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Sample records for chemically deposed layer

  1. Chemically deposed layer sytems for the realization of YBa2Cu3O7-δ band conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis was to produce new buffer-layer systems for biaxially texturated Ni5at%W substrates by means of chemical processes. As very promising materials for the buffer layers CaTiO3 and SrTiO3 were chosen. The production of the single layers pursued from the organometallic prestage by means of dip coating and subsequent head treatment. During the work first the single precursor solutions were to be developed. A main component of the theses forms the understanding of the texture development during the heat treatment of precursor layers on biaxially texturated metallic substrates. Based on this the growth of thick buffer layers is studied and by means of YBCO layers, which were deposed by beans of a pulsed laser, the functionality of the synthesized buffer layers proved. A further component of this thesis formes the influence of nanoscaling precipitations in thew YBCO on its superconducting properties. The YBCO deposition pursued via a variation of the TFA process, as substrate (001)-oriented SrTiO3 monocrystals were applied

  2. Chemically deposed layer sytems for the realization of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} band conductors; Chemisch deponierte Schichtsysteme zur Realisierung von YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}-Bandleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Sebastian

    2009-04-30

    The aim of this thesis was to produce new buffer-layer systems for biaxially texturated Ni5at%W substrates by means of chemical processes. As very promising materials for the buffer layers CaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} were chosen. The production of the single layers pursued from the organometallic prestage by means of dip coating and subsequent head treatment. During the work first the single precursor solutions were to be developed. A main component of the theses forms the understanding of the texture development during the heat treatment of precursor layers on biaxially texturated metallic substrates. Based on this the growth of thick buffer layers is studied and by means of YBCO layers, which were deposed by beans of a pulsed laser, the functionality of the synthesized buffer layers proved. A further component of this thesis formes the influence of nanoscaling precipitations in thew YBCO on its superconducting properties. The YBCO deposition pursued via a variation of the TFA process, as substrate (001)-oriented SrTiO{sub 3} monocrystals were applied.

  3. Natural and gamma radiation-induced conduction of silica and metaphosphate glass layers deposed by radiofrequency cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of natural and 60Co induced conductions in radiofrequency sputtering deposed layers. Capacimetry and electronic microscopy observations permit a knowledge of the physical characteristics, mainly: homogeneity and thickness of these layers. A study of the natural current permit to characterise electrically the deposited films, the electrode and bulk insulator effects. In induced conduction, the behaviour of currents as a function of dose rate is interpreted in terms of ROSE'S and FOWLER'S photoconductivity theories. Induced currents versus applied fields are observed and compared with these obtained in the case of dielectric liquids and glasses. (author)

  4. Chemical Pressure Effects in Layered Manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritomo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Yousuke; Nakamura, Arao

    1998-03-01

    Lattice effects on the magnetic and transport properties have been investigated for layered-type doped mangaites. The insulator-to-metal transition temperature for La_1.2Sr_1.8Mn_2O7 (T_C=130 K) is significantly suppressed with chemical substitution of the trivalent La^3+ ions to smaller Nd^3+ (or Sm^3+) ions(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56(1997)R7057. Similarly, the charge-ordering temperature for La_0.5Sr_1.5MnO4 (T_CO=230 K) is suppresses with chemical substitution(Y. Moritomo et al), Phys. Rev. B56, in press. Systematic x-ray as well as neutron diffraction measurements have revealed that above chemical pressure enhances the static Jahn-Teller distortion of the MnO6 octahedra in both the system. We will explain the suppressions of TC and T_CO in terms of the increasing d_3z^2-r^2 character in the occupied eg state. Our observation indicates that the chemical pressure effects are qualitatively different between the cubic and layered manganites systems. The authors are grateful to K. Ohoyama and M. Ohashi for their help in neutron diffraction measurements, and to S. Mori for his help in electron diffraction measurements. This work was supported by a Grant-In-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sport and Culture and from PRESTO, Japan Scienece and Technology Corporation (JST), Japan.

  5. The Deposing of the Hawaiian Monarch: The Changing Narrative in Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, William

    1992-01-01

    Surveys textbooks to examine how the deposing of the monarchy in Hawaii is treated. Suggests that teachers present three questions: (1) was the United States responsible for the overthrow of the monarchy; (2) how was the overthrow treated in textbooks; and (3) is it correct for the United States to deny responsibility? Argues that textbooks…

  6. Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

  7. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  8. Improving the electrical properties of graphene layers by chemical doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the electronic properties of graphene layers can be modulated by various doping techniques, most of doping methods cost degradation of structural uniqueness or electrical mobility. It is matter of huge concern to develop a technique to improve the electrical properties of graphene while sustaining its superior properties. Here, we report the modification of electrical properties of single- bi- and trilayer graphene by chemical reaction with potassium nitrate (KNO3) solution. Raman spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements showed the n-doping effect of graphene by KNO3. The effect was most dominant in single layer graphene, and the mobility of single layer graphene was improved by the factor of more than 3. The chemical doping by using KNO3 provides a facile approach to improve the electrical properties of graphene layers sustaining their unique characteristics. (paper)

  9. The double-layered chemical structure in DB white dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Althaus, L.G.; Corsico, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    We study the structure and evolution of white dwarf stars with helium-rich atmospheres (DB) in a self-consistent way with the predictions of time-dependent element diffusion. Our treatment of diffusion includes gravitational settling and chemical and thermal diffusion. OPAL radiative opacities for arbitrary metallicity and carbon-and oxygen-rich compositions are employed. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the diffusion-modeled double-layered chemical structure. This structure, which is c...

  10. Stability of Cu-Nb layered nanocomposite from chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Ujjal; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of layered metallic nanocomposites in radiation-resistant materials has been recognized with ultra-high mechanical strengths. Here we present results on layered Cu-Nb composite examining its stability in terms of chemical bond via charge density and transfer analysis, QTAIM, electron localization function and density of states using DFT. An intermediate character of bonding with a significant amount of charge transfer at the interface has been predicted. Shortening of intraplanar bond length is a good manifestation of their observed structural stability which may be due to electron promotion of 3 d → (4 s, 4 p) orbitals associated with the constituent atoms of the composite.

  11. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K S; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A; Hembram, K P S S; Waghmare, Umesh V; Rao, C N R

    2011-02-15

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp(3) C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  12. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K.P.S.S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; RAO, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehyd...

  13. Understanding Molecular Interactions within Chemically Selective Layered Polymer Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary J. Blanchard

    2009-06-30

    This work focuses on two broad issues. These are (1) the molecular origin of the chemical selectivity achieved with ultrathin polymer multilayers, and (2) how the viscoelastic properties of the polymer layers are affected by exposure to solvent and analytes. These issues are inter-related, and to understand them we need to design experiments that probe both the energetic and kinetic aspects of interfacial adsorption processes. This project focuses on controling the chemical structure, thickness, morphology and sequential ordering of polymer layers bound to interfaces using maleimide-vinyl ether and closely related alternating copolymerization chemistry and efficient covalent cross-linking reactions that allow for layer-by-layer polymer deposition. This chemistry has been developed during the funding cycle of this Grant. We have measure the equilibrium constants for interactions between specific layers within the polymer interfaces and size-controlled, surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles. The ability to control both size and functionality of gold nanoparticle model analytes allows us to evaluate the average “pore size” that characterizes our polymer films. We have measured the “bulk” viscosity and shear modulus of the ultrathin polymer films as a function of solvent overlayer identity using quartz crystal microbalance complex impedance measurements. We have measured microscopic viscosity at specific locations within the layered polymer interfaces with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and depolarization techniques. We combine polymer, cross-linking and nanoparticle synthetic expertise with a host of characterization techniques, including QCM gravimetry and complex impedance analysis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopies.

  14. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  15. Advanced titania buffer layer architectures prepared by chemical solution deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Brunkahl, O.; Wesolowski, D.; Edney, C.; Clem, P.; Thomas, N.; Liersch, A.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) was used to grow high-quality (100) oriented films of SrTiO3 (STO) on CSD CaTiO3 (CTO), Ba0.1Ca0.9TiO3 (BCT) and STO seed and template layers. These template films bridge the lattice misfit between STO and the nickel-tungsten (NiW) substrate, assisting in dense growth of textured STO. Additional niobium (Nb) doping of the STO buffer layer reduces oxygen diffusion which is necessary to avoid undesired oxidation of the NiW. The investigated templates offer suitable alternatives to established standard buffer systems like La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and CeO2 for coated conductors.

  16. The double-layered chemical structure in DB white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Althaus, L G

    2004-01-01

    We study the structure and evolution of white dwarf stars with helium-rich atmospheres (DB) in a self-consistent way with the predictions of time-dependent element diffusion. Our treatment of diffusion includes gravitational settling and chemical and thermal diffusion. OPAL radiative opacities for arbitrary metallicity and carbon-and oxygen-rich compositions are employed. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the diffusion-modeled double-layered chemical structure. This structure, which is characterized by a pure helium envelope atop an intermediate remnant shell rich in helium, carbon and oxygen, is expected for pulsating DB white dwarfs, assuming that they are descendants of hydrogen-deficient PG1159 post-AGB stars. We find that, depending on the stellar mass, if DB white dwarf progenitors are formed with a helium content smaller than \\approx 10^-3 M_*, a single-layered configuration is expected to emerge during the DB pulsation instability strip. We also explore the consequences of diffusively evolving ch...

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of Chemical Passivation Layers and High Performance Anti-Reflection Coatings on Back-Illuminated Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A back-illuminated silicon photodetector has a layer of Al2O3 deposited on a silicon oxide surface that receives electromagnetic radiation to be detected. The Al2O3 layer has an antireflection coating deposited thereon. The Al2O3 layer provides a chemically resistant separation layer between the silicon oxide surface and the antireflection coating. The Al2O3 layer is thin enough that it is optically innocuous. Under deep ultraviolet radiation, the silicon oxide layer and the antireflection coating do not interact chemically. In one embodiment, the silicon photodetector has a delta-doped layer near (within a few nanometers of) the silicon oxide surface. The Al2O3 layer is expected to provide similar protection for doped layers fabricated using other methods, such as MBE, ion implantation and CVD deposition.

  18. BI-LAYER HYBRID BIOCOMPOSITES: CHEMICAL RESISTANT AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jawaid,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-layer hybrid biocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up technique by reinforcing oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB and jute fibre mats with epoxy matrix. Hybrid composites were prepared by varying the relative weight fraction of the two fibres. The physical (void content, density, dimensional stability, and chemical resistant properties of hybrid composites were evaluated. When the jute fibre loading increased in hybrid composites, physical and chemical resistant properties of hybrid composites were enhanced. Void content of hybrid composites decreased with an increase in jute fibre loading because jute fibres showed better fibre/matrix interface bonding, which leads to a reduction in voids. The density of hybrid composite increased as the quantity of jute fibre loading increased. The hybridization of the jute fibres with EFB composite improved the dimensional stability of the hybrid composites. The performance of hybrid composites towards chemical reagents improved with an increase in jute fibre loading as compared to the EFB composite. The combination of oil palm EFB/jute fibres with epoxy matrix produced hybrid biocomposites material that is competitive to synthetic composites.

  19. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.

  20. Limiting factors for carbon based chemical double layer capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M. Frank; Johnson, C.; Owens, T.; Stevens, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor improves energy storage density dramatically when compared with conventional electrolytic capacitors. When compared to batteries, the CDL Capacitor is much less energy dense; however, the power density is orders of magnitude better. As a result, CDL-battery combinations present an interesting pulse power system with many potential applications. Due to the nature of the CDL it is inherently a low voltage device. The applications of the CDL can be tailored to auxiliary energy and burst mode storages which require fast charge/discharge cycles. Typical of the applications envisioned are power system backup, directed energy weapons concepts, electric automobiles, and electric actuators. In this paper, we will discuss some of the general characteristics of carbon-based CDL technology describing the structure, performance parameters, and methods of construction. Further, analytical and experimental results which define the state of the art are presented and described in terms of impact on applications.

  1. Chemical modification of niobium layered oxide by tetraalkylammonium intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical modification of the layered K4Nb6O17 material was systematically investigated through the reaction of its proton-exchanged form (H2K2Nb6O17) in alkaline solutions containing tetramethylammonium (tma+), tetraethylammonium (tea+) or tetrapropylammonium (tpa+) cations. The intercalated amount reaches 50% (for tma+), 25% (for tea+) and 15% (for tpa+) of the H2K2Nb6O17 negative charge (concerning the exchange at interlayer I) due to the steric hindrance of larger cations. Hexaniobate samples present (020) basal reflections equal to 23.0, 26.3 and 26.5 A once intercalated respectively with tma+, tea+ and tpa+. When samples are heated above 200-250 deg C, CO2 evolution is observed; Hofmann elimination reaction is also detected for hexaniobate-tpa+ samples. Scanning electron microscopy images show the predominance of plate-like particles; stick-like particles are also observed for samples containing bulky ions. The intercalation reaction is promoted in the order tma+ > tea+ > tpa+, while the formation of a dispersion of colloidal particles is facilitated in the inverse order. (author)

  2. Chemical Tuning of the Magnetic Interactions in Layer Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ronneteg, Sabina

    2005-01-01

    Thin metal films have found their use in many magnetic devices. They form pseudo two-dimensional systems, where the mechanisms for the magnetic interactions between the layers are not completely understood. Layered crystal structures have an advantage over such artificial systems, since the layers can be strictly mono-atomic without any unwanted admixture. In this study, some model systems of layered magnetic crystal structures and their solid solutions have been investigated by x-ray and neu...

  3. The reason why thin-film silicon grows layer by layer in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Takuya Kuwahara; Hiroshi Ito; Kentaro Kawaguchi; Yuji Higuchi; Nobuki Ozawa; Momoji Kubo

    2015-01-01

    Thin-film Si grows layer by layer on Si(001)-(2 × 1):H in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Here we investigate the reason why this occurs by using quantum chemical molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations. We propose a dangling bond (DB) diffusion model as an alternative to the SiH3 diffusion model, which is in conflict with first-principles calculation results and does not match the experimental evidence. In our model, DBs diffuse rapidly along an upper layer c...

  4. Chemical deposition methods for Cd-free buffer layers in CI(G)S solar cells: Role of window layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is currently possible to prepare Cd-free Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based solar cells with efficiencies similar or higher than their CdS references. In these cells, higher efficiencies are generally obtained from soft chemical-based techniques giving conformal depositions such as chemical bath deposition (CBD), ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). However most of these devices are characterized by their pronounced transient behaviour. The aim of this paper is to compare these different chemical-based methods (CBD, ALD, ILGAR...) and to try to provide evidence for the dominant influence of the interface between the Cd-free buffer layer and the window layer on the performance and on the metastable electronic behaviour of these solar cells.

  5. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  6. Chemical control of Ornithonyssus sylviarum on caged layer hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levot, G W

    1992-04-01

    Manual application of aqueous solutions of malathion, carbaryl and permethrin controlled northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum Canestrini and Fanzago, on caged layer hens for at least 118 days. Azamethiphos sprayed manually provided acceptable control for a shorter period. Machine application, particularly of azamethiphos, but also malathion, provided lesser control. The addition of surfactant increased the wetting ability of the sprays but interfered with the efficacy of azamethiphos. PMID:1421482

  7. Growth and properties of few-layer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hye Jin; Meyer, Jannik; Roth, Siegmar; Skakalova, Viera

    2009-01-01

    The structure, and electrical, mechanical and optical properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Ni coated substrate were studied. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show highly crystalline single layer parts of the sample changing to multilayer domains where crystal boundaries are connected by chemical bonds. This suggests two different growth mechanisms. CVD and carbon segregation participate in the growth process ...

  8. Modeling and simulation of chemically stimulated hydrogel layers using the multifield theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyk, Martin; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte hydrogels are ionic gels with viscoelastic properties. They are able to reversibly swell and deswell in response to different external stimuli. In the present work stacked layers of hydrogels - also referred to as hydrogel layers - under chemical stimulation are numerically investigated. For this, a set of coupled partial differential equations describing the chemical, the electrical and the mechanical field is solved by using the finite element method. The swelling behavior of the hydrogel layers - obtained by a novel approach for the osmotic pressure - is in excellent agreement with other investigations available in the literature.

  9. Analytical Capability of Defocused µ-SORS in the Chemical Interrogation of Thin Turbid Painted Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Claudia; Realini, Marco; Botteon, Alessandra; Colombo, Chiara; Noll, Sarah; Elliott, Stephen R; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed micrometer-scale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (μ-SORS) method provides a new analytical capability for investigating non-destructively the chemical composition of sub-surface, micrometer-scale thickness, diffusely scattering layers at depths beyond the reach of conventional confocal Raman microscopy. Here, we demonstrate experimentally, for the first time, the capability of μ-SORS to determine whether two detected chemical components originate from two separate layers or whether the two components are mixed together in a single layer. Such information is important in a number of areas, including conservation of cultural heritage objects, and is not available, for highly turbid media, from conventional Raman microscopy, where axial (confocal) scanning is not possible due to an inability to facilitate direct imaging within the highly scattering sample. This application constitutes an additional capability for μ-SORS in addition to its basic capacity to determine the overall chemical make-up of layers in a turbid system.

  10. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  11. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  12. Investigation of the redox property of a metalloprotein layer self-assembled on various chemical linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2011-10-01

    Myogloblin, a well-known metalloprotein, was immobilized on a gold surface using various chemical linkers to investigate the length effect of chemical linker on the electron transfer in protein layers, because chemical linkers play roles in the pathway that transfers the electron from the protein to the gold substrate and act as protein immobilization reagents. Chemical linkers with 2, 6, 11, and 16 carbons were utilized to confirm length-effects. The immobilization of protein and chemical linker was validated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrochemical property was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronocoulometry (CC). In those results, redox peaks of immobilized protein were controlled via the length of chemical linkers, and it could be directly applied to the realization of bioelectronic device.

  13. Resonant absorption of a chemically sensitive layer based on waveguide gratings

    OpenAIRE

    Davoine, Laurent; Paeder, Vincent; Basset, Guillaume; Schnieper, Marc; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    A colorimetric sensor providing a direct visual indication of chemical contamination was developed. The sensor is a combination of a chemically sensitive dye layer and a resonant waveguide grating. Enhancement of the light absorption by the photonic structure can be clearly seen. The detection is based on the color change of the reflected light after exposure to a gas or a liquid. Low-cost fabrication and compatibility with environments where electricity cannot be used make this device very a...

  14. Parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis using single-layer poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Parker, William

    2009-01-01

    Improving methods for high-throughput combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a major area of research because of the importance of rapidly synthesizing large numbers of chemical compounds for drug discovery and other applications. In this investigation, a novel microfluidic chip for performing parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis was developed. Unlike past microfluidic systems designed for parallel combinatorial chemistry, the chip is a single-layer device made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) ...

  15. Fundamentals of the Layer-by-Layer Chemical Analysis of Heterogeneous Samples Using Secondary Ion Energy-mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenkov, Nikolay N.; Vilkhivskaya, Olga V.; Nikitenkov, Alexsey N.; Sypchenko, Vladimir S.

    The experimental results presented in this paper demonstrate an opportunity for phase analysisof the surfacelayers of heterogeneous solidsusing the energy spectra of secondary ions (ESSI). The resultant ESSI from performing layer-by-layersputteringof thin-film systems using a stationary N2+ primary ion beam are presented and discussed. As examples of such studies, the depth distributions of the chemical compositions were studied on ZnO/Zn andInxAsyOz/InAs. An analysis of the simultaneous change in depth of both secondary molecular ion intensities and secondary atomic ion energy distributions (with reference to the target) enables the identification of separate phases.

  16. Pattern Dependency and Loading Effect of Pure-Boron-Layer Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    The pattern dependency of pure-boron (PureB) layer chemical-vapor Deposition (CVD) is studied with respect to the correlation between the deposition rate and features like loading effects, deposition parameters and deposition window sizes. It is shown experimentally that the oxide coverage ratio and

  17. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  18. An analytical kinetic model for chemical-vapor deposition of pureB layers from diborane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an analytical model is established to describe the deposition kinetics and the deposition chamber characteristics that determine the deposition rates of pure boron (PureB-) layers grown by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) from diborane (B2H6) as gas source on a non-rotating silicon waf

  19. CHEMICALLY DEPOSITED SILVER FILM USED AS A SERS-ACTIVE OVER COATING LAYER FOR POLYMER FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ning Liu; Gi Xue; Yun Lu; Jun Zhang; Fen-ting Li; Chen-chen Xue; Stephen Z.D. Cheng

    2001-01-01

    When colloidal silver particles were chemically deposited onto polymer film as an over-coating layer, surfaceenhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra could be collected for the surface analysis. SERS measurements of liquid crystal film were successfully performed without disturbing the surface morphology.

  20. Comprehensive optical studies on SnS layers synthesized by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minnam Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Park, Chinho; Chan-Wook, Jeon; Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    A simple non-vacuum and cost effective wet chemical technique, chemical bath deposition was used to prepare tin sulphide (SnS) layers on glass substrates. The layers were formed by varying bath temperature in the range, 40-80 °C, keeping other deposition parameters as constant. An exhaustive investigation on their optical properties with bath temperature was made using the transmittance and reflectance measurements. The absorption coefficient was evaluated from the optical transmittance data utilizing Lambert's principle and is >104 cm-1 for all the as-prepared layers. The energy band gap of the layers was determined from the differential reflectance spectra that varied from 1.41 eV to 1.30 eV. Consequently, refractive index and extinction coefficient were obtained from Pankov relations and dispersion constants were calculated using Wemple-Didomenico method. In addition, other optical parameters such as the optical conductivity, dielectric constants, dissipation factor, high frequency dielectric constant and relaxation time were also calculated. Finally electrical parameters such as resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of as-prepared layers were estimated using optical data. A detailed analysis of the dependence of all above mentioned parameters on bath temperature is reported and discussed for a clean understanding of electronic characteristics of SnS layers.

  1. Chemical Composition of Nanoporous Layer Formed by Electrochemical Etching of p-Type GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioud, Youcef A.; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Belarouci, Ali; Paradis, Etienne; Drouin, Dominique; Arès, Richard

    2016-10-01

    We have performed a detailed characterization study of electrochemically etched p-type GaAs in a hydrofluoric acid-based electrolyte. The samples were investigated and characterized through cathodoluminescence (CL), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that after electrochemical etching, the porous layer showed a major decrease in the CL intensity and a change in chemical composition and in the crystalline phase. Contrary to previous reports on p-GaAs porosification, which stated that the formed layer is composed of porous GaAs, we report evidence that the porous layer is in fact mainly constituted of porous As2O3. Finally, a qualitative model is proposed to explain the porous As2O3 layer formation on p-GaAs substrate.

  2. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  3. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of few-layer sp2 bonded boron nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Qing; Snure, Michael; Weyburne, David; Kiefer, Arnold; Siegel, Gene; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-09-01

    A systematic study of the growth of atomically smooth few-layer sp2 bonded BN on 50 mm sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using Triethylboron (TEB) and NH3 as precursors is described. Based on the experimental results obtained using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectance measurements and transmission electron microscopy, we explored the growth parameter space and identified three different growth modes: random three-dimensional (3D) growth, a self-terminating few-layer growth mode, and a very slow layer-by-layer mode. The growth mode depends on the temperature, pressure, V/III ratio, and surface nitridation conditions, as follows: 3D island growth is dominant in the low V/III range and is characterized by a decreasing growth rate with increasing deposition temperature. When the V/III ratio is increased this 3D island growth mode transitions to a self-terminating few-layer growth mode. An additional transition from self-terminating growth to 3D growth occurs when the growth pressure is increased. Very slow layer by layer growth is found at high temperature and low pressure. Finally, substrate surface nitridation promotes self-terminating growth that results in atomically smooth films.

  4. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  5. Chemical mechanical polishing of transparent conductive layers using spherical cationic polymer microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shoji, E-mail: nagaoka@kmt-iri.go.jp [Kumamoto Industrial Research Institute, 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuouku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kumamoto Institute for Photo-Electro Organics (Phoenics), 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Ryu, Naoya [Kumamoto Industrial Research Institute, 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Akio [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuouku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Shirosaki, Tomohiro [Kumamoto Industrial Research Institute, 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Kumamoto Institute for Photo-Electro Organics (Phoenics), 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Horikawa, Maki [Kumamoto Industrial Research Institute, 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuouku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kumamoto Institute for Photo-Electro Organics (Phoenics), 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan); Sakurai, Hideo; Takafuji, Makoto; Ihara, Hirotaka [Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuouku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kumamoto Institute for Photo-Electro Organics (Phoenics), 3-11-38 Higashimachi, Higashiku, Kumamoto 862-0901 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    Spherical cationic polymer microbeads were used to chemically mechanically polish transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layers without the need for inorganic abrasives. Poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) was used as the polymer matrix. Surface cationization of the spherical PMA microbeads was achieved by aminolysis using 1,2-diaminoethane. The amino group content of the microbeads was controlled using the aminolysis reaction time. The surface roughness of the TCO polished using the cationic polymer microbeads was similar to that of TCO polished with an inorganic abrasive. The microbead-polished TCO layer was slightly thinner than the unpolished TCO layer. The sheet resistance of the TCO layer polished using the microbeads was lower than that polished using the inorganic abrasive. The TCO polishing ability of the microbeads was dependent on their cationic properties and softness. - Highlights: • Indium tin oxide (ITO) layer was planarized using cationic polymer microbeads. • Cationic polymer microbeads planarized, while retaining ITO layer thickness • Cationic polymer microbeads did not degrade the sheet resistance of ITO. • Cationic polymer microbeads could planarize the ITO surface without damaging.

  6. Chemical mechanical polishing of transparent conductive layers using spherical cationic polymer microbeads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spherical cationic polymer microbeads were used to chemically mechanically polish transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layers without the need for inorganic abrasives. Poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) was used as the polymer matrix. Surface cationization of the spherical PMA microbeads was achieved by aminolysis using 1,2-diaminoethane. The amino group content of the microbeads was controlled using the aminolysis reaction time. The surface roughness of the TCO polished using the cationic polymer microbeads was similar to that of TCO polished with an inorganic abrasive. The microbead-polished TCO layer was slightly thinner than the unpolished TCO layer. The sheet resistance of the TCO layer polished using the microbeads was lower than that polished using the inorganic abrasive. The TCO polishing ability of the microbeads was dependent on their cationic properties and softness. - Highlights: • Indium tin oxide (ITO) layer was planarized using cationic polymer microbeads. • Cationic polymer microbeads planarized, while retaining ITO layer thickness • Cationic polymer microbeads did not degrade the sheet resistance of ITO. • Cationic polymer microbeads could planarize the ITO surface without damaging

  7. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  8. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Karamat; S. Sonuşen; Ü. Çelik; Y. Uysallı; E. Özgönül; A. Oral

    2015-01-01

    The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties;in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM) value of 30 cm ? 1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm ? 1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm ? 1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm ? 1 as compare to single layer graphene which showed its

  9. Chemical deposition of selenium layers for selenization of sputtered and electrodeposited Cu–Zn–Sn metallic layers for photovoltaic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key steps for high efficiency kesterite based solar cells is the control of the growth conditions of the kesterite phase from precursors. In this work, chemical deposition was used to introduce the selenium needed for Cu–Zn–Sn selenization and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) synthesis. The influence of annealing time and precursor morphology based on deposition techniques (electrodeposition or sputtering) on the reaction path and kinetics of growth and degradation of kesterite phase was studied using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman characterizations. Important differences were detected between porous electrodeposited precursors and dense sputtered precursors. It was suggested that this difference comes from the morphology of the precursors, and that a control of the morphology is critical for the control of the annealing processes in CZTSe synthesis. - Highlights: • Cu–Zn–Sn metallic precursors deposited by co-sputtering and co-electrodeposition • Annealing of Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) using chemical deposition of Se layer • Kinetics of the formation and decomposition of CZTSe • Role of the morphology and composition of precursors on the CZTSe properties

  10. Chemical deposition of selenium layers for selenization of sputtered and electrodeposited Cu–Zn–Sn metallic layers for photovoltaic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbos, Sebastien; Benmoussa, Marya; Bodeux, Romain; Gougaud, Corentin; Naghavi, Negar, E-mail: negar.naghavi@edf.fr

    2015-08-31

    One of the key steps for high efficiency kesterite based solar cells is the control of the growth conditions of the kesterite phase from precursors. In this work, chemical deposition was used to introduce the selenium needed for Cu–Zn–Sn selenization and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) synthesis. The influence of annealing time and precursor morphology based on deposition techniques (electrodeposition or sputtering) on the reaction path and kinetics of growth and degradation of kesterite phase was studied using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman characterizations. Important differences were detected between porous electrodeposited precursors and dense sputtered precursors. It was suggested that this difference comes from the morphology of the precursors, and that a control of the morphology is critical for the control of the annealing processes in CZTSe synthesis. - Highlights: • Cu–Zn–Sn metallic precursors deposited by co-sputtering and co-electrodeposition • Annealing of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) using chemical deposition of Se layer • Kinetics of the formation and decomposition of CZTSe • Role of the morphology and composition of precursors on the CZTSe properties.

  11. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  12. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  13. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  15. Spiral growth of few-layer MoS2 by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X.; Yan, C.; Tomer, D.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.

    2016-08-01

    Growth spirals exhibit appealing properties due to a preferred layer stacking and lack of inversion symmetry. Here, we report spiral growth of MoS2 during chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si and epitaxial graphene/SiC substrates, and their physical and electronic properties. We determine the layer-dependence of the MoS2 bandgap, ranging from 2.4 eV for the monolayer to a constant of 1.3 eV beyond the fifth layer. We further observe that spirals predominantly initiate at the step edges of the SiC substrate, based on which we propose a growth mechanism driven by screw dislocation created by the coalescence of two growth fronts at steps.

  16. The multi-layered protective cuticle of Collembola: a chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerl, Julia; Tsurkan, Mikhail; Hensel, René; Neinhuis, Christoph; Werner, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Collembola, also known as springtails, are soil-dwelling arthropods that typically respire through the cuticle. To avoid suffocating in wet conditions, Collembola have evolved a complex, hierarchically nanostructured, cuticle surface that repels water with remarkable efficiency. In order to gain a more profound understanding of the cuticle characteristics, the chemical composition and architecture of the cuticle of Tetrodontophora bielanensis was studied. A stepwise removal of the different cuticle layers enabled controlled access to each layer that could be analysed separately by chemical spectrometry methods and electron microscopy. We found a cuticle composition that consisted of three characteristic layers, namely, a chitin-rich lamellar base structure overlaid by protein-rich nanostructures, and a lipid-rich envelope. The specific functions, composition and biological characteristics of each cuticle layer are discussed with respect to adaptations of Collembola to their soil habitat. It was found that the non-wetting characteristics base on a rather typical arthropod cuticle surface chemistry which confirms the decisive role of the cuticle topography. PMID:25100321

  17. The multi-layered protective cuticle of Collembola: a chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerl, Julia; Tsurkan, Mikhail; Hensel, René; Neinhuis, Christoph; Werner, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Collembola, also known as springtails, are soil-dwelling arthropods that typically respire through the cuticle. To avoid suffocating in wet conditions, Collembola have evolved a complex, hierarchically nanostructured, cuticle surface that repels water with remarkable efficiency. In order to gain a more profound understanding of the cuticle characteristics, the chemical composition and architecture of the cuticle of Tetrodontophora bielanensis was studied. A stepwise removal of the different cuticle layers enabled controlled access to each layer that could be analysed separately by chemical spectrometry methods and electron microscopy. We found a cuticle composition that consisted of three characteristic layers, namely, a chitin-rich lamellar base structure overlaid by protein-rich nanostructures, and a lipid-rich envelope. The specific functions, composition and biological characteristics of each cuticle layer are discussed with respect to adaptations of Collembola to their soil habitat. It was found that the non-wetting characteristics base on a rather typical arthropod cuticle surface chemistry which confirms the decisive role of the cuticle topography. PMID:25100321

  18. Physical and chemical characterizations of nanometric indigo layers as efficient ozone filter for gas sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J., E-mail: brunet@lasmea.univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LASMEA, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, LASMEA, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Spinelle, L. [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LASMEA, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, LASMEA, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LMI, F-63000 Clermobnt-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6002, LMI, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Ndiaye, A. [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LASMEA, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, LASMEA, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Dubois, M. [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LMI, F-63000 Clermobnt-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6002, LMI, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Monier, G.; Varenne, C.; Pauly, A.; Lauron, B. [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LASMEA, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, LASMEA, F-63177 Aubiere (France); Guerin, K.; Hamwi, A. [Clermont Universite, Universite B. Pascal, LMI, F-63000 Clermobnt-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6002, LMI, F-63177 Aubiere (France)

    2011-11-30

    The relevance of nanometric indigo layers as integrated ozone filters on chemical gas sensors has been established. Indigo can be considered as a selective filter because it ensures a complete removal of ozone in air while being very weakly reactive with CO and NO{sub 2}. The nanometric layers have been realized by thermal evaporation and their chemical structures have been consecutively determined by FT-IR and XPS analyses. Studies about their morphology have been realized by means of SEM and AFM. Results underline the homogeneity and the low roughness of the samples. Electrical characterizations have revealed the high electronic resistivity of nanometric indigo layers. Current-voltage characterizations have put in obviousness that the integration of indigo layer has no effect on the electrical characteristics of sensitive element, even for material exhibiting a very low intrinsic electronic conductivity like metallophthalocyanines. The selective and reproducible measurements of NO{sub 2} concentrations by an original sensing device which takes advantage of on the one hand, the sensitivity and the partial selectivity of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) to oxidizing gases and on the other hand, the filtering selectivity of indigo toward O{sub 3} have been successfully performed. Optimization of sensing performances as well as the scope of indigo nanolayers will be finally discussed.

  19. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D; Xin, Huolin L; Doeff, Marca M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales. PMID:24670975

  20. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D; Xin, Huolin L; Doeff, Marca M

    2014-03-27

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales.

  1. Chemical precursor impact on the properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashistha, Indu B.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    In present work impact of different chemical precursor on the deposition of solar absorber layer Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) were studied by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method without using expensive vacuum facilities and followed by annealing. As compared to the other deposition methods, CBD method is interesting one because it is simple, reproducible, non-hazardous, cost effective and well suited for producing large-area thin films at low temperatures, although effect of precursors and concentration plays a vital role in the deposition. So, the central theme of this work is optimizing and controlling of chemical reactions for different chemical precursors. Further Effect of different chemical precursors i.e. sulphate and chloride is analyzed by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) of annealed CZTS thin film revealed that films were polycrystalline in nature with kestarite tetragonal crystal structure. The Atomic Force micrographs (AFM) images indicated total coverage compact film and as well as growth of crystals. The band gap of annealed CZTS films was found in the range of optimal band gap by absorption spectroscopy.

  2. Regression Methods for Virtual Metrology of Layer Thickness in Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Barak, Bernd; Nagi, Ahmed;

    2014-01-01

    average Silicon Nitride cap layer thickness for the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) dual-layer metal passivation stack process. Process and production equipment Fault Detection and Classification (FDC) data are used as predictor variables. Various variable sets are compared: one most...... algorithm, and Support Vector Regression (SVR). On a test set, SVR outperforms the other methods by a large margin, being more robust towards changes in the production conditions. The method performs better on high-dimensional multivariate input data than on the most predictive variables alone. Process...... expert knowledge used for a priori variable selection further enhances the performance slightly. The results confirm earlier findings that Virtual Metrology can benefit from the robustness of SVR, an adaptive generic method that performs well even if no process knowledge is applied. However...

  3. High Performance Single Layered WSe2 p-FETs with Chemically Doped Contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Hui; Chuang, Steven; Chang, Ting Chia; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2012-01-01

    We report high performance p-type field-effect transistors based on single layered (thickness, ~0.7 nm) WSe2 as the active channel with chemically doped source/drain contacts and high-{\\kappa} gate dielectrics. The top-gated monolayer transistors exhibit a high effective hole mobility of ~250 cm2/Vs, perfect subthreshold swing of ~60 mV/dec, and ION/IOFF of >10^6 at room temperature. Special attention is given to lowering the contact resistance for hole injection by using high work function P...

  4. Parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis using single-layer poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Parker, William

    2009-01-01

    Improving methods for high-throughput combinatorial chemistry has emerged as a major area of research because of the importance of rapidly synthesizing large numbers of chemical compounds for drug discovery and other applications. In this investigation, a novel microfluidic chip for performing parallel combinatorial chemical synthesis was developed. Unlike past microfluidic systems designed for parallel combinatorial chemistry, the chip is a single-layer device made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) that is extremely easy and inexpensive to fabricate. Using the chip, a 2×2 combinatorial series of amide-formation reactions was performed. The results of this combinatorial synthesis indicate that the new device is an effective platform for running parallel organic syntheses at significantly higher throughput than with past methodologies. Additionally, a design algorithm for scaling up the 2×2 combinatorial synthesis chip to address more complex cases was developed. PMID:20216962

  5. Practicing chemical process safety: a look at the layers of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation will review a few public perceptions of safety in chemical plants and refineries, and will compare these plant workplace risks to some of the more traditional occupations. The central theme of this paper is to provide a 'within-the-fence' view of many of the process safety practices that world class plants perform to pro-actively protect people, property, profits as well as the environment. It behooves each chemical plant and refinery to have their story on an image-rich presentation to stress stewardship and process safety. Such a program can assure the company's employees and help convince the community that many layers of safety protection within our plants are effective, and protect all from harm

  6. Plasma chemical reduction of model corrosion brass layers prepared in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkova, Lucie; Mikova, Petra; Prikryl, Radek; Krcma, Frantisek

    2016-08-01

    The brass plates of (50 × 10 × 1) mm3 were prepared with model corrosion layer because the real archaeological artifacts could be damaged during the method optimization. Samples corroded naturally more than 2 years in the soil. Excavated samples were treated in the low pressure (150 Pa) quartz glass plasma reactor (90 cm long and 9.5 cm in diameter) which was surrounded by two external copper electrodes supplied by radio-frequency generator (13.56 MHz). The experiments were carried out in a hydrogen-argon gas mixture at mass flows of 30 sccm for hydrogen and 20 sccm for argon for 90 min. The plasma power was 100, 200, 300 and 400 W in continuous and pulsed mode. Maximum sample temperature was set at 120 °C. The whole process was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and the obtained data were used to calculate the relative intensity of OH radicals and rotational temperature. The results showed that the higher power had the greater maximum intensity of the OH radicals and rapidly degraded the corrosion layer. Corrosion layer was not completely removed during the reduction, but due to the reactions which occur in the plasma corrosion layer became brittle and after plasma chemical treatment can be removed easily. Finally, the SEM-EDX analysis of the surface composition confirmed removal of chlorine and oxygen from the corrosion products layers. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  7. Chemical response of lithiated graphite with deuterium irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C N; B. Heim; Allain, Jean Paul

    2011-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been found to enhance plasma performance for graphite walled fusion devices such as TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX. Among observed plasma enhancements is a reduction in edge density and reduced deuterium recycling. The mechanism by which lithiated graphite retains deuterium is largely unknown. Under controlled laboratory conditions, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to observe the chemical changes that occur on ATJ graphite after lithium depositi...

  8. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 200 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeters, E.E.J.M.; Vries, de W.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the soil solid phase and the soil solution in the humus layer and two mineral layers (0-10 cm and 10-30 cm) was made for 200 forest stands in the year 1995. The stands were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree s

  9. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  10. Aqueous dispersions of few-layer-thick chemically modified magnesium diboride nanosheets by ultrasonication assisted exfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Bedar, Amita; Kannan, Aadithya; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of graphene has led to a rising interest in seeking quasi two-dimensional allotropes of several elements and inorganic compounds. Boron, carbon’s neighbour in the periodic table, presents a curious case in its ability to be structured as graphene. Although it cannot independently constitute a honeycomb planar structure, it forms a graphenic arrangement in association with electron-donor elements. This is exemplified in magnesium diboride (MgB2): an inorganic layered compound comprising boron honeycomb planes alternated by Mg atoms. Till date, MgB2 has been primarily researched for its superconducting properties; it hasn’t been explored for the possibility of its exfoliation. Here we show that ultrasonication of MgB2 in water results in its exfoliation to yield few-layer-thick Mg-deficient hydroxyl-functionalized nanosheets. The hydroxyl groups enable an electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersion and create a heterogeneity leading to an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence. These chemically modified MgB2 nanosheets exhibit an extremely small absorption coefficient of 2.9 ml mg−1 cm−1 compared to graphene and its analogs. This ability to exfoliate MgB2 to yield nanosheets with a chemically modified lattice and properties distinct from the parent material presents a fundamentally new perspective to the science of MgB2 and forms a first foundational step towards exfoliating metal borides. PMID:26041686

  11. Chemical Stability of Titania and Alumina Thin Films Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Gabriela C; Bao, Bo; Strandwitz, Nicholas C

    2015-07-15

    Thin films formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are being examined for a variety of chemical protection and diffusion barrier applications, yet their stability in various fluid environments is not well characterized. The chemical stability of titania and alumina thin films in air, 18 MΩ water, 1 M KCl, 1 M HNO3, 1 M H2SO4, 1 M HCl, 1 M KOH, and mercury was studied. Films were deposited at 150 °C using trimethylaluminum-H2O and tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium-H2O chemistries for alumina and titania, respectively. A subset of samples were heated to 450 and 900 °C in inert atmosphere. Films were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Notably, alumina samples were found to be unstable in pure water, acid, and basic environments in the as-synthesized state and after 450 °C thermal treatment. In pure water, a dissolution-precipitation mechanism is hypothesized to cause surface roughening. The stability of alumina films was greatly enhanced after annealing at 900 °C in acidic and basic solutions. Titania films were found to be stable in acid after annealing at or above 450 °C. All films showed a composition-independent increase in measured thickness when immersed in mercury. These results provide stability-processing relationships that are important for controlled etching and protective barrier layers.

