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Sample records for chemically bonded cements

  1. Influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates in cement hidratation process on corrosion steel bars in concrete

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    Bikić Farzet H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chlorides in concrete is a permanent subject of research because they cause corrosion of steel bars. Chlorides added to the concrete during preparation, as accelerators of the bonding of cement minerals process, enter into reaction with aluminates, creating a phase known as chloroaluminate hydrates. In everyday conditions the product of chemical bonding between chlorides and aluminates is usually monochloridealuminate C3A·CaCl2·Hx, better known as Friedel's salt. In this paper, the influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates during the process of cement hydration on corrosion of steel bars in concrete was investigated. The process of chlorides bonding with aluminates yielding monochloride aluminate is monitored by XRD analyses. It was found that the amount of chlorides bonding with aluminates increases with an increase of temperature, and as a result, reduces the amount of 'free' chlorides in concrete. Potentiodynamic measurements have shown that increase in temperature of the heat treatment of working electrodes by chlorides leads to a reduction of steel bars corrosion as a result of either the increase of the monochloride-aluminate content or the decrease of free chlorides amount. Chlorides bound in chloroaluminate hydrates do not cause activation of steel bars corrosion in concrete. It was also proven that the increase of free chlorides concentration in the concrete leads to intensification of steel bars corrosion. This additionally approves that free chlorides are only the activators of process of steel bars corrosion in the concrete.

  2. BiOBr@SiO2 flower-like nanospheres chemically-bonded on cement-based materials for photocatalysis

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    Wang, Dan; Hou, Pengkun; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Endowment of photocatalytic property on the surface of concrete structure can contribute to the self-cleaning of the structure and purification of the polluted environment. We developed a nano-structured BiOBr@SiO2 photocatalyst and innovatively used for surface-treatment of cement-based materials with the hope of attaining the photocatalytic property in visible-light region and surface modification/densification performances. The SiO2 layer on the flower-like BiOBr@SiO2 helps to maintain a stable distribution of the photocatalyst, as well as achieving a chemical bonding between the coating and the cement matrix. Results showed that the color fading rate of during the degradation of Rhodamine B dye of the BiOBr-cem sample is 2 times higher compared with the commonly studied C, N-TiO2-cem sample. The photo-degradation rates of samples BiOBr-cem and BiOBr@SiO2-cem are 93 and 81% within 150 min, respectively, while sample BiOBr@SiO2-cem reveals a denser and smoother surface after curing for 28 days and pore-filling effect at size within 0.01-0.2 μm when compared with untreated samples. Moreover, additional C-S-H gel can be formed due to the pozzolanic reaction between BiOBr@SiO2 and the hardened cement matrix. Both advantages of the BiOBr@SiO2 favor its application for surface-treatment of hardened cement-based material to acquire an improved surface quality, as well as durable photocatalytic functionality.

  3. Chemical environment in cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  4. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

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    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  5. CEMENT BONDED COMPOSITES – A MECHANICAL REVIEW

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    Stephan Frybort

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years promising cement bonded wood composites for structural purposes have evolved. Durability, toughness, high dimen-sional stability, resistance against environmental influences such as biodegradation or weathering but also availability of the raw material as well as economic factors are features which can make cement-bonded composites superior to conventionally bonded composites. This paper reviews the relationship of diverse parameters, including density and particle size on mechanical and physical properties of cement bonded composites, based on published sources from the last 60 years. For general and recent information about bonding mechanisms, compatibility and setting problems, determination and improvement of compatibility, the used raw materials as well as accelerators are discussed. The main part deals with failure mechanisms in connection with several production parameters. Furthermore, the influence of particle size and geometry, orientation of the particles, cement-wood ratio and the effect of accelerators and treatment of the particles on modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture as well as thickness swelling are discussed.

  6. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  7. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

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    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  9. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

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    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  10. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huan, E-mail: huanzhou@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K. [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Bhaduri, Sarit B. [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Division of Dentistry, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement.

  11. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J.F.; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K.; Goel, Vijay K.; Bhaduri, Sarit B.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5 ± 1 min. The compressive strength after 24 h of incubation was approximately 8.45 ± 1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10 ± 1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16 ± 4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics. - Highlights: • Cement raw powder is derived from egg shells. • A microwave assisted system is used for preparing monetite bone cement. • Colloidal silica is used to reinforce cement

  12. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  13. Influence of temporary cement contamination on the surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements.

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    Takimoto, Masayuki; Ishii, Ryo; Iino, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-02-01

    The surface free energy and dentine bond strength of self-adhesive cements were examined after the removal of temporary cements. The labial dentine surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors were wet ground with #600-grit SiC paper. Acrylic resin blocks were luted to the prepared dentine surfaces using HY Bond Temporary Cement Hard (HY), IP Temp Cement (IP), Fuji TEMP (FT) or Freegenol Temporary Cement (TC), and stored for 1 week. After removal of the temporary cements with an ultrasonic tip, the contact angle values of five specimens per test group were determined for the three test liquids, and the surface-energy parameters of the dentine surfaces were calculated. The dentine bond strengths of the self-adhesive cements were measured after removal of the temporary cements in a shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD test. For all surfaces, the value of the estimated surface tension component γ(S)(d) (dispersion) was relatively constant at 41.7-43.3 mJm(-2). After removal of the temporary cements, the value of the γ(S)(h) (hydrogen-bonding) component decreased, particularly with FT and TC. The dentine bond strength of the self-adhesive cements was significantly higher for those without temporary cement contamination (8.2-10.6 MPa) than for those with temporary cement contamination (4.3-7.1 MPa). The γ(S) values decreased due to the decrease of γ(S)(h) values for the temporary cement-contaminated dentine. Contamination with temporary cements led to lower dentine bond strength. The presence of temporary cement interferes with the bonding performance of self-adhesive cements to dentine. Care should be taken in the methods of removal of temporary cement when using self-adhesive cements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

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    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Pcements and glass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

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    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  16. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  17. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. EVALUATION OF CEMENT-BONDED PARTICLE BOARD PRODUCED FROM AFZELIA AFRICANA WOOD RESIDUES

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    OLUFEMI A. SOTANNDE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was design to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of cement-bonded particleboards produced from Afzelia africana wood residues. The production variables investigated were three wood particle types (flakes, flake-sawdust mix and sawdust, three chemical accelerators (CaCl2, MgCl2 and AlCl3 and four wood-cement ratios (1:2.0, 1:2.5, 1:3.0 and 1:3.5. The accelerators were based on 2% by weight of cement used. The boards produced were subjected to physical tests such as density, percentage water absorption and thickness swelling. Mechanical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture, internal bonding strength and compressive strength. The results revealed that the type of particle used, wood-cement ratio and chemical additives had a marked influence on the physical and mechanical properties of the boards (p < 0.05. From quality view point, flake-sawdust composite ranked best while flake boards ranked least. Similarly, CaCl2 had the best influence on the setting of the boards followed by MgCl2 and AlCl3. Finally, it has been shown that particle boards that satisfied the BISON type HZ requirement and ISO 8335 can be produced from Afzelia africana particularly at wood-cement of 1:2.5 and above.

  19. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; S?, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder? Scotchbond? Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-s...

  20. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

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    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  1. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups. Key words:CAD/CAM ceramic, alumina, zirconia, resin cement, surface pre-treatment, sandblasting, silica-coating, chemical aging, bond degradation, microtensile bond strength. PMID:22322517

  2. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  3. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  4. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  5. The effect of bond characteristics between steel slag fine aggregate and cement paste on mechanical properties of concrete and mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuji, W.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary fine aggregate in concrete has been replaced by ground and sieved steel slag fine aggregate, treated and exposed to air for three months. Compared with concrete made from natural sand, properties such as compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modules, permeability and abrasion resistance are considerably improved. The improvement increases with a decrease in w/c ratio, an increase in curing time and an increase in the replacement weight of sand. These results are due to the fact that the steel slag contains some active minerals such as C/sub 3/S, C/sub 2/S, C/sub 4/AF, etc., and shows favorable surface physical characteristics that improve the bond between steel slag particles and cement paste. The results of XRD, SEM and EPM microhardness showed that there are heavier concentration of ions, with finer crystals and a lower degree of CH orientation at the interfacial zone between steel slag particles and cement paste. The study also found small cementitious and fibrous C-S-H crystals growing from the fine aggregate, which are linked with hydrated products form cement paste making the bond and structural characteristic more favorable with cement. The steel slag fine aggregate is an active mineral similar to cement. The bond between the aggregate and cement paste is strengthened both physically and chemically

  6. Analysis of Chemical Composition of Portland Cement in Ghana: A Key to Understand the Behavior of Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Bediako, Mark; Amankwah, Eric Opoku

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Portland cement in concrete or mortar formation is very well influenced by chemical compositions among other factors. Many engineers usually have little information on the chemical compositions of cement in making decisions for the choice of commercially available Portland cement in Ghana. This work analyzed five different brands of Portland cement in Ghana, namely, Ghacem ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland limestone cement (PLC), CSIR-BRRI Pozzomix, Dangote OPC, a...

  7. Effect of provisional cements on shear bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each tooth. Restorations were fixed with one of three different provisional cements: eugenol-free provisional cement (Cavex), calcium hydroxide (Dycal), and light-cured provisional cement (Tempond Clear). Provisional restorations were removed with either a dental explorer and air-water spray, or a cleaning bur (Opticlean). In the control group, provisional restorations were not used on the surfaces of specimens. IPS Empress 2 ceramic discs were luted with a dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F). Shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's HSD and Dunnett tests. Surfaces were examined by scanning electronic microscopy. Significant differences were found between the control group and both the light-cured provisional cement groups and the eugenol-free provisional cement-cleaning bur group (Pprovisional cement showed the lowest bond strength values. Selection of the provisional cement is an important factor in the ultimate bond strength of the final restoration. Calcium hydroxide provisional cement and cleaning with a dental explorer are advisable.

  8. Factors affecting bond cement across casing leak zones in oil and gas wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasr, Mohamed; Edbeib, Said [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Casing leaks have been a major concern to the oil industry because of their effect on lowering the production rate in many oil and gas wells. The leaks are the result of deterioration of the casing in the well, which is caused by severe corrosion due to the contact of the casing with high salinity foreign fluid. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing the mechanical properties of the hardened cement opposite the casing leak zones. This study is conducted by laboratory measurements of the compressive strength of the hardened cement when the cement slurry was mixed with different percentages of formation water and different concentrations of different cement additives. The results of this study indicate that the compressive strength readings obtained from the cement bond log and the cement evaluation tool against the casing leak zones are lower than those readings recorded in adjacent formations. The low cement compressive strength values observed across casing leak zones are due to the contamination of the cement with saline water present in these formations which, in turn, effects the hardening properties of the cement. The experimental results indicated that the salinity of the formation water when mixed with the cement slurry in the presence of cement additives, decreased the compressive strength of the bond cement and also decreased the thickening time of the cement slurry. It is concluded that casing leaks found in many wells observed in oil fields in Libya were due to the mixing of the cement with high salinity formation water present in the lost circulation zones. The high water salinity in these zones effects the setting time of the cement slurry which, therefore, decreased the hardening properties of the bond cement and caused cracks and channels in the hardened cement across lost circulation zones. (author)

  9. Influence of Photoinitiator on Accelerated Artificial Aging and Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Helouise; Costa, Ana Rosa; Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles de; Abuna, Gabriel Flores; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of the photoinitiator phenylpropanedione (PPD), alone or combined with camphorquinone (CQ), on color stability of photoactivated resin cements and their bond strength to ceramics using a micro-shear test. Four resin cements were used: a commercial brand cement (RelyX Veneer®) and 3 experimental cements with different types and concentration of photoinitiators. For color analysis, ceramic discs were cemented on bovine dentin specimens to simulate indirect restorations (n=8) and were exposed to UV for 120 h and tested for color alteration using a reflectance spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* system. Data were analyzed by Anova and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The color test results did not present statistically significant difference for the ∆E for all the studied cements, neither for ∆L, ∆a and ∆b. For the bond strength, all the studied cements showed statistically significant differences to each other, with the highest result for the RelyX Veneer® (29.07 MPa) cement, followed by the cement with CQ (21.74 MPa) and CQ+PPD (19.09 MPa) cement; the lowest result was obtained by the cement using only PPD as a photoinitiator (13.99 MPa). So, based on the studied parameters, PPD was not advantageous as photoinitiator of resin cements, because it showed a low value of bond strength to the ceramics and no superior color stability.

  10. Cement bond evaluation method in horizontal wells using segmented bond tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruolong; He, Li

    2018-06-01

    Most of the existing cement evaluation technologies suffer from tool eccentralization due to gravity in highly deviated wells and horizontal wells. This paper proposes a correction method to lessen the effects of tool eccentralization on evaluation results of cement bond using segmented bond tool, which has an omnidirectional sonic transmitter and eight segmented receivers evenly arranged around the tool 2 ft from the transmitter. Using 3-D finite difference parallel numerical simulation method, we investigate the logging responses of centred and eccentred segmented bond tool in a variety of bond conditions. From the numerical results, we find that the tool eccentricity and channel azimuth can be estimated from measured sector amplitude. The average of the sector amplitude when the tool is eccentred can be corrected to the one when the tool is centred. Then the corrected amplitude will be used to calculate the channel size. The proposed method is applied to both synthetic and field data. For synthetic data, it turns out that this method can estimate the tool eccentricity with small error and the bond map is improved after correction. For field data, the tool eccentricity has a good agreement with the measured well deviation angle. Though this method still suffers from the low accuracy of calculating channel azimuth, the credibility of corrected bond map is improved especially in horizontal wells. It gives us a choice to evaluate the bond condition for horizontal wells using existing logging tool. The numerical results in this paper can provide aids for understanding measurements of segmented tool in both vertical and horizontal wells.

  11. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (p<0.05). Surface roughening of the tested FRC posts is

  12. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  13. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  14. Effect of Luting Cements On the Bond Strength to Turkom-Cera All-Ceramic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al–Makramani, Bandar M. A.; Razak, Abdul A. A.; Abu–Hassan, Mohamed I.; Al–Sanabani, Fuad A.; Albakri, Fahad M.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of the appropriate luting cement is a key factor for achieving a strong bond between prepared teeth and dental restorations. AIM: To evaluate the shear bond strength of Zinc phosphate cement Elite, glass ionomer cement Fuji I, resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji Plus and resin luting cement Panavia-F to Turkom-Cera all-ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Turkom-Cera was used to form discs 10mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness (n = 40). The ceramic discs were wet ground, air - particle abraded with 50 - μm aluminium oxide particles and randomly divided into four groups (n = 10). The luting cement was bonded to Turkom-Cera discs as per manufacturer instructions. The shear bond strengths were determined using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analysed using the tests One Way ANOVA, the nonparametric Kruskal - Wallis test and Mann - Whitney Post hoc test. RESULTS: The shear bond strength of the Elite, Fuji I, Fuji Plus and Panavia F groups were: 0.92 ± 0.42, 2.04 ± 0.78, 4.37 ± 1.18, and 16.42 ± 3.38 MPa, respectively. There was the statistically significant difference between the four luting cement tested (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: the phosphate-containing resin cement Panavia-F exhibited shear bond strength value significantly higher than all materials tested. PMID:29610618

  15. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different......Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  16. In vitro shear bond strength of cementing agents to fixed prosthodontic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Sorensen, John A

    2004-09-01

    Durable bonding to fixed prosthodontic restorations is desirable; however, little information is available on the strength of the bond between different cements and fixed prosthodontic restorative materials. This study determined the shear-bond strength of cementing agents to high-gold-content alloy castings and different dental ceramics: high-strength aluminum oxide (Procera AllCeram), leucite-reinforced (IPS Empress), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS Empress 2). Prepolymerized resin composite cylinders (5.5 mm internal diameter, n=20) were bonded to the pretreated surfaces of prosthodontic materials. High-gold-content alloy and high-strength aluminum oxide surfaces were airborne-particle-abraded, and pressable ceramics were hydrofluoric acid-etched and silanized prior to cementing. The cementing agents tested were a zinc-phosphate cement (Fleck's zinc cement), glass ionomer cements (Fuji I, Ketac-Cem), resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus, Fuji Cem, RelyX Luting), resin cements (RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Variolink II, Compolute), and a self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem). Half the specimens (n=10) were tested after 30 minutes; the other half (n=10) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 14 days and then thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear-bond strength tests were performed using a universal testing machine at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by multifactorial analysis of variance taking interactions between effects into account. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey method was used (alpha=.05). In a 3-way ANOVA model, the main factors substrate, cement, time, and all corresponding interactions were statistically significant (all P <.0001). In subsequent separate 1-way or 2-way ANOVA models for each substrate type, significant differences between cement types and polymerizing modes were found (all P <.001). None of the

  17. The effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of luting cements to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Haneda, Isabella Gagliardi; de Almeida-Júnior, Antonio Alves; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2012-12-01

    Although titanium presents attractive physical and mechanical properties, there is a need for improving the bond at the titanium/luting cement interface for the longevity of metal ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin-modified glass ionomer and resin cements to commercially pure titanium (CP Ti). Two hundred and forty CP Ti cast disks (9.0 × 3.0 mm) were divided into 8 surface treatment groups (n=30): 1) 50 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 2) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 3) 250 µm Al(2)O(3) particles; 4) 50 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane (RelyX Ceramic Primer); 5) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane; 6) 250 µm Al(2)O(3) particles + silane; 7) 30 µm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Cojet Sand) + silane; and 8) 120 µm Al(2)O(3) particles, followed by 110 µm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Rocatec). The luting cements 1) RelyX Luting 2; 2) RelyX ARC; or 3) RelyX U100 were applied to the treated CP Ti surfaces (n=10). Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested after thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5°C to 55°C). Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). Failure mode was determined with a stereomicroscope (×20). The surface treatments, cements, and their interaction significantly affected the SBS (Pbehavior for all surface treatments. For both cements, only the group abraded with 50 μm Al(2)O(3) particles had lower SBS than the other groups (P<.05). For RelyX ARC, regardless of silane application, abrasion with 50 μm Al(2)O(3) particles resulted in significantly lower SBS than abrasion with 120 μm and 250 μm particles, which exhibited statistically similar SBS values to each other. Rocatec + silane promoted the highest SBS for RelyX ARC. RelyX U100 presented the highest SBS mean values (P<.001). All groups showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode. The adhesive capability of RelyX Luting 2 and RelyX U

  18. Effects of Hybrid Coat on shear bond strength of five cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Zhou, Hou-De; Feng, Yun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the sealing performance of Hybrid Coat and its influence on the shear bond strength of five dentin surface cements. Six premolars were pretreated to expose the dentin surface prior to the application of Hybrid Coat. The microscopic characteristics of the dentinal surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then, 40 premolars were sectioned longitudinally, and 80 semi-sections were divided into a control group (untreated) and a study group (treated by Hybrid Coat). Alloy restoration was bonded to the teeth specimen using five different cements. Shear bond strength was measured by the universal testing machine. The fracture patterns and the adhesive interface were observed using astereomicroscope. SEM revealed that the lumens of dentinal tubules were completely occluded by Hybrid Coat. The Hybrid Coat significantly improved the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC) but weakened the performance of zinc phosphate cement (ZPC), zinc polycarboxylate cement (ZPCC) and glass ionomer cement (GIC). Hybrid Coat is an effective dentinal tubule sealant, and therefore its combined use with resin or resin-modified glass ionomer cements can be applied for the prostheses attachment purpose.

  19. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  20. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  1. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Mittal, Sanjeev; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non-significant (p > 0.05). Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement.

  2. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  3. Characterization and chemical activity of Portland cement and two experimental cements with potential for use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the chemical activity of Portland cement and two other cement types with similar chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate with the aim of developing these cements for further applications in dentistry. The chemical composition of the three cement types namely Portland cement, calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement was evaluated by elemental analysis using energy dispersive analysis with X-ray under the scanning electron microscope and by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) to determine the phases. The constituents of the hydration reaction by-products were evaluated by XRD analysis of the set cements at 1, 7, 28 and 56 days and by analysis of the leachate by ion chromatography. The pH of both cements and leachate was determined at different time intervals. Cements admixed with micro-silica were also tested to determine the effect of micro-silica on the reaction by-products. All three cement types were composed of tricalcium silicate as the main constituent phase. The hydration reaction of Portland cement produced calcium hydroxide. However, this was not present in the other cements tested at all ages. Admixed micro-silica had little or no effect on the cements with regard to reaction by-products. The pH of all cements tested was alkaline. Both the experimental calcium sulpho-aluminate cement and calcium fluoro-aluminate cement had different hydration reactions to that of Portland cement even though calcium silicate was the major constituent element of both cement types. No calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product to cement hydration. Micro-silica addition to the cement had no effect on the hydration reaction.

  4. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  5. [Bonding of visible light cured composite resins to glass ionomer and Cermet cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaboura, A; Vougiouklakis, G

    1990-04-01

    The "sandwich" technique involves combination of composite resins to etched glassionomer cements, is used today in restorative dentistry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the bond strength between several composite resins and glass ionomer or cerment cements. Cylindrical specimens of the cements Ketac-Silver, Ionobond and GC-Lining Ce-ment were inserted in a mold and their flat free surfaces were etched for 30". Cylindrical plastic tubes were set upon each one of these surfaces and filled with the Composite resins Durafill, Brilliant Lux, Estilux posterior, Estilux posterior CVS and Herculite XR. Half of the specimens transferred in tap water for 24 hours and the others after thermocycling in the first month, kept for 4 months. Shear bond strengths were determined in Monsanto Testing Machine and some fractured surfaces were examined under SEM. The results of this investigation indicate that this technique produces bond strengths between composite resins and glassioners and the combination type of resin and type of cement, affects the values of the strength. Glass cermeet--small particle resin provides the most effective strength and glass ionomer--microfill resins the least. Storage time and thermocycling don't significantly effect the bond strength. SEM examination showed that all fracture failures were obtained in the cement while the opposite resin surfaces were covered with particles of the cements.

  6. Impairment of resin cement application on the bond strength of indirect composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovito Adiel SKUPIEN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed resin cement application on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations and, to evaluate adhesive strategies (for regular resin cement or humidity parameters for self-adhesive resin cement. Forty-five enamel/dentin discs (0.5 mm height and 10 mm of diameter obtained from bovine teeth were divided into nine groups (n = 5. For regular cement, the variation factors were cementation technique at three levels (immediate cementation, 5 or 30 min after adhesive system application; and type of adhesive system at two levels (three- or two-step. For self-adhesive cement, the dentin moisture was the source of variation at three levels (normal, dry, or wet cementation. The specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression. Regular cement and three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system showed the highest values of bond strength (25.21 MPa–30 min of delay. Only for this condition, three-step adhesive showed higher bond strength than the two-step adhesive. Nevertheless, the linear regression showed that irrespective of the strategy, the use of the two-step approach when compared with three-step adhesive system decreased μTBS (p < 0.001. The failure analysis showed predominant adhesive failures for all tested groups. All groups had comparable values of bond strength to bovine dentin when the same materials were used, even in suboptimal clinical conditions.

  7. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.; Patzek, Tadeusz; van Oort, Eric

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  8. Detecting Poor Cement Bonding and Zonal Isolation Problems Using Magnetic Cement Slurries

    KAUST Repository

    Nair, Sriramya D.

    2017-10-02

    There has been growing interest in the use of magnetorheological fluids to improve displacement efficiency of fluids (drilling fluids, spacer fluids, cement slurries) in the eccentric casing annuli. When magnetic particles are mixed with the cement slurry for improved displacement, they provide an excellent opportunity for sensing the presence and quality of cement in the annulus. This work focuses on using sophisticated 3D computational electromagnetics to simulate the use of a magnetic cement slurry for well cement monitoring. The main goal is to develop a new tool, which is capable of locating magnetic cement slurry that is placed behind a stainless steel casing. An electromagnetic coil was used to generate a magnetic field inside the borehole. It was found that when a current was passed through the electric coils, magnetic field lines passed through the stainless steel casing, the cement annulus and the rock formation. Three sensors were placed inside the cased borehole and the magnetic field strength variations were observed at these locations. Various factors that have a significant influence on zonal isolation were considered. These include, effect of debonding between casing and cement annulus, effect of changing annuli thickness, influence of a fracture in the rock formation, effect of changing magnetic permeability of cement and finally influence of annuli eccentricity. Based on the results shown in the paper along with the next generation of supersensitive magnetic sensors that are being developed, the magnetic approach appears to be a viable alternative for evaluating the quality of the cement annulus to ensure good zonal isolation.

  9. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  10. 3.4. Chemical additives and granulometric composition influence on soils armed by cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of this work was to evaluate an influence of various chemical additives on soils armed by portland cement. Experimental research of kinetics of soil cements structure formation after adding the chemicals was carried out. According to the investigations it was determined that structure formation process of soil cements depended on granulometric composition of armed soil, cement quantity, type and quantity of chemical additives.

