecule SERS spectra and selection rules is a challenging task, and is still actively debated. Herein, we explore underappreciated chemical phenomena in ultrasensitive SERS. We observe a fluctuating excited electronic state manifold, governed by the conformational dynamics of a molecule (4,4’-dimercaptostilbene, DMS) interacting with a metallic cluster (Ag20). This affects our simulated single molecule SERS spectra; the time trajectories of a molecule interacting with its unique local environment dictates the relative intensities of the observable Raman-active vibrational states. Ab initio molecular dynamics of a model Ag20-DMS system are used to illustrate both concepts in light of recent experimental results.

  18. Anisotropic chemical strain in cubic ceria due to oxygen-vacancy-induced elastic dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tridip; Nicholas, Jason D; Sheldon, Brian W; Qi, Yue

    2018-06-06

    Accurate characterization of chemical strain is required to study a broad range of chemical-mechanical coupling phenomena. One of the most studied mechano-chemically active oxides, nonstoichiometric ceria (CeO2-δ), has only been described by a scalar chemical strain assuming isotropic deformation. However, combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations and elastic dipole tensor theory reveal that both the short-range bond distortions surrounding an oxygen-vacancy and the long-range chemical strain are anisotropic in cubic CeO2-δ. The origin of this anisotropy is the charge disproportionation between the four cerium atoms around each oxygen-vacancy (two become Ce3+ and two become Ce4+) when a neutral oxygen-vacancy is formed. Around the oxygen-vacancy, six of the Ce3+-O bonds elongate, one of the Ce3+-O bond shorten, and all seven of the Ce4+-O bonds shorten. Further, the average and maximum chemical strain values obtained through tensor analysis successfully bound the various experimental data. Lastly, the anisotropic, oxygen-vacancy-elastic-dipole induced chemical strain is polarizable, which provides a physical model for the giant electrostriction recently discovered in doped and non-doped CeO2-δ. Together, this work highlights the need to consider anisotropic tensors when calculating the chemical strain induced by dilute point defects in all materials, regardless of their symmetry.

  19. Spatiotemporal chaos in the dynamics of buoyantly and diffusively unstable chemical fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Guéron, E.; De Wit, A.

    2012-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics resulting from the interplay between diffusive and buoyancy-driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities of autocatalytic traveling fronts are analyzed numerically for various values of the relevant parameters. These are the Rayleigh numbers of the reactant A and autocatalytic product B solutions as well as the ratio D =DB/DA between the diffusion coefficients of the two key chemical species. The interplay between the coarsening dynamics characteristic of the RT instability and the constant short wavelength modulation of the diffusive instability can lead in some regimes to complex dynamics dominated by irregular succession of birth and death of fingers. By using spectral entropy measurements, we characterize the transition between order and spatial disorder in this system. The analysis of the power spectrum and autocorrelation function, moreover, identifies similarities between the various spatial patterns. The contribution of the diffusive instability to the complex dynamics is discussed.

  20. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Coal structure and reactivity changes induced by chemical demineralisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiera, F.; Arenillas, A.; Pevida, C.; Garcia, R.; Pis, J.J. [Department of Energy and Environment, Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Steel, K.M.; Patrick, J.W. [Fuel Technology Group, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering, Nottingham University, University Park, NG7 2RD Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the influence that an advanced demineralisation procedure has on the combustion characteristics of coal. A high-volatile bituminous coal with 6.2% ash content was treated in a mixture of hydrofluoric and fluorosilicic acids (HF/H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}). Nitric acid was used either as a pretreatment, or as a washing stage after HF/H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} demineralisation, with an ash content as low as 0.3% being attained in the latter case. The structural changes produced by the chemical treatment were evaluated by comparison of the FTIR spectra of the raw and treated coal samples. The devolatilisation and combustibility behaviour of the samples was studied by using a thermobalance coupled to a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS) for evolved gas analysis. The combustibility characteristics of the cleaned samples were clearly improved, there being a decrease in SO{sub 2} emissions.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Thermal Induced Chemistry in Tatb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenneville, J.; Germann, T. C.; Thompson, A. P.; Kober, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    A reactive force field (ReaxFF) is used with molecular dynamics to probe the chemistry induced by intense heating (`accelerated cook-off') of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Large-system simulations are desired for TATB because of the high degree of carbon clustering expected in this material. Using small, 32-molecule simulations, we calculate the reaction rate as a function of temperature and compare the Arrhenius-predicted activation energy with experiment. Decomposition product evolution (mainly N2, H2O, CO2 and graphitic carbon clusters) is followed using a 576-molecule larger simulation, which also illustrates the effect of system size on both carbon clustering and reaction rate.

  3. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  4. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Sei-ichi; Tanaka, Ryou-ichi

    1986-01-01

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  5. Radiation chemically induced telomerization of ethylene with selected telogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtendunk, H.J. von.

    1975-01-01

    The suitability of different compounds for the use as telogenes in the telomerization of ethylene has been studied. In all cases the reactions are initiated by the γ-radiation of a 60 Co-source. Temperature programed gas chromatography has proved to be an adequate method of analysis. In the teleomerization process with ethylene also methane tri carboxylic acid tri-ethylene ester (MTE), ortho-formic acid tri-ethylene ester (o-ASE), formic acid, bromium cyane, chlorine cyane and dicyane have been used. The telomerization of MTE and ethylene has been performed successfully with a high yield. The dependence of the reaction on temperature, pressure, radiation dose has been studied as well as the influence of a solvent (acetonitrile). In the attempt to telomerize ortho-formic acid tri-ethylene ester only high molecular weight solid product could be isolated. No interpretable results could be obtained for the telomerization of formic acid with ethylene. In the case of the radiation induced telomerization of chlorine cyane or di-cyane with ethylene in the gas phase, no reaction products could be found. No telomerization between di-cyane and ethylene has been observed even when palladium (II)-cyanide is used as a catalyst of after cocatalys is with triphenyl-phosphile in acetonitrile. (orig./HK) [de

  6. Radiation-induced oxidative chemical changes in dehydrated egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Rasem, B.; Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced buildup of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and destruction of carotenoids were followed in whole egg powder and egg yolk powder as functions of dose, dose rate, and the presence of oxygen. In the absence of air the formation of LOOH was limited by the available oxygen, while destruction of carotenoids progressed linearly with dose; neither process depended on the dose rate. In the presence of air, the accumulation of LOOH and the destruction of carotenoids were strongly coupled and inversely proportional to the dose rate. The induction dose of 2.5 kGy was observed in air in both whole egg powder and egg yolk powder, independent of the dose rate. The practical consequence is that radiation decontamination can be carried out in the presence of air at the highest available dose rate by a dose not exceeding 2.5 kGy to avoid extensive degradation. This dose is adequate for a 10(3) reduction factor of Salmonella and well within the threshold dose of 3 kGy for organoleptic changes

  7. Chemical Reactivity and Spectroscopy Explored From QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using the LIO Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Marcolongo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the current advances in the development and the applications of LIO, a lab-made code designed for density functional theory calculations in graphical processing units (GPU, that can be coupled with different classical molecular dynamics engines. This code has been thoroughly optimized to perform efficient molecular dynamics simulations at the QM/MM DFT level, allowing for an exhaustive sampling of the configurational space. Selected examples are presented for the description of chemical reactivity in terms of free energy profiles, and also for the computation of optical properties, such as vibrational and electronic spectra in solvent and protein environments.

  8. Chemical reactivity and spectroscopy explored from QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations using the LIO code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolongo, Juan P.; Zeida, Ari; Semelak, Jonathan A.; Foglia, Nicolás O.; Morzan, Uriel N.; Estrin, Dario A.; González Lebrero, Mariano C.; Scherlis, Damián A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work we present the current advances in the development and the applications of LIO, a lab-made code designed for density functional theory calculations in graphical processing units (GPU), that can be coupled with different classical molecular dynamics engines. This code has been thoroughly optimized to perform efficient molecular dynamics simulations at the QM/MM DFT level, allowing for an exhaustive sampling of the configurational space. Selected examples are presented for the description of chemical reactivity in terms of free energy profiles, and also for the computation of optical properties, such as vibrational and electronic spectra in solvent and protein environments.

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant-pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stimulation. The transcriptome data of the different parts of the chemically induced A. sinensis trunk provide a rich source of materials for discovering and identifying the genes involved in sesquiterpenoid production and in defensive responses to chemical stimulation. This study is the first to use de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly for different parts of chemically induced A. sinensis. Results demonstrate that the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway and WRKY transcription factor play important roles in agarwood formation via chemical induction. The comparative analysis of the transcriptome data of agarwood and A. sinensis lays the foundation

  10. A phenomenological approach to modeling chemical dynamics in nonlinear and two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasesha, Krupa; De Marco, Luigi; Horning, Andrew D; Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-04-07

    We present an approach for calculating nonlinear spectroscopic observables, which overcomes the approximations inherent to current phenomenological models without requiring the computational cost of performing molecular dynamics simulations. The trajectory mapping method uses the semi-classical approximation to linear and nonlinear response functions, and calculates spectra from trajectories of the system's transition frequencies and transition dipole moments. It rests on identifying dynamical variables important to the problem, treating the dynamics of these variables stochastically, and then generating correlated trajectories of spectroscopic quantities by mapping from the dynamical variables. This approach allows one to describe non-Gaussian dynamics, correlated dynamics between variables of the system, and nonlinear relationships between spectroscopic variables of the system and the bath such as non-Condon effects. We illustrate the approach by applying it to three examples that are often not adequately treated by existing analytical models--the non-Condon effect in the nonlinear infrared spectra of water, non-Gaussian dynamics inherent to strongly hydrogen bonded systems, and chemical exchange processes in barrier crossing reactions. The methods described are generally applicable to nonlinear spectroscopy throughout the optical, infrared and terahertz regions.

  11. Effect of genes controlling radiation sensitivity on chemically induced mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of 16 different genes (rad) conferring radiation sensitivity on chemically induced reversion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. The site of reversion used was a well-defined chain initiation mutant mapping in the structural gene coding for iso-1-cytochrome c. High doses of EMS and HNO 2 resulted in decreased reversion of cyc1-131 in rad6, rad9 and rad15 strains compared to the normal RAD + strains. In addition, rad52 greatly decreased EMS reversion of cyc1-131 but had no effect on HNO 2 -induced reversion; rad18, on the other hand, increased HNO 2 -induced reversion but did not alter EMS-induced reversion. When NQO was used as the mutagen, every rad gene tested, except for rad18, had an effect on reversion; rad6, rad9, rad15, rad17, rad18, rad22, rev1, rev2, and rev3 lowered NQO reversion while rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad10, rad12, and rad16 increased it compared to the RAD + strain. The effect of rad genes on chemical mutagenesis is discussed in terms of their effect on uv mutagenesis. It is concluded that although the nature of the repair pathways may differ for uv- and chemically-induced mutations in yeast, a functional repair system is required for the induction of mutation by the chemical agents NQO, EMS, and HNO 2

  12. The molecular dynamics simulation of ion-induced ripple growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suele, P.; Heinig, K.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of ion-sputtering induced growth of repetitive nanostructures, such as ripples has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in Si. The early stage of the ion erosion driven development of ripples has been simulated on prepatterned Si stripes with a wavy surface. The time evolution of the height function and amplitude of the sinusoidal surface profile has been followed by simulated ion-sputtering. According to Bradley-Harper (BH) theory, we expect correlation between the wavelength of ripples and the stability of them. However, we find that in the small ripple wavelength (λ) regime BH theory fails to reproduce the results obtained by molecular dynamics. We find that at short wavelengths (λ 35 nm is stabilized in accordance with the available experimental results. According to the simulations, few hundreds of ion impacts in λ long and few nanometers wide Si ripples are sufficient for reaching saturation in surface growth for for λ>35 nm ripples. In another words, ripples in the long wavelength limit seems to be stable against ion-sputtering. A qualitative comparison of our simulation results with recent experimental data on nanopatterning under irradiation is attempted.

  13. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsuneyama, Koichi [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Science for Research, University of Toyama, Sugitani, Toyama 930‐0194 (Japan); Endo, Shinya [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Yamane, Hidaka 350‐1241 (Japan); Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan); Yokoi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tyokoi@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Drug Metabolism and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920‐1192 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  14. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Endo, Shinya; Tsukui, Tohru; Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  15. Force-induced chemical reactions on the metal centre in a single metalloprotein molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.; Li, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins play indispensable roles in biology owing to the versatile chemical reactivity of metal centres. However, studying their reactivity in many metalloproteins is challenging, as protein three-dimensional structure encloses labile metal centres, thus limiting their access to reactants and impeding direct measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of single-molecule atomic force microscopy to induce partial unfolding to expose metal centres in metalloproteins to aqueous solution, thus allowing for studying their chemical reactivity in aqueous solution for the first time. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate two chemical reactions for the FeS4 centre in rubredoxin: electrophilic protonation and nucleophilic ligand substitution. Our results show that protonation and ligand substitution result in mechanical destabilization of the FeS4 centre. Quantum chemical calculations corroborated experimental results and revealed detailed reaction mechanisms. We anticipate that this novel approach will provide insights into chemical reactivity of metal centres in metalloproteins under biologically more relevant conditions. PMID:26108369

  16. Semiclassical theory of electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics: Incorporation of the Zhu-Nakamura theory into the frozen Gaussian propagation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondorskiy, A.; Nakamura, H.

    2004-01-01

    The title theory is developed by combining the Herman-Kluk semiclassical theory for adiabatic propagation on single potential-energy surface and the semiclassical Zhu-Nakamura theory for nonadiabatic transition. The formulation with use of natural mathematical principles leads to a quite simple expression for the propagator based on classical trajectories and simple formulas are derived for overall adiabatic and nonadiabatic processes. The theory is applied to electronically nonadiabatic photodissociation processes: a one-dimensional problem of H 2 + in a cw (continuous wave) laser field and a two-dimensional model problem of H 2 O in a cw laser field. The theory is found to work well for the propagation duration of several molecular vibrational periods and wide energy range. Although the formulation is made for the case of laser induced nonadiabatic processes, it is straightforwardly applicable to ordinary electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics

  17. Chemical inducible promotor used to obtain transgenic plants with a silent marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Nam-Hai; Aoyama, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    A chemically inducible promoter is described which may be used to transform plants with genes which are easily regulatable by adding plants or plant cells to a medium containing an inducer of the promoter or by removing the plants or plant cells from such medium. The promoter described is one which is inducible by a glucocorticoid which is not endogenous to plants. Such promoters may be used with a variety of genes such as ipt or knotted1 to induce shoot formation in the presence of a glucocorticoid. The promoter may also be used with antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes which are then regulatable by the presence or absence of inducer rather than being constitutive. Other examples of genes which may be placed under the control of the inducible promoter are also presented.

  18. Chemical inducible promoter used to obtain transgenic plants with a silent marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Zuo, Jianru; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2004-08-31

    A chemically inducible promoter is described that may be used to transform plants, including tobacco and lettuce, with genes which are easily regulatable by adding the plants or plant cells to a medium containing an inducer of the promoter or by removing the plants or plant cells from such medium. The promoter described is one that is inducible by a glucocorticoid which is not endogenous to plants. Such promoters may be used with a variety of genes such as ipt or knotted1 to induce shoot formation in the presence of a glucocorticoid. The promoter may also be used with antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes which are then regulatable by the presence or absence of inducer rather than being constitutive. Other examples of genes which may be placed under the control of the inducible promoter are also presented.

  19. Dynamics of the stochastic low concentration trimolecular oscillatory chemical system with jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongchang; Yang, Qigui

    2018-06-01

    This paper is devoted to discern long time dynamics through the stochastic low concentration trimolecular oscillatory chemical system with jumps. By Lyapunov technique, this system is proved to have a unique global positive solution, and the asymptotic stability in mean square of such model is further established. Moreover, the existence of random attractor and Lyapunov exponents are obtained for the stochastic homeomorphism flow generated by the corresponding global positive solution. And some numerical simulations are given to illustrate the presented results.

  20. Catalytic performances of chemically immobilized urease under static and dynamic conditions: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Yürekli, Yılmaz; Alsoy Altınkaya, Sacide

    2011-01-01

    Immobilized urease has been used for direct removal of urea from aqueous solution and as biological sensing material in the preparation of urea biosensors. The former application is carried out under dynamic condition using ultrafiltration membrane either in tubular form or in flat sheet, while the latter is used in static condition. In this study, the performance of chemically immobilized urease on poly(acrylonitrile-co-sodium methallyl sulfonate) ultrafiltration membrane was determined unde...

  1. Direct Reprogramming of Fibroblasts via a Chemically Induced XEN-like State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Defang; Ma, Yantao; Du, Xiaomin; Jing, Junzhan; Wang, Lipeng; Xie, Bingqing; Sun, Da; Sun, Shaoqiang; Jin, Xueqin; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Ting; Guan, Jingyang; Yi, Zexuan; Lai, Weifeng; Zheng, Ping; Huang, Zhuo; Chang, Yanzhong; Chai, Zhen; Xu, Jun; Deng, Hongkui

    2017-08-03

    Direct lineage reprogramming, including with small molecules, has emerged as a promising approach for generating desired cell types. We recently found that during chemical induction of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts, cells pass through an extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN)-like state. Here, we show that these chemically induced XEN-like cells can also be induced to directly reprogram into functional neurons, bypassing the pluripotent state. The induced neurons possess neuron-specific expression profiles, form functional synapses in culture, and further mature after transplantation into the adult mouse brain. Using similar principles, we were also able to induce hepatocyte-like cells from the XEN-like cells. Cells in the induced XEN-like state were readily expandable over at least 20 passages and retained genome stability and lineage specification potential. Our study therefore establishes a multifunctional route for chemical lineage reprogramming and may provide a platform for generating a diverse range of cell types via application of this expandable XEN-like state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamical isospin effects in nucleon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Li; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen

    2008-01-01

    The isospin effects in proton-induced reactions on isotopes of 112-132 Sn and the corresponding β-stable isobars are studied by means of the improved quantum molecular dynamics model and some sensitive probes for the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities are proposed. The beam energy range is chosen to be 100-300 MeV. Our study shows that the system size dependence of the reaction cross sections for p+ 112-132 Sn deviates from the Carlson's empirical expression obtained by fitting the reaction cross sections for proton on nuclei along the β-stability line and sensitively depends on the stiffness of the symmetry energy. We also find that the angular distribution of elastic scattering for p+ 132 Sn at large impact parameters is very sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy, which is uniquely due to the effect of the symmetry potential with no mixture of the effect from the isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon cross sections. The isospin effects in neutron-induced reactions are also studied and it is found that the effects are just opposite to that in proton-induced reactions. We find that the difference between the peaks of the angular distributions of elastic scattering for p+ 132 Sn and n+ 132 Sn at E p,n =100 MeV and b=7.5 fm is positive for soft symmetry energy U sym sf and negative for super-stiff symmetry energy U sym nlin and close to zero for linear density dependent symmetry energy U sym lin , which seems very useful for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities

  3. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeong eKim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn2+ in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2, deferoxamine (3 mM DFX, and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3, we evaluated whether Zn2+ is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn2+ chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N’N’-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl ethylenediamine (TPEN, prevented the intracellular Zn2+ load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3-hour-later Zn2+ chelation nor a non-Zn2+ chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn2+ rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn2+ release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn2+ might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms.

  4. Disparate roles of zinc in chemical hypoxia-induced neuronal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujeong; Seo, Jung-Woo; Oh, Shin Bi; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Inki; Suh, Nayoung; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has provided a causative role of zinc (Zn(2+)) in neuronal death following ischemic brain injury. Using a hypoxia model of primary cultured cortical neurons with hypoxia-inducing chemicals, cobalt chloride (1 mM CoCl2), deferoxamine (3 mM DFX), and sodium azide (2 mM NaN3), we evaluated whether Zn(2+) is involved in hypoxic neuronal death. The hypoxic chemicals rapidly elicited intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation in viable neurons. The immediate addition of the Zn(2+) chelator, CaEDTA or N,N,N'N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), prevented the intracellular Zn(2+) load and CoCl2-induced neuronal death, but neither 3 hour later Zn(2+) chelation nor a non-Zn(2+) chelator ZnEDTA (1 mM) demonstrated any effects. However, neither CaEDTA nor TPEN rescued neurons from cell death following DFX- or NaN3-induced hypoxia, whereas ZnEDTA rendered them resistant to the hypoxic injury. Instead, the immediate supplementation of Zn(2+) rescued DFX- and NaN3-induced neuronal death. The iron supplementation also afforded neuroprotection against DFX-induced hypoxic injury. Thus, although intracellular Zn(2+) release/accumulation is common during chemical hypoxia, Zn(2+) might differently influence the subsequent fate of neurons; it appears to play a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role depending on the hypoxic chemical used. These results also suggest that different hypoxic chemicals may induce neuronal death via distinct mechanisms.

  5. Dynamics, Miscibility, and Morphology in Polymer-Molecule Blends: The Impact of Chemical Functionality

    KAUST Repository

    Do, Khanh

    2015-10-22

    In the quest to improve the performance of organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells, many recent efforts have focused on developing molecular and polymer alternatives to commonly used fullerene acceptors. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate polymer-molecule blends comprised of the polymer donor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with a series of acceptors based on trialkylsilylethynyl-substituted pentacene. A matrix of nine pentacene derivatives, consisting of systematic chemical variation both in the nature of the alkyl groups and electron-withdrawing moieties appended to the acene, is used to draw connections between the chemical structure of the acene acceptor and the nanoscale properties of the polymer-molecule blend. These connections include polymer and molecular diffusivity, donor-acceptor packing and interfacial (contact) area, and miscibility. The results point to the very significant role that seemingly modest changes in chemical structure play during the formation of polymer-molecule blend morphologies.

  6. Dynamics, Miscibility, and Morphology in Polymer-Molecule Blends: The Impact of Chemical Functionality

    KAUST Repository

    Do, Khanh; Risko, Chad; Anthony, John E; Amassian, Aram; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    In the quest to improve the performance of organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells, many recent efforts have focused on developing molecular and polymer alternatives to commonly used fullerene acceptors. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate polymer-molecule blends comprised of the polymer donor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with a series of acceptors based on trialkylsilylethynyl-substituted pentacene. A matrix of nine pentacene derivatives, consisting of systematic chemical variation both in the nature of the alkyl groups and electron-withdrawing moieties appended to the acene, is used to draw connections between the chemical structure of the acene acceptor and the nanoscale properties of the polymer-molecule blend. These connections include polymer and molecular diffusivity, donor-acceptor packing and interfacial (contact) area, and miscibility. The results point to the very significant role that seemingly modest changes in chemical structure play during the formation of polymer-molecule blend morphologies.

  7. Automated chemical kinetic modeling via hybrid reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döntgen, Malte; Schmalz, Felix; Kopp, Wassja A; Kröger, Leif C; Leonhard, Kai

    2018-06-13

    An automated scheme for obtaining chemical kinetic models from scratch using reactive molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry simulations is presented. This methodology combines the phase space sampling of reactive molecular dynamics with the thermochemistry and kinetics prediction capabilities of quantum mechanics. This scheme provides the NASA polynomial and modified Arrhenius equation parameters for all species and reactions that are observed during the simulation and supplies them in the ChemKin format. The ab initio level of theory for predictions is easily exchangeable and the presently used G3MP2 level of theory is found to reliably reproduce hydrogen and methane oxidation thermochemistry and kinetics data. Chemical kinetic models obtained with this approach are ready-to-use for, e.g., ignition delay time simulations, as shown for hydrogen combustion. The presented extension of the ChemTraYzer approach can be used as a basis for methodologically advancing chemical kinetic modeling schemes and as a black-box approach to generate chemical kinetic models.

  8. Nutrient Induced Type 2 and Chemical Induced Type 1 Experimental Diabetes Differently Modulate Gastric GLP-1 Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO by high-energy (HE diet and by streptozotocin (STZ in Sprague Dawly (SD rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis.

  9. Chemical and biological activity in open flows: A dynamical system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tel, Tamas; Moura, Alessandro de; Grebogi, Celso; Karolyi, Gyoergy

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and biological processes often take place in fluid flows. Many of them, like environmental or microfluidical ones, generate filamentary patterns which have a fractal structure, due to the presence of chaos in the underlying advection dynamics. In such cases, hydrodynamical stirring strongly couples to the reactivity of the advected species: the outcome of the reaction is then typically different from that of the same reaction taking place in a well-mixed environment. Here we review recent progress in this field, which became possible due to the application of methods taken from dynamical system theory. We place special emphasis on the derivation of effective rate equations which contain singular terms expressing the fact that the reaction takes place on a moving fractal catalyst, on the unstable foliation of the reaction free advection dynamics

  10. Systematic trends in photonic reagent induced reactions in a homologous chemical family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-08-29

    The growing use of ultrafast laser pulses to induce chemical reactions prompts consideration of these pulses as "photonic reagents" in analogy to chemical reagents. This work explores the prospect that photonic reagents may affect systematic trends in dissociative ionization reactions of a homologous family of halomethanes, much as systematic outcomes are often observed for reactions between homologous families of chemical reagents and chemical substrates. The experiments in this work with photonic reagents of varying pulse energy and linear spectral chirp reveal systematic correlations between observable ion yields and the following set of natural variables describing the substrate molecules: the ionization energy of the parent molecule, the appearance energy of each fragment ion, and the relative strength of carbon-halogen bonds in molecules containing two different halogens. The results suggest that reactions induced by photonic reagents exhibit systematic behavior analogous to that observed in reactions driven by chemical reagents, which provides a basis to consider empirical "rules" for predicting the outcomes of photonic reagent induced reactions.

  11. Biomarkers of DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses results from the studies on various biomarkers of the DNA and cytogenetic damages induced by environmental chemicals or radiation. Results of the biomonitoring studies have shown that particularly in the condition of Poland, health hazard from radiation exposure is overestimated in contradistinction to the environmental hazard

  12. A proposal for study of ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Problems in ion-beam induced chemical reactions using JAERI Tandem Accelerator were discussed. Research philosophy, some proposed experiments which are based on measurements during ion-beam bombardment, and main features of the experimental apparatus are briefly described in this report. (author)

  13. Optimization of microwave-induced chemical etching for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation is carried out to optimize the recently established microwave-induced chemical etching (MICE) parameters for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors. Several combinations of all available microwave powers with different etching durations were analysed to determine the most suitable etching condition. The etching duration was found to reduce with increasing microwave power and the tracks were observed at about 18, 15, 12, and 6 min for 300, 450, 600 and 900 W of microwave powers respectively compared to a few hours in chemical etching (CE) method. However, for complete development of tracks the etching duration of 30, 40, 50 and 60 min were found to be suitable for the microwave powers of 900, 600, 450 and 300 W, respectively. Temperature profiles of the etchant for all the available microwave powers at different etching durations were generated to regulate the etching process in a controlled manner. The bulk etch rates at different microwave powers were determined by 2 methods, viz., gravimetric and removed thickness methods. A logarithmic expression was used to fit the variation of bulk etch rate with microwave power. Neutron detection efficiencies were obtained for all the cases and the results on track parameters obtained with MICE technique were compared with those obtained from another detector processed with chemical etching. - Highlights: • Microwave-induced chemical etching method is optimized for rapid development of recoil tracks due to neutrons in CR-39 detector. • Several combinations of microwave powers and etching durations are investigated to standardize the suitable etching condition. • Bulk-etch rates are determined for all microwave powers by two different methods, viz. gravimetric and removed thickness method. • The method is found to be simple, effective and much faster compared to conventional chemical etching

  14. Prediction of dynamic loads and induced vibrations in stall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirstrup Petersen, J.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Bjoerck, A. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden (Sweden); Enevoldsen, P. [Bonus Energy A/S (Denmark); Oeye, S. [The Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Ganander, H. [Teknikgruppen AB (Sweden); Winkelaar, D. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    Results from research in an EC Joule-III project and from national projects are presented. The objectives are improvement of design methods for stall regulated wind turbines with emphasis on stall induced vibrations and dynamic stall. The primary concern is limitation of the edgewise vibrations in the fundamental blade natural mode shape, which have caused trouble on modern wind turbines of approximate size 500 kW nominal power and 40 m rotor diameter. A theoretical study of quasi-steady aerodynamics confirms that the vibrations are driven basically by energy supplied from the aerodynamic forces during stalled operation. This energy exchange is equivalent to negative aerodynamic damping. The theoretical approach identifies the main parameters controlling the phenomenon. These parameters describe the steady and the dynamic airfoil characteristics, the overall aerodynamic layout of the blade, e.g. chord length and twist, the structural properties of the blade, e.g. structural damping and properties controlling the resulting vibration direction. Furthermore, full aeroelastic calculations and comparison with measurements show that the properties of the supporting structure, i.e. the main shaft, the nacelle and the tower, are important, as the global vibration of the rotor on its support may exchange energy with the blade vibration, when the blade natural frequency is close to one of the frequencies of the coupled rotor tilt-yaw mode shapes, usually denoted the global rotor whirl frequencies. It is confirmed that the influence of changing the primary design parameters can be determined by use of qualified aeroelastic calculations. Presented design guidelines therefore build on both the simple quasi-steady models, which can be used for the preliminary choice of the design variables mentioned above, and on full aeroelastic calculations. The aeroelastic calculations refine the design basis and should be used for choosing the final design variables and for final

  15. Chemically induced transition phenomena in polyurethanes as seen from generalized mode Grueneisen parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Philipp, M; Bactavatchalou, R; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J; Zielinski, B; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A, Avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1115 (Luxembourg); Possart, W; Alnot, P [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche, Universitaire Saarland-Lorraine (Luxembourg)], E-mail: ulrich.mueller@uni.lu

    2008-05-21

    Many phenomenological properties of reactive polymers like polyurethanes increase or decrease continuously in the course of the curing process before saturating at the end of the chemical reaction. This holds true for instance for the mass density, the refractive index, the chemical turnover and the hypersonic properties. The reason for this monotone behaviour is that the chemical reaction behaves like a continuous succession of irreversible phase transitions. These transitions are superposed by the sol-gel transition and possibly by the chemically induced glass transition, with the drawback that the latter two highlighted transitions are often hidden by the underlying curing process. In this work we propose generalized mode Grueneisen parameters as an alternative probe for elucidating the polymerization process itself and the closely related transition phenomena. As a model system we use polyurethane composed of a diisocyanate and varying ratios of difunctional and trifunctional alcohols.

  16. The chemical cue tetrabromopyrrole from a biofilm bacterium induces settlement of multiple Caribbean corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneed, Jennifer M; Sharp, Koty H; Ritchie, Kimberly B; Paul, Valerie J

    2014-07-07

    Microbial biofilms induce larval settlement for some invertebrates, including corals; however, the chemical cues involved have rarely been identified. Here, we demonstrate the role of microbial biofilms in inducing larval settlement with the Caribbean coral Porites astreoides and report the first instance of a chemical cue isolated from a marine biofilm bacterium that induces complete settlement (attachment and metamorphosis) of Caribbean coral larvae. Larvae settled in response to natural biofilms, and the response was eliminated when biofilms were treated with antibiotics. A similar settlement response was elicited by monospecific biofilms of a single bacterial strain, Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5, isolated from the surface biofilm of a crustose coralline alga. The activity of Pseudoalteromonas sp. PS5 was attributed to the production of a single compound, tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), which has been shown previously to induce metamorphosis without attachment in Pacific acroporid corals. In addition to inducing settlement of brooded larvae (P. astreoides), TBP also induced larval settlement for two broadcast-spawning species, Orbicella (formerly Montastraea) franksi and Acropora palmata, indicating that this compound may have widespread importance among Caribbean coral species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about ∼9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V φ ) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios (∼0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities (∼0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V φ -|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar neighborhood. Our Galactic

  18. Induced dynamic nonlinear ground response at Gamer Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Z.; Bodin, P.; Langston, C.A.; Pearce, F.; Gomberg, J.; Johnson, P.A.; Menq, F.-Y.; Brackman, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a prototype experiment in which we actively induce, observe, and quantify in situ nonlinear sediment response in the near surface. This experiment was part of a suite of experiments conducted during August 2004 in Garner Valley, California, using a large mobile shaker truck from the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. We deployed a dense accelerometer array within meters of the mobile shaker truck to replicate a controlled, laboratory-style soil dynamics experiment in order to observe wave-amplitude-dependent sediment properties. Ground motion exceeding 1g acceleration was produced near the shaker truck. The wave field was dominated by Rayleigh surface waves and ground motions were strong enough to produce observable nonlinear changes in wave velocity. We found that as the force load of the shaker increased, the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity decreased by as much as ???30% at the highest frequencies used (up to 30 Hz). Phase velocity dispersion curves were inverted for S-wave velocity as a function of depth using a simple isotropic elastic model to estimate the depth dependence of changes to the velocity structure. The greatest change in velocity occurred nearest the surface, within the upper 4 m. These estimated S-wave velocity values were used with estimates of surface strain to compare with laboratory-based shear modulus reduction measurements from the same site. Our results suggest that it may be possible to characterize nonlinear soil properties in situ using a noninvasive field technique.