  12. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  13. Effect of Reaction Temperature of CdS Buffer Layers by Chemical Bath Deposition Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jung, Duk Young; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated CdS deposition on a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film via chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to obtain a high-quality optimized buffer layer. The thickness and reaction temperature (from 50 degrees C to 65 degrees C) were investigated, and we found that an increase in the reaction temperature during CBD, resulted in a thicker CdS layer. We obtained a thin film with a thickness of 50 nm at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, which also exhibited the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency for use in solar cells. Room temperature time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements were performed on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film and CdS/CIGS samples to determine the recombination process of the photo-generated minority carrier. The device performance was found to be dependent on the thickness of the CdS layer. As the thickness of the CdS increases, the fill factor and the series resistance increased to 61.66% and decreased to 8.35 Ω, respectively. The best condition was observed at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, and its conversion efficiency was 12.20%.

  14. Deposition of Bioactive Layer on NiTi Alloy by Chemical Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A simple chemical method was developed for inducing bioactivity on NiTi alloys (50 at. pct by Ni/Ti). A layer of calcium phosphate was deposited on the surface to improve biocompatibility of the alloy. NiTi alloys were first etched in HNO3 aqueous solution, and then treated with boiling diluted NaOH solution. A rough surface was created and a thin TiO2 layer was formed on the surface. Pre-calcification was then introduced by immersing the treated NiTi alloys in supersaturated Na2HPO4 solution and supersaturated Ca(OH)2 solution in turn before calcification in simulated body fluid (SBF). A dense and uniform bonelike calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bioactive layer was formed on the surfaces of the specimen, which would improve their biocompatibility. Morphology and element analysis on NiTi surfaces during the treatments were investigated in detail by means of environment scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  15. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  16. Chemical composition and metabolizable energy values of corn germ meal obtained by wet milling for layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CS Albuquerque

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to determine the chemical composition, metabolizable energy values, and coefficients of nutrient digestibility of corn germ meal for layers. The chemical composition of corn germ meal was determined, and then a metabolism assay was performed to determine its apparent metabolizable energy (AME and apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen (AMEn values and its dry matter and gross energy apparent metabolizability coefficients (CAMDM and CAMGE, respectively. In the 8-day assay (four days of adaptation and four days of total excreta collection, 60 29-week-old white Lohman LSL layers were used. A completely randomized experimental design, with three treatments with five replicates of four birds each, was applied. Treatments consisted of a reference diet and two test diets, containing 20 or 30% corn germ meal. Results were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by the Tukey tests at 5% probability level. The chemical composition of corn germ meal was: 96.39% dry matter, 49.48% ether extract, 1.87% ashes, 7243 kcal gross energy/kg, 11.48% protein, 0.19% methionine, 0.21% cystine, 0.48% lysine, 0.40% threonine, 0.72% arginine, 0.35% isoleucine, 0.83% leucine, 0.57% valine, and 0.37% histidine, on as-fed basis. There were no statistical differences in AME, AMEn, CAMDM, and CAMGE values with the inclusion of 20 and 30% corn germ meal in the diets. On dry matter basis, AME, AMEn, CAMDM, and CAMGE values of corn germ meal were: 4,578 and 4,548 kcal/kg, 4,723 and 4,372 kcal/kg, 64.95 and 61.86%, respectively.

  17. Exact Solutions of Chemically Reactive Solute Distribution in MHD Boundary Layer Flow over a Shrinking Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandaneswar Midya

    2012-01-01

    An analytical study of the distribution of a reactant solute undergoing a first-order chemical reaction in the boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible Buid over a linearly shrinking surface is presented. The Row is permeated by an externally applied magnetic Geld normal to the plane of the flow. The equations governing the Row and concentration Reid are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity variables. Closed form exact solutions of the reduced concentration equation are obtained for both prescribed power-law surface concentration (PSC) and power-law wall mass flux (PMF) as boundary conditions. The study reveals that the concentration over a shrinking sheet is signiRcantly different from that of a stretching surface. It s found that te solute boundary layer thickness is enhanced with the increasing values of the Schmidt number and the power-law index parameter, but decreases with enhanced vaJues of magnetic and reaction rate parameters for the PSC case. For the PMF case, the solute boundary layer thickness decreases with the increase of the Schmidt number, magnetic and reaction rate parameter for power-law index parameter n = 0. Negative solute boundary layer thickness is observed for the PMF case when n = 1 and 2, and these facts may not be realized in real-world applications.%An analytical study of the distribution of a reactant solute undergoing a first-order chemical reaction in the boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a linearly shrinking surface is presented.The flow is permeated by an externally applied magnetic field normal to the plane of the flow.The equations governing the flow and concentration field are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity variables.Closed form exact solutions of the reduced concentration equation are obtained for both prescribed power-law surface concentration (PSC) and power-law wall

  18. A Tri-Layer Proton-Conducting Electrolyte for Chemically Stable Operation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-10-07

    Two BaZr0.7Pr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BZPY) layers were used to sandwich a BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BCY) layer to produce a tri-layer electrolyte consisting of BZPY/BCY/BZPY. The BZPY layers significantly improved the chemical stability of the BCY electrolyte layer, which was not stable when tested alone, suggesting that the BZPY layer effectively protected the BCY layer from CO2 reaction, which is the major problem of BCY-based materials. A fuel cell with this sandwiched electrolyte supported on a Ni-based composite anode showed a reasonable cell performance, reaching 185 mW cm-2 at 700 oC, in spite of the relatively large electrolyte thickness (about 65 µm).

  19. Indium sulfide thin films as window layer in chemically deposited solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films have been synthesized by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrates using In(NO3)3 as indium precursor and thioacetamide as sulfur source. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the crystalline state of the as-prepared and the annealed films is β-In2S3. Optical band gap values between 2.27 and 2.41 eV were obtained for these films. The In2S3 thin films are photosensitive with an electrical conductivity value in the range of 10−3–10−7 (Ω cm)−1, depending on the film preparation conditions. We have demonstrated that the In2S3 thin films obtained in this work are suitable candidates to be used as window layer in thin film solar cells. These films were integrated in SnO2:F/In2S3/Sb2S3/PbS/C–Ag solar cell structures, which showed an open circuit voltage of 630 mV and a short circuit current density of 0.6 mA/cm2. - Highlights: • In2S3 thin films were deposited using the Chemical Bath Deposition technique. • A direct energy band gap between 2.41 to 2.27 eV was evaluated for the In2S3 films. • We made chemically deposited solar cells using the In2S3 thin films

  20. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  1. On the segregation of chemical species in a clear boundary layer over heterogeneous land surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Ouwersloot

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have systematically studied the inability of boundary layer turbulence to efficiently mix reactive species. This creates regions where the species are accumulated in a correlated or anti-correlated way, thereby modifying the mean reactivity. Here, we quantify this modification by the intensity of segregation, IS, and analyse the driving mechanisms: heterogeneity of the surface moisture and heat fluxes, various background wind patterns and non-uniform isoprene emissions. For typical conditions in the Amazon rain forest, applying homogeneous surface forcings, the isoprene-OH reaction rate is altered by less than 10 %. This is substantially smaller than the previously assumed IS of 50 % in recent large-scale model analyses of tropical rain forest chemistry. Spatial heterogeneous surface emissions enhance the segregation of species, leading to alterations of the chemical reaction rates of up to 20 %. For these cases, spatial segregation is induced by heterogeneities of the surface properties: a cool and wet forested patch characterized by high isoprene emissions is alternated with a warm and dry patch that represents pasture with relatively low isoprene emissions. The intensities of segregation are enhanced when the background wind direction is parallel to the borders between the patches and reduced in case of a perpendicular wind direction. The effects of segregation on trace gas concentrations vary per species. For the highly reactive OH, the differences in concentration averaged over the boundary layer are less than 2 % compared to homogeneous surface conditions, while the isoprene concentration is increased by as much as 12 % due to the reduced chemical reaction rates. These processes take place at the sub-grid scale of chemistry transport models and therefore need to be parameterized.

  2. On role of kinetic fluctuations in laminar-turbulent transition in chemically nonequilibrium boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Anatoli

    2015-11-01

    Zavol'skii and Reutov (1983), Luchini (2008, 2010), Fedorov (2010, 2012, 2014) explored potential role of kinetic fluctuations (KF) in incompressible and calorically perfect gas boundary layer flows. The results indicate that role of KF is comparable with other disturbance sources in flight experiments and in quiet wind tunnels. The analysis is based on the Landau and Lifshitz (1957) concept of fluctuating hydrodynamics representing the dissipative fluxes as an average and fluctuating parts. We are extending analysis of the receptivity problem to the fluctuating dissipative fluxes in chemically reacting nonequilibrium boundary layer flows of binary mixtures. There are new terms in the energy, and the species equations. The species conservation equation includes the dissipative diffusion flux and the species generation due to dissociation. The momentum equation includes fluctuating stress tensor. The energy equation includes fluctuating heat flux, energy flux due to diffusion of the species, and fluctuating dissipative flux due to viscosity. The effects are compared for the cases stemming from constraints of the HTV project (Klentzman and Tumin, AIAA Paper 2013-2882). Supported by AFOSR.

  3. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  4. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  5. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  6. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere. PMID:27483916

  7. Transport and chemical conversion in convective boundary layer above complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms-Grabe, W.; Corsmeier, U.; Junkermann, W.; Kottmeier, Ch.; Holland, F.; Geiss, H.; Neininger, B.

    2009-04-01

    In summer 2007, the TRACKS campaign (Transport and Chemical Conversion in Convective Systems) was carried out in southwestern Germany in order to study the transport of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols under convective conditions. One focus of this experiment was to investigate the dilution of air pollutants due to dynamical and chemical processes above complex terrain. Therefore, the dispersion of the plume of a metropolitan area has been detected by coordinated measurements of different airborne platforms, including several aircraft and a zeppelin. This contribution addresses the plume of the city of Karlsruhe on a summer day when a convective boundary layer has developed. Karlsruhe is located in the upper Rhine valley between the Palatine mountains and the Black Forest. The transport of air masses is deeply influenced by this orographical situation. The case under investigation is characterized by moderate convective conditions, a frequently occurring summer situation with typical anthropogenic air pollution mainly resulting from traffic and industry. The dispersion of the plume will be shown, mass fluxes are determined and relations between meteorological conditions and trace gas concentrations inside and outside the plume will be discussed. The results reveal a distinctive lateral boundary of the plume. At a distance of 40 km downstream the main emission area, the ozone concentration increased by about 10 ppb, although NO2 does not show a clear horizontal gradient along the plume. In the afternoon, the aerosol in the range of nanometers indicates an unusual growth in size with increasing distance to the city area.

  8. Tribochemical interaction between nanoparticles and surfaces of selective layer during chemical mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Filip, E-mail: filip@meca.omtr.pub.ro [Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Department of Machine Elements and Tribology (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    Nanoparticles have been widely used in polish slurries such as those in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. For understanding the mechanisms of CMP, an atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to characterize polished surfaces of selective layers, after a set of polishing experiments. To optimize the CMP polishing process, one needs to get information on the interaction between the nano-abrasive slurry nanoparticles and the surface of selective layer being polished. The slurry used in CMP process of the solid surfaces is slurry with large nanoparticle size colloidal silica sol nano-abrasives. Silica sol nano-abrasives with large nanoparticle are prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, particles colloidal size, and Zeta potential in this paper. The movement of nanoparticles in liquid and the interaction between nanoparticles and solid surfaces coating with selective layer are very important to obtain an atomic alloy smooth surface in the CMP process. We investigate the nanoparticle adhesion and removal processes during CMP and post-CMP cleaning. The mechanical interaction between nanoparticles and the wafer surface was studied using a microcontact wear model. This model considers the nanoparticle effects between the polishing interfaces during load balancing. Experimental results on polishing and cleaning are compared with numerical analysis. This paper suggests that during post-CMP cleaning, a combined effort in chemical and mechanical interaction (tribochemical interactions) would be effective in removal of small nanoparticles during cleaning. For large nanoparticles, more mechanical forces would be more effective. CMP results show that the removal rate has been improved to 367 nm/min and root mean square (RMS) of roughness has been reduced from 4.4 to 0.80 nm. Also, the results show that the silica sol nano-abrasives about 100 nm are of higher stability (Zeta potential is −65 mV) and narrow distribution of nanoparticle

  9. Controllable chemical vapor deposition growth of few layer graphene for electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dacheng; Wu, Bin; Guo, Yunlong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-15

    Because of its atomic thickness, excellent properties, and widespread applications, graphene is regarded as one of the most promising candidate materials for nanoelectronics. The wider use of graphene will require processes that produce this material in a controllable manner. In this Account, we focus on our recent studies of the controllable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene, especially few-layer graphene (FLG), and the applications of this material in electronic devices. CVD provides various means of control over the morphologies of the produced graph ene. We studied several variables that can affect the CVD growth of graphene, including the catalyst, gas flow rate, growth time, and growth temperature and successfully achieved the controlled growth of hexagonal graphene crystals. Moreover, we developed several modified CVD methods for the controlled growth of FLGs. Patterned CVD produced FLGs with desired shapes in required areas. By introducing dopant precursor in the CVD process, we produced substitutionally doped FLGs, avoiding the typically complicated post-treatment processes for graphene doping. We developed a template CVD method to produce FLG ribbons with controllable morphologies on a large scale. An oxidation-activated surface facilitated the CVD growth of polycrystalline graphene without the use of a metal catalyst or a complicated postgrowth transfer process. In devices, CVD offers a controllable means to modulate the electronic properties of the graphene samples and to improve device performance. Using CVD-grown hexagonal graphene crystals as the channel materials in field-effect transistors (FETs), we improved carrier mobility. Substitutional doping of graphene in CVD opened a band gap for efficient FET operation and modulated the Fermi energy level for n-type or p-type features. The similarity between the chemical structure of graphene and organic semiconductors suggests potential applications of graphene in organic devices. We

  10. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  11. Interrogating chemical variation via layer-by-layer SERS during biofouling and cleaning of nanofiltration membranes with further investigations into cleaning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Pengyu; Zhang, Bifeng; Zhang, Dayi; Li, Junyi; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-12-15

    Periodic chemical cleaning is an essential step to maintain nanofiltration (NF) membrane performance and mitigate biofouling, a major impediment in high-quality water reclamation from wastewater effluent. To target the important issue of how to clean and control biofouling more efficiently, this study developed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a layer-by-layer tool to interrogate the chemical variations during both biofouling and cleaning processes. The fact that SERS only reveals information on the surface composition of biofouling directly exposed to cleaning reagents makes it ideal for evaluating cleaning processes and efficiency. SERS features were highly distinct and consistent with different biofouling stages (bacterial adhesion, rapid growth, mature and aged biofilm). Cleaning was performed on two levels of biofouling after 18 h (rapid growth of biofilm) and 48 h (aged biofilm) development. An opposing profile of SERS bands between biofouling and cleaning was observed and this suggests a layer-by-layer cleaning mode. In addition, further dynamic biochemical and infrastructural changes were demonstrated to occur in the more severe 48-h biofouling, resulting in the easier removal of sessile cells from the NF membrane. Biofouling substance-dependent cleaning efficiency was also evaluated using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS appeared more efficient in cleaning lipid than polysaccharide and DNA. Protein and DNA were the predominant residual substances (irreversible fouling) on NF membrane leading to permanent flux loss. The chemical information revealed by layer-by-layer SERS will lend new insights into the optimization of cleaning reagents and protocols for practical membrane processes. PMID:26433006

  12. Interrogating chemical variation via layer-by-layer SERS during biofouling and cleaning of nanofiltration membranes with further investigations into cleaning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Pengyu; Zhang, Bifeng; Zhang, Dayi; Li, Junyi; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-12-15

    Periodic chemical cleaning is an essential step to maintain nanofiltration (NF) membrane performance and mitigate biofouling, a major impediment in high-quality water reclamation from wastewater effluent. To target the important issue of how to clean and control biofouling more efficiently, this study developed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a layer-by-layer tool to interrogate the chemical variations during both biofouling and cleaning processes. The fact that SERS only reveals information on the surface composition of biofouling directly exposed to cleaning reagents makes it ideal for evaluating cleaning processes and efficiency. SERS features were highly distinct and consistent with different biofouling stages (bacterial adhesion, rapid growth, mature and aged biofilm). Cleaning was performed on two levels of biofouling after 18 h (rapid growth of biofilm) and 48 h (aged biofilm) development. An opposing profile of SERS bands between biofouling and cleaning was observed and this suggests a layer-by-layer cleaning mode. In addition, further dynamic biochemical and infrastructural changes were demonstrated to occur in the more severe 48-h biofouling, resulting in the easier removal of sessile cells from the NF membrane. Biofouling substance-dependent cleaning efficiency was also evaluated using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS appeared more efficient in cleaning lipid than polysaccharide and DNA. Protein and DNA were the predominant residual substances (irreversible fouling) on NF membrane leading to permanent flux loss. The chemical information revealed by layer-by-layer SERS will lend new insights into the optimization of cleaning reagents and protocols for practical membrane processes.

  13. Indium sulfide thin films as window layer in chemically deposited solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo-Loredo, S. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Peña-Méndez, Y., E-mail: yolapm@gmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Calixto-Rodriguez, M. [Universidad Tecnológica Emiliano Zapata del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad Tecnológica No. 1, C.P. 62760 Emiliano Zapata, Morelos (Mexico); Messina-Fernández, S. [Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo” S/N, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Alvarez-Gallegos, A. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Centro de Investigación en Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca Morelos (Mexico); Vázquez-Dimas, A.; Hernández-García, T. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Fac. de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria San Nicolás de Los Garza Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 (Mexico)

    2014-01-01

    Indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) thin films have been synthesized by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrates using In(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as indium precursor and thioacetamide as sulfur source. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the crystalline state of the as-prepared and the annealed films is β-In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. Optical band gap values between 2.27 and 2.41 eV were obtained for these films. The In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films are photosensitive with an electrical conductivity value in the range of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −7} (Ω cm){sup −1}, depending on the film preparation conditions. We have demonstrated that the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films obtained in this work are suitable candidates to be used as window layer in thin film solar cells. These films were integrated in SnO{sub 2}:F/In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/PbS/C–Ag solar cell structures, which showed an open circuit voltage of 630 mV and a short circuit current density of 0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were deposited using the Chemical Bath Deposition technique. • A direct energy band gap between 2.41 to 2.27 eV was evaluated for the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films. • We made chemically deposited solar cells using the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films.

  14. Chemically-modified graphene sheets as an active layer for eco-friendly metal electroplating on plastic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joon-Suk; Hwang, Taeseon; Nam, Gi-Yong; Hong, Jung-Pyo [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ah-Hyun; Son, Sang-Ik; Lee, Geun-Ho; Sung, Hak kyung [Manufacturing Tech. Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Maetan-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, 443-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jae-Do, E-mail: jdnam@skku.edu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-30

    Eco-friendly nickel (Ni) electroplating was carried out on a plastic substrate using chemically modified graphene sheets as an active and conductive layer to initiate electroplating without using conventional pre-treatment or electroless metal-seeding processes. A graphene oxide (GO) solution was self-assembled on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film followed by evaporation to give GO layers (thickness around 6.5 {mu}m) on PET (GO/PET) film. Then, the GO/PET film was chemically and thermally reduced to convert the GO layers to reduced graphene oxide (RGO) layers on the PET substrate. The RGO-coated PET (RGO/PET) film showed the sheet resistance of 100 {Omega} per square. On RGO/PET film, Ni electroplating was conducted under the constant-current condition and the entire surface of the PET film was completely metalized with Ni without any voids.

  15. Large-Area Growth of Uniform Single-Layer MoS2 Thin Films by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Hyun; Choi, Yura; Choi, Woong

    2015-12-01

    We report the largest-size thin films of uniform single-layer MoS2 on sapphire substrates grown by chemical vapor deposition based on the reaction of gaseous MoO3 and S evaporated from solid sources. The as-grown thin films of single-layer MoS2 were continuous and uniform in thickness for more than 4 cm without the existence of triangular-shaped MoS2 clusters. Compared to mechanically exfoliated crystals, the as-grown single-layer MoS2 thin films possessed consistent chemical valence states and crystal structure along with strong photoluminescence emission and optical absorbance at high energy. These results demonstrate that it is possible to scale up the growth of uniform single-layer MoS2 thin films, providing potentially important implications on realizing high-performance MoS2 devices.

  16. Effect of various chemical agents used in gingival retraction systems on smear layer: Scanning electron microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Shivraj Lahoti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical agents used for gingival retraction affects the smear layer. Aim: To determine the effect of three different chemical agents used for gingival retraction systems on smear layer. Materials and Methods: Four human premolars were prepared using air-rotor with air-water spray to receive full crown restoration. Three of them were treated with 21.3% aluminum chloride for 10 min, 0.05% oxymetazoline hydrochloride for 10 min, and expasyl for 2 min, respectively. One sample was left untreated. Then, the tooth specimens were rinsed with tap water to remove any residue of test materials. All the samples (treated and untreated were processed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Processed samples were examined under SEM at ×2400 to evaluate the effect of chemical agents on smear layer. Results: SEM examination revealed that 0.05% oxymetazoline hydrochloride for 10 min produced no alteration to smear layer followed by minimum alteration by expasyl for 2 min and complete removal of smear layer with etching of dentin with 21.3% aluminum chloride for 10 min. Conclusion: 0.05% oxymetazoline hydrochloride and expasyl are kind to smear layer.

  17. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 200 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1995

    OpenAIRE

    Leeters, E.E.J.M.; De, Vries, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the soil solid phase and the soil solution in the humus layer and two mineral layers (0-10 cm and 10-30 cm) was made for 200 forest stands in the year 1995. The stands were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree species and were all located on non-calcareous sandy soils. The soils are nearly all characterized by high nitrogen and metal contents in the humus layer ans low pH and base saturation values in the...

  18. Organometallic chemical vapor-phase deposition (MOCVD) of oxidic high-ε layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The considered materials in this work are (Ba,Sr)TiO3, SrTiO3 and SrTa2O6 and the oxides from the group IVb metals: Ti, Zr and Hf. The films were deposited on Platinum and Silicon substrates in order to evaluate the dielectric properties for applications in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures as well as in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. The high-k films were grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and the evaluation and optimisation of the production processes is a major part of this work. Different approaches were investigated: mixing of conventional precursors for the example of (Ba,Sr)TiO3, test of a single source precursor for SrTa2O6 and tests of newly designed precursors for the group IVb-metal oxides, M-(O-I-Pr)2(tbaoac)2. In addition, compatibility tests of the new Titanium precursors with the conventional Strontium precursor are presented for the example of SrTiO3. Most detailed investigations were performed on the nucleation and growth processes of (Ba,Sr)TiO3 on platinum . Details of the nucleation were obtained from the new method of conductivity scans with the AFM. These investigations were combined with XRD, SEM, HRTEM, SPM and XPS and give a consistent picture of development of the structural properties and their dependencies on growth temperature and chemical composition. The electrical properties, especially capacity and leakage current indicate a strong dependency from film thickness, which can be explained by separating the bulk- from the interface capacity. Based on these results the interface layer was optimised by changing the interfacial stoichiometry. Additionally, SrTa2O6 was tested as an alternative material with low tunability and shows promising electrical results. For the example of SrTiO3 on silicon details of the growth kinetics of the interfacial layer were investigated by HRTEM. The first results from group IVb oxides, which are the most promising candidates for gate oxides, are presented. (orig.)

  19. Summertime aerosol chemical components in the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhouqing; Sun, Liguang; Blum, Joel D.; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei

    2006-05-01

    Samples of aerosols from the marine boundary layer of the Arctic Ocean were collected aboard the R/V Xuelong during summer on the Second Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (July-September 2003). Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) was used to determine chemical compositions of aerosol particles. Multivariate analysis of the SR-XRF data resolved a number of components (factors), which, on the basis of their chemical compositions and from their affiliation with specific meteorological flow patterns, were assigned physical meanings. Five factors explaining 94.7% of the total variance were identified. Ship emissions accounted for 35.3% of the variance (factor 1 (F1)) and are loaded significantly with S, Fe, V, and Ni. The total Fe emitted from ships globally was estimated at 8.60 × 106 kg yr-1. Heavy-metal-rich factors included 34.0% of the variance (F2 and F3) and were interpreted to be pollution carried into the Arctic Ocean by long-range transport. Anthropogenic contributions from industrial regions to the Arctic Ocean during the summer vary and depend on the source locations. Air mass backward trajectories indicate that the metals including Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn come mainly from northern Russia. The third source controlling the chemical compositions of aerosols was sea salt (F4, 12.8%). The role of sea salt decreased from the open sea to areas near pack ice. On the basis of the factor scores of aerosol samples, we infer that chlorine volatilization from sea salt may occur, enhanced by nitrogen and sulfur contamination emitted from ships. Because the global inventories of nitrogen and sulfur for ship exhausts are large, and halogens could have important consequences in possible tropospheric ozone destruction, the role of ships in influencing halogen depression in sea salt should be further investigated. Finally, we also identified a crustal factor (F5, 12.6%) and suggest that crustal elements (e.g., Ca) contaminating sea ice may become reinjected into

  20. Chemical Cleavage of Layered Carbon Nitride with Enhanced Photoluminescent Performances and Photoconduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2015-12-22

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon dots (C-dots) have various alluring properties and potential applications, but they are often limited by unsatisfied optical performance such as low quantum yield, ambiguous fluorescence emission mechanism, and narrow emission wavelength. Herein, we report that bulk polymeric carbon nitride could be utilized as a layered precursor to prepare carbon nitride nanostructures such as nanorods, nanoleaves and quantum dots by chemical tailoring. As doped carbon materials, these carbon nitride nanostructures not only intrinsically emitted UV lights but also well inherited the explicit photoluminescence mechanism of the bulk pristine precursor, both of which were rarely reported for GQDs and C-dots. Especially, carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) had a photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) up to 46%, among the highest QY for metal-free quantum dots so far. As examples, the CNQDs were utilized as a photoluminescence probe for rapid detection of Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 1 μM in 2 min and a photoconductor in an all-solid-state device. This work would open up an avenue for doped nanocarbon in developing photoelectrical devices and sensors.

  1. Formation of a Molecular Wire Using the Chemically Adsorbed Monomolecular Layer Having Pyrrolyl Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Ogawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular wire containing polypyrrolyl conjugate bonds has been prepared by a chemical adsorption technique using 1,1,1-trichloro-12-pyrrolyl-1-siladodecane (PNN and an electrooxidative polymerization technique, and the conductivity of the molecular wire without any dopant has been measured by using AFM/STM at room temperature. When sample dimension measured was about 0.3 nm (thickness of the conductive portion in the PNN monomolecular layer ×100 μm (the average width of an electric path ×2 mm (the distance between Pt positive electrode and the AFM tip covered with Au, the conductivity of the polymerized PNN molecular wire at room temperature was larger than 1.6 × 105 S/cm both in an atmosphere and in a vacuum chamber of 10−5 Torr. The activation energy obtained by Arrhenius' plots was almost zero in the temperature range between 320 and 450 K.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposited Few-Layer Graphene as an Electron Field Emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behural, Sanjay K; Nayak, Sasmita; Yang, Qiaoqin; Hirose, Akira; Janil, Omkar

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on polycrystalline copper (Cu) foil in a low pressure conditions has been presented, aiming to achieve the highest quality with large-scale fabrications, which requires comprehensive understanding and effective controlling of the growth process. Herein, few-layer graphene (FLG) films with large-domain sizes were grown on Cu metal catalyst substrates using a vertical mass-flow hot-filament CVD reactor, with the intention of large scale production, by optimizing the CVD system and three of the process parameters: (i) gas flow compositions, (ii) substrate annealing time and (iii) graphene deposition time. The detailed scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy analysis indicate that all the above mentioned process parameters affect growth of FLG film on Cu substrate. The presence of two intense peaks, G and 2D-band at 1583.6 and 2702.6 cm⁻¹ for synthesized sample at optimized conditions (H₂/CH₄ ratio of 50:1 at graphene deposition time of 10 minutes and substrate annealed time for 20 minutes) revealed the formation of FLG films with large domain size. These graphene films on Cu have shown the room temperature field electron emission characteristics, hence appears to be prospective candidate for vacuum nanoelectronics. PMID:27398456

  3. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer

  4. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  5. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V. [Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shukla, S.; Saxena, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Lee, G.-H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Alwarappan, S., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  6. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R. K.; Shukla, S.; Saxena, S.; Lee, G.-H.; Sahajwalla, V.; Alwarappan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  7. Controlled Growth of Non-Uniform Arsenic Profiles in Silicon Reduced-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxial Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popadic, M.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; De Boer, W.; Sarubbi, F.; Nanver, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    An empirical model of As surface segregation during reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition Si epitaxy is presented. This segregation mechanism determines the resulting doping profile in the grown layer and is here described by a model of simultaneous and independent As adsorption and segregation

  8. Study on CexLa1-xO2 Buffer Layer used in Coated Conductors by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yue; Suo, Hongli; Grivel, Jean-Claude;

    2009-01-01

    Developing multi-functional single buffer layer is one of the most important challenges for simplification of coated conductors configuration. Ladoped CeO2 films were prepared by chemical solution method. And surface morphology and texture quality of the La-doped CeO2 films were investigated...

  9. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 150 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral topsoil (0-30 cm) and soil solution in both topsoil and subsoil (60-100 cm) was made for 150 forest stands in the year 1990. The stands, which were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree s

  10. Chemical composition of aerosol in the atmospheric surface layer of the East Antarctica coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Golobokova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of aerosol in the ground layer of the coastal zone in East Antarctica is analyzed in the article. The aerosol samples were taken in 2006–2015 during seasonal works of the Russian Antarctic Expeditions (RAE, namely, these were 52nd–53rd, 55th, and 58th–60th expeditions. Samples were taken in the 200‑km band of the sea-shore zone along routes of the research vessels (REV «Akademik Fedorov» and «Akademik Treshnikov» as well as on territories of the Russian stations Molodezhnaya and Mirny. Although the results obtained did show the wide range of the aerosol concentrations and a certain variability of their chemical composition, some common features of the variability were revealed. Thus, during the period from 2006 to 2014 a decrease of average values of the sums were noted. Spatially, a tendency of decreasing of the ion concentrations was found in the direction from the station Novolazarevskaya to the Molodezhnaya one, but the concentrations increased from the Molodezhnaya to the station Mirny. The sum of ions of the aerosol in the above mentioned coastal zone was, on the average, equal to 2.44 μg/m3, and it was larger than that on the territory of the Antarctic stations Molodezhnaya (0,29 μg/m3 and Mirny (0,50 ág / m3. The main part to the sum of the aerosol ions on the Antarctic stations was contributed by Na+, Ca2+, Cl−, SO4 2−. The main ions in aerosol composition in the coastal zone are ions Na+ and Cl−. The dominant contribution of the sea salt and SO4 2− can be traced in not only the composition of atmospheric aerosols, but also in the chemical composition of the fresh snow in the coastal areas of East Antarctica: at the Indian station Maitri, on the Larsemann Hills, and in a boring located in 55.3 km from the station Progress (K = 1.4÷6.1. It was noted that values of the coefficient of enrichment K of these ions decreases as someone moves from a shore to inland. Estimation of

  11. Layer-Controlled Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of MoS2 Vertical Heterostructures via van der Waals Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Leith; Bladow, Sage M; Ding, Qi; Zhuo, Junqiao; Jacobberger, Robert M; Arnold, Michael S; Jin, Song

    2016-07-26

    The fascinating semiconducting and optical properties of monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, as exemplified by MoS2, have made them promising candidates for optoelectronic applications. Controllable growth of heterostructures based on these layered materials is critical for their successful device applications. Here, we report a direct low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of MoS2 monolayer/multilayer vertical heterostructures with layer-controlled growth on a variety of layered materials (SnS2, TaS2, and graphene) via van der Waals epitaxy. Through precise control of the partial pressures of the MoCl5 and elemental sulfur precursors, reaction temperatures, and careful tracking of the ambient humidity, we have successfully and reproducibly grown MoS2 vertical heterostructures from 1 to 6 layers over a large area. The monolayer MoS2 heterostructure was verified using cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) while Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed the layer-controlled MoS2 growth and heterostructure electronic interactions. Raman, photoluminescence, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mappings verified the uniform coverage of the MoS2 layers. This reaction provides an ideal method for the scalable layer-controlled growth of transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures via van der Waals epitaxy for a variety of optoelectronic applications.

  12. Change of chemical states of niobium in the oxide layer of zirconium–niobium alloys with oxide growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change of chemical states of niobium with oxide growth was examined in the oxide layers of Zr–2.5Nb around the first kinetic transition by the conversion electron yield – X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements. The detailed depth profiles of niobium chemical states were obtained in both the pre- and the post-transition oxide layers of Zr–2.5Nb formed in water at 663 K for 40–280 d. The depth profiling revealed that the inner oxide layer remained protective to oxidizing species even though in the post-transition region and this excellent stability of barrierness would be attributed the suppression of hydrogen pickup. (author)

  13. Effect of layering sequence and chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of woven kenaf–aramid hybrid laminated composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of woven kenaf/Kevlar hybrid composites were analysed. • The layering sequences affect the mechanical properties of hybrid composites. • Treated kenaf improves the mechanical properties of hybrid composites. - Abstract: This work aims to evaluate the effect of layering sequence and chemical treatment on mechanical properties of woven kenaf–Kevlar composites. Woven kenaf–aramid hybrid laminated composites fabricated through hand lay-up techniques by arranging woven kenaf and Kevlar fabrics in different layering sequences and by using treated kenaf mat. To evaluate the effect of chemical treatment on hybrid composites, the woven kenaf mat was treated with 6% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) diluted solution and compared mechanical properties with untreated kenaf hybrid composites. Results shows that the tensile properties of hybrid composites improved in 3-layer composites compared to 4-layer composites. Hybrid composite with Kevlar as outer layers display a better mechanical properties as compared to other hybrid composites. Tensile and flexural properties of treated hybrid composites are better than non-treated hybrid composites. The fractured surface of hybrid composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. This study is a part of exploration of potential application of the hybrid composite in high velocity impact application

  14. Few-Layer Nanoplates of Bi 2 Se 3 and Bi 2 Te 3 with Highly Tunable Chemical Potential

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-06-09

    A topological insulator (TI) represents an unconventional quantum phase of matter with insulating bulk band gap and metallic surface states. Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that group V-VI materials Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, and Sb2Te3 are TIs with a single Dirac cone on the surface. These materials have anisotropic, layered structures, in which five atomic layers are covalently bonded to form a quintuple layer, and quintuple layers interact weakly through van der Waals interaction to form the crystal. A few quintuple layers of these materials are predicted to exhibit interesting surface properties. Different from our previous nanoribbon study, here we report the synthesis and characterizations of ultrathin Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanoplates with thickness down to 3 nm (3 quintuple layers), via catalyst-free vapor-solid (VS) growth mechanism. Optical images reveal thickness-dependent color and contrast for nanoplates grown on oxidized silicon (300 nm SiO2/Si). As a new member of TI nanomaterials, ultrathin TI nanoplates have an extremely large surface-to-volume ratio and can be electrically gated more effectively than the bulk form, potentially enhancing surface state effects in transport measurements. Low-temperature transport measurements of a single nanoplate device, with a high-k dielectric top gate, show decrease in carrier concentration by several times and large tuning of chemical potential. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Mixing and non-equilibrium chemical reaction in a compressible mixing layer. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compressibility, chemical reaction exothermicity, and non-equilibrium chemical modeling in a reacting plane mixing layer were investigated by means of two dimensional direct numerical simulations. The chemical reaction was irreversible and second order of the type A + B yields Products + Heat. The general governing fluid equations of a compressible reacting flow field were solved by means of high order finite difference methods. Physical effects were then determined by examining the response of the mixing layer to variation of the relevant non-dimensionalized parameters. The simulations show that increased compressibility generally results in a suppressed mixing, and consequently a reduced chemical reaction conversion rate. Reaction heat release was found to enhance mixing at the initial stages of the layer growth, but had a stabilizing effect at later times. The increased stability manifested itself in the suppression or delay of the formation of large coherent structures within the flow. Calculations were performed for a constant rate chemical kinetics model and an Arrhenius type kinetic prototype. The choice of the model was shown to have an effect on the development of the flow. The Arrhenius model caused a greater temperature increase due to reaction than the constant kinetic model. This had the same effect as increasing the exothermicity of the reaction. Localized flame quenching was also observed when the Zeldovich number was relatively large.

  16. Chemically Compatible Sacrificial Layer-Assisted Lift-Off Patterning Method for Fabrication of Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Kim, Min-Hoi; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2011-08-01

    We developed a generic platform to pattern combinatorial functional layers composed of different classes of organic materials using a repetitive lift-off method based on a chemically compatible sacrificial layer (SL) for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The essential features come from the chemically compatible SL of a fluorous-polymer that can be generated by laser-inscription or transfer-printing. The precise registration of lateral patterns of different materials was achieved on a single substrate through a series of SL-assisted lift-off processes. The chemical compatibility of the SL and the stability of the light-emitting characteristics were shown in a fluorous-solvent treated monochrome OLEDs.

  17. Comparisons between box and global model simulations of chemical oxidation in the tropical marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Dwayne; Stone, Daniel; Vaughan, Stewart; Ingham, Trevor; Whalley, Lisa; Evans, Mat; Read, Katie; Lee, James; Moller, Sarah; Carpenter, Lucy; Lewis, Alastair

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric oxidation processes during the daytime are dominated by the OH radical, particularly in the tropical marine boundary layer, where the warm, humid conditions and high solar irradiation lead to high OH production rates. Atmospheric models have shown that such high OH production rates in tropical regions lead to a significant fraction of global methane oxidation in tropical regions. Understanding the processes controlling OH concentrations, and thus the extent of methane oxidation, in tropical regions is therefore essential to our understanding of the global oxidising capacity and for accurate climate change predictions. Long-term measurements of OH, and the closely coupled HO2 radical, were made using the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (16.85 N, 24.87 W) on the island of Sao Vicente as part of the Seasonal Oxidant Study (SOS) in the tropical Atlantic during three distinct seasonal periods in February-March, June and September 2009 (Vaughan et al., ACP, 12, 2149, 2012). In this paper we describe model simulations of OH and HO2 radicals with both a heavily constrained box model using the Dynamically Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity (DSMACC), based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2, extended with a halogen chemistry scheme), and the three-dimensional global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-01-03, including recent updates to include bromine chemistry). The box model calculations indicate that solar photolysis of ozone is responsible for over 80 % of midday radical production, with photolysis of HCHO contributing a further 9 % of the total midday radical production. Radical losses at midday are dominated by CH3O2 + HO2 (26 %), uptake of HO2 onto aerosol surfaces (21 %) and HO2+ HO2 (18 %). Both model approaches result in an overprediction of OH and HO2, potentially arising from incomplete consideration of radical sinks. However, the two model approaches differ in the

  18. An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer by fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin; Chang, Jiaxing; Shao, Youlin; Liu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle has been successful in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), but an improved design is required for future development. In this paper, the coating layers are reconsidered, and an improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer is proposed. Three methods of preparing the porous SiC layer, called high methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentration method, high Ar concentration method and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) method, are experimentally studied. It is indicated that porous SiC layer can be successfully prepared and the density of SiC layer can be adjusted by tuning the preparation parameters. Microstructure and characterization of the improved TRISO coated particle are given based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. It can be found that the improved TRISO coated particle with porous SiC layer can be mass produced successfully. The formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer are also discussed based on the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition principle.

  19. STUDY OF THE VARIABILITY IN CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BARK LAYERS OF QUERCUS SUBER L. FROM DIFFERENT PRODUCTION AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jové

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cork is the bark of the cork oak tree (Quercus suber L, a renewable and biodegradable raw bioresource concentrated mainly in the Mediterranean region. Development of its potential uses as a biosorbent will require the investigation of its chemical composition; such information can be of help to understand its interactions with organic pollutants. The present study investigates the summative chemical composition of three bark layers (back, cork, and belly of five Spanish cork samples and one cork sample from Portugal. Suberin was the main component in all the samples (21.1 to 53.1%, followed by lignin (14.8 to 31%, holocellulose (2.3 to 33.6%, extractives (7.3 to 20.4%, and ash (0.4 to 3.3%. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether the variations in chemical composition with respect to the production area and bark layers were significant. The results indicate that, with respect to the bark layer, significant differences were found only for suberin and holocellulose contents: they were higher in the belly and cork than in the back. Based on the results presented, cork is a material with a lot of potential because of its heterogeneity in chemical composition.

  20. Interface diffusion and chemical reaction of PZT layer/Si(111)sample during the annealing treatment in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU, Yong-Fa(朱永法); CAO, Li-Li(曹立礼); YAN, Pei-Yu(阎培渝); LI, Long-Tu(李龙土); YI, Tao(易涛)

    2000-01-01

    The interface diffusion and chemical reaction between a PZT (PbZrxTi1-xO3) layer and a Si(111) substrate during the annealing treatment in air have been studied by using XPS (XRay Photoelectron Spectroscopy) and AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy). The results indicate that the Ti element in the PZT precursor reacted with residual carbou and silicon, diffused from the Si substrate, to form TiCx, TiSix species in the PZT layer during the thermal treatment. A great interface diffusion and chemical reactiou took place on the interface of PZT/Si also. The silicon atoms diffused from silicon substrate onto the surface of PZT layer. The oxygen atoms, which came from air, diffused into silicon substrate also and reacted with Si atoms to form a SiO2 interlayer between the PZT layer and the Si (111) substrate. The thickness of SiO2 interlayer was proportional to the square root of treatment time. The formation of the SiO2 interlayer was governed by the diffusion of oxygen in the PZT layer at low annealing temperature, and governed by the diffusion of oxygen in SiO2 interlayer at high annealing temperature. The apparent activation energy of the interface oxidation reaction was about 39.1 kJ/mol.