  11. Chloride Ingress in Chemically Activated Calcined Clay-Based Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mwiti Marangu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-laden environments pose serious durability concerns in cement based materials. This paper presents the findings of chloride ingress in chemically activated calcined Clay-Ordinary Portland Cement blended mortars. Results are also presented for compressive strength development and porosity tests. Sampled clays were incinerated at a temperature of 800°C for 4 hours. The resultant calcined clay was blended with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC at replacement level of 35% by mass of OPC to make test cement labeled PCC35. Mortar prisms measuring 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were cast using PCC35 with 0.5 M Na2SO4 solution as a chemical activator instead of water. Compressive strength was determined at 28th day of curing. As a control, OPC, Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, and PCC35 were similarly investigated without use of activator. After the 28th day of curing, mortar specimens were subjected to accelerated chloride ingress, porosity, compressive strength tests, and chloride profiling. Subsequently, apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp were estimated from solutions to Fick’s second law of diffusion. Compressive strength increased after exposure to the chloride rich media in all cement categories. Chemically activated PCC35 exhibited higher compressive strength compared to nonactivated PCC35. However, chemically activated PCC35 had the least gain in compressive strength, lower porosity, and lower chloride ingress in terms of Dapp, compared to OPC, PPC, and nonactivated PCC35.

  12. Bonding effectiveness to different chemically pre-treated dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different chemical pre-treatments on the bond durability to dental zirconia. Fully sintered IPS e.max ZirCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) blocks were subjected to tribochemical silica sandblasting (CoJet, 3M ESPE). The zirconia samples were additionally pre-treated using one of four zirconia primers/adhesives (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, Kuraray Noritake; Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE; Z-PRIME Plus, Bisco). Finally, two identically pre-treated zirconia blocks were bonded together using composite cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE). The specimens were trimmed at the interface to a cylindrical hourglass and stored in distilled water (7 days, 37 °C), after which they were randomly tested as is or subjected to mechanical ageing involving cyclic tensile stress (10 N, 10 Hz, 10,000 cycles). Subsequently, the micro-tensile bond strength was determined, and SEM fractographic analysis performed. Weibull analysis revealed the highest Weibull scale and shape parameters for the 'Clearfil Ceramic Primer/mechanical ageing' combination. Chemical pre-treatment of CoJet (3M ESPE) sandblasted zirconia using Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) and Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent) revealed a significantly higher bond strength than when Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) and Z-PRIME Plus (Bisco) were used. After ageing, Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) revealed the most stable bond durability. Combined mechanical/chemical pre-treatment, the latter with either Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) or Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent), resulted in the most durable bond to zirconia. As a standard procedure to durably bond zirconia to tooth tissue, the application of a combined 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate/silane ceramic primer to zirconia is clinically highly recommended.

  13. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  14. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging.

  15. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A. S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S. Y.

    2000-01-01

    Mercury stabilization and solidification is a significant challenge for conventional stabilization technologies. This is because of the stringent regulatory limits on leaching of its stabilized products. In a conventional cement stabilization process, Hg is converted at high pH to its hydroxide, which is not a very insoluble compound; hence the preferred route for Hg sulfidation to convert it into insoluble cinnabar (HgS). Unfortunately, efficient formation of this compound is pH-dependent. At a high pH, one obtains a more soluble Hg sulfate, in a very low pH range, insufficient immobilization occurs because of the escape of hydrogen sulfide, while efficient formation of HgS occurs only in a moderately acidic region. Thus, the pH range of 4 to 8 is where stabilization with Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPC) is carried out. This paper discusses the authors experience on bench-scale stabilization of various US Department of Energy (DOE) waste streams containing Hg in the CBPC process. This process was developed to treat DOE's mixed waste streams. It is a room-temperature-setting process based on an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and monopotassium phosphate solution that forms a dense ceramic within hours. For Hg stabilization, addition of a small amount ( 2 S or K 2 S is sufficient in the binder composition. Here the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results on CBPC waste forms of surrogate waste streams representing secondary Hg containing wastes such as combustion residues and Delphi DETOXtrademark residues are presented. The results show that although the current limit on leaching of Hg is 0.2 mg/L, the results from the CBPC waste forms are at least one order lower than this stringent limit. Encouraged by these results on surrogate wastes, they treated actual low-level Hg-containing mixed waste from their facility at Idaho. TCLP results on this waste are presented here. The efficient stabilization in all these cases is

  17. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, X F; Yoshida, K; Gu, N

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R a and R y values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane coupler

  18. Chemical adhesion rather than mechanical retention enhances resin bond durability of a dental glass-ceramic with leucite crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, X F [Department of Prosthodontics, The Stomatological Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yoshida, K [Division of Applied Prosthodontics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Gu, N, E-mail: mengsoar@nju.edu.c [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of chemical adhesion by a silane coupler and mechanical retention by hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching on the bond durability of resin to a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystallites. Half of the ceramic plates were etched with 4.8% HFA (HFA group) for 60 s, and the other half were not treated (NoHFA group). The scale of their surface roughness and rough area was measured by a 3D laser scanning microscope. These plates then received one of the following two bond procedures to form four bond test groups: HFA/cement, NoHFA/cement, HFA/silane/cement and NoHFA/silane/cement. The associated micro-shear bond strength and bond failure modes were tested after 0 and 30 000 thermal water bath cycles. Four different silane/cement systems (Monobond S/Variolink II, GC Ceramic Primer/Linkmax HV, Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Porcelain Liner M/SuperBond C and B) were used. The data for each silane/cement system were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. HFA treatment significantly increased the surface R{sub a} and R{sub y} values and the rough area of the ceramic plates compared with NoHFA treatment. After 30 000 thermal water bath cycles, the bond strength of all the test groups except the HFA/Linkmax HV group was significantly reduced, while the HFA/Linkmax HV group showed only adhesive interface failure. The other HFA/cement groups and all NoHFA/cement groups lost bond strength completely, and all NoHFA/silane/cement groups with chemical adhesion had significantly higher bond strength and more ceramic cohesive failures than the respective HFA/cement groups with mechanical retention. The result of the HFA/silane/cement groups with both chemical adhesion and mechanical retention revealed that HFA treatment could enhance the bond durability of resin/silanized glass ceramics, which might result from the increase of the chemical adhesion area on the ceramic rough surface and subsequently reduced degradation speed of the silane

  19. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    and acidic simplified adhesives is a well-studied phenomenon (Kanehira et al., 2006). A chemical incompatibility may occur in the oxygen-inhibited...not completely eliminate this incompatibility (Tay et al., 2003). Recently, new “universal adhesives ” have been introduced. These universal...potential incompatibilities with self-curing resin materials. Low bond strength between self-curing resin materials and acidic simplified adhesives is

  20. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  1. Effect of Provisional Cements on Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate Veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Tak, Onjen; Secilmis, Asli; Usumez, Aslihan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of three provisional cements and two cleaning techniques on the final bond strength of porcelain laminate veneers. Methods: The occlusal third of the crowns of forty molar teeth were sectioned and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Dentin surfaces were polished and specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Provisional restorations were fabricated and two provisional restorations were cemented onto each to...

  2. Sustainable Blended Cements-Influences of Packing Density on Cement Paste Chemical Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Yaniv; Peled, Alva

    2018-04-18

    This paper addresses the development of blended cements with reduced clinker amount by partial replacement of the clinker with more environmentally-friendly material (e.g., limestone powders). This development can lead to more sustainable cements with reduced greenhouse gas emission and energy consumption during their production. The reduced clicker content was based on improved particle packing density and surface area of the cement powder by using three different limestone particle diameters: smaller (7 µm, 3 µm) or larger (70 µm, 53 µm) than the clinker particles, or having a similar size (23 µm). The effects of the different limestone particle sizes on the chemical reactivity of the blended cement were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), loss on ignition (LOI), isothermal calorimetry, and the water demand for reaching normal consistency. It was found that by blending the original cement with limestone, the hydration process and the reactivity of the limestone itself were increased by the increased surface area of the limestone particles. However, the carbonation reaction was decreased with the increased packing density of the blended cement with limestone, having various sizes.

  3. Statistical study of chemical additives effects in the waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Cledola C.O. de; Diniz, Paula S.; Haucz, Maria J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the statistical study, that was carried out to analyse the chemical additives effect in the waste cementation process. Three different additives from two industries were tested: set accelerator, set retarder and super plasticizers, in cemented pates with and without bentonite. The experiments were planned in accordance with the 2 3 factorial design, so that the effect of each type of additive, its quantity and manufacturer in cemented paste and specimens could be evaluated. The results showed that the use of these can improve the cementation process and the product. The admixture quantity and the association with bentonite were the most important factors affecting the process and product characteristics. (author). 4 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. The μSBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion.

  5. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  6. Effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Hyun Park,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment of FRC-Post on bonding strength to resin cements. Materials and Methods Pre-surface treated LuxaPost (DMG, Rely-X Fiber Post (3M ESPE and self adhesive resin cement Rely-X Unicem (3M ESPE, conventional resin cement Rely-X ARC (3M ESPE, and Rely-X Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE were used. After completing the surface treatments of the posts, posts and resin cement were placed in clear molds and photo-activation was performed. The specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the FRC-Post into 2 mm-thick segments, and push-out strength were measured. The results of bond strength value were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons using Scheffe's test. Results Silanization of posts affect to the bond strength in LuxaPost, and did not affect in Rely-X Fiber Post. Rely-X ARC showed higher value than Rely-X Unicem. Conclusions Silanization is needed to enhance the bond strength between LuxaPost and resin cements.

  7. Micro-shear bond strength of resin cement to dentin after application of desensitizing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Goktas, Baris; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of three desensitizing toothpastes on bonding of resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of 72 maxillary third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into three groups according to three desensitizing toothpastes used: Sensodyne Rapid Relief (GlaxoSmithKline, SmithKline Beecham Ltd., Slough, UK), Signal Sensitive Expert (Unilever Sanayi ve Ticaret Türk A.Ş., Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey) and Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (Colgate Palmolive, New York, NY). Following bonding of the resin cement (Clearfil™ SA Cement, Kuraray Co, Osaka, Japan) to dentin, the specimens were light cured for 40 s with a LED (Elipar S10, 3M Espe, St. Paul, MN). The strength measurements were accomplished with a micro-shear testing machine (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that the application of desensitizing toothpastes had significant effects on bond strength of the resin cement tested to dentin (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were observed in all of the groups. The use of a desensitizing toothpaste before cementation might alter the bond strength of adhesively luted restorations.

  8. Influence of the bracket on bonding and physical behavior of orthodontic resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños-Carmona, Victoria; Zein, Bilal; Menéndez-Núñez, Mario; Sánchez-Sánchez, Purificación; Ceballos-García, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of the type of bracket, on bond strength, microhardness and conversion degree (CD) of four resin orthodontic cements. Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) test between the bracket base and the cement was carried out on glass-hour-shaped specimens (n=20). Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) and micro-Raman spectra were recorded in situ under the bracket base. Weibull distribution, ANOVA and non-parametric test were applied for data analysis (pcement showing the worst performance. The CD was from 80% to 62.5%.

  9. Effect of surface treatment and type of cement on push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almufleh, Balqees S; Aleisa, Khalil I; Morgano, Steven M

    2014-10-01

    The effect of the surface treatment of zirconium oxide posts on their push-out bond strength is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconium oxide posts cemented with different cements and to assess the failure mode. Seventy extracted human teeth were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Custom zirconium oxide posts (Cercon; Degudent) were fabricated for 6 groups. Posts in 3 groups were airborne-particle abraded (A). Posts in the other 3 groups were tribochemical silica coated (T). Three cements were used. Zinc phosphate cement was used to cement the zirconium oxide posts in groups AZ and TZ, RelyX ARC cement was used in groups ARA and TRA, and RelyX Unicem cement was used in groups ARU and TRU. Group C contained custom metal posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement. Specimens were horizontally sectioned into 3 sections and subjected to a push-out test. A mixed model analysis of variance, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey multiple comparison tests were used for statistical analysis. The highest push-out bond strength was recorded for Group ARU (21.03 MPa), and the lowest was recorded for Group ARA (7.57 MPa). No significant difference in push-out bond strength was found among the different surface treatments and root regions (P>.05). The type of cement had a significant effect on the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts (P=.049). RelyX Unicem cement recorded (19.57 ±8.83 MPa) significantly higher push-out bond strength compared with zinc phosphate (9.95 ±6.31 MPa) and RelyX ARC cements (9.39 ±5.45 MPa). Adhesive failure at the post-cement interface was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with zinc phosphate and RelyX ARC cements, while mixed failure was recorded for 75% of the posts cemented with RelyX Unicem cement. The type of cement used resulted in a statistically significant difference in the push-out bond strength of zirconium oxide posts, while both the surface treatment

  10. Cement bonded wood wool boards from podocarpus spp. for low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... sound insulation in walls, ceilings and floors, roofs, sound barriers and thermal insulation. Further research is required to investigate the use of different wood species and different mineral binders. Keywords: podocarpus spp, wood-wool, wood-cement composites. Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice Vol.

  11. Quantum mechanical facets of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudel, R.

    1976-01-01

    To define the concept of bond is both a central problem of quantum chemistry and a difficult one. The concept of bond appeared little by little in the mind of chemists from empirical observations. From the wave-mechanical viewpoint it is not an observable. Therefore there is no precise operator associated with that concept. As a consequence there is not a unique approach to the idea of chemical bond. This is why it is preferred to present various quantum mechanical facets, e.g. the energetic facet, the density facet, the partitioning facet and the functional facet, of that important concept. (Auth.)

  12. Thai students' mental model of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawan, Supawadee; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This Research was finding the viewing about concept of chemical bonding is fundamental to subsequent learning of various other topics related to this concept in chemistry. Any conceptions about atomic structures that students have will be shown their further learning. The purpose of this study is to interviews conceptions held by high school chemistry students about metallic bonding and to reveal mental model of atomic structures show according to the educational level. With this aim, the questionnaire prepared making use of the literature and administered for analysis about mental model of chemical bonding. It was determined from the analysis of answers of questionnaire the 10th grade, 11th grade and 12th grade students. Finally, each was shown prompts in the form of focus cards derived from curriculum material that showed ways in which the bonding in specific metallic substances had been depicted. Students' responses revealed that learners across all three levels prefer simple, realistic mental models for metallic bonding and reveal to chemical bonding.

  13. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  14. UV irradiation improves the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chen, Li; Li, Deli; Tan, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effect of UV irradiation on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Twelve epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Cont.): No surface treatment. Group 2 (Low-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 10 cm for 10 min. Group 3 (High-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 1 cm for 3 min. A resin cement (CLEARFIL SA LUTING) was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which contained fiber posts in the center. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the mean bond strengths (MPa) were 18.81 for Cont. group, 23.65 for Low-UV group, 34.75 for High-UV group. UV irradiation had a significant effect on the bond strength (pUV irradiation demonstrates its capability to improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  15. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of commercial chemical additives for cementation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota Vieira, V.; Oliveira, C.C. de

    2015-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical additives (admixtures) in the cementation process of radioactive wastes, which are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market, then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. In this study we performed comparative analyzes of the results of compressive strength at age of 28 and 90 days and between the densities of the samples at the same ages. The compressive strength test at age of 28 days is considered a parameter essential issues related to security handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented product, but presented lower values density products. (authors)

  17. Probabilistic analysis of the influence of the bonding degree of the stem-cement interface in the performance of cemented hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M A; Grasa, J; García-Aznar, J M; Bea, J A; Doblaré, M

    2006-01-01

    The long-term behavior of the stem-cement interface is one of the most frequent topics of discussion in the design of cemented total hip replacements, especially with regards to the process of damage accumulation in the cement layer. This effect is analyzed here comparing two different situations of the interface: completely bonded and debonded with friction. This comparative analysis is performed using a probabilistic computational approach that considers the variability and uncertainty of determinant factors that directly compromise the damage accumulation in the cement mantle. This stochastic technique is based on the combination of probabilistic finite elements (PFEM) and a cumulative damage approach known as B-model. Three random variables were considered: muscle and joint contact forces at the hip (both for walking and stair climbing), cement damage and fatigue properties of the cement. The results predicted that the regions with higher failure probability in the bulk cement are completely different depending on the stem-cement interface characteristics. In a bonded interface, critical sites appeared at the distal and medial parts of the cement, while for debonded interfaces, the critical regions were found distally and proximally. In bonded interfaces, the failure probability was higher than in debonded ones. The same conclusion may be established for stair climbing in comparison with walking activity.

  18. Effect of Enamel and Dentin Surface Treatment on the Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushashe, Amanda Mahmmad; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel and dentin surface treatment on the micro-shear bond strength of self-adhesive cement. Seventy-two extracted third molars had their crowns embedded in acrylic resin and worn to obtain a flat enamel or dentin surface. The enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=12) that were based on surface treatment (11.5% polyacrylic acid solution or no treatment), substrate condition (wet or dry) and storage period (1 day or 90 days), and treated accordingly. Cylinders (1 × 1 mm) were fabricated using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) following the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for either 1 day or 90 days and subjected to micro-shear bond strength test (EMIC DL 2000 at 0.5 mm/min). After this, the failure type of the specimens was determined. Data were subjected to statistical analysis (a=0.05). According to the results, the 11.5% polyacrylic acid application decreased the bond strength in both enamel and dentin samples. The moist groups showed higher bond strength than the dry ones, regardless of the substrate and surface treatment. Storage period did not influence bond strength. In conclusion, surface treatment with 11.5% polyacrylic acid and absence of moisture decreased the bond strength of the resin-cement (RelyU200), regardless of the storage period.

  19. Effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihua; Song, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yaming; Zhu, Qingping; Zhang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether or not an erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser could improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Surface treatments can improve the bonding properties of dental ceramics. However, little is known about the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiated on zirconia ceramics. Specimens of zirconia ceramic pieces were made, and randomly divided into 11 groups according to surface treatments, including one control group (no treatment), one air abrasion group, and nine Er:YAG laser groups. The laser groups were subdivided by applying different energy intensities (100, 200, or 300 mJ) and irradiation times (5, 10, or 15 sec). After surface treatments, ceramic pieces had their surface morphology observed, and their surface roughness was measured. All specimens were bonded to resin cement. Shear bond strength was measured after the bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 h, and additionally aged by thermocycling. Statistical analyses were performed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for shear bond strength, and Dunnett's t test for surface roughness, with α=0.05. Er:YAG laser irradiation changed the morphological characteristics of zirconia ceramics. Higher energy intensities (200, 300 mJ) could roughen the ceramics, but also caused surface cracks. There were no significant differences in the bond strength between the control group and the laser groups treated with different energy intensities or irradiation times. Air abrasion with alumina particles induced highest surface roughness and shear bond strength. Er:YAG laser irradiation cannot improve the bonding property of zirconia ceramics to resin cement. Enhancing irradiation intensities and extending irradiation time have no benefit on the bond of the ceramics, and might cause material defect.

  20. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-Wzirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  1. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and

  2. Evaluation of Calcium Silicate Cement Bond Strength after Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... (chloroform, Endosolv E, orange oil, and eucalyptol) on the push‑out bond strength of calcium ... rotary files, lasers, heating apparatuses, or ultrasonic instruments. .... essential factor for the success of endodontic treatments.

  3. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cadhesive. Air-abrasion and the use of the universal primer improved the bond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used.

  4. Mechanical aspects of degree of cement bonding and implant wedge effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-San; Oxland, Thomas R; Hodgson, Antony J; Duncan, Clive P; Masri, Bassam A; Choi, Donok

    2008-11-01

    The degree of bonding between the femoral stem and cement in total hip replacement remains controversial. Our objective was to determine the wedge effect by debonding and stem taper angle on the structural behavior of axisymmetric stem-cement-bone cylinder models. Stainless steel tapered plugs with a rough (i.e. bonded) or smooth (i.e. debonded) surface finish were used to emulate the femoral stem. Three different stem taper angles (5 degrees , 7.5 degrees , 10 degrees ) were used for the debonded constructs. Non-tapered and tapered (7.5 degrees ) aluminum cylindrical shells were used to emulate the diaphyseal and metaphyseal segments of the femur. The cement-aluminum cylinder interface was designed to have a shear strength that simulated bone-cement interfaces ( approximately 8MPa). The test involved applying axial compression at a rate of 0.02mm/s until failure. Six specimens were tested for each combination of the variables. Finite element analysis was used to enhance the understanding of the wedge effect. The debonded stems sustained about twice as much load as the bonded stem, regardless of taper angle. The metaphyseal model carried 35-50% greater loads than the diaphyseal models and the stem taper produced significant differences. Based on the finite element analysis, failure was most probably by shear at the cement-bone interface. Our results in this simplified model suggest that smooth (i.e. debonded) stems have greater failure loads and will incur less slippage or shear failure at the cement-bone interface than rough (i.e. bonded) stems.

  5. The bonding effectiveness of five luting resin cements to the IPS Empress 2 all ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhan, V; Essop, A R M; Du Preez, I C

    2005-04-01

    Variolink II is the only resin cement used for bonding IPS (Ivoclar Porcelain System) Empress 2 ceramic restorations. Alternative luting resin cements need to be investigated for their bonding effectiveness with the IPS Empress 2 ceramic. To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and the effect of thermocycling, on the bonding effectiveness, of five resin cements to IPS Empress 2 ceramic. The projecting surfaces of one hundred ceramic discs were ground wet on silicone carbide paper. The specimens were divided into 5 groups of 20. The resin cements were bonded to the prepared ceramic surfaces, in the form of a stub. The specimens were stored under distilled water at 37 degrees C in an oven for 24 hours. Ten specimens in each group were thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. All the specimens were stressed to failure in an Instron Materials Testing Machine. The results were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistically similar mean SBS values were grouped using the Bonferroni (Dunn) multiple comparison test. The means for the non-thermocycled group were: 26.21, 19.41, 17.69, 17.43, and 15.76. The means for the thermocycled group were: 22.90, 15.72, 14.34, 13.96 and 13.45. The differences between the means were highly significant (p Empress 2 ceramic was effective. Thermocycling had a significant effect on the mean SBS values of Calibra. Thermocycling had no significant effect on the mean SBS values of the other resin cements.

  6. X-ray diffraction and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical bonds are investigated in sulfamic acid (H 3 N-SO 3 ), sodium sulfonlate dihydrate (H 2 NC 6 H 4 SO 3 Na.2H 2 O), 2,5-dimercaptothiadiazole (HS-C 2 N 2 S-SH), sodium cyanide dihydrate (NaCN.2H 2 O), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN) by X-ray diffraction, and if necessary completed with neutron diffraction. Crystal structures and electron densities are determined together with bond length and angles. Also the effects of thermal motion are discussed

  7. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher μTBS (pEDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher μTBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher μTBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC.