  19. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Plenio, Martin B; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Luy, Burkhard; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13 C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13 C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13 C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis. (paper)

  20. Automatic differentiation tools in the dynamic simulation of chemical engineering processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic Differentiation is a relatively recent technique developed for the differentiation of functions applicable directly to the source code to compute the function written in standard programming languages. That technique permits the automatization of the differentiation step, crucial for dynamic simulation and optimization of processes. The values for the derivatives obtained with AD are exact (to roundoff. The theoretical exactness of the AD comes from the fact that it uses the same rules of differentiation as in differential calculus, but these rules are applied to an algorithmic specification of the function rather than to a formula. The main purpose of this contribution is to discuss the impact of Automatic Differentiation in the field of dynamic simulation of chemical engineering processes. The influence of the differentiation technique on the behavior of the integration code, the performance of the generated code and the incorporation of AD tools in consistent initialization tools are discussed from the viewpoint of dynamic simulation of typical models in chemical engineering.

  1. Strain-induced structural changes and chemical reactions. 1: Thermomechanical and kinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitas, V.I.; Nesterenko, V.F.; Meyers, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Strain-induced chemical reactions were observed recently (Nesterenko et al) in experiments in the shear band in both Ti-Si and Nb-Si mixtures. Reactions can start in the solid state or after melting of at least one component. One of the aims is to find theoretically whether there are possible macroscopic mechanisms of mechanical intensification of the above and other chemical reactions due to plastic shear in the solid state. Continuum thermodynamical theory of structural changes with an athermal kinetics, which includes martensitic phase transformations, plastic strain-induced chemical reactions and polymorphic transformations, is developed at finite strains. The theory includes kinematics, criterion of structural change and extremum principle for determination of all unknown variable parameters for the case with neglected elastic strains. Thermodynamically consistent kinetic theory of thermally activated structural changes is suggested. The concept of the effective temperature is introduced which takes into account that temperature can vary significantly (on 1,000 K) during the chemical reactions under consideration. The theory will be applied in Part 2 of the paper for the description of chemical reactions in the shear band

  2. Electrochemically induced chemical sensor properties in graphite screen-printed electrodes: The case of a chemical sensor for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostaki, Vasiliki T.; Florou, Ageliki B.; Prodromidis, Mamas I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Electrochemical treatment endows analytical characteristics to SPEs. → A sensitive chemical sensor for uranium is described. → Performance is due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. → The amount of the solvent controls the achievable sensitivity. - Abstract: We report for the first time on the possibility to develop chemical sensors based on electrochemically treated, non-modified, graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs). The applied galvanostatic treatment (5 μA for 6 min in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 ) is demonstrated to be effective for the development of chemical sensors for the determination of uranium in aqueous solutions. A detailed study of the effect of various parameters related to the fabrication of SPEs on the performance of the resulting sensors along with some diagnostic experiments on conventional graphite electrodes showed that the inducible analytical characteristics are due to a synergy between electrochemical treatment and ink's solvents. Indeed, the amount of the latter onto the printed working layer controls the achievable sensitivity. The preconcentration of the analyte was performed in an electroless mode in an aqueous solutions of U(VI), pH 4.6, and then, the accumulated species was reduced by means of a differential pulse voltammetry scan in 0.1 M H 3 BO 3 , pH 3. Under selected experimental conditions, a linear calibration curve over the range 5 x 10 -9 to 10 -7 M U(VI) was constructed. The 3σ limit of detection at a preconcentration time of 30 min, and the relative standard deviation of the method were 4.5 x 10 -9 M U(VI) and >12% (n = 5, 5 x 10 -8 M U(VI)), respectively. The effect of potential interferences was also examined.

  3. Method for the deconvolution of incompletely resolved CARS spectra in chemical dynamics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anda, A.A.; Phillips, D.L.; Valentini, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for deconvoluting incompletely resolved CARS spectra to obtain quantum state population distributions. No particular form for the rotational and vibrational state distribution is assumed, the population of each quantum state is treated as an independent quantity. This method of analysis differs from previously developed approaches for the deconvolution of CARS spectra, all of which assume that the population distribution is Boltzmann, and thus are limited to the analysis of CARS spectra taken under conditions of thermal equilibrium. The method of analysis reported here has been developed to deconvolute CARS spectra of photofragments and chemical reaction products obtained in chemical dynamics experiments under nonequilibrium conditions. The deconvolution procedure has been incorporated into a computer code. The application of that code to the deconvolution of CARS spectra obtained for samples at thermal equilibrium and not at thermal equilibrium is reported. The method is accurate and computationally efficient

  4. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    the velocity and pressure distributions in a fluid. CFD also enables the modelling of several fluids simultaneously, e.g. gas bubbles in a liquid, as well as the presence of turbulence and dissolved chemicals in a fluid, and many other phenomena. This makes CFD an appreciated tool for studying flow structures......, mixing, and other mass transfer phenomena in chemical and biochemical reactor systems. In this project, four selected case studies are investigated in order to explore the capabilities of CFD. The selected cases are a 1 ml stirred microbioreactor, an 8 ml magnetically stirred reactor, a Rushton impeller...... and an ion-exchange reaction are also modelled and compared to experimental data. The thesis includes a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals behind a CFD software, as well as a more detailed review of the fluid dynamic phenomena investigated in this project. The momentum and continuity equations...

  5. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine von Maltzan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results.

  6. High-speed imaging and evolution dynamics of laser induced deposition of conductive inks (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrygianni, Marina; Papazoglou, Symeon; Zacharatos, Filimonas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna

    2017-02-01

    During the last decade there is an ever-increasing interest for the study of laser processes dynamics and specifically of the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique, since the evolution of the phenomena under investigation may provide real time metrology in terms of jet velocity, adjacent jet interaction and impact pressure. The study of such effects leads to a more thorough understanding of the deposition process, hence to an improved printing outcome and in these frames, this work presents a study on the dynamics of LIFT for conductive nanoparticles inks using high-speed imaging approaches. Moreover, in this study, we investigated the printing regimes and the printing quality during the transfer of copper (Cu) nanoink, which is a metallic nanoink usually employed in interconnect formation as well as the printing of silver nanowires, which provide transparency and may be used in applications where transparent electrodes are needed as in photovoltaics, batteries, etc. Furthermore, we demonstrate the fabrication of an all laser printed resistive chemical sensor device that combines Ag nanoparticles ink and graphene oxide, for the detection of humidity fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor device architecture was able to host multiple pairs of electrodes, where Ag nanoink or nanopaste were laser printed, to form the electrodes as well as the electrical interconnections between the operating device and the printed circuit board. Performance evaluation was conducted upon flow of different concentrations of humidity vapors to the sensor, and good response (500 ppm limit of detection) with reproducible operation was observed.

  7. The use of dynamic capabilities to boost innovation in a Brazilian Chemical Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Froehlich

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic capabilities seek to explain how competitive advantages can be built in rapidly changing environments. This study aims to assess how the application of dynamic capabilities can contribute to the expansion of innovation capabilities. Data was collected on ten semi-structured interviews with executives from a chemical company, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results indicate that the application of dynamic capabilities contributes to the development of innovation capabilities through the consolidation of the first dynamic capability (sensing, which fosters innovation. Sensing can be considered an organizational capability, resulting from the integration between organizational strategies and the innovation practices of the organization as a whole. This study brings the following contributions the need to include a new microfoundation in the sensing capability, which in this study is called ‘processes to manage innovation on a strategic level' and the need to adapt another microfoundation related to the sensing capability, called ‘processes oriented toward collaboration with suppliers to complement and stimulate innovations within the company'. It is suggested that these processes should be reassessed in terms of their potential to generate and complement organizational innovation.

  8. Chemical leucoderma induced by ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of chemical leucoderma (CL in a 15-year-old girl, who developed patterned depigmentation at the back of both ear lobules after contact with plastic ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC after continuous use for 6-7 months. Patch test with Indian standard series and cosmetic series was negative after 48 h, but she refused patch testing for extended duration as the possibility of induced depigmentation at the test site was unacceptable to her. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plastic ear-ring stopper induced CL.

  9. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.

    1999-01-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  10. Chemical changes induced on a TiO2 surface by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, L.I.; Passeggi, M.C.G.; Ferron, J.

    2007-01-01

    We study the TiO 2 (Ti 4+ ) chemical reduction induced by electron bombardment using Auger electron spectroscopy and factor analysis. We show that the electron irradiation of a TiO 2 sample is characterized by the appearance of a lower Ti oxidation state, Ti 2 O 3 (Ti 3+ ), followed by a further deposition of carbon, which is present inevitably in the environment even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The appearance of C over the surface is found to be a complex mechanism which affects the reduction process through passivation of the electron-induced oxygen desorption and formation of titanium carbide. For very high irradiation doses, we also found that the chemical changes on the surface are stopped due to the deposition of carbon in a graphitic form

  11. The Dynamics of Chemical Reactions: Atomistic Visualizations of Organic Reactions, and Homage to van 't Hoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyue; Houk, K N

    2018-03-15

    Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff was the first Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He pioneered in the study of chemical dynamics, which referred at that time to chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. The term has evolved in modern times to refer to the exploration of chemical transformations in a time-resolved fashion. Chemical dynamics has been driven by the development of molecular dynamics trajectory simulations, which provide atomic visualization of chemical processes and illuminate how dynamic effects influence chemical reactivity and selectivity. In homage to the legend of van 't Hoff, we review the development of the chemical dynamics of organic reactions, our area of research. We then discuss our trajectory simulations of pericyclic reactions, and our development of dynamic criteria for concerted and stepwise reaction mechanisms. We also describe a method that we call environment-perturbed transition state sampling, which enables trajectory simulations in condensed-media using quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM). We apply the method to reactions in solvent and in enzyme. Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff (1852, Rotterdam-1911, Berlin) received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1901 "in recognition of the extraordinary services he has rendered by the discovery of the laws of chemical dynamics and osmotic pressure in solutions". van 't Hoff was born the Netherlands, and earned his doctorate in Utrecht in 1874. In 1896 he moved to Berlin, where he was offered a position with more research and less teaching. van 't Hoff is considered one of the founders of physical chemistry. A key step in establishing this new field was the start of Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie in 1887. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Comparative experimental study of cancer induced by ionizing radiations or by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Animal experiments have contributed to specify a number of parameters used in setting human safety limits for ionizing radiation. In the same way, comparisons have been made between cancers induced in man and in animals in well-defined conditions. In order to use the same experimental data for chemical carcinogens, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis should be the same, i.e. additivity of responses instead of synergy of effects, which requires the development of a new experimental method [fr

  13. Decay Accelerating Factor (CD55) Protects Neuronal Cells from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Pavlakovic G, Isom GE: Dopaminergic neurotoxicity of cyanide: neurochemical, histological and behavioral characterization. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol...provided the original work is properly cited. ResearchDecay accelerating factor (CD55) protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury...deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9) production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured

  14. Assessment of immunotoxicity induced by chemicals in human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, L; Switalla, S; Prenzler, F; Seehase, S; Pfennig, O; Förster, C; Fieguth, H; Braun, A; Sewald, K

    2014-06-01

    Occupational asthma can be induced by a number of chemicals at the workplace. Risk assessment of potential sensitizers is mostly performed in animal experiments. With increasing public demand for alternative methods, human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) have been developed as an ex vivo model. Human PCLS were exposed to increasing concentrations of 20 industrial chemicals including 4 respiratory allergens, 11 contact allergens, and 5 non-sensitizing irritants. Local respiratory irritation was characterized and expressed as 75% (EC25) and 50% (EC50) cell viability with respect to controls. Dose-response curves of all chemicals except for phenol were generated. Local respiratory inflammation was quantified by measuring the production of cytokines and chemokines. TNF-α and IL-1α were increased significantly in human PCLS after exposure to the respiratory sensitizers trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and ammonium hexachloroplatinate (HClPt) at subtoxic concentrations, while contact sensitizers and non-sensitizing irritants failed to induce the release of these cytokines to the same extent. Interestingly, significant increases in T(H)1/T(H)2 cytokines could be detected only after exposure to HClPt at a subtoxic concentration. In conclusion, allergen-induced cytokines were observed but not considered as biomarkers for the differentiation between respiratory and contact sensitizers. Our preliminary results show an ex vivo model which might be used for prediction of chemical-induced toxicity, but is due to its complex three-dimensional structure not applicable for a simple screening of functional and behavior changes of certain cell populations such as dendritic cells and T-cells in response to allergens. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of mechano-chemical degradation induced stresses of polyolefin pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoung Ho [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chudnovsky, Alexander [The University of Illinois, Chicago (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The fracture phenomena in engineering thermoplastics resulting from chemical degradation is usually observed in the form of a microcrack network within a surface layer of degraded polymer exposed to a combined action of mechanical stresses and chemically aggressive environment. Degradation of polymers is usually manifested in a reduction of molecular weight, increase of crystallinity in semi crystalline polymers, increase of material density, a subtle increase in yield strength, and a dramatic reduction in toughness. The critical level of degradation for fracture initiation depends on the rates of toughness deterioration and build-up of the degradation related stresses as well as on the manufacturing and service stresses. In this paper, the evaluation of mechano-chemical degradation induced stress is attempted, and the application of the evaluated stress to the fracture initiation of polymer pipes is presented.

  16. Evaluation of mechano-chemical degradation induced stresses of polyolefin pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoung Ho; Chudnovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The fracture phenomena in engineering thermoplastics resulting from chemical degradation is usually observed in the form of a microcrack network within a surface layer of degraded polymer exposed to a combined action of mechanical stresses and chemically aggressive environment. Degradation of polymers is usually manifested in a reduction of molecular weight, increase of crystallinity in semi crystalline polymers, increase of material density, a subtle increase in yield strength, and a dramatic reduction in toughness. The critical level of degradation for fracture initiation depends on the rates of toughness deterioration and build-up of the degradation related stresses as well as on the manufacturing and service stresses. In this paper, the evaluation of mechano-chemical degradation induced stress is attempted, and the application of the evaluated stress to the fracture initiation of polymer pipes is presented

  17. Assessing the chemical contamination dynamics in a mixed land use stream system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Anne Th; McKnight, Ursula S; Rønde, Vinni; Bjerg, Poul L

    2017-11-15

    Traditionally, the monitoring of streams for chemical and ecological status has been limited to surface water concentrations, where the dominant focus has been on general water quality and the risk for eutrophication. Mixed land use stream systems, comprising urban areas and agricultural production, are challenging to assess with multiple chemical stressors impacting stream corridors. New approaches are urgently needed for identifying relevant sources, pathways and potential impacts for implementation of suitable source management and remedial measures. We developed a method for risk assessing chemical stressors in these systems and applied the approach to a 16-km groundwater-fed stream corridor (Grindsted, Denmark). Three methods were combined: (i) in-stream contaminant mass discharge for source quantification, (ii) Toxic Units and (iii) environmental standards. An evaluation of the chemical quality of all three stream compartments - stream water, hyporheic zone, streambed sediment - made it possible to link chemical stressors to their respective sources and obtain new knowledge about source composition and origin. Moreover, toxic unit estimation and comparison to environmental standards revealed the stream water quality was substantially impaired by both geogenic and diffuse anthropogenic sources of metals along the entire corridor, while the streambed was less impacted. Quantification of the contaminant mass discharge originating from a former pharmaceutical factory revealed that several 100 kgs of chlorinated ethenes and pharmaceutical compounds discharge into the stream every year. The strongly reduced redox conditions in the plume result in high concentrations of dissolved iron and additionally release arsenic, generating the complex contaminant mixture found in the narrow discharge zone. The fingerprint of the plume was observed in the stream several km downgradient, while nutrients, inorganics and pesticides played a minor role for the stream health. The

  18. Radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rodent models. What's different from chemical carcinogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Iizuka, Daisuke; Daino, Kazuhiro; Takabatake, Takashi; Okamoto, Mieko; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of a few well-characterized etiologic factors of human breast cancer. Laboratory rodents serve as useful experimental models for investigating dose responses and mechanisms of cancer development. Using these models, a lot of information has been accumulated about mammary gland cancer, which can be induced by both chemical carcinogens and radiation. In this review, we first list some experimental rodent models of breast cancer induction. We then focus on several topics that are important in understanding the mechanisms and risk modification of breast cancer development, and compare radiation and chemical carcinogenesis models. We will focus on the pathology and natural history of cancer development in these models, genetic changes observed in induced cancers, indirect effects of carcinogens, and finally risk modification by reproductive factors and age at exposure to the carcinogens. In addition, we summarize the knowledge available on mammary stem/progenitor cells as a potential target of carcinogens. Comparison of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis models on these topics indicates certain similarities, but it also indicates clear differences in several important aspects, such as genetic alterations of induced cancers and modification of susceptibility by age and reproductive factors. Identification of the target cell type and relevant translational research for human risk management may be among the important issues that are addressed by radiation carcinogenesis models. (author)

  19. Lack of chemically induced mutation in repair-deficient mutants of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1974-01-01

    Two genes, rad6 and rad9, that confer radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also greatly reduce the frequency of chemically-induced reversions of a tester mutant cyc1-131, which is a chain initiation mutant in the structural gene determining iso-1-cytochrome c. Mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DES), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS), nitroquinoline oxide (NQO), nitrosoguanidine (NTG), nitrogen mustard (HN2), β-propiolactone, and tritiated uridine, as well as mutations induced by ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation were greatly diminished in strains homozygous for either the rad6 or rad9 gene. Nitrous acid and nitrosoimidazolidone (NIL), on the other hand, were highly mutagenic in these repair-deficient mutants, and at low doses, these mutagens acted with about the same efficiency as in the normal RAD strain. At high doses of either nitrous acid or NIL, however, reversion frequencies were significantly reduced in the two rad mutants compared to normal strains. Although both rad mutants are immutable to about the same extent, the rad9 strains tend to be less sensitive to the lethal effect of chemical mutagens than rad6 strains. It is concluded that yeast requires a functional repair system for mutation induction by chemical agents. (auth)

  20. Lack of chemically induced mutation in repair-deficient mutants of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, L

    1974-12-01

    Two genes, rad6 and rad9, that confer radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also greatly reduce the frequency of chemically-induced reversions of a tester mutant cyc1-131, which is a chain initiation mutant in the structural gene determining iso-1-cytochrome c. Mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DES), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS), nitroquinoline oxide (NQO), nitrosoguanidine (NTG), nitrogen mustard (HN2), beta-propiolactone, and tritiated uridine, as well as mutations induced by ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation were greatly diminished in strains homozygous for either the rad6 or rad9 gene. Nitrous acid and nitrosoimidazolidone (NIL), on the other hand, were highly mutagenic in these repair-deficient mutants, and at low doses, these mutagens acted with about the same efficiency as in the normal RAD strain. At high doses of either nitrous acid or NIL, however, reversion frequencies were significantly reduced in the two rad mutants compared to normal strains. Although both rad mutants are immutable to about the same extent, the rad9 strains tend to be less sensitive to the lethal effect of chemical mutagens than rad6 strains. It is concluded that yeast requires a functional repair system for mutation induction by chemical agents.

  1. Bioanalytical evidence that chemicals in tattoo ink can induce adaptive stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2015-10-15

    Tattooing is becoming increasingly popular, particularly amongst young people. However, tattoo inks contain a complex mixture of chemical impurities that may pose a long-term risk for human health. As a first step towards the risk assessment of these complex mixtures we propose to assess the toxicological hazard potential of tattoo ink chemicals with cell-based bioassays. Targeted modes of toxic action and cellular endpoints included cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and adaptive stress response pathways. The studied tattoo inks, which were extracted with hexane as a proxy for the bioavailable fraction, caused effects in all bioassays, with the red and yellow tattoo inks having the greatest response, particularly inducing genotoxicity and oxidative stress response endpoints. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tested black tattoo ink at concentrations twice the recommended level. The detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons only explained 0.06% of the oxidative stress response of the black tattoo ink, thus the majority of the effect was caused by unidentified components. The study indicates that currently available tattoo inks contain components that induce adaptive stress response pathways, but to evaluate the risk to human health further work is required to understand the toxicokinetics of tattoo ink chemicals in the body. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Soft X-ray induced chemical modification of polysaccharides in vascular plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody, George D.; Brandes, Jay; Jacobsen, Chris; Wirick, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and micro carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (C-XANES) can provide quantitative information regarding the distribution of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in vascular plant cell walls. In the case of angiosperms, flowering plants, C-XANES may also be able to distinguish variations in lignin monomer distributions throughout the cell wall. Polysaccharides are susceptible to soft X-ray irradiation induced chemical transformations that may complicate spectral analysis. The stability of a model polysaccharide, cellulose acetate, to variable doses of soft X-rays under conditions optimized for high quality C-XANES spectroscopy was investigated. The primary chemical effect of soft X-ray irradiation on cellulose acetate involves mass loss coincident with de-acetylation. A lesser amount of vinyl ketone formation also occurs. Reduction in irradiation dose via defocusing does enable high quality pristine spectra to be obtained. Radiation induced chemical modification studies of oak cell wall reveals that cellulose and hemicellulose are less labile to chemical modification than cellulose acetate. Strategies for obtaining pristine C-XANES spectra of polysaccharides are presented.

  3. A crowdsourcing workflow for extracting chemical-induced disease relations from free text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong Shu; Bravo, Àlex; Furlong, Laura I.; Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.

    2016-01-01

    Relations between chemicals and diseases are one of the most queried biomedical interactions. Although expert manual curation is the standard method for extracting these relations from the literature, it is expensive and impractical to apply to large numbers of documents, and therefore alternative methods are required. We describe here a crowdsourcing workflow for extracting chemical-induced disease relations from free text as part of the BioCreative V Chemical Disease Relation challenge. Five non-expert workers on the CrowdFlower platform were shown each potential chemical-induced disease relation highlighted in the original source text and asked to make binary judgments about whether the text supported the relation. Worker responses were aggregated through voting, and relations receiving four or more votes were predicted as true. On the official evaluation dataset of 500 PubMed abstracts, the crowd attained a 0.505 F-score (0.475 precision, 0.540 recall), with a maximum theoretical recall of 0.751 due to errors with named entity recognition. The total crowdsourcing cost was $1290.67 ($2.58 per abstract) and took a total of 7 h. A qualitative error analysis revealed that 46.66% of sampled errors were due to task limitations and gold standard errors, indicating that performance can still be improved. All code and results are publicly available at https://github.com/SuLab/crowd_cid_relex Database URL: https://github.com/SuLab/crowd_cid_relex PMID:27087308

  4. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS): applications in spectroscopy and chemical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.D.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Upadhyaya, Hari; Bajaj, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    Resonance ionization is a photophysical process wherein electromagnetic radiation is used to ionize atoms, molecules, transient species, etc., by exciting them through their quantum states. The number of photons required to ionize depends on the species being investigated and energy of the photon. Once a charged particle is produced, it is easy to detect it with high efficiency. With the advent of narrow band high power pulsed and cw tunable dye lasers, it has blossomed into a powerful spectroscopic and analytical technique, commonly known as resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS)/resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The alliance of resonance ionization with mass spectrometry has grown into a still more powerful technique, known as resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), which has made significant contributions in a variety of frontier areas of research and development, such as spectroscopy, chemical dynamics, analytical chemistry, cluster science, surface science, radiochemistry, nuclear physics, biology, environmental science, material science, etc. In this article, we shall describe the application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to spectroscopy of uranium and chemical dynamics of polyatomic molecules

  5. Quantum chemical molecular dynamical investigation of alkyl nitrite photo-dissociated on copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaojing; Wang Wei; Han Peilin; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    An accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' was used to investigate the photolysis of alkyl nitrites series, RONO (R=CH 3 and C(CH 3 ) 3 ) on copper surfaces. Our calculations showed that the photo-dissociated processes are associated with the alkyl substituents of RONO when adsorbed on copper surfaces. For R=CH 3 , a two-step photolysis reaction occurred, yielding diverse intermediate products including RO radical, NO, and HNO, consistent with those reported in gas phase. While for R=C(CH 3 ) 3 , only one-step photolysis reaction occurred and gave intermediate products of RO radical and NO. Consequently, pure RO species were achieved to adsorb on metal surfaces by removing the NO species in photolysis reaction. The detailed photo-dissociated behaviors of RONO on copper surfaces with different alkyl substituents which are uncovered by the present simulation can be extended to explain the diverse dissociative mechanism experimentally observed. The quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' is proved to be highly applicable to the photo-dissociations on metal surfaces

  6. Programming chemical kinetics: engineering dynamic reaction networks with DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Niranjan

    Over the last century, the silicon revolution has enabled us to build faster, smaller and more sophisticated computers. Today, these computers control phones, cars, satellites, assembly lines, and other electromechanical devices. Just as electrical wiring controls electromechanical devices, living organisms employ "chemical wiring" to make decisions about their environment and control physical processes. Currently, the big difference between these two substrates is that while we have the abstractions, design principles, verification and fabrication techniques in place for programming with silicon, we have no comparable understanding or expertise for programming chemistry. In this thesis we take a small step towards the goal of learning how to systematically engineer prescribed non-equilibrium dynamical behaviors in chemical systems. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), combined with mass-action kinetics, as our programming language for specifying dynamical behaviors. Leveraging the tools of nucleic acid nanotechnology (introduced in Chapter 1), we employ synthetic DNA molecules as our molecular architecture and toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement as our reaction primitive. Abstraction, modular design and systematic fabrication can work only with well-understood and quantitatively characterized tools. Therefore, we embark on a detailed study of the "device physics" of DNA strand displacement (Chapter 2). We present a unified view of strand displacement biophysics and kinetics by studying the process at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1-dimensional energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps, and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates three-dimensional geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for

  7. Computational Cellular Dynamics Based on the Chemical Master Equation: A Challenge for Understanding Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Qian, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Modern molecular biology has always been a great source of inspiration for computational science. Half a century ago, the challenge from understanding macromolecular dynamics has led the way for computations to be part of the tool set to study molecular biology. Twenty-five years ago, the demand from genome science has inspired an entire generation of computer scientists with an interest in discrete mathematics to join the field that is now called bioinformatics. In this paper, we shall lay out a new mathematical theory for dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a small volume (i.e., mesoscopic) in terms of a stochastic, discrete-state continuous-time formulation, called the chemical master equation (CME). Similar to the wavefunction in quantum mechanics, the dynamically changing probability landscape associated with the state space provides a fundamental characterization of the biochemical reaction system. The stochastic trajectories of the dynamics are best known through the simulations using the Gillespie algorithm. In contrast to the Metropolis algorithm, this Monte Carlo sampling technique does not follow a process with detailed balance. We shall show several examples how CMEs are used to model cellular biochemical systems. We shall also illustrate the computational challenges involved: multiscale phenomena, the interplay between stochasticity and nonlinearity, and how macroscopic determinism arises from mesoscopic dynamics. We point out recent advances in computing solutions to the CME, including exact solution of the steady state landscape and stochastic differential equations that offer alternatives to the Gilespie algorithm. We argue that the CME is an ideal system from which one can learn to understand "complex behavior" and complexity theory, and from which important biological insight can be gained.

  8. Chaotic Dynamical Ferromagnetic Phase Induced by Nonequilibrium Quantum Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerose, Alessio; Marino, Jamir; Žunkovič, Bojan; Gambassi, Andrea; Silva, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the robustness of a dynamical phase transition against quantum fluctuations by studying the impact of a ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin interaction in one spatial dimension on the nonequilibrium dynamical phase diagram of the fully connected quantum Ising model. In particular, we focus on the transient dynamics after a quantum quench and study the prethermal state via a combination of analytic time-dependent spin wave theory and numerical methods based on matrix product states. We find that, upon increasing the strength of the quantum fluctuations, the dynamical critical point fans out into a chaotic dynamical phase within which the asymptotic ordering is characterized by strong sensitivity to the parameters and initial conditions. We argue that such a phenomenon is general, as it arises from the impact of quantum fluctuations on the mean-field out of equilibrium dynamics of any system which exhibits a broken discrete symmetry.

  9. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  10. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  11. Dynamic absorption coefficients of chemically amplified resists and nonchemically amplified resists at extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallica, Roberto; Stowers, Jason K.; Grenville, Andrew; Frommhold, Andreas; Robinson, Alex P. G.; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic absorption coefficients of several chemically amplified resists (CAR) and non-CAR extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresists are measured experimentally using a specifically developed setup in transmission mode at the x-ray interference lithography beamline of the Swiss Light Source. The absorption coefficient α and the Dill parameters ABC were measured with unprecedented accuracy. In general, the α of resists match very closely with the theoretical value calculated from elemental densities and absorption coefficients, whereas exceptions are observed. In addition, through the direct measurements of the absorption coefficients and dose-to-clear values, we introduce a new figure of merit called chemical sensitivity to account for all the postabsorption chemical reaction ongoing in the resist, which also predicts a quantitative clearing volume and clearing radius, due to the photon absorption in the resist. These parameters may help provide deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms of the EUV concepts of clearing volume and clearing radius, which are then defined and quantitatively calculated.

  12. Aldehyde-functionalized chitosan-montmorillonite films as dynamically-assembled, switchable-chemical release bioplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabbi, Jamal; Jennah, Oumayma; Katir, Nadia; Lahcini, Mohamed; Bousmina, Mosto; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2018-03-01

    Temporal release of synergistic and/or complementary chemicals (e.g.: drugs) is recognized as extremely challenging because of their frequently intertwined kinetic delivery and presently, straightforward concepts enabling to circumvent this bottleneck are missing in the open literature. In this framework, we report herein on aldehyde-functionalized, transparent and flexible chitosan-montmorillonite hybrid films that act as a new generation of eco-friendly, controlled-chemical release bioplastics. These dynamically-assembled nanomaterials are designed by a ternary assembly from biowaste derived chitin biopolymer, aromatic aldehydes and layered clay nanoparticles. On the basis of their geometrical and conformational properties, the oxygenated groups on the grafted aromatics interact preferentially with either the base Schiff belonging to the carbohydrate (via intramolecular CNHO-Ar known as "imine clip") or with the hydroxyl groups belonging to the clay surface (via intermolecular Si-OHO-Ar). The exfoliated clay nanoparticles within the carbohydrate polymer enables either accelerating or slowing down of the imine (CN) hydrolysis depending on the interaction of the conjugated aromatics. This provides the driving force for fine tuning host-guest interactions at the molecular level and constitutes an entry toward subtle discrimination of different chemicals (e.g. complementary fertilizers, synergistic drugs) during their sequential release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  14. Hazard classification of chemicals inducing haemolytic anaemia: An EU regulatory perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, A.; Jacobsen, Helene; Healy, E.