  1. Amelioration de l'adhesion de revetements organiques deposes par plasma froid sur polymeres pour applications biomedicales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbai, Marouan

    Plasma surface modification is commonly used in biomedical field, for example to enhance cell adhesion and growth surrounding the stent covers without affecting its bulk properties. Plasma polymer (PP) deposition used to create thin films rich in functional groups, e.g. primary amines, known to enhance the cellular response and allow grafting of biomolecules especially on stent grafts. Thin film adhesion to stent polymeric cover should be considered especially as they will evolve in a biological environment. The aim of this project is to evaluate the adhesion of PP on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET). Thereafter, an ammonia plasma treatment on PTFE is performed prior to deposition of PP to optimize the PP/PTFE adhesion. PP studied here (referred to as "LP") is prepared from a mixture of ethylene (C2H4) and ammonia (NH3). It is deposited on two supports, PET and PTFE. The interfacial adhesion between the LP coating and the substrate was evaluated by "Peel-test 180 °" according to ASTM F1842. Staining of the surface after peel test followed by an image analysis was performed to determine the percentage of removed coating. Adhesion optimization is done by varying operating plasma parameters such as power, pressure and pretreatment time. Chemical analyses and wettability of LP and pretreated surfaces in dry and wet conditions are characterized by XPS and contact angle measurements, respectively. The adhesion of LP/PET was excellent in a dry environment (water, respectively). However, 56% to 75% of the LP is removed from virgin PTFE in a dry and wet environment, respectively; percentages can be substantially reduced by plasma pretreatment (0% and 8+/-3% in air and 30min in deionized water). Almost no delamination was observed with NH3 plasma pretreatment at 15s, 100 mTorr and 50W. N2 plasma pretreatment, for comparison, proves much less effective. The LP/PTFE adhesion is considerably improved by plasma pretreatment compared to

  2. The Eff ect of Fabrication Conditions for GDC Buff er Layer on Electro chemical Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung-Hoon Song; Myung Geun Jung; Hye Won Park; Hyung-Tae Lim

    2013-01-01

    A Gd-doped ceria (GDC) buff er layer is required between a conventional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and a La-Sr-Co-Fe-O3 (LSCF) cathode to prevent their chemical reaction. In this study, the eff ect of varying the conditions for fabricating the GDC buff er layer, such as sintering temperature and amount of sintering aid, on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) performance was investigated. A finer GDC powder (i.e., ultra-high surface area), a higher sintering temperature (∼1290℃), and a larger amount of sintering aid (∼12%) resulted in improved densification of the buff er layer; however, the electrochemical performance of an anode-supported cell containing this GDC buff er layer was poor. These conflicting results are attributed to the formation of (Zr, Ce)O2 and/or excess cobalt grain boundaries (GBs) at higher sintering temperatures with a large amount of sintering aid (i.e., cobalt oxide). A cell comprising of a cobalt-free GDC buff er layer, which was fabricated using a low-temperature process, had lower cell resistance and higher stability. The results indicate that electrochemical performance and stability of SOFCs strongly depend on fabrication conditions for the GDC buff er layer.

  3. Thermal Instability of Chemically Reacting Maxwell Fluid in a Horizontal Porous Layer with Constant Heat Flux Lower Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Khudeja Akbar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical reaction on the linear stability of a viscoelastic fluid saturated horizontal densely-packed porous layer is investigated. The viscoelastic properties are given by Maxwell constitutive relations. The porous layer is cooled from the upper boundary while an adiabatic thermal boundary condition is imposed at the lower boundary. Linear stability analysis suggests that there is a competition between the processes of viscous relaxation and thermal diffusion that causes the first convective instability to be oscillatory rather than stationary. The effect of Deborah number, Darcy-Prandtl number, normalized porosity, and the Frank-Kamenetskii number on the stability of the system is investigated. Using a weighted residual method we calculate numerically the convective thresholds for both stationary and oscillatory instability. The effects of viscoelasticity and chemical reaction on the instability are emphasized. Some existing results are reproduced as the particular cases of the present study.

  4. Chemical Force Spectroscopy Evidence Supporting the Layer-by-Layer Model of Organic Matter Binding to Iron (oxy)Hydroxide Mineral Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Chassé, Alexander W.

    2015-08-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to metal (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is a critical step for C sequestration in soils. Although equilibrium studies have described some of the factors controlling this process, the molecular-scale description of the adsorption process has been more limited. Chemical force spectroscopy revealed differing adhesion strengths of DOM extracted from three soils and a reference peat soil material to an iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surface. The DOM was characterized using ultrahigh-resolution negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The results indicate that carboxyl-rich aromatic and N-containing aliphatic molecules of DOM are correlated with high adhesion forces. Increasing molecular mass was shown to decrease the adhesion force between the mineral surface and the DOM. Kendrick mass defect analysis suggests that mechanisms involving two carboxyl groups result in the most stable bond to the mineral surface. We conceptualize these results using a layer-by-layer "onion" model of organic matter stabilization on soil mineral surfaces.

  5. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanorods grown chemically on sputtered GaN buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnO nanorods were grown on 200 nm thick sputtered ZnO and GaN buffer layers on quartz substrates by chemical bath deposition. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies show that the ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layer possess larger diameter and smaller lengths and are vertically misaligned, compared to those grown on ZnO buffer layer. These differences are attributed to lack of complete c-axis orientation of crystallites in GaN buffer layer, its lattice mismatch with that of ZnO and a hindered nucleation process of ZnO on GaN surface, owing to a finite nucleation barrier and limited surface diffusion. Photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layer, however, exhibits a much stronger near-band-edge luminescence and drastically suppressed defect luminescence compared to the luminescence spectrum of the nanorods grown on ZnO buffer layer. Deconvolution of the photoluminescence peaks and Raman studies indicate significant reduction of oxygen vacancies and gallium incorporation in the ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layer. These observations suggest the possibility of exchange reaction mediated by the aqueous medium, particularly during the initial stages of growth. - Highlights: • ZnO nanorods were grown on sputtered GaN buffer layer deposited on quartz. • ZnO nanorods on polycrystalline GaN show limited vertical alignment of c-axis. • ZnO nanorods on GaN show high band edge and negligible defect luminescence. • Raman and photoluminescence studies indicate solution mediated interface reaction

  6. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, ul. M. Skłodowskiej–Curie 55, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Żenkiewicz, Marian [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We modified polylactide surface layer with chemical, plasma or laser methods. • We tested selected properties and surface structure of modified samples. • We stated that the plasma treatment appears to be the most beneficial. - Abstract: The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm{sup 2} was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  7. Surface reactivity and layer analysis of chemisorbed reaction films in the surface-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R B Choudhary; O N Anand; O S Tyagi

    2009-05-01

    Studies on surface reactivity of substrate iron (Fe-particles) were made in the tribo-chemical environment of alkyl octadecenoates. Two alkyl octadecenoates namely ethyl octadecenoate and methyl 12-hydroxy octadecenoate, slightly different in their chemical nature, were taken for preparing the chemisorbed reaction films (CRF) at the temperature 100 ± 5°C. The reaction products collected in the composite (amorphous) phase were isolated into three different solvent-soluble fractions (sub-layer films) using polar solvents of increasing polar strength. The FTIR analysis of these films showed that these were primarily organic in nature and were composed of alkyl and/or aryl hydroxy ethers, unsaturated hydroxy ketones, and aromatic structures chemically linked with iron surface. These reaction films also contained large amount of iron (Fe). Further, these film fractions also showed varying thermal behaviour during thermal decomposition in the temperature range of 50-800°C when thermally evaluated in the nitrogen environment.

  8. Growth of novel ceramic layers on metals via chemical and heat treatments for inducing various biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi eKokubo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present authors’ systematic studies on growth of novel ceramic layers on Ti metal and its alloys by chemical and heat treatments for inducing bone-bonding bioactivity and some other biological functions are reviewed. Ti metal formed an apatite on its surface in a simulated body fluid (SBF, when heat-treated after exposure to strong acid solutions to form rutile surface layer, or to strong alkali solutions to form sodium titanate surface layer. Both types of Ti metal tightly bonded to the living bone.The alkali and heat treatment was applied to the surface Ti metal of an artificial hip joint and successfully used in the clinic since 2007. The acid and heat treatments was applied to porous Ti metal to induce osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity. The resulting product was successfully used in clinical trials for spinal fusion devices. For the Ti-based alloys, the alkali and heat treatment was a little modified to form calcium titanate surface layer. Bone-growth promoting Mg, Sr, and Zn ions as well as the antibacterial Ag ion were successfully incorporated into the calcium titanate layer.

  9. Growth of Novel Ceramic Layers on Metals via Chemical and Heat Treatments for Inducing Various Biological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The present authors' systematic studies on growth of novel ceramic layers on Ti metal and its alloys by chemical and heat treatments for inducing bone-bonding bioactivity and some other biological functions are reviewed. Ti metal formed an apatite on its surface in a simulated body fluid, when heat-treated after exposure to strong acid solutions to form rutile surface layer, or to strong alkali solutions to form sodium titanate surface layer. Both types of Ti metal tightly bonded to the living bone. The alkali and heat treatment was applied to the surface Ti metal of an artificial hip joint and successfully used in the clinic since 2007. The acid and heat treatments was applied to porous Ti metal to induce osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity. The resulting product was successfully used in clinical trials for spinal fusion devices. For the Ti-based alloys, the alkali and heat treatment was little modified to form calcium titanate surface layer. Bone-growth promoting Mg, Sr, and Zn ions as well as the antibacterial Ag ion were successfully incorporated into the calcium titanate layer. PMID:26579517

  10. Growth of Ge Layer on Relaxed Ge-Rich SiGe by Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the growth of a germanium (Ge) film on a thin relaxed Ge-rich SiGe buffer.The thin Ge-rich SiGe buffer layer was achieved through a combination of ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD) SiGe epitaxial growth and SiGe oxidation. A lower Ge content strained SiGe layer was first grown on the Si (001) substrate and then the Ge mole fraction was increased by oxidation. After removal of the surface oxide, a higher Ge content SiGe layer was grown and oxidized again. The Ge mole fraction was increased to 0.8 in the 50 nm thick SiGe layer. Finally a 150 nm thick pure Ge film was grown on the SiGe buffer layer using the UHVCVD system. This technique produces a much thinner buffer than the conventional compositionally graded relaxed SiGe method with the same order of magnitude threading dislocation density.

  11. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  12. Chemical origin of the space-charge layer in cuprous oxide front-wall solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herion, J.

    1979-05-01

    Using Auger electron spectroscopy, the region near the front contact of cuprous oxide front-wall solar cells was investigated. In cells showing large photovoltages, a maximum of the copper concentration being by about 4 at.% percent higher than the bulk concentration was observed at a distance of 70 A from the metal-semiconductor interface. If the photovoltage was low a copper maximum adjacent to the interfacial layer was found, instead. It is concluded that changes of the stoichiometry of cuprous oxide must be taken into account in order to explain the origin of the space-charge layer in Cu/sub 2/O front-wall cells.

  13. Chemical Force Spectroscopy Evidence Supporting the Layer-by-Layer Model of Organic Matter Binding to Iron (oxy)Hydroxide Mineral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassé, Alexander W; Ohno, Tsutomu; Higgins, Steven R; Amirbahman, Aria; Yildirim, Nadir; Parr, Thomas B

    2015-08-18

    The adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to metal (oxy)hydroxide mineral surfaces is a critical step for C sequestration in soils. Although equilibrium studies have described some of the factors controlling this process, the molecular-scale description of the adsorption process has been more limited. Chemical force spectroscopy revealed differing adhesion strengths of DOM extracted from three soils and a reference peat soil material to an iron (oxy)hydroxide mineral surface. The DOM was characterized using ultrahigh-resolution negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The results indicate that carboxyl-rich aromatic and N-containing aliphatic molecules of DOM are correlated with high adhesion forces. Increasing molecular mass was shown to decrease the adhesion force between the mineral surface and the DOM. Kendrick mass defect analysis suggests that mechanisms involving two carboxyl groups result in the most stable bond to the mineral surface. We conceptualize these results using a layer-by-layer "onion" model of organic matter stabilization on soil mineral surfaces.

  14. Pattern Dependency of Pure-Boron-Layer Chemical-Vapor Depositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    The pattern dependency of pure-boron (PureB) layer chemicalvapor depositions (CVD) is studied with respect to the correlation between the deposition rate and features like loading effects, deposition parameters and deposition window sizes. It is shown experimentally that the oxide coverage ratio and

  15. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  16. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells with double layered buffers grown by chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.Q.; Shi, J.H.; Zhang, D.W.; Liu, Q.Q.; Sun, Z.; Chen, Y.W. [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Rd. 3663, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang, Z. [Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of the Ministry of Education, Research Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, S.M., E-mail: engp5591@yahoo.com [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Rd. 3663, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2011-10-31

    In based mixture In{sub x}(OH,S){sub y} buffer layers deposited by chemical bath deposition technique are a viable alternative to the traditional cadmium sulfide buffer layer in thin film solar cells. We report on the results of manipulating the absorber/buffer interface between the chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) absorber and CdS or ZnS buffer by addition of a thin In based mixture layer. It is shown that the presence of thin In{sub x}(OH,S){sub y} at the CIGS absorber/CdS or ZnS buffer interfaces greatly improve the solar cell performances. The performances of CIGS cells using dual buffer layers composed of In{sub x}(OH,S){sub y}/CdS or In{sub x}(OH,S){sub y}/ZnS increased by 22.4% and 51.6%, as compared to the single and standard CdS or ZnS buffered cells, respectively.

  17. Quantifying the effect of medium composition on the diffusive mass transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals through unstirred boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Karlson, U.; Christensen, P.S.;

    2005-01-01

    Unstirred boundary layers (UBLs) often act as a bottleneck for the diffusive transport of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in the environment. Therefore, a microscale technique was developed for quantifying mass transfer through a 100-μm thin UBL, with the medium composition of the UBL...... as the controllable factor. The model compound fluoranthene had to (1) partition from a contaminated silicone disk (source) into the medium, (2) then diffuse through 100 μm of medium (UBL), and finally (3) partition into a clean silicone layer (sink). The diffusive mass transfer from source to sink was monitored over...... of magnitude. These results demonstrate that medium constituents, which normally are believed to bind hydrophobic organic chemicals, actually can enhance the diffusive mass transfer of HOCs in the vicinity of a diffusion source (e.g., contaminated soil particles). The technique can be used to evaluate...

  18. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconnet, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: cyril.marconnet@yahoo.fr; Wouters, Y. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Miserque, F. [Laboratoire de Reactivite des Surfaces et des Interfaces, CEA Saclay, Bat. 391, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France); Dagbert, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: catherine.dagbert@ecp.fr; Petit, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, INPG, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Galerie, A. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Feron, D. [Service de Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, CEA Saclay, Bat. 458, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France)

    2008-12-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region.

  19. Effect of conventional chemical treatment on the microbial population in a biofouling layer of reverse osmosis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereschenko, L A; Prummel, H; Euverink, G J W; Stams, A J M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-01-01

    The impact of conventional chemical treatment on initiation and spatiotemporal development of biofilms on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was investigated in situ using flow cells placed in parallel with the RO system of a full-scale water treatment plant. The flow cells got the same feed (extensively pre-treated fresh surface water) and operational conditions (temperature, pressure and membrane flux) as the full-scale installation. With regular intervals both the full-scale RO membrane modules and the flow cells were cleaned using conventional chemical treatment. For comparison some flow cells were not cleaned. Sampling was done at different time periods of flow cell operation (i.e., 1, 5, 10 and 17 days and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months). The combination of molecular (FISH, DGGE, clone libraries and sequencing) and microscopic (field emission scanning electron, epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy) techniques made it possible to thoroughly analyze the abundance, composition and 3D architecture of the emerged microbial layers. The results suggest that chemical treatment facilitates initiation and subsequent maturation of biofilm structures on the RO membrane and feed-side spacer surfaces. Biofouling control might be possible only if the cleaning procedures are adapted to effectively remove the (dead) biomass from the RO modules after chemical treatment.

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Stability of a laminar premixed supersonic free shear layer with chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Pai, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of a two-dimensional compressible supersonic flow in the wake of a flat plate is discussed. The fluid is a multi-species mixture which is undergoing finite rate chemical reactions. The spatial stability of an infinitesimal disturbance in the fluid is considered. Numerical solutions of the eigenvalue stability equations for both reactive and nonreactive supersonic flows are presented and discussed. The chemical reactions have significant influence on the stability behavior. For instance, a neutral eigenvalue is observed near the freestream Mach number of 2.375 for the nonreactive case, but disappears when the reaction is turned on. For reactive flows, the eigenvalues are not very dependent on the free stream Mach number.

  2. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Rytlewski, Piotr; Malinowski, Rafał; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2015-08-01

    The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm2 was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  3. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor with polymer transduction layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksendzov, A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    An integrated optics chemical sensor based on a ring resonator with an ethyl cellulose polymer coating has been demonstrated. The measured sensitivity to isopropanol in air is 50 ppm-the level immediately useful for health-related air quality monitoring. The resonator was fabricated using SiO2 and SixNy materials. The signal readout is based on tracking the wavelength of a resonance peak. The resonator layout optimisation for sensing applications is discussed.

  4. Chemical and biological characterization of Portuguese própolis using thin-layer chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia M. Estevinho; Paula, Vanessa Marina Branco; Dias, L. G.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance obtained by honey bees Apis mellifera, a product considered "natural an8bio8c" which plays an important role in defending the hive, protec8ng it from microorganisms, fungi, bacteria and viruses. This product has a large variety of compounds in its composi8on, giving greater emphasis to the phenolic compounds, which are a>ributed strong an8oxidant and an8microbial ac8vi8es. The main objec8ve of this work is to op8mize the technique of thin layer chroma...

  5. Two-Dimensional Atomic-Layered Alloy Junctions for High-Performance Wearable Chemical Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byungjin; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Dong Jae; Chung, Hee-Suk; Choi, Sun Young; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Yonghun; Lee, Byoung Hun; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Nam, Jaewook; Hahm, Myung Gwan

    2016-08-01

    We first report that two-dimensional (2D) metal (NbSe2)-semiconductor (WSe2)-based flexible, wearable, and launderable gas sensors can be prepared through simple one-step chemical vapor deposition of prepatterned WO3 and Nb2O5. Compared to a control device with a Au/WSe2 junction, gas-sensing performance of the 2D NbSe2/WSe2 device was significantly enhanced, which might have resulted from the formation of a NbxW1-xSe2 transition alloy junction lowering the Schottky barrier height. This would make it easier to collect charges of channels induced by molecule adsorption, improving gas response characteristics toward chemical species including NO2 and NH3. 2D NbSe2/WSe2 devices on a flexible substrate provide gas-sensing properties with excellent durability under harsh bending. Furthermore, the device stitched on a T-shirt still performed well even after conventional cleaning with a laundry machine, enabling wearable and launderable chemical sensors. These results could pave a road toward futuristic gas-sensing platforms based on only 2D materials. PMID:27388231

  6. Importance of the H2 abundance in protoplanetary disk ices for the molecular layer chemical composition

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Hersant, F; Dutrey, A; Semenov, D; Majumdar, L; Guilloteau, S

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the target of many chemical studies (both observational and theoretical) as they contain the building material for planets. Their large vertical and radial gradients in density and temperature make them challenging objects for chemical models. In the outer part of these disks, the large densities and low temperatures provide a particular environment where the binding of species onto the dust grains can be very efficient and can affect the gas-phase chemical composition. We attempt to quantify to what extent the vertical abundance profiles and the integrated column densities of molecules predicted by a detailed gas-grain code are affected by the treatment of the molecular hydrogen physisorption at the surface of the grains. We performed three different models using the Nautilus gas-grain code. One model uses a H2 binding energy on the surface of water (440 K) and produces strong sticking of H2. Another model uses a small binding energy of 23 K (as if there were already a monolayer of H...

  7. ZnO thin films fabricated by chemical bath deposition, used as buffer layer in organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnO thin films synthetized by chemical bath deposition are used as buffer layer between the anode and the organic electron donor in organic solar cells. Films deposited from zinc nitrate solutions are annealed in room air at 300 deg. C for half an hour. The X-ray diffraction and microanalysis studies show that ZnO polycrystalline thin films are obtained. The solar cells used are based on the couple copper phthalocyanine as electron donor and (N,N-diheptyl-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide-PTCDI-C7) as electron acceptor. It is shown that the presence of the ZnO buffer layer improves the energy conversion efficiency of the cells. Such improvement could be attributed to a better energy level alignment at the anode/electron donor interface. The anode roughness induced by the ZnO buffer layer can also transform the planar interface organic electron donor/electron acceptor into roughen topography. This increases the interface area, where carrier separation takes place, which improves solar cells performances.

  8. Role of the conducting layer substrate on TiO2 nucleation when using microwave activated chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumeta, I.; Espinosa, R.; Ayllón, J. A.; Vigil, E.

    2002-12-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 is used in novel dye sensitized solar cells. Because of their interaction with light, thin TiO2 films are also used as coatings for self-cleaning glasses and tiles. Microwave activated chemical bath deposition represents a simple and cost-effective way to obtain nanostructured TiO2 films. It is important to study, in this technique, the role of the conducting layer used as the substrate. The influence of microwave-substrate interactions on TiO2 deposition is analysed using different substrate positions, employing substrates with different conductivities, and also using different microwave radiation powers for film deposition. We prove that a common domestic microwave oven with a large cavity and inhomogeneous radiation field can be used with equally satisfactory results. The transmittance spectra of the obtained films were studied and used to analyse film thickness and to obtain gap energy values. The results, regarding different indium-tin oxide resistivities and different substrate positions in the oven cavity, show that the interaction of the microwave field with the conducting layer is determinant in layer deposition. It has also been found that film thickness increases with the power of the applied radiation while the gap energies of the TiO2 films decrease approaching the 3.2 eV value reported for bulk anatase. This indicates that these films are not crystalline and it agrees with x-ray spectra that do not reveal any peak.

  9. ZnO thin films fabricated by chemical bath deposition, used as buffer layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lare, Y. [Laboratoire sue l' Energie Solaire, Universite de Lome, Lome (Togo); Godoy, A. [Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Diego Portales, Ejercito 141, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Cattin, L. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, IMN, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes, F-44000 France (France); Jondo, K. [Laboratoire sue l' Energie Solaire, Universite de Lome, Lome (Togo); Abachi, T. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Kouba, Alger (Algeria); Diaz, F.R. [Laboratorio de Polimeros, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Santiago (Chile); Morsli, M. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, LAMP, EA 3825, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes, F-44000 France (France); Napo, K. [Laboratoire sue l' Energie Solaire, Universite de Lome, Lome (Togo); del Valle, M.A. [Laboratorio de Polimeros, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Santiago (Chile); Bernede, J.C., E-mail: jean-christian.bernede@univ-nantes.fr [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, LAMP, EA 3825, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes, F-44000 France (France)

    2009-04-15

    ZnO thin films synthetized by chemical bath deposition are used as buffer layer between the anode and the organic electron donor in organic solar cells. Films deposited from zinc nitrate solutions are annealed in room air at 300 deg. C for half an hour. The X-ray diffraction and microanalysis studies show that ZnO polycrystalline thin films are obtained. The solar cells used are based on the couple copper phthalocyanine as electron donor and (N,N-diheptyl-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide-PTCDI-C7) as electron acceptor. It is shown that the presence of the ZnO buffer layer improves the energy conversion efficiency of the cells. Such improvement could be attributed to a better energy level alignment at the anode/electron donor interface. The anode roughness induced by the ZnO buffer layer can also transform the planar interface organic electron donor/electron acceptor into roughen topography. This increases the interface area, where carrier separation takes place, which improves solar cells performances.

  10. Characterization of atomic-layer MoS2 synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying-Zi, Peng; Yang, Song; Xiao-Qiang, Xie; Yuan, Li; Zheng-Hong, Qian; Ru, Bai

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-layer MoS2 ultrathin films are synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transition electron microscopy (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization methods is applied to investigate the crystal structures, valence states, and compositions of the ultrathin film areas. The nucleation particles show irregular morphology, while for a larger size somewhere, the films are granular and the grains have a triangle shape. The films grow in a preferred orientation (002). The HRTEM images present the graphene-like structure of stacked layers with low density of stacking fault, and the interlayer distance of plane is measured to be about 0.63 nm. It shows a clear quasi-honeycomb-like structure and 6-fold coordination symmetry. Room-temperature PL spectra for the atomic layer MoS2 under the condition of right and left circular light show that for both cases, the A1 and B1 direct excitonic transitions can be observed. In the meantime, valley polarization resolved PL spectra are obtained. XPS measurements provide high-purity samples aside from some contaminations from the air, and confirm the presence of pure MoS2. The stoichiometric mole ratio of S/Mo is about 2.0–2.1, suggesting that sulfur is abundant rather than deficient in the atomic layer MoS2 under our experimental conditions. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LY16F040003 and LY16A040007) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51401069 and 11574067).

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Mass Produced High Quality Few Layered Graphene Sheets via a Chemical Method

    KAUST Repository

    Khenfouch, Mohammed

    2014-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. It is a zero band gap semimetal with very unique physical and chemical properties which make it useful for many applications such as ultra-high-speed field-effect transistors, p-n junction diodes, terahertz oscillators, and low-noise electronic, NEMS and sensors. When the high quality mass production of this nanomaterial is still a big challenge, we developed a process which will be an important step to achieve this goal. Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Scanning tunneling microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray system were investigated to characterize and examine the quality of this product.

  12. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  13. Bioactive titanate layers formed on titanium and its alloys by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    To reveal general principles for obtaining bone-bonding bioactive metallic titanium, Ti metal was heat-treated after exposure to a solution with different pH. The material formed an apatite layer at its surface in simulated body fluid when heat-treated after exposure to a strong acid or alkali solution, because it formed a positively charged titanium oxide and negatively charged sodium titanate film on its surface, respectively. Such treated these Ti metals tightly bonded to living bone. Porous Ti metal heat-treated after exposure to an acidic solution exhibited not only osteoconductive, but also osteoinductive behavior. Porous Ti metal exposed to an alkaline solution also exhibits osteoconductivity as well as osteoinductivity, if it was subsequently subjected to acid and heat treatments. These acid and heat treatments were not effective for most Ti-based alloys. However, even those alloys exhibited apatite formation when they were subjected to acid and heat treatment after a NaOH treatment, since the alloying elements were removed from the surface by the latter. The NaOH and heat treatments were also not effective for Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys. These alloys displayed apatite formation when subjected to CaCl2 treatment after NaOH treatment, forming Ca-deficient calcium titanate at their surfaces after subsequent heat and hot water treatments. The bioactive Ti metal subjected to NaOH and heat treatments has been clinically used as an artificial hip joint material in Japan since 2007. A porous Ti metal subjected to NaOH, HCl and heat treatments has successfully undergone clinical trials as a spinal fusion device.

  14. Effect of treatment temperature on surface wettability of methylcyclosiloxane layer formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sasagawa, Keisuke; Furukawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Sou; Yamamoto, Erina; Chiba, Satoshi; Kamiyama, Naosumi; Kiguchi, Takayoshi

    2016-08-01

    The surface wettability of the native Si oxide surfaces were tuned by chemical adsorption of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) molecules through thermal CVD method at different temperature. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the water contact angles of the TMCTS-modified Si oxide surfaces at the temperature of 333-373 K were found to be in the range of 92 ± 2-102 ± 2°. The advancing and receding water contact angle of the surface prepared at 333 K were found to be 97 ± 2/92 ± 2°, showing low contact angle hysteresis surface. The water contact angles of the surfaces prepared at the temperature of 373-413 K increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. When the treatment temperature was more than 423 K, the water contact angles of TMCTS-modified surfaces were found to become more than 150°, showing superhydrophobic surface. AFM study revealed that the surface roughness of the TMCTS-modified surface increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. This geometric morphology enhanced the surface hydrophobicity. The surface roughness could be fabricated due to the hydrolysis/condensation reactions in the gas phase during CVD process. The effect of the treatment temperature on the reactivity of the TMCTS molecules were also investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer.

  15. Characterization, feasibility and optimization of Agaricus subrufescens growth based on chemical elements on casing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha Zied, D.; Pardo-Giménez, A.; de Almeida Minhoni, M.T.; Villas Boas, R.L.; Alvarez-Orti, M.; Pardo-González, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze yields, biological efficiency, earliness (expressed as days to first harvest), and precociousness and establish models for the mushroom growing according to these parameters. The experiment followed a double factorial design with four sources of calcium (calcitic limestone, calcitic limestone + gypsum, dolomitic limestone and dolomitic limestone + gypsum) and 2 application times (25 days before casing and at the moment of casing), with 4 replicates for each treatment. Different calcium sources influenced differently Agaricus subrufescens production, especially as regards earliness, which showed significantly higher values when dolomitic limestone with gypsum was applied. Yield and biological efficiency were negatively correlated with H + AL, organic matter and Mg amount. Furthermore, earliness was positively correlated with H + Al, organic matter, and the amount of Mg and Fe. Finally, negative correlations were observed between precociousness and the amount of Ca, SB (sum of base), CEC (cation exchange capacity) and V% (percentage of base saturation). The models presented in this work are extremely important for predicting the agronomic performance of Agaricus subrufescens on the basis of chemical analysis provided by the casing soil. PMID:23961195

  16. Electrical transport and low-frequency noise in chemical vapor deposited single-layer MoS2 devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Amani, Matin; Motayed, Abhishek; Shah, Pankaj B.; Birdwell, A. Glen; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Dubey, Madan; Li, Qiliang; Davydov, Albert V.

    2014-04-01

    We have studied temperature-dependent (77-300 K) electrical characteristics and low-frequency noise (LFN) in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based back-gated field-effect transistors (FETs). Electrical characterization and LFN measurements were conducted on MoS2 FETs with Al2O3 top-surface passivation. We also studied the effect of top-surface passivation etching on the electrical characteristics of the device. Significant decrease in channel current and transconductance was observed in these devices after the Al2O3 passivation etching. For passivated devices, the two-terminal resistance variation with temperature showed a good fit to the activation energy model, whereas for the etched devices the trend indicated a hopping transport mechanism. A significant increase in the normalized drain current noise power spectral density (PSD) was observed after the etching of the top passivation layer. The observed channel current noise was explained using a standard unified model incorporating carrier number fluctuation and correlated surface mobility fluctuation mechanisms. Detailed analysis of the gate-referred noise voltage PSD indicated the presence of different trapping states in passivated devices when compared to the etched devices. Etched devices showed weak temperature dependence of the channel current noise, whereas passivated devices exhibited near-linear temperature dependence.

  17. Influence of double AlN buffer layers on the qualities of GaN films prepared by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhi-Yu; Hao Yue; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Zhou Hao; Li Xiao-Gang; Meng Fan-Na; Zhang Lin-Xia; Ai Shan; Xu Sheng-Rui; Zhao Yi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report that the GaN thin film is grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition on a sapphire (0001) substrate with double AlN buffer layers.The buffer layer consists of a low-temperature (LT) AlN layer and a high-temperature (HT) AlN layer that are grown at 600 ℃ and 1000 ℃,respectively.It is observed that the thickness of the LT-AlN layer drastically influences the quality of GaN thin film,and that the optimized 4.25-min-LT-AlN layer minimizes the dislocation density of GaN thin film.The reason for the improved properties is discussed in this paper.

  18. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Arnott

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of gases and aerosol particles have been measured at the mountain site of Altzomoni, 4010 m in altitude, located 60 km southeast of Mexico City, 50 km east of Puebla and 70 km northeast of Cuernavaca. The objective of this study was to evaluate the properties of gases and particles in the Regional Mixed Layer (RML of Mexico's Megapolis. Altzomoni is generally above the RML from late evening until late morning at which time the arrival of the RML is marked by increasing concentrations of CO and aerosol particles that reach their maxima in mid-afternoon. The average diurnal cycles for fourteen days in March, 2006 were evaluated during which time the synoptic scale circulation had three principal patterns: from the east (E, southwest (SW and west northwest (WNW. The original hypothesis was that air arriving from the direction of Mexico City would have much higher concentrations of anthropogenic gases and particles than air from Puebla or Cuernavaca, due to the relatively large differences in populations. In fact, not only were the average, maximum concentrations of CO and O3 (0.3 and 0.1 ppmv approximately the same for air originating from the WNW and E, but the average maximum concentrations of Peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN,PPN and particle organic matter (POM in air from the E exceeded those in air from the WNW. Comparisons of measurements from the mountain site with those made by aircraft during the same period, using the same type of aerosol mass spectrometer, show that the total masses of POM, NO3−, SO42− and NH4+ were approximately the same from aircraft measurements made over Mexico City and when winds were from the east at the mountain site. In contrast 75% of the total aerosol mass at the mountain site was POM whereas over Mexico City the fraction of POM was less than 60%. The measurements suggest the occasional influence of emissions from the nearby volcano, Popocatepetl, as well as possible incursions of biomass

  19. A novel and easy chemical-clock synthesis of nanocrystalline iron-cobalt bearing layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Jebril; Grangeon, Sylvain; Warmont, Fabienne; Seron, Alain; Greneche, Jean-Marc

    2014-11-15

    A novel synthesis of cobalt-iron layered double hydroxide (LDH) with interlayer chlorides was investigated. The method consists in mixing concentrated solutions of hexaamminecobalt(III) trichloride with ferrous chloride at room temperature and in anoxic conditions. Four initial Fe/Co atomic ratios have been tried out (0.12, 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8). Neither heating nor addition of alkali was employed for adjusting the pH and precipitating the metal hydroxides. Still, each mixture led to the spontaneous precipitation of a LDH-rich solid having a crystal-chemistry that depended on the initial solution Fe/Co. These LDHs phases were carefully characterized by mean of X-ray diffraction, (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and chemical analysis (total dissolution and phenanthroline method). Solution Eh and pH were also monitored during the synthesis. Increasing initial Fe/Co ratio impacted the dynamic of the observed stepwise reaction and the composition of the resulting product. Once the two solutions are mixed, a spontaneous and abrupt color change occurs after an induction time which depends on the starting Fe/Co ratio. This makes the overall process acting as a chemical clock. This spontaneous generation of CoFe-LDH arises from the interplay between redox chemistries of iron and cobalt-ammonium complexes.

  20. GaN Epitaxial Layer Grown with Conductive Al(x)Ga(1-x)N Buffer Layer on SiC Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Byeongchan; Lee, Kyungbae; Lee, Kyungjae; Heo, Cheon; Pyeon, Jaedo; Ko, Kwangse; Jang, Jongjin; Nam, Okhyun

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated GaN epitaxial layer growth with a conductive Al(x)Ga(1-x)N buffer layer on n-type 4H-SiC by high-temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (HT-MOCVD). The Al composition of the Al(x)Ga(1-x)N buffer was varied from 0% to 100%. In terms of the crystal quality of the GaN layer, 79% Al was the optimal composition of the Al(x)Ga(1-x)N buffer layer in our experiment. A vertical conductive structure was fabricated to measure the current voltage (I-V) characteristics as a function of Al composition, and the I-V curves showed that the resistance increased with increasing Al concentration of the Al(x)Ga(1-x)N buffer layer. PMID:27483845

  1. Influence of NH3.H2O additive on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with chemical sintered scattering layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 layers for highly efficient photoelectrodes. Display Omitted Highlights: → A chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 layer was prepared. → The nanocrystalline TiO2 layer can offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties. → The DSSC with this nanocrystalline TiO2 layer in the photoelectrode shows obviously enhanced photovoltaic performance. → The influence of additional amount of NH3.H2O chemical sintering agent on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs was studied. - Abstract: A bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO2 (nc-TiO2) layer able to offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties was prepared with a simple method through adding the basic NH3.H2O agent into an acid nc-TiO2 paste to form some big rod-like nc-TiO2 aggregates by the chemical sintering process. The influence of additional amount of NH3.H2O on the photovoltaic performance of the dye-sensitized solar cell with this bi-functional nc-TiO2 layer in the photoelectrode was studied. It was found that through controlling the additional amount of NH3.H2O and the thickness of the bi-functional nc-TiO2 layer, the highest energy conversion efficiency about 8.11% could be obtained, which was much higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell containing a single nc-TiO2 layer prepared with the original acid nc-TiO2 paste (4.34%).

  2. Influence of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O additive on the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with chemical sintered scattering layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Zhang, E-mail: lanzhang@hqu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Wu Jihuai, E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Lin Jianming; Huang, Miaoliang [Engineering Research Center of Environment-Friendly Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China); Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou 362021 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layers for highly efficient photoelectrodes. Display Omitted Highlights: > A chemical sintered bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer was prepared. > The nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer can offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties. > The DSSC with this nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer in the photoelectrode shows obviously enhanced photovoltaic performance. > The influence of additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O chemical sintering agent on the photovoltaic performance of DSSCs was studied. - Abstract: A bi-functional nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} (nc-TiO{sub 2}) layer able to offer both light-scattering and electron generating properties was prepared with a simple method through adding the basic NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O agent into an acid nc-TiO{sub 2} paste to form some big rod-like nc-TiO{sub 2} aggregates by the chemical sintering process. The influence of additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O on the photovoltaic performance of the dye-sensitized solar cell with this bi-functional nc-TiO{sub 2} layer in the photoelectrode was studied. It was found that through controlling the additional amount of NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and the thickness of the bi-functional nc-TiO{sub 2} layer, the highest energy conversion efficiency about 8.11% could be obtained, which was much higher than that of the dye-sensitized solar cell containing a single nc-TiO{sub 2} layer prepared with the original acid nc-TiO{sub 2} paste (4.34%).

  3. Impact of thickness of GaN buffer layer on properties of AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We studied the impact of the thickness of GaN buffer layer on the properties of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The samples were characterized by using metallographic microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and spectrophotometer. The results show that the thickness of the GaN buffer layer can significantly affect the properties of the DBR structure and there is an optimal thickness of the GaN buffer layer. This work would be helpful for the growth of high quality DBR structures.

  4. Influence of the nucleation layer annealing atmosphere on the resistivity of GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: LT-PL spectra of GaN samples A, B and C with sheet resistance of 1.1 × 104 Ω/sq, 5.5 × 104 Ω/sq and 1.0 × 108 Ω/sq, respectively. - Highlights: • HR-GaN was fabricated by optimizing the nucleation layer annealing (NL) atmosphere. • The morphology of NLs annealed in different atmosphere has been investigated. • The resistance of GaN increased with density of edge type threading dislocations. • The PL results indicate that the HR-GaN is achieved due to the compensation of acceptor states. - Abstract: High-resistance (HR) GaN with sheet resistance of 1.0 × 108 Ω/sq was grown on sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Sheet resistance of the GaN film increases 4 orders of magnitude by changing the nucleation layer (NL) annealing atmosphere from H2 to N2. It is observed that the morphology of the NLs strongly depends on the annealing atmosphere. The analysis results based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and etch pit density (EPD) measurements demonstrate that the density of edge-type threading dislocations increases with the proportion of the N2 in the annealing atmosphere. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra is employed to analyze the optical properties of GaN films. The XRD and PL results indicate the primary compensating mechanism is due to acceptor levels introduced by the increase in edge-type threading dislocations density. It is concluded that the annealing atmosphere of the NL controls sizes and densities of the nucleation islands, which affect electrical properties of GaN epitaxial films through changing the ratio of edge to screw/mixed-type threading dislocations

  5. A Potential Impact on the Chemical Composition in the Marine Boundary Layer in the Arctic Ocean by Ship Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.; Wang, X.; Blum, J. D.; Sun, L.

    2005-12-01

    Samples of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Arctic Ocean were collected aboard R/V ()Xuelong during the summer on the Second Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (July-September, 2003). Chemical compositions including major and trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aerosol particles were analyzed. Results showed that significant amounts of S, Fe, V and Ni are emitted from ship diesel engines and contaminate the ambient air. The total amount of Fe, which plays a significant role in the ocean ()biological pump, emitted from ships in the Arctic is estimated at 4.33-A106 kg yr-1. Sulfur emitted into the atmosphere may be transformed to sulfur acid and result in a chlorine depletion in sea-salt. Because the global inventory of sulfur from ship exhausts is large and halogens may have important consequences in possible tropospheric ozone destruction, the role of ships in effecting halogen depression in sea-salt should be evaluated. For organic compounds, 17 PAHs including Fluoranthene, Phenanthrene, Chrysene, Indeno[123-cd]pyrene, Pyrene, Benzo[b]fluoranthene, Benzo[ghi]pyrene, Naphthalene, Benzo[a]anthracene, Benzo[k]fluoranthene, Coronene, Fluorene, Benzo[a]pyrene, Acenaphthene, Anthracene, Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene and Acenaphthylene were detected. The average levels of subspecies of PAHs in ambient air ranged from 0.003 to 0.089 ng/m3. Among the 17 PAHs, fluoranthene had a relative high level, while the level of acenaphthylene was relative low. The aerosols contaminated by the ship, which were commonly excluded in previous investigations, thus provide an opportunity to investigate and understand the role of ship emissions in the atmospheric chemistry of the marine boundary layer, especially in the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Annually-layered lake sediments reveal strongly increased release of persistent chemicals due to accelerated glacier melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Blüthgen, Nancy; Bogdal, Christian; Schmid, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Melting glaciers may represent a secondary source of chemical pollutants that have previously been incorporated and stored in the ice. Of particular concern are persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as the insecticide dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) and industrial chemicals like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are hazardous environmental contaminants due to their persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic properties. They were introduced in the 1930s and eventually banned in the 1970s. After release into the environment these chemicals were atmospherically transported to even remote areas such as the Alps and were deposited and stored in glaciers. Ongoing drastic glacier melting due to global warming, which is expected to further accelerate, implies the significance of studying the fate of these 'legacy pollutants'. Proglacial lake sediments provide well-dated and high-resolution archives to reconstruct timing and quantities of such a potentially hazardous remobilization. The goal of this study is to reconstruct the historical inputs of POPs into remote alpine lakes and to investigate the accelerated release of POPs from melting glaciers. Due to their lipophilic character, these chemicals exhibit a high tendency to adsorb to particles whereas concentrations in water are expected to be low. Therefore, quantitative determination in annually-layered lake sediment provides an excellent way to investigate the temporal trend of inputs into lakes that act as particle sinks. For this purpose, sediment cores were sampled from proglacial lakes in the Bernese Alps (Switzerland), which are exclusively fed by glacial melt waters. For comparison, cores were also taken from nearby high-alpine lakes located in non-glaciated catchments, which only should record the initial atmospheric fall-out. Sediment layers were dated by annual varve counting and radionuclide measurements; they cover the time period from the mid 20th century to today. The measured time series of

  7. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts. PMID:27488185

  8. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts.