  8. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  9. Effect of saliva contamination and artificial aging on different primer/cement systems bonded to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, João; Branco, Teresa C; Portugal, Jaime

    2018-05-01

    Saliva contamination has been shown to decrease bonding to zirconia. Adopting a less contamination-sensitive cement system may be an alternative to decontamination. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the ability of different primer/cement systems to promote a durable bond to zirconia after saliva contamination. Zirconia blocks (Lava Plus) (N=320) were airborne-particle abraded (50 μm Al 2 O 3 ) and divided into 32 experimental groups (n=10) according to the variables in the study: saliva contamination; primer/cement system (Panavia SA [PSA]; RelyX Unicem 2 [RU2]; Bifix SE [BSE]; Panavia F2.0 [PF2]; Scotchbond Universal + RelyX Ultimate [SBU+RXU]; Futurabond M+ + Bifix QM [FBM+BQM]; All-Bond Universal + Duo-link [ABU+DL]; Z-Prime Plus + Duo-link [ZPP+DL]; and aging period (72 hours; 30 days with 10 000 thermocycles at 5°C to 55°C). After half of the blocks had been contaminated with fresh human saliva for 10 minutes, rinsed with water, and air-dried, each primer/cement was applied. Polymerized composite resin disks were then placed over the cement, and the resin cement was light-polymerized for 20 seconds each at 2 opposite margins. After the aging time, the specimens were tested in shear (1 mm/min). The failure mode was classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. Statistical analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) data was performed with ANOVA followed by Tukey honest significant difference post hoc tests. Chi-square tests were used to analyze the failure mode data (α=.05). The mean SBS ranged between 4.2 and 34.5 MPa. Shear bond strength was influenced (Pcontamination, aging time). SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM showed a higher mean SBS than those of the other experimental groups (Pcontamination (P>.05). Failure was predominantly classified as adhesive. In general, saliva contamination and aging decreased bonding efficacy. Two systems, combining an application of a universal adhesive and a resin cement (SBU+RXU and FBM+BQM) were not affected by

  10. Bond strength of primer/cement systems to zirconia subjected to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Jian, Yu-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Creating reliable and durable adhesion to the nonactive zirconia surface is difficult and has limited zirconia use. The introduction of functional monomers such as 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) appears to have enhanced bond strength to zirconia. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term bond strength of several MDP-containing primer/cement systems to zirconia. Zirconia blocks were divided into 6 groups (n=24) according to the 3 primers/cements to be bonded, as follows: Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate (SU/RU; consisting of MDP-containing primer/MDP-free cement); Clearfil ceramic primer/Panavia F (CCP/PAN; consisting ofMDP-containing/MDP-containing); and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (ZP/DUO; consisting ofMDP-containing/MDP-free), which were compared with 3 nonprimed groups, RU, PAN, and DUO. After bonding, each group was further divided into 3 subgroups (n=8) according to the level of aging: 24-hour storage in water at 37°C (24H); 30-day storage at 37°C (30D); and 30-day storage at 37°C followed by 3000 thermal cycles (30D/TC). After aging, a shear bond strength test and failure mode analysis were performed. The data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). After aging, nearly all primer/cement groups presented significantly higher bond strength than the related nonprimed groups for each level of aging (P<.05), except for CCP/PAN versus PAN with 24H (P=.741). SU/RU had the highest bond strength among the groups for all treatments (P<.05), except for CCP/PAN versus SU/RU with 30D/TC (P=.171). Among the nonprimed groups, only RU went through 30D/TC without premature debonding. With 24H and 30D, the failure modes in SU/RU and CCP/PAN were purely mixed, whereas those in the other groups were mainly adhesive, except for RU. The superiority of the initial bond strength in SU/RU may result from some functional components other than MDP. The presence of MDP in the cement did not appear to have a positive effect on long-term bond

  11. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  12. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  13. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

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    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  14. Effect of a bonding agent on in vitro biochemical activities of remineralizing resin-based calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Sabine H; Flaim, Glenn M

    2008-09-01

    To test whether fluoride in a resin-based Ca-PO4 ion releasing cement or coating with an acidic bonding agent for improved adhesion compromised the cement remineralization potential. Cements were formulated without fluoride (Cement A) or with fluoride (Cement B). The treatment groups were A=Cement A; A2=Cement A+bonding agent; B=Cement B; B2=Cement B+bonding agent. The calcium, phosphate, and fluoride ion release in saliva-like solution (SLS) was determined from hardened cement disks without or with a coating of bonding agent. For the remineralization, two cavities were prepared in dentin of extracted human molars and demineralized. One cavity received composite resin (control); the other received treatment A, A2, B or B2. After 6 week incubation in SLS, 180 microm cross-sections were cut. The percentage remineralization was determined by transverse microradiography comparing the dentin mineral density under the cement to that under the control. The percentage of remineralization (mean+/-S.D.) was A (39+/-14)=B (37+/-18), A2 (23+/-13), B2 (14+/-7). Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Holm-Sidak test showed a significant effect from the presence of bonding agent (p0.05). The ion solution concentrations of all groups showed undersaturation with respect to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium fluoride and supersaturation for fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite suggesting a positive remineralization potential. Compared to the control all treatments resulted in mineral increase. The remineralization was negatively affected by the presence of the bonding agent.

  15. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC(®) Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink(®) II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus(®) (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Combination of CEREC(®) Blocs PC and Variolink(®) II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Variolink(®) II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used.

  16. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the oxide layers are chemically bonded to graphene (Zhang ... sists of three glass chambers, one to contain the metal halide. (TiCl4, SiCl4 ... In this step, the metal halide reacts with the oxygen function- ... 1·0 g of FeCl3 were vigorously stirred in 30 ml of ethylene ... Reaction with water vapour results in hydrolysis of the un-.

  17. Effect of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength between Resin Cement and Ce-TZP/Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Eun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Although several studies evaluating the mechanical properties of Ce-TZP/Al2O3 have been published, to date, no study has been published investigating the bonding protocol between Ce-TZP/Al2O3 and resin cement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to air-abraded Ce-TZP/Al2O3 when primers and two different cement types were used. Materials and Methods. Two types of zirconia (Y-TZP and Ce-TZP/Al2O3 specimens were further divided into four subgroups according to primer application and the cement used. Shear bond strength was measured after water storage for 3 days or 5,000 times thermocycling for artificial aging. Results. The Y-TZP block showed significantly higher shear bond strength than the Ce-TZP/Al2O3 block generally. Primer application promoted high bond strength and less effect on bond strength reduction after thermocycling, regardless of the type of cement, zirconia block, or aging time. Conclusions. Depending on the type of the primer or resin cement used after air-abrasion, different wettability of the zirconia surface can be observed. Application of primer affected the values of shear bond strength after the thermocycling procedure. In the case of using the same bonding protocol, Y-TZP could obtain significantly higher bond strength compared with Ce-TZP/Al2O3.

  18. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Khalilian-Gourtani, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-07-01

    Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (Pstrength in all tests (P>0.05). Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite.

  19. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and...

  20. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  1. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola; Fabiyi, James Sunday; Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola

    2007-01-01

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m 3 and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning

  2. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    OpenAIRE

    Pamato, Saulo; do Valle, Acc?cio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; S?, Marcus-Vin?cius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer?s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond? FL,...

  3. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  4. Investigation of the histology and interfacial bonding between carbonated hydroxyapatite cement and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Keya; Hao Libo; Tang Peifu; Wang Zheng; Wen Ning; Du Mingkui; Wang Jifang; Wang Yan; Yang Yun; Li Jiangtao

    2009-01-01

    An ideal bone implant should facilitate the formation of a new bone layer as an osteo-integrated interface between bone and the implanted biomaterials. In the present work, the interface between carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) cement and bone was evaluated by interfacial bonding strength measurements and histological characterizations. CHA cement was implanted into a mongrel dog's femoral supracondylar and below the tibial plateau area, and was then tested ex vivo by, respectively, detaching and pullout experiments. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was used as a control. CHA cement could be directly injected and solidified in situ to repair bone defects. Histology results showed that CHA bonded with bone through gradual remodeling and was replaced by new bone tissue, which is an attribute for excellent biocompatibility. The interfacial bonding strength increased with implantation time. After 16 weeks implantation, the measured detaching force and the pullout force between CHA and bone were 281 ± 16 N and 512.5 ± 14.5 N, respectively. These values were several times higher compared to 5 days implantation. In contrast, the control showed a fibrous microstructure between PMMA and bone, and the detaching force and the pullout force decreased with implantation time. The results strongly suggest that CHA can form a better osteo-integrated interface compared to PMMA, and could be used as an ideal biomaterial for bone defect repair.

  5. PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CEMENT-BONDED KENAF BAST FIBRES COMPOSITE BOARDS WITH DIFFERENT DENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. AHMED AMEL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to explore the potential of kenaf bast fibres (KBFs for production of cement-bonded kenaf composite boards (CBKCBs. More than 70% of the KBFs were of size >3.35 mm and length of 31±0.4 mm, therefore, they were used for CBKCBs production. The CBKCBs with the dimensions of 450 × 450 × 12 mm were produced using cement (C: KBF with proportion of (2:1 and different board densities (BD namely 1100, 1300 and 1500 kg/m3. The CBKCBs were first cured in a tank saturated with moisture for 7days, and then kept at room temperature for 21 days. Mechanical and physical properties of the CBKCBs were characterized with regards to their modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE, internal bond (IB, water absorption (WA, and thickness swelling (TS. Results of the tested CBKCBs revealed that the MOR increased while the MOE decreased due to uniform distribution of KBFs. It was found that loading of KBFs has a negative influence on the internal bond (IB of the CBKCBs; the IB was reduced as KBFs tend to balling and making unmixed aggregates with the cement. These results showed that the CBKCB is a promising construction material that could potentially be used in different structural applications due to their good mechanical characteristics.

  6. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  7. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  8. Effect of Sandblasting and Type of Cement on the Bond Strength of Molar Bands on Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Omar A; Elaraby, Alaa; Alshamrani, Hamed; Salama, Fouad S

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) compare the bond strength of molar bands cemented to stainless steel crowns (SSCs) using glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or polycarboxylate cement (PXC); and (2) assess the influence of sandblasting molar bands on the mean bond strength between the band and the SSC. Sixty SSCs and 60 molar bands were used. The inner surfaces of 30 molar bands were roughened by sandblasting prior to cementation. The bond strength was measured after dislodging the SSC using a push-out test. In the nonsandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.04). In the sandblasted group, a significant difference was observed between PXC and RMGIC (P >.02), while there was only a marginal difference between GIC and RMGIC (P >.05). The sandblasted group exhibited superior bond strength overall. However, the only significant improvement was observed for GIC (P >.03). PXC showed the highest bond strength of molar bands to SSCs, while RMGIC showed the lowest. Sandblasting the inner surface of bands enhanced the bond strength of different cements.

  9. Bonding pathways of high-pressure chemical transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Anguang; Zhang Fan

    2013-01-01

    A three-stage bonding pathway towards high-pressure chemical transformations from molecular precursors or intermediate states has been identified by first-principles simulations. With the evolution of principal stress tensor components in the response of chemical bonding to compressive loading, the three stages can be defined as the van der Waals bonding destruction, a bond breaking and forming reaction, and equilibrium of new bonds. The three-stage bonding pathway leads to the establishment of a fundamental principle of chemical bonding under compression. It reveals that during high-pressure chemical transformation, electrons moving away from functional groups follow anti-addition, collision-free paths to form new bonds in counteracting the local stress confinement. In applying this principle, a large number of molecular precursors were identified for high-pressure chemical transformations, resulting in new materials. (fast track communication)

  10. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  11. [Effects of different surface treatments on the zirconia-resin cement bond strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y; Liu, X Q; Chen, L; Zhou, J F; Tan, J G

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. Forty zirconia discs were randomly divided into four groups (10 discs in each group) for different surface treatments: control, no surface treatment; sandblast, applied air abrasion with aluminum oxide particles; ultraviolet (UV), the zirconia sample was placed in the UV sterilizer at the bottom of the UV lamp at 10 mm, and irradiated for 48 h; cold plasma, the discs were put in the cold plasma cabinet with the cold plasma generated from the gas of He for 30 s. Specimens of all the groups were surface treated prior to cementation with Panavia F 2.0 cement. The surface morphology and contact angle of water were measured. The shear bond strengths were tested and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. Surface morphology showed no difference between the UV/cold plasma group and the control group. Sandblasted zirconia displayed an overall heterogeneous distribution of micropores. The contact angle of the control group was 64.1°±2.0°. After sandblasting, UV irradiation and cold plasma exposure, the values significantly decreased to 48.8°±2.6°, 27.1°±3.6° and 32.0°±3.3°. The values of shear bond strength of the specimens with sandblasted (14.82±2.01) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa with statistically significant difference (Pbond strength of the specimens with UV irradiation (10.02±0.64) MPa were higher than those with no treatment (9.41±1.07) MPa, but without statistically significant difference (P>0.05). The values of cold plasma group (18.34±3.05) MPa were significantly higher than those of control group (9.41±1.07) MPa, even more than those with sandblast(14.82±2.01) MPa (PUV and cold plasma treatment. The surface C/O ratio also decreased after UV and cold plasma treatment. Zirconia specimens treated with UV and cold plasma could significantly improve the hydrophilicity. The surface

  12. Effect of Silanization on Microtensile Bond Strength of Different Resin Cements to a Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gré, Cristina Parise; de Ré Silveira, Renan C; Shibata, Shizuma; Lago, Carlo Tr; Vieira, Luiz Cc

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a silane-coupling agent on the bond strength of a self-adhesive cement and a conventional resin cement to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. A total of eight ceramic blocks were fabricated and divided into four groups (n = 2). In groups 1 and 3, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid 10% for 20 seconds, rinsed for 30 seconds, and air-dried. One layer of a silane agent was applied onto all ceramic specimens and air-dried for 30 seconds. In groups 2 and 4, ceramic surfaces were etched with hydrofluoric acid, rinsed, and air-dried without application of the silane-coupling agent. The ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite with a self-adhesive resin cement or with a conventional resin cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding interface area to obtain beams with a bonding area of 0.8 mm(2) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell post hoc test (p = 0.05). Fractured specimens were examined under optical microscopy at 40x magnification. Silanization resulted in higher microtensile bond strength compared to groups without silane. No significant differences were found between the conventional resin cement and the self-adhesive resin cement with silane agent (p = 0.983), and without silane agent (p = 0.877). Silanization appears to be crucial for resin bonding to a lithium disilicate-based ceramic, regardless of the resin cement used. The self-adhesive resin cement performed as well as the conventional resin cement. Applying one layer of a silane-coupling agent after etching the ceramic surface with hydrofluoric acid 10% enhanced the bond strength between resin cements and a glass ceramic.

  13. Persistent local chemical bonds in intermetallic phase formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yanwen [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian, Xiufang, E-mail: xfbian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Qin, Xubo [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2014-05-01

    We found a direct evidence for the existence of the local chemical Bi–In bonds in the BiIn{sub 2} melt. These bonds are strong and prevail, dominating the structure evolution of the intermetallic clusters. From the local structure of the melt-quenched BiIn{sub 2} ribbon, the chemical Bi–In bonds strengthen compared with those in the equilibrium solidified alloy. The chemical bonds in BiIn{sub 2} melt retain to solid during a rapid quenching process. The results suggest that the intermetallic clusters in the melt evolve into the as-quenched intermetallic phase, and the intermetallic phase originates from the chemical bonds between unlike atoms in the melt. The chemical bonds preserve the chemical ordered clusters and dominate the clusters evolution.

  14. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  15. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical, antibacterial and bond strength properties of nano-titanium-enriched glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene GARCIA-CONTRERAS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs has become a significant area of research in Dentistry. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the physical, antibacterial activity and bond strength properties of conventional base, core build and restorative of glass ionomer cement (GIC compared to GIC supplemented with titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanopowder at 3% and 5% (w/w. Material and Methods Vickers microhardness was estimated with diamond indenter. Compressive and flexural strengths were analyzed in a universal testing machine. Specimens were bonded to enamel and dentine, and tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine. Specimens were incubated with S. mutans suspension for evaluating antibacterial activity. Surface analysis of restorative conventional and modified GIC was performed with SEM and EDS. The analyses were carried out with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA (post-hoc, Tukey test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney. Results Conventional GIC and GIC modified with TiO2 nanopowder for the base/liner cement and core build showed no differences for mechanical, antibacterial, and shear bond properties (p>0.05. In contrast, the supplementation of TiO2 NPs to restorative GIC significantly improved Vickers microhardness (p<0.05, flexural and compressive strength (p<0.05, and antibacterial activity (p<0.001, without interfering with adhesion to enamel and dentin. Conclusion GIC supplemented with TiO2 NPs (FX-II is a promising material for restoration because of its potential antibacterial activity and durable restoration to withstand the mastication force.

  17. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  18. Chemical constitution, physical properties, and biocompatibility of experimentally manufactured Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yun-Chan; Kim, Do-Hee; Hwang, In-Nam; Song, Sun-Ju; Park, Yeong-Joon; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Son, Ho-Hyun; Oh, Won-Mann

    2011-01-01

    An experimental Portland cement was manufactured with pure raw materials under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the chemical constitution, physical properties, and biocompatibility of experimentally manufactured Portland cement with those of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement. The composition of the cements was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX). The setting time and compressive strength were tested. The biocompatibility was evaluated by using SEM and XTT assay. SEM and EDAX revealed the experimental Portland cement to have a similar composition to Portland cement. The setting time of the experimental Portland cement was significantly shorter than that of MTA and Portland cement. The compressive strength of the experimental Portland cement was lower than that of MTA and Portland cement. The experimental Portland cement showed a similar biocompatibility to MTA. The experimental Portland cement might be considered as a possible substitute for MTA in clinical usage after further testing. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of different provisional cement remnant cleaning procedures including Er:YAG laser on shear bond strength of ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortuk, Mustafa; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cement removal by different dentin cleaning protocols (dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, Er:YAG laser) on the shear bond strength between ceramic and dentin. In total, 36 caries-free unrestored human third molars were selected as tooth specimens. Provisional restorations were fabricated and cemented with eugenol-free provisional cement. Then, disc-shaped ceramic specimens were fabricated and randomly assigned to four groups of dentin cleaning protocols (n = 9). Group 1 (control): Provisional cements were mechanically removed with a dental explorer. Group 2: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning brush with pumice Group 3: The dentin surfaces were treated with a cleaning bur. Group 4: The provisional cements were removed by an Er:YAG laser. Self-adhesive luting cement was used to bond ceramic discs to dentin surfaces. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.05 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed using a Kolmogorov Smirnov, One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). THE DENTIN CLEANING METHODS DID NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE SBS OF CERAMIC DISCS TO DENTIN AS FOLLOWS: dental explorer, pumice, cleaning bur, and Er:YAG laser. The use of different cleaning protocols did not affect the SBS between dentin and ceramic surfaces.

  20. The role of chemical admixtures in the formation of the structure of cement stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sulfates and carbonates of potassium and sodium on the character of the formation of the microstructure of cement stone was studied. The role of cations in the structure formation of cement stone is shown. The efficiency of chemical additives, hardening accelerators, was estimated from the ratio of the volumes of gel and capillary micropores. The ratio of gel and capillary pores allows to determine the efficiency coefficient of the action of chemical additives. It is shown that the potassium carbonate for Portland cement is the most effective additive for hardening in terms of microstructure modification, and potassium sulfate for slag Portland cement.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic instrumentation on the bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth. An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Braulino de Melo Filho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported the benefits of sonic and/or ultrasonic instrumentation for root debridement, with most of them focusing on changes in periodontal clinical parameters. The present study investigated possible alterations in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate cement to natural teeth after ultrasonic instrumentation. Forty recently extracted intact human third molars were selected, cleaned and stored in physiologic serum at 4°C. They received standard preparations, at a 16º convergence angle, and AgPd alloy crowns. The crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement and then divided into four groups of 10 teeth each. Each group was then subdivided into two subgroups, with one of the subgroups being submitted to 5,000 thermal cycles ranging from 55 ± 2 to 5 ± 2°C, while the other was not. Each group was submitted to ultrasonic instrumentation for different periods of time: group 1 - 0 min (control, group 2 - 5 min, group 3 - 10 min, and group 4 - 15 min. Tensile bond strength tests were performed with an Instron testing machine (model 4310. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test at the 5% level of significance. A significant reduction in the tensile bond strength of crowns cemented with zinc phosphate and submitted to thermal cycles was observed at 15 min (196.75 N versus 0 min = 452.01 N, 5 min = 444.23 N and 10 min = 470.85 N. Thermal cycling and ultrasonic instrumentation for 15 min caused a significant reduction in tensile bond strength (p < .05.

  2. The Effect of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Thickness and Translucency on Shear Bond Strength of Light-cured Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Moghaddas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To achieve acceptable clinical performance, a ceramic veneer must be bonded to enamel by well-polymerized resin cement. Among different factors, thickness and translucency of the ceramic may affect the resin cement polymerization. Thus, the current study evaluated the effect of the thickness and translucency of lithium disilicate ceramic on light-cured resin cement bond strength to enamel. Methods: In this laboratory study, 208 sound bovine incisors were equally divided into 16 groups (n = 13. The lithium disilicate ceramic cubes in four thicknesses (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mm with four translucencies (high and medium opaque, high and low translucent were fabricated and bonded to prepared enamel surfaces using a light-cured translucent resin cement according to manufacturer recommendations. After 5000 cycles of thermocycling, the bonded specimens were placed in a universal testing machine and loaded to the point of fracture. To determine the mode of failure, each sample was observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were recorded and analyzed by Shapiro-Wilk test and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: The ceramic thickness and translucency could not significantly affect shear bond strength (SBS of resin cement to enamel (p = 0.17 and p = 0.097, respectively.  The Adhesive and ceramic cohesive failures were reported as the maximum and minimum mode of failure, respectively. Conclusion: The SBS of the light-cured resin cement bonding to enamel and lithium disilicate ceramic was not affected by the translucency of ceramics having a thickness of less than 1 mm.

  3. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  4. Teaching and Learning the Concept of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bonding is one of the key and basic concepts in chemistry. The learning of many of the concepts taught in chemistry, in both secondary schools as well as in the colleges, is dependent upon understanding fundamental ideas related to chemical bonding. Nevertheless, the concept is perceived by teachers, as well as by learners, as difficult,…

  5. The effect of chemically adjusting cement compositions on leachabilities of waste ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.W.; Scheetz, B.E.; Roy, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical composition of both portland and aluminate cements was adjusted by adding amorphous silica. In the case of portland cement, the object was to react with excess portlandite and obtain an overall composition compatible with C-S-H gel or C-S-H gel + silica at low temperatures, and to obtain the tobermorite composition in order to be in equilibrium with this phase at temperatures above normal ambient. In the case of aluminate cement, the object was to be in equilibrium with more silica-rich phases. These silica-adjusted cements were used to make composites with nuclear waste forms. Leach tests showed that the silica-adjusted composites were chemically more stable than those made with as-received cement. Leach rates were lower in the case of the adjusted cements for Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Al, and Si. Only Na in the case of both portland and aluminate cements, and Mg and U in the case of aluminate cements, had greater leach rates in adjusted cements. Adjusting the composition of cements with silica is concluded to be beneficial when making composites to encapsulate nuclear waste forms

  6. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  7. Effect of Self-Adhesive and Separate Etch Adhesive Dual Cure Resin Cements on the Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Dentin at Different Parts of the Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mohamadian Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bonding of fiber posts to intracanal dentin is challenging in the clinical setting. This study aimed to compare the effect of self-adhesive and separate etch adhesive dual cure resin cements on the bond strength of fiber post to dentin at different parts of the root.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 20 single-rooted premolars. The teeth were decoronated at 1mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ, and the roots underwent root canal treatment. Post space was prepared in the roots. Afterwards, the samples were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, the fiber posts were cemented using Rely X Unicem cement, while in group 2, the fiber posts were cemented using Duo-Link cement, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The intracanal post in each root was sectioned into three segments of coronal, middle, and apical, and each cross-section was subjected to push-out bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 1mm/minute until failure. Push-out bond strength data were analyzed using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The bond strength at the middle and coronal segments in separate etch adhesive cement group was higher than that in self-adhesive cement group. However, the bond strength at the apical segment was higher in self-adhesive cement group compared to that in the other group. Overall, the bond strength in separate etch adhesive cement group was significantly higher than that in self-adhesive cement group (P<0.001.Conclusions: Bond strength of fiber post to intracanal dentin is higher after the use of separate etch adhesive cement compared to self-adhesive cement.

  8. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  9. Compatibility improvement method of empty fruit bunch fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded boards: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullah, Hayana; Abidin Akasah, Zainal; Zaini Nik Soh, Nik Mohd; Mangi, Sajjad Ali

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre on bio-composite product has been introduced to replace current material mainly wood fibre. OPEFB is widely available as palm oil is one of the major agricultural crops in Malaysia. EFB fibre are lignocellulosic materials that could replace other natural fibre product especially cement bonded board. However, the contains of residual oil and sugar in EFB fibre has been detected to be the reason for incompatibility issue between EFB fibre and cement mixtures. Regarding on the issue, a study has been conducted widely on finding the suitable pre-treatment method for EFB fibre to remove carbohydrate contained in the said fibre that are known to inhibit cement hydration. Aside from that, cement accelerator was introduced to enhance the hydration of cement when it was mixed with natural fibre. Hence, this paper will summaries the previous findings and in-depth study on the use of EFB fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded fibre boards.

  10. Standard Test Method for Bond Strength of Ceramic Tile to Portland Cement Paste

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the ability of glazed ceramic wall tile, ceramic mosaic tile, quarry tile, and pavers to be bonded to portland cement paste. This test method includes both face-mounted and back-mounted tile. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  12. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  13. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  14. The chemical bond as an emergent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jon C; Ho, Vinh; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-05-07

    We first argue that the covalent bond and the various closed-shell interactions can be thought of as symmetry broken versions of one and the same interaction, viz., the multi-center bond. We use specially chosen molecular units to show that the symmetry breaking is controlled by density and electronegativity variation. We show that the bond order changes with bond deformation but in a step-like fashion, regions of near constancy separated by electronic localization transitions. These will often cause displacive transitions as well so that the bond strength, order, and length are established self-consistently. We further argue on the inherent relation of the covalent, closed-shell, and multi-center interactions with ionic and metallic bonding. All of these interactions can be viewed as distinct sectors on a phase diagram with density and electronegativity variation as control variables; the ionic and covalent/secondary sectors are associated with on-site and bond-order charge density wave, respectively, the metallic sector with an electronic fluid. While displaying a contiguity at low densities, the metallic and ionic interactions represent distinct phases separated by discontinuous transitions at sufficiently high densities. Multi-center interactions emerge as a hybrid of the metallic and ionic bond that results from spatial coexistence of delocalized and localized electrons. In the present description, the issue of the stability of a compound is that of the mutual miscibility of electronic fluids with distinct degrees of electron localization, supra-atomic ordering in complex inorganic compounds coming about naturally. The notions of electronic localization advanced hereby suggest a high throughput, automated procedure for screening candidate compounds and structures with regard to stability, without the need for computationally costly geometric optimization.