    2006-01-01

    Haemolytic anaemia is often induced following prolonged exposure to chemical substances. Currently, under EU Council Directive 67/548/EEC, substances which induce such effects are classified as dangerous and assigned the risk phrase R48 'Danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure......! Whilst the general classification criteria for this endpoint are outlined in Annex VI of this Directive, they do not provide specific information to assess haemolytic anaemia. This review produced by the EU Working Group on Haemolytic Anaemia provides a toxicological assessment of haemolytic anaemia...... and proposes criteria that can be used in the assessment for classification of substances which induce such effects. An overview of the primary and secondary effects of haemolytic anaemia which can occur in rodent repeated dose toxicity studies is given. A detailed analysis of the toxicological significance...

  15. Three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence measurements of turbulent chemical plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Aaron; Crimaldi, John

    2017-11-01

    In order to find prey, mates, and suitable habitat, many organisms must navigate through complex chemical plume structures in turbulent flow environments. In this context, we investigate the spatial and temporal structure of chemical plumes released isokinetically into fractal-grid-generated turbulence in an open channel flow. We first utilized particle image velocimetry (PIV) to characterize flow conditions (mean free stream velocities, turbulence intensities, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates, Taylor Reynolds numbers). We then implemented a newly developed high-resolution, high-speed, volumetric scanning laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system for near time-resolved measurements of three-dimensional chemical plume structures. We investigated cases with and without a cylinder wake, and compare statistical (mean, variance, intermittency, probability density functions) and spectral (power spectrum of concentration fluctuations) characteristics of the chemical plume structure. Stretching and folding of complex three-dimensional filament structures during chaotic turbulent mixing is greatly enhanced in the cylinder wake case. In future experiments, we will implement simultaneous PIV and LIF, enabling computation of the covariance of the velocity and chemical concentration fluctuations and thus estimation of turbulent eddy diffusivities. NSF PHY 1555862.

  16. True Triaxial Experimental Study of Rockbursts Induced By Ramp and Cyclic Dynamic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guoshao; Hu, Lihua; Feng, Xiating; Yan, Liubin; Zhang, Gangliang; Yan, Sizhou; Zhao, Bin; Yan, Zhaofu

    2018-04-01

    A modified rockburst testing system was utilized to reproduce rockbursts induced by ramp and cyclic dynamic disturbances with a low-intermediate strain rate of 2 × 10-3-5 × 10-3 s-1 in the laboratory. The experimental results show that both the ramp and cyclic dynamic disturbances play a significant role in inducing rockbursts. In the tests of rockbursts induced by a ramp dynamic disturbance, as the static stress before the dynamic disturbance increases, both the strength of specimens and the kinetic energy of the ejected fragments first increase and then decrease. In the tests of rockbursts induced by a cyclic dynamic disturbance, there exists a rockburst threshold of the static stress and the dynamic disturbance amplitude, and the kinetic energy of the ejected fragments first increases and then decreases as the cyclic dynamic disturbance frequency increases. The main differences between rockbursts induced by ramp dynamic disturbances and those induced by cyclic dynamic disturbances are as follows: the rockburst development process of the former is characterized by an impact failure feature, while that of the latter is characterized by a fatigue failure feature; the damage evolution curve of the specimen of the former has a leap-developing form with a significant catastrophic feature, while that of the latter has an inverted S-shape with a remarkable fatigue damage characteristic; the energy mechanism of the former involves the ramp dynamic disturbance giving extra elastic strain energy to rocks, while that of the latter involves the cyclic dynamic disturbance decreasing the ultimate energy storage capacity of rocks.

  17. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  18. Estimation of flow stress of radiation induced F/M steels using molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Ameya; Dutta, B.K.; Durgaprasad, P.V.; Arya, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Fe-Cr based Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels are the candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors. In this work, a multi-scale approach comprising atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations are used to model the effect of irradiation dose on the flow stress of F/M steels. At the atomic scale, molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dislocation interaction with irradiation induced defects, i.e. voids and He bubbles. Whereas, the DDD simulations are used to estimate the change in flow stress of the material as a result of irradiation hardening. (author)

  19. A plant-based chemical genomics screen for the identification of flowering inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiers, Martijn; Hoogenboom, Jorin; Brunazzi, Alice; Wennekes, Tom; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2017-01-01

    Floral timing is a carefully regulated process, in which the plant determines the optimal moment to switch from the vegetative to reproductive phase. While there are numerous genes known that control flowering time, little information is available on chemical compounds that are able to influence this process. We aimed to discover novel compounds that are able to induce flowering in the model plant Arabidopsis. For this purpose we developed a plant-based screening platform that can be used in a chemical genomics study. Here we describe the set-up of the screening platform and various issues and pitfalls that need to be addressed in order to perform a chemical genomics screening on Arabidopsis plantlets. We describe the choice for a molecular marker, in combination with a sensitive reporter that's active in plants and is sufficiently sensitive for detection. In this particular screen, the firefly Luciferase marker was used, fused to the regulatory sequences of the floral meristem identity gene APETALA1 (AP1) , which is an early marker for flowering. Using this screening platform almost 9000 compounds were screened, in triplicate, in 96-well plates at a concentration of 25 µM. One of the identified potential flowering inducing compounds was studied in more detail and named Flowering1 (F1). F1 turned out to be an analogue of the plant hormone Salicylic acid (SA) and appeared to be more potent than SA in the induction of flowering. The effect could be confirmed by watering Arabidopsis plants with SA or F1, in which F1 gave a significant reduction in time to flowering in comparison to SA treatment or the control. In this study a chemical genomics screening platform was developed to discover compounds that can induce flowering in Arabidopsis. This platform was used successfully, to identify a compound that can speed-up flowering in Arabidopsis.

  20. Dynamics and mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion in women of fertile age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mikkel; Andersen, Claus Yding; la Cour Freiesleben, Nina

    2010-01-01

    To study ovarian follicular dynamics during chemotherapy to understand the mechanisms behind chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion and to evaluate whether pretreatment levels of ovarian reserve markers were predictive of the posttreatment levels.......To study ovarian follicular dynamics during chemotherapy to understand the mechanisms behind chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion and to evaluate whether pretreatment levels of ovarian reserve markers were predictive of the posttreatment levels....

  1. Collisionally induced stochastic dynamics of fast ions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of excited state formation in collisions of fast highly charged ions with solids are reviewed. We discuss a classical transport theory employing Monte-Carlo sampling of solutions of a microscopic Langevin equation. Dynamical screening by the dielectric medium as well as multiple collisions are incorporated through the drift and stochastic forces in the Langevin equation. The close relationship between the extrinsically stochastic dynamics described by the Langevin and the intrinsic stochasticity in chaotic nonlinear dynamical systems is stressed. Comparison with experimental data and possible modification by quantum corrections are discussed. 49 refs., 11 figs

  2. Anticonvulsant activity of B2, an adenosine analog, on chemical convulsant-induced seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. However, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients still suffer from uncontrolled seizures. Effective treatments for epilepsy are yet to be developed. N (6-(3-methoxyl-4-hydroxybenzyl adenine riboside (B2 is a N(6-substitued adenosine analog. Here we describe an investigation of the effects and mechanisms of B2 on chemical convulsant-induced seizures. Seizures were induced in mice by administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, picrotoxin, kainite acid (KA, or strychnine. B2 has a dose-related anticonvulsant effect in these chemical-induced seizure models. The protective effects of B2 include increased latency of seizure onset, decreased seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration and reduced mortality rate. Radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation assays indicated that B2 might be a functional ligand for both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Furthermore, DPCPX, a selective A1 receptor antagonist, but not SCH58261, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, blocked the anticonvulsant effect of B2 on PTZ-induced seizure. c-Fos is a cellular marker for neuronal activity. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses indicated that B2 significantly reversed PTZ-induced c-Fos expression in the hippocampus. Together, these results indicate that B2 has significant anticonvulsant effects. The anticonvulsant effects of B2 may be attributed to adenosine A1 receptor activation and reduced neuronal excitability in the hippocampus. These observations also support that the use of adenosine receptor agonist may be a promising approach for the treatment of epilepsy.

  3. Delay-Induced Consensus and Quasi-Consensus in Multi-Agent Dynamical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Ren, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies consensus and quasi-consensus in multi-agent dynamical systems. A linear consensus protocol in the second-order dynamics is designed where both the current and delayed position information is utilized. Time delay, in a common perspective, can induce periodic oscillations or even

  4. Lunasin-aspirin combination against NIH/3T3 cells transformation induced by chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; de Lumen, Ben O

    2011-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process involving a number of molecular pathways sensitive to intervention. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. To achieve greater inhibitory effects on cancer cells, combination of two or more chemopreventive agents is commonly considered as a better preventive and/or therapeutic strategy. Lunasin is a promising cancer preventive peptide identified in soybean and other seeds. Its efficacy has been demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo models. This peptide has been found to inhibit human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells proliferation, suppressing cell cycle progress and inducing cell apoptosis. Moreover, lunasin potentiates the effects on these cells of different synthetic and natural compounds, such as aspirin and anacardic acid. This study explored the role of lunasin, alone and in combination with aspirin and anacardic acid on cell proliferation and foci formation of transformed NIH/3T3 cells induced by chemical carcinogens 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene or 3-methylcholanthrene. The results revealed that lunasin, acting as a single agent, inhibits cell proliferation and foci formation. When combined with aspirin, these effects were significantly increased, indicating that this combination might be a promising strategy to prevent/treat cancer induced by chemical carcinogens.

  5. Evaluation of Chemical Changes in Some Soybean Mutants Induced by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-Elkalik, K.; Mekkawy, S.H.; El-Demerdash, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Egyptian soybean cultivar Giza-22 was used to induce genetic variability by using gamma rays at dose levels of 100, 150 and 200 Gy. Sixteen mutants (including parental cultivar) were evaluated in M3 generation for their agronomic traits and chemical analysis was done in seeds of M3 generation. Four mutants A21 (150 Gy), A22, A23 and A24 (200 Gy) showed superiority in their agronomic traits compared with parental cultivar. The results of chemical analysis of seeds of M3 generation showed that, oil and energy contents were unaffected by irradiation treatments while protein contents were significantly increased at doses 150 and 200 Gy. Phenolic and tannin contents in seeds of M3 generation showed no significant changes in their percentages due to irradiation treatments. Gamma irradiation significantly increased in linoleic acid content in most of the mutants compared with the control (Giza-22), whereas, there were decreases in linolenic acid content. Investigation of amino acid composition of mutants of M3 generation revealed significant increases in the essential amino acids in most mutants induced by gamma irradiation at 150 and 200 Gy. It could be suggested that the use of gamma irradiation can induce an improvement of the oil and protein composition in soybean

  6. Thermally induced all-optical inverter and dynamic hysteresis loops in graphene oxide dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melle, Sonia; Calderón, Oscar G; Egatz-Gómez, Ana; Cabrera-Granado, E; Carreño, F; Antón, M A

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally study the temporal dynamics of amplitude-modulated laser beams propagating through a water dispersion of graphene oxide sheets in a fiber-to-fiber U-bench. Nonlinear refraction induced in the sample by thermal effects leads to both phase reversing of the transmitted signals and dynamic hysteresis in the input-output power curves. A theoretical model including beam propagation and thermal lensing dynamics reproduces the experimental findings.

  7. Dynamic random links enhance diversity-induced coherence in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tions among the units of complex biological and sociological systems. For small world ... of neuronal dynamics ranging from regular spiking to self-sustained chaotic bursting. Temporal ... The pulse interval is defined as, Sk(i) = Pramana – J.

  8. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.; Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using

  9. Bifurcation and stability analysis of rotating chemical spirals in circular domains: Boundary-induced meandering and stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Markus; Bangia, Anil K.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2003-05-01

    Recent experimental and model studies have revealed that the domain size may strongly influence the dynamics of rotating spirals in two-dimensional pattern forming chemical reactions. Hartmann et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1384 (1996)], report a frequency increase of spirals in circular domains with diameters substantially smaller than the spiral wavelength in a large domain for the catalytic NO+CO reaction on a microstructured platinum surface. Accompanying simulations with a simple reaction-diffusion system reproduced the behavior. Here, we supplement these studies by a numerical bifurcation and stability analysis of rotating spirals in a simple activator-inhibitor model. The problem is solved in a corotating frame of reference. No-flux conditions are imposed at the boundary of the circular domain. At large domain sizes, eigenvalues and eigenvectors very close to those corresponding to infinite medium translational invariance are observed. Upon decrease of domain size, we observe a simultaneous change in the rotation frequency and a deviation of these eigenvalues from being neutrally stable (zero real part). The latter phenomenon indicates that the translation symmetry of the spiral solution is appreciably broken due to the interaction with the (now nearby) wall. Various dynamical regimes are found: first, the spiral simply tries to avoid the boundary and its tip moves towards the center of the circular domain corresponding to a negative real part of the “translational” eigenvalues. This effect is noticeable at a domain radius of Rinduced spiral meandering. A systematic study of the spiral rotation as a function of a control parameter and the domain size reveals that the meandering instability in large domains becomes suppressed, and the spiral rotation becomes rigid, at a critical radius Rcr,0. Boundary-induced

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  11. Chemical and Dynamical Impacts of Stratospheric Sudden Warmings on Arctic Ozone Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Steenrod, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    We use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model with Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields to quantify heterogeneous chemical ozone loss in Arctic winters 2005-2015. Comparisons to Aura Microwave Limb Sounder N2O and O3 observations show the GMI simulation credibly represents the transport processes and net heterogeneous chemical loss necessary to simulate Arctic ozone. We find that the maximum seasonal ozone depletion varies linearly with the number of cold days and with wave driving (eddy heat flux) calculated from MERRA fields. We use this relationship and MERRA temperatures to estimate seasonal ozone loss from 1993 to 2004 when inorganic chlorine levels were in the same range as during the Aura period. Using these loss estimates and the observed March mean 63-90N column O3, we quantify the sensitivity of the ozone dynamical resupply to wave driving, separating it from the sensitivity of ozone depletion to wave driving. The results show that about 2/3 of the deviation of the observed March Arctic O3 from an assumed climatological mean is due to variations in O3 resupply and 13 is due to depletion. Winters with a stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) before mid-February have about 1/3 the depletion of winters without one and export less depletion to the midlatitudes. However, a larger effect on the spring midlatitude ozone comes from dynamical differences between warm and cold Arctic winters, which can mask or add to the impact of exported depletion.

  12. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Sills, Robert C.; Pandiri, Arun R.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization where as chemical induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify National Toxicology Program (NTP) rodent bioassays with treatment-related retinal degene...

  13. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-02-06

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming.

  14. Time evolution studies of laser induced chemical changes in InAs nanowire using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Suparna; Aggarwal, R.; Kumari Gupta, Vandna; Ingale, Alka [Laser Physics Application Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, MP (India)

    2014-07-07

    We report the study of time evolution of chemical changes on the surface of an InAs nanowire (NW) on laser irradiation in different power density regime, using Raman spectroscopy for a time span of 8–16 min. Mixture of metastable oxides like InAsO{sub 4,} As{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed upon oxidation, which are reflected as sharp Raman peaks at ∼240–254 and 180–200 cm{sup −1}. Evidence of removal of arsenic layer by layer is also observed at higher power density. Position controlled laser induced chemical modification on a nanometer scale, without changing the core of the NW, can be useful for NW based device fabrication.

  15. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (-)-isolongifolene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kazuki; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-02-24

    In this study, biotransformation of (-)-isolongifolene (1) by Glomerella cingulata and suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, 1 was carried out the microbial transformation by G. cingulata. The result found that 1 was converted into (-)-isolongifolen-9-one (2), (-)-(2S)-13-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (3), and (-)-(4R)-4-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (4) by G. cingulata, and their conversion rates were 60, 25, and 15%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramid and AFB(1) in the umu test. Comound 2 showed gene expression by chemical mutagens furylfuramide and AFB(1) was suppressed 54 and 50% at <0.5 mM, respectively. Compound 2 is the most effective compound in this experiment.

  16. Complete synchronization of the global coupled dynamical network induced by Poisson noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Wan, Fangyi

    2017-01-01

    The different Poisson noise-induced complete synchronization of the global coupled dynamical network is investigated. Based on the stability theory of stochastic differential equations driven by Poisson process, we can prove that Poisson noises can induce synchronization and sufficient conditions are established to achieve complete synchronization with probability 1. Furthermore, numerical examples are provided to show the agreement between theoretical and numerical analysis.

  17. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  18. A crowdsourcing workflow for extracting chemical-induced disease relations from free text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong Shu; Bravo, Àlex; Furlong, Laura I; Good, Benjamin M; Su, Andrew I

    2016-01-01

    Relations between chemicals and diseases are one of the most queried biomedical interactions. Although expert manual curation is the standard method for extracting these relations from the literature, it is expensive and impractical to apply to large numbers of documents, and therefore alternative methods are required. We describe here a crowdsourcing workflow for extracting chemical-induced disease relations from free text as part of the BioCreative V Chemical Disease Relation challenge. Five non-expert workers on the CrowdFlower platform were shown each potential chemical-induced disease relation highlighted in the original source text and asked to make binary judgments about whether the text supported the relation. Worker responses were aggregated through voting, and relations receiving four or more votes were predicted as true. On the official evaluation dataset of 500 PubMed abstracts, the crowd attained a 0.505F-score (0.475 precision, 0.540 recall), with a maximum theoretical recall of 0.751 due to errors with named entity recognition. The total crowdsourcing cost was $1290.67 ($2.58 per abstract) and took a total of 7 h. A qualitative error analysis revealed that 46.66% of sampled errors were due to task limitations and gold standard errors, indicating that performance can still be improved. All code and results are publicly available athttps://github.com/SuLab/crowd_cid_relexDatabase URL:https://github.com/SuLab/crowd_cid_relex. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics simulation for chemical looping combustion of coal in a dual circulation fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Mingze; Zhao, Haibo; Ma, Jinchen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD simulation of a 5 kW_t_h CLC reactor of coal was conducted. • Gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency of the reactor was analyzed. • Optimal condition was achieved based on operation characteristics understanding. - Abstract: A dual circulation fluidized bed system is widely accepted for chemical looping combustion (CLC) for enriching CO_2 from the utilization of fossil fuels. Due to the limitations of the measurement, the details of multiphase reactive flows in the interconnected fluidized bed reactors are difficult to obtain. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation provides a promising method to understand the hydrodynamics, chemical reaction, and heat and mass transfers in CLC reactors, which are very important for the rational design, optimal operation, and scaling-up of the CLC system. In this work, a 5 kW_t_h coal-fired CLC dual circulation fluidized bed system, which was developed by our research group, was first simulated for understanding gas leakage, flow pattern and combustion efficiency. The simulation results achieved good agreement with the experimental measurements, which validates the simulation model. Subsequently, to improve the combustion efficiency, a new operation condition was simulated by increasing the reactor temperature and decreasing the coal feeding. An improvement in the combustion efficiency was attained, and the simulation results for the new operation condition were also validated by the experimental measurements in the same CLC combustor. All of the above processes demonstrated the validity and usefulness of the simulation results to improve the CLC reactor operation.

  20. Chemical Control for Host-Parasitoid Model within the Parasitism Season and Its Complex Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we develop a host-parasitoid model with Holling type II functional response function and chemical control, which can be applied at any time of each parasitism season or pest generation, and focus on addressing the importance of the timing of application pesticide during the parasitism season or pest generation in successful pest control. Firstly, the existence and stability of both the host and parasitoid populations extinction equilibrium and parasitoid-free equilibrium have been investigated. Secondly, the effects of key parameters on the threshold conditions have been discussed in more detail, which shows the importance of pesticide application times on the pest control. Thirdly, the complex dynamics including multiple attractors coexistence, chaotic behavior, and initial sensitivity have been studied by using numerical bifurcation analyses. Finally, the uncertainty and sensitivity of all the parameters on the solutions of both the host and parasitoid populations are investigated, which can help us to determine the key parameters in designing the pest control strategy. The present research can help us to further understand the importance of timings of pesticide application in the pest control and to improve the classical chemical control and to make management decisions.

  1. The dynamic behavior of chemically "stiffened" red blood cells in microchannel flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Alison M; Wan, Jiandi; Ristenpart, William D; Stone, Howard A

    2010-07-01

    The rigidity of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in whole blood viscosity and is correlated with several cardiovascular diseases. Two chemical agents that are commonly used to study cell deformation are diamide and glutaraldehyde. Despite diamide's common usage, there are discrepancies in the literature surrounding diamide's effect on the deformation of RBCs in shear and pressure-driven flows; in particular, shear flow experiments have shown that diamide stiffens cells, while pressure-driven flow in capillaries did not give this result. We performed pressure-driven flow experiments with RBCs in a microfluidic constriction and quantified the cell dynamics using high-speed imaging. Diamide, which affects RBCs by cross-linking spectrin skeletal membrane proteins, did not reduce deformation and showed an unchanged effective strain rate when compared to healthy cells. In contrast, glutaraldehyde, which is a non-specific fixative that acts on all components of the cell, did reduce deformation and showed increased instances of tumbling, both of which are characteristic features of stiffened, or rigidified, cells. Because glutaraldehyde increases the effective viscosity of the cytoplasm and lipid membrane while diamide does not, one possible explanation for our results is that viscous effects in the cytoplasm and/or lipid membrane are a dominant factor in dictating dynamic responses of RBCs in pressure-driven flows. Finally, literature on the use of diamide as a stiffening agent is summarized, and provides supporting evidence for our conclusions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Lepidium meyenii (maca) on testicular function of mice with chemically and physically induced subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Cuya, M; Yarasca De La Vega, K; Lévano Sánchez, G; Vásquez Cavero, J; Temoche García, H; Torres Torres, L; Cruz Ornetta, V

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Lepidium meyenii (maca) in chemically and physically subfertile mice. After 35 days, the following groups of mice were evaluated: control, sham, chemical subfertility, chemical subfertility-maca-supplemented, physical subfertility, physical subfertility-maca-supplemented and maca-supplemented only. Motility (32.36% ± 5.34%) and sperm count (44.4 ± 5.37 × 10(6) /ml) in the chemically and physically subfertile mice (11.81% ± 4.06%, 17.34 ± 13.07 × 10(6) /ml) decreased compared to the control (75.53% ± 2.97% and 57.4 ± 19.6 10(6) /ml) and sham (53.5% ± 7.86% and 58.4 ± 14.10 10(6) /ml). Maca was able to reverse the deleterious effect of motility (76.36 ± 1.97) as well as sperm count (53.5 ± 9.18 × 10(6) /ml) on chemical subfertility. In contrast, maca did not reverse the effects of induced physical subfertility nor motility (18.78% ± 14.41%) or sperm count (20.17 ± 11.20 × 10(6) /ml). The percentage of sperm DNA fragmentation in the physically subfertile mice increased (11.1% ± 19.29%) compared to the control (0.84% ± 0.85%). However, in the physically subfertile group, maca decreased sperm DNA fragmentation (2.29% ± 2.30%) closer to the sham (1.04% ± 0.62%) and the control (0.84% ± 0.85%). The group supplemented only with maca showed 0.54% ± 0.50% of spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation. Yet, the differences observed were statistically not significant. In conclusion, it appears that maca activates the cytochrome P450 system after chemically induced subfertility. However, it does not reverse the low mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa compromised in the physical subfertility group. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Effect of heavy atoms on photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yusuke; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Given its short hyperpolarization time (∼10-6 s) and mostly non-perturbative nature, photo-chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) is a powerful tool for sensitivity enhancement in nuclear magnetic resonance. In this study, we explore the extent of 1H-detected 13C nuclear hyperpolarization that can be gained via photo-CIDNP in the presence of small-molecule additives containing a heavy atom. The underlying rationale for this methodology is the well-known external-heavy-atom (EHA) effect, which leads to significant enhancements in the intersystem-crossing rate of selected photosensitizer dyes from photoexcited singlet to triplet. We exploited the EHA effect upon addition of moderate amounts of halogen-atom-containing cosolutes. The resulting increase in the transient triplet-state population of the photo-CIDNP sensitizer fluorescein resulted in a significant increase in the nuclear hyperpolarization achievable via photo-CIDNP in liquids. We also explored the internal-heavy-atom (IHA) effect, which is mediated by halogen atoms covalently incorporated into the photosensitizer dye. Widely different outcomes were achieved in the case of EHA and IHA, with EHA being largely preferable in terms of net hyperpolarization.

  4. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Induces Fetal Hemoglobin through Activation of GATA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Shearstone

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention aimed at reactivation of fetal hemoglobin protein (HbF is a promising approach for ameliorating sickle cell disease (SCD and β-thalassemia. Previous studies showed genetic knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC 1 or 2 is sufficient to induce HbF. Here we show that ACY-957, a selective chemical inhibitor of HDAC1 and 2 (HDAC1/2, elicits a dose and time dependent induction of γ-globin mRNA (HBG and HbF in cultured primary cells derived from healthy individuals and sickle cell patients. Gene expression profiling of erythroid progenitors treated with ACY-957 identified global changes in gene expression that were significantly enriched in genes previously shown to be affected by HDAC1 or 2 knockdown. These genes included GATA2, which was induced greater than 3-fold. Lentiviral overexpression of GATA2 in primary erythroid progenitors increased HBG, and reduced adult β-globin mRNA (HBB. Furthermore, knockdown of GATA2 attenuated HBG induction by ACY-957. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq of primary erythroid progenitors demonstrated that HDAC1 and 2 occupancy was highly correlated throughout the GATA2 locus and that HDAC1/2 inhibition led to elevated histone acetylation at well-known GATA2 autoregulatory regions. The GATA2 protein itself also showed increased binding at these regions in response to ACY-957 treatment. These data show that chemical inhibition of HDAC1/2 induces HBG and suggest that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by histone acetylation-induced activation of the GATA2 gene.

  6. Chemical modifications of polymer films induced by high energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiyong; Sun Youmei; Liu Changlong; Liu Jie; Jin Yunfan

    2002-01-01

    Polymer films including polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC) were irradiated at room temperature with ions of 35 MeV/u 40 Ar, 25 MeV/u 84 Kr, 15.1 MeV/u 136 Xe and 11.4 MeV/u 238 U to fluences ranging from 9x10 9 to 5.5x10 12 ions/cm 2 . The radiation-induced chemical changes of the materials were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopies. It is found that the absorbance in the ultraviolet and visible range induced by all irradiations follows a linear relationship with fluence. The radiation-induced absorbance normalized to one particle increases slowly with increasing of electronic energy loss below about 8 keV/nm followed by a sharp increase up to about 15 keV/nm above which saturation is reached. FTIR measurements reveal that the materials suffer serious degradation through bond breaking. The absorbance of the typical infrared bands decays exponentially with increase of ion fluence and the bond-disruption cross-section shows a sigmoid variation with electronic energy loss. In PET loss of crystallinity is attributed to the configuration transformation of the ethylene glycol residue from trans into the gauche. Alkyne end groups are induced in all the materials above certain electronic energy loss threshold, which is found to be about 0.8 keV/nm for PS and 0.4 keV/nm for PC. The production cross-section of alkyne end group increases with increasing of electronic energy loss and shows saturation at high electronic energy loss values. It is concluded that not only the physical processes but also the chemical processes of the energy deposition determine the modification of polymer

  7. Dynamic response of shear induced structure solutions in permeable rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvers, N.J.W.; Spain, D.S.W.; Golombok, M.

    2009-01-01

    Additives for improving the flow uniformity during secondary oil recovery are partially retained in the rock. The flow improval effects continue to be observed even when the chemical solution is succeeded by pure water. Considerable flushing with water is required before the old permeability of the

  8. physical, chemical, technological and biological properties of some mutant oil seeds induced by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, H.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to evaluated sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds induced by gamma rays, as plant breeding unit, plant research department, radioisotope application division, nuclear research center, atomic energy authority Inshas. the obtained results indicate the following : chemical composition of mutant seeds: the radiation mutation caused a significant increase in both oil and ash content total carbohydrates showed a significant decreased in sesame seeds. radiation mutation induced significant increase in oil and protein content of sunflower and safflower seeds. while the total carbohydrate showed a significant decrease. physiochemical properties of oils extracted mutant seeds: the radiation mutation had no real effect on the refractive index and A.V of oils extracted from control and mutant sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds. while it caused a slight increase in red color and P.V. of sesame oil, the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) value of mutant sesame oil was not alter upon radiation mutation, but it induced a slight decrease in TBA of mutant sunflower and safflower oils. the unsaponifiable matter percentage of oils extracted from mutant sesame, sunflower and safflower seeds were slightly increased by radiation mutation .radiation mutation of seeds had no real effect on the total SFA and USFA of sesame oil. however, radiation mutation induced a remarkable changes in fatty acid profiles of sunflower and safflower oil as total SFA decreased, while USFA increased. Uric acid was only detected in oil extracted from mutant sunflower seeds

  9. Network evolution induced by the dynamical rules of two populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platini, Thierry; Zia, R K P

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a finite dynamical network composed of two interacting populations, namely extrovert (a) and introvert (b). In our model, each group is characterized by its size (N a and N b ) and preferred degree (κ a and κ b a ). The network dynamics is governed by the competing microscopic rules of each population that consist of the creation and destruction of links. Starting from an unconnected network, we give a detailed analysis of the mean field approach which is compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The time evolution of the restricted degrees (k bb ) and (k ab ) presents three time regimes and a non-monotonic behavior well captured by our theory. Surprisingly, when the population sizes are equal N a = N b , the ratio of the restricted degree θ 0 = (k ab )/(k bb ) appears to be an integer in the asymptotic limits of the three time regimes. For early times (defined by t 1 = κ b ) the total number of links presents a linear evolution, where the two populations are indistinguishable and where θ 0 = 1. Interestingly, in the intermediate time regime (defined for t 1 2 ∝κ a and for which θ 0 = 5), the system reaches a transient stationary state, where the number of contacts among introverts remains constant while the number of connections increases linearly in the extrovert population. Finally, due to the competing dynamics, the network presents a frustrated stationary state characterized by a ratio θ 0 = 3

  10. Single neuron dynamics during experimentally induced anoxic depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; Stigen, Tyler; ten Haken, Bernard; Netoff, Theoden; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    We studied single neuron dynamics during anoxic depolarizations, which are often observed in cases of neuronal energy depletion. Anoxic and similar depolarizations play an important role in several pathologies, notably stroke, migraine, and epilepsy. One of the effects of energy depletion was

  11. Network evolution induced by the dynamical rules of two populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platini, Thierry; Zia, R. K. P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a finite dynamical network composed of two interacting populations, namely extrovert (a) and introvert (b). In our model, each group is characterized by its size (Na and Nb) and preferred degree (κa and \\kappa_b\\ll \\kappa_a ). The network dynamics is governed by the competing microscopic rules of each population that consist of the creation and destruction of links. Starting from an unconnected network, we give a detailed analysis of the mean field approach which is compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The time evolution of the restricted degrees langkbbrang and langkabrang presents three time regimes and a non-monotonic behavior well captured by our theory. Surprisingly, when the population sizes are equal Na = Nb, the ratio of the restricted degree θ0 = langkabrang/langkbbrang appears to be an integer in the asymptotic limits of the three time regimes. For early times (defined by t introverts remains constant while the number of connections increases linearly in the extrovert population. Finally, due to the competing dynamics, the network presents a frustrated stationary state characterized by a ratio θ0 = 3.