  9. Atomic-layer chemical-vapor-deposition of TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S; Kim, Y D; Kim, W M

    2000-01-01

    An atomic-layer chemical vapor deposition (AL-CVD) system was used to deposit TiN thin films on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates by cyclic exposures of TiCl sub 4 and NH sub 3. The growth rate was measured by using the number of deposition cycles, and the physical properties were compared with those of TiN films grown by using conventional deposition methods. To investigate the growth mechanism, we suggest a growth model for TiN n order to calculate the growth rate per cycle with a Cerius program. The results of the calculation with the model were compared with the experimental values for the TiN film deposited using the AL-CVD method. The stoichiometry of the TiN film was examined by using Auger electron spectroscopy, and the chlorine and the oxygen impurities were examined. The x-ray diffraction and the transmission electron microscopy results for the TiN film exhibited a strong (200) peak and a randomly oriented columnar microstructure. The electrical resistivity was found to decrease with increasing deposit...

  10. A highly homogeneous nanocoating strategy for Li-rich Mn-based layered oxides based on chemical conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin; Li, Biao; An, Li; Wei, Hang; Wang, Xiayan; Yu, Pingrong; Xia, Dingguo

    2015-03-01

    Herein, we report a novel strategy for preparing a highly homogeneous nanocoating for Li-rich Mn-based layered oxides by the elemental Al doping followed by chemical conversion in phosphate buffer solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy results exhibit that there exist AlPO4 nanocoating on the surface of particles. The resultant AlPO4-nanocoated Li[Li0.2Ni0.11Co0.11Mn0.54Al0.04]O2 particles exhibit a greatly enhanced reversible capacity with superior thermal stabilities in relative to pristine Li[Li0.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54]O2. Under a current density of 30 mA g-1, the AlPO4-nanocoated Li[Li0.2Ni0.11Co0.11Mn0.54Al0.04]O2 can deliver a specific capacity of 282.1 mAh g-1 with capacity retention of 89% after 35 cycles.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition and analysis of thermally insulating ZrO{sub 2} layers on injection molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakan, Burak; Khlopyanova, Victoria; Mausberg, Simon; Kandzia, Adrian; Pflitsch, Christian [Thermodynamik (IVG) and Cenide, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Mumme, Frank [Kunststoff-Institut Luedenscheid, Karolinenstrasse 8, 58507 Luedenscheid (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    High quality injection molding requires a precise control of cooling rates. Thermal barrier coating (TBC) of zirconia with a thickness of 20-40 μm on polished stainless steel molds could provide the necessary insulating effect. This paper presents results of zirconia deposition on stainless steel substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) aiming to provide the process parameters for the deposition of uniform zirconia films with such a thickness. The deposition was performed with zirconium (IV) acetylacetonate (Zr(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 4}) as precursor and synthetic air as co-reactant, which allows deposition at temperatures below 600 C. The experiments were carried out in a hot-wall reactor at pressures between 7.5 mbar and 500 mbar and in a temperature range from 450 C to 600 C. Important growth parameters were characterized and growth rates between 1 and 2.5 μm/h were achieved. Thick and well adhering zirconia layers of 38 μm could be produced on steel within 40 h. The transient heat transfer rate upon contact with a hot surface was also evaluated experimentally with the thickest coatings. These exhibit a good TBC performance. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Liming effects on the chemical composition of the organic surface layer of a mature Norway spruce stand (Picea abies [L.] Karst.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, W.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Knicker, H.; Jager, de P.A.; Kreutzer, K.; Weiá, T.

    2003-01-01

    The application of lime in a mature Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) forest in southern Germany induced major changes in the activity of soil organisms and root growth. Since this may influence the chemical compostion of the soil organic matter (SOM) of the organic surface layer, its composit

  13. Physical and chemical degradation behavior of sputtered aluminum doped zinc oxide layers for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Boumans, T.; Stegeman, F.; Colberts, F.; Illiberi, A.; Berkum, J. van; Barreau, N.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sputtered aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers on borosilicate glass were exposed to damp heat (85 C/85% relative humidity) for 2876 h to accelerate the physical and chemical degradation behavior. The ZnO:Al samples were characterized by electrical, compositional and optical measurements before

  14. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  15. Microstructures of GaN Buffer Layers Grown on Si(111) Using Rapic Thermal Process Low-Pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Peng; ZHENG You-Dou; JIANG Shu-Sheng; FENG Duan; Z. C. Huang; SHEN Bo; ZHU Jian-Min; CHEN Zhi-Zhong; ZHOU Yu-Gang; XIE Shi-Yong; ZHANG Rong; HAN Ping; GU Shu-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Microstructures of GaN buffer layers grown on Si (111) substrates using rapid thermal process low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are investigated by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). AFM images show that the islands appear in the GaN buffer layer after annealing at high temperature. Cross-sectional HRTEM micrographs of the buffer region of these samples indicate that there are bunched steps on the surface of the Si substrate and a lot of domains in GaN misorienting each other with small angles. The boundaries of those dowains locate near the bunched steps,and the regions of the film on a terrace between steps have the same crystal orientation. An amorphous-like layer, about 3 nm thick, can also be observed between the GaN buffer layer and the Si substrate.

  16. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D2O ice beneath a H2O ice layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D2O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D2O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H2O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H2O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D2O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D2O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H2O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be

  17. Epitaxial growth of antiphase boundary free GaAs layer on 300 mm Si(001) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition with high mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcotte, R.; Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; Cipro, R.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Ducroquet, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Sanchez, E.; Ye, Z.; Bao, X. Y.; Pin, J. B.; Baron, T.

    2016-04-01

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs on standard nominal 300 mm Si(001) wafers was studied. Antiphase boundary (APB) free epitaxial GaAs films as thin as 150 nm were obtained. The APB-free films exhibit an improvement of the room temperature photoluminescence signal with an increase of the intensity of almost a factor 2.5. Hall effect measurements show an electron mobility enhancement from 200 to 2000 cm2/V s. The GaAs layers directly grown on industrial platform with no APBs are perfect candidates for being integrated as active layers for nanoelectronic as well as optoelectronic devices in a CMOS environment.

  18. Atomic-Resolution Visualization of Distinctive Chemical Mixing Behavior of Ni, Co and Mn with Li in Layered Lithium Transition-Metal Oxide Cathode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Jianming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lv, Dongping [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wei, Yi [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zheng, Jiaxin [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, Zhiguo [Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Kuppan, Saravanan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, Jianguo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Luo, Langli [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Danny J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olszta, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amine, Khalil [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xiao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pan, Feng [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Chen, Guoying [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Jiguang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Chong M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Capacity and voltage fading of layer structured cathode based on lithium transition metal oxide is closely related to the lattice position and migration behavior of the transition metal ions. However, it is scarcely clear about the behavior of each of these transition metal ions. We report direct atomic resolution visualization of interatomic layer mixing of transition metal (Ni, Co, Mn) and lithium ions in layer structured oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries. Using chemical imaging with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and DFT calculations, we discovered that in the layered cathodes, Mn and Co tend to reside almost exclusively at the lattice site of transition metal (TM) layer in the structure or little interlayer mixing with Li. In contrast, Ni shows high degree of interlayer mixing with Li. The fraction of Ni ions reside in the Li layer followed a near linear dependence on total Ni concentration before reaching saturation. The observed distinctively different behavior of Ni with respect to Co and Mn provides new insights on both capacity and voltage fade in this class of cathode materials based on lithium and TM oxides, therefore providing scientific basis for selective tailoring of oxide cathode materials for enhanced performance.

  19. In Situ XPS Chemical Analysis of MnSiO3 Copper Diffusion Barrier Layer Formation and Simultaneous Fabrication of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electrical Test MOS Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Conor; Brennan, Barry; McCoy, Anthony P; Bogan, Justin; Brady, Anita; Hughes, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Copper/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices both with and without a MnSiO3 barrier layer at the Cu/SiO2 interface have been fabricated in an ultrahigh vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system, which allows interface chemical characterization of the barrier formation process to be directly correlated with electrical testing of barrier layer effectiveness. Capacitance voltage (CV) analysis, before and after tube furnace anneals of the fabricated MOS structures showed that the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer significantly improved electric stability of the device structures. Evidence of improved adhesion of the deposited copper layer to the MnSiO3 surface compared to the clean SiO2 surface was apparent both from tape tests and while probing the samples during electrical testing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling measurements of the MOS test structures reveal distinct differences of copper diffusion into the SiO2 dielectric layers following the thermal anneal depending on the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer. PMID:26732185

  20. Water vapor-controlled thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition of double-layered TiN/PSZ coatings on Si and WC-Co substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double-layer TiN/PSZ film coatings were deposited on Si wafers and WC-Co cutting tools from Ti-, Zr-, and Y-alkoxide solutions by thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) containing water vapor. The partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) layer was coated on a TiN film by oxidation of Zr- and Y-alkoxides with H2O supplied by both constant and step-wise methods. Double-layer TiN/PSZ coatings deposited on Si wafers and WC-Co by the two H2O supply methods were approximately 2 μm thick. TEM observation showed that the interface between the TiN and PSZ in the double-layer TiN/PSZ formed by the step-wise H2O supply is more adhesive than under constant H2O supply. Double-layer TiN/PSZ films coated on WC-Co substrates by the step-wise supply exhibited good crater wear resistance, comparable to a commercial double-layer TiN/Al2O3 coating by thermal CVD.

  1. Water vapor-controlled thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition of double-layered TiN/PSZ coatings on Si and WC-Co substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Takanori [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, West-8, North-13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Shimada, Shiro, E-mail: shimashi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, West-8, North-13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kiyono, Hajime [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, West-8, North-13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Tsujino, Jiro [Research and Development Department, Hokkaido Electric Power Co. Ltd., 2-1, Tsuishikari, Ebetsu City 067-0033 (Japan); Yamazaki, Isao [Hokkaido Sumiden Precision Industries Ltd., 776 Naie, Sorachi-gun, Hokkaido 079-0304 (Japan)

    2010-08-25

    Double-layer TiN/PSZ film coatings were deposited on Si wafers and WC-Co cutting tools from Ti-, Zr-, and Y-alkoxide solutions by thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) containing water vapor. The partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) layer was coated on a TiN film by oxidation of Zr- and Y-alkoxides with H{sub 2}O supplied by both constant and step-wise methods. Double-layer TiN/PSZ coatings deposited on Si wafers and WC-Co by the two H{sub 2}O supply methods were approximately 2 {mu}m thick. TEM observation showed that the interface between the TiN and PSZ in the double-layer TiN/PSZ formed by the step-wise H{sub 2}O supply is more adhesive than under constant H{sub 2}O supply. Double-layer TiN/PSZ films coated on WC-Co substrates by the step-wise supply exhibited good crater wear resistance, comparable to a commercial double-layer TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating by thermal CVD.

  2. Characterization of GaN/AlGaN epitaxial layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition for high electron mobility transistor applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhubesh Chander Joshi; Manish Mathew; B C Joshi; D Kumar; C Dhanavantri

    2010-01-01

    GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers are grown by a metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) system. The crystalline quality of these epitaxially grown layers is studied by different characterization techniques. PL measurements indicate band edge emission peak at 363.8 nm and 312 nm for GaN and AlGaN layers respectively. High resolution XRD (HRXRD) peaks show FWHM of 272 and 296 arcsec for the (0 0 0 2) plane of GaN and GaN in GaN/AlGaN respectively. For GaN buffer layer, the Hall mobility is 346 cm2/V-s and carrier concentration is 4.5 × 1016 /cm3. AFM studies on GaN buffer layer show a dislocation density of 2 × 108/cm2 by wet etching in hot phosphoric acid. The refractive indices of GaN buffer layer on sapphire at 633 nm are 2.3544 and 2.1515 for TE and TM modes respectively.

  3. Modelling the effect of the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials used as casing layers on the production parameters of Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Arturo; Emilio Pardo, J; de Juan, J Arturo; Zied, Diego Cunha

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was to show the mathematical data obtained through the correlations found between the physical and chemical characteristics of casing layers and the final mushrooms' properties. For this purpose, 8 casing layers were used: soil, soil + peat moss, soil + black peat, soil + composted pine bark, soil + coconut fibre pith, soil + wood fibre, soil + composted vine shoots and, finally, the casing of La Rioja subjected to the ruffling practice. The conclusion that interplays in the fructification process with only the physical and chemical characteristics of casing are complicated was drawn. The mathematical data obtained in earliness could be explained in non-ruffled cultivation. The variability observed for the mushroom weight and the mushroom diameter variables could be explained in both ruffled and non-ruffled cultivations. Finally, the properties of the final quality of mushrooms were established by regression analysis. PMID:20878147

  4. Relationships among equivalent oxide thickness, nanochemistry, and nanostructure in atomic layer chemical-vapor-deposited Hf-O films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S. K.; Das, A.; Tsai, M.; Gu, D.; Floyd, M.; Carpenter, R. W.; De Waard, H.; Werkhoven, C.; Marcus, S.

    2004-05-01

    The relationships among the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), nanochemistry, and nanostructure of atomic layer chemical-vapor-deposited (ALCVD) Hf-O-based films, with oxide and nitrided oxide interlayers on Si substrates, were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in annular dark-field imaging (ADF), and parallel electron energy-loss spectroscopy (PEELS), capacitance-voltage, and leakage-current-voltage measurements. The XPS (Hf 4f binding energy shift) studies indicated the formation of Hf-O-Si bonds in as-deposited amorphous films, the amount of which was influenced by the interlayer composition and annealing conditions. After post-deposition annealing in N2 and O2, the Hf-O layers were nanocrystalline. Although HRTEM images showed a structurally sharp interface between the Hf-O layer and the interlayer, angle-resolved XPS, ADF imaging, and PEELS in the STEM revealed a chemically diffused HfSiOx region in between. This interdiffusion was observed by the detection of Si (using Si L edge) and Hf (using Hf O2,3 edge) in the Hf-O layer and the interlayer. For an annealed Hf-O/interlayer stack, with an ALCVD target thickness of 4.0 nm for the Hf-O layer on 1.2 nm of nitrided chemical oxide, the experimentally measured EOT and leakage current (at -1 V) were 1.52 nm and ˜10-8 A/cm2. A three-layer (1.2 nm interlayer of nitrided chemical oxide/compositionally graded, 2 nm region of HfSiOx/2 nm HfO2 layer) capacitor model was used to determine the respective contributions to the measured EOT, and the dielectric permittivity of the interlayer was found to be 6.06. These studies clearly indicate that a total EOT of 1 nm and below is attainable in the Hf-N-O-Si/Si-N-O system.

  5. Quantitative phase analysis and thickness measurement of surface-oxide layers in metal and alloy powders by the chemical-granular method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracconi, Pierre; Nyborg, Lars

    1998-05-01

    The principles of the chemical-granular analysis of metal and alloy powders are reviewed and the results are compared with those provided by the spectroscopic analytical techniques XPS, AES and SIMS, including ion etching in their depth-profiling mode, when they are applied to the same materials. Several examples are analysed and it is shown that the chemical-granular method alone can provide the very same information as depth profiling. However, it is averaged over a macroscopic powder sample in contrast to one or a few single particles. Nevertheless, it is the combination of the chemical-granular and depth-profiling analyses that really provides an unparalleled description in quantitative terms of the phase composition and microstructure of either multiphase and/or irregular surface layers resulting from oxidation, precipitation or contamination.

  6. Performance improvement of inverted organic solar cells by adding ultrathin Al2O3 as an electron selective layer and a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of SiOx encapsulating layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the performance improvement of inverted organic solar cells by adding an ultrathin electron selective layer of Al2O3 prepared between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and the active transport layer through atomic layer deposition (ALD). We evaluated the cell shelf-life after encapsulating with SiOx-coated polyethylene terephthalate, where the SiOx layer was made by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). It was found that the devices with ALD Al2O3 have a higher open circuit voltage than those without the ALD Al2O3 layer. Al2O3 deposited on an ITO electrode decreased the work function of ITO. Furthermore, based on the current density–voltage curves of the initial devices showing a pronounced S-shape, we soaked the cells with the ultraviolet (UV) light process. Then we obtained a higher efficiency in these ALD Al2O3 treated devices. With a careful analysis by atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we believe that the UV light soaking process affected both ITO and Al2O3. Further, after the encapsulation by PECVD SiOx, our devices achieved a shelf-life of over 500 h for 50% retained cell efficiency. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 improved the property of inverted organic solar cells. • Ultraviolet light soaking affected electrode work function and Al2O3 conductivity. • SiOx coating enveloped cells can achieve a 500 h shelf-life

  7. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack N. Blandy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  8. Work function variation of MoS2 atomic layers grown with chemical vapor deposition: The effects of thickness and the adsorption of water/oxygen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical properties of two-dimensional atomic sheets exhibit remarkable dependences on layer thickness and surface chemistry. Here, we investigated the variation of the work function properties of MoS2 films prepared with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on SiO2 substrates with the number of film layers. Wafer-scale CVD MoS2 films with 2, 4, and 12 layers were fabricated on SiO2, and their properties were evaluated by using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. In accordance with our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, our Kelvin probe force microscopy investigation found that the surface potential of the MoS2 films increases by ∼0.15 eV when the number of layers is increased from 2 to 12. Photoemission spectroscopy (PES) with in-situ annealing under ultra high vacuum conditions was used to directly demonstrate that this work function shift is associated with the screening effects of oxygen or water molecules adsorbed on the film surface. After annealing, it was found with PES that the surface potential decreases by ∼0.2 eV upon the removal of the adsorbed layers, which confirms that adsorbed species have a role in the variation in the work function

  9. I/S and C/S mixed layers, some indicators of recent physical-chemical changes in active geothermal systems: The case study of Chipilapa (El Salvador)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaufort, D.; Papapanagiotou, P.; patrier, P.; Fouillac, A.M.; Traineau, H.

    1996-01-24

    I/S and C/S mixed layers from the geothermal field of Chipilapa (El Salvador) have been studied in details in order to reevaluate their potential use as indicator of the thermodynamic conditions in which they were formed. It is funded that overprinting of clay bearing alteration stages is common. For a given alteration stage, the spatial variation of I/S and C/S mixed layer ininerals is controlled by kinetics of mixed layer transformation and not only by temperature. Clay geo-thermometers cannot give reliable results because the present crystal-chemical states of the I/S and C/S mixed layers is not their initial state, it was aquired during the overall hydrothermal history which post dated the nucleation of smectitic clay material at high temperature. Occurrences of smectites or smectite-rich mixed layers at high temperature in reservoirs is a promising guide for reconstruct the zones in which boiling or mixing of non isotherinal fluids occurred very recently or still presently.

  10. Optimization of the ZnS Buffer Layer by Chemical Bath Deposition for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated a ZnS buffer layer prepared using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process for application in cadmium-free Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. The ZnS buffer layer showed good transmittance (above 90%) in the spectral range from 300 to 800 nm and was non-toxic compared with the CdS buffer layers normally used in CIGS solar cells. The CBD process was affected by several deposition conditions. The deposition rate was dependent on the ammonia concentration (complexing agent). When the ammonia concentration was either too high or low, a decrease in the deposition rate was observed. In addition, post heat treatments at high temperatures had detrimental influences on the ZnS buffer layers because portions of the ZnS thin films were transformed into ZnO. With optimized deposition conditions, a CIGS solar cell with a ZnS buffer layer showed an efficiency of 14.18% with a 0.23 cm2 active area under 100 mW/cm2 illumination.

  11. Influence of a Thiolate Chemical Layer on GaAs (100 Biofunctionalization: An Original Approach Coupling Atomic Force Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bienaime

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Widely used in microelectronics and optoelectronics; Gallium Arsenide (GaAs is a III-V crystal with several interesting properties for microsystem and biosensor applications. Among these; its piezoelectric properties and the ability to directly biofunctionalize the bare surface, offer an opportunity to combine a highly sensitive transducer with a specific bio-interface; which are the two essential parts of a biosensor. To optimize the biorecognition part; it is necessary to control protein coverage and the binding affinity of the protein layer on the GaAs surface. In this paper; we investigate the potential of a specific chemical interface composed of thiolate molecules with different chain lengths; possessing hydroxyl (MUDO; for 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (HS(CH211OH or carboxyl (MHDA; for mercaptohexadecanoic acid (HS(CH215CO2H end groups; to reconstitute a dense and homogeneous albumin (Rat Serum Albumin; RSA protein layer on the GaAs (100 surface. The protein monolayer formation and the covalent binding existing between RSA proteins and carboxyl end groups were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis. Characterization in terms of topography; protein layer thickness and stability lead us to propose the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface as the optimal chemical layer to efficiently graft proteins. This analysis was coupled with in situ MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements; which proved the presence of a dense and uniform grafted protein layer on the 10% MHDA/MUDO interface. We show in this study that a critical number of carboxylic docking sites (10% is required to obtain homogeneous and dense protein coverage on GaAs. Such a protein bio-interface is of fundamental importance to ensure a highly specific and sensitive biosensor.

  12. Chemical approach to the deposition of textured CeO2 buffer layers based on sol gel dip coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread use of vacuum techniques for the development of coated conductors, in which buffer and superconducting (REBa2Cu3O7-δ) layers are deposited epitaxially on a substrate, is well established in the research environment. However, obtaining uninterrupted deposition at high speed, increasing flexibility in composition and in film thickness and attaining independence of geometric constraints are areas in which many vacuum techniques will need sustained development in order to answer industrial demands. This work describes the deposition of textured CeO2 buffer layers based on sol gel dip coating under atmospheric environment and from aqueous precursor materials. Research has been performed towards the deposition of CeO2-buffer layers using the amorphous citrate method on sapphire substrates and Ni-W foils. Coating is performed using the dip-coating technique, which allows extension to a continuous system. The withdrawal speed and the thermal treatment have been optimised in order to obtain highly oriented (001) layers exhibiting a smooth and crack-free morphology both on ceramic and metallic substrates. From the results it was concluded that sintering atmosphere and sintering temperature play a crucial role in the growth mechanism. This study describes the structural and morphological analysis of the thin layer with special attention to the difference between ceramic and metallic substrates. (orig.)

  13. Friction and Wear Modifiers Using Solvent Partitioning of Hydrophilic Surface-Interactive Chemicals Contained in Boundary Layer-Targeted Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A wear and/or friction reducing additive for a lubricating fluid in which the additive is a combination of a moderately hydrophilic single-phase compound and an anti-wear and/or anti-friction aqueous salt solution. The aqueous salt solution produces a coating on boundary layer surfaces. The lubricating fluid can be an emulsion-free hydrophobic oil, hydraulic fluid, antifreeze, or water. Preferably, the moderately hydrophilic single-phase compound is sulfonated castor oil and the aqueous salt solution additionally contains boric acid and zinc oxide. The emulsions produced by the aqueous salt solutions, the moderately hydrophilic single-phase compounds, or the combination thereof provide targeted boundary layer organizers that significantly enhance the anti-wear and/or anti-friction properties of the base lubricant by decreasing wear and/or friction of sliding and/or rolling surfaces at boundary layers.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopic imaging and device applications of large-area patternable single-layer MoS2 synthesized by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woanseo; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Tae-Young; Cho, Kyungjune; Hong, Woong-Ki; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Takhee

    2014-05-27

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films, which are only a single atomic layer thick, have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and have gained significant attention due to their band-gap semiconducting properties. However, in order for them to be useful for the fabrication of practical devices, patterning processes that can be used to form specific MoS2 structures must be integrated with the existing synthetic approaches. Here, we report a method for the synthesis of centimeter-scale, high-quality single-layer MoS2 that can be directly patterned during CVD, so that postpatterning processes can be avoided and device fabrication can be streamlined. Utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic imaging, we characterize the chemical states of these CVD-synthesized single-layer MoS2 films and demonstrate that the triangular-shaped MoS2 are single-crystalline single-domain monolayers. We also demonstrate the use of these high-quality and directly patterned MoS2 films in electronic device applications by fabricating and characterizing field effect transistors. PMID:24730654

  15. The importance of proper crystal-chemical and geometrical reasoning demonstrated using layered single and double hydroxides

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic modelling techniques and Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction data are widely used but often result in crystal structures that are not realistic, presumably because the authors neglect to check the crystal-chemical plausibility of their structure. The purpose of this paper is to reinforce the importance and utility of proper crystal-chemical and geometrical reasoning in structural studies. It is achieved by using such reasoning to generate new yet fundamental information ...

  16. Chemical analysis of aerosol in the Venusian cloud layer by reaction gas chromatography on board the Vega landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, B. G.; Drozdov, Y. V.; Melnikov, V. V.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.; Bondarev, V. B.; Dolnikov, G. G.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment on sulfuric acid aerosol determination in the Venusian cloud layer on board the Vega landers is described. An average content of sulfuric acid of approximately 1 mg/cu m was found for the samples taken from the atmosphere at heights from 63 to 48 km and analyzed with the SIGMA-3 chromatograph. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was revealed in the gaseous sample at the height of 48 km. From the experimental results and blank run measurements, a suggestion is made that the Venusian cloud layer aerosol consists of more complicated particles than the sulfuric acid water solution does.

  17. Synchrotron-based multiple-beam FTIR chemical imaging of a multi-layered polymer in transmission and reflection: towards cultural heritage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Miriam; Mattson, Eric; Schmidt Patterson, Catherine; Alavi, Zahrasadet; Carson, David; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2013-04-01

    IRENI (infrared environmental imaging) is a recently commissioned Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) chemical imaging beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, WI, USA. This novel beamline extracts 320 mrad of radiation, horizontally, from one bending magnet. The optical transport separates and recombines the beam into 12 parallel collimated beams to illuminate a commercial FTIR microspectrometer (Bruker Hyperion 3000) equipped with a focal plane array detector where single pixels in the detector image a projected sample area of either 0.54×0.54 μm2 or 2×2 μm2, depending in the measurement geometry. The 12 beams are partially overlapped and defocused, similar to wide-field microscopy, homogeneously illuminating a relatively large sample area compared to single-beam arrangements. Both transmission and reflection geometries are used to examine a model cross section from a layered polymer material. The compromises for sample preparation and measurement strategies are discussed, and the chemical composition and spatial definition of the layers are distinguished in chemical images generated from data sets. Deconvolution methods that may allow more detailed data analysis are also discussed.

  18. Diffraction analysis of nonuniform stresses in surface layers : Application to cracked TiN coatings chemically vapor deposited on Mo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, W.G.; Kooi, B.J.; Delhez, R.; Keijser, Th.H. de; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Variations of residual stresses in layers on substrates can occur in directions parallel and perpendicular to the surface as a result of compositional inhomogeneity and/or porosity or cracks. Diffraction methods to evaluate such stress variations are presented. Comparison of the experimental value f

  19. Development of carbon nanotubes based gas diffusion layers by in situ chemical vapor deposition process for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A. M.; Kanagala, P.; Veedu, V.

    A proprietary in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was developed for gas diffusion layer (GDL) by growing a micro-porous layer on the macro-porous, non-woven fibrous carbon paper. The characteristics of the GDL samples such as, surface morphology, wetting characteristics, and cross-section were characterized using electron microscopes, goniometer and focused ion beam, respectively. Fuel cell performance of the GDLs was evaluated using single cell with hydrogen/oxygen as well as hydrogen/air at ambient pressure, at elevated temperature and various RH conditions using Nafion-212 as an electrolyte. The GDLs with in situ growth of micro-porous layers containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without any hydrophobic agent showed significant improvement in mechanical robustness as well as fuel cell performance at elevated temperature at lower RH conditions. The micro-porous layer of the GDLs as seen under scanning electron microscope showed excellent surface morphology with surface homogeneity through reinforcement by the multi-walled CNTs.

  20. Growth of thick La2Zr2O7 buffer layers for coated conductors by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We develops a low-cost and high-efficient technology of fabricating LZO buffer layers. • Sufficient thickness LZO buffer layers have been obtained on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate. • Highly biaxially textured YBCO thin film has been deposited on LZO/NiW. - Abstract: La2Zr2O7 (LZO) epitaxial films have been deposited on LaAlO3 (LAO) (1 0 0) single-crystal surface and bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition, and afterwards studied with XRD, SEM and AFM approaches. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth, crack free and with a sufficient thickness (>240 nm) LZO buffer layers have been obtained on LAO (1 0 0) single-crystal surface; The films deposited on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate are also found with high degree in-plane and out-of-plane texturing, good density with pin-hole-free, micro-crack-free nature and a thickness of 300 nm. Highly epitaxial 500 nm thick YBa2Cu3O7−x (YBCO) thin film exhibits the self-field critical current density (Jc) reached 1.3 MA/cm2 at 77 K .These results demonstrate the LZO epi-films obtained with current techniques have potential to be a buffer layer for REBCO coated conductors

  1. Effect of Group-III precursors on unintentional gallium incorporation during epitaxial growth of InAlN layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeomoh, E-mail: jkim610@gatech.edu; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Unintentional incorporation of gallium (Ga) in InAlN layers grown with different molar flow rates of Group-III precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally investigated. The Ga mole fraction in the InAl(Ga)N layer was increased significantly with the trimethylindium (TMIn) flow rate, while the trimethylaluminum flow rate controls the Al mole fraction. The evaporation of metallic Ga from the liquid phase eutectic system between the pyrolized In from injected TMIn and pre-deposited metallic Ga was responsible for the Ga auto-incorporation into the InAl(Ga)N layer. The theoretical calculation on the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid phase Ga and the effective partial pressure of Group-III precursors based on growth parameters used in this study confirms the influence of Group-III precursors on Ga auto-incorporation. More Ga atoms can be evaporated from the liquid phase Ga on the surrounding surfaces in the growth chamber and then significant Ga auto-incorporation can occur due to the high equilibrium vapor pressure of Ga comparable to effective partial pressure of input Group-III precursors during the growth of InAl(Ga)N layer.

  2. Effect of Group-III precursors on unintentional gallium incorporation during epitaxial growth of InAlN layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unintentional incorporation of gallium (Ga) in InAlN layers grown with different molar flow rates of Group-III precursors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally investigated. The Ga mole fraction in the InAl(Ga)N layer was increased significantly with the trimethylindium (TMIn) flow rate, while the trimethylaluminum flow rate controls the Al mole fraction. The evaporation of metallic Ga from the liquid phase eutectic system between the pyrolized In from injected TMIn and pre-deposited metallic Ga was responsible for the Ga auto-incorporation into the InAl(Ga)N layer. The theoretical calculation on the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid phase Ga and the effective partial pressure of Group-III precursors based on growth parameters used in this study confirms the influence of Group-III precursors on Ga auto-incorporation. More Ga atoms can be evaporated from the liquid phase Ga on the surrounding surfaces in the growth chamber and then significant Ga auto-incorporation can occur due to the high equilibrium vapor pressure of Ga comparable to effective partial pressure of input Group-III precursors during the growth of InAl(Ga)N layer

  3. Epitaxial growth of antiphase boundary free GaAs layer on 300 mm Si(001 substrate by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition with high mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alcotte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs on standard nominal 300 mm Si(001 wafers was studied. Antiphase boundary (APB free epitaxial GaAs films as thin as 150 nm were obtained. The APB-free films exhibit an improvement of the room temperature photoluminescence signal with an increase of the intensity of almost a factor 2.5. Hall effect measurements show an electron mobility enhancement from 200 to 2000 cm2/V s. The GaAs layers directly grown on industrial platform with no APBs are perfect candidates for being integrated as active layers for nanoelectronic as well as optoelectronic devices in a CMOS environment.

  4. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Nazarov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  5. Heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air with consideration of the finite rate of chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyegbesan, A. O.; Algermissen, J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical investigation of heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air on an isothermal flat plate is carried out for different degrees of cooling of the wall. A finite-difference chemical model is used to study elementary reactions involving NO2 and N2O. The analysis is based on equations of continuity, momentum, energy, conservation and state for the two-dimensional viscous flow of a reacting multicomponent mixtures. Attention is given to the effects of both catalyticity and noncatalyticity of the wall.

  6. Synthesis of few-layer graphene on a Ni substrate by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG) was successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni a large scale by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC PE-CVD), which may serve as an alternative route in large-scale graphene synthesis. The synthesis time had an effect on the quality of the graphene produced. The applied DC voltage, on the other hand, influenced the minimization of the defect densities in the graphene grown. We also present a method of producing a free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)/graphene membrane on a FeCl{sub 3(aq)} solution, which could then be transferred to the desired substrate.

  7. Screw-Dislocation-Driven Growth of Two-Dimensional Few-Layer and Pyramid-Like WSe2 by Sulfur-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Bilu; Abbas, Ahmad N.; Ma, Yuqiang; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered tungsten diselenides (WSe2) material has recently drawn a lot of attention due to its unique optoelectronic properties and ambipolar transport behavior. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of 2D WSe2 is not as straightforward as other 2D materials due to the low reactivity between reactants in WSe2 synthesis. In addition, the growth mechanism of WSe2 in such CVD process remains unclear. Here we report the observation of a screw-dislocation-dr...

  8. Effects of E-Beam Irradiation on the Chemical, Physical, and Electrochemical Properties of Activated Carbons for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Jung Jung; Mi-Seon Park; Young-Seak Lee

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) were modified via e-beam irradiation at various doses for use as an electrode material in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). The chemical compositions of the AC surfaces were largely unchanged by the e-beam irradiation. The ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy exhibited higher nanocrystallinity than the untreated ACs. The specific surface areas and pore volumes of the e-beam irradiated ACs were also higher than those of the untreated ACs. Th...

  9. Chemical Characterization of Polysaccharide from the Slime Layer of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis flos-aquae C3-40

    OpenAIRE

    Plude, John L.; Parker, Dorothy L.; Schommer, Olivia J.; Timmerman, Robert J.; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Joers, James M.; Hnasko, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Macromolecular material from the slime layer of the cyanobacterium Microcystis flos-aquae C3-40 was defined as material that adhered to cells during centrifugation in growth medium but was dislodged by washing with deionized water and retained within dialysis tubing with a molecular-weight cutoff of 3,500. At each step of this isolation procedure, the slime was observed microscopically. Cells in the centrifugal pellet were surrounded by large amounts of slime that excluded negative stain, whe...

  10. Effect of conventional chemical treatment on the microbial population in a biofouling layer of reverse osmosis systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bereschenko, L.A.; Prummel, H.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of conventional chemical treatment on initiation and spatiotemporal development of biofilms on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was investigated in situ using flow cells placed in parallel with the RO system of a full-scale water treatment plant. The flow cells got the same feed (extensivel

  11. Control of metamorphic buffer structure and device performance of InxGa1−xAs epitaxial layers fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a step-graded (SG) buffer structure via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate a high suitability of In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers on a GaAs substrate for electronic device application. Taking advantage of the technique’s precise control, we were able to increase the number of SG layers to achieve a fairly low dislocation density (∼106 cm−2), while keeping each individual SG layer slightly exceeding the critical thickness (∼80 nm) for strain relaxation. This met the demanded but contradictory requirements, and even offered excellent scalability by lowering the whole buffer structure down to 2.3 μm. This scalability overwhelmingly excels the forefront studies. The effects of the SG misfit strain on the crystal quality and surface morphology of In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers were carefully investigated, and were correlated to threading dislocation (TD) blocking mechanisms. From microstructural analyses, TDs can be blocked effectively through self-annihilation reactions, or hindered randomly by misfit dislocation mechanisms. Growth conditions for avoiding phase separation were also explored and identified. The buffer-improved, high-quality In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers enabled a high-performance, metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor on a GaAs substrate. The devices displayed remarkable capacitance–voltage responses with small frequency dispersion. A promising interface trap density of 3 × 1012 eV−1 cm−2 in a conductance test was also obtained. These electrical performances are competitive to those using lattice-coherent but pricey InGaAs/InP systems. (paper)

  12. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  13. Application techniques of alpha particles and heavy ion elastic scattering to chemical analysis of thin layers and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work turns to account two aspects of the elastic scattering: Rutherford or non-Rutherford backscattering of alpha particles for the study of the stoechiometry of complex thin layers and production of recoil nuclei under energetic argon ion (16-20 MeV) bombardment for the surface analysis of light elements like oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The first section treats the analysis conditions of Ti(1-x)NbxO2 and Ti(1-x)VxO2 layers whose composition depends on deposition parameters of the H.F. cathodic sputtering process of mixtures of oxide powders. In the first place, the analysis conditions of these layers were determined with the best possible accuracy. As for the experimental results, we show for the best deposition conditions (residual vacuum, pre-sputtering) that the ratio O/(M+Ti) can be adjusted to 2±0.1 over all the target concentration ranges. The evolution of the ratio Nb/(Nb+Ti) and V/(V+Ti) is not identical to that of targets with deviations whose significance we attempt to interprete. In the second section dealing with time of flight detection of recoil nuclei, we justify our choice of experimental parameters by a detailed study of their influence on the analytical performances. In spite of serious limitations posed by angular dispersions the depth resolution typically varies from 2 to 5 nm for oxygen and carbon depending on whether one deals with a matrix of medium Z(Si) or high Z (Ta). An energy discrimination serves at optimizing the analysable depths and avoiding interferences (C,N and O analysable over 70 nm). This discrimination allows us to lower the detection limit (down to 1013 at/cm2) by reduction of background noise. The current limitations and possible improvements are presented from surface analysis examples

  14. Interfacial chemical reaction and multiple gap state formation on three layer cathode in organic light-emitting diode: Ca/BaF2/Alq3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gun; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin; Lee, Seung Mi; Kim, Jeong Won

    2015-07-01

    A three layer cathode is a promising stack structure for long lifetime and high efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. The interfacial chemical reactions and their effects on electronic structures for alkaline-earth metal (Ca, Ba)/Alq3 [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum] and Ca/BaF2/Alq3 are investigated using in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as molecular model calculation. The BaF2 interlayer initially prevents direct contact between Alq3 and the reactive Ca metal, but it is dissociated into Ba and CaF2 by the addition of Ca. As the Ca thickness increases, the Ca penetrates the interlayer to directly participate in the reaction with the underlying Alq3. This series of chemical reactions takes place irrespective of the BaF2 buffer layer thickness as long as the Ca overlayer thickness is sufficient. The interface reaction between the alkaline-earth metal and Alq3 generates two energetically separated gap states in a sequential manner. This phenomenon is explained by step-by-step charge transfer from the alkaline-earth metal to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Alq3, forming new occupied states below the Fermi level.

  15. Interfacial chemical reaction and multiple gap state formation on three layer cathode in organic light-emitting diode: Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gun; Kim, Jeong Won, E-mail: jeongwonk@kriss.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), 267 Gajeong-ro, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 206 Gajeong-ro, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyunbok [Department of Physics, Kangwon National University, 1 Gangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yeonjin [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemoon-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Mi [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), 267 Gajeong-ro, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-14

    A three layer cathode is a promising stack structure for long lifetime and high efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. The interfacial chemical reactions and their effects on electronic structures for alkaline-earth metal (Ca, Ba)/Alq{sub 3} [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum] and Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3} are investigated using in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as molecular model calculation. The BaF{sub 2} interlayer initially prevents direct contact between Alq{sub 3} and the reactive Ca metal, but it is dissociated into Ba and CaF{sub 2} by the addition of Ca. As the Ca thickness increases, the Ca penetrates the interlayer to directly participate in the reaction with the underlying Alq{sub 3}. This series of chemical reactions takes place irrespective of the BaF{sub 2} buffer layer thickness as long as the Ca overlayer thickness is sufficient. The interface reaction between the alkaline-earth metal and Alq{sub 3} generates two energetically separated gap states in a sequential manner. This phenomenon is explained by step-by-step charge transfer from the alkaline-earth metal to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Alq{sub 3}, forming new occupied states below the Fermi level.

  16. Growth of TiO2 anti-reflection layer on textured Si (100) wafer substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sang-Hun; Choi, Jin-Woo; Cho, Sang-Jin; Kimt, Keun Soo; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2011-08-01

    Recently anti-reflective films (AR) have been intensely studied. Particularly for textured silicon solar cells, the AR films can further reduce the reflection of the incident light through trapping the incident light into the cells. In this work, TiO2 anti-reflection films have been grown on the textured Si (100) substrate which is processed in two steps, and the films are deposited using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with a precursor of titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP). The effect of the substrate texture and the growth conditions of TiO2 films on the reflectance has been investigated. Pyramid size of textured silicon had approximately 2-9 microm. A well-textured silicon surface can lower the reflectance to 10%. For more reduced reflection, TiO2 anti-reflection films on the textured silicon were deposited at 600 degrees C using titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) as a precursor by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and the deposited TiO2 layers were then treated by annealing for 2 h in air at 600 and 1000 degrees C, respectively. In this process, the treated samples by annealing showed anatase and rutile phases, respectively. The thickness of TiO2 films was about 75 +/- 5 nm. The reflectance at specific wavelength can be reduced to 3% in optimum layer. PMID:22103185

  17. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  18. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO2 film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MOx/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MOx was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO2 as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe2O3 as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition, materials absorptance determined from

  19. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore and CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  20. Chemical bath deposition of thin semiconductor films for use as buffer layers in CuInS sub 2 thin film solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, C A

    2002-01-01

    different growth phases, layer morphology and solar cell performance were sought and an improved deposition process was developed. As a result, Cd-free CulnS sub 2 thin film solar cells with efficiencies of up to 10.6%) (total area) could be produced. Overall the substitution of CdS is shown to be possible by different alternative compounds, such as Zn(OH,O) sub x S sub y or In(OH,O) sub x S sub y. In the case of In(OH,O) sub x S sub y , an understanding of the CBD process and the effect of different growth phases on the resulting solar cell characteristics could be developed. A CulnS sub 2 thin film solar cell is a multilayered semiconductor device. The solar cells discussed have a layer sequence Mo/CulnS sub 2 /buffer/i-ZnO/ZnO:Ga, where a heterojunction establishes between the p-type absorber and the n-type front contact. Conventionally the buffer consists of CdS, deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD). Apart from providing process oriented benefits the buffer layer functions as a tool for engineering...