  15. Closing in on chemical bonds by opening up relativity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cynthia K

    2008-03-01

    This paper develops a connection between the phenomenology of chemical bonding and the theory of relativity. Empirical correlations between electron numbers in atoms and chemical bond stabilities in molecules are first reviewed and extended. Quantitative chemical bond strengths are then related to ionization potentials in elements. Striking patterns in ionization potentials are revealed when the data are viewed in an element-independent way, where element-specific details are removed via an appropriate scaling law. The scale factor involved is not explained by quantum mechanics; it is revealed only when one goes back further, to the development of Einstein's special relativity theory.

  16. Resin cements formulated with thio-urethanes can strengthen porcelain and increase bond strength to ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; de Oliveira, Gabriel Rodrigues; Pfeifer, Carmem; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2018-06-01

    The use of thio-urethane oligomers has been shown to significantly improve the mechanical properties of resin cements (RCs). The aim of this study was to use thio-urethane-modified RC to potentially reinforce the porcelain-RC structure and to improve the bond strength to zirconia and lithium disilicate. Six oligomers were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, P) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP, T) - with di-functional isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic, AL) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic, AR) or Dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic, CC). Thio-urethanes (20 wt%) were added to a BisGMA/UDMA/TEGDMA organic matrix. Filler was introduced at 60 wt%. The microshear bond strength (μSBS), Weibull modulus (m), and failure pattern of RCs bonded to zirconia (ZR) and lithium disilicate (LD) ceramics was evaluated. Biaxial flexural test and fractographic analysis of porcelain discs bonded to RCs were also performed. The biaxial flexural strength (σ bf ) and m were calculated in the tensile surfaces of porcelain and RC structures (Z = 0 and Z = -t 2 , respectively). The μSBS was improved with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL or T_AL bonded to LD and P_AL, P_AR or T_CC bonded to zirconia in comparison to controls. Mixed failures predominated in all groups. σ bf had superior values at Z = 0 with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL, P_AR, T_AL, or T_CC in comparison to control; σ bf increased with all RCs composed by thio-urethanes at Z = -t 2 . Fractographic analysis revealed all fracture origins at Z = 0. The use of specific thio-urethane oligomers as components of RCs increased both the biaxial flexural strength of the porcelain-RC structure and the μSBS to LD and ZR. The current investigation suggests that it is possible to reinforce the porcelain-RC pair and obtain higher bond strength to LD and ZR with RCs

  17. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) wer...

  18. Kekuatan perlekatan geser semen ionomer kaca terhadap dentin dan NiCr alloy (Shear bond strenght of glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Leonita

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements were used broadly in restorative dentistry. That’s why researchers always try to invent new form of glass ionomer cement. The newest invention was the paste-paste formulation. Shear bond strenght of powder-liquid glass ionomer cement and paste-paste glass ionomer cement in dentin and NiCr alloy was tested to 4 groups of samples. Each group consisted contain 6 samples that were shaped into cylinder with 4 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. Group A was dentin with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, group B was dentin with paste-paste glass ionomer cement, group C was alloy with powder-liquid glass ionomer cement, and group D was alloy with paste-paste glass ionomer cement. Each sample in each group was tested with Autograph. The datas were analyzed statistically using T-test with level of signficance 0.05. The result showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement shear bond strenght was 211 N and paste-paste glass ionomer cement was 166.92 N. That showed that powder-liquid glass ionomer cement had a better shear bond strenght.

  19. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  20. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  1. Effect of Anatomical Customization of the Fiber Post on the Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Adricyla Teixeira; Gonçalves, Leticia Machado; Vasconcelos, Ana Júlia de Carvalho; Matos Maia Filho, Etevaldo; Nunes Carvalho, Ceci; De Jesus Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate, by means of the push-out test, the effect of the anatomical customization of the fiber post on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement. Twelve endodontically treated, human, upper central incisors were randomly divided into two groups ( n = 6): control (glass fiber posts cemented with Relyx® U200) and customized (glass fiber posts anatomically customized with translucent composite resin cemented with Relyx U200). The roots were sectioned into three slices, cervical, middle, and apical, and photographed with a digital camera attached to a stereomicroscopic loupe. The images were analyzed by software, for evaluation of the cement line. The slices were subsequently submitted to the push-out test until the post had completely extruded, and the fracture mode was analyzed with a stereomicroscopic loupe. The results showed significant differences between the groups in the different root thirds in relation to the area occupied by air bubbles ( p customized group. The customized group showed greater bond resistance than the control group and a more uniform cement layer.

  2. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  3. One hundred years of Lewis Chemical Bond!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Chemists knew how many electrons are there in each element and were also aware of stable electronic configurations. For example, 'inert gases' having. 8 electrons in the valence shell (now known as s and p orbitals) were very stable. Bonding in polar molecules, called electrovalent those days, such as ...

  4. Evaluation of the bond strength of resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giray, Figen Eren; Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Two adhesive cements, one "etch-and-rinse" [Variolink II (V)] and one "self-etch" [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U test. No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (pceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used.

  5. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  6. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed various cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline restorations have gained widespread use because of its enhanced strength and esthetics. During the try-in process, zirconia is likely to be contaminated with saliva. This contamination leads to a clear weakening of the bond between restorative material and cement. For this reason, zirconia surface should be cleaned before cementation. Hence, the purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of zirconia restorations cleansed with various surface cleansing protocols bonded with two different resin cements. Materials and Methods: Eighty samples of zirconia discs were prepared in the dimensions 2.5 mm diameter and 4.5 mm thickness. They were divided into two groups of each forty samples based on luting cement used. Each group was further subdivided into four subgroups of each (n = 10: Group 1: uncontaminated zirconia blocks, Group 2: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks and cleaned only with distilled water, Group 3: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks treated with Ivoclean, and Group 4: saliva-contaminated zirconia blocks were air abraded. Eighty human maxillary premolars were then sectioned to expose dentin and were mounted on an acrylic block. A jig was fabricated to bond zirconia with the tooth using two self-adhesive resin cements. The samples were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significance difference test with a level of significance set at p < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strength values of Group 1 and 2 - subgroup B are 10.3 ± 0.4 and 9.80 ± 0.7 (saliva-contaminated zirconia, cleansed with distilled water only, respectively, were lowest among all test subgroups and were significantly less than mean values of subgroup C, Group 1 - 20.45 ± 0.6 and Group 2 - 20.75 ± 0.4 (Ivoclean group and subgroup D, Group 1 - 20.90 ± 0.3 and Group 2 - 20.60 ± 0.5 (air

  7. Unicorns in the world of chemical bonding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenking, Gernot; Krapp, Andreas

    2007-01-15

    The appearance and the significance of heuristically developed bonding models are compared with the phenomenon of unicorns in mythical saga. It is argued that classical bonding models played an essential role for the development of the chemical science providing the language which is spoken in the territory of chemistry. The advent and the further development of quantum chemistry demands some restrictions and boundary conditions for classical chemical bonding models, which will continue to be integral parts of chemistry. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Bent, B.E.

    1984-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table

  9. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surfaces...... of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...

  10. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  11. Structure and chemical bond characteristics of LaB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Lina; Ma Ning; Liu Fengli

    2009-01-01

    The structure and chemical bond characteristics of LaB 6 have been achieved by means of the density functional theory using the state-of-the-art full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method, which are implemented within the EXCITING code. The results show our optimized lattice constant a (4.158 A), parameter z (0.1981) and bulk modulus B (170.4 GPa) are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Electron localization function (ELF) shows the La-La bond mainly is ionic bond, La-B bond is between ionic and covalent bond while the covalent bond between the nearest neighbor B atoms (B2 and B3) is a little stronger than that between the nearer neighbor B atoms (B1 and B4).

  12. Development of a Zero-Cement Binder Using Slag, Fly Ash, and Rice Husk Ash with Chemical Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand and consumption of cement have necessitated the use of slag, fly ash, rice husk ash (RHA, and so forth as a supplement of cement in concrete construction. The aim of the study is to develop a zero-cement binder (Z-Cem using slag, fly ash, and RHA combined with chemical activator. NaOH, Ca(OH2, and KOH were used in varying weights and molar concentrations. Z-Cem was tested for its consistency, setting time, flow, compressive strength, XRD, SEM, and FTIR. The consistency and setting time of the Z-Cem paste increase with increasing RHA content. The Z-Cem mortar requires more superplasticizer to maintain a constant flow of 110±5% compared with OPC. The compressive strength of the Z-Cem mortar is significantly influenced by the amounts, types, and molar concentration of the activators. The Z-Cem mortar achieves a compressive strength of 42–44 MPa at 28 days with 5% NaOH or at 2.5 molar concentrations. The FTIR results reveal that molecules in the Z-Cem mortar have a silica-hydrate (Si-H bond with sodium or other inorganic metals (i.e., sodium/calcium-silica-hydrate-alumina gel. Therefore, Z-Cem could be developed using the aforementioned materials with the chemical activator.

  13. In vitro Evaluation of Effect of Dental Bleaching on the Shear Bond Strength of Sapphire Orthodontics Brackets Bonded with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab M Kadhom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to assess the effect of various types of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of sapphire brackets bonded to human maxillary premolar teeth using resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and to determine the site of bond failure. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary human premolars were selected and assigned into three equal groups, ten teeth in each. The first group was the control (unbleached group; the second group comprised teeth bleached with hydrogen peroxide group (HP 37.5% (in-office bleaching while the third group included teeth bleached with carbamide peroxide group (CP 16% (at-home bleaching. The teeth in the experimental groups were bleached and stored in water one day then bonded with sapphire brackets using RMGIC with the control group and left another day. De-bonding was performed using Instron universal testing machine. To determine the site of bond failure, both the enamel surface and bracket base of each tooth were examined under magnifying lens (20X of a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed statistically highly significant difference in the shear bond strengths between control group and both of bleaching groups being low in the control group. Score III was the predominant site of bond failure in all groups. Conclusions: RMGIC provides adequate bond strength when bonding the sapphire brackets to bleached enamel; this bonding was strong enough to resist both the mechanical and masticatory forces. Most of the adhesive remained on the brackets, so it reduced the time required for removal of the bonding material’s remnants during enamel finishing and polishing.

  14. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm - 2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100 o C and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 (author)

  15. Chemical composition, radiopacity, and biocompatibility of Portland cement with bismuth oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yun-Chan; Lee, Song-Hee; Hwang, In-Nam; Kang, In-Chol; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Sun-Hun; Son, Ho-Hyun; Oh, Won-Mann

    2009-03-01

    This study compared the chemical constitution, radiopacity, and biocompatibility of Portland cement containing bismuth oxide (experimental cement) with those of Portland cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The chemical constitution of materials was determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The radiopacity of the materials was determined using the ISO/6876 method. The biocompatibility of the materials was tested by MTT assay and tissue reaction. The constitution of all materials was similar. However, the Portland cement and experimental cement were more irregular and had a larger particle size than MTA. The radiopacity of the experimental cement was similar to MTA. The MTT assay revealed MTA to have slightly higher cell viability than the other materials. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials, with the exception of MTA at 24 h. There was no significant difference in the tissue reaction between the experimental groups. These results suggest that the experimental cement may be used as a substitute for MTA.

  16. Chemically-bonded brick production based on burned clay by means of semidry pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voroshilov, Ivan, E-mail: Nixon.06@mail.ru; Endzhievskaya, Irina, E-mail: icaend@mail.ru; Vasilovskaya, Nina, E-mail: icaend@mail.ru [FSAEI HVE Siberian Federal University, 82 Svobodny Prospekt, Krasnoyarsk, 660130 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    We presented a study on the possibility of using the burnt rocks of the Krasnoyarsk Territory for production of chemically-bonded materials in the form of bricks which are so widely used in multistory housing and private house construction. The radiographic analysis of the composition of burnt rock was conducted and a modifier to adjust the composition uniformity was identified. The mixing moisture content was identified and optimal amount at 13-15% was determined. The method of semidry pressing has been chosen. The process of obtaining moldings has been theoretically proved; the advantages of chemically-bonded wall materials compared to ceramic brick were shown. The production of efficient artificial stone based on material burnt rocks, which is comparable with conventionally effective ceramic materials or effective with cell tile was proved, the density of the burned clay-based cell tile makes up to 1630-1785 kg \\ m{sup 3}, with compressive strength of 13.6-20.0 MPa depending on the compression ratio and cement consumption, frost resistance index is F50, and the thermal conductivity in the masonry is λ = 0,459-0,546 W \\ m {sup *} °C. The clear geometric dimensions of pressed products allow the use of the chemically-bonded brick based on burnt clay as a facing brick.

  17. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  18. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of moisture on the shear bond strength of gold alloy rods bonded to enamel with a self-adhesive and a hydrophobic resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Wiechmann, Dirk; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of enamel moisture on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a hydrophobic resin cement, Maximum Cure (MC), and a self-adhesive resin cement, Multilink Sprint (MLS), after etching of the enamel. Forty cylindrical gold alloy rods were used to simulate the Incognito lingual bracket system. They were bonded to the enamel of 40 human teeth embedded in self-cured acrylic resin. Twenty were bonded with MC (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel) and 20 with MLS (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel). The SBS of MC and MLS was determined in a universal testing machine and the site of bond failure was defined by the adhesive remnant index (ARI). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed followed by Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparison tests on the SBS results (P enamel, no significant differences between MC (58 +/- 5 MPa) and MLS (64 +/- 13 MPa) were noted. On wet enamel, the adherence of MC (6 +/- 8 MPa) and MLS (37 +/- 13 MPa) significantly decreased but to a lesser extent for MLS. The ARI scores corroborated these results. In conclusion, MC did not tolerate moisture. MLS was also affected but maintained sufficient adherence.

  20. Influence of HEMA content on the mechanical and bonding properties of experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nam Lim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of incrementally added uncured HEMA in experimental HEMA-added glass ionomer cement (HAGICs on the mechanical and shear bond strength (SBS of these materials. Increasing contents of uncured HEMA (10-50 wt.% were added to a commercial glass ionomer cement liquid (Fuji II, GC, Japan, and the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the resulting HAGICs were measured. The SBS to non-precious alloy, precious alloy, enamel and dentin was also determined after these surfaces were subjected to either airborne-particle abrasion (Aa or SiC abrasive paper grinding (Sp. Both strength properties of the HAGICs first increased and then decreased as the HEMA content increased, with a maximum value obtained when the HEMA content was 20% for the compressive strength and 40% for the tensile strength. The SBS was influenced by the HEMA content, the surface treatment, and the type of bonding surface (p<0.05. These results suggest that addition of an appropriate amount of HEMA to glass ionomer cement would increase diametral tensile strength as well as bond strength to alloys and teeth. These results also confirm that the optimal HEMA content ranged from 20 to 40% within the limitations of this experimental condition.

  1. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2011-01-01

    Cementation is a very useful process to solidify radioactive wastes. Depending on the waste it can be necessary to use of chemical additives (admixtures) to improve the cementation process and its product. Admixtures are materials, other than cement, aggregate and water, that are added either before or during the mixing to alter some properties, such as workability, curing temperature range, and setting time. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. In this changeable scenario it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their characteristics. In this research the effects of chemical admixtures in the solidification process has been studied. For the tests it was prepared a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste, cemented by two different formulations, and three chemical admixtures from two manufacturers. The tested admixtures were accelerators, set retarders and super plasticizers. The experiments were organized by a planning factorial 23 to quantify the effects of formulations, of the admixtures, its quantity and manufacturer in properties of the paste and products. The measured parameters were the density, the viscosity and the setting time of the paste, and the product compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  2. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin and enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raphaela F; Ramos, Carla M; Francisconi, Paulo A S; Borges, Ana Flávia S

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians continue to search for ways to simplify bonding procedures without compromising clinical efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear strength of self-adhesive cements RelyX U100 and RelyX U200, and conventional resin cement RelyX ARC to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments. The crowns of 120 bovine incisor teeth were separated from the roots and embedded in epoxy resin in polyvinyl chloride tubes. In each tooth, the area to be cemented was delimited with central holed adhesive tape. The teeth were distributed into 12 groups (n=10) according to the substrate; etched or not with 37% phosphoric acid; and cement type of enamel-U100, enamel-phosphoric acid-U100, enamel-U200, enamel-phosphoric acid-U200, enamel-ARC, enamel-phosphoric acid-ARC, dentin-U100, dentin-phosphoric acid-U100, dentin-U200, dentin-phosphoric acid-U200, dentin-ARC, and dentin-phosphoric acid-ARC. After 7 days of storage in artificial saliva, shear strength tests were performed by using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=.05). Fracture analysis was performed with a light microscope. Two specimens from each group were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. In enamel, ARC (9.96 MPa) had higher shear strength (P=.038) than U100 (5.14 MPa); however, after surface etching, U100 (17.81 MPa) and U200 (17.52 MPa) had higher shear strength (Padhesive type. U200 self-adhesive cement had similar bond strength to the ARC in enamel, but the combination with phosphoric acid had the best bond strength. For dentin, self-adhesive resin cements are equally effective alternatives to conventional resin cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface properties and bond strength measurements of N-vinylcaprolactam (NVC)-containing glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chee, Winston W; Brantley, William A; Schricker, Scott R

    2011-03-01

    N-vinylcaprolactam (NVC)-containing glass ionomers are promising dental restorative materials with improved mechanical properties; however, little information is available on other physical characteristics of these types of modified glass ionomers, especially their surface properties. Understanding the surface characteristics and behavior of glass ionomers is important for understanding their clinical behavior and predictability as dental restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of NVC-containing terpolymers on the surface properties and bond strength to dentin of GIC (glass-ionomer cement), and to evaluate the effect of NVC-containing terpolymer as a dentin conditioner. The terpolymer of acrylic acid (AA)-itaconic acid (IA)-N-vinylcaprolactam (NVC) with a molar ratio of 8:1:1 (AA:IA:NVC) was synthesized by free radical polymerization and characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The synthesized terpolymer was used in glass-ionomer cement formulations (Fuji IX GP). Ten disc-shaped specimens (12 × 1 mm) were mixed and fabricated at room temperature. Surface properties (wettability) of modified cements were studied by contact angle measurements as a function of time. Work of adhesion values of different surfaces were also determined. The effect of NVC-modified polyacid on the bond strength of glass-ionomer cement to dentin was investigated. The mean data obtained from contact angle and bonding strength measurements were subjected to t test and 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). NVC-modified glass-ionomer cements showed significantly (Pcement also showed significantly higher values for shear bond strength to dentin (8.7 ±0.15 MPa after 1 month) when compared to the control group (8.4 ±0.13 MPa after 1 month). NVC-containing terpolymers may enhance the surface properties of GICs and increase their bond strength to the dentin. Furthermore, NVC-containing polyelectrolytes are

  4. Effect of different power settings of Er,Cr:YSGG laser before or after tribosilicatization on the microshear bond strength between zirconia and two types of cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Leonardo C; Esteves, Camila M; Oliveira, Juliana A; Brugnera, Aldo; Cassoni, Alessandra; Rodrigues, José Augusto

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different output powers of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the association with tribochemical silica coating on the bond strength between zirconia ceramic and two resin cements. One hundred ninety-two zirconia ceramic bars (IPS e-max ZirCAD Ivoclar Vivadent-) were sectioned (6 × 6 × 4 mm), sintered, and randomly divided into 12 groups for each cement system according to the surface treatment (n = 8): C-without treatment (control); R-tribochemical coating + resin cement (control); 2L-laser (2.0 W) + resin cement; 2LR-laser (2.0 W) + tribochemical coating + resin cement; R2L-tribochemical coating + laser (2.0 W) + resin cement; 2.5L-laser (2.5 W) + resin cement; 2.5LR-laser (2.5 W) + tribochemical coating + resin cement; R2.5L-tribochemical coating + laser (2.5 W) + resin cement; 3L-laser (3.0 W) + resin cement; 3LR-laser (3.0 W) + tribochemical coating + resin cement, R3L-tribochemical coating + laser (3.0 W) + resin cement; and RPHO-tribochemical + resin cement + photoactivation (control). After the surface treatment, the respective primers were applied, and resin cements, Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent (M), and Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray Medical Inc. (P), were inserted into Tygon molds which were bonded to the zirconia bars. Each specimen received two cements bars. After 24 h of storage in a relative humidity (100%) at 37 °C, they were evaluated by the microshear test speed of 1 mm/min. The microshear values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). ANOVA showed statistically significant differences among the evaluated groups. The highest bond strength was observed in RPHO, which statistically differed from all groups. The lowest bond strength was observed in M2.5L (Multilink N) and in P3LR (Panavia F 2.0). It can be concluded that the lowest power output tested was suitable and showed bond strength values similar to tribochemical silica deposition. The light curing is important to

  5. Influence of chemical composition of civil construction waste in the cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, G.A.; Andrade, A.C.D.; Souza, J.M.M.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and demolition waste when disposed inappropriately might cause serious public health problems. Its reutilization focusing on the development of new products using simple production techniques, assuring a new product life cycle and not damaging the environment is inserted in sustainable concept. The aim of this work was identifying the characteristics of types of waste generated in a residential reform (glassy ceramic and fill dirt leftovers) verifying separately its influence on cement pastes mechanical behavior. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions with an approximately 0,35 water/cement relation and, glue time determination, water absorption, resistance to compression and X-ray fluorescence assays were taken. The results indicate that the chemical composition of the waste causes changes in the behavior of cement pastes, reflecting on their resistance to compression. (author)

  6. Benchmarking Density Functionals for Chemical Bonds of Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    Gold plays a major role in nanochemistry, catalysis, and electrochemistry. Accordingly, hundreds of studies apply density functionals to study chemical bonding with gold, yet there is no systematic attempt to assess the accuracy of these methods applied to gold. This paper reports a benchmark aga...

  7. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenisey, Murat; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Rona, Nergiz

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on bond strength between resin cement and differently sintered zirconium-oxide ceramics. 220 zirconium-oxide ceramic (Ceramill ZI) specimens were prepared, sintered in two different period (Short=Ss, Long=Ls) and divided into ten treatment groups as: GC, no treatment; GSil, silanized (ESPE-Sil); GSilPen, silane flame treatment (Silano-Pen); GSb, sandblasted; GSbSil, sandblasted+silanized; GSbCoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (CoJet)+silanized; GSbRoSil, sandblasted+silica coated (Rocatech-Plus)+silanized; GSbDSil, sandblasted+diamond particle abraded (Micron MDA)+silanized; GSbSilPen, sandblasted+silane flame treatment+silanized; GSbLSil, sandblasted+Er:Yag (Asclepion-MCL30) laser treated+silanized. The composite resin (Filtek Z-250) cylinders were cemented to the treated ceramic surfaces with a resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Shear bond strength test was performed after specimens were stored in water for 24h and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles (5-55 °C). Data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tamhane's multiple comparison test (α=0.05). According to the ANOVA, sintering time, surface treatments and their interaction were statistically significant (pzirconium-oxide ceramics. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (pceramics (pceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  10. Modelling of chemical evolution of low pH cements at long term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitouri, Y.; Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A.; Bourbon, X.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the underground radioactive waste repository, low-pH cements were developed to reduce interactions between concrete and clay barrier. These cements contain high proportions of mineral additions like silica fume, fly ash or blast furnace slag for example. The high ratio of cement replacement by pozzolanic additions allows to reduce the pH by a global reduction of Ca/Si ratio of the hydrates (according to the one observed on CEM I pastes). In order to predict the short term development of the hydration for each component of this cement, a multiphasic hydration model, previously developed, is used. The model predicts the evolution of hydration degree of each anhydrous phase and consequently the quantity of each hydrate in paste (CH, aluminates, CSH with different Ca/Si ratios). However, this model is not suitable to determine the long term mineralogical and chemical evolution of the material, due to the internal change induced by chemical imbalance between initial hydrates. In order to evaluate the chemical characteristics of low pH cement based materials, and thus assess its chemical stability in the context of radioactive waste storage, a complementary model of chemical evolution at long term is proposed. This original model is based on 'solid-solution' principles. It assumes that the microdiffusion of calcium plays a major role to explain how the different Ca/Si ratio of initial C-S-H tends together toward a medium stabilized value. The main mechanisms and full development of the model equations are presented first. Next, a comparison of the model with experimental data issue from EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) analysis on low pH cement allows to test the model. (authors)

  11. Study of chemical additives in the cementation of radioactive waste of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2012-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical admixtures in the cementation process of radioactive wastes. These additives are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market. Then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 23. The measured parameters were: the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. The parameter evaluated in this study was the compressive strength at age of 28 days, is considered essential security issues relating to the handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented products. (author)

  12. Effect of ceramic thickness and cement shade on the final shade after bonding using the 3D master system: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Javier; Gómez-Polo, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The final color of a ceramic restoration is influenced by both the ceramic thickness and the cement shade. This study aims to evaluate the color stability according to the 3D Master System of e.max ceramic discs after bonding with different shades of luting agents. A total of 120 e.max.Press 2M1 HT ceramic discs (60 discs of 1-mm thick and 60 discs of 0.5 mm thick) and three different values of Variolink Veneer cement were used (-3, 0, +3) for the cementation process. An Easyshade compact device was used to measure color shade tabs, according to the 3D Master System, on the discs both before and after the cementation protocols. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out with the spss v.21. After bonding with the different luting agents, only 30% remained as 2M1: specifically, 22% of the thinner discs and 37.3% of the thicker discs. In general, the effect of bonding increased the value and the chroma of the shade to a significant extent. Regression analyses revealed that the most significant predictor for all color parameters was cement shade, the thinner disc group bonded with -3 cement being the most unstable subgroup. According to the 3D Master System, the shade of the luting agent was the main predictor of the final color. However, the final color seems to be somewhat unpredictable, at least according to the modulating factors evaluated in the present study.