  12. Chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells: mechanisms and biological significance in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshimura, M.; Barrett, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A literature review with over 200 references examines the growing body of evidence from human and animal cancer cytogenetics that aneuploidy is an important chromosome change in carcinogenesis. Evidence from in vitro cell transformation studies supports the idea that aneuploidy has a direct effect on the conversion of a normal cell to a preneoplastic or malignant cell. Induction of an aneuploid state in a preneoplastic or neoplastic cell could have any of the following four biological effects: a change in gene dosage, a change in gene balance, expression of a recessive mutation, or a change in genetic instability (which could secondarily lead to neoplasia). There are a number of possible mechanisms by which chemicals might induce aneuploidy, including effects on microtubules, damage to essential elements for chromosome function reduction in chromosome condensation or pairing, induction of chromosome interchanges, unresolved recombination structures, increased chromosome stickiness, damage to centrioles, impairment of chromosome alignment ionic alterations during mitosis, damage to the nuclear membrane, and a physical disruption of chromosome segregation. Therefore, a number of different targets exist for chemically induced aneuploidy.

  13. Radiated flow of chemically reacting nanoliquid with an induced magnetic field across a permeable vertical plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahanthesh

    Full Text Available Impact of induced magnetic field over a flat porous plate by utilizing incompressible water-copper nanoliquid is examined analytically. Flow is supposed to be laminar, steady and two-dimensional. The plate is subjected to a regular free stream velocity as well as suction velocity. Flow formulation is developed by considering Maxwell–Garnetts (MG and Brinkman models of nanoliquid. Impacts of thermal radiation, viscous dissipation, temperature dependent heat source/sink and first order chemical reaction are also retained. The subjected non-linear problems are non-dimensionalized and analytic solutions are presented via series expansion method. The graphs are plotted to analyze the influence of pertinent parameters on flow, magnetism, heat and mass transfer fields as well as friction factor, current density, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. It is found that friction factor at the plate is more for larger magnetic Prandtl number. Also the rate of heat transfer decayed with increasing nanoparticles volume fraction and the strength of magnetism. Keywords: Induced magnetic field, Nanoliquids, Heat source/sink, Series expansion method, Chemical reaction, Thermal radiation

  14. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  15. Contact Angle and Adhesion Dynamics and Hysteresis on Molecularly Smooth Chemically Homogeneous Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ying; Kaufman, Yair; Schrader, Alex M; Seo, Dongjin; Lee, Dong Woog; Page, Steven H; Koenig, Peter H; Isaacs, Sandra; Gizaw, Yonas; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2017-09-26

    Measuring truly equilibrium adhesion energies or contact angles to obtain the thermodynamic values is experimentally difficult because it requires loading/unloading or advancing/receding boundaries to be measured at rates that can be slower than 1 nm/s. We have measured advancing-receding contact angles and loading-unloading adhesion energies for various systems and geometries involving molecularly smooth and chemically homogeneous surfaces moving at different but steady velocities in both directions, ±V, focusing on the thermodynamic limit of ±V → 0. We have used the Bell Theory (1978) to derive expressions for the dynamic (velocity-dependent) adhesion energies and contact angles suitable for both (i) dynamic adhesion measurements using the classic Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR, 1971) theory of "contact mechanics" and (ii) dynamic contact angle hysteresis measurements of both rolling droplets and syringe-controlled (sessile) droplets on various surfaces. We present our results for systems that exhibited both steady and varying velocities from V ≈ 10 mm/s to 1 nm/s, where in all cases but one, the advancing (V > 0) and receding (V contact angles converged toward the same theoretical (thermodynamic) values as V → 0. Our equations for the dynamic contact angles are similar to the classic equations of Blake & Haynes (1969) and fitted the experimental adhesion data equally well over the range of velocities studied, although with somewhat different fitting parameters for the characteristic molecular length/dimension or area and characteristic bond formation/rupture lifetime or velocity. Our theoretical and experimental methods and results unify previous kinetic theories of adhesion and contact angle hysteresis and offer new experimental methods for testing kinetic models in the thermodynamic, quasi-static, limit. Our analyses are limited to kinetic effects only, and we conclude that hydrodynamic, i.e., viscous, and inertial effects do not play a role at the

  16. Chemically-induced solid-state dewetting of thin Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazit, Nimrod; Klinger, Leonid; Rabkin, Eugen

    2017-01-01

    We employed the solid state dewetting technique to produce nanoparticles of silver-gold alloy on a sapphire substrate. We deposited a thin gold layer on the substrate with alloy nanoparticles, and studied its thermal stability at low homological temperatures. We demonstrated that a large number of densely spaced holes form at the initial stages of dewetting of the gold layer with nanoparticles. A similar homogeneous gold film deposited on a bare sapphire substrate remained stable under identical annealing conditions, exhibiting the onset of dewetting at higher temperatures, and with a lower number of holes. We attributed the decreased thermal stability of the gold film deposited on the substrate with the silver-gold nanoparticles to accelerated grooving at the grain boundaries and triple junctions in the film. The grooving process is accelerated by the diffusion fluxes of Au atoms driven from the film towards the nanoparticles by the gradient of chemical potential. We developed a quantitative model of this chemically-induced dewetting process, and discussed its applicability for the design of better catalytic systems. Our work demonstrates that the chemical driving forces have to be reckoned with in the analysis of thermal stability of multicomponent thin films.

  17. Evaluation of Maltose-Induced Chemical Degradation at the Interface of Bilayer Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Yousuke; Murayama, Daisuke; Katakawa, Yoshifumi; Mimura, Hisashi; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Fixed dose combination tablets consisting of mirabegron (MB) and solifenacin succinate (SS) were developed and formulated into bilayer tablets in the current study. The results of a chemical stability study showed that the original formulation for the tablets led to a significant increase of unknown degradants in the SS layer. Two compatibility studies were conducted to simulate the interface between the MB and SS layers, and the results revealed that the degradants only formed in the presence of both active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and that the presence of maltose in the SS layer was critical to inducing degradation. High resolution mass spectroscopy coupled with high performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the chemical structures of the degradants, which were identified to MB derivatives bearing one or two sugar units. These findings therefore suggested that the degradation of the API could be attributed to the addition of sugar units from maltose to MB under the acidic conditions caused by SS. With this in mind, we developed a new formulation by replacing maltose with hydroxypropyl cellulose as a polymer-type binder. The results showed that this formulation suppressed the formation of the degradants. The results of this study have shown that chemical degradation can occur at the interface of bilayer tablets and that an alternative strategy is available to formulate more stable MB/SS bilayer tablets.

  18. Artificially induced polyploidization in Humulus lupulus L. and its effect on morphological and chemical traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojak-Goluch, Anna; Skomra, Urszula

    2013-12-01

    Chemically induced polyploids were obtained by the colchicine treatment of shoot tips of Humulus lupulus L. 'Sybilla'. Flow cytometry revealed that most of the treatments resulted in the production of tetraploids. The highest number of tetraploids was obtained when explants were immersed in 0.05% colchicine for 48 h. A field experiment was conducted to compare diploid and tetraploid plants and assess the effect of genome polyploidization on the morphological and chemical characteristics. Tetraploids showed significant differences in relation to diploids. They had thinner and shorter shoots. The influence of chromosome doubling was also reflected in the length, width and area of leaves. The length of female flowers in the tetraploids was significantly shorter than that observed in diploids. Tetraploids produced a diverse number of lupuline glands that were almost twice as large as those observed in diploids. The most distinct effect of genome polyploidization was a significant increase in the weight of cones and spindles. Contents of major chemical constituents of hop cones was little affected by ploidy level. Total essential oils were significantly lower than those in diploids. However there was a significant increase in the proportion of humulene, caryophyllene and farnesene, oils desired by the brewing industry.

  19. Polysaccharides from astragali radix restore chemical-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Astragali Radix has been used widely for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and to enhance endurance and stamina in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for over 2000 years. The polysaccharide constituents of Astragali Radix (ARP) are considered as one of the major constituents contributing to the multiple pharmacological effects of this medicinal plant. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the vascular regenerative activities of ARPs in a chemically-induced blood vessel loss model in zebrafish. Methods Blood vessel loss was induced in both Tg(fli-1a:EGFP)y1 and Tg(fli-1a:nEGFP)y7 embryos by administration of 300 nM VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) for 3 h at 24 hpf (hour post-fertilization). Then, the blood vessel damaged zebrafish were treated with ARPs for 21 h and 45 h after VRI withdrawal. Morphological changes in intersegmental vessels (ISVs) of zebrafish larvae were observed under the fluorescence microscope and measured quantitatively. The rescue effect of ARPs in the zebrafish models was validated by measuring the relative mRNA expressions of Kdrl, Kdr and Flt-1 using real-time PCR. Results Two polysaccharide fractions, P4 (50000 D 0.1 μm), isolated from Astragali Radix by ultrafiltration, produced a significant and dose-dependent recovery in VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Flk-1 and Flt-1 mRNA expression induced by VRI was reversed by treatment with P4. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that P4 isolated from Astragali Radix reduces VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish. These findings support the hypothesis that polysaccharides are one of the active constituents in Astragali Radix, contributing to its beneficial effect on treatment of diseases associated with a deficiency in angiogenesis. PMID:22357377

  20. Selenium and vitamin E inhibit radiogenic and chemically induced transformation in vitro via different mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borek, C.; Ong, A.; Mason, H.; Donahue, L.; Biaglow, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Results from in vivo and in vitro studies showing that antioxidants may act as anticarcinogens support the role of active oxygen in carcinogenesis and provide impetus for exploring the functions of dietary antioxidants in cancer prevention by using in vitro models. The authors examined the single and combined effects of selenium, a component of glutathione peroxidase, and vitamin E, a known antioxidant, on cell transformation induced in C3H/10T-1/2 cells by x-rays, benzo[a]pyrene, or tryptophan pyrolysate and on the levels of cellular scavenging systems peroxide destruction. Incubation of C3H/10T-1/2 cells with 2.5 μM Na 2 SeO 3 (selenium) or with 7 μM α-tocopherol succinate (vitamin E) 24 hr prior to exposure to x-rays or the chemical carcinogens resulted in an inhibition of transformation by each of the antioxidants with an additive-inhibitory action when the two nutrients were combined. Cellular pretreatment with selenium resulted in increased levels of cellular glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and nonprotein thiols (glutathione) and in an enhanced destruction of peroxide. The results support our earlier studies showing that free radical-mediated events play a role in radiation and chemically induced transformation. They indicate that selenium and vitamin E act alone and in additive fashion as radioprotecting and chemopreventing agents. The results further suggest that selenium confers protection in part by inducing or activating cellular free-radical scavenging systems and by enhancing peroxide breakdown while vitamin E appears to confer its protection by and alternate complementary mechanism

  1. String and brane models with spontaneously or dynamically induced tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, E.I.; Kaganovich, A.; Nissimov, E.; Pacheva, S.

    2002-01-01

    We study in some detail the properties of a previously proposed new class of string and brane models whose world-sheet (world-volume) actions are built with a modified reparametrization-invariant measure of integration and which do not contain any ad hoc dimensionful parameters. The ratio of the new and the standard Riemannian integration measure densities plays the role of a dynamically generated string or brane tension. The latter is identified as (the magnitude of) an effective (non-Abelian) electric field strength on the world-sheet or world-volume obeying the standard Gauss-law constraint. As a result a simple classical mechanism for confinement via modified-measure 'color' strings is proposed where the colorlessness of the 'hadrons' is an automatic consequence of the new string dynamics

  2. The Dynamics of SecM-Induced Translational Stalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SecM is an E. coli secretion monitor capable of stalling translation on the prokaryotic ribosome without cofactors. Biochemical and structural studies have demonstrated that the SecM nascent chain interacts with the 50S subunit exit tunnel to inhibit peptide bond formation. However, the timescales and pathways of stalling on an mRNA remain undefined. To provide a dynamic mechanism for stalling, we directly tracked the dynamics of elongation on ribosomes translating the SecM stall sequence (FSTPVWISQAQGIRAGP using single-molecule fluorescence techniques. Within 1 min, three peptide-ribosome interactions work cooperatively over the last five codons of the SecM sequence, leading to severely impaired elongation rates beginning from the terminal proline and lasting four codons. Our results suggest that stalling is tightly linked to the dynamics of elongation and underscore the roles that the exit tunnel and nascent chain play in controlling fundamental steps in translation.

  3. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  4. Chemical kinetic insights into the ignition dynamics of n-hexane

    KAUST Repository

    Tingas, Alexandros

    2017-10-13

    Normal alkanes constitute a significant fraction of transportation fuels, and are the primary drivers of ignition processes in gasoline and diesel fuels. Low temperature ignition of n-alkanes is driven by a complex sequence of oxidation reactions, for which detailed mechanisms are still being developed. The current study explores the dynamics of low-temperature ignition of n-hexane/air mixtures, and identifies chemical pathways that characterize the combustion process. Two chemical kinetic mechanisms were selected as a comparative study in order to better understand the role of specific reaction sequences in ignition dynamics: one mechanism including a new third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (recently proposed by Wang et al. 2017), while the other without (Zhang et al. 2015). The analysis is conducted by applying tools generated from the computational singular perturbation (CSP) approach to two distinct ignition phenomena: constant volume and compression ignition. In both cases, the role of the third sequential O2 addition reactions proves to be significant, although it is found to be much more pronounced in the constant volume cases compared to the HCCI. In particular, in the constant volume ignition case, reactions present in the third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (e.g., KDHP  →  products + OH) contribute significantly to the explosivity of the mixture; when accounted for along with reactions P(OOH)2 + O2  →  OOP(OOH)2 and OOP(OOH)2  →  KDHP + OH, they decrease ignition delay time of the mixture by up to 40%. Under HCCI conditions, in the first-stage ignition, the third-O2 addition reactions contribute to the process, although their role decays with time and becomes negligible at the end of the first stage. The second ignition stage is dominated almost exclusively by hydrogen-related chemistry.

  5. Characterization of chemically induced liver injuries using gene co-expression modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Tawa

    Full Text Available Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1 known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2 clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20% genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects.

  6. Exposure to Gulf War Illness chemicals induces functional muscarinic receptor maladaptations in muscle nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B Y; Johnson, R D; Nutter, T J

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is a component of the multisymptom disease known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). There is evidence that pain symptoms could have been a consequence of prolonged and/or excessive exposure to anticholinesterases and other GW chemicals. We previously reported that rats exposed, for 8 weeks, to a mixture of anticholinesterases (pyridostigmine bromide, chlorpyrifos) and a Nav (voltage activated Na(+) channel) deactivation-inhibiting pyrethroid, permethrin, exhibited a behavior pattern that was consistent with a delayed myalgia. This myalgia-like behavior was accompanied by persistent changes to Kv (voltage activated K(+)) channel physiology in muscle nociceptors (Kv7, KDR). In the present study, we examined how exposure to the above agents altered the reactivity of Kv channels to a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist (oxotremorine-M). Comparisons between muscle nociceptors harvested from vehicle and GW chemical-exposed rats revealed that mAChR suppression of Kv7 activity was enhanced in exposed rats. Yet in these same muscle nociceptors, a Stromatoxin-insensitive component of the KDR (voltage activated delayed rectifier K(+) channel) exhibited decreased sensitivity to activation of mAChR. We have previously shown that a unique mAChR-induced depolarization and burst discharge (MDBD) was exaggerated in muscle nociceptors of rats exposed to GW chemicals. We now provide evidence that both muscle and vascular nociceptors of naïve rats exhibit MDBD. Examination of the molecular basis of the MDBD in naïve animals revealed that while the mAChR depolarization was independent of Kv7, the action potential burst was modulated by Kv7 status. mAChR depolarizations were shown to be dependent, in part, on TRPA1. We argue that dysfunction of the MDBD could be a functional convergence point for maladapted ion channels and receptors consequent to exposure to GW chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of chemical-induced DNA damage on male germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holme, J.A.; Bjoerge, C.; Trbojevic, M.; Olsen, A.K.; Brunborg, G.; Soederlund, E.J. [National Inst. of Public Health, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Bjoeras, M.; Seeberg, E. [National Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Microbiology; Scholz, T.; Dybing, E.; Wiger, R. [National Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Inst. for Surgical Research and Surgical Dept. B

    1998-12-31

    Several recent studies indicate declines in sperm production, as well as increases in the incidence of genitourinary abnormalities such as testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. It is not known if these effects are due to exposure to chemical pollutants or if other ethiological factors are involved. Animal studies indicate that chemicals will induce such effects by various genetic, epigenetic or non-genetic mechanisms. Recently, much attention has been focused on embryonic/fetal exposure to oestrogen-mimicking chemicals (Toppari et al., 1996). However, the possibility that chemicals may cause reproductive toxicity by other mechanisms such as interactions with DNA, should not be ignored. DNA damage in germ cells may lead to the production of mutated spermatozoa, which in turn may result in spontaneous abortions, malformations and/or genetic defects in the offspring. Regarding the consequences of DNA alterations for carcinogenesis it is possible that genetic damage may occur germ cells, but the consequences are not expressed until certain genetic events occur in postnatal life. Transmission of genetic risk is best demonstrated by cancer-prone disorders such as hereditary retinoblastoma and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. A number of experiments indicate that germ cells and proliferating cells may be particularly sensitive to DNA damaging agents compared to other cells. Furthermore, several lines of evidence have indicated that one of the best documented male reproductive toxicants, 1,2-dibrome-3-chloropropane (DBCP), causes testicular toxicity through DNA damage. It is possible that testicular cells at certain maturational stages are more subject to DNA damage, have less efficient DNA repair, or have different thresholds for initiating apoptosis following DNA damage than other cell types. (orig.)

  8. Frictional melting dynamics in the upper conduit: A chemical answer to a complex physical question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton De Angelis, S.; Lavallee, Y.; Kendrick, J. E.; Hornby, A.; von Aulock, F. W.; Clesham, S.; Hirose, T.; Perugini, D.

    2013-12-01

    During volcanic eruptions the generation of frictional heat along the walls of the shallow conduit leads to melting of the rocks along the slip interface. Frictional melting has previously been described as a process out of thermodynamic equilibrium, but upon slip and mingling of the melt batches, homogeneity can be achieved, and may have an h important rheological control on the dynamics of slip. To test melt homogenization in the frictional melt zones of volcanic conduits we performed constant-rate slip experiments under controlled stress conditions using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. Volcanic dome samples from three different volcanoes (Volcán De Colima, Soufrière Hills Volcano and Santiaguito Volcano) were investigated. Each sample was subjected to a stress of 1 MPa and slip rate of 1 m/s. For each sample set 5 experiments were conducted: 1) experiment stopped at the onset of melting; 2) experiment stopped on the formation of a full melt layer; 3) experiment stopped after 5m of slip at steady state conditions; 4) experiment stopped after 10m of slip at steady state conditions; 5) experiment stopped after 15m of slip at steady state conditions. We analyzed the resulting proto-melt zones using micron sized X-ray spectroscopy in the high-brightness synchrotron beamline I18 (at Diamond Light Source UK). Particular focus was given to the concentration variance analysis of Rare Earth Elements as their mobilities can be used to precisely quantify the degree and timescale of homogenisation involved during frictional melting. This study refines our understanding of the chemical process of melting and mixing which carry important consequences for the rheological control on the physical dynamics of slip.

  9. Dynamics, chemical properties and bioavailability of DOC in an early successional catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Risse-Buhl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC have been intensively studied in mature ecosystems, but little is known about DOC dynamics and the significance of DOC as a substrate for microbial activity in early-successional catchments. We determined the concentration, chemical composition, source, radiocarbon age, and bioavailability of DOC along the hydrological flow path from soil solution to a downstream pond in a recently constructed catchment (Chicken Creek Catchment, Germany. Soil solution, upwelling ground water, stream water, subsurface water in an alluvial fan, and pond water all had high DOC concentrations (averages: 6.0–11.6 mg DOC L–1, despite small carbon stocks in both vegetation and soil of the catchment. Solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR of DOC in upwelling ground water revealed a higher proportion of aromatic compounds (32% and a lower proportion of carbohydrates (33% than in pond water (18% and 45%, respectively. The average 14C age of DOC in upwelling ground water was 2600 to 2900 yr, while organic matter of the Quaternary substrate of the catchment had a 14C age of 3000 to 16 000 yr. Both the 14C age data and 13C NMR spectra suggest that DOC partly derived from organic matter of the Quaternary substrate (about 40 to 90% of the C in the DOC, indicating that both recent and old C of the DOC can support microbial activity during early ecosystem succession. However, in a 70 day incubation experiment, only about 11% of the total DOC was found to be bioavailable. This proportion was irrespective of the water type. Origin of the microbial communities within the catchment (enriched from soil, stream sediment or pond water also had only a marginal effect on overall DOC utilization.

  10. Intercellular distribution of mutations induced in oopcytes of Drosophila melanogaster by chemical and physical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1979-01-01

    When females of Drosophila melanogaster are treated with chemical or physical mutagens, not only in one but also in both of the two homologous X chromosomes of a given oocyte, a recessive sex-linked lethal mutation may be induced. A method is described that discriminates between such single and double mutations. A theory is developed to show how a comparison betweeen the expected and the observer frequency of double mutations yields an indication of the intercellular distribution (random or nonrandom) of recessive lethal mutations induced by mutagenic agents in oocytes and, consequently, of the distribution (homogenous or nonhomogeneous) of those agents. Three agents were tested: FUdR (12.5, 50.0 and 81.0 μg/ml), mitomycin C (130.0 μg/ml) and x rays (2000 R, 150 kV). After FUdR feeding, no increase in the mutation frequency usually observed in D. melanogaster without mutagenic treatment was obtained (u = 0.13%, namely three single mutations among 2332 chromosomes tested). After mitomycin C feeding 104 single and three double mutations were obtained. All of the 50 mutations observed after x irradiation were single mutations. The results obtained in the mitomycin C and radiation experiments favor the assumption of a random intercellular distribution of recessive lethal mutations induced by these two agents in oocytes of D. melanogaster. Reasons are discussed why for other types of mutagenic agents nonrandom distributions may be observed with our technique

  11. High protein mutants of winter fodder barley induced by radiation and chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankulov, M.; Genchev, K.; Nikolov, Kh.

    1982-01-01

    Several induced mutants of winter fodder barley with higher rpotein content are described. These mutants were produced by treating seeds of cvs. Vogelsaenger Gold, Ager and 468 with gamma-rays, sodium azide and ethyl methanesulfonate (alone and in combinations) and with ethylene and formamide. The gamma-ray induced mutants of winter fodder barley have 1-4% higher protein content. The mutant line 109 has, besides high protein content (17,37%), 5.96 lysine per 100 g protein, but its endosperm is wrinkeled. Mutants produced by chemical mutagens have 6-7% higher protein content than the initial cultivars. All induced mutants have 85-95 cm high stems, i.e. they are by 10-20 cm shorter than the initial cultivars. Some of these mutants are now resistant to the diseases Helminthosporium gramineum and Ustilago nuda. The recommended mutants could be successfully used in breeding programs for producing of higher protein content and quality in winter fodder barley.

  12. High protein mutants of winter fodder barley induced by radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankulov, M.; Genchev, K.; Nikolov, Kh.

    1982-01-01

    Several induced mutants of winter fodder barley with higher rpotein content are described. These mutants were produced by treating seeds of cvs. Vogelsaenger Gold, Ager and 468 with gamma-rays, sodium azide and ethyl methanesulfonate (alone and in combinations) and with ethylene and formamide. The gamma-ray induced mutants of winter fodder barley have 1-4% higher protein content. The mutant line 109 has, besides high protein content (17,37%), 5.96 lysine per 100 g protein, but its endosperm is wrinkeled. Mutants produced by chemical mutagens have 6-7% higher protein content than the initial cultivars. All induced mutants have 85-95 cm high stems, i.e. they are by 10-20 cm shorter than the initial cultivars. Some of these mutants are now resistant to the diseases Helminthosporium gramineum and Ustilago nuda. The recommended mutants could be successfully used in breeding programs for producing of higher protein content and quality in winter fodder barley

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Fargesin on Chemically Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Yue

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fargesin is a bioactive lignan from Flos Magnoliae, an herb widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, and headache in Asia. We sought to investigate whether fargesin ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in mice. Oral administration of fargesin significantly attenuated the symptoms of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis in mice by decreasing the inflammatory infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, reducing tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α secretion, and inhibiting nitric oxide (NO production in colitis mice. The degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα, phosphorylation of p65, and mRNA expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB target genes were inhibited by fargesin treatment in the colon of the colitis mice. In vitro, fargesin blocked the nuclear translocation of p-p65, downregulated the protein levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and dose-dependently inhibited the activity of NF-κB-luciferase in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Taken together, for the first time, the current study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of fargesin on chemically induced IBD might be associated with NF-κB signaling suppression. The findings may contribute to the development of therapies for human IBD by using fargesin or its derivatives.

  14. Abnormal development of tapetum and microspores induced by chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Gaisheng; Song, Qilu; Zhang, Yingxin; Li, Zheng; Guo, Jialin; Niu, Na; Ma, Shoucai; Wang, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    Chemical hybridization agent (CHA)-induced male sterility is an important tool in crop heterosis. To demonstrate that CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development, the cytology of CHA-SQ-1-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages was studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay and DAPI staining. The results indicated that the SQ-1-treated plants underwent premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD), which was initiated at the early-uninucleate stage of microspore development and continued until the tapetal cells were completely degraded; the process of microspore development was then blocked. Microspores with low-viability (fluorescein diacetate staining) were aborted. The study suggests that premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion. Furthermore, it determines the starting period and a key factor in CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility at the cell level, and provides cytological evidence to further study the mechanism between PCD and male sterility.

  15. Abnormal development of tapetum and microspores induced by chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Wang

    Full Text Available Chemical hybridization agent (CHA-induced male sterility is an important tool in crop heterosis. To demonstrate that CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development, the cytology of CHA-SQ-1-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages was studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL assay and DAPI staining. The results indicated that the SQ-1-treated plants underwent premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD, which was initiated at the early-uninucleate stage of microspore development and continued until the tapetal cells were completely degraded; the process of microspore development was then blocked. Microspores with low-viability (fluorescein diacetate staining were aborted. The study suggests that premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion. Furthermore, it determines the starting period and a key factor in CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility at the cell level, and provides cytological evidence to further study the mechanism between PCD and male sterility.

  16. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular-dynamics study of CuTi and Cu4Ti3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Sabochick, M.J.

    1991-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu 4 Ti 3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs

  17. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Hoon [Division of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seongman [Division of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Bin, E-mail: yblim@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  18. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP, heart rate (HR, and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n=8 and diabetic (n=8 groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R and postexercise session (PE on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103±2 versus PE: 111±3 mmHg and HR (R: 290±7 versus PE: 328±10 bpm reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70±0.06 versus PE: -1.21±0.09 bpm/mmHg was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  19. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y.; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: −0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: −1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes. PMID:22203833

  20. Dynamics of water and nutrients for potted plants induced by flooded bench fertigation : experiments and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamics of water and nutrients as affected by physical and chemical characteristics of a substrate, fertigation method and schedule, and plant uptake were studied for a flooded bench fertigation system for potted plants, through a detailed experimental study of the root environment and a

  1. Initial Chemical Events in CL-20 Under Extreme Conditions: An Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaev, Olexandr; Kholod, Yana; Gorb, Leonid; Qasim, Mohammad; Fredrickson, Herb; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    .... In the present study molecular structure, electrostatic potential, vibrational spectrum and dynamics of thermal decomposition of CL-20 have been investigated by static and dynamic methods of ab...

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases regulate the formation of dendritic spine head protrusions during chemically induced long-term potentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are are small membranous protrusions that extend from neuronal dendrites and harbor the majority of excitatory synapses. Increasing evidence has shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of extracellularly acting and Zn(2+-dependent endopeptidases, are able to rapidly modulate dendritic spine morphology. Spine head protrusions (SHPs are filopodia-like processes that extend from the dendritic spine head, representing a form of postsynaptic structural remodeling in response to altered neuronal activity. Herein, we show that chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP in dissociated hippocampal cultures upregulates MMP-9 activity that controls the formation of SHPs. Blocking of MMPs activity or microtubule dynamics abolishes the emergence of SHPs. In addition, autoactive recombinant MMP-9, promotes the formation of SHPs in organotypic hippocampal slices. Furthermore, spines with SHPs gained postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors upon cLTP and the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors was controlled by MMPs. The present results strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in the formation of SHPs and the control of postsynaptic receptor distribution upon cLTP.

  3. Physico-chemical studies of laser-induced plasmas for quantitative analysis of materials in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Rawad

    2014-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a multi-elemental analysis technique very well suited for analysis in hostile environments particularly in the nuclear industry. Quantitative measurements are frequently performed on liquid or solid samples but in some cases, atypical signal behaviors were observed in the LIBS experiment. To avoid or minimize any impact on measurement accuracy, it is necessary to improve the understanding of these phenomena. In the framework of a three-year PhD thesis, the objective was to study the chemical reactions occurring within laser-generated plasma in a LIBS analysis. Experiments on a model material (pure aluminum sample) highlighted the dynamics of molecular recombination according to different ambient gas. The temporal evolution of Al I atomic emission lines and molecular bands of AlO and AlN were studied. A collisional excitation effect was identified for a peculiar electronic energy level of aluminum in the case of a nitrogen atmosphere. This effect disappeared in air. The aluminum plasma was also imaged during its expansion under the different atmospheres in order to localize the areas in which the molecular recombination process takes place. Spectacular particle projections have been highlighted. (author) [fr

  4. Self-grooming induced by sexual chemical signals in male root voles (Microtus oeconomus Pallas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Honghao; Yue, Pengpeng; Sun, Ping; Zhao, Xinquan

    2010-03-01

    Sniffing is one-way animals collect chemical signals, and many males self-groom when they encounter the odor of opposite-sex conspecifics. We tested the hypothesis that sexual chemical signals from females can induce self-grooming behavior in male root voles (Microtus oeconomus Pallas). Specifically, we investigated the sniffing pattern of male root voles in response to odors from the head, trunk, and tail areas of lactating and non-lactating females. The self-grooming behavior of males in response to female individual odorant stimuli was documented, and the relationship between self-grooming and sniffing of odors from the head, trunk, and tails areas were analyzed. Sniffing pattern results showed that males are most interested in odors from the head area, and more interested in odors from the tail as compared to the trunk area. Males displayed different sniffing and self-grooming behaviors when they were exposed to odors from lactating females as compared to non-lactating females. Males also spent more time sniffing and engaged in more sniffing behaviors in response to odors from the lactating females' tail area as compared to the same odors from non-lactating females. Similarly, males spent more time self-grooming and engaged in more self-grooming behaviors in the presence of individual odors from lactating females as compared to individual odors from non-lactating females. Partial correlation analyses revealed that the frequency of self-grooming was significantly correlated with the frequency of tail area sniffs. Results from this experiment suggest that sexual attractiveness of lactating females is stronger than that of non-lactating females. Furthermore, the partial correlation analysis demonstrated that self-grooming in males is induced by odors from the tail area of females. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that sexual chemical signals from females can induce self-grooming behavior in male root voles. Self-grooming may also reflect the

  5. Photo-Induced Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2009-01-17

    We experimentally investigate the dynamics of spins in GaAs quantum wells under applied electric bias by photoluminescence (PL) measurements excited with circularly polarized light. The bias-dependent circular polarization of PL (P(PL)) with and without magnetic field is studied. The P(PL) without magnetic field is found to be decayed with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias. However, P(PL) in a transverse magnetic field shows oscillations under an electric bias, indicating that the precession of electron spin occurs in quantum wells. The results are discussed based on the electron-hole exchange interaction in the electric field.

  6. Photo-Induced Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We experimentally investigate the dynamics of spins in GaAs quantum wells under applied electric bias by photoluminescence (PL measurements excited with circularly polarized light. The bias-dependent circular polarization of PL (P PL with and without magnetic field is studied. TheP PLwithout magnetic field is found to be decayed with an enhancement of increasing the strength of the negative bias. However,P PLin a transverse magnetic field shows oscillations under an electric bias, indicating that the precession of electron spin occurs in quantum wells. The results are discussed based on the electron–hole exchange interaction in the electric field.

  7. Dynamics of GeV light-ion-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.S.; Hsi, W.C.; Morley, K.B.; Viola, V.E.; Wang, G.; Korteling, R.G.; Legrain, R.