  1. Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} single buffer layer for YBCO coated conductors by polymer assisted chemical solution deposition (PACSD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Pu, M.H.; Sun, R.P.; Wang, W.T.; Wu, W.; Zhang, X.; Yang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education of China), Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)], E-mail: yzhao@home.swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-10-20

    An over 150 nm thick Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 1.9-x} (SCO) single buffer layer has been deposited on bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth and crack free SCO single layer has been obtained via a polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition (PACSD) approach. YBCO thin film has been deposited equally via a PACSD route on the SCO-buffered NiW, the as grown YBCO yielding a sharp transition at T{sub c0} = 87 K as well as J{sub c}(0 T, 77 K) {approx} 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. These results indicates that RE (lanthanides other than Ce) doping may be an effective approach to improve the critical thickness of solution derived CeO{sub 2} film, which renders it a promising candidate as single buffer layer for YBCO coated conductors.

  2. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative aging of organic aerosol particles, we illustrate how the

  3. Synthesis of multi-layer graphene films on copper tape by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene films were successfully synthesized by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Methane (CH4) gas and copper (Cu) tapes were used as a carbon source and a catalyst, respectively. The CVD temperature and time were in the range of 800–1000 °C and 10 s to 45 min, respectively. The role of the CVD temperature and time on the growth of graphene films was investigated in detail via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The results of SEM images and Raman spectra show that the quality of the graphene films was improved with increasing of CVD temperature due to the increase of catalytic activity. (paper)

  4. Platinum thin films with good thermal and chemical stability fabricated by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bo-Heng [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hung Ji, E-mail: hjhuang@itrc.narl.org.tw [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Taiwan (China); Huang, Sheng-Hsin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chien-Nan [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    The inductively coupled plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) method was used to fabricate ultrathin and smooth Pt thin films at low temperatures without the use of a Pt seed layer. The Pt thin metal films deposited at 200 °C onto Si and glass substrates exhibited high conductivities (< 12 μΩ cm for films with a thickness greater than 8 nm) and thermal stabilities resembling those of the bulk material. The measured density of the deposited Pt thin films was 20.7 ± 6 g/cm{sup 3}. X-ray photoelectron spectra of the films showed clear 4f peaks (74.3 eV (4f{sub 5/2}) and 71.1 eV (4f{sub 7/2})), and X-ray diffraction measurements showed the (111) peak of the fcc structure. The deposited Pt layers were in crystal form. The 25.5-nm Pt films coated onto 170-nm-wide trench structures (aspect ratio of 3.5:1) exhibited good step coverage. The PEALD-deposited Pt thin films were chemically stable under high-temperature light illumination and could serve as catalysts under strongly alkaline conditions (pH = 12) during the long-term oxidization of ammonium ions. - Highlights: • Inductively coupled plasma applied to enhance atomic layer deposition (PEALD) • Smooth Pt films fabricated by PEALD at low temperature • 8-nm Pt shows clear metal peaks in XPS and XRD. • 8-nm Pt shows low electrical resistivity of 16 μΩ cm. • 8-nm Pt shows stability under strong light and pH = 12 wash by NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NaOH solution.

  5. Growth of thick La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers for coated conductors by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xzhang@my.swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Xia, Yudong [State Key Lab of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Guo, Chunsheng [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhang, Han [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We develops a low-cost and high-efficient technology of fabricating LZO buffer layers. • Sufficient thickness LZO buffer layers have been obtained on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate. • Highly biaxially textured YBCO thin film has been deposited on LZO/NiW. - Abstract: La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZO) epitaxial films have been deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) (1 0 0) single-crystal surface and bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition, and afterwards studied with XRD, SEM and AFM approaches. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth, crack free and with a sufficient thickness (>240 nm) LZO buffer layers have been obtained on LAO (1 0 0) single-crystal surface; The films deposited on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate are also found with high degree in-plane and out-of-plane texturing, good density with pin-hole-free, micro-crack-free nature and a thickness of 300 nm. Highly epitaxial 500 nm thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−x} (YBCO) thin film exhibits the self-field critical current density (Jc) reached 1.3 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K .These results demonstrate the LZO epi-films obtained with current techniques have potential to be a buffer layer for REBCO coated conductors.

  6. Laminar or turbulent boundary-layer flows of perfect gases or reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer flows of non-reacting gases are predicted for both interal (nozzle) and external flows. Effects of favorable pressure gradients on two eddy viscosity models were studied in rocket and hypervelocity wind tunnel flows. Nozzle flows of equilibrium air with stagnation temperatures up to 10,000 K were computed. Predictions of equilibrium nitrogen flows through hypervelocity nozzles were compared with experimental data. A slender spherically blunted cone was studied at 70,000 ft altitude and 19,000 ft/sec. in the earth's atmosphere. Comparisons with available experimental data showed good agreement. A computer program was developed and fully documented during this investigation for use by interested individuals.

  7. Wet chemical synthesis and magnetic properties of single crystal Co nanochains with surface amorphous passivation Co layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shao-Min

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, for the first time, high-yield chain-like one-dimensional (1D Co nanostructures without any impurity have been produced by means of a solution dispersion approach under permanent-magnet. Size, morphology, component, and structure of the as-made samples have been confirmed by several techniques, and nanochains (NCs with diameter of approximately 60 nm consisting of single-crystalline Co and amorphous Co-capped layer (about 3 nm have been materialized. The as-synthesized Co samples do not include any other adulterants. The high-quality NC growth mechanism is proposed to be driven by magnetostatic interaction because NC can be reorganized under a weak magnetic field. Room-temperature-enhanced coercivity of NCs was observed, which is considered to have potential applications in spin filtering, high density magnetic recording, and nanosensors. PACS: 61.46.Df; 75.50; 81.07.Vb; 81.07.

  8. Universal Transfer and Stacking of Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Two-Dimensional Atomic Layers with Water-Soluble Polymer Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhixing; Sun, Lifei; Xu, Guanchen; Zheng, Jingying; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jingyi; Jiao, Liying

    2016-05-24

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has shown great potential in synthesizing various high-quality two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). However, the nondestruction transfer of these CVD-grown 2D TMDCs at a high yield remains a key challenge for applying these emerging materials in various aspects. To address this challenge, we designed a water-soluble transfer mediator consisting of two polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which can form strong interactions with CVD-grown 2D TMDCs for the nondestruction transfer of these materials. With this mediator, we realized the physical transfer of CVD-grown MoS2 flakes and several other 2D TMDCs, including 2D alloys and heterostructures to a wide range of substrates at a high yield of >90% with well-retained properties as evidenced by various microscopic, spectroscopic, and electrical measurements. Field-effect transistors (FETs) made on thus-transferred CVD-grown MoS2 monolayers exhibited obviously higher mobility than those transferred by chemical method. We also constructed several artificial 2D crystals showing very strong interlayer coupling by the multiple transfer of CVD-grown 2D TMDCs monolayers with this approach. This transfer approach will make versatile CVD-grown 2D materials and their artificial stacks with pristine qualities easily accessible for both fundamental studies and practical applications. PMID:27158832

  9. Physico-chemical properties of the potentially oxidative water and its capability of the instrumentation residual layer remotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Silva-Herzog FLORES

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to elaborate the potentially oxidative water (POW and analyze some of the physico-chemical properties: pH density, superficial stress, contact angle, conductivity and REDOX potential; besides comparing its POW organic as well as non-organic matter removal capacity with hypochlorite sodium at 1% plus 17% EDTA. For the methodology the POW elaboration an electrolysis process was used and the physico-chemical properties were determined in 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. For the removal capacity of teeth tartarevaluation, 30 extracted uniradicular premolars were used, divided in three groups:positive control (NaOCl at 1% + EDTA at 17%, negative control(distilled water and experimental (POW. Afterwards, the samples were observed under electronic microscopy with 2500x magnifying at the middle thirds and apical, analyzing them with the Rome scale (amount of open dental tubes. For the statistical analysis the Chi-square and the Fisher Exact Proofwas used. The results showed that the solution was constantly maintained at all times during the evaluation and there was found statistical difference between negative control and positive control and between negative control and the experimental group. With regards to the dental tartar removal it was found that there was no statistical difference between the control group and the experimental group (POW; reason why it is concluded that the POW has the capacity to remove dental tartar. Nevertheless, to be able to propose the use of the POW as an irrigator solution in Endodontics it is necessary to do further studies to evaluate its cytotoxicity and biocompability.

  10. Chemical relations between atmospheric aerosols, deposition and stone decay layers on historic buildings at the mediterranean coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, K.; Van Grieken, R.

    To evaluate the effects of the environment on weathering of historical buildings in the Mediterranean Basin, an elaborate study has been carried out at four monuments, with specific interest directed on the action of air pollution and marine salts. The composition of the atmosphere around the monuments has been investigated by monitoring the aerosols and the total deposition. These results are combined with the stone decay phenomena to interpret the deterioration at the respective monuments. In Eleusis, Greece, a highly industrialized area, high concentrations of heavy metals and sulphate are found in the aerosols and deposition and in the decay layers of the stone, while the marine influence is obscured, in spite of its location close to the sea. In Malta and in Cadiz (Spain), the influence of the sea dominates in the stone weathering process. In Bari (Italy), next to the effects of marine aerosols on the stone decay inside and outside the building, high concentrations of sulphate are observed on the outside stones. The aerosols and depositions reflect a relatively small influence of anthropogenic derived elements; this points out the action of gaseous SO 2 on the stones.

  11. High performance thin layer chromatography fingerprinting, phytochemical and physico-chemical studies of anti-diabetic herbal extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itankar, Prakash R.; Sawant, Dattatray B.; Tauqeer, Mohd.; Charde, Sonal S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Herbal medicines have gained increasing popularity in the last few decades, and this global resurgence of herbal medicines increases their commercial value. However, this increasing demand has resulted in a decline in their quality, primarily due to a lack of adequate regulations pertaining to herbal medicines. Aim: To develop an optimized methodology for the standardization of herbal raw materials. Materials and Methods: The present study has been designed to examine each of the five herbal anti-diabetic drugs, Gymnema sylvester R. Br., Pterocarpus marsupium Roxburgh., Enicostema littorale Blume., Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels. and Emblica officinalis Gaertn. The in-house extracts and marketed extracts were evaluated using physicochemical parameters, preliminary phytochemical screening, quantification of polyphenols (Folin–Ciocalteu colorimetric method) and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint profiling with reference to marker compounds in plant extracts. Results: All the plants mainly contain polyphenolic compounds and are quantified in the range of 3.6–21.72% w/w. E. officinalis contain the highest and E. littorale contain the lowest content of polyphenol among plant extracts analyzed. HPTLC fingerprinting showed that the in-house extracts were of better quality than marketed extracts. Conclusion: The results obtained from the study could be utilized for setting limits for the reference phytoconstituents (biomarker) for the quality control and quality assurance of these anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:27011722

  12. Current induced annealing and electrical characterization of single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition for future interconnects in VLSI circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Neetu; Kumari, Anita; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Mathur, P. C.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2014-09-01

    Single layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated for its prospective application as horizontal interconnects in very large scale integrated circuits. However, the major bottleneck for its successful application is its degraded electronic transport properties due to the resist residual trapped in the grain boundaries and on the surface of the polycrystalline CVD graphene during multi-step lithographic processes, leading to increase in its sheet resistance up to 5 MΩ/sq. To overcome this problem, current induced annealing has been employed, which helps to bring down the sheet resistance to 10 kΩ/sq (of the order of its initial value). Moreover, the maximum current density of ˜1.2 × 107 A/cm2 has been obtained for SLG (1 × 2.5 μm2) on SiO2/Si substrate, which is about an order higher than that of conventionally used copper interconnects.

  13. Thermal radiation and chemical reaction effects on boundary layer slip flow and melting heat transfer of nanofluid induced by a nonlinear stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, M. R.; Gireesha, B. J.; Prasannakumara, B. C.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-09-01

    A theoretically investigation has been performed to study the effects of thermal radiation and chemical reaction on MHD velocity slip boundary layer flow and melting heat transfer of nanofluid induced by a nonlinear stretching sheet. The Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects are incorporated in the present nanofluid model. A set of proper similarity variables is used to reduce the governing equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An efficient numerical method like Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg-45 order is used to solve the resultant equations for velocity, temperature and volume fraction of the nanoparticle. The effects of different flow parameters on flow fields are elucidated through graphs and tables. The present results have been compared with existing one for some limiting case and found excellent validation.

  14. Methane as an effective hydrogen source for single-layer graphene synthesis on Cu foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Seung; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Young Duck; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Joo, Kisu; Kim, Eunho; Jung, Jongwan; Yoon, Euijoon; Park, Yun Daniel; Seo, Sunae; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-02-01

    A single-layer graphene is synthesized on Cu foil in the absence of H(2) flow by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). In lieu of an explicit H(2) flow, hydrogen species are produced during the methane decomposition process into their active species (CH(xpower. The resulting grain size (the nucleation density) has a maximum (minimum) at 50 W and saturates when the plasma power is higher than 120 W because hydrogen partial pressures are effectively tuned by a simple control of the plasma power. Raman spectroscopy and transport measurements show that decomposed methane alone can provide a sufficient amount of hydrogen species for high-quality graphene synthesis by PECVD. PMID:23299508

  15. Growth of thick La2Zr2O7 buffer layers for coated conductors by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yong; Xia, Yudong; Guo, Chunsheng; Cheng, C. H.; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Han

    2015-06-01

    La2Zr2O7 (LZO) epitaxial films have been deposited on LaAlO3 (LAO) (1 0 0) single-crystal surface and bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition, and afterwards studied with XRD, SEM and AFM approaches. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth, crack free and with a sufficient thickness (>240 nm) LZO buffer layers have been obtained on LAO (1 0 0) single-crystal surface; The films deposited on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate are also found with high degree in-plane and out-of-plane texturing, good density with pin-hole-free, micro-crack-free nature and a thickness of 300 nm. Highly epitaxial 500 nm thick YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film exhibits the self-field critical current density (Jc) reached 1.3 MA/cm2 at 77 K .These results demonstrate the LZO epi-films obtained with current techniques have potential to be a buffer layer for REBCO coated conductors.

  16. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  17. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part 2: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, acyl peroxy nitrate (APN and particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model predictions of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional mixed layer (RML reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentration after that time. The differences are caused by an over rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being actually produced by photochemical production downwind of the emission sources than predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are lognormal with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200±20 nm, showing little observed or predicted change with respect to the time when the RML is above the Altzomoni research station. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation past about six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico's Megapolis. This could greatly simplify parameterization in climate models although it is not known at this time if this invariance can be extended to other megacity regions.

  18. Super-capacitive electro-chemical performance of polymer blend gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) in carbon-based electrical double-layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports on the fabrication and comparative performance characteristics of a symmetrical electrical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) employed gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) assembled between carbon based electrodes. Three cells, A, B and C were fabricated using different composition of active materials (activated or porous carbon), binder (PVdF-HFP) and conductivity enhancer (super-P). The configuration of cell A: 0.9 porous carbon/0.1 PVdF-HFP, cell B: 0.45 activated carbon/0.45 porous carbon/0.1 PVdF-HFP and cell C: 0.8 activated carbon/0.1 super-P/0.1 PVdF-HFP. The GPE, comprising a poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP)/poly(vinylidene fluoride co-hexafluoroproplyne) (PVdF-HFP) blend complexed with magnesium triflate, Mg(CF3SO3)2, was prepared by the solution casting technique at 60 °C. The physico-chemical properties of the GPEs were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The ionic conductivity at the ambient temperature of the GPE is 2.16 × 10−4 S cm−1 at 7.5 wt.% of Mg(CF3SO3)2 with a ∼2.6 V electro-chemical stability window. At the 1000th cycle, the specific capacitance, Cs of cell A is 89 F g−1 while cell B and C are 63 and 49 F g−1. Cell A shows excellent long-term cyclic stability (less than a 5% decrease in specific capacitance after 1000 cycles). The best operating voltage for cell A is 1.6 V with the specific capacitance 106 F g−1 after 500 cycles

  19. Effect of band-aligned double absorber layers on photovoltaic characteristics of chemical bath deposited PbS/CdS thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Yeon, Deuk; Chandra Mohanty, Bhaskar; Lee, Seung Min; Soo Cho, Yong

    2015-09-23

    Here we report the highest energy conversion efficiency and good stability of PbS thin film-based depleted heterojunction solar cells, not involving PbS quantum dots. The PbS thin films were grown by the low cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) process at relatively low temperatures. Compared to the quantum dot solar cells which require critical and multistep complex procedures for surface passivation, the present approach, leveraging the facile modulation of the optoelectronic properties of the PbS films by the CBD process, offers a simpler route for optimization of PbS-based solar cells. Through an architectural modification, wherein two band-aligned junctions are stacked without any intervening layers, an enhancement of conversion efficiency by as much as 30% from 3.10 to 4.03% facilitated by absorption of a wider range of solar spectrum has been obtained. As an added advantage of the low band gap PbS stacked over a wide gap PbS, the devices show stability over a period of 10 days.

  20. Current induced annealing and electrical characterization of single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition for future interconnects in VLSI circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Neetu, E-mail: neetu.prasad@south.du.ac.in, E-mail: neetu23686@gmail.com; Kumari, Anita; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Mathur, P. C. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Bhatia, C. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-15

    Single layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated for its prospective application as horizontal interconnects in very large scale integrated circuits. However, the major bottleneck for its successful application is its degraded electronic transport properties due to the resist residual trapped in the grain boundaries and on the surface of the polycrystalline CVD graphene during multi-step lithographic processes, leading to increase in its sheet resistance up to 5 MΩ/sq. To overcome this problem, current induced annealing has been employed, which helps to bring down the sheet resistance to 10 kΩ/sq (of the order of its initial value). Moreover, the maximum current density of ∼1.2 × 10{sup 7 }A/cm{sup 2} has been obtained for SLG (1 × 2.5 μm{sup 2}) on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate, which is about an order higher than that of conventionally used copper interconnects.

  1. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA CNRS/NTU/Thales, UMI 3288, 50 Nanyang Drive (Singapore); Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, 117608 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  2. Investigation of the influence of the chemical composition of HSLA steel grades on the microstructure homogeneity during hot rolling in continuous rolling mills using a fast layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, M.; Rimnac, A.; Warczok, P.; Kozeschnik, E.; Bernhard, C.; Bragin, S.; Kawalla, R.; Linzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    The newly developed LaySiMS simulation tool provides new insight for inhomogeneous material flow and microstructure evolution in an endless strip production (ESP) plant. A deepened understanding of the influence of inhomogeneities in initial material state, temperature profile and material flow and their impact on the finished product can be reached e.g. by allowing for variable layer thickness distributions in the roll gap. Coupling temperature, deformation work and work hardening/recrystallization phenomena accounts for covering important effects in the roll gap. The underlying concept of the LaySiMS approach will be outlined and new insight gained regarding microstructural evolution, shear and inhomogeneous stress and strain states in the roll gap as well as local residual stresses will be presented. For the case of thin slab casting and direct rolling (TSDR) the interrelation of inhomogeneous initial state, micro structure evolution and dissolution state of micro alloying elements within the roughing section of an ESP line will be discussed. Special emphasis is put on the influence of the local chemical composition arising from direct charging on throughthickness homogeneity of the final product. It is concluded that, due to the specific combination of large reductions in the high reduction mills (HRM) and the highly inhomogeneous inverse temperature profile, the ESP-concept provides great opportunities for homogenizing the microstructure across the strip thickness.

  3. Current induced annealing and electrical characterization of single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition for future interconnects in VLSI circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated for its prospective application as horizontal interconnects in very large scale integrated circuits. However, the major bottleneck for its successful application is its degraded electronic transport properties due to the resist residual trapped in the grain boundaries and on the surface of the polycrystalline CVD graphene during multi-step lithographic processes, leading to increase in its sheet resistance up to 5 MΩ/sq. To overcome this problem, current induced annealing has been employed, which helps to bring down the sheet resistance to 10 kΩ/sq (of the order of its initial value). Moreover, the maximum current density of ∼1.2 × 107 A/cm2 has been obtained for SLG (1 × 2.5 μm2) on SiO2/Si substrate, which is about an order higher than that of conventionally used copper interconnects.

  4. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO. PMID:26653465

  5. Effects of E-Beam Irradiation on the Chemical, Physical, and Electrochemical Properties of Activated Carbons for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jung Jung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons (ACs were modified via e-beam irradiation at various doses for use as an electrode material in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs. The chemical compositions of the AC surfaces were largely unchanged by the e-beam irradiation. The ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy exhibited higher nanocrystallinity than the untreated ACs. The specific surface areas and pore volumes of the e-beam irradiated ACs were also higher than those of the untreated ACs. These results were attributed to the transformation and degradation of the nanocrystallinity of the AC surfaces due to the e-beam irradiation. The specific capacitance of the ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy increased by 24% compared with the untreated ACs, and the charge transfer resistance of the ACs was decreased by the e-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the electrochemical properties of the e-beam irradiated ACs can be attributed to an increase in their specific surface area and surface crystallinity.

  6. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kosemura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  7. Photoluminescence characteristics of CdS layers deposited in a chemical bath and their correlation to CdS/CdTe solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza-Perez, R.; Aguilar-Hernandez, J.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Ximello-Quiebras, N.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Vigil-Galan, O.; Moreno-Garcia, E. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Edificio 9, UPALM, DF 07738 (Mexico); Santana-Rodriguez, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan 04510, DF (Mexico); Morales-Acevedo, A. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Depto. de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida IPN No. 2508, DF 07360 (Mexico)

    2006-06-15

    In this work, we study CdS films processed by chemical bath deposition (CBD) using different thiourea concentrations in the bath solution with post-thermal treatments using CdCl{sub 2}. We study the effects of the thiourea concentration on the photovoltaic performance of the CdS/CdTe solar cells, by the analysis of the I-V curve, for S/Cd ratios in the CBD solution from 3 to 8. In this range of S/Cd ratios the CdS/CdTe solar cells show variations of the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) and the fill factor (FF). Other experimental data such as the optical transmittance and photoluminescence were obtained in order to correlate to the I-V characteristics of the solar cells. The best performance of CdS-CdTe solar cells made with CdS films obtained with a S/Cd ratio of 6 is explained in terms of the sulfur vacancies to sulfur interstitials ratio in the CBD-CdS layers. (author)

  8. Control of thickness and chemical properties of atomic layer deposition overcoats for stabilizing Cu/γ-Al2 O3 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Brandon J; Sener, Canan; Jackson, David H K; Kuech, Thomas F; Dumesic, James A

    2014-12-01

    Whereas sintering and leaching of copper nanoparticles during liquid-phase catalytic processing can be prevented by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to overcoat the nanoparticles with AlOx , this acidic overcoat leads to reversible deactivation of the catalyst by resinification and blocking of the pores within the overcoat during hydrogenation of furfural. We demonstrate that decreasing the overcoat thickness from 45 to 5 ALD cycles is an effective method to increase the rate per gram of catalyst and to decrease the rate of deactivation for catalysts pretreated at 673 K, and a fully regenerable copper catalyst can be produced with only five ALD cycles of AlOx . Moreover, although an overcoat of MgOx does not lead to stabilization of copper nanoparticles against sintering and leaching during liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions, the AlOx overcoat can be chemically modified to decrease acidity and deactivation through the addition of MgOx , while maintaining stability of the copper nanoparticles.

  9. Growth of carbon nanofiber coatings on nickel thin films on fused silica by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition: On the use of titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum as adhesion layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Coatings of carbon nanofiber (CNF) layers were synthesized on fused silica substrates using a catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition process (C-TCVD). The effects of various adhesion layers–titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum–under the nickel thin film on the attachment of carbon nanofiber

  10. Growth of InGaN films on c-plane sapphire substrates with an AlN nucleation layer by using metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang-Hui [Xidian University, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an (China); Xu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Chen, Ke; Bi, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Lin-Xia; Meng, Fan-Na; Ai, Shan; Hao, Yue [Xidian University, Xi' an (China)

    2012-08-15

    In this study, we report on the crystal quality of InGaN epifilms with different indium fractions grown at different growth temperatures on c-plane sapphire substrates with an AlN nucleation layer by using low-pressure metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD). High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), atom force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL) and Raman scattering measurements were employed to study the crystal quality, optical properties and strain condition of InGaN epifilms with increasing indium fraction (from 4.36% to 15.36%). Results show that InGaN epitaxial layers can be realized with a higher indium fraction at a lower temperature by inserting an AlN nucleation layer between the sapphire substrate and the GaN buffer layer and that the obtained InGaN epifilms have an improved crystal quality and a lower threading dislocation density.

  11. Facile chemical synthesis of nanoporous layered δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film for high-performance flexible electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yu; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Xionghua; Zheng, Yanfeng [The Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen, Zhenxing, E-mail: chenzx65@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Low-Carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Layered δ-MnO{sub 2} thin films with a three-dimensional nanostructure are successfully fabricated on stainless steel foil substrates for flexible electrochemical capacitors by a facile and effective chemical bath deposition technology from ethanol and potassium permanganate solution at 15 °C. The as-prepared thin films display nanoporous morphology and a water contact angle of 20°. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses reveal that the thin films are composed of δ-MnO{sub 2}. Electrochemical data demonstrate that the δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film electrodes can deliver a high special capacitance of 447 F/g at 2 mV/s, and provide a good capacitance retention ratio of 87% after 1000 continuous cycles at 10 mV/s in 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Compressive and tensile bending tests show that the as-prepared electrodes can steadily work over a wide range of applied curvatures between −2.5 cm{sup −1} (tension) and 2.5 cm{sup −1} (compression). Only a small decrease in special capacitance (0.9% at a curvature of 2.5 cm{sup −1} under compressive strain, or 1.2% at a curvature of −2.5 cm{sup −1} under tensile strain) is observed even after bending for 200 cycles, indicating the excellent mechanical flexibility and electrochemical stability of the δ-MnO{sub 2} thin film electrodes.

  12. An all chemical solution deposition approach for the growth of highly textured CeO2 cap layers on La2Zr2O7-buffered long lengths of biaxially textured Ni-W substrates for YBCO-coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reel-to-reel, dip coating process has been developed to continuously deposit epitaxial La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and CeO2 on 5 m long cube-textured {100} (001)Ni tapes. Recent results for La2Zr2O7 and CeO2 buffer layers deposited on long lengths of Ni substrate for the realization of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO)-coated conductors are presented. The major achievement is the development of a new all chemical solution deposition (CSD) process leading to the formation of highly textured buffer layers at moderate annealing temperatures. Reproducible highly textured, dense and crack-free LZO buffer layers and CeO2 cap layers were obtained for annealing temperatures as low as 900 deg. C in a reducing atmosphere (Ar-5 at.%-H2). The thickness of the LZO buffer layers was determined to be (200 ± 10) nm per single coating; prepared cerium oxide layers showed a thickness of 60 nm ± 10 nm. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow YBCO films on these substrates. A Tc0 of T = 90.5 K and ΔTc = 1.4 K was obtained on PLD-YBCO/CSD-CeO2 /CSD-LZO/Ni-5 at.% W, which shows the outstanding features of this new buffer layer architecture processed by CSD. The large layer thickness combined with low annealing temperatures is the main advantage of this new process for low-cost buffer layer deposition on Ni-RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrates)

  13. Use of different Zn precursors for the deposition of Zn(S,O) buffer layers by chemical bath for chalcopyrite based Cd-free thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Araoz, R.; Lux-Steiner, M.C. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Ennaoui, A.; Kropp, T.; Veryaeva, E. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany); Niesen, T.P. [AVANCIS GmbH and Co. KG, Munich (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Progress in fabricating Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGSSe) solar cells with Zn(S,O) buffer layers prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD) is discussed. The effect of different Zn salt precursors on solar cell device performance is investigated using production scale CIGSSe absorbers provided by AVANCIS GmbH and Co. KG. The CBD process has been developed at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut (HMI) using zinc nitrate, zinc sulphate or zinc chloride as zinc precursor. An average efficiency of 14.2{+-}0.8% is obtained by using one-layer CBD Zn(S,O) The dominant recombination path for well performing solar cells is discussed based on the results obtained from temperature dependent J(V) analysis. The structure and morphology of buffer layers deposited using zinc nitrate and zinc sulphate has been studied by means of transmission electron micrographs of glass/Mo/CIGSSe/Zn(S,O) structures. Results show a conformal coverage of the absorber by a Zn(S,O) layer of 15-25 nm consisting of nanocrystals with radii of {proportional_to}5 nm. XAES analysis of the buffer layer reveals a similar surface composition for buffer layers deposited with zinc nitrate and zinc sulphate. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Characterization of CBD-CdS layers with different S/Cd ratios in the chemical bath and their relation with the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous papers we have reported the improvement of the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells by varying the thiourea/CdCl2 ratio (R tc) in the chemical bath solution used for the deposition of the CdS layers. In this work, a more complete study concerning the physical properties of Chemical Bath Deposited (CBD) CdS layers studied by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy are correlated to the I-V characteristics under AM 1.5 sunlight and the spectral response of CdS/CdTe solar cells. It is confirmed that the optimum R tc for the CBD CdS films is R tc = 5, since in this case the best solar cells were obtained and these films show the better optical and structural characteristics

  15. Characterization of CBD-CdS layers with different S/Cd ratios in the chemical bath and their relation with the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Galan, O. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: osvaldo@esfm.ipn.mx; Morales-Acevedo, A. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Electrical Engineering Departament, Av. IPN No 2508, 07360 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Cruz-Gandarilla, F. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Jimenez-Escamilla, M.G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Hernandez, J. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sastre-Hernandez, J. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Meza, E. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ramon-Garcia, M.L. [Centro de Investigaciones en Energia.UNAM. Privada Xochicalco s/n Col. Centro Temixco. CP. 62580 Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-05-31

    In previous papers we have reported the improvement of the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells by varying the thiourea/CdCl{sub 2} ratio (R {sub tc}) in the chemical bath solution used for the deposition of the CdS layers. In this work, a more complete study concerning the physical properties of Chemical Bath Deposited (CBD) CdS layers studied by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy are correlated to the I-V characteristics under AM 1.5 sunlight and the spectral response of CdS/CdTe solar cells. It is confirmed that the optimum R {sub tc} for the CBD CdS films is R {sub tc} = 5, since in this case the best solar cells were obtained and these films show the better optical and structural characteristics.

  16. Quantitative determination of seven chemical constituents and chemo-type differentiation of chamomiles using high-performance thin-layer chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricaria recutita L. (German Chamomile), Anthemis nobilis L. (Roman Chamomile) and Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat are commonly used chamomiles. High performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed for estimation of six flavonoids (rutin, luteolin-7-O-ß-glucoside, chamaemeloside...

  17. 4-Amino-1,2,4-triazole: Playing a key role in the chemical deposition of Cu-In-Ga metal layers for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid film processing of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layers has the potential to lower the cell production costs significantly namely because of the absence of vacuum steps and high material utilization. In this work an ink system based on metal carboxylates in a mixture of a nitrogen-containing base and an alcohol is investigated. After the coating step on a suitable substrate followed by the drying of the alcohol, the metal ions are reduced to the respective metals with a simple heat treatment. However, depending on the conditions, the resulting metal layers are either highly porous or dewetting above 160 °C due to the high surface tension of the intermediate liquid indium. Adding 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to the ink leads to a homogeneous metal layer, which is crucial for the formation of dense chalcopyrite layers. We propose a stabilization mechanism based on a temporary polymeric complex of Cu2+ and the additive 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole which is decomposing completely at selenization conditions. - Highlights: • Influence of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole on the film formation has been investigated. • Two polymers identified forming an organic matrix during the layer processing • This matrix allows processing of dense and crack free metallic layers. • The polymers decompose completely under selenization conditions

  18. The influence of post-annealing on the chemical structures and dielectric properties of the surface layer of Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barium strontium titanate (Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, BST) films have been deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The influences of conventional thermal annealing (CTA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the chemical structures of the surface layers of the BST films have been investigated. Grazing x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that the RTA-films exhibit more compact structure and more completed crystallization than the CTA-films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations show that the surface layer is composed of a non-perovskited BST phase and a perovskited BST phase. For the CTA-film, the surface contains about 70% non-perovskited BST phase, and the surface layer is approximately 3-5 nm thick, while for the RTA-film, the surface non-perovskited BST phase amounts to about 40%, and the surface layer is about 1nm. XPS also indicates that the CTA-film surface adsorbs a larger amount of carbon contaminations than the RTA-film. Fourier transform infrared reveals that the amount of the surface adsorbed water and/or OH groups may be ignored. The non-perovskited BST phase is mainly related to the surface structure and the adsorbed carbon contaminations. The effect of annealing temperature on the surface layer and the amount of non-perovskited BST phase has been discussed, and the dielectric properties have also been measured

  19. Material design of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiCH films for low-k cap layers in the further scaling of ultra-large-scale integrated devices-Cu interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Shimizu, Shuji Nagano, Akira Uedono, Nobuo Tajima, Takeshi Momose and Yukihiro Shimogaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cap layers for Cu interconnects in ultra-large-scale integrated devices (ULSIs, with a low dielectric constant (k-value and strong barrier properties against Cu and moisture diffusion, are required for the future further scaling of ULSIs. There is a trade-off, however, between reducing the k-value and maintaining strong barrier properties. Using quantum mechanical simulations and other theoretical computations, we have designed ideal dielectrics: SiCH films with Si–C2H4–Si networks. Such films were estimated to have low porosity and low k; thus they are the key to realizing a cap layer with a low k and strong barrier properties against diffusion. For fabricating these ideal SiCH films, we designed four novel precursors: isobutyl trimethylsilane, diisobutyl dimethylsilane, 1, 1-divinylsilacyclopentane and 5-silaspiro [4,4] noname, based on quantum chemical calculations, because such fabrication is difficult by controlling only the process conditions in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD using conventional precursors. We demonstrated that SiCH films prepared using these newly designed precursors had large amounts of Si–C2H4–Si networks and strong barrier properties. The pore structure of these films was then analyzed by positron annihilation spectroscopy, revealing that these SiCH films actually had low porosity, as we designed. These results validate our material and precursor design concepts for developing a PECVD process capable of fabricating a low-k cap layer.

  20. Material design of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiCH films for low-k cap layers in the further scaling of ultra-large-scale integrated devices-Cu interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cap layers for Cu interconnects in ultra-large-scale integrated devices (ULSIs), with a low dielectric constant (k-value) and strong barrier properties against Cu and moisture diffusion, are required for the future further scaling of ULSIs. There is a trade-off, however, between reducing the k-value and maintaining strong barrier properties. Using quantum mechanical simulations and other theoretical computations, we have designed ideal dielectrics: SiCH films with Si–C2H4–Si networks. Such films were estimated to have low porosity and low k; thus they are the key to realizing a cap layer with a low k and strong barrier properties against diffusion. For fabricating these ideal SiCH films, we designed four novel precursors: isobutyl trimethylsilane, diisobutyl dimethylsilane, 1, 1-divinylsilacyclopentane and 5-silaspiro [4,4] noname, based on quantum chemical calculations, because such fabrication is difficult by controlling only the process conditions in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using conventional precursors. We demonstrated that SiCH films prepared using these newly designed precursors had large amounts of Si–C2H4–Si networks and strong barrier properties. The pore structure of these films was then analyzed by positron annihilation spectroscopy, revealing that these SiCH films actually had low porosity, as we designed. These results validate our material and precursor design concepts for developing a PECVD process capable of fabricating a low-k cap layer. (paper)

  1. Chemical solution deposition (CSD) of CeO2 and La2Zr2O7 buffer layers on cube textured NiW substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of crack free layers of CeO2 and La2Zr2O7 deposited by means of CSD on cube textured Ni-4 at.% W substrates. EBSD-data show histograms with very good inplane- and out-of-plane textures and were used to simulate the critical current density in the YBCO layer. The surface roughness, a sensitive feature for good deposition results, was analyzed with a profilometer. In the CSD process we applied, the 2, 4-pentanedionates of the metal cations in glacial acetic acid and methanol served as starting substances

  2. Microstructural analysis of InGaN/GaN epitaxial layers of metal organic chemical vapor deposition on c-plane of convex patterned sapphire substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructures of the P-GaN (250 nm)/GaN cap (∼ 35 nm)/7 pairs of InGaN/GaN MQWs (multi-quantum wells)/n-GaN (3 μm)/HT (high temperature)-GaN (3 μm)/LT (low temperature)-GaN buffer (5 nm) on c-plane convex patterned sapphire substrate were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High density of dislocations in the LT-GaN buffer layer at both flat and convex patterned regions was observed to form. At the flat region, some of high dislocations formed at LT-GaN buffer grew over, bended to from stair-like dislocations extended along the edge of the convex pattern and then transformed to TDs (threading dislocations) extending through the InGaN/GaN epitaxial layers. However, few TDs reached the top of the epitaxial layers. Quantitative analysis revealed that the dislocation density has been drastically reduced to ∼ 106 cm−2, reducing formation of V-defects at the 7 pairs of multi-quantum-wells near the surface. - Highlights: • The InGaN/GaN epitaxial layers were grown on convex patterned sapphire substrate. • We systematically study the defect structures by transmission electron microscopy. • Reduce threading dislocation and V defect by growth on convex pattered substrate. • Improving of overall microstructure by growth on convex pattern substrate

  3. Microfabrication, separations, and detection by mass spectrometry on ultrathin-layer chromatography plates prepared via the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride onto carbon nanotube templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyal, Supriya S; Häbe, Tim T; Cushman, Cody V; Dhunna, Manan; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Farnsworth, Paul B; Morlock, Gertrud E; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-07-24

    Microfabrication of ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) plates via conformal deposition of silicon nitride by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds was demonstrated. After removal of the CNTs and hydroxylation, the resulting UTLC phase showed no expansion or distortion of their microfeatures and the absence/reduction of remaining nitrogenic species. Developing time of a mixture of lipophilic dyes on this UTLC plates was 86% shorter than on high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) plates. A water-soluble food dye mixture was also separated resulting in low band broadening and reduced developing time compared to HPTLC. For the latter example, mobile phase optimization on a single UTLC plate consisted of 14 developments with different mobile phases, each preceded by a plate prewashing step. The same plate was again reused for additional 11 separations under varying conditions resulting in a development procedure with a mean separation efficiency of 233,000theoretical plates/m and a reduced mobile phase consumption of only 400μL. This repeated use proved the physical robustness of the ultrathin layer and its resistance to damage. The layer was highly suited for hyphenation to ambient mass spectrometry, including desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry.

  4. A comparative study of the annealing behavior of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 based solar cells with an indium sulfide buffer layer, partly submitted to wet chemical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium sulfide thin films deposited via thermal evaporation from compound source material have been successfully utilized as a cadmium free buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 based solar cells. However, high efficiencies are only reached after an additional annealing step. In this work, the annealing behavior of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 based indium sulfide buffered solar cells is compared to the annealing behavior of similar cells, which were submitted to wet chemical treatments partly containing cadmium ions. Upon annealing a significant improvement of the initial solar cell characteristics is observed for the untreated cell and is related to the increase of activation energy for the carrier recombination process and a decrease of the ideality factor within the one diode model. It is shown here that this improvement can also be achieved by wet treatments of the absorber prior to buffer layer deposition. Upon annealing these treated cells still gain in collection length but lose open circuit voltage, which is explained here within a model including a highly p-doped absorber surface layer and supported by simulations showing that a decrease in doping density of such a surface layer would lead to the observed effects

  5. Micro computed tomography and CFD simulation of drop deposition on gas diffusion layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cells are electrochemical power generation system which may achieve high energy efficiencies with environmentally friendly emissions. Among the different types, Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) seem at present one of the most promising choices. A very important component of a PEMFC is the gas diffusion layer (GDL), which has the primary role of managing water in the cell, allowing reactant gases transport to the catalyst layer while keeping the membrane correctly hydrated and preventing electrode flooding. Therefore, GDLs have to be porous and very hydrophobic. Carbon clothes or carbon papers coated with a hydrophobizing agent – typically a fluoropolymer – are used. Given the complex chemistry and morphology of the GDLs, wettability analyses on them present some critical issues when using the conventional contact angle measurement techniques. In this paper, the deposition of a drop on a GDL (produced using polytetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoroalcoxy vinyl ether as the fluorinated polymer) was investigated by means of micro computed tomography (microCT) and numerical simulation. The microCT facility operational at the University of Bergamo was used to acquire a 3D tomography of a water drop deposed on a sample GDL. The reconstructed drop dataset allows thorough understanding of the real drop shape, of its contact area and contact line. The GDL dataset was used to create a realistic mesh for the numerical simulation of the drop deposition, which was performed using the OpenFOAM® interFOAM solver

  6. Micro computed tomography and CFD simulation of drop deposition on gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, M.; Santini, M.; Lorenzi, M.; Knisel, V.; Fest-Santini, S.

    2014-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical power generation system which may achieve high energy efficiencies with environmentally friendly emissions. Among the different types, Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) seem at present one of the most promising choices. A very important component of a PEMFC is the gas diffusion layer (GDL), which has the primary role of managing water in the cell, allowing reactant gases transport to the catalyst layer while keeping the membrane correctly hydrated and preventing electrode flooding. Therefore, GDLs have to be porous and very hydrophobic. Carbon clothes or carbon papers coated with a hydrophobizing agent - typically a fluoropolymer - are used. Given the complex chemistry and morphology of the GDLs, wettability analyses on them present some critical issues when using the conventional contact angle measurement techniques. In this paper, the deposition of a drop on a GDL (produced using polytetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoroalcoxy vinyl ether as the fluorinated polymer) was investigated by means of micro computed tomography (microCT) and numerical simulation. The microCT facility operational at the University of Bergamo was used to acquire a 3D tomography of a water drop deposed on a sample GDL. The reconstructed drop dataset allows thorough understanding of the real drop shape, of its contact area and contact line. The GDL dataset was used to create a realistic mesh for the numerical simulation of the drop deposition, which was performed using the OpenFOAM® interFOAM solver.

  7. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  8. Effect of Chemical Reaction on Convective Heat Transfer of Boundary Layer Flow in Nanofluid over a Wedge with Heat Generation/Absorption and Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Kasmani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine the convective heat transfer of nanofluid past a wedge subject to first-order chemical reaction, heat generation/absorption and suction effects. The influence of wedge angle parameter, thermophoresis, Dufour and Soret type diffusivity are included. The local similarity transformation is applied to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. Shooting method integrated with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the ordinary differential equations. The skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates as well as the effects of various parameters on velocity, temperature and solutal concentration profiles are analyzed. The results indicate that when the chemical reaction parameter increases, the heat transfer coefficient increases while the mass transfer coefficient decreases. The effect of chemical reaction parameter is very important in solutal concentration field compared to velocity and temperature profiles since it decreases the solutal concentration of the nanoparticle.