  13. Bonding Characteristics of Macrosynthetic Fiber in Latex-Modified Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites as a Function of Carbon Nanotube Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hong Jean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of carbon nanotube content (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% of the cement weight on the bonding properties of macrosynthetic fiber in latex-modified hybrid fiber cement-based composites (LMHFRCCs was evaluated. The slump value, compressive strength, and bonding strength were measured for each LMHFRCC. As the carbon nanotube content increased to 1.5%, the bonding properties of the macrosynthetic fiber improved. However, the bonding performance deteriorated at a carbon nanotube content of 2.0%. A decrease in the fluidity of the mix negatively affected the dispersion of the nanotubes in the LMHFRCCs. The addition of carbon nanotubes also affected the relative bonding strength independently of the improvement in compressive strength. Microscopic analysis of the macrosynthetic fiber surfaces was used to understand changes in the bonding behavior.

  14. Chemical composition influence of cement based mortars on algal biofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelle, Dalod; Alexandre, Govin; Philippe, Grosseau; Christine, Lors; René, Guyonnet; Denis, Damidot

    2013-04-01

    The main cause of building-facade biodegradation is the growth of microorganisms. This phenomenon depends on several parameters such as the geographical situation, the environmental conditions and the surface state of the substrate. Several researches have been devoted to the study of the effect of porosity and roughness on the biofouling of stones and mortars. However, none of them have addressed the influence of the mortar chemistry on the microorganism growth kinetic. The main objective of this study is to highlight the influence of the mortar chemistry in relationship with its physical properties on biological weathering. Earlier work showed a good resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cements to biodeterioration by acidogenic bacteria (Thiobacillus) and fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus Niger and Coniosporium uncinatum). In order to characterize the influence of the mortar chemistry on biofouling, two Portland cements and two alumina cements are used. Among micro-organisms able to grow, green algae are most involved in the aesthetic deterioration of facades. Indeed, they can colonize any type of media and can be a source of nutrients for other micro-organisms such as fungi. The green algae Klebsormidium flaccidum is chosen because of its representativeness. It is indeed the species the most frequently identified and isolated from samples taken on sites. The biofouling kinetic is followed on samples exposed outdoor and on samples tested in a laboratory bench which consists in spraying an algae culture on mortar specimens. The results obtained by in situ trials are compared with the results obtained on the laboratory bench. The microorganism growth kinetic is measured by image analysis. To improve the detection of algae on the surface of the cementitious samples, the raw image is converted in the YIQ color space. Y, I and Q correspond respectively to luminance, in-phase, and quadrature. On the Q channel, the areas covered by algae and the areas of clean mortar

  15. Radiation chemical treatment of cement mortar - polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the hardened cement pastes,mortars and concretes which contain polymers has progressed rapidly in years. Developmental work has identified a number of applications where the high strength and excellent durability of the composite materials will provide definite advantages over conventional mortars and concretes. The first investigations of polymer - impregnated concrete tried mainly to increase the quantity of absorbed and polymerised monomer because this gave a greater decrease in the original of concrete and a subsequent improvement in physico - mechanical properties. However, the production costs which is due mainly to the organic polymer, becomes the most important item. In this respect recent research showed the possibility of obtaining with a very compact concrete, of relative low porosity, a compound material with high performances after impregnation 26 tabs.,28 figs.,109 refs

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of pastes of bone cements with ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinto H, A.; Pina B, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Setting times and temperature of sixteen calcium phosphate cements added with ZrO 2 were evaluated. Their behaviors were analysed to be used like injectable formulations in surgery of bone. Two cements of calcium phosphates enriched with ZrO 2 with the best characteristics in setting times and temperature, were mechanically tested after 1 and 7 days of prepared. Density was determined using a pycnometer, chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction and the molecular structure was determined by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  17. Chemically bonded ceramic matrix composites: Densification and conversion to diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.R.; Guelguen, M.A.; Kriven, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Chemically bonded ceramics appear to be a promising alternative route for near-net shape fabrication of multi-phase ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). The hydraulic (and refractory) properties of fine mono-calcium aluminate (CaAl 2 O 4 ) powders were used as the chemically bonding matrix phase, while calcia stabilized zirconia powders were the second phase material. Samples containing up to 70 wt% (55 vol%) zirconia have been successfully compacted and sintered. Various processing techniques were evaluated. Processing was optimized based on material properties, dilatometry and simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA/TGA). The physical characteristics of this novel CMC were characterized by hardness, density, and fracture toughness testing. Microstructures were evaluated by SEM and phase identification was verified using XRD

  18. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  19. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  20. The effect of continuous application of MDP-containing primer and luting resin cement on bond strength to tribochemical silica-coated Y-TZP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myung-Jin; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of continuous application of 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-containing primer and luting resin cement on bond strength to tribochemical silica-coated yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP). Forty bovine teeth and Y-TZP specimens were prepared. The dentin specimens were embedded in molds, with one side of the dentin exposed for cementation with the zirconia specimen. The Y-TZP specimen was prepared in the form of a cylinder with a diameter of 3 mm and a height of 10 mm. The bonding surface of the Y-TZP specimen was sandblasted with silica-coated aluminium oxide particles. The forty tribochemical silica-coated Y-TZP specimens were cemented to the bovine dentin (4 groups; n = 10) with either an MDP-free primer or an MDP-containing primer and either an MDP-free resin cement or an MDP-containing resin cement. After a shear bond strength (SBS) test, the data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (α = 0.05). The group with MDP-free primer and resin cement showed significantly lower SBS values than the MDP-containing groups ( p Y-TZP was the best choice among the alternatives tested in this study.

  1. Coupling between cracking and chemical degradation in cement based materials: characterisation and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tognazzi, C.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the durability of concretes used for radioactive waste storage. It has already been shown that the concrete degradation during a storage phenomenon is due to the attack of the cement barrier by the water of the host rock, at ambient temperature. The modelling of this chemical degradation is now validated for un-cracked materials. However, a concrete preexisting crack can exist. In this work, has then been particularly studied the influence of a crack on the long term chemical degradation. The studies have been carried out on a mortar cracked mechanically (in compression or traction) and chemically degraded by leaching (reference degradation) and by accelerated degradations (with ammonium nitrate or under electric field). The diffusion properties have been measured at each step of the experiment. They have been confronted with transfer models. Results have revealed the existence of a coupling between the preexisting crack and the chemical degradation. At last, a modelling of the chemical degradation for cement materials has been proposed and validated both for pure cement and for mortars, in the cases of simple leaching and of leaching with ammonium nitrate. Its application to cracked materials by a microscopic approach (crack described in the lattice) has allowed to specify the interpretation of the experimental results. (O.M.)

  2. Chemical processes causing cementation in heat-affected smectite - the Kinnekulle bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Takase, Hiroyasu; Benbow, S. [Quantisci Ltd., Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    Numerical calculation of silica migration and precipitation that can cause cementation of smectite buffer clay has been made using the Grindrod/Takase chemical model. It is used here to investigate whether the silicification of the bentonite and surrounding sediments at Kinnekulle, southwestern Sweden, can be explained by the heat pulse caused by the diabase intrusion that took place in Permian time. Compilation of data concerning silica cementation and associated microstructural and rheological changes showed that significant silica precipitation should have occurred in the Kinnekulle case and this is also documented. Thus, precipitation of quartz has taken place to an extent that can be explained by the chemical model, which also showed conversion of smectite to illite by neoformation of the latter mineral but only for the 3000 years long heating period. Introduction of a criterion for non-reversible illitization is hence a necessary improvement of the model for explaining the actual presence of neoformed illite, which may in fact be wholly or partly responsible for the cementation. (The report is made up of two articles: `Cementation processes in smectite clay associated with conversion of smectite to illite as exemplified by the Kinnekulle bentonites` and `Nonisothermal modelling of geochemical evolution in the Kinnekulle bentonite layer. Mathematical modelling and simulation`) 33 refs, 40 figs.

  3. Chemical processes causing cementation in heat-affected smectite - the Kinnekulle bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Takase, Hiroyasu; Benbow, S.

    1998-12-01

    Numerical calculation of silica migration and precipitation that can cause cementation of smectite buffer clay has been made using the Grindrod/Takase chemical model. It is used here to investigate whether the silicification of the bentonite and surrounding sediments at Kinnekulle, southwestern Sweden, can be explained by the heat pulse caused by the diabase intrusion that took place in Permian time. Compilation of data concerning silica cementation and associated microstructural and rheological changes showed that significant silica precipitation should have occurred in the Kinnekulle case and this is also documented. Thus, precipitation of quartz has taken place to an extent that can be explained by the chemical model, which also showed conversion of smectite to illite by neoformation of the latter mineral but only for the 3000 years long heating period. Introduction of a criterion for non-reversible illitization is hence a necessary improvement of the model for explaining the actual presence of neoformed illite, which may in fact be wholly or partly responsible for the cementation. (The report is made up of two articles: 'Cementation processes in smectite clay associated with conversion of smectite to illite as exemplified by the Kinnekulle bentonites' and 'Nonisothermal modelling of geochemical evolution in the Kinnekulle bentonite layer. Mathematical modelling and simulation')

  4. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  5. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

  6. Additional chemical polymerization of dual resin cements: reality or a goal to be achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Sakaguti UMETSUBO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study serves as a warning to dentists and researchers that dual-cured resin cements may not polymerize completely under some prosthetic crowns. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the polymerization degree of dual-cured resin cements under prosthetic barrier, by microhardness test. Material and method Three cements (Bistite II, RelyX ARC and Variolink II were light-cured through different barriers, placed between the cement and the light source: G1: without barrier; G2: composite resin (Cesead; G3: Inceram alumina; G4: IPS Empress; G5: Inceram zirconia; G6: tooth fragment. Photopolymerization was carried out using a halogen light unit (650 mW/cm2; microhardness was evaluated using the Microhardness Tester FM 700, under a load of 50gf with a dwell time of 15s, at two evaluation times (30min and 24h. Result The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%. Both Inceram alumina and Inceram zirconia ceramic barriers hindered polymerization. Bistite, followed by RelyX and Variolink, exhibited the highest microhardness values (p<0.05. As the highest values were obtained without a barrier, it was determined that the barrier, followed by the tooth, influenced microhardness. Both Empress and Cesead had the smallest microhardness values but with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion The barrier negatively affected the microhardness of dual-cured resin cements; evaluation time did not affect microhardness values for most of the conditions tested. There is a limited effect of the chemical activator on the polymerization of some dual-cured cements, and their performance is product specific.

  7. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  8. Using chemical imaging to study bonding of dissimilar alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuhrer, R.; Phillips, M.R.; Huggett, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: New welding techniques are currently being developed to bond very dissimilar materials such as cast irons or wear resistant steels welded to mild steel. X-ray mapping and chemical phase imaging provides useful information on the mass transport across the interface as well as phase segregation within the weld joint. Cast iron / steel and wear resistant steel / mild steel weld joints were mounted in a bakelite mount, cross-sectioned with a diamond wafering blade and polished to an optical finish using diamond abrasives. X-ray maps were collected at over a range of accelerating voltages using a Moran Scientific energy dispersive x-ray analysis and mapping system. These elemental x-ray maps were used to generate scatter plots, where pixel frequency versus element concentration profiles are plotted against each other in two or three dimensions for selected elements within the sample. The clusters observed in these plots correspond to different phases within the weld seam. The contributing pixels to each cluster can be used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of its associated phase in a chemical image of the specimen. Of particular interest to this study were the branches and links between clusters in each scatter plot and how these features correlate the chemical distribution of elements both in and around the bond region. Preliminary analysis indicated that these links and branches in the scatter plot correspond to solid solutions between chemical phases and diffusion gradients. Proper interpretation of these scatter plots will provide a better understanding of the chemical processes involved in welding dissimilar materials. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  9. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  10. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfang Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbide residue (CCR is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH2, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP. The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope. Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  11. Evaluation of physico-chemical properties of Portland cements and MTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Gonçalves

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hydrogenionic potential and electrical conductivity of Portland cements and MTA, as well as the amount of arsenic and calcium released from these materials. In Teflon molds, samples of each material were agitated and added to plastic flasks containing distilled water for 3, 24, 72 and 168 h. The results were analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test for global comparisons and a Dunn-Tukey test for pairwise comparisons. The results revealed no significant differences in the pH of the materials (p > 0.05. The electrical conductivity of the cements were not statistically different (p > 0.05. White non-structural cement and MTA BIO released the largest amount of calcium ions into solution (p 0.05. The results indicated that the physico-chemical properties of Portland cements and MTA were similar. Furthermore, all materials produced an alkaline environment and can be considered safe for clinical use because arsenic was not released. The electrical conductivity and the amount of calcium ions released into solution increased over time.

  12. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongfang; Li, Zishanshan; Bai, Jing; Memon, Shazim Ali; Dong, Biqin; Fang, Yuan; Xu, Weiting; Xing, Feng

    2015-02-13

    Calcium carbide residue (CCR) is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH)₂, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP). The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength) with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope). Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  13. Evaluation of physico-chemical properties of Portland cements and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Jorge Luis; Viapiana, Raqueli; Miranda, Carlos Eduardo Saraiva; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Cruz Filho, Antônio Miranda da

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hydrogenionic potential and electrical conductivity of Portland cements and MTA, as well as the amount of arsenic and calcium released from these materials. In Teflon molds, samples of each material were agitated and added to plastic flasks containing distilled water for 3, 24, 72 and 168 h. The results were analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test for global comparisons and a Dunn-Tukey test for pairwise comparisons. The results revealed no significant differences in the pH of the materials (p > 0.05). The electrical conductivity of the cements were not statistically different (p > 0.05). White non-structural cement and MTA BIO released the largest amount of calcium ions into solution (p 0.05). The results indicated that the physico-chemical properties of Portland cements and MTA were similar. Furthermore, all materials produced an alkaline environment and can be considered safe for clinical use because arsenic was not released. The electrical conductivity and the amount of calcium ions released into solution increased over time.

  14. Melting and related precursor cooperative phenomena in chemically bonded assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2004-09-01

    A number of experimental studies of condensed matter assemblies with different types of chemical bonding will provide the focus of this work. Condensed compounds X(CH 3 ) 4 , with X = C,Si or Ge, are the first of such assemblies; two phase boundaries in the pressure temperature plane being studied: melting and a solid phase boundary heralding orientational disordering of molecules still however on a lattice. Secondly, directionally bonded d-electron transition metals such as Ni, Pd and Nb will be treated. Here, melting is the main focus, but the precursor transition is now the separation of a high-temperature ductile solid from a lower temperature mechanically brittle phase. A dislocation-mediated model of these transitions is discussed, leading into the third area of covalently bonded solids graphite and silicon. Here topological defect models again provide the focus; both dislocations and rotation-dislocations now being invoked. Some qualitative suggestions are made to interpret the melting curve of graphite subjected to high pressure. (author)

  15. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  16. Effects of tree species and wood particle size on the properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufacturing from tree prunings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ramadan A; Al-Mefarrej, H A; Abdel-Aal, M A; Alshahrani, T S

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the possibility of using the prunings of six locally grown tree species in Saudi Arabia for cement-bonded particleboard (CBP) production. Panels were made using four different wood particle sizes and a constant wood/cement ratio (1/3 by weight) and target density (1200 kg/m3). The mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the produced panels were determined. The interfacial area and distribution of the wood particles in cement matrix were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the panels produced from these pruning materials at a target density of 1200 kg m(-3) meet the strength and dimensional stability requirements of the commercial CBP panels. The mean moduli of rupture and elasticity (MOR and MOE) ranged from 9.68 to 11.78 N mm2 and from 3952 to 5667 N mm2, respectively. The mean percent water absorption for twenty four hours (WA24) ranged from 12.93% to 23.39%. Thickness swelling values ranged from 0.62% to 1.53%. For CBP panels with high mechanical properties and good dimensional stability, mixed-size or coarse particles should be used. Using the tree prunings for CBPs production may help to solve the problem of getting rid of these residues by reducing their negative effects on environment, which are caused by poor disposal of such materials through direct combustion process and appearance of black cloud and then the impact on human health or the random accumulation and its indirect effects on the environment.

  17. Hydrogen concentration profiles and chemical bonding in silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Stein, H.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Picraux, S.T.

    1978-01-01

    The complementary technique of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption were used to study the concentration profile and chemical bonding of hydrogen in silicon nitride for different preparation and annealing conditions. Silicon nitride prepared by chemical vapor deposition from ammonia-silane mixtures is shown to have hydrogen concentrations of 8.1 and 6.5 at.% for deposition temperatures of 750 and 900 0 C, respectively. Plasma deposition at 300 0 C from these gases results in hydrogen concentrations of approximately 22 at.%. Comparison of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption measurements after isothermal annealing shows that all of the hydrogen retained in the films remains bonded to either silicon or nitrogen and that hydrogen release from the material on annealing is governed by various trap energies involving at least two N-H and one Si-H trap. Reasonable estimates of the hydrogen release rates can be made from the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from measurements of hydrogen migration in hydrogen implanted and annealed films

  18. Physical, chemical and antimicrobial evaluation of a composite material containing quaternary ammonium salt for braces cementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugii, Mari Miura [Departamento de Odontologia Restaurativa, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba – Universidade de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Ferreira, Fábio Augusto de Souza, E-mail: ferreira.fabio.a.s@gmail.com [Grupo de Química de Materiais Híbridos e Inorgânicos, Instituto de Química de São Carlos – Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP 13563-120 (Brazil); Müller, Karina Cogo [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Área de Farmacologia, Anestesiologia e Terapeutica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba – Universidade de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Lima, Debora Alves Nunes Leite [Departamento de Odontologia Restaurativa, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba – Universidade de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Groppo, Francisco Carlos [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Área de Farmacologia, Anestesiologia e Terapeutica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Piracicaba – Universidade de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP 13414-903 (Brazil); Imasato, Hidetake; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara Pereira [Grupo de Química de Materiais Híbridos e Inorgânicos, Instituto de Química de São Carlos – Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP 13563-120 (Brazil); and others

    2017-04-01

    The antibiofilm effect of iodide quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (IQAMS) in Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive resin used for braces cementation was evaluated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed IQAMS formation and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled to Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) revealed that as coating, the quaternary ammonium groups from IQAMS were homogeneously dispersed throughout the surface. When incorporated, the composite material presented homogeneous dispersion throughout the resin. Assays with Streptococcus mutans demonstrated enhanced antibiofilm effect for the IQAMS coated resin, with much lower colony-forming units (CFU), in comparison to incorporated IQAMS. Such a difference was assigned to low availability of quaternary ammonium groups at the surface of resin when IQAMS was incorporated, hindering its antibiofilm effect. Additionally, the incorporation of IQAMS led to slight decrease in ultimate bond strength (UBS) and shear bond strength (SBS), in comparison to the neat commercial resin. Thus, the synthesized IQAMS displays great potential as antibiofilm coating or sealant to prevent oral infections in brackets during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Synthesis of ORMOSIL-based material with antibiofilm activity is performed. • Antibiofilm activity of the ORMOSIL-based material on commercial available resin for braces cementation is evaluated. • Antibiofilm ORMOSIL-based coating with potential application as varnish or sealant in orthodontic appliances is presented.

  19. Physical, chemical and antimicrobial evaluation of a composite material containing quaternary ammonium salt for braces cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugii, Mari Miura; Ferreira, Fábio Augusto de Souza; Müller, Karina Cogo; Lima, Debora Alves Nunes Leite; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Imasato, Hidetake; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara Pereira

    2017-01-01

    The antibiofilm effect of iodide quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (IQAMS) in Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive resin used for braces cementation was evaluated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed IQAMS formation and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled to Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) revealed that as coating, the quaternary ammonium groups from IQAMS were homogeneously dispersed throughout the surface. When incorporated, the composite material presented homogeneous dispersion throughout the resin. Assays with Streptococcus mutans demonstrated enhanced antibiofilm effect for the IQAMS coated resin, with much lower colony-forming units (CFU), in comparison to incorporated IQAMS. Such a difference was assigned to low availability of quaternary ammonium groups at the surface of resin when IQAMS was incorporated, hindering its antibiofilm effect. Additionally, the incorporation of IQAMS led to slight decrease in ultimate bond strength (UBS) and shear bond strength (SBS), in comparison to the neat commercial resin. Thus, the synthesized IQAMS displays great potential as antibiofilm coating or sealant to prevent oral infections in brackets during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Synthesis of ORMOSIL-based material with antibiofilm activity is performed. • Antibiofilm activity of the ORMOSIL-based material on commercial available resin for braces cementation is evaluated. • Antibiofilm ORMOSIL-based coating with potential application as varnish or sealant in orthodontic appliances is presented.

  20. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (Pcementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  1. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirgiz, Mehmet Serkan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC) on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG) were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC) were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP) or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP) for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min). Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC) and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS) and flexural strengths (FS) of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2), sodium oxide (Na2O), and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2) at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM) in comparison with reference mortars (RM) at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement. PMID:24587737

  2. Effects of Blended-Cement Paste Chemical Composition Changes on Some Strength Gains of Blended-Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Serkan Kirgiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical compositions changes of blended-cement pastes (BCPCCC on some strength gains of blended cement mortars (BCMSG were monitored in order to gain a better understanding for developments of hydration and strength of blended cements. Blended cements (BC were prepared by blending of 5% gypsum and 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% marble powder (MP or 6%, 20%, 21%, and 35% brick powder (BP for CEMI42.5N cement clinker and grinding these portions in ball mill at 30 (min. Pastes and mortars, containing the MP-BC and the BP-BC and the reference cement (RC and tap water and standard mortar sand, were also mixed and they were cured within water until testing. Experiments included chemical compositions of pastes and compressive strengths (CS and flexural strengths (FS of mortars were determined at 7th-day, 28th-day, and 90th-day according to TS EN 196-2 and TS EN 196-1 present standards. Experimental results indicated that ups and downs of silica oxide (SiO2, sodium oxide (Na2O, and alkali at MP-BCPCC and continuously rising movement of silica oxide (SiO2 at BP-BCPCC positively influenced CS and FS of blended cement mortars (BCM in comparison with reference mortars (RM at whole cure days as MP up to 6% or BP up to 35% was blended for cement.

  3. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-01-01

    , color and others. Portland cements commonly used in the construction industry, they are based primarily on the mineral phases of limestone and silica. In conventional cement admixtures the chemical reactivity depends on the ratio of tricalcium and dicalcium silicate (C 3 S/C 2 S), the tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) influences in the setting time and tetra calcium ferro aluminate (C 4 AF) gives a different color to the cement. In this research the mineralogical composition of two commercial cements is studied and its influence on the phenomenon of radionuclides retention. For this particular concrete discs were manufactured with water, sand and two commercial cements: Tolteca Extra CPC 30-RRS and Cruz Azul CPC Type II 30-R. The solid observation techniques used for analysis of the cement paste and concrete they are: X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy, as well as the nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer and X-ray Fluorescence. (Author)

  4. Effect of conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of phosphate monomer-based cement on zirconia ceramic in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Balducci, Ivan; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the durability of bond strength between a resin cement and aluminous ceramic submitted to various surface conditioning methods. Twenty-four blocks (5 X 5 X 4 mm 3) of a glass-in filtrated zirconia-alumina ceramic (inCeram Zirconia Classic) were randomly

  5. Mechano-Chemical Interactions at Cement-Geomaterial Interfaces in Repository and Borehole Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghi, J. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Matteo, E. N.; Heath, J. E.; Jove Colon, C. F.; Fuller, T.