    1996-09-01

    Recent results from studies of the 1.8 - 4.8 GeV 3 He + nat Ag, 197 Au reactions at LNS with the ISiS detector array have shown evidence for a saturation in deposition energy and multifragmentation from a low-density source. The collision dynamics have been examined in the context of intranuclear cascade and BUU models, while breakup phenomena have been compared with EES and SMM models. Fragment-fragment correlations and isotope ratios are also investigated. (K.A.)

  8. Theoretical study of ultraviolet induced photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Ayumi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Ikeda, Kumiko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Danielache, Sebastian O. [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Department of Environmental Science and Techonology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yoohama 226-8502 (Japan); Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Photodissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at low-lying electronically excited states were investigated. • Photochemical processes were simulated by on-the-fly ab initio MD. • Sulfuric acid after the excitation to the S{sub 1} state dissociated to HSO{sub 4}(1{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S). • Sulfuric acid after the excitation to the S{sub 2} state dissociated to HSO{sub 4}(2{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S). • The energy region of the UV spectra where NMD fractionation may occur is predicted. - Abstract: Photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid after excitation to the first and second excited states (S{sub 1} and S{sub 2}) were studied by an on-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Zhu–Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH). Forces acting on the nuclear motion were computed on-the-fly by CASSCF method with Dunning’s augmented cc-pVDZ basis set. It was newly found that the parent molecule dissociated into two reaction-channels (i) HSO{sub 4}(1{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S) by S{sub 1}-excitation, and (ii) HSO{sub 4}(2{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S) by S{sub 2}-excitation. The direct dissociation dynamics yield products different from the SO{sub 2} + 2OH fragments often presented in the literature. Both channels result in the same product and differs only in the electronic state of the HSO{sub 4} fragment{sub .} The trajectories running on S{sub 2} do not hop with S{sub 0} and a nonadiabatic transition happens at the S{sub 2}–S{sub 1} conical intersection located at a longer OH bond-length than the S{sub 1}–S{sub 0} intersection producing an electronic excited state (2{sup 2}A″) of HSO{sub 4} product.

  9. Analysis of thermally induced magnetization dynamics in spin-transfer nano-oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino, M., E-mail: daquino@uniparthenope.it [Department of Technology, University of Naples ' Parthenope' , 80143 Naples (Italy); Serpico, C. [Department of Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples (Italy); Bertotti, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica 10135 Torino (Italy); Bonin, R. [Politecnico di Torino - Sede di Verres, 11029 Verres (Aosta) (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [ECE Department and UMIACS, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The thermally induced magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin-polarized currents injected into a spin-valve-like structure used as microwave spin-transfer nano-oscillator (STNO) is considered. Magnetization dynamics is described by the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Slonczewski (LLS) equation. First, it is shown that, in the presence of thermal fluctuations, the spectrum of the output signal of the STNO exhibits multiple peaks at low and high frequencies. This circumstance is associated with the occurrence of thermally induced transitions between stationary states and magnetization self-oscillations. Then, a theoretical approach based on the separation of time-scales is developed to obtain a stochastic dynamics only in the slow state variable, namely the energy. The stationary distribution of the energy and the aforementioned transition rates are analytically computed and compared with the results of direct integration of the LLS dynamics, showing very good agreement.

  10. Biofiltration of airborne VOCs with green wall systems-Microbial and chemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, A; Li, T; Vesala, M; Saarenheimo, J; Ahonen, V; Kärenlampi, S; Blande, J D; Tiirola, M; Tervahauta, A

    2018-05-06

    Botanical air filtration is a promising technology for reducing indoor air contaminants, but the underlying mechanisms need better understanding. Here, we made a set of chamber fumigation experiments of up to 16 weeks of duration, to study the filtration efficiencies for seven volatile organic compounds (VOCs; decane, toluene, 2-ethylhexanol, α-pinene, octane, benzene, and xylene) and to monitor microbial dynamics in simulated green wall systems. Biofiltration functioned on sub-ppm VOC levels without concentration-dependence. Airflow through the growth medium was needed for efficient removal of chemically diverse VOCs, and the use of optimized commercial growth medium further improved the efficiency compared with soil and Leca granules. Experimental green wall simulations using these components were immediately effective, indicating that initial VOC removal was largely abiotic. Golden pothos plants had a small additional positive impact on VOC filtration and bacterial diversity in the green wall system. Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota of rhizosphere and irrigation water. Airborne VOCs shaped the microbial communities, enriching potential VOC-utilizing bacteria (especially Nevskiaceae and Patulibacteraceae) in the irrigation water, where much of the VOC degradation capacity of the biofiltration systems resided. These results clearly show the benefits of active air circulation and optimized growth media in modern green wall systems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An automated method to find transition states using chemical dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, Emilio

    2015-02-05

    A procedure to automatically find the transition states (TSs) of a molecular system (MS) is proposed. It has two components: high-energy chemical dynamics simulations (CDS), and an algorithm that analyzes the geometries along the trajectories to find reactive pathways. Two levels of electronic structure calculations are involved: a low level (LL) is used to integrate the trajectories and also to optimize the TSs, and a higher level (HL) is used to reoptimize the structures. The method has been tested in three MSs: formaldehyde, formic acid (FA), and vinyl cyanide (VC), using MOPAC2012 and Gaussian09 to run the LL and HL calculations, respectively. Both the efficacy and efficiency of the method are very good, with around 15 TS structures optimized every 10 trajectories, which gives a total of 7, 12, and 83 TSs for formaldehyde, FA, and VC, respectively. The use of CDS makes it a powerful tool to unveil possible nonstatistical behavior of the system under study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Chemical and Microbial Dynamics during Composting of Herbal Pharmaceutical Industrial Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Zameer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed to analyze the dynamics of chemical, biochemical and microbial parameters during composting of herbal pharmaceutical waste. All the parameters were analyzed at three different intervals of composting (1st, 15th and 60th days. Temperature of the compost pile was initially high (46.2 °C and on 60th day it dropped to 33.3 °C. The pH of the sample was initially acidic (2.39 and with the progress of decomposition gradually changed to neutrality (7.55. Electrical conductivity (EC value was high (3.8 mS during last day of composting compared to other stages. The activity of degradative enzymes namely amylase, invertase and urease were initially high (4.1, 4.79 mg of glucose/g/h and 0.19 mg of ammonia/g/h respectively while it decreased with composting. The beneficial microbial load was initially low and very high at the last stages of decomposition. The bioassay studies using compost extracts revealed that the 60th day old sample was not phytotoxic in nature.

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the Swiss Light Source for chemical dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Melanie; Bodi, Andras; Schulz, Lothar; Gerber, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A bend-magnet vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline, intended for chemical dynamics studies, was constructed and brought into operation at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) of the Paul Scherrer Institut. The beamline delivers synchrotron radiation in the 5-30 eV photon energy range with a photon flux of 10 11 photons/s at 10 eV and 10 12 photons/s at 20 eV with a resolving power of 2500. The resolving power increases to 10 4 at the cost of photon flux. An in-house designed rare gas filter is used to suppress higher harmonic radiation by a factor of >10 4 , yielding purely monochromatic light in the energy range of 5-21.6 eV. The filter is compact, easy to align, requires a total pumping power of less than 645 l/s and consumes only 3 normal l/h of filter gas. It is located at the end of the beamline, right in front of the experimental endstation. It is usually operated at a higher pressure than the endstation, which offers the additional benefit of protecting the beamline vacuum from sample contamination.

  14. Dynamics of chemical elements in the fermentation process of ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepomuceno, N.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Bacchi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Brazil has become the largest producer of biomass ethanol derived from sugar cane. The industrial production is based on the fermentation of sugar cane juice by yeast, inside of large volume vats, in a fed-batch process that recycles yeast cells. To study the dynamics of chemical elements in each operating cycle, five stages of the fermentation process were considered: must, yeast suspension, wine, non-yeast wine and yeast cream. For this, a mass balance of the terrigenous elements, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Sc, Sm, and Th, and the sugar cane plant elements, Br, K, Rb, and Zn, were established in fermentation vats of an industrial scale unit, with sampling undertaken during different climatic conditions (dry and rainy periods). A similar distribution of the sugar cane characteristics elements was found for the stages analysed, while for the terrigenous elements a trend of accumulation in the yeast cream was observed. Preferential absorption of Br, K, Rb, and Zn by yeast cells was indicated by the smaller concentrations observed in yeast suspension than in yeast cream. (author)

  15. Critical role of surface chemical modifications induced by length shortening on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussy Cyrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Given the increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNT in composite materials and their possible expansion to new areas such as nanomedicine which will both lead to higher human exposure, a better understanding of their potential to cause adverse effects on human health is needed. Like other nanomaterials, the biological reactivity and toxicity of CNT were shown to depend on various physicochemical characteristics, and length has been suggested to play a critical role. We therefore designed a comprehensive study that aimed at comparing the effects on murine macrophages of two samples of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT specifically synthesized following a similar production process (aerosol-assisted CVD, and used a soft ultrasonic treatment in water to modify the length of one of them. We showed that modification of the length of MWCNT leads, unavoidably, to accompanying structural (i.e. defects and chemical (i.e. oxidation modifications that affect both surface and residual catalyst iron nanoparticle content of CNT. The biological response of murine macrophages to the two different MWCNT samples was evaluated in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and oxidative stress. We showed that structural defects and oxidation both induced by the length reduction process are at least as responsible as the length reduction itself for the enhanced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative response observed with short (oxidized compared to long (pristine MWCNT. In conclusion, our results stress that surface properties should be considered, alongside the length, as essential parameters in CNT-induced inflammation, especially when dealing with a safe design of CNT, for application in nanomedicine for example.

  16. Rain-Induced Wash-Off of Chemical Warfare Agent (VX) from Foliar Surfaces of Living Plants Maintained in a Surety Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    RAIN-INDUCED WASH-OFF OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENT (VX) FROM FOLIAR SURFACES OF LIVING PLANTS MAINTAINED IN A...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2014 – Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rain-Induced Wash-Off of Chemical Warfare Agent (VX) from Foliar...galli Foliage Chemical warfare agent (CWA) O-ethyl-S-(2

  17. Investigation of Dynamic Friction Induced by Shock Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanicotena, A.; Szarzynski, S.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the frictional sliding of one surface against another under high pressure is often required to correctly describe the response of complex systems to shock loading. In order to provide data for direct code and model comparison, a new friction experiment investigating dry sliding characteristics of metal on metal at normal pressures up to 10 GPa and sliding velocities up to 400 m/s has been developed. The test consists of a specifically designed target made of two materials. A plane shock wave generated by plate impact results in one material sliding against the other. The material velocity of the rear surface of the target is recorded versus time by Doppler Laser Interferometry. The dynamic friction coefficient μ is then indirectly determined by comparison with results of numerical simulations involving the conventional Coulomb law. Using this new experimental configuration, three dynamic friction experiments were performed on AA 5083-Al (H111) / AISI 321 stainless steel tribo-pair. Results suggest a decrease in the friction coefficient with increasing sliding velocity

  18. Dynamic evolution characteristics of mining-induced fractures in overlying strata detected by radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Ma Liqiang; Wang Xufeng; Fang Gangwei; Zhang Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    For environment protection in mining areas in northwest China, we developed a CTSRM (comprehensive test system by radon measurement) to measure radon radioactivity and detect dynamic evolution characteristics of mining-induced fractures in overlying strata. It was used to simulate the relationship between the dynamic evolution characteristics and radon concentrations of No. 33201 coalface at Bulianta coal mine in Inner Mongolia, and feasibility of the method was validate. (authors)

  19. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: A chemical chaperone at atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Brian J.; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea ...

  20. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced renal alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Domínguez, Bibiana; Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Tapia, Edilia; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-09-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of diverse types of cancer, however, acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important side effect of this treatment. Diverse mechanisms have been involved in cisplatin-induced AKI, such as oxidative stress, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. On the other hand, curcumin is a polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. Previous studies have shown that curcumin protects against the cisplatin-induced AKI; however, it is unknown whether curcumin can reduce alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamic in this model. It was found that curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced: (a) AKI and (b) alterations in the following mitochondrial parameters: bioenergetics, ultrastructure, hydrogen peroxide production and dynamic. In fact, curcumin prevented the increase of mitochondrial fission 1 protein (FIS1), the decrease of optic atrophy 1 protein (OPA1) and the decrease of NAD + -dependent deacetylase sirtuin-3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial dynamic regulator as well as the increase in the mitophagy associated proteins parkin and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)-induced putative kinase protein 1 (PINK1). In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin in cisplatin-induced AKI was associated with the prevention of the alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics, ultrastructure, redox balance, dynamic, and SIRT3 levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A framework of induced hyperspace dynamical systems equipped with the hit-or-miss topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yangeng; Wei Guo; Campbell, William H.; Bourquin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    For any dynamical system (E,d,f), where E is Hausdorff locally compact second countable (HLCSC), let F (resp., 2 E ) denote the space of all closed subsets (resp., non-empty closed subsets) of E equipped with the hit-or-miss topology τ f . Both F and 2 E are again HLCSC (F actually compact), thus metrizable. Let ρ be such a metric (three metrics available). The main purpose is to determine the conditions on f that ensure the continuity of the induced hyperspace maps 2 f :F→F and 2 f :2 E →2 E defined by 2 f (F)=f(F). With this setting, the induced hyperspace systems (F,ρ,2 f ) and (2 E ,ρ,2 f ) are compact and locally compact dynamical systems, respectively. Consequently, dynamical properties, particularly metric related dynamical properties, of the given system (E,d,f) can be explored through these hyperspace systems. In contrast, when the Vietoris topology τ v is equipped on 2 E , the space of the induced hyperspace topological dynamical system (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ) is not metrizable if E is not compact metrizable, e.g., E=R n , implying that metric related dynamical concepts cannot be defined for (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ). Moreover, two examples are provided to illustrate the advantages of the hit-or-miss topology as compared to the Vietoris topology.

  2. Chemical composition of waterfall-induced air ions: Spectrometry vs. simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parts, T.-E.; Luts, A. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental Physics; Laakso, L.; Hirsikko, A.; Groenholm, T.; Kulmala, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Sciences

    2007-07-01

    Our measurements of ion size distributions near a waterfall provided new evidence for a waterfall-induced modification of air ion sizes. The ion size spectrum near a waterfall permanently differs from that in ordinary tropospheric air. In this paper we investigated the near-waterfall air ions chemical nature in detail. We carried out a simulation series of air small negative ion evolution, proposing that falling water, as a new environmental component, increases the concentration of OH{sup -} cluster ions. The produced OH{sup -} ions were employed as an extra input for our ion evolution model. The presence of additional OH{sup -} ions resulted in a decrease of typically model-provided NO{sub 3}{sup -} and/or HSO{sub 4}{sup -} cluster ion concentrations and an increase of the abundance of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} cluster ions. Near the waterfall the latter ions became dominant in our simulations. (orig.)

  3. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of the ion beam induced crystallization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.A.; Caturla, M.J.; Huang, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the ion bombardment induced amorphous-to-crystal transition in silicon using molecular dynamics techniques. The growth of small crystal seeds embedded in the amorphous phase has been monitored for several temperatures in order to get information on the effect of the thermal temperature increase introduced by the incoming ion. The role of ion-induced defects on the growth has been also studied

  5. Fission dynamics of superheavy nuclei formed in uranium induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurjit Kaur; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The compound nuclear system follows symmetric fission if the competing processes such as quasi-elastic, deep inelastic, quasi-fission etc are absent. The contribution of quasi fission events towards the fusion-fission mechanism depends on the entrance channel asymmetry of reaction partners, deformations and orientations of colliding nuclei beside the dependence on energy and angular momentum. Usually the 209 Bi and 208 Pb targets are opted for the production of superheavy nuclei with Z CN =104-113. The nuclei in same mass/charge range can also be synthesized using actinide targets + light projectiles (i.e. asymmetric reaction partners) via hot fusion interactions. These actinide targets are prolate deformed which prefer the compact configurations at above barrier energies, indicating the occurrence of symmetric fission events. Here an attempt is made to address the dynamics of light superheavy system (Z CN =104-106), formed via hot fusion interactions involving actinide targets

  6. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using stochastic simulations at a wide range of points in parameter space and compare with analytical approximations. Specifically, we investigate whether polarity switching of stochastic patterns occurs at a defined frequency. We find that it can do so in individual realizations of a stochastic simulation, but that the frequency is not defined consistently across realizations in our samples of parameter space. Further, we examine the effect of noise on deterministically predicted traveling waves and find them increased in amplitude and decreased in speed. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  7. Cellular proton dynamics in Elodea canadensis leaves induced by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq Javed, M; Lindberg, Sylvia; Greger, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Our earlier investigations showed that Elodea canadensis shoots, grown in the presence of cadmium (Cd), caused basification of the surrounding medium. The present study was aimed to examine the proton dynamics of the apoplastic, cytosolic and vacuolar regions of E. canadensis leaves upon Cd exposure and to establish possible linkage between cellular pH changes and the medium basification. The changes in cytosolic calcium [Ca(2+)]cyt was also investigated as the [Ca(2+)]cyt and [pH]cyt homeostasis are closely linked. The cellular H(+) and Ca(2+) concentrations were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and ion-specific fluorescent dyes. Cadmium concentration of leaf-cell walls was measured after plant cultivation at different fixed levels of starting pH. The protoplasts from E. canadensis leaves were isolated by use of a newly developed enzymatic method. Upon Cd addition, both cytosolic and vacuolar pH of leaf protoplasts increased with a concomitant rise in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Time course studies revealed that changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt and [pH]cyt followed similar dynamics. Cadmium (0.5 μM) exposure decreased the apoplastic pH by 0.85 units. The maximum cell wall bound Cd-contents were obtained in plants grown at low starting pH. It is concluded that Cd treatment causes apoplastic acidosis in E. canadensis leaves associated with enhanced Cd binding to the cell walls and, consequently, reduced Cd influx into the cytosol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Pollution-Induced Community Tolerance To Diagnose Hazardous Chemicals in Multiple Contaminated Aquatic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Stefanie; Gunold, Roman; Mothes, Sibylle; Paschke, Albrecht; Brack, Werner; Altenburger, Rolf; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild

    2015-08-18

    Aquatic ecosystems are often contaminated with large numbers of chemicals, which cannot be sufficiently addressed by chemical target analyses. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) enables the identification of toxicants in complex contaminated environmental samples. This study suggests pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) as a confirmation tool for EDA to identify contaminants which actually impact on local communities. The effects of three phytotoxic compounds local periphyton communities, cultivated at a reference (R-site) and a polluted site (P-site), were assessed to confirm the findings of a former EDA study on sediments. The sensitivities of R- and P-communities to prometryn, tributyltin (TBT) and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine (PNA) were quantified in short-term toxicity tests and exposure concentrations were determined. Prometryn and PNA concentrations were significantly higher at the P-site, whereas TBT concentrations were in the same range at both sites. Periphyton communities differed in biomass, but algal class composition and diatom diversity were similar. Community tolerance of P-communities was significantly enhanced for prometryn, but not for PNA and TBT, confirming site-specific effects on local periphyton for prometryn only. Thus, PICT enables in situ effect confirmation of phytotoxic compounds at the community level and seems to be suitable to support confirmation and enhance ecological realism of EDA.

  9. Cadmium-induced disruption of environmental exploration and chemical communication in matrinxa, Brycon amazonicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, R.T.; Fernandes-de-Castilho, M.; Val, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of cadmium exposure on both environment exploration and behavioral responses induced by alarm substance in matrinxa (Brycon amazonicus), a fish species endemic to the Amazon basin, were investigated. Fish exposed to 9.04 ± 0.07 μg/L waterborne cadmium for 96 h followed by 24 h depuration period in clean water, were video-recorded for 15 min, followed by immediate introduction of conspecific skin extract to the tank and a new 30 min period of fish video-recording. Cd-exposed matrinxa showed a significantly lowered locomotor activity (t-test t 12 = 2.7; p = 0.025) and spatial distribution (t-test t 12 = 2.4; p = 0.03) relative to the unexposed control fish prior to the alarm substance introduction, and did not present any significant reaction when the skin extract was introduced. The control fish, in opposite, showed a higher level of activity and spatial distribution prior the skin extract contact and significantly decreased their response after the chemical stimulus (locomotion-repeated-measure ANOVA F 1,11 = 5.6; p = 0.04; spatial distribution F 1,11 = 19.4; p = 0.001). In conclusion, exposure to a low level of cadmium affects both the environment exploration performance and the conspecific chemical communication in matrinxa. If the reduced environmental exploration performance of Cd-exposed fish is an adjustment to the compromised chemical communication or an independent effect of cadmium is the next step to be investigated

  10. Cadmium-induced disruption of environmental exploration and chemical communication in matrinxa, Brycon amazonicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, R.T. [Centro Universitario Nilton Lins - CUNL, Laboratory of Toxicology, Av. Prof. Nilton Lins 3259, Parque das Laranjeiras, Zip 69058-040 Manaus, AM (Brazil)], E-mail: rhonda@niltonlins.br; Fernandes-de-Castilho, M. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR, Research Center on Animal Welfare (RECAW), Laboratory of Studies on Animal Stress, Department of Physiology, Sector of Biological Science, Jardim das Americas, Zip 81531-970 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Val, A.L. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia - INPA, Laboratory of Ecophysiology and Molecular Evolution, Av. Andre Araujo 2936, Aleixo, Zip 69083-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2008-09-17

    The effects of cadmium exposure on both environment exploration and behavioral responses induced by alarm substance in matrinxa (Brycon amazonicus), a fish species endemic to the Amazon basin, were investigated. Fish exposed to 9.04 {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/L waterborne cadmium for 96 h followed by 24 h depuration period in clean water, were video-recorded for 15 min, followed by immediate introduction of conspecific skin extract to the tank and a new 30 min period of fish video-recording. Cd-exposed matrinxa showed a significantly lowered locomotor activity (t-test t{sub 12} = 2.7; p = 0.025) and spatial distribution (t-test t{sub 12} = 2.4; p = 0.03) relative to the unexposed control fish prior to the alarm substance introduction, and did not present any significant reaction when the skin extract was introduced. The control fish, in opposite, showed a higher level of activity and spatial distribution prior the skin extract contact and significantly decreased their response after the chemical stimulus (locomotion-repeated-measure ANOVA F{sub 1,11} = 5.6; p = 0.04; spatial distribution F{sub 1,11} = 19.4; p = 0.001). In conclusion, exposure to a low level of cadmium affects both the environment exploration performance and the conspecific chemical communication in matrinxa. If the reduced environmental exploration performance of Cd-exposed fish is an adjustment to the compromised chemical communication or an independent effect of cadmium is the next step to be investigated.

  11. Induced gravity and the attractor dynamics of dark energy/dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Putter, Roland de; Linder, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Attractor solutions that give dynamical reasons for dark energy to act like the cosmological constant, or behavior close to it, are interesting possibilities to explain cosmic acceleration. Coupling the scalar field to matter or to gravity enlarges the dynamical behavior; we consider both couplings together, which can ameliorate some problems for each individually. Such theories have also been proposed in a Higgs-like fashion to induce gravity and unify dark energy and dark matter origins. We explore restrictions on such theories due to their dynamical behavior compared to observations of the cosmic expansion. Quartic potentials in particular have viable stability properties and asymptotically approach general relativity

  12. Electronic dynamics induced by laser in (D)KDP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, G.; Geoffroy, G.; Dyan, A.; Piombini, H.; Geoffroy, G.; Guizard, S.

    2011-01-01

    DKDP (KD 2 PO 4 ) and KDP (KH 2 PO 4 ) crystals that are used in frequency conversion systems have a damage threshold that limits the development of power lasers. It is assumed that laser-induced damage (LID) stems for a precursor defect present in the crystal or quickly generated by the laser-radiation. The Socrate bench has been useful for studying the evolution of LID but the understanding of the very beginning of the LID requires a new method. We have performed femtosecond interferometric measures to study the behaviour of charge carriers. We show that the valence electrons are excited through multi-photon absorption and their relaxation time depends on the isotope (hydrogen or deuterium). The various electron populations are computed through an adequate simulation and the comparison with experimental data has allowed us to get values for multi-photon absorption cross-sections and relaxation times

  13. The development and application of dynamic operational risk assessment in oil/gas and chemical process industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaole; Mannan, M. Sam

    2010-01-01

    A methodology of dynamic operational risk assessment (DORA) is proposed for operational risk analysis in oil/gas and chemical industries. The methodology is introduced comprehensively starting from the conceptual framework design to mathematical modeling and to decision making based on cost-benefit analysis. The probabilistic modeling part of DORA integrates stochastic modeling and process dynamics modeling to evaluate operational risk. The stochastic system-state trajectory is modeled according to the abnormal behavior or failure of each component. For each of the possible system-state trajectories, a process dynamics evaluation is carried out to check whether process variables, e.g., level, flow rate, temperature, pressure, or chemical concentration, remain in their desirable regions. Component testing/inspection intervals and repair times are critical parameters to define the system-state configuration, and play an important role for evaluating the probability of operational failure. This methodology not only provides a framework to evaluate the dynamic operational risk in oil/gas and chemical industries, but also guides the process design and further optimization. To illustrate the probabilistic study, we present a case-study of a level control in an oil/gas separator at an offshore plant.

  14. Crystallization-induced dynamic resolution R-epimer from 25-OCH3-PPD epimeric mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sainan; Tang, Yun; Cao, Jiaqing; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Yuqing

    2015-11-15

    25-OCH3-PPD is a promising antitumor dammarane sapogenin isolated from the total saponin-hydrolyzed extract of Panax ginseng berry and Panax notoginseng leaves. 20(R)-25-OCH3-PPD was more potent as an anti-cancer agent than 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD and epimeric mixture of 25-OCH3-PPD. This paper describes the rapid separation process of the R-epimer of 25-OCH3-PPD from its epimeric mixture by crystallization-induced dynamic resolution (CIDR). The optimized CIDR process was based on single factor analysis and nine well-planned orthogonal design experiments (OA9 matrix). A rapid and sensitive reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) was developed and validated for the quantitation of 25-OCH3-PPD epimeric mixture and crystalline product. Separation and quantitation were achieved with a silica column using a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water (87:13, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The ELSD detection was performed at 50°C and 3L/min. Under conditions involving 3mL of 95% ethanol, 8% HCl, and a hermetically sealed environment for 72h, the maximum production of 25(R)-OCH3-PPD was achieved with a chemical purity of 97% and a total yield of 87% through the CIDR process. The 25(R)-OCH3-PPD was nearly completely separated from the 220mg 25-OCH3-PPD epimeric mixture. Overall, a simple and steady small-batch purification process for the large-scale production of 25(R)-OCH3-PPD from 25-OCH3-PPD epimeric mixture was developed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential for supernova-induced chemical enrichment of protoglobular cluster clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.; Smith, G.H.; Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria, Canada)

    1986-01-01

    This paper seeks to explain the large internal abundance variations that are seen in the globular cluster Omega Cen in terms of supernova-induced chemical enrichment that occurred when the cluster was still largely in a gaseous phase and star formation was continuing. Using a simple power-law density model of this protoglobular gas cloud, the conditions under which this can occur have been established analytically. Clouds less massive than about 100,000 solar masses are completely disrupted by supernova explosions in their adiabatic phase. In clouds of greater mass, supernova explosions occurring near the tidal radius tend to lose their hot gas and metals to the intercloud medium. For explosions occurring closer to the mass center the ejecta must be slowed below the escape velocity, and this can only occur in clouds more massive than about 3 x 10 to the 6th solar masses. If this condition is met, then the slow isothermal momentum-conserving shocks generated by the supernova explosions may eventually induce secondary star formation. For such shocks converging on the mass center, it is found that a cloud mass of at least 10 to the 7th solar masses is required for this process to be efficient. From the observed properties of Omega Cen, a primordial mass of order 10 to the 8th solar masses is estimated, which emphasizes the unusual character of this object. 39 references

  16. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2010-11-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. One chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) fused to a cellular 'address' (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). The second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain from FKBP-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1, also known as mTor). Rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBP12- and FRB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment.

  17. Chemical and biological insights into uranium-induced apoptosis of rat hepatic cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; You, Yong [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); Du, Ke-Jie [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); Fang, Zhen [Anhui Normal University, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Wuhu (China); Wen, Ge-Bo [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China); Lin, Ying-Wu [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China)

    2015-05-15

    Uranium release into the environment is a threat to human health, and the mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by uranium are not well-understood. To improve our understanding in this respect, we herein evaluated the effects of uranium exposure on normal rat hepatic BRL cells. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis, uranyl nitrate was found to be transformed into uranyl phosphate particles in the medium and taken up by BRL cells in an endocytotic uptake manner, which presumably initiates apoptosis of the cell, although soluble uranyl ion may also be toxic. The apoptosis of BRL cells upon uranium exposure was also confirmed by both the acridine orange and ethidium bromide double staining assay and the Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining assay. Further studies revealed that uranium induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the uranium-induced apoptosis was found to be associated with the activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, indicating both a mitochondria-dependent signaling pathway and a death receptor pathway by a crosstalk. This study provides new chemical and biological insights into the mechanism of uranium toxicity toward hepatic cells, which will help seek approaches for biological remediation of uranium. (orig.)

  18. Dynamical coupling of electrons and ions in Xray-induced dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saalmann, Ulf; Camacho, Abraham; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Photo-absorption from short and intense Xray pulses by a molecule or a cluster triggers a complicated electron and ion dynamics. Whereas the excitation process concerns largely core-shell electrons, there are various subsequent relaxation channels like electronic decays and ionic Coulomb explosion. We will discuss the interplay of those processes for molecular clusters and fullerenes. (paper)

  19. Near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled silane monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich C. Fischer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A general concept for parallel near-field photochemical and radiation-induced chemical processes for the fabrication of nanopatterns of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM of (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES is explored with three different processes: 1 a near-field photochemical process by photochemical bleaching of a monomolecular layer of dye molecules chemically bound to an APTES SAM, 2 a chemical process induced by oxygen plasma etching as well as 3 a combined near-field UV-photochemical and ozone-induced chemical process, which is applied directly to an APTES SAM. All approaches employ a sandwich configuration of the surface-supported SAM, and a lithographic mask in form of gold nanostructures fabricated through colloidal sphere lithography (CL, which is either exposed to visible light, oxygen plasma or an UV–ozone atmosphere. The gold mask has the function to inhibit the photochemical reactions by highly localized near-field interactions between metal mask and SAM and to inhibit the radiation-induced chemical reactions by casting a highly localized shadow. The removal of the gold mask reveals the SAM nanopattern.