  9. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF6, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E0'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  10. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie

    2009-02-28

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl){sub 2}(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF{sub 6}, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E{sup 0}'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period.

  11. Influence of ZnO seed layer precursor molar ratio on the density of interface defects in low temperature aqueous chemically synthesized ZnO nanorods/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoor, Hatim; Pozina, Galia; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr; Liu, Xianjie; Iandolo, Donata; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis (LT-ACS) of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) has been attracting considerable research interest due to its great potential in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The influence of the molar ratio of the zinc acetate (ZnAc): KOH as a ZnO seed layer precursor on the density of interface defects and hence the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in LT-ACS of ZnO NRs/GaN LEDs has been systematically investigated. The material quality of the as-prepared seed layer as quantitatively deduced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is found to be influenced by the molar ratio. It is revealed by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence that the seed layer molar ratio plays a significant role in the formation and the density of defects at the n-ZnO NRs/p-GaN heterostructure interface. Consequently, LED devices processed using ZnO NRs synthesized with molar ratio of 1:5 M exhibit stronger yellow emission (˜575 nm) compared to those based on 1:1 and 1:3 M ratios as measured by the electroluminescence. Furthermore, seed layer molar ratio shows a quantitative dependence of the non-radiative defect densities as deduced from light-output current characteristics analysis. These results have implications on the development of high-efficiency ZnO-based LEDs and may also be helpful in understanding the effects of the ZnO seed layer on defect-related non-radiative recombination.

  12. Effect of chemical reaction, heat and mass transfer on nonlinear boundary layer past a porous shrinking sheet in the presence of suction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhaimin, E-mail: muh003@yahoo.co [Computational Fluid Dynamics, FSSW, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400, Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Kandasamy, Ramasamy, E-mail: future990@gmail.co [Computational Fluid Dynamics, FSSW, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400, Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Hashim, Ishak [School of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-05-15

    This work is concerned with the viscous flow due to a shrinking sheet in the presence of suction with variable stream conditions. The cases of two-dimensional and axisymmetric shrinking have been discussed. The governing partial differential equations of the problem, subjected to their boundary conditions, are solved numerically by applying an efficient solution scheme for local nonsimilarity boundary layer analysis. Favorable comparison with previously published work is performed. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as for the skin friction, heat and mass transfer and deposition rate are obtained and displayed graphically for pertinent parameters to show interesting aspects of the solution.

  13. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  14. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  15. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  16. ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} photovoltaic cells fabricated using chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S.N.; Lam, W.W.; Qiu, C.X.; Shih, I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1997-04-14

    CdS thin films have been prepared by using chemical bath deposition. The effects of bath temperature and concentration of NH{sub 4}OH were studied. Optimum deposition conditions were established. The resulted CdS thin films exhibit optical transmissions in excess of 90 over the majority of the solar spectrum. ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells were fabricated on electrodeposited CuInSe{sub 2} thin films. A conversion efficiency of 6.3 was obtained with an active area of 7.8 mm{sup 2} (no AR coating)

  17. Deposition and mechanical properties of Ti-Si-N coated layer on WC-Co by RF inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eung-Ahn; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2002-12-02

    Coatings of Ti-Si-N on WC-Co substrates were deposited by an r.f. inductively coupled (RFI) PECVD technique. Ti-Si-N coating layers were grown with fairly high deposition rates, and had a maximum hardness value of 38-40 GPa when deposited at 500-600 deg. C with a Si content of approximately 10 at.%. The film microstructure of maximum hardness was revealed to be a nanocomposite of nano-sized TiN crystallites embedded in amorphous silicon nitride phase by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The increase of Si content above 10 at.% caused thickening of amorphous silicon nitride phase and an appearance of free Si, although increasing Si also induced finer and more isotropic TiN crystallites with full percolation by amorphous phase. The deposition behaviors of Ti-Si-N, their microstructures, and mechanical property by an RFI-PECVD method were systematically investigated in this work.

  18. Deposition and mechanical properties of Ti-Si-N coated layer on WC-Co by RF inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings of Ti-Si-N on WC-Co substrates were deposited by an r.f. inductively coupled (RFI) PECVD technique. Ti-Si-N coating layers were grown with fairly high deposition rates, and had a maximum hardness value of 38-40 GPa when deposited at 500-600 deg. C with a Si content of approximately 10 at.%. The film microstructure of maximum hardness was revealed to be a nanocomposite of nano-sized TiN crystallites embedded in amorphous silicon nitride phase by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The increase of Si content above 10 at.% caused thickening of amorphous silicon nitride phase and an appearance of free Si, although increasing Si also induced finer and more isotropic TiN crystallites with full percolation by amorphous phase. The deposition behaviors of Ti-Si-N, their microstructures, and mechanical property by an RFI-PECVD method were systematically investigated in this work

  19. Vertical transport rates and concentrations of OH and Cl radicals in the Tropical Tropopause Layer from observations of CO2 and halocarbons: implications for distributions of long- and short-lived chemical species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Bui

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Rates for large-scale vertical transport of air in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL were determined using high-resolution, in situ observations of CO2 concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during the NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4 campaign in August 2007. Upward movement of trace gases in the deep tropics was notably slower in TC4 than during the Costa Rica AURA Validation Experiment (CR-AVE, in January 2006. Transport rates in the TTL were combined with in situ measurements of chlorinated and brominated organic compounds from whole air samples to determine chemical loss rates for reactive chemical species, providing empirical vertical profiles for 24-h mean concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (OH and chlorine atoms in the TTL. The analysis shows that important short-lived species such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, and CH2Br2 have longer chemical lifetimes than the time for transit of the TTL, implying that these species, which are not included in most models, could readily reach the stratosphere and make significant contributions of chlorine and/or bromine to stratospheric loading.

  20. Vertical transport rates and concentrations of OH and Cl radicals in the Tropical Tropopause Layer from Observations of CO2 and halocarbons: implications for distributions of long- and short-lived chemical species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Bui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates for large-scale vertical transport of air in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL were determined using high-resolution, in situ observations of CO2 concentrations in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during the NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4 campaign in August 2007. Upward movement of trace gases in the deep tropics was notably slower in TC4 than during the Costa Rica AURA Validation Experiment (CR-AVE, in January 2006. Transport rates in the TTL were combined with in situ measurements of chlorinated and brominated organic compounds from whole air samples to determine chemical loss rates for reactive chemical species, providing empirical vertical profiles for 24-h mean concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (OH and chlorine atoms in the TTL. The analysis shows that important short-lived species such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, and CH2Br2 have longer chemical lifetimes than the time for transit of the TTL, implying that these species, which are not included in most models, could readily reach the stratosphere and make significant contributions of chlorine and/or bromine to stratospheric loading.

  1. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of atomic-layer deposited lanthanum doped zirconium dioxide thin film on 4H-SiC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Way Foong; Quah, Hock Jin; Lu, Qifeng; Mu, Yifei; Ismail, Wan Azli Wan; Rahim, Bazura Abdul; Esa, Siti Rahmah; Kee, Yeh Yee; Zhao, Ce Zhou; Hassan, Zainuriah; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2016-03-01

    Effects of rapid thermal annealing at different temperatures (700-900 °C) on structural, chemical, and electrical characteristics of lanthanum (La) doped zirconium oxide (ZrO2) atomic layer deposited on 4H-SiC substrates have been investigated. Chemical composition depth profiling analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cross-sectional studies using high resolution transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line scan analysis were insufficient to justify the presence of La in the investigated samples. The minute amount of La present in the bulk oxide was confirmed by chemical depth profiles of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The presence of La in the ZrO2 lattice led to the formation of oxygen vacancies, which was revealed through binding energy shift for XPS O 1s core level spectra of Zrsbnd O. The highest amount of oxygen vacancies in the sample annealed at 700 °C has yielded the acquisition of the highest electric breakdown field (∼ 6.3 MV/cm) and dielectric constant value (k = 23) as well as the highest current-time (I-t) sensor response towards oxygen gas. The attainment of both the insulating and catalytic properties in the La doped ZrO2 signified the potential of the doped ZrO2 as a metal reactive oxide on 4H-SiC substrate.

  2. The structural and chemical origin of the oxygen redox activity in layered and cation-disordered Li-excess cathode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Jinhyuk; Urban, Alexander; Malik, Rahul; Kang, ShinYoung; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-07-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are now reaching the energy density limits set by their electrode materials, requiring new paradigms for Li(+) and electron hosting in solid-state electrodes. Reversible oxygen redox in the solid state in particular has the potential to enable high energy density as it can deliver excess capacity beyond the theoretical transition-metal redox-capacity at a high voltage. Nevertheless, the structural and chemical origin of the process is not understood, preventing the rational design of better cathode materials. Here, we demonstrate how very specific local Li-excess environments around oxygen atoms necessarily lead to labile oxygen electrons that can be more easily extracted and participate in the practical capacity of cathodes. The identification of the local structural components that create oxygen redox sets a new direction for the design of high-energy-density cathode materials. PMID:27325096

  3. Chemical compatibility issues related to use of copper as an interfacial layer for SiC fiber reinforced Ti3Ai+Nb composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of Cu, a potential interfacial compliant layer for the Ti3Al plus Nb/SiC composite, with SiC, SCS-6 fiber, and the Ti3Al plus Nb matrix was examined at two temperatures: 1223 and 1273 K. Reaction of Cu with SiC resulted in the formation of a CuSi solution and free carbon, the reaction product being molten at 1273 K. Hot pressing the SCS-6 fiber in a Cu matrix at 1273 K resulted in cracking and delamination of the outer carbon-rich coating, thus allowing the Cu to penetrate to the SiC-carbon coating interface and react with SiC. In contrast, no such damage to the outer coating was observed at 1223 K. There was excessive reaction between Cu and the Ti3Al plus Nb matrix, the reaction product being molten both at 1223 and 1273 K. An interlayer of Nb between Cu and Ti3Al plus Nb matrix prevented the reaction between the two.

  4. Molecularly imprinted layer-coated silica nanoparticles for selective solid-phase extraction of bisphenol A from chemical cleansing and cosmetics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly selective molecularly imprinted layer-coated silica nanoparticles for bisphenol A (BPA) were synthesized by molecular imprinting technique with a sol-gel process on the supporter of silica nanoparticles. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectrometer, transmission electron microscope, dynamic adsorption and static adsorption tests. The equilibrium association constant, Ka, and the apparent maximum number of binding sites, Qmax, were estimated to be 1.25 x 105 mL μmol-1 and 16.4 μmol g-1, respectively. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles solid-phase extraction (SPE) column had higher selectivity for BPA than the commercial C18-SPE column. The results of the study indicated that the prepared BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles exhibited high adsorption capacity and selectivity, and offered a fast kinetics for the rebinding of BPA. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles were successfully used in SPE to selectively enrich and determine BPA from shampoo, bath lotion and cosmetic cream samples.

  5. Molecularly imprinted layer-coated silica nanoparticles for selective solid-phase extraction of bisphenol A from chemical cleansing and cosmetics samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Rong; Zhao Wenhui; Zhai Meijuan; Wei Fangdi; Cai Zheng; Sheng Na [School of Pharmacy, Nanjing Medical University, Hanzhong Road 140, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029 (China); Hu Qin, E-mail: huqin@njmu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Nanjing Medical University, Hanzhong Road 140, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029 (China)

    2010-01-25

    Highly selective molecularly imprinted layer-coated silica nanoparticles for bisphenol A (BPA) were synthesized by molecular imprinting technique with a sol-gel process on the supporter of silica nanoparticles. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectrometer, transmission electron microscope, dynamic adsorption and static adsorption tests. The equilibrium association constant, K{sub a}, and the apparent maximum number of binding sites, Q{sub max}, were estimated to be 1.25 x 10{sup 5} mL {mu}mol{sup -1} and 16.4 {mu}mol g{sup -1}, respectively. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles solid-phase extraction (SPE) column had higher selectivity for BPA than the commercial C18-SPE column. The results of the study indicated that the prepared BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles exhibited high adsorption capacity and selectivity, and offered a fast kinetics for the rebinding of BPA. The BPA-imprinted silica nanoparticles were successfully used in SPE to selectively enrich and determine BPA from shampoo, bath lotion and cosmetic cream samples.

  6. Wet chemical preparation of YVO4:Eu thin films as red-emitting phosphor layers for fully transparent flat dielectric discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly transparent YVO4:Eu thin films were deposited via dip coating of liquid nanoparticle dispersions on glass substrates. Annealing of the nanoparticle layers resulted in restructuring of the material into oriented crystalline films. The crystallinity was confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction. Film thickness was adjusted to 467 nm by multiple deposition. The resulting coatings show > 99% absorbance for wavelength below 300 nm and > 90% transmission in the visible spectral range. Under UV-light excitation a bright red photoluminescence with a quantum efficiency of 20% is observed. A planar, transparent dielectric barrier discharge lamp was constructed using YVO4:Eu coated glasses and transparent electrodes made from antimony-doped tin dioxide thin films. - Highlights: ► Preparation of highly transparent Eu3+ doped YVO4 phosphor thin films. ► Improved crystallinity and optical properties through heat treatment. ► Red emitting films on glass substrates were combined with antimony tin oxide thin films. ► Fully transparent, planar gas discharge lamp as prototype for a light emitting window.

  7. 一个化工过程运行系统的多层信息集成平台%A Multi-layer Information Integration Platform for Chemical Process Operation Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱宇; 李荷华; 李秀喜

    2004-01-01

    In the process industry, automation and process control systems are widely implemented, information integration is however far away from satisfactory. It remains a hard job for senior managers to make decisions based on the plant-wide real-time integrated information. This paper proposes a multi-layer information integration platform. In the data integration level, the standard for the exchange of product (STEP) and the extensible markup language (XML) are used to unify these data of the chemical process. In the model integration level, the models are integrated by using the neutral model repository and CAPE-OPEN. In the integration of process task, the common object request broker architecture (CORBA) is used as the communication mediator. The XML is taken as the data standard. A uniform information platform is thus constructed and realized. The proposed information integration platform is satisfactorily implemented to solve the Tennessee Eastman (TE) problem.

  8. Soft-chemical synthesis and catalytic activity of Ni-Al and Co-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs intercalated with anions with different charge density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Takei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-Al and Ni-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs intercalated with three types of anionic molecules, dodecylsulfate (C12H25SO4−, DS, di-2-ethylsulfosuccinate ([COOC2H3EtBu]2C2H3SO3−, D2ES, and polytungstate (H2W12O4210−, HWO were prepared by means of ion-exchange and co-precipitation processes. With the use of DS and D2ES as intercalation agents, high crystallinity was maintained after intercalation into the LDHs. In the case of HWO, the intercalated LDHs could be obtained by ion-exchange as well as co-precipitation with a decline in the crystallinity; however, unreacted LDH was detected in the ion-exchange samples, and some unwanted phases such as hydroxide and pyrochlore were generated by the co-precipitation process. The maximum specific surface area and pore volume of the Ni-Al sample with intercalated HWO, prepared by the ion-exchange process were 74 m2/g and 0.174 mL/g, respectively. The occupancies of DS, D2ES, and HWO within the interlayer space were approximately 0.3–0.4, 0.5–0.6, and 0.1–0.2, respectively, in the Co-Al and Ni-Al LDHs. Analysis of the catalytic activity demonstrated that the DS-intercalated Ni-Al LDH sample exhibited relatively good catalytic activity for conversion of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone.

  9. Developmental changes in electrophysiological properties and a transition from electrical to chemical coupling between excitatory layer 4 neurons in the rat barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliza eValiullina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During development, sensory systems switch from an immature to an adult mode of function along with the emergence of the active cortical states. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings from neocortical slices in vitro to characterize the developmental changes in the basic electrophysiological properties of excitatory L4 neurons and their connectivity before and after the developmental switch, which occurs in the rat barrel cortex in vivo at postnatal day P8. Prior to the switch, L4 neurons had lower resting membrane potentials, higher input resistance, lower membrane capacity, as well as action potentials (APs with smaller amplitudes, longer durations and higher AP thresholds compared to the neurons after the switch. A sustained firing pattern also emerged around the switch. Dual patch-clamp recordings from L4 neurons revealed that recurrent connections between L4 excitatory cells do not exist before and develop rapidly across the switch. In contrast, electrical coupling between these neurons waned around the switch. We suggest that maturation of electrophysiological features, particularly acquisition of a sustained firing pattern, and a transition from the immature electrical to mature chemical synaptic coupling between excitatory L4 neurons, contributes to the developmental switch in the cortical mode of function.

  10. Thin relaxed SiGe layer grown on Ar+ ion implanted Si substrate by ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Chun; YU Ben-Hai; LIU Jiang-Feng; CAO Jian-Qing; ZHU De-Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Thin strain-relaxed Si0.81Ge0.19 films (95 nm) on the Ar+ ion implanted Si substrates with different energies (30 keV, 40 keV and 60 keV) at the same implanted dose (3×l015cm-2) were grown by ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD). Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling (RBS/C), Raman spectra as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize these SiGe films. Investigations by RBS/C demonstrate that these thin Si0.81Ge0.19 films were epitaxially grown on the Ar+ ion implanted Si substrates, although there existed lots of crystal defects. The relaxation extent of Si0.81Ge0.19 films on the Ar+ implanted Si substrates is larger than that in the unimplanted case, which were verified by Raman spectra. Considering the relaxation extent of strain, surface roughness and crystal defects in these SiGe films, the thin relaxed SiGe film on the 30 keV Ar+ implanted Si substrate is optimal.

  11. Formation and characterization of the MgO protecting layer deposited by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, M S; Byun, J C; Kim, D S; Choi, C K; Lee, J Y; Kim, K H

    1999-01-01

    MgO films were prepared on Si(100) and soda-lime glass substrates by using plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition. Various ratios of the O sub 2 /CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu gas mixture and various gas flow rates were tested for the film fabrications. Highly (100)-oriented MgO films with good crystallinity were obtained with a 10 sccm CH sub 3 MgO sup t Bu flow without an O sub 2 gas flow. About 5 % carbon was contained in all the MgO films. The refractive index and the secondary electron emission coefficient for the best quality film were 1.43 and 0.45, respectively. The sputtering rate was about 0.2 nm/min for 10 sup 1 sup 1 cm sup - sup 3 Ar sup + ion density. Annealing at 500 .deg. C in an Ar ambient promoted the grain size without inducing a phase transition.

  12. Large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser with mono-layer chemical vapor deposition graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duanduan; Xiong, Fengfu; Zhang, Cankun; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Cai, Weiwei; Che, Kaijun; Luo, Zhengqian

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped laser using a mono-layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene saturable absorber (SA). By exploiting the large laser gain of Er:Yb double-clad fiber and optimizing the coupling ratio of the output coupler, not only can the mono-layer CVD graphene SA be protected from oversaturation and thermal damage, but also a large pulse energy up to 1.05 μJ (corresponding to the average output power of 25.6 mW) is thus achieved. Using a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter, stable Q-switched pulses can operate with a tunable range from 1530.97 to 1546.92 nm, covering a wavelength range of ∼16  nm. The Q-switching states at the different lasing wavelengths have been observed and recorded. The Q-switched repetition rate and the pulse duration (with the minimum one of 2.6 μs) have been characterized as well. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the largest pulse energy from an all-fiber graphene Q-switched laser. PMID:25089965

  13. Influence of decontamination and preconditioning on corrosion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation field exists in nuclear power plants is primarily due to the deposition of radioisotopes on the surfaces of pipes and other primary components. These radiation fields cause occupational radiation exposure (ORE) to personnel engaged in maintenance work during refuelling shutdowns and thus significantly influence the operation and maintenance works on nuclear power plants. Dissolved and particulate corrosion products can also deposit on fuel cladding and primary system surfaces. Primary problems caused by fuel assemblies' deposits are the increase of cladding temperature, which enhances corrosion risk and may lead to and/or contribute to fuel rod failure, For VVERs the deposition mechanism is most likely influenced by some organic substances (residues from decontamination agents), whose behaviour in the active zone and role in the deposition mechanism are not completely known. Operational experience from various NPPs (e.g. Novovoronezh, Loviisa, and Paks) revealed the large impact of decontamination processes on the quality of oxide layer and deposits, so did the loop and autoclave tests. Actual in-pile loop tests carried at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) Rez are focused on the study of surface preconditioning and decontamination solutions' effect on surface layer after irradiation exposition. Effects of the decontamination on depositi formation onto primary circuit surfaces are investigated under steam generator (SG) operating conditions with the model device which contains SG heat exchanger tube, VVER spacer grids and heating rods simulating fuel cladding surface. The entire experiment is performed in experimental reactor water loop (RVS 4) on the NRI research reactor LVR-15. Oxide layer was built-up on the inner surface of as received SG tubes under higher temperature primary water conditions and with irradiation. This long-term exposure should enable to create oxide surface layers corresponding to the real conditions. The whole loop

  14. EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED SOLUBILITY CONTROLS ON RADIONUCLIDES IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.; Millings, M.

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  15. Exposing and Deposing Hyper-Economized School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, John Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Despite indications of the problematic nature of "laissez faire" capitalism, such as the convictions of corporate leaders and the global financial crisis that appeared to largely stem from a de-regulated financial services industry, it seems clear that societies and environments continue to be strongly influenced by hyper-economized worldviews and…

  16. Exposing and deposing hyper-economized school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, John Lawrence

    2010-06-01

    Despite indications of the problematic nature of laissez faire capitalism, such as the convictions of corporate leaders and the global financial crisis that appeared to largely stem from a de-regulated financial services industry, it seems clear that societies and environments continue to be strongly influenced by hyper-economized worldviews and practices. Given the importance of societal acceptance of a potentially dominant ideological perspective, it is logical to assume that it would be critical for students to be prepared to function in niches prioritizing unrestricted for-profit commodity exchanges. Indeed, in their article in this issue, Lyn Carter and Ranjith Dediwalage appear to support this claim in their analyses of the large-scale and expensive Australian curriculum and instruction project, Sustainability by the Bay. More specifically, they effectively demonstrate that this project manifests several characteristics that would suggest neoliberal and neoconservative influences—ideological perspectives that they argue are largely fundamental to the functioning of the global economic system. In this forum article, possible adverse effects of neoliberalism and neoconservatism on school science are discussed—with further justification for Carter and Dediwalage's concerns. Additionally, however, this article raises the possibility of subverting neoliberalism and neoconservatism in science education through application of communitarian ideals.

  17. Deposing the Cool Corona of KPD 0005+5106

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, J J D K

    2005-01-01

    The ROSAT PSPC pulse height spectrum of the peculiar He-rich hot white dwarf KPD 0005+5106 provided a great surprise when first analysed by Fleming, Werner & Barstow (1993). It defied the best non-LTE modelling attempts in terms of photospheric emission from He-dominated atmospheres including C, N and O and was instead interpreted as the first evidence for a coronal plasma around a white dwarf. We show here that a recent high resolution Chandra LETGS spectrum has more structure than expected from a thermal bremsstrahlung continuum and lacks the narrow lines of H-like and He-like C expected from a coronal plasma. Moreover, a coronal model requires a total luminosity more than two orders of magnitude larger than that of the star itself. Instead, the observed 20-80 AA flux is consistent with photospheric models containing trace amounts of heavier elements such as Fe. The soft X-ray flux is highly sensitive to the adopted metal abundance and provides a metal abundance diagnostic. The weak X-ray emission at 1 ...

  18. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  19. A novel thin-layer amperometric detector based on chemically modified ring-disc electrode and its application for simultaneous measurements of nitric oxide and nitrite in rat brain combined with in vivo microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, L; Shi, G; Tian, Y; Liu, H; Jin, L; Yamamoto, K; Tao, S; Jin, J

    1998-08-01

    A novel thin-layer amperometric detector (TLAD) based on chemically modified ring-disc electrode and its application for simultaneous measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) in rat brain were demonstrated in this work. The ring-disc electrode was simultaneously sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) by modifying its inner disc with electropolymerized film of cobalt(II) tetraaminophthalocyanine (polyCoTAPc)/Nafion and its outer ring with poly(vinylpyridine) (PVP), respectively. The ring-disc electrode was used to constitute a novel TLAD in radial flow cell for simultaneous measurements of NO and NO(2)(-) in rat brain combined with techniques of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vivo microdialysis. It was found that the basal concentration of NO in the caudate nucleus of rat brain is lower than 1.0x10(-7) mol l(-1), NO(2)(-) concentration is 5.0x10(-7) mol l(-1) and NO exists in brain maybe mainly in the form of its decomposed product. PMID:18967286

  20. Application of Radar Systems for Remote Monitoring of Lower Atmosphere Layers' Chemical composition%应用雷达系统遥测低气压层化学成分

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivon.,VA; Niko.,VV

    2000-01-01

    The remote monitoring of the chemical composition of the lower atmos ph ere layers problem solving can be done through application of radar systems (RS) working in the range of superhigh frequencies (SHF) on resonance frequencies of contamination gases' rotation molecule spectrum. In this research, methods of p arameters and gas contamination dynamics determination are studied. The determin ation is done through obtaining the radar information taking into consideration the special characteristics of absorption lines that are adequate to the real co nditions. The evaluation of RS technical potential is done.%应用雷达系统测定污染气体旋转分子光谱共振频率的超高频范围, 从而解决遥测低气压层的化学成分.本文对参数和气体污染动力学的测定方法进行了研究. 通过综合考虑雷达信息和适合实际情况的吸收线特性来进行测定.对雷达系统的技术潜力做了评估.

  1. Study on advanced Ce0.9La0.1O2/Gd2Zr2O7 buffer layers architecture towards all chemical solution processed coated conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Ma, L.; Wu, W.;

    2015-01-01

    Chemical solution deposition is a versatile technique to deposit functional oxide films with low cost. In this study, this approach was employed to grow multi-layered, second-generation, high-temperature superconductors ("coated conductors") with high superconducting properties. The Ce0.9La0.1O2/...

  2. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  3. Studies on the reactive deposition of TiN{sub x} and TiO{sub x} in a DC magnetron plasma; Untersuchungen zur reaktiven Abscheidung von TiN{sub x} und TiO{sub x} in einem DC-Magnetronplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrehde, Stefan

    2009-10-30

    In the present thesis experiments in a magnetron coating plasma on the (reactive) deposition of Ti, Ti{sub x}, and TiO{sub x} layers were performed. The aim was to meet by correlation of measurements of the ion and energy current on the substrate during the coating procedure with studies of the properties of the deposed layers statements about the connections of deposition conditions and layer properties. The layers deposed in the argon plasma without reactive gas contained beside titanium as main component also small concentrations of oxygen in the range of 8..15%, no completely pure respectively metallic titanium layers could be deposed. In the layers deposed in the argon-nitrogen plasma the increasing nitrogen admixture to the plasma leads mto an increasing nitridation of the layers. The measurements of the crystal structure show higher macroscopical stresses in the layers deposed in the unbalanced mode. From the combination of the higher thicknesses and densities of the layers deposed in the unbalanced mode in this operation mode of the magnetron higher deposition rates result. In the argon-oxygen plasma at increasing oxygen part it comes to a distinct increasement of the oxygen concentration at simultaneous decreasement of the relative titanium concentration in the deposed layers. The deposition in the unbalanced mode leads against the that in the balanced mode to a slightly lower oxygen concentration in the layers. The measurements of the crystal structure show also a lower oxygen insertion and tendentially lower macroscopical stresses in the layers deposed in the unbalanced mode. The measured densities of the layers deposed in the unbalanced mode are distinctly lower than to be expected, and above all smaller than those of the layers deposed in the balanced mode.

  4. Decorative layers on tin bronzes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Konopka

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Decorative layers are decisive for aesthetic value of castings, therefore significant demands are raised towards such layers, e.g. pleasant durable colour, gloss, and smoothness. The work discusses the influence of the type of mechanical working applied to the surfaces of CuSn10 tin bronze castings on the quality and durability of a decorative coating. The scope of the work has included designing and manufacturing of cast samples of tin bronze, mechanical working of the surfaces in order to prepare them for applying coating layers,generating decorative layers as a result of chemical reactions, and the quality assessment and comparison of the obtained coating. Theassessment of thickness and continuity of the obtained decorative layers based on metallographic examinations has been presented.

  5. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  6. Atomic layer epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Colin H. L.; Pessa, Markus V.

    1986-08-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is not so much a new technique for the preparation of thin films as a novel modification to existing methods of vapor-phase epitaxy, whether physical [e.g., evaporation, at one limit molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)] or chemical [e.g., chloride epitaxy or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)]. It is a self-regulatory process which, in its simplest form, produces one complete molecular layer of a compound per operational cycle, with a greater thickness being obtained by repeated cycling. There is no growth rate in ALE as in other crystal growth processes. So far ALE has been applied to rather few materials, but, in principle, it could have a quite general application. It has been used to prepare single-crystal overlayers of CdTe, (Cd,Mn)Te, GaAs and AlAs, a number of polycrystalline films and highly efficient electroluminescent thin-film displays based on ZnS:Mn. It could also offer particular advantages for the preparation of ultrathin films of precisely controlled thickness in the nanometer range and thus may have a special value for growing low-dimensional structures.

  7. Tropical tropopause layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueglistaler, S.; Dessler, A. E.; Dunkerton, T. J.; Folkins, I.; Fu, Q.; Mote, P. W.

    2009-03-01

    Observations of temperature, winds, and atmospheric trace gases suggest that the transition from troposphere to stratosphere occurs in a layer, rather than at a sharp "tropopause." In the tropics, this layer is often called the "tropical tropopause layer" (TTL). We present an overview of observations in the TTL and discuss the radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes that lead to its time-varying, three-dimensional structure. We present a synthesis definition with a bottom at 150 hPa, 355 K, 14 km (pressure, potential temperature, and altitude) and a top at 70 hPa, 425 K, 18.5 km. Laterally, the TTL is bounded by the position of the subtropical jets. We highlight recent progress in understanding of the TTL but emphasize that a number of processes, notably deep, possibly overshooting convection, remain not well understood. The TTL acts in many ways as a "gate" to the stratosphere, and understanding all relevant processes is of great importance for reliable predictions of future stratospheric ozone and climate.

  8. Electrochemical and chemical dissolution behavior of Zn-Fe alloy coatings and its application to the analysis of Zn-Fe alloy layer. Zn-Fe kei mekki so no bunkyokuter dot yokai kyodo to teiryo bunseki eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimoto, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Matsumura, Y. (Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    As surface treated steel sheets, steel sheets with Zn-Fe coatings as well as double-layer steel sheets with Fe-P alloy coatings on Zn-Fe alloy coatings are often used practically. Two treatment methods, which are used to dissolve only alloy layers without dissolving steel sheets in order to find amount and composition of alloy layersr have already been reported. This report investigates the mechanisms of these methods, particularly the mechanisms to control dissolution of steel sheets. In the alkali-dissolution method, Zn-Fe alloy coatings are dissolved in a strong alkaline solution(NaOH-triethanolamine (TEA)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). In this case, steel sheets are insoluble because passive films are formed on the surface. In the cathodic polarization electrolysis method, alloy layers are electrolyzed({minus}l.2V) and dissolved in an ammonium nitrate-0-phen electrolyte. At this potential, dissolution of steel sheets can be prevented by the 0-phen films adsorbed on the surface. Consequently, the alkali-dissolution mehtod and the cathodic polarization electrolysis method are applicable to the quantitative analysis of Zn-rich layer (Fe is 40% or less) coatings and that of Fe-rich layer(Fe is 70% or less) coatings, respectively. 18 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Phytoplankton communities of polar regions--Diversity depending on environmental conditions and chemical anthropopressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Klaudia; Polkowska, Żaneta; Żyszka, Beata; Lipok, Jacek

    2016-04-15

    The polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic) constitute up to 14% of the biosphere and offer some of the coldest and most arid Earth's environments. Nevertheless several oxygenic phototrophs including some higher plants, mosses, lichens, various algal groups and cyanobacteria, survive that harsh climate and create the base of the trophic relationships in fragile ecosystems of polar environments. Ecosystems in polar regions are characterized by low primary productivity and slow growth rates, therefore they are more vulnerable to disturbance, than those in temperate regions. From this reason, chemical contaminants influencing the growth of photoautotrophic producers might induce serious disorders in the integrity of polar ecosystems. However, for a long time these areas were believed to be free of chemical contamination, and relatively protected from widespread anthropogenic pressure, due their remoteness and extreme climate conditions. Nowadays, there is a growing amount of data that prove that xenobiotics are transported thousands of kilometers by the air and ocean currents and then they are deposed in colder regions and accumulate in many environments, including the habitats of marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria (blue green algae), as a natural part of phytoplankton assemblages, are globally distributed, but in high polar ecosystems they represent the dominant primary producers. These microorganisms are continuously exposed to various concentration levels of the compounds that are present in their habitats and act as nourishment or the factors influencing the growth and development of cyanobacteria in other way. The most common group of contaminants in Arctic and Antarctic are persistent organic pollutants (POPs), characterized by durability and resistance to degradation. It is important to determine their concentrations in all phytoplankton species cells and in their environment to get to know the possibility of contaminants to transfer to higher

  10. Supercritical fluid chemical deposition of Pd nanoparticles on magnesium–scandium alloy for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Samuel; Kirikova, Marina [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zaïdi, Warda; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zhang, Junxian; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel [ICMPE, CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320-Thiais (France); Aymard, Luc [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Bobet, Jean-Louis, E-mail: bobet@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Nanoparticles of Pd were deposed on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method. •Numerous parameters were tested and optimized in order to obtain a homogeneous deposition. •At the first step, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} under hydrogen pressure (1 MPa) at 330 °C. •The mixture, after decomposition absorbs hydrogen reversibly on Mg/MgH{sub 2} couple with good kinetics. -- Abstract: The deposition of Pd nanoparticles on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method was performed. There, the SFCD operating parameters (co-solvent, temperature, CO{sub 2} and hydrogen pressure, reaction time) have been optimized to obtain homogeneous deposition of Pd nanoparticles (around 10 nm). The hydrogenation properties of the optimized Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} material were determined and compared to those of Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35}Pd{sub 0.024}. The latter compound forms at 300 °C and 1 MPa of H{sub 2} a hydride that crystallizes in the fluorite structure, absorbs reversibly 1.5 wt.% hydrogen and exhibits fast kinetics. In contrast, Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} compound decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} during hydrogen absorption under the same conditions. However, reversible sorption reaches 3.3 wt.% of hydrogen while keeping good kinetics. The possible roles of Pd on the hydrogen-induced alloy decomposition are discussed.

  11. Two layer structure for reinforcing pothole repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Yao; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Jiann-Wen; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry

    2013-04-01

    We have applied dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin for reinforcing pothole patch materials due to its unique properties - low cost, low viscosity at beginning and ultra-toughness after curing, chemical compatibility with tar, tunable curing profile through catalyst design. In this paper, we have designed a two layer structure - well compacted base layer and DCPD reinforced 1-1.5" top layer - for pothole repair. By choosing two graded asphalt mixes, a porous top layer and fully compacted base layer was prepared after compaction and ready for DCPD resin infiltration. The DCPD curing and infiltration profile within this porous top layer was measured with thermocouples. The rutting resistance was tested with home-made wheel rutter. The cage effect due to the p-DCPD wrapping was characterized with wheel penetration test. The results showed that this two layer structure pothole repair has greatly improved properties and can be used for pothole repair to increase the service life.

  12. Layer-by-layer assembly of vertically conducting graphene devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Jing; Meng, Jie; Zhou, Yang-Bo; Wu, Han-Chun; Bie, Ya-Qing; Liao, Zhi-Min; Yu, Da-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has various potential applications owing to its unique electronic, optical, mechanical and chemical properties, which are primarily based on its two-dimensional nature. Graphene-based vertical devices can extend the investigations and potential applications range to three dimensions, while interfacial properties are crucial for the function and performance of such graphene vertical devices. Here we report a general method to construct graphene vertical devices with controllable functions via choosing different interfaces between graphene and other materials. Two types of vertically conducting devices are demonstrated: graphene stacks sandwiched between two Au micro-strips, and between two Co layers. The Au|graphene|Au junctions exhibit large magnetoresistance with ratios up to 400% at room temperature, which have potential applications in magnetic field sensors. The Co|graphene|Co junctions display a robust spin valve effect at room temperature. The layer-by-layer assembly of graphene offers a new route for graphene vertical structures. PMID:23715280

  13. Layer-by-Layer Assembly Onto Gold Nanoparticles of Various Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, Andrew; Kessler, Sarah; Dobbins, Tabbetha

    This research focuses on the potential applications of coated gold nanoparticles in medicine. By coating gold nanoparticles in layers of polyelectrolytes, with a final layer of antibodies which targets chemicals uniquely exhibited by cancer cells, we eventually hope to selectively attach the nanoparticles to the cancer cells. The coated nanoparticles are assembled through layer-by-layer coulombic attraction due to the passive zeta potential of the particle and the charged nature of the polyelectrolytes. This poster will explore the potential usefulness of variously sized nanoparticles with various thickness of polyelectrolyte layers.

  14. Evolution Of Lattice Structure And Chemical Composition Of The Surface Reconstruction Layer In Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 Cathode Material For Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pengfei; Nie, Anmin; Zheng, Jianming; Zhou, Yungang; Lu, Dongping; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Rui; Belharouak, Ilias; Zu, Xiaotao; Xiao, Jie; Amine, Khalil; Liu, Jun; Gao, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-01-14

    Voltage and capacity fading of layer structured lithium and manganese rich (LMR) transition metal oxide is directly related to the structural and composition evolution of the material during the cycling of the battery. However, understanding such evolution at atomic level remains elusive. Based on atomic level structural imaging, elemental mapping of the pristine and cycled samples and density functional theory calculations, it is found that accompanying the hoping of Li ions is the simultaneous migration of Ni ions towards the surface from the bulk lattice, leading to the gradual depletion of Ni in the bulk lattice and thickening of a Ni enriched surface reconstruction layer (SRL). Furthermore, Ni and Mn also exhibit concentration partitions within the thin layer of SRL in the cycled samples where Ni is almost depleted at the very surface of the SRL, indicating the preferential dissolution of Ni ions in the electrolyte. Accompanying the elemental composition evolution, significant structural evolution is also observed and identified as a sequential phase transition of C2/m →I41→Spinel. For the first time, it is found that the surface facet terminated with pure cation is more stable than that with a mixture of cation and anion. These findings firmly established how the elemental species in the lattice of LMR cathode transfer from the bulk lattice to surface layer and further into the electrolyte, clarifying the long standing confusion and debate on the structure and chemistry of the surface layer and their correlation with the voltage fading and capacity decaying of LMR cathode. Therefore, this work provides critical insights for designing of cathode materials with both high capacity and voltage stability during cycling.

  15. Protecting the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  16. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermal, physico-chemical and rheological boundary layers in multi-component oxidic melt spreads; Couches limites thermiques, physico-chimiques et rheologiques lors de coulees de bains de melanges d'oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journeau, Ch.; Sudreau, F.; Gatt, J.M.; Cognet, G. [CEA/Cadarache, Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires (DRN), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1999-11-01

    In the unlikely case of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the core material could melt and form a molten mixture named corium. The CEA has undertaken a large program to improve knowledge on corium behaviour. An experiment in which 17 kg of simulant corium - mainly made of hafnon, zircon, silica and wustite - at more than 2 200 K, was spread in the VULCANO facility, is described. It is analysed in terms of thermal cooling by fitting the pyrometric measurements with outputs of a conduction code. This enables the estimation of temperature profiles inside the corium. From physicochemical modelling, the solid fraction, density and viscosity can be estimated. Thermal, physicochemical and rheological boundary layers are thus found. The rheological boundary layer is very steep (exponential decay parameter around 800 m{sup -1}) and could significantly affect the flow dynamics. A visible aspect of this boundary layer is the presence of folds on the corium surface, similar to those on ropy pahoehoe lavas. (authors)

  18. Two- and three-layer models of Uranus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present simple two-layer models of Uranus with rocky core and polytropic envelope satisfying exactly the observed mass, radius and the gravitational moments. The models show that the value of the fourth order zonal harmonic is J4 -6, while J6 approx. 10-6. More elaborate three-layer models fail to satisfy the observational constraints of the ice/rock ratio and/or of the rotation period. It is concluded that three-layer models with uniform chemical composition in each layer may be too restrictive. More realistic models should account for variable chemical composition within each layer. (Auth.)

  19. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  20. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  1. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  2. Layer like porous materials with hierarchical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wieslaw J; Gil, Barbara; Makowski, Wacław; Marszalek, Bartosz; Eliášová, Pavla

    2016-06-13

    Many chemical compositions produce layered solids consisting of extended sheets with thickness not greater than a few nanometers. The layers are weakly bonded together in a crystal and can be modified into various nanoarchitectures including porous hierarchical structures. Several classes of 2-dimensional (2D) materials have been extensively studied and developed because of their potential usefulness as catalysts and sorbents. They are discussed in this review with focus on clays, layered transition metal oxides, silicates, layered double hydroxides, metal(iv) phosphates and phosphonates, especially zirconium, and zeolites. Pillaring and delamination are the primary methods for structural modification and pore tailoring. The reported approaches are described and compared for the different classes of materials. The methods of characterization include identification by X-ray diffraction and microscopy, pore size analysis and activity assessment by IR spectroscopy and catalytic testing. The discovery of layered zeolites was a fundamental breakthrough that created unprecedented opportunities because of (i) inherent strong acid sites that make them very active catalytically, (ii) porosity through the layers and (iii) bridging of 2D and 3D structures. Approximately 16 different types of layered zeolite structures and modifications have been identified as distinct forms. It is also expected that many among the over 200 recognized zeolite frameworks can produce layered precursors. Additional advances enabled by 2D zeolites include synthesis of layered materials by design, hierarchical structures obtained by direct synthesis and top-down preparation of layered materials from 3D frameworks. PMID:26489452

  3. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  4. Ozone Layer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  5. Structure and properties of layered inorganic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Duan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Inorganic layered materials are a class of advanced functional materials that have attracted considerable attention by virtue of their practical applications in a wide variety of fields. Sys-tematic studies of structure, design, synthesis, and fabrication processing may extend the range of practical utility of inor-ganic layered functional materials, in areas such as food industry,chemical industry, energy engineering, environmental engineer-ing, drug and gene delivery, electronics technology, and materials protection.