    2017-12-01

    A number of factors negatively affect wellbore integrity including interactions at boundaries between cement and surrounding geomaterial. These include mechanical and chemical mechanisms that can lead to wellbore failure. To examine these interactions, potential coupling, and pathways to failure, we discuss progress on an experimental and modeling study involving cement-clay and cement-salt interfaces. A sample shotcrete-bentonite interface from the FEBEX heater test at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland is examined using multi-beam scanning electron microscopy (mSEM) at 4 nm resolution over an area 10's of square millimeters. We examine changes in alteration as manifested by pore structural changes as a function of distance from the interface. A parallel effort examines time-dependent changes in interface structure in cement cores in a triaxial coreholder. Cores are exposed to conditions of 70oC, 14 MPa pressure, and small differential loads, with degradation being monitored by effluent pH, pulse-echo ultrasonics, and piston displacement (measuring sample shortening). We will measure the mechanical consequences of interface alteration using nano-indentation. Experimental results are being incorporated as a validation effort in a coupled reactive-transport mechanics model linking the Sandia ALBANY finite element code, the KAYENTA elasto-plastic constitutive model, with the reactive transport code PFLOTRAN. Plans call to apply the model to understanding the evolution of the FEBEX sample, as well as a cement-salt sample from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525. SAND 2017-8277 A

  6. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p improved the bond strength quality and values.

  7. Peen treatment on a titanium implant: effect of roughness, osteoblast cell functions, and bonding with bone cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandaker M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Morshed Khandaker,1,4 Shahram Riahinezhad,1 Fariha Sultana,1 Melville B Vaughan,2,4 Joshua Knight,2 Tracy L Morris3,4 1Department of Engineering & Physics, 2Department of Biology, 3Department of Mathematics and Statistics, 4Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, USA Abstract: Implant failure due to poor integration of the implant with the surrounding biomaterial is a common problem in various orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. Implant fixation mostly depends upon the implant surface topography. Micron to nanosize circular-shaped groove architecture with adequate surface roughness can enhance the mechanical interlock and osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue and solve its poor fixation problem. Such groove architecture can be created on a titanium (Ti alloy implant by laser peening treatment. Laser peening produces deep, residual compressive stresses in the surfaces of metal parts, delivering increased fatigue life and damage tolerance. The scientific novelty of this study is the controlled deposition of circular-shaped rough spot groove using laser peening technique and understanding the effect of the treatment techniques for improving the implant surface properties. The hypothesis of this study was that implant surface grooves created by controlled laser peen treatment can improve the mechanical and biological responses of the implant with the adjoining biomaterial. The objective of this study was to measure how the controlled laser-peened groove architecture on Ti influences its osteoblast cell functions and bonding strength with bone cement. This study determined the surface roughness and morphology of the peen-treated Ti. In addition, this study compared the osteoblast cell functions (adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation between control and peen-treated Ti samples. Finally, this study measured the fracture strength between each kind of Ti samples

  8. Behaviour of a cement stone with chemical additions under short high temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falikman, V.R.; Veselova, V.I.; Ershov, V.Yu.; Muzalevskij, L.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate the influence of different chemical additions used in NPP construction on thermal stability of a cement stone under short- and high-temperature effects. S-3 and dihydroxyphenyl utilized as peptizing agents for increase of placeability of concrete mixtures as well as sodium nitrite utilized as an antifreezing addition at conccreting at low temperatures are used as additions. The investigations were conducted in the 0-900 deg C temperature range divided into 4 ranges. Shrinkage and mass losses of specimens were determined. The obtained data show that specimens with additions are subjected to smaller shrinkage and mass losses as compared with specimens without additions. The highest positive effect is attained in portland cements with active mineral additions

  9. Content of heavy metals and chemical composition of the hydraulic cement marketed in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas Padilla, Jimmy; Calderon Jimenez, Bryan; Sibaja Brenes, Jose Pablo; Salazar Delgado, Jorge; Rodriguez Castro, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of heavy metals, specifically lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and mercury (Hg), and also the chemical composition (CaO, SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 among others) were quantified of the hydraulic cement marketed in Costa Rica. The physical parameters of density and fineness confirmed the homogeneity of the samples to determinate accurately the content of the major components and heavy metals in the cements. The mineralogical constitution was determined by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Specifically, the cements showed a mass fraction in the range of (61.22 - 63.12) % of CaO, (18.10 - 26.14) % of SiO 2 , (3.70 - 6.05) % of Al 2 O 3 , (2.57 - 3.36) % Fe 2 O 3 and (0.60 - 4.09) % de MgO. Other components such as MgO, TiO 2 , K 2 O, P 2 O 5 , Na 2 O and Mn 2 O 3 were found on an average mass fraction lower than 1%. Moreover, using the ignition test results and assuming a complete decomposition of the limestone, it was possible to estimate (indirectly) the content of CaCO 3 and CaO given by the raw materials. The metal content of the heavy metals was determined using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS), Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (ETAAS), and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (CVAAS). The analysis demonstrated that the Pb in cements is present in different concentrations ranging the (2.45 ± 0.72) mg kg -1 to the (8.95 ± 1.34) mg kg -1 . Chromium (Cr) was presented in higher concentrations of (10.69 ± 0.92) mg kg-1. The Hg concentration was below 0.141 ± 0.021 mg kg -1 . In general terms, the hydraulic cements marketed and used in Costa Rica have a suitable chemical composition compared with some cements marketed in Germany. The results of the content of heavy metals presented in this study provide significant information for future studies in the area of toxicology, ecotoxicology, standardization and national regulation. (author) [es

  10. Early age volume changes in concrete due to chemical shrinkage of cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebensperger, L.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Unrestrained early age volume changes due to chemical shrinkage in cement pastes, mortars and concretes have been determined. The measurements were performed on sealed and unsealed samples which were stored under water. The chemical shrinkage of unsealed specimens represents the amount of absorbed water due to the chemical reaction of the cement It depends only on the cement content of the sample and does not lead to changes of the external dimensions. However the chemical shrinkage of sealed specimens is connected with a real volume change due to self-desiccation and the effect of internal pressures. The shrinkage depends in this case on the restraining effect of coarse aggregates as well as the cement content. The chemical shrinkage measured on sealed concretes was much higher than the one expected to ocurr on concretes, because normally an equalization of pressure takes place to some extent in the interior of the concrete. The use of expansive additives showed that they may compensate the chemical shrinkage, but its dosage is very sensitive and should be defined exactly for each case particularly.

    Se han determinado los cambios volumétricos que ocurren en pastas de cemento, morteros y hormigones a edad temprana debido al efecto de la retracción química. Las mediciones se realizaron en probetas selladas y no selladas sumergidas bajo agua. La retracción química en probetas no selladas representa la cantidad de agua absorbida debido a la reacción química del cemento. Depende solamente del contenido de cemento de la probeta y no produce ningún cambio en las dimensiones de la probeta. Por el contrario, la retracción química en probetas selladas está relacionada con un cambio volumétrico real debido al efecto de la autodesecación y presiones internas. La retracción en este caso depende tanto de la restricción que imponen los áridos, como del contenido de cemento. La retracción química medida en hormigones sellados

  11. Nature of chemical bond through positron angular correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, S.; Nagarajan, T.

    1979-01-01

    Two photon angular distribution of positron annihilation is measured for compounds (1) m- and (2) p-nitroanilines, (3) m- and (4) p-methylsulphonyl-N, N-dimethylanilines and (5) p-phenylthio- and (6) p-phenoxyanilines in order to investigate the phenomenon of resonance and the involvement of d-orbitals of sulphur in chemical bonding. The FWHM is the same (10.8 mrad) for compounds (1) and (2) indicating that the resonance in the p-isomer does not change the annihilation characteristic much. The measured FWHM (9.4 mrad) for compound (4) is much broader than that of compound (3) (FWHM = 7.7 mrad). In the case of p-isomer, there is the involvement of d-orbitals of sulphur in bond formation. FWHM for compounds (5) and (6) are almost same (8.4 mrad). In this pair the only difference is that the sulphur in one case is replaced by oxygen in the other. Since there is not enough scope for excess electrons to be accomodated at oxygen or sulphur, there is no preferential annihilation of positron at these centres. (auth.)

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bond in technetium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyagina, A.P.; Fursova, V.D.; Levin, A.A.; Gutsev, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    DV-X α method is used to study electron structure and peculiarities of chemical bond in Tc 2 and Tc 2 2+ dimers. Electron state characteristics are calculated in the basis of numerical Hartree-Fock functions for d 6 s 1 - and d 5 s 2 -configurations of Tc atom and for Tc 2 2+ ion d 5 s 1 -configuration. Disposition order for valence MO in Tc and Tc 2 2+ calculated for the given configurations is presented. It is shown that quinary bond with π u 4 dσ g 2 σ g 4 sσ g 2 δ u 2 configuration corresponds to the ground state of Tc 2 molecule. In Tc 2 some weakening of binding for π- and δ-orbitals and strengthening of total σ-binding in comparison with Mo 2 takes place. In Tc + and Tc 2+ MO composition is slightly changed, but a shift of 2σ-MO relatively MO consisting of d-AO is occured

  13. Dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials and five cements after six months storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Schmidt, Stefanie Zita; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to investigate dentin bond strength of two resin-ceramic materials and five cements after 24 h and six months storage. Cylinders (n=15/group) of Lava Ultimate (3M ESPE) and VITA ENAMIC (VITA Zahnfabrik) were cemented to mid-coronal dentin of 300 extracted human molars with RelyX Ultimate (3M ESPE), PANAVIA F2.0 (Kuraray), Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), els cem (Saremco Dental), or Ketac Cem Plus (3M ESPE). Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured after 24 h or six months storage (37°C, 100% humidity) and statistically analyzed (significance level: α=0.05). SBS varied markedly between Lava Ultimate and VITA ENAMIC, between the five cements, and between storage of either 24 h or six months. After six months, SBS was highest when Lava Ultimate was cemented with RelyX Ultimate and when VITA ENAMIC was cemented with RelyX Ultimate or with Variolink II. Lava Ultimate was somewhat more sensitive to storage than was VITA ENAMIC.

  14. Chemical bond activation observed with an x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of bonding and anti-bonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Lastly, we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding–anti-bonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultra short optical laser pulse.

  15. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid.   Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  16. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... was used to analyze the bond strength values of different groups. .... was 10 Hz, 3W, 300 mJ, at a distance of 10 mm from the .... gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) group, (e) 2 W Er,Cr:YSGG group, (f) 3 W Er,Cr:YSGG group d c b f.

  17. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Özgür; Kılıç, Kerem; Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Sağsen, Burak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were determined with a metallographic optical microscope and push-out tests were done. RESULTS No significant differences were observed in terms of push-out bond strength between the oval and circular fiber posts (P>.05) The resin cement thicknesses of the oval posts were greater than those of the circular posts group in the coronal, middle and apical specimens (P<.05). CONCLUSION In the light of these results, it can be stated that resin cement thickness does not affect the push-out bond strength. PMID:25722832

  18. Physico-Chemical Studies Involving Incorporation of Radioactive and Industrial Waste In Cement-Epoxy Resin Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, M.S.; Hafez, N.

    1999-01-01

    Cement and epoxy resin as chemical additives are proposed to incorporate different types of wastes. The study was extended to prepare different mixtures of cement and epoxy resin in presence of some toxic ions. The studied ions were Cd II, Ni II, Cu II, Fe III, Ce IV, 154+152 Eu, phenol and toluene. The physical, mechanical and leaching properties of the mixtures were studied. The thermal analysis and infrared spectra were also investigated. It was observed that all the studied properties of the epoxy modified cement as a disposal matrix was improved

  19. Physico-chemical studies of gamma-irradiated polyester. Impregnated cement mortar composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.R.; Afifi, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of impregnation time on the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of polyester-cement mortar composite has been investigated. The samples were soaked in unsaturated polyester resin containing 40% styrene monomer at impregnation times ranging from 1-15 hours and then exposed to 50 kGy of γ-irradiation. The effects on polymer loading, compressive strength, apparent porosity, and water absorption in addition to IR spectra and TGA of the samples were studied. It was found that, the polymer loading and compressive strength increase with the increased of soaking time up to 4 hours and there is no significant improvement of the polymer loading and strength. Whereas, the apparent porosity and water absorption behave in an opposite direction. These are attributed to the presence of polymer in the pores of the samples. IR spectra showed that, new bands appeared as result of the reaction between polyester and set cement. TGA showed that, the polyester cement composite has higher thermal stability as a compared to irradiated polyester. (author)

  20. Understanding the triple nature of the chemical bond on submicroscopic level

    OpenAIRE

    Klun, Tina

    2017-01-01

    The master’s thesis addresses three definitions of chemical bond with particular emphasis on the sub-microscopic level in a comprehensive manner. Slovenian pupils are taught about chemical bond for the first time in the eighth grade of primary school as part of learning about the connection between particles. Due to the abstract nature of the notion chemical bond, it is essential that pupils are encouraged to learn about the topic on the macroscopic, sub microscopic and symbolic level as this...

  1. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Artioli COSTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10 and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3. Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0 than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1 (p < 0.05 and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7. The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6; seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7, and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9, showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05. Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin.

  2. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  3. Chemical Bond Parameters in Sr3MRhO6 (M=Rare earth)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical bond parameters, that is, bond covalency, bond valence, macroscopic linear susceptibility, and oxidation states of elements in Sr3MRhO6 (M=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) have been calculated. The results indicate that the bond covalency of M-O decreases sharply with the decrease of ionic radius of M3+ from Sm to Yb, while no obvious trend has been found for Rh-O and Sr-O bonds. The global instability index indicates that the crystal structures of Sr3MrhO6 (M = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho) have strained bonds.

  4. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  5. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  6. Chemical and morphological characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahbaz; Kaleem, Muhammad; Fareed, Muhammad Amber; Habib, Amir; Iqbal, Kefi; Aslam, Ayesha; Ud Din, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and particle morphology of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and two white Portland cements (CEM 1 and CEM 2). Compositional analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction whereas, morphological characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and Laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. The elemental composition of WMTA, CEM 1 and CEM 2 were similar except for the presence of higher amounts of bismuth in WMTA. Calcium oxide and silicon oxide constitute the major portion of the three materials whereas, tricalcium silicate was detected as the major mineral phase. The particle size distribution and morphology of WMTA was finer compared to CEM 1 and CEM 2. The three tested materials had relatively similar chemical composition and irregular particle morphologies.

  7. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  8. Representations of Chemical Bonding Models in School Textbooks--Help or Hindrance for Understanding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anna; Drechsler, Michal; De Jong, Onno; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2013-01-01

    Models play an important and central role in science as well as in science education. Chemical bonding is one of the most important topics in upper secondary school chemistry, and this topic is dominated by the use of models. In the past decade, research has shown that chemical bonding is a topic that students find difficult, and therefore, a wide…

  9. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on the tensile bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin. Zirconia ceramic surfaces were treated with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles, 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles, argon-ion bombardment, gas plasma, and piranha solution (H2SO4:H2O2=3:1). In addition, slip casting surfaces were examined. Untreated surfaces were used as the control group. Tensile bond strengths (TBS) were measured after water storage for 3 days or 150 days with additional 37,500 thermal cycling for artificial aging. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way and 3-way ANOVA, followed by comparison of means with the Tukey HSD test. After storage in distilled water for three days at 37 °C, the highest mean tensile bond strengths (TBS) were observed for zirconia ceramic surfaces abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles (TBS(AAP)=37.3 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=40.4 MPa), and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles (TBS(AZP)=34.8 MPa, TBS(CAZP)=35.8 MPa). Also a high TBS was observed for specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=37.8 MPa). After 150 days of storage, specimens abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles revealed high TBS (TBS(AAP)=37.6 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=33.0 MPa, TBS(AZP)=22.1 MPa and TBS(CAZP)=22.8 MPa). A high TBS was observed also for specimens prepared with slip casting (TBS(SC)=30.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed for control specimens (TBS(UNT)=12.5 MPa, TBS(CUNT)=9.0 MPa), specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=10.3 MPa) and gas plasma (TBS(GP)=11.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed also for specimens treated with piranha solution (TBS(PS)=3.9 MPa, TBS(CPS)=4.1 MPa). A significant difference in TBS after three days storage was observed for specimens treated with different methods (p0.05), CAAP(p>0.05) and SC(p>0.05). However, the failure patterns of debonded specimens prepared with 150-μm abrasive zirconia

  10. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  11. Preparation, physical-chemical characterisation and cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Miao, Baoji; Bareille, Reine; Rey, Christian

    2006-03-01

    The feasibility of calcium carbonate cements involving the recrystallisation of metastable calcium carbonate varieties has been demonstrated. Calcium carbonate cement compositions presented in this paper can be prepared straightforwardly by simply mixing water (liquid phase) with two calcium carbonate phases (solid phase) which can be easily obtained by precipitation. An original cement composition was obtained by mixing amorphous calcium carbonate and vaterite with an aqueous medium. The cement set and hardened within 2h at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere saturated with water and the final composition of the cement consisted mostly of aragonite. The hardened cement was microporous and showed poor mechanical properties. Cytotoxicity tests revealed excellent cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cement compositions. Calcium carbonates with a higher solubility than the apatite formed for most of the marketed calcium phosphate cements might be of interest to increase biomedical cement resorption rates and to favour its replacement by bone tissue.

  12. Optimization of properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from cotton stalk and sawdust containing calcium chloride CaCl2 as an additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    morteza nazerian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigation of hydration behavior and mechanical properties of cement-bonded particleboard manufactured from different ratio of cotton stalk to poplar wood particle, sawdust content and CaCl2 as additive at different weight ratios. At the first, curing time of cement paste containing different amount of additive (CaCl2 and wood and cotton fines was determined. Besides, the effect of additive (CaCl2 content, weight ratio of cotton to poplar wood particles and percentage of sawdust on modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE and internal bonding (IB of cement-bonded particleboard was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM. In order to optimize the properties of panels, a mathematical model equation (second order plan was done by a computer simulation program. According to results, there is a good coincidence between predicted values and actual values (R2 for MOR, MOE and IB was 0.93, 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. This study showed that the response surface methodology (RSM can be effectively used for modeling of panel properties. Results showed that using weight ratio of cotton to poplar particle 43:57 the MOR, MOE and IB of panels can be reached to maximum values (12.5, 2545 and 0.35 MPa, respectively. Simultaneously, application of 4.5% additive and 9% sawdust at had a positive effect on the properties of the panels.

  13. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  14. An in situ evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength of resin cements used for luting fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Camilo Andrés; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Bittencourt, Bruna Fortes; Kalinowski, Hypolito José; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2016-10-01

    The behavior and magnitude of the deformations that occur during polymerization and the behavior of the luting agents of glass fiber posts inside the root canal require quantification. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the in situ polymerization shrinkage, degree of conversion, and bond strength inside the root canal of resin cements used to lute fiber posts. Thirty maxillary canines were prepared to lute fiber posts. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15) according to the cementation system used, which included ARC, the conventional dual-polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC, and the U200 system, a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX U200. Two fiber optic sensors with recorded Bragg gratings (FBG) were attached to each post before inserting the resin cement inside the root canal to measure the polymerization shrinkage (PS) of the cements in the cervical and apical root regions (με). Specimens were sectioned (into cervical and apical regions) to evaluate bond strength (BS) with a push-out test and degree of conversion (DC) with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (α=.05). The ARC and U200 system showed similar PS values (-276.4 ±129.2 με and -252.1 ±119.2 με, respectively). DC values from ARC were higher (87.5 ±2.7%) than those of U200 (55.9 ±9.7%). The cervical region showed higher DC values (74.8 ±15.2%) and PS values (-381.6 ±53.0 με) than those of the apical region (68.5 ±20.1% and -146.9 ±43.5 με, respectively) for both of the resin cements. BS was only statistically different between the cervical and apical regions for ARC (P<.05). The ARC system showed the highest PS and DC values compared with U200; and for both of the resin cements, the PS and DC values were higher at the cervical region than at the apical region of the canal root. BS was higher in the cervical region only for ARC. Copyright © 2016

  15. Effects of chemical and mineral additives and the water/cement ratio on the thermal resistance of Portland cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Leandro Cesar Dias; Morelli, Arnaldo C.; Baldo, Joao Baptista

    1998-01-01

    The exposure of Portland concrete to high temperatures (>250 deg C) can damage drastically the microstructural integrity of the material. Since the water/cement ratio as well as the inclusion of superplasticizers and mineral additives (silica fume) can alter constitutively and micro structurally the material, in this work it was investigated per effect of these additions on the damage resistance of portland concrete after exposure to high temperatures. (author)

  16. Chemical stability of seven years aged cement-PET composite waste form containing radioactive borate waste simulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt); Tawfik, M.E. [Department of Polymers and Pigments, National Research Center, Dokki (Egypt); Bayoumi, T.A. [Radioisotope Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki (Egypt)

    2011-04-15

    Different samples of radioactive borate waste simulate [originating from pressurized water reactors (PWR)] have been prepared and solidified after mixing with cement-water extended polyester composite (CPC). The polymer-cement composite samples were prepared from recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) waste and cement paste (water/cement ratio of 40%). The prepared samples were left to set at room temperature (25 deg. C {+-} 5) under humid conditions. After 28 days curing time the obtained specimens were kept in their molds to age for 7 years under ambient conditions. Cement-polymer composite waste form specimens (CPCW) have been subjected to leach tests for both {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides according to the method proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Leaching tests were justified under various factors that may exist within the disposal site (e.g. type of leachant, surrounding temperature, leachant behavior, the leachant volume to CPCW surface area...). The obtained data after 260 days of leaching revealed that after 7 years of aging the candidate cement-polymer composite (CPC) containing radioactive borate waste samples are characterized by adequate chemical stability required for the long-term disposal process.

  17. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p enamel showed the highest mean fracture load (MFL; 1591 ± 172.59 N). The RelyX Ultimate groups MFLs were significantly higher than the corresponding RelyX U200 groups (p enamel (p enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Selenium recovery from kiln powder of cement manufacturing by chemical leaching and bioreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, S; Hasegawa, A; Kuroda, M; Hanada, A; Yamashita, M; Ike, M

    2015-01-01

    A novel process by using chemical leaching followed by bacterial reductive precipitation was proposed for selenium recovery from kiln powder as a byproduct of cement manufacturing. The kiln powder at a slurry concentration of 10 w/v% with 0.25 M Na2CO3 at 28°C produced wastewater containing about 30 mg-Se/L selenium. The wastewater was diluted four-fold and adjusted to pH 8.0 as preconditioning for bioreduction. A bacterial strain Pseudomonas stutzeri NT-I, capable of reducing selenate and selenite into insoluble elemental selenium, could recover about 90% selenium from the preconditioned wastewater containing selenium of 5 mg-Se/L when supplemented with lactate or glycerol. The selenium concentrations in the treated wastewater were low around the regulated effluent concentration of 0.1 mg-Se/L in Japan.

  19. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  20. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  1. Microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of zirconia bonded to dentin using two self-adhesive resin cements; effect of airborne abrasion and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Gamal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Airborne abrasion-surface treatment of zirconia significantly enhanced the μTBS of both cements adhered to dentin while aging had an adverse effect. MS showed higher insignificant μTBS.

  2. Comparison of the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin with different protocol of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, Mohammad Javad; Hossainipour, Zahra; Majidinia, Sara; Ojrati, Najmeh

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin with and without surface treatments, and compare them with conventional resin cement as the control group. In this experimental study, buccal and lingual surface of the thirty sound human premolars were polished in order to obtain a flat surface of enamel (E) in buccal, and dentin (D) in lingual. Sixty feldspathic ceramic blocks (2×3×3 mm) were prepared and randomly divided into six groups (n=10). Each block was cemented to the prepared surface (30 enamel and 30 dentin surface) according to different protocol: E1 and D1; RelyX ARC as control group, E2, D2; RelyX Unicem, E3, D3; acid etching +RelyX Unicem. The specimens were termocycled and subjected to shear forces by a universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of fracture were evaluated by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods using SPSS version 15. One-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at α=0.05. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences within the enamel subgroups, but there were significant differences within the dentinal subgroups, and statistically significant differences were found between the groups D1and D3 (p=0.02). Comparison between similar enamel and dentinal subgroups showed that there was a significant difference just between the subgroups E3 and D3 (p=0.01). Elective etching of enamel did not lead to significant increase in the shear bond strength of RelyX Unicem in comparison to RelyX ARC. On the other hand, elective etching of dentin reduces the bond strength of RelyX Unicem with the dentin.