  20. H-2 restriction of the T cell response to chemically induced tumors: evidence from F1 → parent chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannin, D.R.; Yu, S.; McKhann, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    It has been well established that T cells that react to tumor antigen on virus-induced tumors must share H-2D or H-2K specificities with the tumor. It has been impossible to perform similar studies with chemically induced tumors because each chemically induced tumor expresses a unique tumor antigen that cannot be studied in association with other H-2 types. This study provies evidence that H-2 recognition is also necessary for recognition of chemically induced tumors. We have found that F 1 → parent chimeras preferentially recognize chemically induced tumors of parental H-2 type. C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice were lethally irradiated and restored with (C3H x C57BL/6) F 1 hybrid bone marrow. The F 1 → C3H chimera but not the F 1 → C57BL/6 chimera was able to respond to a C3H fibrosarcoma in mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell culture and also to neutralize the tumor in an in vivo tumor neutralization assay. On the other hand, the F 1 → C57BL/6 chimera but not the F 1 → C3H chimera was able to kill the C57BL/6 lymphoma EL4 in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Both chimeras were tolerant to C3H and C57BL/6 alloantigens but could respond normally to Con A and to BALB/c spleen cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures and cytotoxicity assay

  1. All-in-one light-tunable borated phosphors with chemical and luminescence dynamical control resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun Che; Liu, Yun-Ping; Xiao, Zhi Ren; Wang, Yin-Kuo; Cheng, Bing-Ming; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2014-06-25

    Single-composition white-emitting phosphors with superior intrinsic properties upon excitation by ultraviolet light-emitting diodes are important constituents of next-generation light sources. Borate-based phosphors, such as NaSrBO3:Ce(3+) and NaCaBO3:Ce(3+), have stronger absorptions in the near-ultraviolet region as well as better chemical/physical stability than oxides. Energy transfer effects from sensitizer to activator caused by rare-earth ions are mainly found in the obtained photoluminescence spectra and lifetime. The interactive mechanisms of multiple dopants are ambiguous in most cases. We adjust the doping concentration in NaSrBO3:RE (RE = Ce(3+), Tb(3+), Mn(2+)) to study the energy transfer effects of Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) and Mn(2+) by comparing the experimental data and theoretical calculation. The vacuum-ultraviolet experimental determination of the electronic energy levels for Ce(3+) and Tb(3+) in the borate host regarding the 4f-5d and 4f-4f configurations are described. Evaluation of the Ce(3+)/Mn(2+) intensity ratios as a function of Mn(2+) concentration is based on the analysis of the luminescence dynamical process and fluorescence lifetime measurements. The results closely agree with those directly obtained from the emission spectra. Density functional calculations are performed using the generalized gradient approximation plus an on-site Coulombic interaction correction scheme to investigate the forbidden mechanism of interatomic energy transfer between the NaSrBO3:Ce(3+) and NaSrBO3:Eu(2+) systems. Results indicate that the NaSrBO3:Ce(3+), Tb(3+), and Mn(2+) phosphors can be used as a novel white-emitting component of UV radiation-excited devices.

  2. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced here that quantifies the influence of chemistry and transport on ozone concentration changes and that is easily implemented in CCMs and chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this method, ozone tendencies (i.e. the time rate of change of ozone are partitioned into a contribution from ozone production and destruction (chemistry and a contribution from transport of ozone (dynamics. The influence of transport on ozone in a specific region is further divided into export of ozone out of that region and import of ozone from elsewhere into that region. For this purpose, a diagnostic is used that disaggregates the ozone mixing ratio field into 9 separate fields according to in which of 9 predefined regions of the atmosphere the ozone originated. With this diagnostic the ozone mass fluxes between these regions are obtained. Furthermore, this method is used here to attribute long-term changes in ozone to chemistry and transport. The relative change in ozone from one period to another that is due to changes in production or destruction rates, or due to changes in import or export of ozone, are quantified. As such, the diagnostics introduced here can be used to attribute changes in ozone on monthly, interannual and long-term time-scales to the responsible mechanisms. Results from a CCM simulation are shown here as examples, with the main focus of the paper being on introducing the method.

  3. Potential of an ensemble Kalman smoother for stratospheric chemical-dynamical data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Milewski

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A new stratospheric ensemble Kalman smoother (EnKS system is introduced, and the potential of assimilating posterior stratospheric observations to better constrain the whole model state at analysis time is investigated. A set of idealised perfect-model Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSE assimilating synthetic limb-sounding temperature or ozone retrievals are performed with a chemistry–climate model. The impact during the analysis step is characterised in terms of the root mean square error reduction between the forecast state and the analysis state. The performances of (1 a fixed-lag EnKS assimilating observations spread over 48 hours and (2 an ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF assimilating a denser network of observations are compared with a reference EnKF. The ozone assimilation with EnKS shows a significant additional reduction of analysis error of the order of 10% for dynamical and chemical variables in the extratropical upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS and Polar Vortex regions when compared to the reference EnKF. This reduction has similar magnitude to the one achieved by the denser-network EnKF assimilation. Similarly, the temperature assimilation with EnKS significantly decreases the error in the UTLS for the wind variables like the denser-network EnKF assimilation. However, the temperature assimilation with EnKS has little or no significant impact on the temperature and ozone analyses, whereas the denser-network EnKF shows improvement with respect to the reference EnKF. The different analysis impacts from the assimilation of current and posterior ozone observations indicate the capacity of time-lagged background-error covariances to represent temporal interactions up to 48 hours between variables during the ensemble data assimilation analysis step, and the possibility to use posterior observations whenever additional current observations are unavailable. The possible application of the EnKS for reanalyses is

  4. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawkwell, M. J., E-mail: cawkwell@lanl.gov; Niklasson, Anders M. N. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana M. [Weapons Experiments Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  5. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N; Dattelbaum, Dana M

    2015-02-14

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories.

  6. Dynamic control of magnetic nanowires by light-induced domain-wall kickoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Eric; El Hallak, Fadi; Clauß, Conrad; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Totti, Federico; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. In contrast to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiance is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magneto-optical switching. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to numerous fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity.

  7. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  8. Recurring dynamically induced thinning during 1985 to 2010 on Upernavik Isstrøm, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjaer, K.H.; Korsgaard, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    elevation satellite laser altimeter data supplemented with altimeter surveys from NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper during 2002 to 2010. To assess thinning prior to 2002, we analyze aerial photographs from 1985. We document at least two distinct periods of dynamically induced ice loss during 1985 to 2010...

  9. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F. [OGG-INFM, Grenoble (France); Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Genova (Italy); Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Fasano, A. [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Bari (Italy); Riccio, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia D.B.A.F., Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP. (orig.)

  10. The role of dynamically induced variability in the recent warming trend slowdown over the Northern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaodan; Huang, Jianping; Guo, Ruixia; Lin, Pu

    2015-07-30

    Since the slowing of the trend of increasing surface air temperature (SAT) in the late 1990 s, intense interest and debate have arisen concerning the contribution of human activities to the warming observed in previous decades. Although several explanations have been proposed for the warming-trend slowdown (WTS), none has been generally accepted. We investigate the WTS using a recently developed methodology that can successfully identify and separate the dynamically induced and radiatively forced SAT changes from raw SAT data. The dynamically induced SAT changes exhibited an obvious cooling effect relative to the warming effect of the adjusted SAT in the hiatus process. A correlation analysis suggests that the changes are dominated primarily by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Our results confirm that dynamically induced variability caused the WTS. The radiatively forced SAT changes are determined mainly by anthropogenic forcing, indicating the warming influence of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which reached levels of 400 ppm during the hiatus period. Therefore, the global SAT will not remain permanently neutral. The increased radiatively forced SAT will be amplified by increased dynamically induced SAT when the natural mode returns to a warming phase in the next period.

  11. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation to induced blood pressure changes in human experimental and clinical sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M

    2016-01-01

    (-1) ; P = 0·91 versus baseline; P = 0·14 versus LPS]. While our findings support the concept that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is enhanced during the very early stages of sepsis, they remain inconclusive with regard to more advanced stages of disease, because thigh-cuff deflation failed to induce...... (Ps...

  12. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear Hamiltonian mechanics applied to molecular dynamics theory and computational methods for understanding molecular spectroscopy and chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Farantos, Stavros C

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents numerical methods for describing and calculating invariant phase space structures, as well as solving the classical and quantum equations of motion for polyatomic molecules. Examples covered include simple model systems to realistic cases of molecules spectroscopically studied. Vibrationally excited and reacting molecules are nonlinear dynamical systems, and thus, nonlinear mechanics is the proper theory to elucidate molecular dynamics by investigating invariant structures in phase space. Intramolecular energy transfer, and the breaking and forming of a chemical bond have now found a rigorous explanation by studying phase space structures.

  14. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Mehring, Michael; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature dependence on plasma-induced damage and chemical reactions in GaN etching processes using chlorine plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zecheng; Ishikawa, Kenji; Imamura, Masato; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) on GaN was optimally reduced by high-temperature chlorine plasma etching. Energetic ion bombardments primarily induced PID involving stoichiometry, surface roughness, and photoluminescence (PL) degradation. Chemical reactions under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and chlorine radical exposure at temperatures higher than 400 °C can be controlled by taking into account the synergism of simultaneous photon and radical irradiations to effectively reduce PID.

  16. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of mushy layers induced by external stochastic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Dmitri V; Bashkirtseva, Irina A; Ryashko, Lev B

    2018-02-28

    The time-dependent process of directional crystallization in the presence of a mushy layer is considered with allowance for arbitrary fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity. A nonlinear set of mushy layer equations and boundary conditions is solved analytically when the heat and mass fluxes at the boundary between the mushy layer and liquid phase are induced by turbulent motion in the liquid and, as a result, have the corresponding convective form. Namely, the 'solid phase-mushy layer' and 'mushy layer-liquid phase' phase transition boundaries as well as the solid fraction, temperature and concentration (salinity) distributions are found. If the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity are constant, the analytical solution takes a parametric form. In the more common case when they represent arbitrary functions of time, the analytical solution is given by means of the standard Cauchy problem. The deterministic and stochastic behaviour of the phase transition process is analysed on the basis of the obtained analytical solutions. In the case of stochastic fluctuations in the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity, the phase transition interfaces (mushy layer boundaries) move faster than in the deterministic case. A cumulative effect of these noise contributions is revealed as well. In other words, when the atmospheric temperature and friction velocity fluctuate simultaneously due to the influence of different external processes and phenomena, the phase transition boundaries move even faster. This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.This article is part of the theme issue 'From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  19. Nonlinear absorption dynamics using field-induced surface hopping: zinc porphyrin in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhr, Merle I S; Petersen, Jens; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Mitrić, Roland

    2013-05-10

    We wish to present the application of our field-induced surface-hopping (FISH) method to simulate nonlinear absorption dynamics induced by strong nonresonant laser fields. We provide a systematic comparison of the FISH approach with exact quantum dynamics simulations on a multistate model system and demonstrate that FISH allows for accurate simulations of nonlinear excitation processes including multiphoton electronic transitions. In particular, two different approaches for simulating two-photon transitions are compared. The first approach is essentially exact and involves the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in an extended manifold of excited states, while in the second one only transiently populated nonessential states are replaced by an effective quadratic coupling term, and dynamics is performed in a considerably smaller manifold of states. We illustrate the applicability of our method to complex molecular systems by simulating the linear and nonlinear laser-driven dynamics in zinc (Zn) porphyrin in the gas phase and in water. For this purpose, the FISH approach is connected with the quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical approach (QM/MM) which is generally applicable to large classes of complex systems. Our findings that multiphoton absorption and dynamics increase the population of higher excited states of Zn porphyrin in the nonlinear regime, in particular in solution, provides a means for manipulating excited-state properties, such as transient absorption dynamics and electronic relaxation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hydration structure and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in water clusters of varying size and temperature: Quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A theoretical study of hydroxide ion-water clusters is carried for varying cluster size and temperature. ► The structures of OH − (H 2 O) n are found out through quantum chemical calculations for n = 4, 8, 16 and 20. ► The finite temperature behavior of the clusters is studied through ab initio dynamical simulations. ► The spectral features of OH modes (deuterated) and their dependence on hydrogen bonding states of water are discussed. ► The mechanism and kinetics of proton transfer processes in these anionic clusters are also investigated. - Abstract: We have investigated the hydration structure and dynamics of OH − (H 2 O) n clusters (n = 4, 8, 16 and 20) by means of quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that the solvation structure of the hydroxide ion transforms from three and four-coordinated surface states to five-coordinated interior state with increase in cluster size. Several other isomeric structures with energies not very different from the most stable isomer are also found. Ab initio simulations show that the most probable configurations at higher temperatures need not be the lowest energy isomeric structure. The rates of proton transfer in these clusters are found to be slower than that in bulk water. The vibrational spectral calculations reveal distinct features for free OH (deuterated) stretch modes of water in different hydrogen bonding states. Effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties are also investigated for the largest cluster considered here.

  1. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  2. Radiation-induced chemical evolution of glycine to (Gly)2, (Gly)3, and (Gly)4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Izumi, Y.; Kamohara, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Yokoya, A.

    2006-01-01

    Recently amino acids were detected from some meteorites. Since these amino acids were found after hydrolysis, some oligopeptides were possibly formed in space. A simulation experiment of chemical evolution from Glycine (Gly) to Glycylglycine ((Gly)2) was reported by Kaneko et al. In this work, we irradiated (Gly)2 with 8 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons or with 530 eV soft X-ray photons and examined absolute values of quantum yield of radiation-induced chemical evolution from Gly2 to Glycylglycylglycine ((Gly)3) and Glycylglycylglycylglycine ((Gly)4). Thin films of (Gly)2 were prepared on quartz plate or CuBe plate with a vacuum evaporation technique. These samples were irradiated by 8 eV photons from a Xe 2 * excimer lamp or by 530 eV soft X-ray photons at SPring-8 Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Irradiated samples were analyzed with a high performance liquid chromatography HPLC. Decomposition of (Gly)2 and production of Gly, (Gly)3 and (Gly)4 were observed. Quantum yield Y was defined to be N = Y N 0 , where N is the number of produced or decomposed molecule, and N 0 is the number of (Gly)2 molecules excited by photons. Obtained results by 8 eV irradiation were summarized in Table 1. The similar magnitude of decomposition of (Gly)2 may show that yield of the primary breaking reaction upon photo-excitation is of similar magnitude. It should be noted that (Gly)3 and (Gly)4 was produced by irradiation with the yield of 10 -4 without any catalysis. For soft X-ray irradiation, yield of Gly was tentatively determined to be about 40. This largervalue than that for 8 eV irradiation may originate from large energy of incident soft X-ray photons just like a result reported by Simakov et al. We will discuss in detail at the conference. (authors)

  3. Dynamics of liquids, molecules, and proteins measured with ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo chemical exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, M D

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of molecular systems undergo fast structural changes under thermal equilibrium conditions. Such transformations are involved in a vast array of chemical problems. Experimentally measuring equilibrium dynamics is a challenging problem that is at the forefront of chemical research. This review describes ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo chemical exchange experiments and applies them to several types of molecular systems. The formation and dissociation of organic solute-solvent complexes are directly observed. The dissociation times of 13 complexes, ranging from 4 ps to 140 ps, are shown to obey a relationship that depends on the complex's formation enthalpy. The rate of rotational gauche-trans isomerization around a carbon-carbon single bond is determined for a substituted ethane at room temperature in a low viscosity solvent. The results are used to obtain an approximate isomerization rate for ethane. Finally, the time dependence of a well-defined single structural transformation of a protein is measured.

  4. Chemical stress induced by heliotrope (Heliotropium europaeum L.) allelochemicals and increased activity of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghader, Kalantar; Nojavan, Majid; Naghshbandi, Nabat

    2008-03-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the allelopathic potential of heliotrope on some biochemical processes of dodder. The preliminary experiments revealed that the effect of aqueous extract of leaves of heliotrope is higher than its seeds and roots. So, the aqueous extract of leaves was used in remaining experiments. Leaf extracts of 5 g powder per 100 mL H2O inhibited the germination of dodder seeds up to 95% and that of radish up to 100%. While, the aqueous extract of vine leaves which is a non-allelopathic plant did not have any inhibitory effect on these seeds. Vine leaf was used as a control to show that the inhibitory effect of heliotrope is due to an inhibitory compound but not due to the concentration. The leaf extract of heliotrope at 0.0, 0.1, 1.0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 g powder per 100 mL H2O reduced the radish seedling growth from 14 cm to about 0.5 cm and that of dodder from 7.5 cm to about 0.25 cm. The effects of heliotrope allelochemicals on some physiological and biochemical processes of radish was also Investigated. The activity of auxin oxidase increased in leaves and roots of radish. Suggesting that the reduced radish growth is due to the decreased active auxin levels in its leaves and roots. The activity of alpha-amylase was reduced, so reduction of starch degradation and lack of respiratory energy is the prime reason of germination inhibition in dodder and radish seeds. The level of soluble sugars increased. This is an indication of reduction of the activity of some respiratory enzymes and reduced consumption of these sugars. Proline levels were also increased, indicating that, the chemical stress is induced by leaf extract. Finally, the activities of GPX and CAT which are antioxidant enzymes were increased, along with increased extract concentration. These finding shows that the chemical stress induced by leaf extract produces super oxide (O2*) and H2O2, which is neutralized to H2O and O2 by these enzymes.

  5. Dynamics of defect-induced dark solitons in an exciton-polariton condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opala, Andrzej; Pieczarka, Maciej; Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2018-04-01

    We study theoretically the emission of dark solitons induced by a moving defect in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate. The number of created dark solitons per unit of time is found to be strongly dependent on the pump power. We relate the observed dynamics of this process to the oscillations of the drag force experienced by the condensate. We investigate the stability of the polariton quantum fluid and present various types of dynamics depending on the condensate and moving obstacle parameters. Furthermore, we provide analytical expressions for dark soliton dynamics using the variational method adapted to the nonequilibrium polariton system. The determined dynamical equations are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  6. Application of chaos theory to the particle dynamics of asymmetry-induced transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2018-03-01

    The techniques of chaos theory are employed in an effort to better understand the complex single-particle dynamics of asymmetry-induced transport in non-neutral plasmas. The dynamical equations are re-conceptualized as describing time-independent trajectories in a four-dimensional space consisting of the radius r, rotating frame angle ψ, axial position z, and axial velocity v. Results include the identification of an integral of the motion, fixed-point analysis of the dynamical equations, the construction and interpretation of Poincaré sections to visualize the dynamics, and, for the case of chaotic motion, numerical calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. Chaotic cases are shown to be associated with the overlap of resonance islands formed by the applied asymmetry.

  7. Optical wall dynamics induced by coexistence of monostable and bistable spatial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odent, V; Louvergneaux, E; Clerc, M G; Andrade-Silva, I

    2016-11-01

    When nonequilibrium extended homogeneous systems exhibit multistability, it leads to the presence of domain walls between the existing equilibria. Depending on the stability of the steady states, the dynamics differs. Here, we consider the interface dynamics in the case of a spatially inhomogeneous system, namely, an optical system where the control parameter is spatially Gaussian. Then interfaces connect the monostable and the bistable nonuniform states that are associated with two distinct spatial regions. The coexistence of these two regions of different stability induces relaxation dynamics and the propagation of a wall with a time-dependent speed. We emphasize analytically these two dynamical behaviors using a generic bistable model. Experimentally, an inhomogeneous Gaussian light beam traveling through either a dye-doped liquid crystal cell or a Kerr cavity depicts these behaviors, in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Line-shape theory and molecular dynamics in collision-induced light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balucani, U.; Tognetti, V.; Vallauri, R.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics studies in argon at 148 amagats are presented for gaining information on the dynamical properties responsible for the depolarized light scattering from simple fluids. The total and pair-correlation functions are computed within the simple dipole--induced-dipole model of polarizability anisotropy. The pair spectral shape is derived. These results are compared with a theoretical analysis based on a continued-fraction approach. The necessary frequency moments are calculated both in the low-density limit and taking into account first-order density corrections, and compared with the molecular-dynamics data. The agreement between the theoretical spectra and molecular-dynamics data shows the validity of the memory-function approach. The comparison with the real experimental results allows one to test the relevant physical contributions to the polarizability anisotropy

  9. Evaluation of Yield and Chemical Characteristics of some Peanut Mutants Induced by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-daem, G.A.; Anwar, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate some promising mutants in peanut for yielding ability over three generation (M5, M6 and M7) and to evaluate yield attributes as will as chemical characteristics of these mutants in M7 generation induced by 100 Gy gamma radiation. The obtained results showed that the increase of yield / plot over three generation as a percentage of control was 5% for mutant 7, 10.2 % for mutant 10; 22% for mutant 9 and 22.9% for mutant 8. This increase in yield may be due to increase of one or more of yield attributes for most mutant lines. The significant increase for. No .of pods and seeds/ plant, weight of pods and seeds/ plant and 100- seed weight in M7 as compared to the control. For saturated fatty acid composition, results revealed that total saturated fatty acids ranged from 17.79% for mutant 8 to 21.75 for mutant 2 compared to 24.21% for control. Reduction of total saturated fatty acid was noticed for different mutants compared to that of the original variety. However, for total unsaturated fatty acids, results indicated that total unsaturated fatty acid composition ranged from 77.95% for mutant 9 to 82.09% for mutant 8 compared to 75.49% for control. Higher total unsaturated fatty acids for all mutant lines were obtained than that of the control, however, total saturated (TS)/ total unsaturated (TU) ratio was decreased for all mutants compared to control. The physical and chemical contents of Peanut oils showed that the refractive indices were ranged from 1.4620 to 1.4718 specific gravity were in range of 0.9146 to 0.9177. Acid value was range from 0.54 to 0.89% lodine value was ranged from 94.56 to 101.85. Saponification value was ranged from 185.2 to 190.7 and unsaponifiable matter was ranged from 0.98 to 1.33. The peroxide values ranged from 1.15 to 2.33 meq/kg oil. Also, fortified yoghurt made with replaced mutant peanut oil by 50% as milk fat substitute. Data showed that chemical composition and organolyptic properties had the

  10. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaux, G.; Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C.; Machado, M.L.; Denise, P.; Comoz, F.; Hitier, M.; Landemore, G.; Philoxène, B.; Besnard, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  11. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  12. Ultrafast infrared studies of chemical reaction dynamics in room-temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haw [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Femtosecond infrared spectroscopy provides sufficient spectral and temporal resolution to support a detailed investigation of the early events of a photochemical reaction. Previously unreported transient species that arise as intermediates during the course of a reaction may have lifetimes that are too short for conventional characterization. For these species, quantum-mechanical (density functional theoretical and ab initio) electronic structure calculations provide invaluable insight into chemical properties including molecular structure and energetic. With the combination of experimental and theoretical results, it is possible to assemble a comprehensive picture of the reaction dynamics of a system that is intricately influenced by the surrounding solvent molecules. The mechanisms of several important organometallic reactions, such as alkane C– H bond activation by η3-Tp*Rh(CO), silane Si–H bond activation by η5-CpMn(CO)2 and η5-CpRe(CO)2, as well as chlorinated methane C–Cl bond cleavage by the Re(CO)5 radical are elucidated. The results demonstrate the importance of molecular morphology change (C–H and Si–H act ivat ion), solvent rearrangement (Si–H activation), intersystem crossing (Si–H activation), and solvent caging (C–Cl cleavage) in understanding the reactivity of the organometallic species, The nature of the apparent free-energy barrier for C–H, Si–H, and C–Cl bond activation reaction is found to be- cleavage of an alkane C–H bond, rearrangement of a silane molecule HSiR3 (R = alkyl group) from a nonreactive alkyl site to the reactive Si–H bond, and Cl atom transfer from a chlorinated methane molecule to Re(CO)5, respectively. These results support previous d initio calculations for C–H and Si–H bond activation reaction profiles which suggest that cleavage of an alkane C–H bond by a transition metal center, unlike that of a silane

  13. Sensitivity of neuroprogenitor cells to chemical-induced apoptosis using a multiplexed assay suitable for high-throughput screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druwe, Ingrid; Freudenrich, Theresa M.; Wallace, Kathleen; Shafer, Timothy J.; Mundy, William R.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput methods are useful for rapidly screening large numbers of chemicals for biological activity, including the perturbation of pathways that may lead to adverse cellular effects. In vitro assays for the key events of neurodevelopment, including apoptosis, may be used in a battery of tests for detecting chemicals that could result in developmental neurotoxicity. Apoptosis contributes to nervous system development by regulating the size of the neuroprogenitor cell pool, and the balance between cellular proliferation and apoptosis during neuroprogenitor cell proliferation helps to determine the size and shape of the nervous system. Therefore, chemicals that affect apoptosis during neuronal development can have deleterious effects on the developing brain. The present study examined the utility of a high-throughput assay to detect chemical-induced apoptosis in mouse or human neuroprogenitor cells, as well as differentiated human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Apoptosis was assessed using an assay that measures enzymatic activity of caspase-3/7 in a rapid and cost efficient manner. The results show that all three commercially available models generated a robust source of proliferating neuroprogenitor cells, and that the assay was sensitive and reproducible when used in a multi-well plate format. There were differences in the response of rodent and human neuroprogenitor cells to a set of chemicals previously shown to induce apoptosis in vitro. Neuroprogenitor cells were more sensitive to chemical-induced apoptosis than differentiated neurons, suggesting that neuroprogenitor cells are one of the cell models that should be considered for use in a developmental neurotoxicity screening battery

  14. Overexpression and amplification of the c-myc gene in mouse tumors induced by chemical and radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Ohtsura; Enoki, Yoshitaka; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1989-03-01

    We examined expression of the c-myc gene by the dot blot hybridization of total cellular RNA from mouse primary tumors induced by chemicals and radiations. Expression of the c-myc gene was found to be elevated in 69 cases among 177 independently induced tumors of 12 different types. DNA from tumors overexpressing the myc gene was analyzed by Southern blotting. No case of rearrangement was detected. However, amplification of the c-myc gene was found in 7 cases of primary sarcomas. These included 4 cases out of 24 methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas and 3 cases out of 7 /alpha/-tocopherol-induced sacromas. We also analyzed 8 cases of sarcomas induced by radiations, but could not find changes in the gene structure of the c-myc gene. Thus, our data indicate tumor type specificity and agent specificity of c-myc gene amplification. (author).

  15. Obesity May Not Induce Dynamic Stability Disadvantage during Overground Walking among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Qi; Yang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been related to postural instability during static standing. It remains unknown how obesity influences stability during dynamic movements like gait. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of obesity on dynamic gait stability control in young adults during gait. Forty-four young adults (21 normal-weight and 23 obese) participated in this study. Participants walked five times at their self-selected gait speeds on a linear walkway. Their full-body kinematics were gathered by a motion capture system. Compared with normal-weight group, individuals with obesity walked more slowly with a shorter but wider step. People with obesity also spent an elongated double stance phase than those with normal weight. A reduced gait speed decreases the body center of mass's velocity relative to the base of support, leading to a reduction in dynamic stability. On the other hand, a shortened step in accompanying with a less backward-leaning trunk has the potential to bring the center of mass closer to the base of support, resulting in an increase in dynamic stability. As the result of these adaptive changes to the gait pattern, dynamic gait stability among people with obesity did not significantly differ from the one among people with normal weight. Obesity seems to not be inducing dynamic stability disadvantage in young adults during level overground walking. These findings could provide insight into the mechanisms of stability control among people affected by obesity during dynamic locomotion.

  16. Simplified dynamic analysis to evaluate liquefaction-induced lateral deformation of earth slopes: a computational fluid dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, Yaser; Ghorbani, Ali; Ahmadi, Omid

    2014-09-01

    Lateral deformation of liquefiable soil is a cause of much damage during earthquakes, reportedly more than other forms of liquefaction-induced ground failures. Researchers have presented studies in which the liquefied soil is considered as viscous fluid. In this manner, the liquefied soil behaves as non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity decreases as the shear strain rate increases. The current study incorporates computational fluid dynamics to propose a simplified dynamic analysis for the liquefaction-induced lateral deformation of earth slopes. The numerical procedure involves a quasi-linear elastic model for small to moderate strains and a Bingham fluid model for large strain states during liquefaction. An iterative procedure is considered to estimate the strain-compatible shear stiffness of soil. The post-liquefaction residual strength of soil is considered as the initial Bingham viscosity. Performance of the numerical procedure is examined by using the results of centrifuge model and shaking table tests together with some field observations of lateral ground deformation. The results demonstrate that the proposed procedure predicts the time history of lateral ground deformation with a reasonable degree of precision.

  17. Microbial dynamics during and after in situ chemical oxidation of chlorinated solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, N.B.; Atashgahi, S.; Wal, van der J.; Wijn, G.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Smidt, H.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2015-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) followed by a bioremediation step is increasingly being considered as an effective biphasic technology. Information on the impact of chemical oxidants on organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB), however, is largely lacking. Therefore, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR)

  18. Does the QCD vacuum build up a colour chemical potential dynamically?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, K.; Greiner, W.

    1998-01-01

    The one-loop effective theory is found for QCD assuming an overcritical homogeneous gluon vector potential background that corresponds to a non-vanishing colour chemical potential. It is found that the vacuum is unstable against building up a non-vanishing colour chemical potential for sufficiently large number of flavours. (author)

  19. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allendorf, Mark D; Houk, Ronald J T; Andruszkiewicz, Leanne; Talin, A Alec; Pikarsky, Joel; Choudhury, Arnab; Gall, Kenneth A; Hesketh, Peter J

    2008-11-05

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N2 or O2. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO2. Finally, we report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes.

  20. Modification of tolerance of oats to crown rust induced by chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, M.D.; Browning, J.A.; Frey, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Seeds of crown rust (Puccinia coronata) susceptible cultivated oats (Avena sativa) were treated with the mutagenic chemical ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), and pure lines derived from these treated seeds were tested in later generations for the relative amount of reduction in yield and seed weight caused by crown rust infection. In the absence of crown rust, the yield of most of the treated lines was greatly reduced. The overall means of the treated lines for both yield and seed weight response to infection were significantly lower than the control, but 10 lines significantly exceeded the control for yield response and 15 exceeded it for seed weight response. Recurrent EMS treatment of once-treated lines rated as tolerant resulted in groups of lines that were more tolerant, on the average, than groups of lines from recurrently treated lines rated as susceptible. A few of the recurrently treated individual lines derived from tolerant parents had a higher degree of tolerance than their parental lines. EMS treatment of diploid (A. strigosa) and tetraploid (A. abyssinica) oats resulted in groups of lines showing significant genetic variance for response to crown rust, indicating that treatment had induced real genetic change. A few diploid lines were a little more tolerant than their control, but none of the tetraploid lines showed any consistent improvement. (author)

  1. Studies on chemical and physical mutagens' induced polygenic variability in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangwan, H.P.S.; Singh, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Pulses used to be and still are cultivated on marginal lands under poor management conditions which result in low production. Genotypes which could respond to better management have been eliminated by past selection. It is, therefore, difficult and challenging to breed high yielding varieties in pulse crops with the limited genetic variability available. Induced mutations could supplement this variability. Extensive studies on genotype-mutagen interaction were undertaken with six varieties of mungbean having contrasting seed characteristics, morphological traits and genetic backgrounds. Each variety was treated with 300 Gy and 600 Gy of gamma rays, 0.1 and 0.5% of EMS, and 0.1 and 0.05 of SA. Dry seeds, water soaked and phosphate buffer soaked seeds served as controls. The following observations were made: differential response of varieties to mutagen treatments - irrespective of the variety or the characters; gamma-rays proved to be more effective than chemical mutagens; mutagenic treatments resulted in development of early maturing mutants that can fit well in multiple cropping systems particularly in raising a mung crop after the wheat harvest. The fact that some mutants were detected in M 4 with significant increase in yield and marginal improvement in protein content generation suggests the possibility of improving both characters provided a large population is screened. (author)

  2. Serum-induced G0/G1 transition in chemically transformed 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, H.E.; Buchou, T.; Mester, J.