  6. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  7. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  8. Properties Research of Ceramic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Żółkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the method of full mould the polystyrene model, which fills the mould cavity in the course of filling by the liquid metal is subjected tothe influence of high temperature and passes from the solid, through the liquid, to the gaseous state. During this process solid and gaseousproducts of thermal decomposition of polystyrene patterns occur. The kinetics of this process is significantly influenced by the gasificationtemperature, density and mass of the polystyrene patterns. One of the basic parameters is the amount and rate of gas from the polystyrenemodel during its thermal decomposition. Specific properties of ceramic layer used for lost foam castings are required. To ensure optimalprocess flow of metal in the form proper permeability of the ceramic layer is needed.To ensure optimal conditions for technological casting method EPS patterns are tested and determined are the technological parametersand physical-chemical process in: material properties of the pattern, properties of the ceramic layer applied to the pattern, pattern gasification kinetics pouring processIn the course of the research the characteristics of polystyrene and ceramic layer were determined.

  9. Multilayer Article Characterized by Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Outer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer article comprises a substrate comprising a ceramic or a silicon-containing metal alloy. The ceramic is a Si-containing ceramic or an oxide ceramic with or without silicon. An outer layer overlies the substrate and at least one intermediate layer is located between the outer layer and thc substrate. An optional bond layer is disposed between thc 1 least one intermediate layer and thc substrate. The at least one intermediate layer may comprise an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent the outer layer, a mullite-containing layer and an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent to the bond layer or substrate. The outer layer comprises a compound having a low coefficient of thermal expansion selected from one of the following systems: rare earth (RE) silicates; at least one of hafnia and hafnia-containing composite oxides; zirconia-containing composite oxides and combinations thereof.

  10. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide

  11. Growth of ferroelectric Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} epitaxial films by ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of chemical solution derived precursor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queraltó, A.; Pérez del Pino, A., E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Mata, M. de la; Tristany, M.; Gómez, A.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Arbiol, J. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2015-06-29

    Highly crystalline epitaxial Ba{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (BST) thin-films are grown on (001)-oriented LaNiO{sub 3}-buffered LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser irradiation of solution derived barium-zirconium-titanium precursor layers using a UV Nd:YAG laser source at atmospheric conditions. The structural analyses of the obtained films, studied by X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy, demonstrate that laser processing allows the growth of tens of nm-thick BST epitaxial films with crystalline structure similar to that of films obtained through conventional thermal annealing methods. However, the fast pulsed nature of the laser employed leads to crystallization kinetic evolution orders of magnitude faster than in thermal treatments. The combination of specific photothermal and photochemical mechanisms is the main responsible for the ultrafast epitaxial laser-induced crystallization. Piezoresponse microscopy measurements demonstrate equivalent ferroelectric behavior in laser and thermally annealed films, being the piezoelectric constant ∼25 pm V{sup −1}.

  12. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  13. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  14. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  15. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  16. Inter-layer FEC decoded multi-layer video streaming

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Yongkai; Zuo, Xin; Robert G. Maunder; Hanzo, L

    2012-01-01

    Layered video coding creates multiple layers of unequal importance, where the enhancement layers will be affected when the base layer is corrupted. In this treatise, a novel inter-layer FEC scheme is investigated, where the information of the base layer1 is incorporated into the systematic bits of the enhancement layers with the aid of an exclusive-OR operation. When the base layer can be recovered independently, the soft information of the enhancement layers can be deduced by flipping the si...

  17. InN Segregation in InGaN Layers Grownby Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition%MOCVD生长的InGaN薄膜中InN分凝的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦志新; 陈志忠; 童玉珍; 陆曙; 张国义

    2001-01-01

    The amount of InN segregated in InGaN films grown by MOCVD was estimated by Xray diffraction measurement technology. In compositions in the InGaN films are measured as 0.1 ~0.34 by X-ray 2θ scan using Vegard's law. The inclusion of InN in InGaN layers was obtained as 0.068 4 % ~2. 639 6% by measuring the ratio of the integrated intensities of InN (0002) peak to that of InGaN (0002) peak in X-ray rocking curves. The theoretical diffraction intensities from InN and InGaN have been calculated according to the X-ray diffraction theory. The values of InN inclusion for all the samples were less than 3 %, which indicate that degree of phase separation of the samples was low. It was also found that the flow rate of N2 carrier gas and operation pressure strongly affect the InN inclusion in InGaN.%利用X射线衍射(XRD)技术测量了MOCVD生长的InGaN薄膜中的InN分凝量.利用Vegard定理和XRD 2θ扫描测得实验的InGaN薄膜的In组分为0.1~0.34.通过测量XRD摇摆曲线的InN(0002)和InGaN(0002)的积分强度之比测得InN在InGaN中的含量为0.0684%~2.6396%.根据XRD理论,计算出InN和InGaN的理论衍射强度.InN含量在所有样品中均小于3%,这表明样品的相分离度比较低.还发现InN在InGaN薄膜中的含量与氮气载气流量和反应室气压明显相关.

  18. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  19. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  20. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  1. Boosting Water Oxidation Layer-by-Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo Acosta, Jonnathan Cesar; Scanlon, Micheal; Mendez, Manuel A.; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and ...

  2. Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula T. Hammond

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and nucleic acids, is examined. Specific advantages of the use of LbL assembly versus traditional polymeric blend encapsulation are discussed. Examples are provided to present potential new directions. Translational opportunities are discussed to examine the impact and potential for true biomedical translation using rapid assembly methods, and applications are discussed with high need and medical return.

  3. In situ imaging and control of layer-by-layer femtosecond laser thinning of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. W.; Zhou, Y. S.; Huang, X.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2015-02-01

    Although existing methods (chemical vapor deposition, mechanical exfoliation, etc.) are available to produce graphene, the lack of thickness control limits further graphene applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach to precisely thin graphene films to a specific thickness using femtosecond (fs) laser raster scanning. By using appropriate laser fluence and scanning times, graphene thinning with an atomic layer precision, namely layer-by-layer graphene removal, has been realized. The fs laser used was configured in a four-wave mixing (FWM) system which can be used to distinguish graphene layer thickness and count the number of layers using the linear relationship between the FWM signal intensity and the graphene thickness. Furthermore, FWM imaging has been successfully applied to achieve in situ, real-time monitoring of the fs laser graphene thinning process. This method can not only realize the large-scale thinning of graphene with atomic layer precision, but also provide in situ, rapid imaging capability of graphene for an accurate assessment of the number of layers.Although existing methods (chemical vapor deposition, mechanical exfoliation, etc.) are available to produce graphene, the lack of thickness control limits further graphene applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach to precisely thin graphene films to a specific thickness using femtosecond (fs) laser raster scanning. By using appropriate laser fluence and scanning times, graphene thinning with an atomic layer precision, namely layer-by-layer graphene removal, has been realized. The fs laser used was configured in a four-wave mixing (FWM) system which can be used to distinguish graphene layer thickness and count the number of layers using the linear relationship between the FWM signal intensity and the graphene thickness. Furthermore, FWM imaging has been successfully applied to achieve in situ, real-time monitoring of the fs laser graphene thinning process. This method can not

  4. Layering in Provenance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Margo I.; Muniswamy-Reddy, Kiran-Kumar; Braun, Uri Jacob; Holland, David A.; MACKO Peter; Maclean, Diana; Margo, Daniel Wyatt; Smogor, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Digital provenance describes the ancestry or history of a digital object. Most existing provenance systems, however, operate at only one level of abstraction: the sys- tem call layer, a workflow specification, or the high-level constructs of a particular application. The provenance collectable in each of these layers is different, and all of it can be important. Single-layer systems fail to account for the different levels of abstraction at which users need to reason about their data and proc...

  5. Testing water pollution in a two layer aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    García León, Manuel; Lin Ye, Jue

    2011-01-01

    Water bodies around urban areas may be polluted with chemical elements from urban or industrial activities. We study the case of underground water pollution. This is a serious problem, since under- ground water is high qualified drinkable water in a world where this natural resource is increasingly reduced. This study is focused on a two-layer aquifer. If the superficial layer is contaminated, the deeper layer could be spoiled as well. This contribution checks the equality of the mean or c...

  6. Development of new layered selenide oxides with perovskite-type oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Koichi; Ogino, Hiraku; Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-Ichi

    2010-03-01

    Several Fe-based superconductors with perovskite-type oxide layers, such as Sr2ScFePO3 (Tc ˜ 17 K)^[1], were discovered in our previous study. These compounds are composed of alternate stacking of superconducting layers with antifluorite structure and perovskite-type blocking layers. Since both layers are flexible in terms of chemical composition, development of various new functional materials can be expected from this family. In the present study, we have attempted to synthesize new layered selenide oxides with CuSe layers and discovered more than ten compounds, such as Sr2MCu2Se2O2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and Sr2MCuSeO3 (M = Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ga, In), thus far. These indicated that the CuSe layer can accommodate various types of blocking layers, which may lead various functions. Among them, Sr2Cu3Se2O2 has a potential as for the mother compound of superconductor, if appropriate concentration of carrier is introduced to the CuO2 layer. Crystal structure and physical properties of these newly found compounds will be reported. [1] H. Ogino et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 (2009) 075008

  7. Part I. Improved flame retardant textiles. Part II. Novel approach to layer-by-layer processing for flame retardant textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this presentation, new approaches for flame retardant textile by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and layer-by-layer processing will be discussed. Due to its environmentally benign character, the scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical re...

  8. Influence of an Fe cap layer on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe49Pt51/Fe bi-layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Chao-Yang; Ma Bin; Wei Fu-Lin; Zhang zong-Zhi; Jin Qing-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The influences of an Fe cap layer on the structural and magnetic properties of FePt/Fe bi-layers are investigated.Compared with single FePt alloy films, a thin Fe layer can affect the crystalline orientation and improve the chemical ordering of L10 FePt films. Moreover, the coercivity increases when a thin Fe layer covers the FePt layer. Beyond a critical thickness, however, the Fe cover layer quickens the magnetization reversal of Fe49Pt51/Fe bi-layers by their exchange coupling.

  9. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  10. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  11. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  12. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  13. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution; a...... method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according to...

  14. Characterization of internal boundary layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal boundary layer capacitors were characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy and by microscale electrical measurements. Data are given for the chemical and physical characteristics of the individual grains and boundaries, and their associated electric and dielectric properties. Segregated internal boundary layers were identified with resistivities of 1012-1013 Ω-cm. Bulk apparent dielectric constants were 10,000-60,000. A model is proposed to explain the dielectric behavior in terms of an equivalent n-c-i-c-n representation of ceramic microstructure, which is substantiated by capacitance-voltage analysis

  15. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-01

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(iii)/Ir(iv) and Ir(iv)-Ir(iv)/Ir(iv)-Ir(v) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology. PMID:26977761

  16. Layer-by-layer nanoencapsulation of camptothecin with improved activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Joshi, Chaitanya; Shutava, Tatsiana; DeCoster, Mark; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-04-25

    160 nm nanocapsules containing up to 60% of camptothecin in the core and 7-8 polyelectrolyte bilayers in the shell were produced by washless layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and block-copolymer of poly-l-lysine and polyethylene glycol. The outer surface of the nanocapsules was additionally modified with polyethylene glycol of 5 kDa or 20 kDa molecular weight to attain protein resistant properties, colloidal stability in serum and prolonged release of the drug from the capsules. An advantage of the LbL coated capsules is the preservation of camptothecin lactone form with the shell assembly starting at acidic pH and improved chemical stability of encapsulated drug at neutral and basic pH, especially in the presence of albumin that makes such formulation more active than free camptothecin. LbL nanocapsules preserve the camptothecin lactone form at pH 7.4 resulting in triple activity of the drug toward CRL2303 glioblastoma cell. PMID:24508806

  17. Modeling release of chemicals from multilayer materials into food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration of chemicals from materials into food is predictable by various mathematical models. In this article, a general mathematical model is developed to quantify the release of chemicals through multilayer packaging films based on Fick's diffusion. The model is solved numerically to elucidate the effects of different diffusivity values of different layers, distribution of chemical between two adjacent layers and between material and food, mass transfer at the interface of material and food on the migration process.

  18. The Equatorial Ekman Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence; Soward, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The steady incompressible viscous flow in the wide gap between spheres rotating about a common axis at slightly different rates (small Ekman number E) has a long and celebrated history. The problem is relevant to the dynamics of geophysical and planetary core flows, for which, in the case of electrically conducting fluids, the possible operation of a dynamo is of considerable interest. A comprehensive asymptotic study, in the limit E<<1, was undertaken by Stewartson (J. Fluid Mech. 1966, vol. 26, pp. 131-144). The mainstream flow, exterior to the E^{1/2} Ekman layers on the inner/outer boundaries and the shear layer on the inner sphere tangent cylinder C, is geostrophic. Stewartson identified a complicated nested layer structure on C, which comprises relatively thick quasi-geostrophic E^{2/7} (inside C) and E^{1/4} (outside C) layers. They embed a thinner E^{1/3} ageostrophic shear layer (on C), which merges with the inner sphere Ekman layer to form the E^{2/5} Equatorial Ekman layer of axial length E^{...

  19. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  20. Multi-layer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Abrams, Ze' ev R.; Gonsalves, Peter R.

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are coating materials and methods for applying a top-layer coating that is durable, abrasion resistant, highly transparent, hydrophobic, low-friction, moisture-sealing, anti-soiling, and self-cleaning to an existing conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating. The top coat imparts superior durability performance and new properties to the under-laying conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating without reducing the anti-reflectiveness of the coating. Methods and data for optimizing the relative thickness of the under-layer high temperature anti-reflective coating and the top-layer thickness for optimizing optical performance are also disclosed.

  1. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  2. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  3. Characterization of metal oxide layers grown on CVD graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of a fully oxidized aluminum oxide layer with low surface roughness on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is demonstrated. This is accomplished by the deposition of a 0.2 nm thick titanium seed layer on the graphene prior to the deposition of the aluminum under ultra high vacuum conditions, which was subsequently oxidized. The stoichiometry and surface roughness of the oxide layers were measured for a range of titanium and aluminum depositions utilizing ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. These fully oxidized films are expected to produce good dielectric layers for use in graphene based electronic devices.

  4. Layers of the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Review Abstracting, Coding, & Staging ICD-O Site Codes Morphology & Grade Extent of Disease Evaluation Physical Exam Lab ... the majority of the structure of the skin, hair, and nails. The squamous cell layer is the ...

  5. Layered circle packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a bounded sequence of integers {d0,d1,d2,…}, 6≤dn≤M, there is an associated abstract triangulation created by building up layers of vertices so that vertices on the nth layer have degree dn. This triangulation can be realized via a circle packing which fills either the Euclidean or the hyperbolic plane. We give necessary and sufficient conditions to determine the type of the packing given the defining sequence {dn}.

  6. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  7. Chemical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  8. Intercalation compounds involving inorganic layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTINO VERA R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional inorganic networks can shown intracrystalline reactivity, i.e., simple ions, large species as Keggin ions, organic species, coordination compounds or organometallics can be incorporated in the interlayer region. The host-guest interaction usually causes changes in their chemical, catalytic, electronic and optical properties. The isolation of materials with interesting properties and making use of soft chemistry routes have given rise the possibility of industrial and technological applications of these compounds. We have been using several synthetic approaches to intercalate porphyrins and phthalocyanines into inorganic materials: smectite clays, layered double hydroxides and layered niobates. The isolated materials have been characterized by elemental and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, scanning electronic microscopy, electronic and resonance Raman spectroscopies and EPR. The degree of layer stacking and the charge density of the matrices as well their acid-base nature were considered in our studies on the interaction between the macrocycles and inorganic hosts.

  9. Coacervates as prebiotic chemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Swanson, Mercedes; Menger, Fredric M.

    2012-10-01

    Coacervates are colloidal systems that are comprised of two immiscible aqueous layers, the colloid-rich layer, so-called coacervate, and the colloid-poor layer, so-called equilibrium liquid. Although immiscible, the two phases are both water-rich. Coacervates are important for prebiotic chemistry, but also have various practical applications, notably as transport vehicles of personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Our objectives are to explore the potential of coacervates as prebiotic chemical reactors. Since the reaction medium in coacervates is water, this creates a challenge, since most organic reactants are not water-soluble. To overcome this challenge we are utilizing recent Green Chemistry examples of the organic reactions in water, such as the Passerini reaction. We have investigated this reaction in two coacervate systems, and report here our preliminary results.

  10. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  11. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  12. Production of carbon nanotubes: Chemical vapor deposition synthesis from liquefied petroleum gas over Fe-Co-Mo tri-metallic catalyst supported on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Sudibandriyo, M.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes were produced by chemical vapor deposition method to meet the specifications for hydrogen storage. So far, the various catalyst had been studied outlining their activities, performances, and efficiencies. In this work, tri-metallic catalyst consist of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used. The catalyst was prepared by wet-impregnation method. Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was used as carbon source. The synthesis was conducted in atmospheric fixed bed reactor at reaction temperature range 750 - 850 °C for 30 minutes. The impregnation method applied in this study successfully deposed metal component on the MgO support surface. It found that the deposited metal components might partially replace Mg(OH)2 or MgO molecules in their crystal lattice. Compare to the original MgO powder; it was significant increases in pore volume and surface area has occurred during catalyst preparation stages. The size of obtained carbon nanotubes is ranging from about 10.83 nm OD/4.09 nm ID up to 21.84 nm OD/6.51 nm ID, which means that multiwall carbon nanotubes were formed during the synthesis. Yield as much as 2.35 g.CNT/g.catalyst was obtained during 30 minutes synthesis and correspond to carbon nanotubes growth rate of 0.2 μm/min. The BET surface area of the obtained carbon nanotubes is 181.13 m2/g and around 50 % of which is contributed by mesopores. Micropore with half pore width less than 1 nm contribute about 10% volume of total micro and mesopores volume of the carbon nanotubes. The existence of these micropores is very important to increase the hydrogen storage capacity of the carbon nanotubes.

  13. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  14. Quark Neutron Layer Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carinhas, P A

    1993-01-01

    Typical nuclear equations of state and a quark bag model, surprisingly, allow compact stars with alternate layers of neutrons and quarks. One can determine on the basis of the Gibbs free energy which phase, nuclear or quark, is energetically favorable. Using the nuclear equation of state of Wiringa, and a quark equation of state given by Freedman and McLerran, the allowed quark parameter space for such layer stars is searched. This paper differs from past work in that configurations are found in which quark matter is located exterior and interior to shells of nuclear matter, i.e., dependent on quark parameters, a star may contain several alternating layers of quark and nuclear matter. Given the uncertainty in the quark parameter space, one can estimate the probability for finding pure neutron stars, pure quark stars (strange stars), stars with a quark core and a nucleon exterior, or layer stars. Several layer models are presented. The physical characteristics, stability, and results of a thorough search of th...

  15. Interference layer metallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refractory metallic materials for application in Gas Cooled High Temperature Reactors are age-hardened nickel or iron base alloys. To control their behaviour and to adapt it to realistic load conditions, these materials have to be subjected to suitable informing tests and characterized. In the past few years, interference layer metallography has proved to be a highly flexible characterization procedure, suitable as an independent investigation method as well as an outstanding way of sample preparation for application of automatic quantitative image analysis to refractory alloys. This paper reports the problems of characterization of the Ni and Fe base alloys to be solved by interference layer metallography and the physical background of this method. The procedure of chromatic contrasting is discussed. From these considerations arises the result that for technical applications the optimum layer material for each special sample should be selected a priori. For that purpose it is necessary to measure the optical constants of the respective structural elements of the alloys as well as those of the candidate layer materials. The measuring procedures are discussed in detail. A routine procedure is deduced which allows to determine a priori the layer material and thickness fitting best to a given problem. (orig.)

  16. Boundary Layer Ventilation by Convection and Coastal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, H.

    2008-12-01

    Several observational studies measuring aerosol in the atmosphere have found multiple aerosol layers located above the marine boundary layer. It is hypothesized that the existence of these layers is influenced by the diurnal variation in the structure of the upwind continental boundary layer. Furthermore, collision between a sea breeze and the prevailing wind can result in enhanced convection at the coast which can also lead to elevated layers of pollution. In this study we investigate the processes responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer near the coast using the UK Met Office Unified Model. Pollution sources are represented by the constant emission of a passive tracer everywhere over land. The ventilation processes observed include shallow convection, a sea breeze circulation and coastal outflow. Vertical distributions of tracer at the coast are validated qualitatively with AMPEP (Aircraft Measurement of chemical Processing Export fluxes of Pollutants over the UK) CO aircraft measurements and are shown to agree well.

  17. Chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven;

    2015-01-01

    are available, the presence of the condition can only be established in accordance to criteria definitions. Numerous modes of action have been suggested to explain CI, with the most commonly discussed theories involving the immune system, central nervous system, olfactory and respiratory systems as well...... chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI...... or offered health care solutions with limited or no effect, and they experience being met with mistrust and doubt by health care professionals, the social care system and by friends and relatives. Evidence-based treatment options are currently unavailable, however, a person-centered care model based...

  18. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO{sub x} buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  19. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Tim; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2015-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform, single layer, and high carrier mobility large area graphene. The main goals of this work are; (1) explore the graphene growth mechanics in a low pressure cold-wall CVD system on a copper substrate, ...

  20. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  1. Chemical pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Cheng-Hung; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2013-12-01

    Pneumothorax is defined as the presence of air in the pleural cavity. Spontaneous pneumothorax, occurring without antecedent traumatic or iatrogenic cause, is sub-divided into primary and secondary. The severity of pneumothorax could be varied from asymptomatic to hemodynamically compromised. Optimal management of this benign disease has been a matter of debate. In addition to evacuating air from the pleural space by simple aspiration or chest tube drainage, the management of spontaneous pneumothorax also focused on ceasing air leakage and preventing recurrences by surgical intervention or chemical pleurodesis. Chemical pleurodesis is a procedure to achieve symphysis between the two layers of pleura by sclerosing agents. In the current practice guidelines, chemical pleurodesis is reserved for patients unable or unwilling to receive surgery. Recent researches have found that chemical pleurodesis is also safe and effective in preventing pneumothorax recurrence in patients with the first episode of spontaneous pneumothorax or after thoracoscopic surgery and treating persistent air leakage after thoracoscopic surgery. In this article we aimed at exploring the role of chemical pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax, including ceasing air leakage and preventing recurrence. The indications, choice of sclerosants, safety, effects, and possible side effects or complications of chemical pleurodesis are also reviewed here.

  2. Computation of Boundary Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Dénes

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first part of a series of studies where we examine several methods for the solution of the boundary layer equation of the fluid mechanics. The first of these is the analytical or rather quasi analytical method due to Blasius. This method reduces a system of partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations and these in turn are solved by numerical methods since no exact solution of the Blasius type equations is known. We determind all the Blasius equation neccessary for up to 11-th order approximation. Our further aim to study the finite difference numerical solutions of the boundary layer equation and some of the methods applying weighted residual principles and by comparing these with the ”exact” solutions arrived at by Blasius method develop a quick reliable method for solving the boundary layer equation.

  3. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  4. Deposing the "Tyranny of Extroverts": Collaborative Learning in the Traditional Classroom Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes in detail the design and implementation of a collaborative learning project in a Constitutional law class, then uses education and social science research to explore how best to create and implement a collaborative learning project. Relates the research to the experience of the class project. (EV)

  5. Caracterisation de nanofilms polymeriques deposes par plasma froid : Stabilite et proprietes mecaniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrette, Jeremie

    The current project is inscribed in the research axis on bioactive coatings of Dr. Sophie Lerouge's Laboratoire de Biomatériaux endovasculaires (LBeV). The aim of our work was to extract mechanical properties of a new plasma polymer called L-PPE :N (developed to enhance healing around stent-graft) and determine the effect of various experimental parameters on the stability behavior of our thin films (hundred nanometer thick coatings). Subsidiary to these goals, we also had in mind to test whether usual methods for characterizing polymers and films were applicable on our cold-plasma deposited material. Properties concerned by our endeavor included Young's modulus, hardness, storage and loss modulus, resistance to tearing, ultimate strain and aqueous stability under different temperature and pH for films of varying ratio of gases and thicknesses. Apparatus and work hypothesis used to succeed in our characterization work included, but was not limited to: a quartz crystal dissipative microbalance (QCM-D), a nanoindenter, an ellipsometer, and a tensile testing bench specifically designed for microscopic observation. Hypothesis attached to these methods are that each of these will work as intended for the characterization of our material. Furthermore, we also need to consider the properties of our film as constant throughout its volume (surface-wise for QCM-D analysis and thickness-wise for nanoindentation). QCM-D results allowed us to determine the best compromise of deposition gas ratio R=NH3/C2H4 of L-PPE:N for our biomedical application to be 0.75, from a stability and bioactivity point of view. Starting from that information, we submitted ratio 0.75 films to temperature, thickness and pH essays to make sure they could handle every situation we could need to put them through. Nanoindentation essays have helped us finding reduced modulus and hardness of 8.0 and 0.4 GPa for the 2 µm coating and 10.4 and 0.5 GPa for the 200 nm film, respectively. These values are greater than other biomaterials currently in use, and similar to other cold plasma materials. Further improvements to this work include, at this point of the L-PPE:N development, to start studying the impact of conventional sterilization methods on the stability, mechanical and biological properties of our film, and to submit our coating to a testing bench designed specifically to mimic the insertion and deployment of a stent-graft, in order to verify the structural integrity of the film afterwards.

  6. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  7. Pressure Controlled Chemical Gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Megan R; Batista, Bruno C; Steinbock, Oliver

    2016-06-30

    The dissolution of metal salts in silicate solution can result in the growth of hollow precipitate tubes. These "chemical gardens" are a model of self-organization far from the equilibrium and create permanent macroscopic structures. The reproducibility of the growth process is greatly improved if the solid salt seed is replaced by a salt solution that is steadily injected by a pump; however, this modification of the original experiment eliminates the membrane-based osmotic pump at the base of conventional chemical gardens and does not allow for analyses in terms of the involved pressure. Here we describe a new experimental method that delivers the salt solution according to a controlled hydrostatic pressure. In one form of the experiment, this pressure slowly decreases as zinc sulfate solution flows into the silicate-containing reaction vessel, whereas a second version holds the respective solution heights constant. In addition to three known growth regimes (jetting, popping, budding), we observe single tubes that fill the vessel in a horizontally undulating but vertically layered fashion (crowding). The resulting, dried product has a cylindrical shape, very low density, and one continuous connection from top to bottom. We also present phase diagrams of these growth modes and show that the flow characteristics of our experiments follow a reaction-independent Hagen-Poiseuille equation. PMID:27266993

  8. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; de Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the

  9. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  10. Layer-Cake Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  11. Layered pavement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous aspects of the mechanical and structural response of layered pavement systems are discussed. Subgrade moduli for soil that exhibits nonlinear behavior are predicted. The use of a pressure meter test to predict modulus is discussed. Load equivalency factors of triaxial loading for flexible pavements is discussed, as well as a constitutive equation for the permanent strain of sand subjected to cyclic loading.

  12. Physical Layer Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Yomo, Hironori; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause...

  13. EHD lubricating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvarts, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    The simplest model of an EHD lubricating layer consists of a unipolarly charged nonconducting viscous fluid between two parallel or slightly inclined nonconducting plates. The performance of such a layer is analyzed here on the basis of the fundamental EHD equations, with a plane-parallel approximation of the flow of a thin layer under a variable upper boundary. The results of the solution indicate that the bearing capacity of such a layer between parallel plates does not depend on the viscosity of the fluid, but is proportional to the energy density of the electric field in vacuum. With the plates not parallel, the bearing capacity depends on the mobility and the diffusion of the charged fluid particles. In either case the energy of the electric field can be made to compensate for the energy dissipation due to viscous friction, and in this case or with overcompensation such as EHD bearing becomes an EHD generator. Most valuable for practical applications are fluids with a high dielectric permittivity, such as ammonia and hydrogen chloride at cryogenic temperatures. 5 references, 1 figure.

  14. Bi-layer functionally gradient thick film semiconducting methane sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Banerjee; A K Haldar; J Mondal; A Sen; H S Maiti

    2002-11-01

    Gas sensors based on metal oxide semiconductors like tin dioxide are widely used for the detection of toxic and combustible gases like carbon monoxide, methane and LPG. One of the problems of such sensors is their lack of sensitivity, which to some extent, can be circumvented by using different catalysts. However, highly reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) coming from different industrial and domestic products (e.g. paints, lacquers, varnishes etc) can play havoc on such sensors and can give rise to false alarms. Any attempt to adsorb such VOCs (e.g. by using activated charcoal) results in sorption of the detecting gases (e.g. methane) too. To get round the problem, bi-layer sensors have been developed. Such tin oxide based functionally gradient bi-layer sensors have different compositions at the top and bottom layers. Here, instead of adsorbing the VOCs, they are allowed to interact and are consumed on the top layer of the sensors and a combustible gas like methane being less reactive, penetrates the top layer and interacts with the bottom layer. By modifying the chemical compositions of the top and bottom layers and by designing the electrode-lead wire arrangement properly, the top layer can be kept electrically shunted from the bottom layer and the electrical signal generated at the bottom layer from the combustible gas is collected. Such functionally gradient sensors, being very reliable, can find applications in domestic, industrial and strategic sectors.

  15. The concept of chemical capacitance, A critique.

    OpenAIRE

    Trissl, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of chemical capacitance as introduced by Hong and Mauzerall (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1974. 71:1564) is critically reexamined. This novel capacitance was introduced to explain the time-course of flash-induced photocurrents observed in lipid bilayer membranes containing porphyrins. According to Hong and Mauzerall, the chemical capacitance results from a combination of three fundamental capacitances: the geometric membrane capacitance and the two interfacial double layer capaci...

  16. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW Chemistry of layered d-metal pnictide oxides and their potential as candidates for new superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi C Ozawa et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered d-metal pnictide oxides are a unique class of compounds which consist of characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers. More than 100 of these layered compounds, including the recently discovered Fe-based superconducting pnictide oxides, can be classified into nine structure types. These structure types and the chemical and physical properties of the characteristic d-metal pnictide layers and metal oxide layers of the layered d-metal pnictide oxides are reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, possible approaches to design new superconductors based on these layered d-metal pnictide oxides are proposed.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  19. Chemical information science coverage in Chemical Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, G

    1987-02-01

    For many years Chemical Abstracts has included in its coverage publications on chemical documentation or chemical information science. Although the bulk of those publications can be found in section 20 of Chemical Abstracts, many relevant articles were found scattered among 39 other sections of CA in 1984-1985. In addition to the scattering of references in CA, the comprehensiveness of Chemical Abstracts as a secondary source for chemical information science is called into question. Data are provided on the journals that contributed the most references on chemical information science and on the languages of publication of relevant articles.

  20. Tensile strength of thin resin composite layers as a function of layer thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, D; Feilzer, A J; De Gee, A J; Davidson, C L

    1995-11-01

    As a rule, cast restorations do not allow for free curing contraction of the resin composite luting cement. In a rigid situation, the resulting contraction stress is inversely proportional to the resin layer thickness. Adhesive technology has demonstrated, however, that thin joints may be considerably stronger than thicker ones. To investigate the effects of layer thickness and contraction stress on the tensile strength of resin composite joints, we cured cylindrical samples of a chemically initiated resin composite (Clearfil F2) in restrained conditions and subsequently loaded them in tension. The samples had a diameter of 5.35 mm and thicknesses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 microns, 1.4 mm, or 2.7 mm. None of the samples fractured due to contraction stress prior to tensile loading. Tensile strength decreased gradually from 62 +/- 2 MPa for the 50-microns layer to 31 +/- 4 MPa for the 2.7-mm layer. The failures were exclusively cohesive in resin for layers between 50 and 400 microns thick. Between 500 and 700 microns, the failures were cohesive or mixed adhesive/cohesive, while the 1.4- and 2.7-mm layers always failed in a mixed adhesive/cohesive mode. For the resin composite tested, the contraction stress did not endanger the cohesive strength. It was concluded that if adhesion to tooth structure were improved, thinner adhesive joints might enhance the clinical success of luted restorations.

  1. CFCs, their replacements, and the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, T J

    1995-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have become widely used in a variety of applications, ranging from aerosols to refrigeration, through their unique combination of the properties of nonflammability and general inertness. However, their chemical stability, which makes CFCs relatively safe and non-toxic, is also responsible for their potential to damage the environment. From 1974 opinion developed that CFCs might indirectly affect the stratospheric 'ozone layer' through their ability to transport halogens, particularly chlorine, to this level. By the mid 1980s a consensus emerged that atmospheric CFCs could contribute significantly to ozone depletion and an annual thinning (a 'hole') in the ozone layer over the Antarctic was reported. Some of the atmospheric chemistry which is believed to occur, and some of the measurements made on the ozone 'layer' are reviewed together with the environmental regulatory actions that have been taken. These are leading to a controlled rapid phase out of a number of industrial chemicals, including CFCs. The pharmaceutical industry uses significant quantities of CFCs as propellants in metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Two suitable alternative molecules, the hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) HFA134a and HFA227, which have the required properties but are not ozone depleting, are introduced. PMID:10150493

  2. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  3. Recent and Future Evolution of the Stratospheric Ozone Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameris, Martin; Loyola, Diego

    Since the early 1980s significant depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, in other words the ozone hole, has been observed every year over the South Pole area in Antarctic spring. In the meantime destruction of stratospheric ozone has been detected globally. Emissions of man-made halogenated chemicals play a dominant role in ozone loss. Combined analyses of observations and numerical modeling help to understand the complex interplay of the dynamic and chemical processes involved. Evaluated models provide a base for predicting the future recovery of the ozone layer expected for the middle of this century.

  4. An investigation on corrosion protection layers in pipelines transporting hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Gabetta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical reactions between carbon steel, water and chemical species produce corrosion layers (scales on the internal surface of pipelines transporting hydrocarbons. Scales act as a diffusion barrier and prevent the progress of corrosion, a dangerous failure initiator. The protective film (10-100 μm thickness can be removed locally by the action of the internal flow, or by other mechanisms. Adhesion with the substrate and the failure modes of the corrosion layer can be tested by indentation. Some results are presented of experiments performed on specimens with scales grown in a controlled environment.

  5. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  6. Multifunctional layered magnetic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Siglreitmeier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A fabrication method of a multifunctional hybrid material is achieved by using the insoluble organic nacre matrix of the Haliotis laevigata shell infiltrated with gelatin as a confined reaction environment. Inside this organic scaffold magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs are synthesized. The amount of MNPs can be controlled through the synthesis protocol therefore mineral loadings starting from 15 wt % up to 65 wt % can be realized. The demineralized organic nacre matrix is characterized by small-angle and very-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and VSANS showing an unchanged organic matrix structure after demineralization compared to the original mineralized nacre reference. Light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of stained samples show the presence of insoluble proteins at the chitin surface but not between the chitin layers. Successful and homogeneous gelatin infiltration in between the chitin layers can be shown. The hybrid material is characterized by TEM and shows a layered structure filled with MNPs with a size of around 10 nm. Magnetic analysis of the material demonstrates superparamagnetic behavior as characteristic for the particle size. Simulation studies show the potential of collagen and chitin to act as nucleators, where there is a slight preference of chitin over collagen as a nucleator for magnetite. Colloidal-probe AFM measurements demonstrate that introduction of a ferrogel into the chitin matrix leads to a certain increase in the stiffness of the composite material.

  7. Thin-Layer Spectroelectrochemistry on an Aqueous Micro-drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroll, Cynthia A.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Heineman, William R.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2012-05-01

    Here we report the ability to perform thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry using an aqueous micro-drop. The thin-layer setup was evaluated using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-} as a absorbance based model analyte and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 3+/2+} as an emission based model analyte. The thin-layer capability of the electrochemical cell was validated with these two chemical systems using cyclic voltammetry, and UV-visible absorbance and luminescence spectroscopies. This work supports our FCRD process monitoring work and is a direct result of the collaboration under subcontract with University of Cincinnati.

  8. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  9. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  10. Graphene Electronic Device Based Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, are emerging as an exciting material system for a new generation of atomically thin electronic devices. With their ultrahigh surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical properties, 2D-layered materials hold the promise for the construction of a generation of chemical and biological sensors with unprecedented sensitivity. In my PhD thesis, I mainly focus on graphene based electronic biosensors and chemical sensors. In the first...

  11. The coating layer structure of commercial chrome plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AES and XPS depth profiling analysis were used in the experiment. • The detailed coating layer structure of the commercial chrome plate was obtained. • Peak fitting method was used to investigate the chemical states of Cr in the coating. - Abstract: The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of the commercial chrome plate coating layer with the thickness of dozens of nanometers have been observed. To investigate the detailed structure of the coating layer, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the low energy Ar+ sputtering technique have been employed. Through careful analysis of experimental data, it can be obtained that the coating layer of commercial chrome plates is composed of four layers from top to bottom with different compositions

  12. Biomass-burning emissions and associated haze layers over Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Harriss, R. C.; Hill, G. F.; Sachse, G. W.; Talbot, R. W.; Garstang, M.; Jacob, D. J.; Torres, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of haze layers, which were visually observed over the central Amazon Basin during many of the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A flights in July/August 1985, were investigated by remote and in situ measurements, using the broad range of instrumentation and sampling equipment on board the Electra aircraft. It was found that these layers strongly influenced the chemical and optical characteristics of the atmosphere over the eastern Amazon Basin. Relative to the regional background, the concentrations of CO, CO2, O3, and NO were significantly elevated in the plumes and haze layers, with the NO/CO ratio in fresh plumes much higher than in the aged haze layers. The haze aerosol was composed predominantly of organic material, NH4, K(+), NO3(-), SO4(2-), and organic anions (formate, acetate, and oxalate).

  13. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2010-08-26

    How cratons-extremely stable continental areas of the Earth's crust-formed and remained largely unchanged for more than 2,500 million years is much debated. Recent studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at depths too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. Here we show that changes in the direction of azimuthal anisotropy with depth reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the North American continent. The top layer is thick ( approximately 150 km) under the Archaean core and tapers out on the surrounding Palaeozoic borders. Its thickness variations follow those of a highly depleted layer inferred from thermo-barometric analysis of xenoliths. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is relatively flat (ranging from 180 to 240 km in depth), in agreement with the presence of a thermal conductive root that subsequently formed around the depleted chemical layer. Our findings tie together seismological, geochemical and geodynamical studies of the cratonic lithosphere in North America. They also suggest that the horizon detected in receiver function studies probably corresponds to the sharp mid-lithospheric boundary rather than to the more gradual lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. PMID:20740006

  14. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  16. Infrared analysis of thin layers by attenuated total reflection spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochat, N.; Chabli, A.; Bertin, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Mur, P.; Petitdidier, S.; Besson, P

    2003-09-15

    Interests in infrared spectroscopy (IRS) have been stimulated by the increasing need for non-destructive surface characterization providing structural and chemical informations about the new materials used in microelectronic devices. Standard infrared spectroscopy of thin layers is limited because of its lack of sensitivity. The use of optical configurations such as the attenuated total reflection (ATR) allows to characterize nanometric layers. This paper will present the results of a study conducted for a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of this technique. A theoretical analysis based on a perturbation method is used to elucidate the results of ATR measurements performed on silicon oxide layers of different thickness on silicon substrates. This analysis shows that the absorbance ATR spectrum in p polarization is the image of the layer energy loss function, under specific conditions. The exact ATR spectrum simulation using a matrix formalism showed that the straightforward interpretation in terms of the layer dielectric function is limited to a very narrow layer thickness range. The fitting process of the ATR spectrum is evaluated for the interpretation of experimental spectra obtained for the growth of chemical silicon oxide layers.

  17. Identifying layers in random multiphase structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Kevin; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    X-Ray microscopic methods, benefiting from the large penetration depth of X-rays in many materials, enable 3D investigation of a wide variety of samples. This allows for a wide variety of physical, chemical, and biological structures to be seen and explored, in some cases even in real time. Such measurements have lead to insights into paleontology, vulcanology, genetics, and material science. The ability to see and visualize complex systems can provide otherwise unobtainable information on structure, interactions, mechanical behavior, and evolution. The field has, however, led to a massive amount of new, heterogenous, difficult to process data. We present a general, model-free approach for characterizing multiphase 3D systems and show how the method can be applied to experimental X-ray microscopy data to better understand and quantify layer structure in two typical systems: investigation of layered fibers and clay samples.

  18. Oxyfluoride Chemistry of Layered Perovskite Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Tsujimoto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review recent progress and new challenges in the area of oxyfluoride perovskite, especially layered systems including Ruddlesden-Popper (RP, Dion-Jacobson (DJ and Aurivillius (AV type perovskite families. It is difficult to synthesize oxyfluoride perovskite using a conventional solid-state reaction because of the high chemical stability of the simple fluoride starting materials. Nevertheless, persistent efforts made by solid-state chemists have led to a major breakthrough in stabilizing such a mixed anion system. In particular, it is known that layered perovskite compounds exhibit a rich variety of O/F site occupation according to the synthesis used. We also present the synthetic strategies to further extend RP type perovskite compounds, with particular reference to newly synthesized oxyfluorides, Sr2CoO3F and Sr3Fe2O5+xF2−x (x ~ 0.44.

  19. In situ study of glasses decomposition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to understand the involved mechanisms during the decomposition of glasses by water and the consequences on the morphology of the decomposition layer, in particular in the case of a nuclear glass: the R7 T7. The chemical composition of this glass being very complicated, it is difficult to know the influence of the different elements on the decomposition kinetics and on the resulting morphology because several atoms have a same behaviour. Glasses with simplified composition (only 5 elements) have then been synthesized. The morphological and structural characteristics of these glasses have been given. They have then been decomposed by water. The leaching curves do not reflect the decomposition kinetics but the solubility of the different elements at every moment. The three steps of the leaching are: 1) de-alkalinization 2) lattice rearrangement 3) heavy elements solubilization. Two decomposition layer types have also been revealed according to the glass heavy elements rate. (O.M.)