  3. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-07-25

    In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD), granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  4. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD, granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  5. Mechanism of alkalinity lowering and chemical equilibrium model of high fly ash silica fume cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Seiichi; Honda, Akira; Negishi, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alkalinity lowering of a High Fly ash Silica fume Cement (HFSC) under liquid/solid ratio conditions where the pH is largely controlled by the soluble alkali components (Region I) has been studied. This mechanism was incorporated in the chemical equilibrium model of HFSC. As a result, it is suggested that the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- partially contributes to alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I. A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali (Na, K) adsorption, which was presumed as another contributing factor of the alkalinity lowering effect, was also developed, and an HFSC immersion experiment was analyzed using the model. The results of the developed model showed good agreement with the experiment results. From the above results, it was concluded that the alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I was attributed to both the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- and alkali adsorption, in addition to the absence of Ca(OH) 2 . A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali and SO 4 2- adsorption was also proposed. (author)

  6. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    ) fabricate graphene/metal interfaces and metal/graphene/metal sandwich structures evidencing classical anisotropic umpolung chemistry from carbon pz-orbrital charge pinning, and (Chapter 5) engineer graphene/dielectric interfaces showing electron depletion from carbon atoms at the HfO2/graphene interface. The fabrication of graphene interfaces remains a critical gap for successful commercialization of graphene-based devices, yet we demonstrate that interfacial hybridization, anisotropic charge redistribution, local chemical bonding, and discrete electronic hybridization regimes play a critical role in the electronic structure at graphene interfaces.

  7. Addition of bioactive glass to glass ionomer cements: Effect on the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caluwé, T; Vercruysse, C W J; Ladik, I; Convents, R; Declercq, H; Martens, L C; Verbeeck, R M H

    2017-04-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are a subject of research because of their inferior mechanical properties, despite their advantages such as fluoride release and direct bonding to bone and teeth. Recent research aims to improve the bioactivity of the GICs and thereby improve mechanical properties on the long term. In this study, two types of bioactive glasses (BAG) (45S5F and CF9) are combined with GICs to evaluate the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility of the BAG-GIC combinations. The effect of the addition of Al 3+ to the BAG composition and the use of smaller BAG particles on the BAG-GIC properties was also investigated. Conventional aluminosilicate glass (ASG) and (modified) BAG were synthesized by the melt method. BAG-GIC were investigated on setting time, compressive strength and bioactivity. Surface changes were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDS and PO 4 3- -and Ca 2+ uptake in SBF. Biocompatibility of selected BAG-GICs was determined by a direct toxicity assay. The addition of BAG improves the bioactivity of the GIC, which can be observed by the formation of an apatite (Ap) layer, especially in CF9-containing GICs. More BAG leads to more bioactivity but decreases strength. The addition of Al 3+ to the BAG composition improves strength, but decreases bioactivity. BAGs with smaller particle sizes have no effect on bioactivity and decrease strength. The formation of an Ap layer seems beneficial to the biocompatibility of the BAG-GICs. Bioactive GICs may have several advantages over conventional GICs, such as remineralization of demineralized tissue, adhesion and proliferation of bone- and dental cells, allowing integration in surrounding tissue. CF9 BAG-GIC combinations containing maximum 10mol% Al 3+ are most promising, when added in ≤20wt% to a GIC. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their…

  9. Bitumen coating as a tool for improving the porosity and chemical stability of simulated cement-waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Coating process of simulated cement-based waste form with bitumen was evaluated by performing physical and chemical experimental tests. X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electron microscope investigations were applied on coated and non-coated simulated waste forms. Experimental results indicated that coating process improved the applicable properties of cement-based waste form such as porosity and leachability. Diffusion coefficients and leach indecies of coated specimens were calculated and show acceptable records. It could be stated that coating cemented waste form by bitumen emulsion, isolate the radioactive contaminants, thus reduces their back release to surrounding and in consequently save the environment proper and safe

  10. The rim zone of cement based materials - barrier or fast lane for chemical degradation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwotzer, M.; Kaltenbach, J.; Heck, P.F.; Konno, K.; Gerdes, A.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution focuses exemplarily on the chemical and mineralogical changes in the rim zone of cement paste samples exposed to different chloride solutions (NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 and CaCl 2 ), to hard tap water and to demineralized water. The determination of the Ca(OH) 2 and Mg(OH) 2 content of the solid phases was performed by means of thermogravimetry with pulverized samples (TGA/SDTA 851, Mettler-Toledo). A potential relation between temperature and the time dependant development of the material due to reactive transport processes will also be addressed. The experiments with tap water showed that the contact between the cement paste samples and hard tap water did not lead to significant changes in the composition of the solid samples or of the reaction solution. This can be attributed to a rapid formation of a protective calcium carbonate layer on the surface of the cement paste. The slight decrease of the Ca 2+ content in the solution indicates that the growth of this layer occurs within the first few hours. In contrast to the tap water exposure, the results of the experiments with the MgCl 2 solutions show features of an intense attack despite the presence of crystalline covering layers. The quick formation of a thick and dense Mg(OH) 2 layer does not provide any protection against reactive transport processes. In this experiment, the degradation rate of Ca(OH) 2 as well as the Ca 2+ release was higher than in all other experiments. In addition the rapid formation of a Mg(OH) 2 layer starting already during the first hour of the experiment did not prevent the chloride ingress compared to the other experiments with chloride solutions. The pH value of the reaction solution remains stable and relatively low which indicates a crystallisation process. In the other experiments, performed with demineralized water, alkali chloride solutions, and the CaCl 2 solution, no significant formation of potentially protective covering layers and no development of transport

  11. Microtensile Bond Strength of CAD/CAM Resin Blocks to Dual-Cure Adhesive Cement: The Effect of Different Sandblasting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Kara, Dilan; Baydemir, Canan

    2018-02-11

    To investigate the effect of sandblasting powder particles on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of dual-cure adhesive cement to CAD/CAM blocks. CAD/CAM blocks (Cerasmart, VITA, and LAVA) were cut in slabs and divided into groups: group 1, no sandblasting; group 2, sandblasted with 27-μm Al 2 O 3 ; group 3, sandblasted with 30-μm CoJet; group 4, sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 . After sandblasting, all specimens were silanized and luted using dual-cure adhesive cement (G-CEM LinkForce). After 24 hours, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.2 mm 2 sticks, and μTBS values were obtained (N = 30). Additionally, 132 CAD/CAM block sections were prepared for surface roughness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluations. Results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis One-way ANOVA and Dunn's Post Hoc Test (p 0.05). For LAVA, μTBS values of specimens that were sandblasted with 50-μm Al 2 O 3 powder were significantly higher than 30-μm-SiO 2 and 27-μm Al 2 O 3 (p CAD/CAM blocks for Cerasmart and VITA, although the results changed significantly for LAVA. The ideal bond protocol for CAD/CAM blocks is specific to the material used. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO) 3 (PR 3 ) 2 (H 2 ) (CO = carbonyl; PR 3 = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H 2 exchanges easily with D 2 . This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H 2 bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H 2 )(R 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PR 2 ) 2 were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig

  13. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical; Cimento para poco de petroleo desenvolvido a partir de cimento comum: caracterizacao fisica, quimica e mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Bezerra, U.T., E-mail: daninascimento.eng@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (IFPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  14. Preparation, physical-chemical characterisation and cytocompatibility of calcium carbonate cements

    OpenAIRE

    Combes, Christèle; Miao, Baoji; Bareille, Reine; Rey, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of calcium carbonate cements involving the recrystallisation of metastable calcium carbonate varieties has been demonstrated. Calcium carbonate cement compositions presented in this paper can be prepared straightforwardly by simply mixing water (liquid phase) with two calcium carbonate phases (solid phase) which can be easily obtained by precipitation. An original cement composition was obtained by mixing amorphous calcium carbonate and vaterite with an aqueous medium. The cem...

  15. Self-healing polymer cement composites for geothermal wellbore applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, K. A.; Fernandez, C.; Childers, I.; Koech, P.; Um, W.; Roosendaal, T.; Nguyen, M.; Huerta, N. J.; Chun, J.; Glezakou, V. A.

    2017-12-01

    Cement is vital for controlling leaks from wellbores employed in oil, gas, and geothermal operations by sealing the annulus between the wellbore casing and geologic formation. Wellbore cement failure due to physical and chemical stresses is common and can result in significant environmental consequences and ultimately significant financial costs due to remediation efforts. To date numerous alternative cement blends have been proposed for the oil and gas industry. Most of these possess poor mechanical properties, or are not designed to work in high temperature environments. This research investigates novel polymer-cement composites which could function at most geothermal temperatures. Thermal stability and mechanical strength of the polymer is attributed to the formation of a number of chemical interactions between the polymer and cement matrix including covalent bonds, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions. It has been demonstrated that the bonding between cement and casing is more predictable when polymer is added to cement and can even improve healing of adhesion break when subjected to stresses such as thermal shock. Fractures have also been healed, effectively reducing permeability with fractures up to 0.3-0.5mm apertures, which is two orders of magnitude larger than typical wellbore fractures. Additionally, tomography analysis was used to determine internal structure of the cement polymer composite and imaging reveals that polymers fill fractures in the cement and between the cement and casing. By plugging fractures that occur in wellbore cement, reducing permeability of fractures, both environmental safety and economics of subsurface operations will be improved for geothermal energy and oil and gas production.

  16. physico-chemical studies on polymer impregnated blending cement mortar composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    as the increasing of the demand on a specific performance characteristics in concrete such as improved strength, low heat, sulfate resistance, improved impermeability and certain other applications. some of the industrial waste materials such as the blast-furnace slag, silica fume and fly ash were mixed with the cement clinker to produce blended cement . the use of these materials modifies the strength, pore structure and permeability of hardened cement mortar or concrete. the incorporation of blast furnace slag and silica fume in the hardened blended cement mortar or concrete is a common practice recently due to technological, economical and environmental benefits

  17. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  18. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  19. Effects of the addition of oil shale ash and coal ash on physic-chemical properties of CPJ45 cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabih K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We focused our research on recycling industrial wastes, fly ash (F.A, bottom ash (B.A and oil shale ash (S.A in cement production. The study concerns physico-chemical characterization of these products and the influence of their addition on the mechanical proprieties of the CPJ45 cement. XRF allowed us to rank the three additives used according to their contents on major oxides. Coal ashes belong to the class F, and thus possess poozzolanic properties and oil shale ash belongs to the class C and possesses hydraulic and poozolanic properties. The crystalline phases constituting each ash were analysed by XRD. We observe in bottom ash the presence of quartz and mullite. The same crystals are found in fly ash with hematite and magnetite. Oil shale ash is composed of quartz, anhydrite, gehlenite, wollastonite and periclase. The microstructures of fly ash and bottom ash were studied using SEM. The bottom ash was composed respectively of fine particles that are generally irregularly shaped, their dimensions are between 5 and 28μm and of big particles(300 μm. The EDX analysis coupled with an electronic microscope provided some information about the major elements that constitute our samples. The dehydrations of anhydrous and three days hydrated cement were examined by DSC. For hydrated cements we noticed endothermic peaks related to the dehydration of CSH, CH and decomposition of carbonates. The study of the mechanical properties of CPJ45 cement by adding different proportions of fly ash, bottom ash and oil shale ash helped clarifying the percentage of ash that leaded to improve the 28 days mechanical strength. The results show that the cements studied have their maximum mechanical resistance with the addition at 7% of fly ash or 10% of oil shale ash.

  20. Design of Fit-for-Purpose Cement to Restore Cement-Caprock Seal Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project aims to study critical research needs in the area of rock-cement interfaces, with a special focus on crosscutting applications in the Wellbore Integrity Pillar of the SubTER initiative. This study will focus on design and test fit-for-purpose cement formulations. The goals of this project are as follows: 1) perform preliminary study of dispersing nanomaterial admixtures in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mixes, 2) characterize the cement-rock interface, and 3) identify potential high-performance cement additives that can improve sorption behavior, chemical durability, bond strength, and interfacial fracture toughness, as appropriate to specific subsurface operational needs. The work presented here focuses on a study of cement-shale interfaces to better understand failure mechanisms, with particular attention to measuring bond strength at the cement-shale interface. Both experimental testing and computational modeling were conducted to determine the mechanical behavior at the interface representing the interaction of cement and shale of a typical wellbore environment. Cohesive zone elements are used in the finite element method to computationally simulate the interface of the cement and rock materials with varying properties. Understanding the bond strength and mechanical performance of the cement-formation interface is critical to wellbore applications such as sequestration, oil and gas production and exploration and nuclear waste disposal. Improved shear bond strength is an indication of the capability of the interface to ensure zonal isolation and prevent zonal communication, two crucial goals in preserving wellbore integrity. Understanding shear bond strength development and interface mechanics will provide an idea as to how the cement-formation interface can be altered under environmental changes (temperature, pressure, chemical degradation, etc.) so that the previously described objectives can be achieved. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  1. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  2. Microstructure and chemical bonding of DLC films deposited on ACM rubber by PACVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; Schenkel, M.; Pei, Y.T.; Sánchez-López, J.C.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure and chemical bonding of DLC films prepared by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition on acrylic rubber (ACM) are studied in this paper. The temperature variation produced by the ion impingement during plasma cleaning and subsequent film deposition was used to modify the film

  3. A comparison of finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests of the bracket-cement-enamel system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Algera, T.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) and tensile bond strength (TBS) of 45 metal brackets bonded with Transbond XT to bovine enamel. The SBS was determined by loading the short and the long sides of the bracket base. Testing took place after storage of the

  4. Chapa aglomerada de cimento-madeira de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. Cement-bonded particleboard of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Yoshico Arakaki Okino

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Chapas de partículas de cimento-madeira foram confeccionadas com a madeira de quatro clones de Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (seringueira: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 e AVROS 1301. Confeccionaram-se as chapas na proporção de 1:4:1 (madeira:cimento:água por peso e nas dimensões de 450 x 450 x 13 mm e densidade nominal de 1,4 g/cm³, com a adição de 4% de cloreto de cálcio di-hidratado (CaCl2.2H2O como acelerador. Foram testadas partículas fervidas e não-fervidas dos quatro clones, totalizando oito tratamentos, sendo em cada um destes, com quatro repetições, avaliadas as propriedades mecânicas e físicas das chapas, segundo a norma ASTM D 1037 - 96a. De forma geral, os melhores resultados de propriedades físicas e mecânicas foram obtidos nas chapas com partículas do clone AVROS 1301. No teste de hidratação do cimento, a madeira de seringueira in natura foi classificada como de "inibição extrema", porém com a adição de CaCl2 o foi como de "baixa inibição". Essa madeira se mostrou tecnicamente viável à produção de chapas de cimento-madeira, independentemente do clone.Cement-bonded particleboards of rubberwood were manufactured with four clones of Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg. (rubberwood: IAN 717, IAN 873, GT 711 and AVROS 1301. Boards of 450 x 450 x 13 mm were manufactured in a ratio of 1:4:1 (wood/cement/water, weight basis, with 1.4 g/cm³ density and 4% calcium chloride dihydrated - CaCl2.2H2O as accelerator. The particles of four clones were tested in treated and untreated conditions, totaling eight treatments. In each treatment with four replicates, the physical and mechanical properties were evaluated according to ASTM D 1037 - 96a standard. Overall, the best mechanical and physical results were obtained with the cement-bonded particleboard made with particles from clone AVROS 1301. Rubberwood has shown to be "highly inhibitory" in the hydration test, however when CaCl2 was added the inhibition index decreased and

  5. Representational Classroom Practices that Contribute to Students' Conceptual and Representational Understanding of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Annette; Nichols, Kim

    2011-11-01

    Understanding bonding is fundamental to success in chemistry. A number of alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding have been reported in the literature. Research suggests that many alternative conceptions held by chemistry students result from previous teaching; if teachers are explicit in the use of representations and explain their content-specific forms and functions, this might be avoided. The development of an understanding of and ability to use multiple representations is crucial to students' understanding of chemical bonding. This paper draws on data from a larger study involving two Year 11 chemistry classes (n = 27, n = 22). It explores the contribution of explicit instruction about multiple representations to students' understanding and representation of chemical bonding. The instructional strategies were documented using audio-recordings and the teacher-researcher's reflection journal. Pre-test-post-test comparisons showed an improvement in conceptual understanding and representational competence. Analysis of the students' texts provided further evidence of the students' ability to use multiple representations to explain macroscopic phenomena on the molecular level. The findings suggest that explicit instruction about representational form and function contributes to the enhancement of representational competence and conceptual understanding of bonding in chemistry. However, the scaffolding strategies employed by the teacher play an important role in the learning process. This research has implications for professional development enhancing teachers' approaches to these aspects of instruction around chemical bonding.

  6. The hardness and chemical changes in demineralized primary dentin treated by fluoride and glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Fernandes DIAS

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoride plays an important role in the control of dental caries. Aim To evaluate the chemical exchange between restoration of glass ionomer cement of high viscosity (GIC and primary dentin with application of sodium fluoride (NaF 2% through changes in hardness from uptake of calcium, phosphate and fluoride. Material and method Class I cavities were prepared in 40 sound primary molars, and the sample was divided into two groups (n=20 according to dentin condition: sound (1 and demineralized (2. Sub-groups (n=10 were formed to investigate the isolated action of the GIC or the association with NaF (F. This in vitro study examined the chemical exchange under two conditions, sound and demineralized dentin (pH cycling, to simulate the occurrence of mineral loss for the caries lesion. G1 and G2 received GIC restoration only; groups G1F and G2F received NaF before GIC restoration. The specimens were prepared for Knoop hardness test and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A two-way ANOVA test (α = 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Micro-Raman data were qualitatively described. Result Increased hardness was observed in all the sites of direct contact with GIC in sound and demineralized dentin for all groups (p0.05. In the evaluation of micro-Raman, direct contact between GIC and dentin for sound and demineralized dentin resulted in increased peaks of phosphate. Conclusion The exchange between GIC and demineralized dentin may induce changes of mechanical properties of the substrate, and uptake of mineral ions (phosphate occurs without the influence of NaF.

  7. Effect of phototherapy on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of in-vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aali, Khulud Abdulrahman

    2018-05-11

    The present study systematically reviewed the literature to investigate the effect of phototherapy on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. electronic databases including MEDLINE (PubMed), ISI Web of Science, Scopus, ScIELO, LILACS and EMBASE until April 2018. The addressed focused question was: Does phototherapy increase the SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramics?" A total of 8 in-vitro studies were included in the qualitative and quantitative analysis. The mean SBS for phototherapy ranged from 4.1 to 18.95 MPa while mean SBS for sandblasted zirconia-composite specimens ranged from 3.98 to 23.35 MPa in the included studies. Qualitative analysis showed 3 studies favoured application of phototherapy in significantly increasing SBS, while 4 studies indicated sandblasting showed significantly greater SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Considering the effects of phototherapy, significant heterogeneity for SBS (Q value = 136.37, p<0.0001, I 2  = 94.87%) was noticed among both the groups. The overall mean difference for SBS (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI = -1.99 to -0.80, p = 0.402) was not significant between phototherapy and sandblast (control) groups. Whether the effect of phototherapy on increasing the SBS of resin cement to zirconia ceramic is debatable. Further in-vitro studies should be performed in order to obtain strong conclusions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Evaluation of physical stability and leachability of Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) solidified chemical sludge generated from textile wastewater treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Hema; Pandey, Suneel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge from textile wastewater treatment plants using Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) containing fly ash. ► Physical engineering (compressive strength and block density) indicates that sludge has potential to be reused for construction purpose after stabilization/solidification. ► Leaching of heavy metals from stabilized/solidified materials were within stipulated limits. ► There is a modification of microstructural properties of PPC with sludge addition as indicated by XRD and SEM patterns. - Abstract: The chemical sludge generated from the treatment of textile dyeing wastewater is a hazardous waste as per Indian Hazardous Waste Management rules. In this paper, stabilization/solidification of chemical sludge was carried out to explore its reuse potential in the construction materials. Portland Pozzolona Cement (PPC) was selected as the binder system which is commercially available cement with 10–25% fly ash interground in it. The stabilized/solidified blocks were evaluated in terms of unconfined compressive strength, block density and leaching of heavy metals. The compressive strength (3.62–33.62 MPa) and block density (1222.17–1688.72 kg/m 3 ) values as well as the negligible leaching of heavy metals from the stabilized/solidified blocks indicate that there is a potential of its use for structural and non-structural applications.

  9. The Long-Term Study of Some mechanical and Chemical Properties of Polymer Modified Cement Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatta, H.A.; Eskander, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is a new experimental trend to study the long-term durability of polymer/cement/borate waste forms in storage and disposal sites during the long period of time. The data obtained indicate that all the samples of polymer modified cement waste forms immersed in both distilled and ground water (for more than 2700 days) show a slight increase in the compressive strength values. The chemical stability of the immobilized borate waste forms in distilled and ground water was studied. The cumulative leach fraction in percentage, of Cs-137 isotope from the final solidified waste forms in case of using ground water was lower than that in distilled water for all samples used and the presence of polymer lowered the percent release of radioactive Cs-137 isotope in all samples studied . The leach coefficients (Lc) and the leach indices (Li) of radioactive cesium-137 isotope for cement borate and polymer modified cement waste forms were also calculated. It was found that the leach indices values greater than 6

  10. Relaxation of the chemical bond skin chemisorption size matter ZTP mechanics H2O myths

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explore the detectable properties of a material to the parameters of bond and non-bond involved and to clarify the interdependence of various properties. This book is composed of four parts; Part I deals with the formation and relaxation dynamics of bond and non-bond during chemisorptions with uncovering of the correlation among the chemical bond, energy band, and surface potential barrier (3B) during reactions; Part II is focused on the relaxation of bonds between atoms with fewer neighbors than the ideal in bulk with unraveling of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation mechanism, which clarifies the nature difference between nanostructures and bulk of the same substance; Part III deals with the relaxation dynamics of bond under heating and compressing with revealing of rules on the temperature-resolved elastic and plastic properties of low-dimensional materials; Part IV is focused on the asymmetric relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the anomalous behav...

  11. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P thick layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  12. Atomic Charges and Chemical Bonding in Y-Ga Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Grin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A negative deviation from Vegard rule for the average atomic volume versus yttrium content was found from experimental crystallographic information about the binary compounds of yttrium with gallium. Analysis of the electron density (DFT calculations employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules revealed an increase in the atomic volumes of both Y and Ga with the increase in yttrium content. The non-linear increase is caused by the strengthening of covalent Y-Ga interactions with stronger participation of genuine penultimate shell electrons (4d electrons of yttrium in the valence region. Summing the calculated individual atomic volumes for a unit cell allows understanding of the experimental trend. With increasing yttrium content, the polarity of the Y-Ga bonding and, thus its ionicity, rises. The covalency of the atomic interactions in Y-Ga compounds is consistent with their delocalization from two-center to multi-center ones.

  13. Evaluation of the chemical modifications in petroleum asphalt cement with the addition of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcondes, C.P.; Sales, M.J.A.; Resck, I.S.; Farias, M.M.; Souza, M.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Studies show that the common distress mode in the Brazilian highway network are fatigue cracks and plastic deformation, which are associated with the type of material used in the pavement layers, structural project, excessive traffic load and weathering. To minimize these defects, research on modifiers such as polymers, added to asphalt binders have been developed to provide physical, chemical and rheological improvement. This paper investigates chemical modifications of the binders with the addition of PP by FTIR, NMR and DSC. FTIR spectra of pure and modified binder showed no differences in absorption. NMR analysis showed no strong chemical bonds between the binder and PP. DSC curve of PP showed a melting temperature of 160 deg C (ΔH = 94J/g) and the pure binder presented an endothermic transition between 20 and 40 deg C (ΔH = 2J/g). In the DSC curves of mixtures, these transitions are not significant, indicating possible interactions between asphalt binder and PP. (author)

  14. Interaction between benzenedithiolate and gold: Classical force field for chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yongsheng; Krstić, Predrag S.; Wells, Jack C.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dean, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We have constructed a group of classical potentials based on ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to describe the chemical bonding between benzenedithiolate (BDT) molecule and gold atoms, including bond stretching, bond angle bending, and dihedral angle torsion involved at the interface between the molecule and gold clusters. Three DFT functionals, local-density approximation (LDA), PBE0, and X3LYP, have been implemented to calculate single point energies (SPE) for a large number of molecular configurations of BDT-1, 2 Au complexes. The three DFT methods yield similar bonding curves. The variations of atomic charges from Mulliken population analysis within the molecule/metal complex versus different molecular configurations have been investigated in detail. We found that, except for bonded atoms in BDT-1, 2 Au complexes, the Mulliken partial charges of other atoms in BDT are quite stable, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in partial charge selections in classical molecular simulations. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structure of BDT self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the adsorption geometry of S adatoms on Au (111) surface. We found that the bond-stretching potential is the most dominant part in chemical bonding. Whereas the local bonding geometry of BDT molecular configuration may depend on the DFT functional used, the global packing structure of BDT SAM is quite independent of DFT functional, even though the uncertainty of some force-field parameters for chemical bonding can be as large as ˜100%. This indicates that the intermolecular interactions play a dominant role in determining the BDT SAMs global packing structure.