    1987-01-01

    Quiescent, chemically transformed (benzo-a-pyrene) BALB/c 3T3 cells (BP A31) enter the cell division cycle when exposed to complete medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS); the number of cells recruited is a function of the duration of serum exposure. The recruitment of cells by short (<4 h) serum pulses is not inhibited by simultaneous exposure to cycloheximide (CH), and therefore the initial commitment does not require protein synthesis. The cells enter S phase with a constant delay following the removal of CH, even if CH exposure has been continued for as long as 20 h after the end of the serum pulse. The cell recruitment by serum pulses was inhibited by 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB), an inhibitor of cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation. These data suggest that serum exposure produces a stable memory that is necessary and sufficient for the eventual progression through G1 to S phase that occurs when protein synthesis is resumed after the removal of CH; this memory probably consists of mRNA species that are induced by serum and that are stable in the absence of protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, pretreatment of quiescent BP A31 cells with CH (8-24 h) dramatically increased the fraction of the total cell population that is recruited by a serum pulse of fixed duration

  3. Acidification-induced chemical changes in coniferous forest soils in southern Sweden 1988-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, U.; Rosengren, U.; Thelin, G.; Nihlgaard, B

    2003-05-01

    Acidification of south-Swedish coniferous forest soils continues and soil nutrient status is no longer sustainable in a long-term perspective. - Thirty-two Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in southern Sweden were studied for a period of 12 years to evaluate acidification-induced chemical changes in the soil. Soil, at 20-30 cm depth in the mineral layer, was sampled three times during this period (1988, 1993 and 1999). The results show that pH(BaCl{sub 2}) in mineral soil decreased by, on average, 0.17 units between 1988 and 1999, accompanied by an increase in aluminium (Al) concentration and a decrease in base saturation in the soil. In 1999, the base saturation was below 5% in 58% of the 32 sites compared with 16% in 1988 and 7% in 1993. Concentrations of calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) are low and decreasing. Based on C/N ratios in humus, 45% of the sites may be subjected to leaching of considerable amounts of nitrate. The results show that the acidification of coniferous forest soils in southern Sweden is continuing, and that the negative effects on the nutrient status in soil are extensive. The results are compared with reference values for productive, long-term sustainably managed boreal coniferous or mixed forest soils and implications for long-term sustainability are discussed.

  4. Thrombolytic effect of nattokinase on a chemically induced thrombosis model in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Fujii, R; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-10-01

    Nattokinase is a new fibrinolytic enzyme which cleaves directly cross-linked fibrin in vitro. In this study, we investigated the thrombolytic effect of nattokinase on a thrombus in the common carotid artery of rat in which the endothelial cells of the vessel wall were injured by acetic acid. When a section of occluded vessel was stained for CD61 antigen by immunofluorescence utilizing a monoclonal antibody, the antigen was localized around the surface of the occluded blood vessels. This result suggests that the occlusive thrombosis was caused by platelet aggregation. In addition, thrombolysis with urokinase (UK; 50000 IU/kg, i.v.) or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA; 13300 IU/kg, i.v.) in our model was observed to restore the blood flow over a 60 min monitoring period. The results indicate that our chemically induced model is useful for screening and evaluating a thrombolytic agent. We evaluated the thrombolytic activity of nattokinase using this model and compared it with fibrino(geno)lytic enzyme, plasmin or elastase. On a molar basis, the recovery of the arterial blood flow with nattokinase, plasmin and elastase were 62.0 +/- 5.3%, 15.8 +/- 0.7% and 0%, respectively. The results indicate that the thrombolytic activity of nattokinase is stronger than that of plasmin or elastase in vivo.

  5. A new route to nanoscale tomographic chemical analysis: Focused ion beam-induced auger electron spectrosocpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Hamed

    This research project is aimed to study the application of ion-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (IAES) in combination with the characteristics of focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy for performing chemical spectroscopy and further evaluate its potential for 3-dimensional chemical tomography applications. The mechanism for generation of Auger electrons by bombarding ions is very different from its electron induced counterpart. In the conventional electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (EAES), an electron beam with energy typically in the range 1-10kV is used to excite inner-shell (core) electrons of the solid. An electron from a higher electron energy state then de-excites to fill the hole and the extra energy is then transferred to either another electron, i.e. the Auger electron, or generation of an X-ray (photon). In both cases the emitting particles have charac-teristic energies and could be used to identify the excited target atoms. In IAES, however, large excitation cross sections can occur by promotion of in-ner shell electrons through crossing of molecular orbitals. Originally such phenomenological excitation processes were first proposed [3] for bi-particle gas phase collision systems to explain the generation of inner shell vacancies in violent collisions. In addition to excitation of incident or target atoms, due to a much heavier mass of ions compared to electrons, there would also be a substantial momentum transfer from the incident to the target atoms. This may cause the excited target atom to recoil from the lattice site or alternatively sputter off the surface with the possibility of de-excitation while the atom is either in motion in the matrix or traveling in vacuum. As a result, one could expect differences between the spectra induced by incident electrons and ions and interpretation of the IAE spectra requires separate consideration of both excitation and decay processes. In the first stage of the project, a state-of-the-art mass

  6. Quantum chaos induced by nonadiabatic coupling in wave-packet dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Hisashi; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of nonadiabatic coupling due to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation on chaos is investigated. A couple of measures (indicators) that detect the extent of chaos in wave-packet dynamics on coupled potential functions are devised. Using them, we show that chaos is indeed induced by a nonadiabatic coupling in individual time-dependent wave-packet dynamics. This chaos is genuinely of quantum nature, since it arises from bifurcation and merging of a wave packet at the quasicrossing region of two coupled potential functions

  7. Observation of the dynamics of magnetically induced chains of sub-micron superparamagnetic beads in aqueous solutions by laser light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanizawa, Y; Tashiro, T; Sandhu, A; Ko, P J

    2013-01-01

    Optical monitoring the behaviour of magnetically induced self-assembled chains of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) are of interest for biomedical applications such as biosensors. However, it is difficult to directly monitor magnetically induced self-assembly of sub-micron nano-beads with conventional optical microscopes. Here, we describe the optical observation of the dynamics of magnetically induced self-assembled rotating chains of 130 nm SPBs in aqueous solutions by laser light scattering. Magnetic fields of ∼1 kOe were applied to control the self-assembly chains of SPBs and their behaviour analyzed by monitoring the intensity of laser light scattered from the chain structures. We compared the light scattering from chains that were formed only by the application of external fields with chains formed by beads functionalized by EDC, where chemical reactions lead to the bonding of individual beads to form chains. The EDC experiments are a precursor to experiments on molecular recognition applications for biomedical diagnostics.

  8. Dynamics and spike trains statistics in conductance-based integrate-and-fire neural networks with chemical and electric synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cofré, Rodrigo; Cessac, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of electric synapses (gap junctions) on collective neuronal dynamics and spike statistics in a conductance-based integrate-and-fire neural network, driven by Brownian noise, where conductances depend upon spike history. We compute explicitly the time evolution operator and show that, given the spike-history of the network and the membrane potentials at a given time, the further dynamical evolution can be written in a closed form. We show that spike train statistics is described by a Gibbs distribution whose potential can be approximated with an explicit formula, when the noise is weak. This potential form encompasses existing models for spike trains statistics analysis such as maximum entropy models or generalized linear models (GLM). We also discuss the different types of correlations: those induced by a shared stimulus and those induced by neurons interactions

  9. Chemical Oscillations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IMTECH),. Chandigarh. Praveen Kumar is pursuing his PhD in chemical dynamics at. Panjab University,. Chandigarh. Keywords. Chemical oscillations, autoca-. talYSis, Lotka-Volterra model, bistability, hysteresis, Briggs-. Rauscher reaction.

  10. New jump mechanisms for dumbbell and induced migration of point defects by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, N.V.; Pontikis, V.; Tenenbaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    The induced migration of the (100) - dumbbell is studied using the molecular dynamics simulation. Two new types of jumps are discovered for the dumbbell: first the jump takes place through an intermediate crowdion configuration (110), then the crowdion is converted into the dumbbell configuration with some other orientation. The threshold energy is found for different knocked-on directions. The dependence of the interstitial jump frequency on the incident electron energy is determined for copper. The induced interstitial migration shows a maximum value, but for an electron energy around 15 Kev. The effect of new jump mechanisms on the effective recombination volume is discussed

  11. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  12. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  13. Al-induced root cell wall chemical components differences of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root growth is different in plants with different levels of Al-tolerance under Al stress. Cell wall chemical components of root tip cell are related to root growth. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between root growth difference and cell wall chemical components. For this purpose, the cell wall chemical ...

  14. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  15. A practical MGA-ARIMA model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shuhong; Gao, Yifeng; Shi, Houbao; Zhao, Ge

    2013-05-01

    novel and practical modified genetic algorithm (MGA)-autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation has been established by combining genetic algorithm ideas with the ARIMA model. It is proved that due to the introduction of MGA into the ARIMA(1,1,7) model, the MGA-ARIMA model has the potential to be conveniently applied in every country or area by creating a parameter database used by the ARIMA(1,1,7) model. The parameter database is given in this paper based on attenuation data measured in Xi'an, China. The methods to create the parameter databases in other countries or areas are offered, too. Based on the experimental results, the MGA-ARIMA model has been proved practical for forecasting dynamic rain-induced attenuation in real time. The novel model given in this paper is significant for developing adaptive fade mitigation technologies at millimeter wave bands.

  16. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Emission of electric spark dissociation of CH 3 I is similar to its fs LIBS. • We use fs laser induced breakdown as a simulation for electric spark dissociation. • The I 2 molecule formation is directly observed in the time-resolved LIBS. • Bimolecular collision of I ∗ and CH 3 I is responsible for the formation of I 2 . - Abstract: The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH 3 I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I + , CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, H, and I 2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I 2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I 2 ∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I 2 ∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I ∗ ( 4 P) and CH 3 I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH 3 I

  17. Assessing the chemical contamination dynamics in a mixed land use stream system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Anne Thobo; McKnight, Ursula S.; Rønde, Vinni

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, the monitoring of streams for chemical and ecological status has been limited to surface water concentrations, where the dominant focus has been on general water quality and the risk for eutrophication. Mixed land use stream systems, comprising urban areas and agricultural production......, are challenging to assess with multiple chemical stressors impacting stream corridors. New approaches are urgently needed for identifying relevant sources, pathways and potential impacts for implementation of suitable source management and remedial measures. We developed a method for risk assessing chemical...... stressors in these systems and applied the approach to a 16-km groundwater-fed stream corridor (Grindsted, Denmark). Three methods were combined: (i) in-stream contaminant mass discharge for source quantification, (ii) Toxic Units and (iii) environmental standards. An evaluation of the chemical quality...

  18. Cytogenetic damages induced in vivo in human lymphocytes by environmental chemicals or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of various environmental exposures has been evident in variation in cancer incidence and mortality. Benzene is considered to be a human carcinogen, is clastogenic to rodents and humans, and it affects the immune response. Workers in various industrial plants, are exposed to benzene and benzene related compounds as a result of various activities in which benzene is processed, generated or used. Major sources of environmental exposure to benzene related compounds, continue to be active and passive smoking, auto exhaust, and driving or riding in automobiles. Benzene is of a particular interest, not only because of its known toxicity, but also because this was to be the parent compound and a model for extensive programs of metabolism of a variety of aromatic chemicals. Ionizing radiation is an unavoidable physical agent that is presented in environment, and public opinion is well aware against radiation risk and strongly against it. The aim of the presentation was comparison between cytogenetic damages induced in vivo by environmental chemicals with those of radiation. Results from biomonitoring survey on genotoxicity in human blood cells of benzene and benzene related compounds were compared to damages detected in lymphocytes of persons who had been accidentally exposed to gamma radiation. In the groups, that had been occupationally or environmentally exposed to benzene related compound, total aberration frequencies, or percent of aberrant cells ranged between 0 - 0.16 aberrations/cell or 16% of aberrant cells respectively. A multivariate regression analysis confirmed: (i) a significant association between cytogenetic damage and exposure to benzene related compound, (ii) a possible association between cytogenetic damage and cancer, (iii) a significant influence of smoking habit. In 1996 few persons were suspected of accidental exposure to gamma radiation. To estimate the absorbed doses, lymphocytes from their blood have been analyzed for the presence of

  19. Water dynamics of Ser-His-Glu-Cys-Asn powder and effects of moisture absorption on its chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Songyi; Xue, Peiyu; Yang, Shuailing; Li, Xingfang; Dong, Xiuping; Chen, Feng

    2017-08-01

    This study has elucidated moisture dynamics in the soybean peptide, Ser-His-Glu-Cys-Asn (SHECN) powder by using dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We also tried to investigate the effects of moisture absorption on the biological activity and chemical properties of SHECN with some effective methods such as mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). DVS results showed that the moisture absorption of SHECN could reach a maximum of 33%, and the SHECN powder after synthesis actually existed in a trihydrate state of SHECN.3H 2 O. Low-field NMR revealed that three water proportions including strong combined water, binding water and bulk water were involved in SHECN moisture absorption and absored water dominantly existed in the form of combined water. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MIR spectroscopy results indicated that moisture absorption could change the morphology and structure of SHECN. After moisture absorption at 50% and 75% relative humidity, 19 volatiles were identified by GC-MS analysis. Additionally, this study showed that a part of reductive groups in SHECN was oxidized and its antioxidant ability declined significantly (P moisture absorption. Water absorbed into SHECN powder can significantly change its microstructure and cause its activity to decrease. We must prevent SHECN from absorbing moisture during storage because the water can accelerate the oxidation of samples and promote microbial reactions. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Vascularization of the dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerve of the mouse: Implications for chemical-induced peripheral sensory neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melemedjian Ohannes K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although a variety of industrial chemicals, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer or HIV, preferentially induce a peripheral sensory neuropathy what remains unclear is why these agents induce a sensory vs. a motor or mixed neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that the endothelial cells that vascularize the dorsal root ganglion (DRG, which houses the primary afferent sensory neurons, are unique in that they have large fenestrations and are permeable to a variety of low and high molecular weight agents. In the present report we used whole-mount preparations, immunohistochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to show that the cell body-rich area of the L4 mouse DRG has a 7 fold higher density of CD31+ capillaries than cell fiber rich area of the DRG or the distal or proximal aspect of the sciatic nerve. This dense vascularization, coupled with the high permeability of these capillaries, may synergistically contribute, and in part explain, why many potentially neurotoxic agents preferentially accumulate and injure cells within the DRG. Currently, cancer survivors and HIV patients constitute the largest and most rapidly expanding groups that have chemically induced peripheral sensory neuropathy. Understanding the unique aspects of the vascularization of the DRG and closing the endothelial fenestrations of the rich vascular bed of capillaries that vascularize the DRG before intravenous administration of anti-neoplastic or anti-HIV therapies, may offer a mechanism based approach to attenuate these chemically induced peripheral neuropathies in these patients.

  1. High-precision spectrometer for studies of ion-induced and spontaneous fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batenkov, O.; Elmgren, K.; Majorov, M.; Blomgren, J.; Conde, H.; Hultqvist, S.; Olsson, N.; Rahm, J.; Ramstroem, E.; Smirnov, S.; Veshikov, A.

    1997-01-01

    A spectrometer has been designed and built to investigate the dynamics of spontaneous and ion-induced fission processes. It consists of 8 neutron detectors surrounding a low mass scattering chamber containing the fissionable targets and two fission fragment telescopes. The spectrometer measures neutron spectra, and energy and angular correlations of neutrons, as well as kinetic energy, mass, and relative angle of fission fragments. A 252 Cf fission reference source is used for calibration. (orig.)

  2. Numerical results on noise-induced dynamics in the subthreshold regime for thermoacoustic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Kabiraj, Lipika

    2017-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a serious issue in practical combustion systems. Such systems are inherently noisy, and hence the influence of noise on the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability is an aspect of practical importance. The present work is motivated by a recent report on the experimental observation of coherence resonance, or noise-induced coherence with a resonance-like dependence on the noise intensity as the system approaches the stability margin, for a prototypical premixed laminar flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Phys. Rev. E, 4 (2015)). We numerically investigate representative thermoacoustic models for such noise-induced dynamics. Similar to the experiments, we study variation in system dynamics in response to variations in the noise intensity and in a critical control parameter as the systems approach their stability margins. The qualitative match identified between experimental results and observations in the representative models investigated here confirms that coherence resonance is a feature of thermoacoustic systems. We also extend the experimental results, which were limited to the case of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, to the case of supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We identify that the phenomenon has qualitative differences for the systems undergoing transition via subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Two important practical implications are associated with the findings. Firstly, the increase in noise-induced coherence as the system approaches the onset of thermoacoustic instability can be considered as a precursor to the instability. Secondly, the dependence of noise-induced dynamics on the bifurcation type can be utilised to distinguish between subcritical and supercritical bifurcation prior to the onset of the instability.

  3. The role of dynamically induced variability in the recent warming trend slowdown over the Northern Hemisphere

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Xiaodan; Huang, Jianping; Guo, Ruixia; Lin, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Since the slowing of the trend of increasing surface air temperature (SAT) in the late 1990?s, intense interest and debate have arisen concerning the contribution of human activities to the warming observed in previous decades. Although several explanations have been proposed for the warming-trend slowdown (WTS), none has been generally accepted. We investigate the WTS using a recently developed methodology that can successfully identify and separate the dynamically induced and radiatively fo...

  4. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs

  5. Combination of high-performance refractometry and infrared spectroscopy as a probe for chemically induced gelation and vitrification of epoxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U; Philipp, M; Gervais, P-C; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K; Possart, W; Wehlack, C; Kieffer, J

    2010-01-01

    A combination of infrared spectroscopy and high-performance refractometry was used to investigate the chemically induced sol-gel and glass transition during the polymerization of epoxies. Representations of the refractive index versus chemical conversion reveal an interesting insight into the optical properties accompanying gelation and vitrification. Whereas the electronic polarizability of the liquid state of small average molecular mass and the glassy state is dominated by the mass density, an unexpected excess polarizability observed during the gelation is attributed to cooperative dipole-dipole interactions.

  6. Combination of high-performance refractometry and infrared spectroscopy as a probe for chemically induced gelation and vitrification of epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Philipp, M; Gervais, P-C; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A avenue de la faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Possart, W; Wehlack, C [Fachbereich Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Kieffer, J, E-mail: ulrich.mueller@uni.l [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-08-15

    A combination of infrared spectroscopy and high-performance refractometry was used to investigate the chemically induced sol-gel and glass transition during the polymerization of epoxies. Representations of the refractive index versus chemical conversion reveal an interesting insight into the optical properties accompanying gelation and vitrification. Whereas the electronic polarizability of the liquid state of small average molecular mass and the glassy state is dominated by the mass density, an unexpected excess polarizability observed during the gelation is attributed to cooperative dipole-dipole interactions.

  7. Spin-motive Force Induced by Domain Wall Dynamics in the Antiferromagnetic Spin Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Ryoko; Ichimura, Masahiko; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Crest Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    In spite of no net magnetization in antiferromagnetic (AF) textures, the local magnetic properties (Neel magnetization) can be manipulated in a similar fashion to ferromagnetic (F) ones. It is expected that, even in AF metals, spin transfer torques (STTs) lead to the domain wall (DW) motion and that the DW motion induces spin-motive force (SMF). In order to study the Neel magnetization dynamics and the resultant SMF, we treat the nano-structured F1/AF/F2 junction. The F1 and F2 leads behave as a spin current injector and a detector, respectively. Each F lead is fixed in the different magnetization direction. Torsions (DW in AF) are introduced reflecting the fixed magnetization of two F leads. We simulated the STT-induced Neel magnetization dynamics with the injecting current from F1 to F2 and evaluate induced SMF. Based on the adiabatic electron dynamics in the AF texture, Langevin simulations are performed at finite temperature. This research was supported by JST, CREST, Japan.

  8. Dynamic correlation of photo-excited electrons: Anomalous levels induced by light–matter coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiankai [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China); Song, Bo, E-mail: bosong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-204, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear light–matter coupling plays an important role in many aspects of modern physics, such as spectroscopy, photo-induced phase transition, light-based devices, light-harvesting systems, light-directed reactions and bio-detection. However, excited states of electrons are still unclear for nano-structures and molecules in a light field. Our studies unexpectedly present that light can induce anomalous levels in the electronic structure of a donor–acceptor nanostructure with the help of the photo-excited electrons transferring dynamically between the donor and the acceptor. Furthermore, the physics underlying is revealed to be the photo-induced dynamical spin–flip correlation among electrons. These anomalous levels can significantly enhance the electron current through the nanostructure. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the understanding of the photo-excited electrons with dynamic correlations, which provides a push to the development and application of techniques based on photosensitive molecules and nanostructures, such as light-triggered molecular devices, spectroscopic analysis, bio-molecule detection, and systems for solar energy conversion.

  9. Effect of strain-induced precipitation on dynamic recrystallization in Mg–Al–Sn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, Abu Syed Humaun; Sanjari, Mehdi; Su, Jing; Jung, In-Ho; Yue, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Two different amounts of tin (Sn) were added to a Mg–3 wt% Al binary alloy to form different amounts of precipitates during hot deformation. The thermodynamic modeling software, FactSage ™ , was used to calculate the amounts of Sn to generate the desired relative levels of precipitation. The alloys were deformed at four different temperatures and three different strain rates to generate different amounts of precipitates. The objective was to study the effect of these precipitates on dynamic recrystallization. The results indicated that the formation of strain-induced precipitates is a function of deformation temperature, strain, and strain rate. The findings also revealed that higher amounts of precipitates reduced the volume fraction of dynamic recrystallization and refined the dynamically recrystallized grain size

  10. Dynamic response of infrastructure to environmentally induced loads analysis, measurements, testing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Manolis, George

    2017-01-01

    This book provides state of the art coverage of important current issues in the analysis, measurement, and monitoring of the dynamic response of infrastructure to environmental loads, including those induced by earthquake motion and differential soil settlement. The coverage is in five parts that address numerical methods in structural dynamics, soil–structure interaction analysis, instrumentation and structural health monitoring, hybrid experimental mechanics, and structural health monitoring for bridges. Examples that give an impression of the scope of the topics discussed include the seismic analysis of bridges, soft computing in earthquake engineering, use of hybrid methods for soil–structure interaction analysis, effects of local site conditions on the inelastic dynamic analysis of bridges, embedded models in wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring, recent developments in seismic simulation methods, and seismic performance assessment and retrofit of structures. Throughout, the empha...

  11. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment

  12. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studies are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.

  13. Delineating pathological pathways in a chemically induced mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Ayelet; Zigdon, Hila; Meshcheriakova, Anna; Klein, Andrés D; Yaacobi, Chen; Eilam, Raya; Kenwood, Brandon M; Rahim, Ahad A; Massaro, Giulia; Merrill, Alfred H; Vitner, Einat B; Futerman, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    Great interest has been shown in understanding the pathology of Gaucher disease (GD) due to the recently discovered genetic relationship with Parkinson's disease. For such studies, suitable animal models of GD are required. Chemical induction of GD by inhibition of acid β-glucosidase (GCase) using the irreversible inhibitor conduritol B-epoxide (CBE) is particularly attractive, although few systematic studies examining the effect of CBE on the development of symptoms associated with neurological forms of GD have been performed. We now demonstrate a correlation between the amount of CBE injected into mice and levels of accumulation of the GD substrates, glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, and show that disease pathology, indicated by altered levels of pathological markers, depends on both the levels of accumulated lipids and the time at which their accumulation begins. Gene array analysis shows a remarkable similarity in the gene expression profiles of CBE-treated mice and a genetic GD mouse model, the Gba(flox/flox) ;nestin-Cre mouse, with 120 of the 144 genes up-regulated in CBE-treated mice also up-regulated in Gba(flox/flox) ;nestin-Cre mice. We also demonstrate that various aspects of neuropathology and some behavioural abnormalities can be arrested upon cessation of CBE treatment during a specific time window. Together, our data demonstrate that injection of mice with CBE provides a rapid and relatively easy way to induce symptoms typical of neuronal forms of GD. This is particularly useful when examining the role of specific biochemical pathways in GD pathology, since CBE can be injected into mice defective in components of putative pathological pathways, alleviating the need for time-consuming crossing of mice. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Combining machine learning, crowdsourcing and expert knowledge to detect chemical-induced diseases in text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Àlex; Li, Tong Shu; Su, Andrew I; Good, Benjamin M; Furlong, Laura I

    2016-01-01

    Drug toxicity is a major concern for both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. In this context, text-mining methods for the identification of drug side effects from free text are key for the development of up-to-date knowledge sources on drug adverse reactions. We present a new system for identification of drug side effects from the literature that combines three approaches: machine learning, rule- and knowledge-based approaches. This system has been developed to address the Task 3.B of Biocreative V challenge (BC5) dealing with Chemical-induced Disease (CID) relations. The first two approaches focus on identifying relations at the sentence-level, while the knowledge-based approach is applied both at sentence and abstract levels. The machine learning method is based on the BeFree system using two corpora as training data: the annotated data provided by the CID task organizers and a new CID corpus developed by crowdsourcing. Different combinations of results from the three strategies were selected for each run of the challenge. In the final evaluation setting, the system achieved the highest Recall of the challenge (63%). By performing an error analysis, we identified the main causes of misclassifications and areas for improving of our system, and highlighted the need of consistent gold standard data sets for advancing the state of the art in text mining of drug side effects.Database URL: https://zenodo.org/record/29887?ln¼en#.VsL3yDLWR_V. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Radiation induced chemical changes in foodstuffs model reaction systems and strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitfellner, F.

    1999-10-01

    In the first part of this work 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl ester (4-HBAEE) were investigated in order to elucidate the reaction mechanisms leading to final products after reaction with OH-radicals (N 2 O-saturated and aerated aqueous solutions) at various pH. Irradiation of 5*10 -4 mol l -1 solutions of 4-HBA at pH 6.0 leads to formation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and hydroquinone. In case of the ester neither hydroxylation nor decarboxylation products are observable. By means of pulse radiolysis it could be shown that water splitting from the ester OH-adducts is 17 times faster than from that of the acid. Therefore the main transients are phenoxyl radicals in case of the ester. At pH 10, where base catalyzed water elimination takes place, no hydroxylation products are observable either. In aerated solutions dihydroxy-compounds are formed with both substrates. In the case of 4-HBA 68 % of the OH-radicals result in 3,4-dihydroxyderivate, for 4-HBAEE these are only 25 %. Comparison of the initial degradation yields demonstrates 4-HBAEE to be 1.6-times more stable towards radiation. The second part of this work deals with radiation induced chemical changes in strawberries. Dose/concentration relationships could be obtained for 7 components, i.e. gallic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy-cinnamic acid, (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin. Linear dose relationships have been found for 4-HBA (formation) and (+)-catechin (degradation). In addition a specific radiolytically formed compound which can be used as marker for irradiation treatment of strawberries could be detected. There are strong indications that it is a radiolytic product of kaempferol, however, it could not yet be identified exactly. (author)

  16. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  17. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez R, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  18. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors.

  19. Dynamical, structural and chemical heterogeneities in a binary metallic glass-forming liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puosi, F.; Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2018-04-01

    As it approaches the glass transition, particle motion in liquids becomes highly heterogeneous and regions with virtually no mobility coexist with liquid-like domains. This complex dynamic is believed to be responsible for different phenomena including non-exponential relaxation and the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. Understanding the relationships between dynamical heterogeneities and local structure in metallic liquids and glasses is a major scientific challenge. Here we use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomic dynamics and microscopic structure of Cu50Zr50 alloy in the supercooling regime. Dynamical heterogeneities are identified via an isoconfigurational analysis. We demonstrate the transition from isolated to clustering low mobility with decreasing temperature. These slow clusters, whose sizes grow upon cooling, are also associated with concentration fluctuations, characterized by a Zr-enriched phase, with a composition CuZr2 . In addition, a structural analysis of slow clusters based on Voronoi tessellation evidences an increase with respect of the bulk system of the fraction of Cu atoms having a local icosahedral order. These results are in agreement with the consolidated scenario of the relevant role played by icosahedral order in the dynamic slowing-down in supercooled metal alloys.

  20. Dynamics of shearing force and its correlations with chemical compositions and dry matter digestibility of stylo ( stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Zi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study explored the dynamics of shearing force and its correlation with chemical compositions and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of stylo. Methods The shearing force, diameter, linear density, chemical composition, and IVDMD of different height stylo stem were investigated. Linear regression analysis was done to determine the relationships between the shearing force and cut height, diameter, chemical composition, or IVDMD. Results The results showed that shearing force of stylo stem increased with plant height increasing and the crude protein (CP content and IVDMD decreased but fiber content increased over time, resulting in decreased forage value. In addition, tall stem had greater shearing force than short stem. Moreover, shearing force is positively correlated with stem diameter, linear density and fiber fraction, but negatively correlated with CP content and IVDMD. Conclusion Overall, shearing force is an indicator more direct, easier and faster to measure than chemical composition and digestibility for evaluation of forage nutritive value related to animal performance. Therefore, it can be used to evaluate the nutritive value of stylo.

  1. Effects of chemical modifications on photophysics and exciton dynamics on {pi}-conjugation attenuated and metal-chelated photoconducting polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L. X.; Jager, W. J. H.; Gosztola, D. J.; Niemczyk, M. P.; Wasielewski, M. R.

    2000-03-11

    Effects of two types of chemical modifications on photoconducting polymers consisting of polyphenylenevinylene (PPV) derivatives are studied by static and ultrafast transient optical spectroscopy as well as semi-empirical ZINDO calculations. The first type of modification inserts 2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-5-vinylene units (bpy V) in the PPV backbone, and the second type involves metal-chelation with the bpy sites. Photoluminescence and exciton dynamics of polymers 1 and 2 with PV:bpyV ratios of 1 and 3 were examined in solution, and compared to those of the homopolymer, poly(2,5-bis(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV). Similar studies were carried out for several metal-chelated polymers. These results can be explained by changes in {pi}-conjugation throughout the polymer backbone. The attenuation in {pi}-conjugation by the chemical modifications transforms a conducting polymer from one-dimensional semiconductor to molecular aggregates.

  2. Combinatorial computational chemistry approach of tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method to the design of the automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yuki; Jung, Changho; Luo, Yi; Koyama, Michihisa; Endou, Akira; Kubo, Momoji; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a new tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics program 'Colors' for combinatorial computational chemistry approach. This methodology is based on our original tight-binding approximation and realized over 5000 times acceleration compared to the conventional first-principles molecular dynamics method. In the present study, we applied our new program to the simulations on various realistic large-scale models of the automotive three-way catalysts, ultrafine Pt particle/CeO 2 (111) support. Significant electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 (111) surface was observed and it was found to strongly depend on the size of the Pt particle. Furthermore, our simulation results suggest that the reduction of the Ce atom due to the electron transfer from the Pt particle to the CeO 2 surface is a main reason for the strong interaction of the Pt particle and CeO 2 (111) support

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Theory of Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    The calculation of cross sections and rate constants for chemical reactions in the gas phase has long been a major problem in theoretical chemistry. The need for reliable and applicable theories in this field is evident when one considers the significant recent advances that have been made in developing experimental techniques, such as lasers and molecular beams, to probe the microscopic details of chemical reactions. For example, it is now becoming possible to measure cross sections for chemical reactions state selected in the vibrational­ rotational states of both reactants and products. Furthermore, in areas such as atmospheric, combustion and interstellar chemistry, there is an urgent need for reliable reaction rate constant data over a range of temperatures, and this information is often difficult to obtain in experiments. The classical trajectory method can be applied routinely to simple reactions, but this approach neglects important quantum mechanical effects such as tunnelling and resonances. For al...

  4. Modeling heat dissipation at the nanoscale: an embedding approach for chemical reaction dynamics on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-04-25

    We present an embedding technique for metallic systems that makes it possible to model energy dissipation into substrate phonons during surface chemical reactions from first principles. The separation of chemical and elastic contributions to the interaction potential provides a quantitative description of both electronic and phononic band structure. Application to the dissociation of O2 at Pd(100) predicts translationally "hot" oxygen adsorbates as a consequence of the released adsorption energy (ca. 2.6 eV). This finding questions the instant thermalization of reaction enthalpies generally assumed in models of heterogeneous catalysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Iteration scheme for implicit calculations of kinetic and equilibrium chemical reactions in fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    An iteration scheme for the implicit treatment of equilibrium chemical reactions in partial equilibrium flow has previously been described. Here we generalize this scheme to kinetic reactions as well as equilibrium reactions. This extends the applicability of the scheme to problems with kinetic reactions that are fast in regions of the flow field but slow in others. The resulting scheme thereby provides a single unified framework for the implicit treatment of an arbitrary number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions in chemically reacting fluid flow. 10 refs., 2 figs

  6. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1α protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1α hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1α degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1α protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

  7. Ingested plastic transfers hazardous chemicals to fish and induces hepatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Hoh, Eunha; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Teh, Swee J.