  20. Development of all chemical solution derived Ce0.9La0.1O2 − y/Gd2Zr2O7 buffer layer stack for coated conductors: influence of the post-annealing process on surface crystallinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Li, Xiaofen; Khoryushin, Alexey;

    2012-01-01

    Preparation and characterization of a biaxially textured Gd2Zr2O7 and Ce0.9La0.1O2 − y (CLO, cap)/Gd2Zr2O7 (GZO, barrier) buffer layer stack by the metal–organic deposition route are reported. YBa2Cu3O7 − d (YBCO) superconductor films were deposited by the pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique...... to assess the efficiency of such a novel buffer layer stack. Biaxial texture quality and morphology of the buffer layers and the YBCO superconductor films were fully characterized. The surface crystallinity of the buffer layers is studied by the electron backscatter diffraction technique. It is revealed......-field), demonstrating that the novel CLO/GZO stack is very promising for further development of low cost buffer layer architectures for coated conductors....

  1. HV/CVD Grown Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layers for SiGe HMOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文韬; 罗广礼; 史进; 邓宁; 陈培毅; 钱佩信

    2003-01-01

    High-vacuum/chemical-vapor deposition (HV/CVD) system was used to grow relaxed SiGe buffer layers on Si substrates. Several methods were then used to analyze the quality of the SiGe films. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed that the upper layer was almost fully relaxed. Second ion mass spectroscopy showed that the Ge compositions were step-graded. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the misfit dislocations were restrained to the graded SiGe layers. Tests of the electrical properties of tensile-strained Si on relaxed SiGe buffer layers showed that their transconductances were higher than that of Si devices. These results verify the high quality of the relaxed SiGe buffer layer. The calculated critical layer thicknesses of the graded Si1-xGex layer on Si substrate and a Si layer on the relaxed SiGe buffer layer agree well with experimental results.

  2. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting turbulent mixing layer by a pseudospectral-spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the implementation of the spectral-element technique for simulating a chemically reacting, spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. Attention is given to experimental and numerical studies that have investigated the development, evolution, and mixing characteristics of shear flows. A mathematical formulation is presented of the physical configuration of the spatially developing reacting mixing layer, in conjunction with a detailed representation of the spectral-element method's application to the numerical simulation of mixing layers. Results from 2D and 3D calculations of chemically reacting mixing layers are given.

  3. Graded thermal insulation layer systems; Gradierte Waermedaemmschichtsysteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leushake, U.; Krell, T. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoff-Forschung

    1996-12-31

    Graded thermal insulation systems reduce local stresses between two layers. Grading usually involves a concentration variation in a second phase but may also involve variations of the microstructure or chemical composition. The contribution discusses the application of this technique for thermal protection of turbine blades in aircraft propulsion systems. [Deutsch] Mit Hilfe gradierter Waermeschichtsysteme ist es moeglich die lokalen Spannungen zwischen zwei Schichten zu verringern. Die Gradierung umfasst meistens eine Variation des Gehaltes einer zweiten Phase, kann aber auch die Variation der Mikrostruktur oder der chemischen Zusammensetzung beinhalten. In diesem Beitrag wird auf die Anwendung als thermischer Schutz von Turbinenschaufeln fuer Flugtriebwerke eingegangen.

  4. Modern Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F.; Poole, Salwa K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the important modern developments of thin-layer chromatography are introduced. Discussed are the theory and instrumentation of thin-layer chromatography including multidimensional and multimodal techniques. Lists 53 references. (CW)

  5. Physical layer network coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...... the impact of interference from other transmissions. Unlike these conventional studies, in this paper, we apply PLNC to a large-scale cellular network in the presence of intercell interference (ICI). In cellular networks, a terminal and a Base Station (BS) have different transmission power, which causes...

  6. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be interpre

  7. Layered kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  8. Physical Layer Network Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Shengli, Zhang; Lam, Patrick P K

    2007-01-01

    A main distinguishing feature of a wireless network compared with a wired network is its broadcast nature, in which the signal transmitted by a node may reach several other nodes, and a node may receive signals from several other nodes simultaneously. Rather than a blessing, this feature is treated more as an interference-inducing nuisance in most wireless networks today (e.g., IEEE 802.11). This paper shows that the concept of network coding can be applied at the physical layer to turn the broadcast property into a capacity-boosting advantage in wireless ad hoc networks. Specifically, we propose a physical-layer network coding (PNC) scheme to coordinate transmissions among nodes. In contrast to straightforward network coding which performs coding arithmetic on digital bit streams after they have been received, PNC makes use of the additive nature of simultaneously arriving electromagnetic (EM) waves for equivalent coding operation. And in doing so, PNC can potentially achieve 100% and 50% throughput increase...

  9. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  10. BORATING OF CARBON AND ALLOY STEEL IN BOILING LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Koukhareva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes how to obtain boride coatings on steel 20, 4X5MФС, X12M being treated in a boiling layer of metallothermic powder environment. Phase and chemical compositions, hardness and wear- resistance of boride coatings

  11. Structural and Chemical Diversity of Tl-Based Cuprate Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信赢

    2003-01-01

    The Tl-based cuprate superconductor family is the largest family in crystal structure and chemical composition among all high Tc cuprate superconductors. The Tl family can be divided into two sub-families, the Tl single layer family and the Tl double layer family, based on their crystal structural characteristics. The Tl single layer family is an ideal material for investigating the evolution of crystalline formation, charge carrier density, chemical composition, transport properties, superconductivity and their relationships. The Tl family contains almostall possible crystal structures discovered in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Tl cuprate superconductors are of great importance not only in studying high-temperature superconductivity but also in commercial applications.

  12. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  13. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  14. Metal deposition using seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  15. The Adobe Photoshop layers book

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Layers are the building blocks for working in Photoshop. With the correct use of the Layers Tool, you can edit individual components of your images nondestructively to ensure that your end result is a combination of the best parts of your work. Despite how important it is for successful Photoshop work, the Layers Tool is one of the most often misused and misunderstood features within this powerful software program. This book will show you absolutely everything you need to know to work with layers, including how to use masks, blending, modes and layer management. You'll learn professional tech

  16. Layer-by-layer growth of superparamagnetic, fluorescent barcode nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a novel stepwise layer-by-layer synthesis strategy to achieve multi-component barcode nanospheres that contain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as the core and quantum dots (QDs) of different emission colors in spatially separated silica layers as the shells, with QD-free silica layers as the insulation layers. This strategy offers the following unique features: (1) the location of the MNPs and the QDs in the silica spheres are separated spatially, so that no interference of the QD photoluminescence (PL) by the magnetic particles is observed; (2) the PL spectra of barcode nanospheres can be easily tuned through the ratio of different QDs loaded in each layer; (3) the size of the silica nanospheres can range from submicron (∼100 nm) to micrometers depending on the number of layers and the thickness of each layer; (4) QD stability is preserved by embedding the QDs covalently in the silica matrix; (5) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different colored QDs is avoided by isolating them into separated layers with a silica spacer layer

  17. Layer-by-layer growth of superparamagnetic, fluorescent barcode nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qiangbin [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Liu Yan [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Lin Chenxiang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yan Hao [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    We report a novel stepwise layer-by-layer synthesis strategy to achieve multi-component barcode nanospheres that contain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as the core and quantum dots (QDs) of different emission colors in spatially separated silica layers as the shells, with QD-free silica layers as the insulation layers. This strategy offers the following unique features: (1) the location of the MNPs and the QDs in the silica spheres are separated spatially, so that no interference of the QD photoluminescence (PL) by the magnetic particles is observed; (2) the PL spectra of barcode nanospheres can be easily tuned through the ratio of different QDs loaded in each layer; (3) the size of the silica nanospheres can range from submicron ({approx}100 nm) to micrometers depending on the number of layers and the thickness of each layer; (4) QD stability is preserved by embedding the QDs covalently in the silica matrix; (5) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different colored QDs is avoided by isolating them into separated layers with a silica spacer layer.

  18. The layers of subtitling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Di Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of subtitling, although widely practiced over the past 20 years, has generally been confined to comparative studies focusing on the product of subtitle translation, with little or no consideration of the conditions of creation and reception. Focusing on the process of subtitle production, occasional studies have touched upon the cognitive processes accompanying it, but no study so far has related these processes, and the resulting products, to various degrees of translators’ competence. This is precisely what this essay does, focusing on the different layers of subtitle translation provided for two different films and in two different contexts. By analysing the first and second versions of subtitle translations, we shall reflect on the acquisition, and application, of different subtitling competences.

  19. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  20. Spatial observation of the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin-Beekmann, Sophie

    2010-04-01

    This article provides an overview of the various satellite instruments, which have been used to observe stratospheric ozone and other chemical compounds playing a key role in stratospheric chemistry. It describes the various instruments that have been launched since the late 1970s for the measurement of total ozone column and ozone vertical profile, as well as the major satellite missions designed for the study of stratospheric chemistry. Since the discovery of the ozone hole in the early 1980s, spatial ozone measurements have been widely used to evaluate and quantify the spatial extension of polar ozone depletion and global ozone decreasing trends as a function of latitude and height. Validation and evaluation of satellite ozone data have been the subject of intense scientific activity, which was reported in the various ozone assessments of the state of the ozone layer published after the signature of the Montreal protocol. Major results, based on satellite observations for the study of ozone depletion at the global scale and chemical polar ozone loss, are provided. The use of satellite observations for the validation of chemistry climate models that simulate the recovery of the ozone layer and in data assimilation is also described.

  1. Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Peter J.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Haas, Jeffrey S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2007-07-24

    A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

  2. Band Gap Engineering and Layer-by-Layer Band Gap Mapping of Selenium-doped Molybdenum Disulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yongji [Rice University; Liu, Zheng [Rice University; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Lin, Junhao [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Zhou, Wu [ORNL; Ajayan, Pullikel M [Rice University

    2014-01-01

    Ternary two-dimensional dichalcogenide alloys exhibit compositionally modulated electronic structure and hence, control of dopant concentration within each layer of these layered compounds provides a powerful way to modify their properties. The challenge then becomes quantifying and locating the dopant atoms within each layer in order to better understand and fine-tune the desired properties. Here we report the synthesis of selenium substitutionally doped molybdenum disulfide atomic layers, with a broad range of selenium concentrations, resulting in band gap modulations of over 0.2 eV. Atomic scale chemical analysis using Z-contrast imaging provides direct maps of the dopant atom distribution in individual MoS2 layers and hence a measure of the local band gaps. Furthermore, in a bilayer structure, the dopant distribution of each layer is imaged independently. We demonstrate that each layer in the bilayer contains similar doping levels, randomly distributed, providing new insights into the growth mechanism and alloying behavior in two-dimensional dichalcogenide atomic layers. The results show that growth of uniform, ternary, two-dimensional dichalcogenide alloy films with tunable electronic properties is feasible.

  3. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  4. Wet chemical thinning of molybdenum disulfide down to its monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Amara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the preparation of mono- and bi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 from a bulk crystal by facile wet chemical etching. We show that concentrated nitric acid (HNO3 effectively etches thin MoS2 crystals from their edges via formation of MoO3. Interestingly, etching of thin crystals on a substrate leaves behind unreacted mono- and bilayer sheets. The flakes obtained by chemical etching exhibit electronic quality comparable to that of mechanically exfoliated counterparts. Our findings indicate that the self-limiting chemical etching is a promising top-down route to preparing atomically thin crystals from bulk layer compounds.

  5. Seed layer, solution concentration and thickness effects on CSD-derived La2Zr2O7 buffer layers for coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La2Zr2O7/NiW buffer layers as very promising buffer layers for coated conductors were fabricated by chemical solution deposition using cheap precursors, La-acetate and Zr-(IV) n-propoxide (70% w/w in n-propanol). The effects on the orientation and microstructure of La2Zr2O7 buffer layers, including seed layer, thickness and solution concentration, were investigated. The results showed that insertion of a seed layer could obviously improve the crystallization and orientation, and decrease of single layer thickness could also obviously improve the in-plane orientation. The results of all metalorganic depositions derived YBCO/CeO2/La2Zr2O7/NiW showed that the prepared La2Zr2O7 buffer layers were suitable for coated conductors using all metalorganic depositions

  6. Structure and physical properties of layered ferrofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghominezhad

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully synthesised and studied the bilayer ferrofluids with sodium oleate C18H33O2-Na+ as the first layer and sodium dodecyle sulfate C12H25Na+SO-4 (SDS as the second layer surfactants. The solid phase of the ferromagnetic colloidal system was formed based on quick chemical growth. The adsorption of oleate molecule on the surface of the solid solution has been investigated by IR spectroscopy. The XRD analysis of the oxides and titration by KMnO4 show that the closest stoichiometry of Fe3O4 is achieved by the increase of Fe3+/Fe2+ molar ratio up to 2/3 with extra acidifying for prevention of uncontrolled Fe2+ excitation. The X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements by VSM were employed for determining the particle magnetic and crystal sizes. The particle size was determined to be 9-13 nm. The magnetisation measurement of the ferrofluid indicate a saturation magnetisation of about 1.5 emu/g and reduced initial susceptibility of 6 10-3 Oe-1, which are the proper values for a superparamagnet. However, the saturation magnetisation shows a local maxima at SDS concentration about 0.07M, which is different from the behaviour presented by the mono-layer ferrofuids.

  7. Epitaxial Growth of High-Quality Silicon Films on Double-Layer Porous Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宜平; 竺士炀; 李爱珍; 王瑾; 黄靖云; 叶志镇

    2001-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of a high-quality silicon layer on double-layer porous silicon by ultra-high vacuum/chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The two-step anodization process results in a double-layer porous silicon structure with a different porosity. This double-layer porous silicon structure and an extended low-temperature annealing in a vacuum system was found to be helpful in subsequent silicon epitaxial growth. X-ray diffraction,cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and spreading resistance testing were used in this work to study the properties of epitaxial silicon layers grown on the double-layer porous silicon. The results show that the epitaxial silicon layer is of good crystallinity and the same orientation with the silicon substrate and the porous silicon layer.

  8. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond. PMID:24905820

  9. The chemical life(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    You write this narrative autoethnography to open up a conversation about our chemical lives. You go through your day with chemical mindfulness, questioning taken-for-granted ideas about natural and artificial, healthy and unhealthy, dependency and addiction, trying to understand the chemical messages we consume through the experiences of everyday life. You reflect on how messages about chemicals influence and structure our lives and why some chemicals are celebrated and some are condemned. Using a second-person narrative voice, you show how the personal is relational and the chemical is cultural. You write because you seek a connection, a chemical bond.

  10. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  11. Electron diffraction studies on CVD grown bi-layered graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, Kiran; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Quin, Haijun; Rao, Apparao; Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC USA 29634. Team; Advanced Materials Research Laboratories, Clemson University, Anderson, SC USA 29625 Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has generated enormous interest in the scientific community due to its peculiar properties like electron mobility, thermal conductivity etc. Several recent reports on exfoliated graphene emphasized the role of layer stacking on the electronic and optical properties of graphene in case of bi-layered and few layered graphene and several synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Copper foils are employed to prepare graphene for applications at a large scale. However, a correlated study pertinent to the stacking order in CVD grown graphene is still unclear. In this work, using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analysis we analyzed the preferred misorientation angles in a CVD grown bi-layered graphene and also the role of Cu crystal facets on the graphene stacking order will be presented.

  12. Concentration profiles in paint layers studied by differential PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, Z. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: ziga.smit@fmf.uni-lj.si; Ursic, M.; Pelicon, P. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O.B. 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Trcek-Pecak, T.; Seme, B. [University of Ljubljana, Academy of Fine Arts and Design, Erjavceva 23, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Smrekar, A. [National Gallery of Slovenia, Puharjeva 9, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Langus, I. [National Museum of Slovenia, Presernova 20, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Nemec, I.; Kavkler, K. [ZVKDS Restoration Centre RS, Poljanska 40, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-05-15

    Differential PIXE measurements varying the proton energy were used to probe the concentration profiles of metal-based pigments in paint layers. The algorithms developed earlier for metal targets were improved and enhanced to include light elements; the necessary information on chemical compounds has to be provided by complimentary methods. The de-convolution method employs slicing the target into layers characterized by mean production depths; the matrix inversion is replaced by a min {chi}{sup 2} problem. Two different methods of normalization are used: setting the sum of weight fractions of particular compounds to unity, and direct measurements of the projectile number, in our case through the argon line excited in the air. The efficiency of the two methods was compared for paint layers in frescoes, showing that smother concentration profiles are obtained using the measured proton numbers. Conversion of the layer areal densities into geometrical thicknesses is discussed.

  13. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4}, which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4} above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T{sub N}, excitations at this

  14. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  15. Layer-by-layer self-assembled active electrodes for hybrid photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniprath, Rolf

    2008-11-18

    Solar cells based on thin organic/inorganic heterofilms are currently in the focus of research, since they represent promising candidates for cost-efficient photovoltaic energy conversion. In this type of cells, charges are separated at a heterointerface between dissimilar electrode materials. These materials either absorb light themselves, or they are sensitized by an additional absorber layer at the interface. The present work investigates photovoltaic cells which are composed of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} combined with conjugated polymers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The method of layer-by-layer self-assembly of oppositely charged nanoparticles and polymers is used for the fabrication of such devices. This method allows to fabricate nanoporous films with controlled thicknesses in the range of a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. Investigations with scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveal that the surface morphology of the films depends only on the chemical structure of the polyions used in the production process, and not on their molecular weight or conformation. From dye adsorption at the internal surface of the electrodes one can estimate that the internal surface area of a 1 {mu}m thick film is up to 120 times larger than the projection plane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to demonstrate that during the layer-by-layer self-assembly at least 40% of the TiO{sub 2} surface is covered with polymers. This feature allows to incorporate polythiophene derivatives into the films and to use them as sensitizers for TiO{sub 2}. Further, electrodes containing CdSe or CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers are fabricated. For the fabrication of photovoltaic cells the layer-by-layer grown films are coated with an additional polymer layer, and Au back electrodes are evaporated on top. The cells are illuminated through transparent doped SnO{sub 2} front electrodes. The I/V curves of all fabricated cells show diode

  16. Design of chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes design of chemical plant, which includes chemical engineer and plan for chemical plant, development of chemical process, cost engineering pattern, design and process development, general plant construction plan, project engineering, foundation for economy on assets and depreciation, estimation for cost on capital investment and manufacturing cost, design with computers optimal design and method like fluid mechanics design chemical device and estimation for cost, such as dispatch of material and device writing on design report and appendixes.

  17. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  18. Evidence of wettability variation on carbon nanofiber layers grown on oxidized silicon substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, H.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Thakur, D.B.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Houselt, van A.; Lefferts, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how layers of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with a controllable wettability can be synthesized by means of thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition on nickel-based thin films on oxidized silicon supports. In order to achieve well-adhesive CNF-layers with a uniform surface coverage

  19. Metallurgical investigations of dry sliding surface layer in phosphorous iron/steel friction pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Surface layer behaviors of composition concentration and micro-hardness were inves-tigated on phosphorous cast irons after dry sliding. The experimental results indicate that thehardness and chemical composition unevenly distribute in the surface layer. The sliding conditionand microstructure of the pin specimen have greatly effects on the distributions.

  20. Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Manfreda, Allison; Mansour, Kamjou; Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer polymer layer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in index of refraction of the polymer causes a measurable shift in the resonance peaks of the ring. In a prototype that has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this sensor concept, the ring resonator is a dielectric optical waveguide laid out along a closed path resembling a racetrack (see Figure 1). The prototype was fabricated on a silicon substrate by use of standard techniques of thermal oxidation, chemical vapor deposition, photolithography, etching, and spin coating. The prototype resonator waveguide features an inner cladding of SiO2, a core of SixNy, and a chemical-sensing outer cladding of ethyl cellulose. In addition to the ring Chemical sensors based on optical ring resonators are undergoing development. A ring resonator according to this concept is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, is a made of a polymer that (1) has an index of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core and (2) absorbs chemicals from the surrounding air. The index of refraction of the polymer changes with the concentration of absorbed chemical( s). The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong

  1. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  2. Formation of conductive spontaneous via holes in AlN buffer layer on n+Si substrate by filling the vias with n-AlGaN by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and application to vertical deep ultraviolet photo-sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have grown conductive aluminum nitride (AlN layers using the spontaneous via holes formation technique on an n+-Si substrate for vertical-type device fabrication. The size and density of the via holes are controlled through the crystal growth conditions used for the layer, and this enables the conductance of the layer to be controlled. Using this technique, we demonstrate the fabrication of a vertical-type deep ultraviolet (DUV photo-sensor. This technique opens up the possibility of fabrication of monolithically integrated on-chip DUV sensors and DUV light-emitting devices (LEDs, including amplifiers, controllers and other necessary functional circuits, on a Si substrate.

  3. Silver hollow optical fibers with acrylic silicone resin coating as buffer layer for sturdy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Katsumasa; Takaku, Hiroyuki; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    For sturdy silver hollow optical fibers, acrylic silicone resin is newly used as a buffer layer between an inner silver layer and a silica capillary. This acrylic silicone resin film prevents the glass surface from chemical and mechanical micro damages during silver plating process, which deteriorate mechanical strength of the hollow fibers. In addition, it keeps high adhesion of the silver layer with the glass surface. We discuss improvement of mechanical strength of the hollow glass fibers without deterioration of optical properties.

  4. Characterization of thick epitaxial GaAs layers for X-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Samic, H; Donchev, V; Nghia, N X; Gandouzi, M; Zazoui, M; Bourgoin, J C; El-Abbassi, H; Rath, S; Sellin, P J

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics of p/i/n structures made on non-intentionally doped epitaxial GaAs layers grown by the chemical reaction method. Deep level transient spectroscopy demonstrates that these layers contain a low defect concentration. X-ray photoconductivity shows that the diffusion length is large. The homogeneity of the properties of these layers, which has been evaluated over large area (cm sup 2), is confirmed by photoluminescence mapping.

  5. Supercapacitive properties of nanoporous oxide layer formed on 304 type stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, A A; Lokhande, A C; Kim, J H; Lokhande, C D

    2016-07-01

    The nanoporous oxide layer is formed on the surface of 304 type stainless steel (SS) by chemical oxidation method. The characterization of the oxide layer is carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The supercapacitive properties of oxide layer are studied using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. PMID:27042821

  6. Metallic conduction induced by direct anion site doping in layered SnSe 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Il Kim; Sungwoo Hwang; Se Yun Kim; Woo-Jin Lee; Doh Won Jung; Kyoung-Seok Moon; Hee Jung Park; Young-Jin Cho; Yong-Hee Cho; Jung-Hwa Kim; Dong-Jin Yun; Kyu Hyoung Lee; In-taek Han; Kimoon Lee; Yoonchul Sohn

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of metallic conduction in layered dichalcogenide semiconductor materials by chemical doping is one of key issues for two-dimensional (2D) materials engineering. At present, doping methods for layered dichalcogenide materials have been limited to an ion intercalation between layer units or electrostatic carrier doping by electrical bias owing to the absence of appropriate substitutional dopant for increasing the carrier concentration. Here, we report the occurrence of metallic co...

  7. CMUTs with high-K atomic layer deposition dielectric material insulation layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F

    2014-12-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (Six)Ny)) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2) such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD Six)Ny) and 100-nm HfO2) insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  8. Sub-Transport Layer Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Krigslund, Jeppe; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2014-01-01

    oblivious to the congestion control algorithms of the utilised transport layer protocol. Although our coding shim is indifferent towards the transport layer protocol, we focus on the performance of TCP when ran on top of our proposed coding mechanism due to its widespread use. The coding shim provides gains......Packet losses in wireless networks dramatically curbs the performance of TCP. This paper introduces a simple coding shim that aids IP-layer traffic in lossy environments while being transparent to transport layer protocols. The proposed coding approach enables erasure correction while being...

  9. Superradiance in spherical layered nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupalov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a design of a spherically symmetric nanostructure consisting of alternate concentric semiconductor and dielectric layers. The exciton states in different semiconductor layers of such a structure interact via the common electromagnetic field of light. We show that, if the exciton states in N semiconductor layers are in resonance with one another, then a superradiant state emerges under optical excitation of such a structure. We discuss the conditions under which superradiance can be observed and show that they strongly depend on the valence-band structure of the semiconductor layers.

  10. Nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan assembled layer-by-layer: An antibacterial surface for Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Nascimento, Vicente F; Murillo, Duber; Taketa, Thiago B; Sahoo, Prasana; de Souza, Alessandra A; Beppu, Marisa M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-01-20

    In this work, nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan (HA/CHI) assembled layer by layer were synthesized; their application as a potential antimicrobial material was demonstrated for the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium, here used as a model. For the synthesis, the influence of pH and ionic strength of these natural polymer stem-solutions on final characteristics of the HA/CHI nanofilms was studied in detail. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using widefield fluorescence microscopy. These results were correlated with the chemical properties of the nanofilms, studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, as well as with their morphology and surface properties characterized using SEM and AFM. The present findings can be extended to design and optimize HA/CHI nanofilms with enhanced antimicrobial behavior for other type of phytopathogenic gram-negative bacteria species, such as Xanthomonas citri, Xanthomas campestri and Ralstonia solanacearum. PMID:26572322

  11. Development of the layer-by-layer biosensor using graphene films: application for cholesterol determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation and characterization of graphene films for cholesterol determination are described. The graphene films were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Methane gas (CH4) and copper tape were used as carbon source and catalyst in the graphene growth process, respectively. The intergrated array was fabricated by using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology in which Fe3O4-doped polyaniline (PANi) film was electropolymerized on Pt/Gr electrodes. The properties of the Pt/Gr/PANi/Fe3O4 films were investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized onto the working electrode with glutaraldehyde agent. The cholesterol electrochemical biosensor shows high sensitivity (74 μA mM−1 cm−2) and fast response time (2) of 0.9986. This new layer-by-layer biosensor based on graphene films promises many practical applications. (paper)

  12. Boundary Layer Ventilation Processes During a High Pressure Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S. L.; Dacre, H. F.; Belcher, S. E.

    2006-12-01

    It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer is weak during high pressure events. But is this always true? Here we investigate the processes responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a high pressure event that occured on the 9 May 2005 using the UK Met Office Unifed Model. Pollution sources are represented by the constant emission of a passive tracer everywhere over land. The ventilation processes observed include a sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing across the top of the boundary layer followed by large-scale ascent, and shallow convection. Vertical distributions of tracer are validated with AMPEP (Aircraft Measurement of chemical Processing Export fluxes of Pollutants over the UK) CO aircraft measurements and are shown to agree impressively well. Budget calculations of tracers are performed in order to determine the relative importance of these ventilation processes. The sea breeze circulation was found to ventilate 26% of the boundary layer tracer by sunset of which 2% was above 2km. A combination of the sea breeze circulation and turbulent mixing ventilated 46% of the boundary layer tracer, of which 10% was above 2km. Finally, the sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing and shallow convection processes together ventilated 52% of the tracer into the free troposphere, of which 26% was above 2km. Hence this study shows that signicant ventilation of the boundary layer can occur during high pressure events; turbulent mixing and convection processes can double the amount of pollution ventilated from the boundary layer.

  13. Traces of ancient mafic layers in the Tethys oceanic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Dmitry S.; Dijkstra, Arjan H.; Meisel, Thomas; Brügmann, Gerhard; Sergeev, Sergey A.

    2014-03-01

    Oceanic basalts are formed by melting of a chemically and isotopically heterogeneous mantle source. The oceanic mantle probably resembles a marble cake containing layers of mafic rock - perhaps recycled ocean crust - stored in the mantle for >1 billion years. Many questions about the nature and distribution of these mantle heterogeneities remain. Here we show that lithological and isotopic traces of ancient mafic layers can still be seen in mantle rocks that have melted to form oceanic crust at a spreading centre in the Tethys Ocean. We have found centimetre-scale heterogeneity in initial osmium isotope ratios in mantle rocks from the Pindos Ophiolite. Deformed pyroxenite layers have high 187Os/188Os ratios (0.14-0.20) compared to adjacent host peridotites (187Os/188Os: 0.12-0.13). These layers were formed by a reaction between mantle rock and melt derived from ancient rocks with high Re/Os ratios. We interpret the pyroxenite layers as the wall rocks of billion-year old mafic layers that melted and transformed adjacent mantle peridotite into pyroxenite by melt-rock reaction. The pyroxenite layers are the relics of ancient metre-scale basaltic veins in a kilometre-sized marble cake domain in the oceanic mantle that has withstood homogenization on a billion-year time scale.

  14. Plasma boundary layer and magnetopause layer of the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IMP 6 observations of the plasma boundary layer (PBL) and magnetopause layer (MPL) of the earth's magnetosphere indicate that plasma in the low-latitude portion of the PBL is supplied primarily by direct transport of magnetosheath plasma across the MPL and that this transport process is relatively widespread over the entire sunward magnetospheric boundary

  15. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  16. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    Full Text Available Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  17. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Liao, Zhi; Wang, Xin-Xing; Bao, Lin-Fei; Fan, Mei-Hua; Li, Xiao-Min; Wu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  18. The growth of AgGaTe2 layers on glass substrates with Ag2Te buffer layer by closed space sublimation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AgGaTe2 layer growth was performed by the closed space sublimation method on the Mo/glass substrate. The Ag2Te buffer layer was inserted between AgGaTe2 and Mo layers, to improve the quality of grown layers. Crystallographic properties were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Ag2Te layer grown on the Mo/glass exhibited a membrane filter structure from the SEM observation. XRD spectra of layers grown with and without the buffer layer were compared. The AgGaTe2 layer with the Ag2Te buffer layer exhibited peaks originating from AgGaTe2, and a very strong diffraction peak of 112 was observed. On the other hand, it was cleared that the layer grown without the buffer layer exhibited no strong peaks associated with AgGaTe2, but Ga-Te compounds. From this, crystallographic properties of the AgGaTe2 layer were drastically improved by the insertion of the Ag2Te buffer layer. Moreover, the surface morphology exhibited a smooth surface when the Ag2Te buffer layer was inserted. The nucleation site density of AgGaTe2 was probably increased since the membrane filter structure exhibited numbers of kinks at the edge. Chemical reaction between Ga and Mo was also eliminated. It was cleared that the insertion of the buffer layer and its surface morphology were an important parameter to grow high quality AgGaTe2 layers. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. The growth of AgGaTe{sub 2} layers on glass substrates with Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer by closed space sublimation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruno, Aya; Usui, Ayaka; Takeda, Yuji; Inoue, Tomohiro [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masakazu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Research Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The AgGaTe{sub 2} layer growth was performed by the closed space sublimation method on the Mo/glass substrate. The Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer was inserted between AgGaTe{sub 2} and Mo layers, to improve the quality of grown layers. Crystallographic properties were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Ag{sub 2}Te layer grown on the Mo/glass exhibited a membrane filter structure from the SEM observation. XRD spectra of layers grown with and without the buffer layer were compared. The AgGaTe{sub 2} layer with the Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer exhibited peaks originating from AgGaTe{sub 2}, and a very strong diffraction peak of 112 was observed. On the other hand, it was cleared that the layer grown without the buffer layer exhibited no strong peaks associated with AgGaTe{sub 2}, but Ga-Te compounds. From this, crystallographic properties of the AgGaTe{sub 2} layer were drastically improved by the insertion of the Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer. Moreover, the surface morphology exhibited a smooth surface when the Ag{sub 2}Te buffer layer was inserted. The nucleation site density of AgGaTe{sub 2} was probably increased since the membrane filter structure exhibited numbers of kinks at the edge. Chemical reaction between Ga and Mo was also eliminated. It was cleared that the insertion of the buffer layer and its surface morphology were an important parameter to grow high quality AgGaTe{sub 2} layers. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Layer-layer competition in multiplex complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Gerardo; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple types of interactions within social, technological and biological networks has moved the focus of the physics of complex systems towards a multiplex description of the interactions between their constituents. This novel approach has unveiled that the multiplex nature of complex systems has strong influence in the emergence of collective states and their critical properties. Here we address an important issue that is intrinsic to the coexistence of multiple means of interactions within a network: their competition. To this aim, we study a two-layer multiplex in which the activity of users can be localized in each of the layer or shared between them, favoring that neighboring nodes within a layer focus their activity on the same layer. This framework mimics the coexistence and competition of multiple communication channels, in a way that the prevalence of a particular communication platform emerges as a result of the localization of users activity in one single interaction layer. Our...

  1. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.

  2. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Enzymes on Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-01

    The use of Layer-by-layer techniques for immobilizing several types of enzymes, e.g. glucose oxidase (GOx), horse radish oxidases(HRP), and choline oxidase(CHO) on carbon nanotubes and their applications for biosenseing are presented. The enzyme is immobilized on the negatively charged CNT surface by alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and a enzyme layer. The sandwich-like layer structure (PDDA/enzyme/PDDA/CNT) formed by electrostatic assembling provides a favorable microenvironment to keep the bioactivity of enzyme and to prevent enzyme molecule leakage. The morphologies and electrocatalytic acitivity of the resulted enzyme film were characterized using TEM and electrochemical techniques, respectively. It was found that these enzyme-based biosensors are very sensitive, selective for detection of biomolecules, e.g. glucose, choline.

  3. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: weili.unsw@gmail.com; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Crystallisation kinetic is used to analyse seed layer surface cleanliness. • Simplified RCA cleaning for the seed layer can shorten the epitaxy annealing duration. • RTA for the seed layer can improve the quality for both seed layer and epi-layer. • Epitaxial poly-Si solar cell performance is improved by RTA treated seed layer. - Abstract: This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, V{sub oc} and J{sub sc} than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  4. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  5. Thin-film chemical sensors based on electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.; Leduc, H. G.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying a novel chemical sensor based on electron tunneling in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions were studied. Chemical sensors based on electron tunneling were shown to be sensitive to a variety of substances that include iodine, mercury, bismuth, ethylenedibromide, and ethylenedichloride. A sensitivity of 13 parts per billion of iodine dissolved in hexane was demonstrated. The physical mechanisms involved in the chemical sensitivity of these devices were determined to be the chemical alteration of the surface electronic structure of the top metal electrode in the MIM structure. In addition, electroreflectance spectroscopy (ERS) was studied as a complementary surface-sensitive technique. ERS was shown to be sensitive to both iodine and mercury. Electrolyte electroreflectance and solid-state MIM electroreflectance revealed qualitatively the same chemical response. A modified thin-film structure was also studied in which a chemically active layer was introduced at the top Metal-Insulator interface of the MIM devices. Cobalt phthalocyanine was used for the chemically active layer in this study. Devices modified in this way were shown to be sensitive to iodine and nitrogen dioxide. The chemical sensitivity of the modified structure was due to conductance changes in the active layer.

  6. Film loss-free cleaning chemicals for EUV mask lifetime elongation developed through combinatorial chemical screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Kim, Jinsu; Lowe, Jeff; Dattilo, Davide; Koh, Soowan; Choi, Jun Yeol; Dietze, Uwe; Shoki, Tsutomu; Kim, Byung Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2015-10-01

    EUV masks include many different layers of various materials rarely used in optical masks, and each layer of material has a particular role in enhancing the performance of EUV lithography. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how the mask quality and patterning performance can change during mask fabrication, EUV exposure, maintenance cleaning, shipping, or storage. SPM (Sulfuric acid peroxide mixture) which has been extensively used for acid cleaning of photomask and wafer has serious drawback for EUV mask cleaning. It shows severe film loss of tantalum-based absorber layers and limited removal efficiency of EUV-generated carbon contaminants on EUV mask surface. Here, we introduce such novel cleaning chemicals developed for EUV mask as almost film loss free for various layers of the mask and superior carbon removal performance. Combinatorial chemical screening methods allowed us to screen several hundred combinations of various chemistries and additives under several different process conditions of temperature and time, eventually leading to development of the best chemistry selections for EUV mask cleaning. Recently, there have been many activities for the development of EUV pellicle, driven by ASML and core EUV scanner customer companies. It is still important to obtain film-loss free cleaning chemicals because cleaning cycle of EUV mask should be much faster than that of optic mask mainly due to EUV pellicle lifetime. More frequent cleaning, combined with the adoption of new materials for EUV masks, necessitates that mask manufacturers closely examine the performance change of EUV masks during cleaning process. We have investigated EUV mask quality changes and film losses during 50 cleaning cycles using new chemicals as well as particle and carbon contaminant removal characteristics. We have observed that the performance of new chemicals developed is superior to current SPM or relevant cleaning chemicals for EUV mask cleaning and EUV mask lifetime elongation.

  7. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  8. Studies on Synthesis and Properties of Mg-Al-nitrate Layered Double Hydroxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A positive Mg-Al-nitrate layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has been synthesized using a non-steady coprccipitation method. The shape, size, chemical composition, electrical property and anion exchange property of the positive nanoparticle were studied by SEM, XRD, FTIR,chemical analysis, spectroanalysis and measuring of electrophoretic mobilities. Preliminary results show the positive nanopartiele is a promising precursor ofpolymer/LDHs nanocomposite.

  9. Electrodeposition of platinum and silver into chemically modified microporous silicon electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Koda, Ryo; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Sakka, Tetsuo; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2012-01-01

    Electrodeposition of platinum and silver into hydrophobic and hydrophilic microporous silicon layers was investigated using chemically modified microporous silicon electrodes. Hydrophobic microporous silicon enhanced the electrodeposition of platinum in the porous layer. Meanwhile, hydrophilic one showed that platinum was hardly deposited within the porous layer, and a film of platinum on the top of the porous layer was observed. On the other hand, the electrodeposition of silver showed simil...

  10. Intercalation Assembly Method and Intercalation Process Control of Layered Intercalated Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kaitao; WANG Guirong; LI Dianqing; LIN Yanjun; DUAN Xue

    2013-01-01

    Layered intercalated functional materials of layered double hydroxide type are an important class of functional materials developed in recent years.Based on long term studies on these materials in the State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering in Beijing University of Chemical Technology,the principle for the design of controlled intercalation processes in the light of future production processing requirements has been developed.Intercalation assembly methods and technologies have been invented to control the intercalation process for preparing layered intercalated materials with various structures and functions.

  11. Chromized Layers Produced on Steel Surface by Means of CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKA Ewa; BOGDA(N)SKI Bogdan; JEZIORSKI Leopold; JASI(N)SKI J(o)zef; TORBUS Roman

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of chromium on the surface of carbon steel has been investigated using a novel CVD method that combines the low cost of pack cementation method with advantages of vacuum technique. The processes have been performed in chromium chlorides atmosphere at a low pressure range from 1 to 800 hPa, the treatment temperature 800 to 950℃. Studies of the layers thickness, the phase composition, Cr, C and Fe depth profiles in diffusion zone have been conducted. The effect of the vacuum level during the process and the process parameters such as time and temperature on layer diffusion growth on the carbon steel surface has been investigated.

  12. [The dentinal smear layer. Characteristics and interactions. 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, P L; Eramo, S; Lotito, M; De Pino, C

    1991-03-15

    The Authors, after the presentation (in the first part of the Dossier) of a large literature review about the physical, chemical and clinical characteristics of formation, interaction, remotion of "smear layer" during cavity preparation in hard tooth tissue, describe the results of a scanning microelectronic research about the action as cleanser (for the dentinal cavity wall) of the CK101 (Caridex) versus wather, Tubulicid and phosphoric acid. The experimental results obtained "in vitro" show that the substance has relative action, without removing the tubular portion of "smear layer". PMID:2070916

  13. Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide nanosheets on polyamide membranes for durable reverse-osmosis applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wansuk; Choi, Jungkyu; Bang, Joona; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2013-12-11

    Improving membrane durability associated with fouling and chlorine resistance remains one of the major challenges in desalination membrane technology. Here, we demonstrate that attractive features of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets such as high hydrophilicity, chemical robustness, and ultrafast water permeation can be harnessed for a dual-action barrier coating layer that enhances resistance to both fouling and chlorine-induced degradation of polyamide (PA) thin-film composite (TFC) membranes while preserving their separation performance. GO multilayers were coated on the PA-TFC membrane surfaces via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of oppositely charged GO nanosheets. Consequently, it was shown that the conformal GO coating layer can increase the surface hydrophilicity and reduce the surface roughness, leading to the significantly improved antifouling performance against a protein foulant. It was also demonstrated that the chemically inert nature of GO nanosheets enables the GO coating layer to act as a chlorine barrier for the underlying PA membrane, resulting in a profound suppression of the membrane degradation in salt rejection upon chlorine exposure. PMID:24219033

  14. XTEM and AES study of the microstructure for high density Co-Cr-Nb-Pt double layered perpendicular magnetic recording media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, G. E-mail: safran@ait.pref.akita.jp; Ariake, Jun; Honda, Naoki; Ouchi, Kazuhiro; Czigany, Zsolt; Barna, P.B.; Menyhard, M.; Radnoczi, G

    2001-10-01

    A Ti intermediate layer between permalloy and Co-Cr-Nb-Pt storage layer improved the magnetic properties of double layered media. Cr segregation, Ni and Co enrichment was found within the Ti layer by AES. XTEM study revealed reduced crystallite size of Co-Cr-Nb-Pt due to nucleation in an amorphous phase formed as a result of a chemical interaction at the interface of the Ti and permalloy layers.

  15. Towards advanced chemical microsensors-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewski, W; Dybko, A; Malinowska, E; Brzózka, Z

    2004-05-10

    The paper presents design and performance of miniaturized chemical sensors based on silicon transducers: ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) and solid-state electrode (SSE). The sensors were fabricated as back-side contact structures, which facilitate their mounting in a flow-cell. The role of an intermediate layer between the transducer and the ion-selective membrane is discussed. Various polymeric matrices were used to manufacture microsensors: polysiloxanes, polyacrylates (polymethacrylates), polyurethanes. PMID:18969402

  16. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  17. Chemical Search Web Utility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chemical Search Web Utility is an intuitive web application that allows the public to easily find the chemical that they are interested in using, and which...

  18. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  19. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  20. Personal Chemical Exposure informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical Exposure science is the study of human contact with chemicals (from manufacturing facilities, everyday products, waste) occurring in their environments and advances knowledge of the mechanisms and dynamics of events that cause or prevent adverse health outcomes. (adapted...