    2013-01-01

    Plastic debris litters aquatic habitats globally, the majority of which is microscopic (plastic and accumulated pollutants are largely unknown. Here, we show that fish, exposed to a mixture of polyethylene with chemical pollutants sorbed from the marine environment, bioaccumulate these chemical pollutants and suffer liver toxicity and pathology. Fish fed virgin polyethylene fragments also show signs of stress, although less severe than fish fed marine polyethylene fragments. We provide baseline information regarding the bioaccumulation of chemicals and associated health effects from plastic ingestion in fish and demonstrate that future assessments should consider the complex mixture of the plastic material and their associated chemical pollutants. PMID:24263561

  8. Energy price slump and policy response in the coal-chemical industry district : a case study of Ordos with a system dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Delu; Ma, Gang; Song, Xuefeng; Liu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    We employ system dynamics method towards a coal-chemical industry district economy evolution model, using coal industry, the coal-chemical industry, their downstream industries, and the manufacture-related service industry. Moreover, we construct energy price and policy response scenarios based on Ordos’ management experience. The results show that the energy price slump had a negative impact on the overall economic development of the coal-chemical industry district, despite promoting non-res...

  9. Thermal shock induced dynamics of a spacecraft with a flexible deploying boom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhenxing; Li, Huijian; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics in the process of deployment of a flexible extendible boom as a deployable structure on the spacecraft is studied. For determining the thermally induced vibrations of the boom subjected to an incident solar heat flux, an axially moving thermal-dynamic beam element based on the absolute nodal coordinate formulation which is able to precisely describe the large displacement, rotation and deformation of flexible body is presented. For the elastic forces formulation of variable-length beam element, the enhanced continuum mechanics approach is adopted, which can eliminate the Poisson locking effect, and take into account the tension-bending-torsion coupling deformations. The main body of the spacecraft, modeled as a rigid body, is described using the natural coordinates method. In the derived nonlinear thermal-dynamic equations of rigid-flexible multibody system, the mass matrix is time-variant, and a pseudo damping matrix which is without actual energy dissipation, and a heat conduction matrix which is relative to the moving speed and the number of beam element are arisen. Numerical results give the dynamic and thermal responses of the nonrotating and spinning spacecraft, respectively, and show that thermal shock has a significant influence on the dynamics of spacecraft.

  10. Synthetic tetracycline-inducible regulatory networks: computer-aided design of dynamic phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaznessis Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tightly regulated gene networks, precisely controlling the expression of protein molecules, have received considerable interest by the biomedical community due to their promising applications. Among the most well studied inducible transcription systems are the tetracycline regulatory expression systems based on the tetracycline resistance operon of Escherichia coli, Tet-Off (tTA and Tet-On (rtTA. Despite their initial success and improved designs, limitations still persist, such as low inducer sensitivity. Instead of looking at these networks statically, and simply changing or mutating the promoter and operator regions with trial and error, a systematic investigation of the dynamic behavior of the network can result in rational design of regulatory gene expression systems. Sophisticated algorithms can accurately capture the dynamical behavior of gene networks. With computer aided design, we aim to improve the synthesis of regulatory networks and propose new designs that enable tighter control of expression. Results In this paper we engineer novel networks by recombining existing genes or part of genes. We synthesize four novel regulatory networks based on the Tet-Off and Tet-On systems. We model all the known individual biomolecular interactions involved in transcription, translation, regulation and induction. With multiple time-scale stochastic-discrete and stochastic-continuous models we accurately capture the transient and steady state dynamics of these networks. Important biomolecular interactions are identified and the strength of the interactions engineered to satisfy design criteria. A set of clear design rules is developed and appropriate mutants of regulatory proteins and operator sites are proposed. Conclusion The complexity of biomolecular interactions is accurately captured through computer simulations. Computer simulations allow us to look into the molecular level, portray the dynamic behavior of gene regulatory

  11. Real-time optical diagnostics of graphene growth induced by pulsed chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Regmi, Murari; Thonnard, Norbert; Eres, Gyula

    2013-06-01

    within 1 second at 800 °C at high partial pressures. At lower partial pressures, isothermal graphene growth is shown to continue 10 seconds after the gas pulse. These flux-dependent growth kinetics are described in the context of a dissolution/precipitation model, where carbon rapidly dissolves into the Ni film and later precipitates driven by gradients in the chemical potential. The combination of pulsed-CVD and real-time optical diagnostics opens new opportunities to understand and control the fast, sub-second growth of graphene on various substrates at high temperatures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A movie of graphene growth after exposure to a single C2H2 pulse, modeling of gas dynamics, Raman map and spectra of graphene transferred to a SiO2/Si substrate, time-resolved reflectivity upon exposure to a pure Ar pulse, Raman map of I(2D)/I(G) ratios for 800 °C and 20% C2H2 concentration, comparison of Raman spectra of a single layer suspended graphene at 532 nm and 404.5 nm, processing of reflectivity curves for comparison with growth kinetics based on Raman measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01436c

  12. Distinct retrosplenial cortex cell populations and their spike dynamics during ketamine-induced unconscious state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E Fox

    Full Text Available Ketamine is known to induce psychotic-like symptoms, including delirium and visual hallucinations. It also causes neuronal damage and cell death in the retrosplenial cortex (RSC, an area that is thought to be a part of high visual cortical pathways and at least partially responsible for ketamine's psychotomimetic activities. However, the basic physiological properties of RSC cells as well as their response to ketamine in vivo remained largely unexplored. Here, we combine a computational method, the Inter-Spike Interval Classification Analysis (ISICA, and in vivo recordings to uncover and profile excitatory cell subtypes within layers 2&3 and 5&6 of the RSC in mice within both conscious, sleep, and ketamine-induced unconscious states. We demonstrate two distinct excitatory principal cell sub-populations, namely, high-bursting excitatory principal cells and low-bursting excitatory principal cells, within layers 2&3, and show that this classification is robust over the conscious states, namely quiet awake, and natural unconscious sleep periods. Similarly, we provide evidence of high-bursting and low-bursting excitatory principal cell sub-populations within layers 5&6 that remained distinct during quiet awake and sleep states. We further examined how these subtypes are dynamically altered by ketamine. During ketamine-induced unconscious state, these distinct excitatory principal cell subtypes in both layer 2&3 and layer 5&6 exhibited distinct dynamics. We also uncovered different dynamics of local field potential under various brain states in layer 2&3 and layer 5&6. Interestingly, ketamine administration induced high gamma oscillations in layer 2&3 of the RSC, but not layer 5&6. Our results show that excitatory principal cells within RSC layers 2&3 and 5&6 contain multiple physiologically distinct sub-populations, and they are differentially affected by ketamine.

  13. Scan direction induced charging dynamics and the application for detection of gate to S/D shorts in logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Tian, Qing; Wu, Kevin; Zhao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Gate to source/drain (S/D) short is the most common and detrimental failure mechanism for advanced process technology development in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) device manufacturing. Especially for sub-1Xnm nodes, MOSFET device is more vulnerable to gate-S/D shorts due to the aggressive scaling. The detection of this kind of electrical short defect is always challenging for in-line electron beam inspection (EBI), especially new shorting mechanisms on atomic scale due to new material/process flow implementation. The second challenge comes from the characterization of the shorts including identification of the exact shorting location. In this paper, we demonstrate unique scan direction induced charging dynamics (SDCD) phenomenon which stems from the transistor level response from EBI scan at post metal contact chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) layers. We found that SDCD effect is exceptionally useful for gate-S/D short induced voltage contrast (VC) defect detection, especially for identification of shorting locations. The unique SDCD effect signatures of gate-S/D shorts can be used as fingerprint for ground true shorting defect detection. Correlation with other characterization methods on the same defective location from EBI scan shows consistent results from various shorting mechanism. A practical work flow to implement the application of SDCD effect for in-line EBI monitor of critical gate-S/D short defects is also proposed, together with examples of successful application use cases which mostly focus on static random-access memory (SRAM) array regions. Although the capability of gate-S/D short detection as well as expected device response is limited to passing transistors and pull-down transistors due to the design restriction from standard 6-cell SRAM structure, SDCD effect is proven to be very effective for gate-S/D short induced VC defect detection as well as yield learning for advanced technology development.

  14. Physical and chemical changes induced by 70 MeV carbon ions in polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.; Chandi, P.S.; Srivastava, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes induced by 70 MeV carbon ions ( 12 C 5+ ) have been investigated in bulk polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer. The induced changes have been studied with respect to their optical, chemical and structural response using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques. The ion fluences ranging from 2.5x10 11 to 9x10 13 ions cm -2 have been used to study the irradiation effects. It has been observed that at the fluence of 9x10 13 ions cm -2 the PVDF sample became brittle and practically it was not possible to handle it for any further measurements. The recorded UV-visible spectra show that the optical absorption increases with increasing fluence, indicating maximum absorption at 200 nm. An interesting feature of UV-visible spectra is that dips change into peaks and vice versa with increase of fluence. In the FTIR spectra, development of new peaks at 1714 and 3692 cm -1 along with disappearance of peaks at 2363 and 3025 cm -1 and shifting of peak at 2984-2974 cm -1 have been observed due to high energy irradiation, indicating the chemical changes induced by 12 C 5+ . The diffraction pattern of PVDF indicates that this polymer is semi-crystalline in nature; a large decrease in the diffraction intensity indicates decrease in crystallinity. Increase in crystallite size has also been observed due to heavy ion irradiation

  15. Do High School Chemistry Examinations Inhibit Deeper Level Understanding of Dynamic Reversible Chemical Reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, R.; Atkinson, R.; Dawes, A.; Levinson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Chemistry examinations can favour the deployment of algorithmic procedures like Le Chatelier's Principle (LCP) rather than reasoning using chemical principles. This study investigated the explanatory resources which high school students use to answer equilibrium problems and whether the marks given for examination answers…

  16. Dynamic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and chemical erosion from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the hydrogen retention [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. 374 (2008) 304] and chemical erosion of porous graphite. To model the chemical erosion process due to thermal hydrogen ions, Kueppers cycle [J. Kueppers, Surf. Sci. Rep. 22 (1995) 249; M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186] has been introduced. The model is applied to study hydrogen transport in deposits collected from the leading edge of neutralizers of Tore Supra. The effect of internal structure on chemical erosion is studied. The MD study [E. Salonen et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293 (2001) 144] shows that the experimentally observed decrease of erosion yield at higher fluxes is due to the decrease of carbon collision cross-section at a surface due to shielding by hydrogen atom already present on the surface. Inspired by this study, a simple multi-scale model is developed to describe the flux dependence of chemical erosion. The idea is to use the local chemistry effect from the Kueppers model to calculate the hydrocarbon molecule formation process and then to find the release probability of the produced hydrocarbon based on the purely geometrical constraints. The model represents quite well the trends in experimental data.

  17. Limited Investigation of the Effects of Elevator Rate Limiting and Stick Dynamics on Longitudinal Pilot Induced Oscillations (HAVE GRIP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peters, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of the HAVE GRIP flight test program. This program performed a limited investigation of the effects of stick dynamics and elevator rate limiting on longitudinal pilot induced oscillations (PIOs...

  18. Mobility and Attenuation Dynamics of Potentially Toxic Chemical Species at an Abandoned Copper Mine Tailings Dump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mugera Gitari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Large volumes of disposed mine tailings abound in several regions of South Africa, as a consequence of unregulated, unsustainable long years of mining activities. Tailings dumps occupy a large volume of valuable land, and present a potential risk for aquatic systems, through leaching of potentially toxic chemical species. This paper reports on the evaluation of the geochemical processes controlling the mobility of potentially toxic chemical species within the tailings profile, and their potential risk with regard to surface and groundwater systems. Combination of X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS techniques, show that the tailing profiles are uniform, weakly altered, and vary slightly with depth in both physical and geochemical properties, as well as mineralogical composition. Mineralogical analysis showed the following order of abundance: quartz > epidote > chlorite > muscovite > calcite > hematite within the tailings profiles. The neutralization of the dominant alumino-silicate minerals and the absence of sulfidic minerals, have produced medium alkaline pH conditions (7.97–8.37 at all depths and low concentrations of dissolved Cu (20.21–47.9 µg/L, Zn (0.88–1.80 µg/L, Pb (0.27–0.34 µg/L, and SO42− (15.71–55.94 mg/L in the tailings profile leachates. The relative percentage leach for the potentially toxic chemical species was low in the aqueous phase (Ni 0.081%, Cu 0.006%, and Zn 0.05%. This indicates that the transport load of potentially toxic chemical species from tailings to the aqueous phase is very low. The precipitation of secondary hematite has an important known ability to trap and attenuate the mobility of potentially toxic chemical species (Cu, Zn, and Pb by adsorption on the surface area. Geochemical modelling MINTEQA2 showed that the tailings leachates were below saturation regarding oxyhydroxide minerals, but oversaturated with Cu

  19. Combined comparative and chemical proteomics on the mechanisms of levo-tetrahydropalmatine-induced antinociception in the formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Zhou, Jiangrui; Wang, Shuowen; Ye, Mingliang; Jiang, Chunlei; Fan, Guorong; Zou, Hanfa

    2010-06-04

    This study investigated the mechanisms involved in the antinociceptive action induced by levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) in the formalin test by combined comparative and chemical proteomics. Rats were pretreated with l-THP by the oral route (40 mg/kg) 1 h before formalin injection. The antinociceptive effect of l-THP was shown in the first and second phases of the formalin test. To address the mechanisms by which l-THP inhibits formalin-induced nociception in rats, the combined comparative and chemical proteomics were applied. A novel high-throughput comparative proteomic approach based on 2D-nano-LC-MS/MS was applied to simultaneously evaluate the deregulated proteins involved in the response of l-THP treatment in formalin-induced pain rats. Thousands of proteins were identified, among which 17 proteins survived the stringent filter criteria and were further included for functional discussion. Two proteins (Neurabin-1 and Calcium-dependent secretion activator 1) were randomly selected, and their expression levels were further confirmed by Western Blots. The results matched well with those of proteomics. In the present study, we also described the development and application of l-THP immobilized beads to bind the targets. Following incubation with cellular lysates, the proteome interacting with the fixed l-THP was identified. The results of comparative and chemical proteomics were quite complementary. Although the precise roles of these identified moleculars in l-THP-induced antinociception need further study, the combined results indicated that proteins associated with signal transduction, vesicular trafficking and neurotransmitter release, energy metabolism, and ion transport play important roles in l-THP-induced antinociception in the formalin test.

  20. POSSIBLE NATURE OF THE RADIATION-INDUCED SIGNAL IN NAILS: HIGH-FIELD EPR, CONFIRMING CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS, AND QUANTUM CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipikin, Dmitriy S; Swarts, Steven G; Sidabras, Jason W; Trompier, François; Swartz, Harold M

    2016-12-01

    Exposure of finger- and toe-nails to ionizing radiation generates an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal whose intensity is dose dependent and stable at room temperature for several days. The dependency of the radiation-induced signal (RIS) on the received dose may be used as the basis for retrospective dosimetry of an individual's fortuitous exposure to ionizing radiation. Two radiation-induced signals, a quasi-stable (RIS2) and stable signal (RIS5), have been identified in nails irradiated up to a dose of 50 Gy. Using X-band EPR, both RIS signals exhibit a singlet line shape with a line width around 1.0 mT and an apparent g-value of 2.0044. In this work, we seek information on the exact chemical nature of the radiation-induced free radicals underlying the signal. This knowledge may provide insights into the reason for the discrepancy in the stabilities of the two RIS signals and help develop strategies for stabilizing the radicals in nails or devising methods for restoring the radicals after decay. In this work an analysis of high field (94 GHz and 240 GHz) EPR spectra of the RIS using quantum chemical calculations, the oxidation-reduction properties and the pH dependence of the signal intensities are used to show that spectroscopic and chemical properties of the RIS are consistent with a semiquinone-type radical underlying the RIS. It has been suggested that semiquinone radicals formed on trace amounts of melanin in nails are the basis for the RIS signals. However, based on the quantum chemical calculations and chemical properties of the RIS, it is likely that the radicals underlying this signal are generated from the radiolysis of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) amino acids in the keratin proteins. These DOPA amino acids are likely formed from the exogenous oxidation of tyrosine in keratin by the oxygen from the air prior to irradiation. We show that these DOPA amino acids can work as radical traps, capturing the highly reactive and unstable sulfur

  1. POSSIBLE NATURE OF THE RADIATION-INDUCED SIGNAL IN NAILS: HIGH-FIELD EPR, CONFIRMING CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS, AND QUANTUM CHEMICAL CALCULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipikin, Dmitriy S.; Swarts, Steven G.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Trompier, François; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of finger- and toe-nails to ionizing radiation generates an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal whose intensity is dose dependent and stable at room temperature for several days. The dependency of the radiation-induced signal (RIS) on the received dose may be used as the basis for retrospective dosimetry of an individual's fortuitous exposure to ionizing radiation. Two radiation-induced signals, a quasi-stable (RIS2) and stable signal (RIS5), have been identified in nails irradiated up to a dose of 50 Gy. Using X-band EPR, both RIS signals exhibit a singlet line shape with a line width around 1.0 mT and an apparent g-value of 2.0044. In this work, we seek information on the exact chemical nature of the radiation-induced free radicals underlying the signal. This knowledge may provide insights into the reason for the discrepancy in the stabilities of the two RIS signals and help develop strategies for stabilizing the radicals in nails or devising methods for restoring the radicals after decay. In this work an analysis of high field (94 GHz and 240 GHz) EPR spectra of the RIS using quantum chemical calculations, the oxidation–reduction properties and the pH dependence of the signal intensities are used to show that spectroscopic and chemical properties of the RIS are consistent with a semiquinone-type radical underlying the RIS. It has been suggested that semiquinone radicals formed on trace amounts of melanin in nails are the basis for the RIS signals. However, based on the quantum chemical calculations and chemical properties of the RIS, it is likely that the radicals underlying this signal are generated from the radiolysis of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) amino acids in the keratin proteins. These DOPA amino acids are likely formed from the exogenous oxidation of tyrosine in keratin by the oxygen from the air prior to irradiation. We show that these DOPA amino acids can work as radical traps, capturing the highly reactive and unstable

  2. Remobilization Dynamics of Caffeine, Ciprofloxacin, and Propranolol following Evaporation-Induced Immobilization in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normile, Hayley J; Papelis, Charalambos; Kibbey, Tohren C G

    2017-06-06

    Changing weather conditions can cause cycles of wetting and drying in the unsaturated zone. When porewater evaporates, any nonvolatile solutes present in the pores will be driven to adsorb and ultimately precipitate on solid surfaces. When media are subsequently resaturated through rainfall infiltration, the remobilization of solutes likely depends on both the hydraulics of resaturation and the dynamics of dissolution processes. The focus of this work was to study the dynamics of remobilization of three different emerging contaminants (caffeine, ciprofloxacin, and propranolol) and two model compounds (fluorescein and sulforhodamine B) from porous media following evaporation of porewater. Remobilization column experiments were conducted to study this phenomenon and were evaluated using a finite difference model developed to simulate the adsorption-desorption dynamics during resaturation and elution. Results indicate that dissolution dynamics become increasingly important with increasing adsorption affinity for solid surfaces. Trends in observed elution behavior are not well-predicted from chemical properties, such as solubility. One of the most significant observations of the work is the presence of spikes in elution concentrations well above initial porewater concentration, resulting from the hydraulics of the resaturation process. The effect is most significant in highly mobile compounds that exhibit low adsorption affinity for solid surfaces.

  3. Noise-induced multistability in chemical systems: Discrete versus continuum modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duncan, A.; Liao, S.; Vejchodský, Tomáš; Erban, R.; Grima, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 4 (2015), s. 042111 ISSN 1539-3755 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 328008 - STOCHDETBIOMODEL Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : chemical master equation * chemical Fokker-Planck equation * multimodality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2014 http://journals.aps.org/pre/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevE.91.042111

  4. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  5. Heat-induced chemical and color changes of extractive-free Black Locust (Rosinia Pseudoacacia) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Jianmin Gao; Yongming Fan; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Nicole M. Stark

    2012-01-01

    To investigate chemical and color changes of the polymeric constituents of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) wood during heat treatment, extractive-free wood flour was conditioned to 30% initial moisture content (MC) and heated for 24 h at 120 °C in either an oxygen or nitrogen atmosphere. The color change was measured using the CIELAB color system. Chemical changes...

  6. B-lymphocytes as key players in chemical-induced asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa De Vooght

    Full Text Available T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes are key players in allergic asthma, with B-lymphocytes producing antigen-specific immunoglobulins E (IgE. We used a mouse model of chemical-induced asthma and transferred B-lymphocytes from sensitized animals into naïve wild type mice, B-lymphocyte knock-out (B-KO mice or severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. On days 1 and 8, BALB/c mice were dermally sensitized with 0.3% toluene diisocyanate (TDI (20 µl/ear. On day 15, mice were euthanized and the auricular lymph nodes isolated. B-lymphocytes (CD19(+ were separated from the whole cell suspension and 175,000 cells were injected in the tail vein of naïve wild type, B-KO or SCID mice. Three days later, the mice received a single oropharyngeal challenge with 0.01% TDI (20 µl or vehicle (acetone/olive oil (AOO (controls. Airway reactivity to methacholine and total and differential cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid were measured 24 hours after challenge. B-lymphocytes of AOO or TDI-sensitized mice were characterized for the expression of surface markers and production of cytokines. We found that transfer of B-cells obtained from mice dermally sensitized to toluene diisocyanate (TDI into naïve wild type mice, B-KO mice or SCID mice led, within three days, to an acute asthma-like phenotype after an airway challenge with TDI. This response was specific and independent of IgE. These B-lymphocytes showed antigen presenting capacities (CD80/CD86 and CD40 and consisted of B effector (Be2- (IL-4 and Be1-lymphocytes (IFN-γ. The transferred B-lymphocytes were visualized near large airways, 24 hours after TDI challenge. Thus, B-lymphocytes can provoke an asthmatic response without the action of T-lymphocytes and without major involvement of IgE.

  7. Crop rotations and poultry litter impact dynamic soil chemical properties and soil biota long-term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic soil physiochemical interactions with conservation agricultural practices and soil biota are largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims to quantify long-term (12-yr) impacts of cover crops, poultry litter, crop rotations, and conservation tillage and their interactions on soil physiochemica...

  8. Conformational Sampling by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations Improves NMR Chemical Shift Predictions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Möller, H. M.; Exner, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2013), s. 3806-3815 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations * hydration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  9. Vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during elicitor-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Sano, Toshio; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Responses of plant cells to environmental stresses often involve morphological changes, differentiation and redistribution of various organelles and cytoskeletal network. Tobacco BY-2 cells provide excellent model system for in vivo imaging of these intracellular events. Treatment of the cell cycle-synchronized BY-2 cells with a proteinaceous oomycete elicitor, cryptogein, induces highly synchronous programmed cell death (PCD) and provide a model system to characterize vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during the PCD. Sequential observation revealed dynamic reorganization of the vacuole and actin microfilaments during the execution of the PCD. We further characterized the effects cryptogein on mitotic microtubule organization in cell cycle-synchronized cells. Cryptogein treatment at S phase inhibited formation of the preprophase band, a cortical microtubule band that predicts the cell division site. Cortical microtubules kept their random orientation till their disruption that gradually occurred during the execution of the PCD twelve hours after the cryptogein treatment. Possible molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of the dynamic behavior of the organelles and cytoskeletal network in the pathogenic signal-induced PCD are discussed.

  10. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance

  11. Distributed Dynamic Traffic Modeling and Implementation Oriented Different Levels of Induced Travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to respond to the variable state of traffic network in time, a distributed dynamic traffic assignment strategy is proposed which can improve the intelligent traffic management. The proposed dynamic assignment method is based on utility theory and is oriented to different levels of induced users. A distributed model based on the marginal utility is developed which combines the advantages of both decentralized paradigm and traveler preference, so as to provide efficient and robust dynamic traffic assignment solutions under uncertain network conditions. Then, the solution algorithm including subroute update and subroute calculation is proposed. To testify the effectiveness of the proposed model in optimizing traffic network operation and minimizing traveler’s cost on different induced levels, a sequence numerical experiment is conducted. In the experiment, there are two test environments: one is in different network load conditions and the other is in different deployment coverage of local agents. The numerical results show that the proposed model not only can improve the running efficiency of road network but also can significantly decrease the average travel time.

  12. The modelling of dynamic chemical state of paper machine unit operations; Dynaamisen kemiallisen tilan mallintaminen paperikoneen yksikkoeoperaatioissa - MPKT 04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylen, J P; Jutila, P [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    The chemical state of paper mass is considered to be a key factor to the smooth operation of the paper machine. There are simulators that have been developed either for dynamic energy and mass balances or for static chemical phenomena, but the combination of these is not a straight forward task. Control Engineering Laboratory of Helsinki University of Technology has studied the paper machine wet end phenomena with the emphasis on pH-modelling. VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) Process Physics has used thermodynamical modelling successfully in e.g. Bleaching processes. In this research the different approaches are combined in order to get reliable dynamical models and modelling procedures for various unit operations. A flexible pilot process will be constructed and different materials will be processed starting from simple inorganic substances (e.g. Calcium carbonate and distilled water) working towards more complex masses (thick pulp with process waters and various reagents). The pilot process is well instrumented with ion selective electrodes, total calcium analysator and all basic measurements. (orig.)

  13. The modelling of dynamic chemical state of paper machine unit operations; Dynaamisen kemiallisen tilan mallintaminen paperikoneen yksikkoeoperaatioissa - MPKT 04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylen, J.P.; Jutila, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The chemical state of paper mass is considered to be a key factor to the smooth operation of the paper machine. There are simulators that have been developed either for dynamic energy and mass balances or for static chemical phenomena, but the combination of these is not a straight forward task. Control Engineering Laboratory of Helsinki University of Technology has studied the paper machine wet end phenomena with the emphasis on pH-modelling. VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) Process Physics has used thermodynamical modelling successfully in e.g. Bleaching processes. In this research the different approaches are combined in order to get reliable dynamical models and modelling procedures for various unit operations. A flexible pilot process will be constructed and different materials will be processed starting from simple inorganic substances (e.g. Calcium carbonate and distilled water) working towards more complex masses (thick pulp with process waters and various reagents). The pilot process is well instrumented with ion selective electrodes, total calcium analysator and all basic measurements. (orig.)

  14. Emergency material allocation with time-varying supply-demand based on dynamic optimization method for river chemical spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Jiang, Dexun; Wang, Peng

    2018-04-13

    Aiming to minimize the damage caused by river chemical spills, efficient emergency material allocation is critical for an actual emergency rescue decision-making in a quick response. In this study, an emergency material allocation framework based on time-varying supply-demand constraint is developed to allocate emergency material, minimize the emergency response time, and satisfy the dynamic emergency material requirements in post-accident phases dealing with river chemical spills. In this study, the theoretically critical emergency response time is firstly obtained for the emergency material allocation system to select a series of appropriate emergency material warehouses as potential supportive centers. Then, an enumeration method is applied to identify the practically critical emergency response time, the optimum emergency material allocation and replenishment scheme. Finally, the developed framework is applied to a computational experiment based on south-to-north water transfer project in China. The results illustrate that the proposed methodology is a simple and flexible tool for appropriately allocating emergency material to satisfy time-dynamic demands during emergency decision-making. Therefore, the decision-makers can identify an appropriate emergency material allocation scheme in a balance between time-effective and cost-effective objectives under the different emergency pollution conditions.

  15. Effect of complex polyphenols and tannins from red wine (WCPT) on chemically induced oxidative DNA damage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalini, C; Lodovici, M; Briani, C; Paganelli, G; Remy, S; Cheynier, V; Dolara, P

    1999-08-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic antioxidants occurring in vegetables and fruits as well as beverages such as tea and wine which have been thought to influence oxidative damage. We wanted to verify whether a complex mixture of wine tannins (wine complex polyphenols and tannins, WCPT) prevent chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage in vivo. Oxidative DNA damage was evaluated by measuring the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (80HdG)/ 2-deoxyguanosine (2dG) x 10(-6) in hydrolyzed DNA using HPLC coupled with electrochemical and UV detectors. We treated rats with WCPT (57 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 d, a dose 10-fold higher than what a moderate wine drinker would be exposed to. WCPT administration significantly reduced the ratio of 80HdG/2dG x 10(-6) in liver DNA obtained from rats treated with 2-nitropropane (2NP) relative to controls administered 2NP only (33. 3 +/- 2.5 vs. 44.9 +/- 3.2 x 10(-6) 2dG; micro +/- SE; p<0.05). On the contrary, pretreatment with WCPT for 10 d did not protect the colon mucosa from oxidative DNA damage induced by 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). 2NP and DMH are hepatic and colon carcinogens, respectively, capable of inducing oxidative DNA damage. WCPT have protective action against some types of chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage in vivo.

  16. Chemical dynamics simulations of X- + CH3Y → XCH3 + Y- gas-phase S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Nonstatistical dynamics and nontraditional reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Zhang, Jiaxu; Hase, William L

    2012-03-29

    Extensive classical chemical dynamics simulations of gas-phase X(-) + CH(3)Y → XCH(3) + Y(-) S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reactions are reviewed and discussed and compared with experimental measurements and predictions of theoretical models. The primary emphasis is on reactions for which X and Y are halogen atoms. Both reactions with the traditional potential energy surface (PES), which include pre- and postreaction potential energy minima and a central barrier, and reactions with nontraditional PESs are considered. These S(N)2 reactions exhibit important nonstatistical atomic-level dynamics. The X(-) + CH(3)Y → X(-)---CH(3)Y association rate constant is less than the capture model as a result of inefficient energy transfer from X(-)+ CH(3)Y relative translation to CH(3)Y rotation and vibration. There is weak coupling between the low-frequency intermolecular modes of the X(-)---CH(3)Y complex and higher frequency CH(3)Y intramolecular modes, resulting in non-RRKM kinetics for X(-)---CH(3)Y unimolecular decomposition. Recrossings of the [X--CH(3)--Y](-) central barrier is important. As a result of the above dynamics, the relative translational energy and temperature dependencies of the S(N)2 rate constants are not accurately given by statistical theory. The nonstatistical dynamics results in nonstatistical partitioning of the available energy to XCH(3) +Y(-) reaction products. Besides the indirect, complex forming atomic-level mechanism for the S(N)2 reaction, direct mechanisms promoted by X(-) + CH(3)Y relative translational or CH(3)Y vibrational excitation are possible, e.g., the roundabout mechanism.

  17. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  18. Induced Unbalance as a Method for Improving the Dynamic Stability of High-Speed Turbochargers

    KAUST Repository

    Gordon Kirk, R.; Alsaeed, Ali A.

    2011-01-01

    The high-speed diesel engine turbocharger is known to have subsynchronous vibrations for a wide speed range. The bearing fluid-film instability is the main source of the vibration. The nonlinear forces inside the bearings are causing the rotor to whirl in a limit cycle. This study presents a new method for improving the dynamic stability by inducing the turbocharger rotor unbalance in order to suppress the subsynchronous vibration. The finite-element model of the turbocharger with floating-ring bearings is numerically solved for the nonlinear time-transient response. Both compressor and turbine added unbalance are induced and the dynamic stability is computed. The turbocharger model with linearized floating-ring bearings is also solved for eigenvalues to predict the modes of instability. The linear analysis demonstrates that the forward whirling mode of the floating-ring at the compressor end also becomes unstable at the higher turbocharger speeds, in addition to the unstable forward conical and cylindrical modes. The numerical predictions are also compared to the former experimental results of a similar turbocharger. The results of the study show that the subsynchronous frequency amplitude of the dominant first mode is reduced when inducing either the compressor or the turbine unbalance at a certain level. © 2011 R. Gordon Kirk and Ali A. Alsaeed.

  19. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  20. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Miranda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.