  15. New conception in the theory of chemical bonding; the role of core and valence atomic orbitals in formation of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikova, G.P.; Kostikov, Yu.P.; Korol'kov, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectra leads to a simple and consistent conception in the theory of chemical bonding, which satisfies (unlike the simple MO-LCAO theory) the virial theorem and defines the roles of the core and valence atomic orbitals in the formation of chemical bonds. Its essence is clear from the foregoing: the exothermic effects of the formation of complexes are caused by the lowering of the energies of the core levels of the central atoms with simultaneous small changes in the energies of the core levels of the ligands despite the significant destabilization of the delocalized valence MO's in comparison to the orbital energies of the corresponding free atoms. In order to confirm these ideas, they recorded the x-ray photoelectron spectra of the valence region and the inner levels of single-crystal silicon carbide, silicon, and graphite

  16. Electronic parameters of Sr2Nb2O7 and chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Korotkov, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    /2)) and Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s)-BE(Sr 3d(5/2)), were used to characterize the valence electron transfer on the formation of the Nb-O and Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and earlier published structural and XPS data for other Sr- or Nb...

  17. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength and microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement and compomer: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, C Vishnu; Varma, Balagopal; Jayanthi

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the tensile bond strength and microleakage of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass and to compare bond strength with degree of microleakage exhibited by the same materials. Occlusal surfaces of 96 noncarious primary teeth were ground perpendicular to long axis of the tooth. Preparations were distributed into three groups consisting of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC and Compoglass. Specimens were tested for tensile bond strength by mounting them on Instron Universal Testing Machine. Ninety-six primary molars were treated with Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass on box-only prepared proximal surface. Samples were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. ANOVA and Bonferrani correction test were done for comparisons. Pearson Chi-square test and regression analysis were done to assess the association between the parameters. Compoglass showed highest tensile strength and Fuji II LC showed least microleakage. There was a significant difference between the three groups in tensile strength and microleakage levels. The correlation between tensile strength and microleakage level in each group showed that there was a significant negative correlation only in Group 3. Fuji II LC and compoglass can be advocated in primary teeth because of their superior physical properties when compared with Fuji IX GP.

  18. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength and microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement, resin modified glass ionomer cement and compomer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vishnu Rekha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the tensile bond strength and microleakage of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass and to compare bond strength with degree of microleakage exhibited by the same materials. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 96 noncarious primary teeth were ground perpendicular to long axis of the tooth. Preparations were distributed into three groups consisting of Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC and Compoglass. Specimens were tested for tensile bond strength by mounting them on Instron Universal Testing Machine. Ninety-six primary molars were treated with Fuji IX GP, Fuji II LC, and compoglass on box-only prepared proximal surface. Samples were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. ANOVA and Bonferrani correction test were done for comparisons. Pearson Chi-square test and regression analysis were done to assess the association between the parameters. Results: Compoglass showed highest tensile strength and Fuji II LC showed least microleakage. There was a significant difference between the three groups in tensile strength and microleakage levels. The correlation between tensile strength and microleakage level in each group showed that there was a significant negative correlation only in Group 3. Conclusion: Fuji II LC and compoglass can be advocated in primary teeth because of their superior physical properties when compared with Fuji IX GP.

  19. Evaluation of temperature rise and bonding strength in cements used for permanent head attachments in rats and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, Martijn J. H.; Spoelstra, Edwin N.; van der Wijst, Suzanne; Brakkee, Jan H.; Wiegant, Victor M.; Hamelink, Ralph; Brouns, Kim; Westerink, Ben H.; Remie, Rene

    In animal models, devices such as indwelling catheters and intracranial cannulae are often fixed on the skull to allow sampling or injection in the freely moving animal. The most commonly used method to fixate these devices is by embedding them in a 'helmet' of cement which is fixed to the skull

  20. Durability of cement-based materials: modeling of the influence of physical and chemical equilibria on the microstructure and the residual mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, E.

    2004-09-01

    A large part of mechanical and durability characteristics of cement-based materials comes from the performances of the hydrated cement, cohesive matrix surrounding the granular skeleton. Experimental studies, in situ or in laboratory, associated to models, have notably enhanced knowledge on the cement material and led to adapted formulations to specific applications or particularly aggressive environments. Nevertheless, these models, developed for precise cases, do not permit to specifically conclude for other experimental conclusions. To extend its applicability domain, we propose a new evolutive approach, based on reactive transport expressed at the microstructure scale of the cement. In a general point of view, the evolution of the solid compounds of the cement matrix, by dissolutions or precipitations, during chemical aggressions can be related to the pore solution evolution, and this one relied to the ionic exchanges with the external environment. By the utilization of a geochemical code associated to a thermodynamical database and coupled to a 3D transport model, this approach authorizes the study of all aggressive solution. The approach has been validated by the comparison of experimental observations to simulated degradations for three different environments (pure water, mineralized water, seawater) and on three different materials (CEM I Portland cement with 0.25, 0.4 and 0.5 water-to cement ratio). The microstructural approach permits also to have access to mechanical properties evolutions. During chemical aggressions, the cement matrix evolution is traduced in a microstructure evolution. This one is represented from 3D images similarly to the models developed at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). A new finite-element model, validated on previous tests or models, evaluates the stiffness of the cement paste, using as a mesh these microstructures. Our approach identifies and quantifies the major influence of porosity and its spatial

  1. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  2. X-ray electron density investigation of chemical bonding in van der Waals materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Tolborg, Kasper; Sist, Mattia; Zhang, Jiawei; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Filsø, Mette Ø.; Cenedese, Simone; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Nishibori, Eiji; Iversen, Bo B.

    2018-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) solids have attracted great attention ever since the discovery of graphene, with the essential feature being the weak chemical bonding across the vdW gap. The nature of these weak interactions is decisive for many extraordinary properties, but it is a strong challenge for current theory to accurately model long-range electron correlations. Here we use synchrotron X-ray diffraction data to precisely determine the electron density in the archetypal vdW solid, TiS2, and compare the results with density functional theory calculations. Quantitative agreement is observed for the chemical bonding description in the covalent TiS2 slabs, but significant differences are identified for the interactions across the gap, with experiment revealing more electron deformation than theory. The present data provide an experimental benchmark for testing theoretical models of weak chemical bonding.

  3. Fast and accurate covalent bond predictions using perturbation theory in chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuang-Yu; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    I will discuss the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among systems of different chemical composition. We have investigated single, double, and triple bonds occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecular species with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order estimates of covalent bonding potentials can achieve chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) if the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry) among chemical elements from third and fourth row of the periodic table. When applied to nonbonded systems of molecular dimers or solids such as III-V semiconductors, alanates, alkali halides, and transition metals, similar observations hold, enabling rapid predictions of van der Waals energies, defect energies, band-structures, crystal structures, and lattice constants.

  4. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C_3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data. - Highlights: • Ion exchange theory to model the swelling behavior of Ion exchange resin. • Experimental phenomenon analysis about Chemo-mechanical interaction between IER and cement paste matrix. • Chemo-Transport modeling on a composite material made with IER embedded into cement paste matrix.

  5. The Effect of Simplified Bonding Agents on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Self-Activated Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    steps that included an acidic conditioner, primer, and adhesive monomer. Examples include Optibond FL (Kerr) and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose ( 3M ESPE...Bond NT (Dentsply) and Adper Prompt L-Pop ( 3M /ESPE); and two non-simplified adhesives , Optibond FL (Kerr) and Clearfil SE (Kuraray). The four...presentation at the 2013 IADR by Bisco Inc. compared their simplified adhesive and self-cure resin combination All-Bond Universal and Duolink with

  6. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of water treatment plant waste for use in soil-cement brick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessin, L.R.; Destefani, A.Z.; Holanda, J.N.F.

    2011-01-01

    The water treatment plants (WTP) for human consumption generate huge amounts of waste in the form of sludge (sludge) that have been over the years mostly inadequately prepared in water resources and the environment. Moreover, traditional methods of disposal of waste water treatment plants commonly used are generally costly activities. An alternative method for disposal of this waste abundant is its incorporation in ceramic products. This work is focused on the physical-chemical and mineralogical composition of a sample of waste water treatment plants from the region of Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ to their use in the manufacture of soil-cement brick. Several characterization techniques were used including X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, picnometry, particle size analysis and plasticity. The experimental results indicate that the waste water treatment plants have the potential to be used in the manufacture of ecologic soil-cement bricks. (author)

  7. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke

    2015-01-01

    The use of cementitious materials in nuclear waste management is quite widespread. It covers the solidification of low/intermediate-level liquid as well as solid wastes (e.g. laboratory wastes) and serves as shielding. For both high-level and intermediate-low level activity repositories, cement/concrete likewise plays an important role. It is used as construction material for underground and surface disposals, but more importantly it serves as barrier or sealing material. For the requirements of waste conditioning, special cement mixtures have been developed. These include special mixtures for the solidification of evaporator concentrates, borate binding additives and for spilling solid wastes. In recent years, low-pH cements were strongly discussed especially for repository applications, e.g. (Celine CAU DIT COUMES 2008; Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). Examples for relevant systems are Calcium Silicate Cements (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based) or Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC). Low-pH pore solutions are achieved by reduction of the portlandite content by partial substitution of OPC by mineral admixtures with high silica content. The blends follow the pozzolanic reaction consuming Ca(OH) 2 . Potential admixtures are silica fume (SF) and fly ashes (FA). In these mixtures, super plasticizers are required, consisting of polycarboxilate or naphthalene formaldehyde as well as various accelerating admixtures (Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). The pH regime of concrete/cement materials may stabilize radionuclides in solution. Newly formed alteration products retain or release radionuclides. An important degradation product of celluloses in cement is iso-saccharin acid. According to Glaus 2004 (Glaus and van Loon 2004), it reacts with radionuclides forming dissolved complexes. Apart from potentially impacting radionuclide solubility limitations, concrete additives, radionuclides or other strong complexants compete for surface sites for sorbing onto cement phases. In

  8. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  9. Polymer-Cement Composites with Self-Healing Ability for Geothermal and Fossil Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childers, M. Ian; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Rod, Kenton A.; Koech, Phillip K.; Um, Wooyong; Chun, Jaehun; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Linn, Diana; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Huerta, Nicolas John; Kutchko, Barbara G.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2017-05-18

    Sealing of wellbores in geothermal and tight oil/gas reservoirs by filling the annulus with cement is a well-established practice. Failure of the cement as a result of physical and/or chemical stress is a common problem with serious environmental and financial consequences. Numerous alternative cement blends have been proposed for the oil and gas industry. Most of these possess poor mechanical properties, or are not designed to work in high temperature environments. This work reports on a novel polymer-cement composite with remarkable self-healing ability that maintains the required properties of typical wellbore cements and may be stable at most geothermal temperatures. We combine for the first time experimental analysis of physical and chemical properties with density functional theory simulations to evaluate cement performance. The thermal stability and mechanical strength are attributed to the formation of a number of chemical interactions between the polymer and cement matrix including covalent bonds, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions. Self-healing was demonstrated by sealing fractures with 0.3–0.5 mm apertures, 2 orders of magnitude larger than typical wellbore fractures. This polymer-cement composite represents a major advance in wellbore cementing that could improve the environmental safety and economics of enhanced geothermal energy and tight oil/gas production.

  10. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  11. Exact solutions for chemical bond orientations from residual dipolar couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedemeyer, William J.; Rohl, Carol A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2002-01-01

    New methods for determining chemical structures from residual dipolar couplings are presented. The fundamental dipolar coupling equation is converted to an elliptical equation in the principal alignment frame. This elliptical equation is then combined with other angular or dipolar coupling constraints to form simple polynomial equations that define discrete solutions for the unit vector(s). The methods are illustrated with residual dipolar coupling data on ubiquitin taken in a single anisotropic medium. The protein backbone is divided into its rigid groups (namely, its peptide planes and C α frames), which may be solved for independently. A simple procedure for recombining these independent solutions results in backbone dihedral angles φ and ψ that resemble those of the known native structure. Subsequent refinement of these φ-ψ angles by the ROSETTA program produces a structure of ubiquitin that agrees with the known native structure to 1.1 A C α rmsd

  12. Comparative study of physico-chemical properties of MTA-based and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alvaro H; Pedro, Fábio L M; Miranda, Carlos E S; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex; Pécora, Jesus D; Filho, Antônio M Cruz

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of gray and white structural and nonstructural Portland cement, gray and white ProRoot MTA and MTA BIO. The water/powder ratio, setting time, solubility and pH (hydrogen-ion potential) changes of the materials were evaluated. Tests followed specification #57 from the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (2000) for endodontic sealing materials and pH was determined by a digital pH meter. The test results were statistically analyzed by variance analyses for global comparison and by the complementary Tukey's test for pairwise comparisons (5%). Considering the water/powder ratio, no significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed among the cements. MTA BIO (33.10 +/- 2.30) had the lowest setting time (p Portland cement (2.55 +/- 0.08) had the highest solubility (p 0.05) was observed among materials when considering pH evaluation. The pH levels were highly alkaline immediately after immersion in solution, remaining stable throughout the test period. The authors conclude that the cements had similar water/powder proportions. MTA BIO had the shortest setting time and gray ProRoot MTA had the lowest solubility. All cements had similar behavior in the pH analysis.

  13. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The role of radial nodes of atomic orbitals for chemical bonding and the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-15

    The role of radial nodes, or of their absence, in valence orbitals for chemical bonding and periodic trends is discussed from a unified viewpoint. In particular, we emphasize the special role of the absence of a radial node whenever a shell with angular quantum number l is occupied for the first time (lack of "primogenic repulsion"), as with the 1s, 2p, 3d, and 4f shells. Although the consequences of the very compact 2p shell (e.g. good isovalent hybridization, multiple bonding, high electronegativity, lone-pair repulsion, octet rule) are relatively well known, it seems that some of the aspects of the very compact 3d shell in transition-metal chemistry are less well appreciated, e.g., the often weakened and stretched bonds at equilibrium structure, the frequently colored complexes, and the importance of nondynamical electron-correlation effects in bonding. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  16. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of two commercial cements and its evolution in function of time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez B, O.

    2014-01-01

    Mineralogical evolution of Portland cement is studied during hydration process using materials characterization techniques as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (Sem) in order to analyze the changes in the various cement minerals as alite, belite, celite, during processing to the hydrated phases of tobermorite gel, portlandite and ettringite, respectively, in the cement paste setting at different ages (3, 7 and 28 days). It was found that the hydration process occurs differently in each mineral because of their reaction rates or changes they experience in their crystals during processing of anhydrous to hydrated phase. You may notice changes in the appearance of the dough as you go hydration and the formation of tobermorite gel, portlandite and ettringite. (Author)

  17. The Collaboration of Cooperative Learning and Conceptual Change: Enhancing the Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymur, Gülüzar; Geban, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cooperative learning based on conceptual change approach instruction on ninth-grade students' understanding in chemical bonding concepts compared to traditional instruction. Seventy-two ninth-grade students from two intact chemistry classes taught by the same teacher in a public high…

  18. Spunlaced and chemically bonded nonwovens for filtration applications: Performance evaluation and comparison

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boguslavsky, L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available . The physical, mechanical and performance properties were measured and compared. It was concluded that chemical bonding had a higher effect on the fabric structural changes, such as pore size and its distribution. The results showed an improvement in dust...

  19. Physical and chemical characterization of 50 pulverized coal ashes with respect to partial cement replacement in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sloot, H A; Weijers, E G

    1986-04-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of 50 pulverized coal ashes from Dutch, Belgian and German installations has been carried out to identify the parameters that have to be kept under control, when pulverized coal ashes are to be used as partial cement replacement in concrete. For a good workability of fly ash/cement mortars the particle size and the carbon content are important. By performing a mortar flow test (Heagermann) upon delivery exterme ashes can be easily eliminated. The compressive strength is largely determined by the fineness of the ash (weight fraction below 20 micron). A direct effect of carbon content on strength development is not observed, but a reduction in mortar slow due to carbon leads to loss in strength, while the workability has to be adjusted. Size distribution measurement by optical methods is recommended as the relevant part of the ash size distribution cannot be properly assessed by sieve methods. The net contribution of fly ash to the compressive strength of a fly ash/cement (20/80) mortar exhibits a minimum at 14 days curing, which is common to all 50 ashes studied. Improvements in ash quality as obtained from pulverized-coal fired installations can be achieved by improvements in coal milling and optimizing ash collection. 6 figs., 4 tabs., 19 refs.

  20. The influence of chemical composition and fineness on the performance of alkali activated cements obtained from blast furnace slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langaro, Eloise Aparecida; Matoski, Adalberto; Luz, Caroline Angulski da; Buth, Islas Stein; Moraes, Maryah Costa de; Pereira Filho, Jose Ilo

    2017-01-01

    New binders are being developed for concrete in order to reduce the environmental impact mainly related to CO_2 emissions. Alkali -activated cements (CATs) are obtained from lime-aluminosilicate materials and an alkali activator and can reduce by 80% the emission of CO_2 compared to Portland Cement (PC). Papers have also shown physical and mechanical properties similar or higher than those presented by the PC, however, the activation of raw material is complex. Recent papers have also have showed a strong influence of the characteristics of raw material on the performance of CAT, however, little mentioned in the literature.. Therefore, this paper aimed to analyze the influence of characteristics of blast furnace slag (fineness and chemical composition) on the behavior of activated alkali cements. For this purpose, two slags were used, A and B, which were submitted to different milling times; and activated using 5% of NaOH. Mortars and pastes were prepared for compressive strength testing (7 and 28 days), measurements of heat of hydration and investigation of microstructure (XRD and DSC) were made. The results showed that the mortar made with slag A reached a very good mechanical performance, close to 48MPa at 28 days, and higher formation of CSH, in opposite of slag B. The probable hypothesis of this study is that the system formed in CAT made with slag A (containing more Al_2O_3) could provide CSH with a greater incorporation of Al and a lower crystallinity, increasing the mechanical strength. (author)

  1. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynier, N.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N., E-mail: nicolas.reynier@canada.ca [Natural Resources Canada, CanmetMINING, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Chapman, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury, and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. The chemical leachability of 3 key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a surrogate cemented waste (SCW) was studied with several lixiviants. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/washing steps, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements solubilisation of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs, respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to 7 other SCWs prepared with different cements, liquid ratios, and at different aging times and temperatures. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO{sub 4}. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that is amenable to conventional ion exchange technology for the separation and recovery of uranium. (author)

  2. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  3. Preparation, Physical-Chemical Characterization, and Cytocompatibility of Polymeric Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Khashaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Physicochemical mechanical and in vitro biological properties of novel formulations of polymeric calcium phosphate cements (CPCs were investigated. Methods. Monocalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, and synthetic hydroxyapatite were combined with either modified polyacrylic acid, light activated polyalkenoic acid, or polymethyl vinyl ether maleic acid to obtain Types I, II, and III CPCs. Setting time, compressive and diametral strength of CPCs was compared with zinc polycarboxylate cement (control. Specimens were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of CPCs and control was assessed. Results. X-ray diffraction analysis showed hydroxyapatite, monetite, and brushite. Acid-base reaction was confirmed by the appearance of stretching peaks in IR spectra of set cements. SEM revealed rod-like crystals and platy crystals. Setting time of cements was 5–12 min. Type III showed significantly higher strength values compared to control. Type III yielded high biocompatibility. Conclusions. Type III CPCs show promise for dental applications.

  4. Prediction of Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation from sequence and chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.go [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2010-03-15

    We present a program, named Promega, to predict the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on the basis of backbone chemical shifts and the amino acid sequence. Using a chemical shift database of proteins of known structure together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of cis Xaa-Pro peptide bonds, a cis/trans probability score is calculated from the backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of the proline and its neighboring residues. For an arbitrary number of input chemical shifts, which may include Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}}, Promega calculates the statistical probability that a Xaa-Pro peptide bond is cis. Besides its potential as a validation tool, Promega is particularly useful for studies of larger proteins where Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}} assignments can be challenging, and for on-going efforts to determine protein structures exclusively on the basis of backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts.

  5. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH 2 PO 4 . However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. - Highlights: • High packing density and amorphous hydrated phase improved the compressive strength. • Residual KH 2 PO 4 and poor bonding phase lower the compressive strength. • MPCBC fabricated with optimized parameters had the highest compressive strength

  6. Optimization and validation of a chemical process for uranium, mercury and cesium leaching from cemented radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynier, N.; Riveros, P.; Lastra, R.; Laviolette, C.; Bouzoubaa, N.; Chapman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is developing a treatment and long-term management strategy for a legacy cemented radioactive waste that contains uranium, mercury and fission products. Extracting the uranium would be advantageous for decreasing the waste classification and reducing the cost of long-term management. Consequently, there are safety and economic and environmental incentives for the extraction of uranium, mercury and cesium before subjecting the cemented waste to a stabilization process. The mineralogical analysis of the surrogate cemented waste (SCW) indicated that uranium forms calcium uranate, CaUO 4 , occurring as layers of several millimeters or as grains of 20 μm. Hg is found mostly as large (∼50 μm) and small grains (5-8 μm) of HgO. The chemical leachability of three key elements (U, Hg, and Cs) from a SCW was studied with several leaching materials. The results showed that the most promising approach to leach and recover U, Hg, and Cs is the direct leaching of the SCW with H 2 SO 4 in strong saline media. Operating parameters such as particle size, temperature, pulp density, leaching time, acid and salt concentrations, number of leaching/rinsing step, etc. were optimized to improve key elements solubilization. Sulfuric leaching in saline media of a SCW (U5) containing 1182 ppm of U, 1598 ppm of Hg, and 7.9 ppm of Cs in the optimized conditions allows key elements recovery of 98.5 ± 0.4%, 96.6 ± 0.1%, and 93.8 ± 1.1% of U, Hg, and Cs respectively. This solubilization process was then applied in triplicate to seven other SCW prepared with different cement, liquid ratio and at different aging time and temperature. Concentrated sulfuric acid is added to the slurry until the pH is about 2, which causes the complete degradation of cement and the formation of CaSO 4 . At this pH, the acid consumption is moderate and the formation of amorphous silica gel is avoided. Sulfuric acid is particularly useful because it produces a leachate that

  7. Theoretical study of relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Jun; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Sekine, Rika; Nakamatsu, Hirohide; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Adachi, Hirohiko.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed the relativistic molecular orbital calculation for the ground state of UF 6 , using the discrete-variational Dirac-Slater method (DV-DS), in order to elucidate the relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding. Compared with the electronic structure calculated by the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-X α )MO method, not only the direct relativistic effects (spin-orbit splitting etc), but also the indirect effect due to the change in screening core potential charge are shown to be important in the MO level structure. From the U-F bond overlap population analysis, we found that the U-F bond formation can be explained only by the DV-DS, not by the DV-X α . The calculated electronic structure in valence energy region (-20-OeV) and excitation energies in UV region are in agreement with experiments. (author)

  8. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  9. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  10. Influence of chemical composition of civil construction waste in the cement paste; Influencia da composicao quimica dos residuos da construcao civil a pasta de cimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, G.A.; Andrade, A.C.D.; Souza, J.M.M.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C., E-mail: valeria@eq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    The construction and demolition waste when disposed inappropriately might cause serious public health problems. Its reutilization focusing on the development of new products using simple production techniques, assuring a new product life cycle and not damaging the environment is inserted in sustainable concept. The aim of this work was identifying the characteristics of types of waste generated in a residential reform (glassy ceramic and fill dirt leftovers) verifying separately its influence on cement pastes mechanical behavior. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions with an approximately 0,35 water/cement relation and, glue time determination, water absorption, resistance to compression and X-ray fluorescence assays were taken. The results indicate that the chemical composition of the waste causes changes in the behavior of cement pastes, reflecting on their resistance to compression. (author)

  11. Investigation of Chemical Bond Properties and Mssbauer Spectroscopy in YBa2Cu3O7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高发明; 李东春; 张思远

    2003-01-01

    Chemical bond properties of YBa2Cu3O7 were studied by using the average band-gap model. The calculated results show that the covalency of Cu(1)-O bond is 0.406, and one of Cu(2)-O is 0.276. Mssbauer isomer shifts of 57Fe in Y-123 were calculated by the chemical surrounding factor hv defined by covalency and electronic polarizability. The charge-state and site of Fe were determined. The relation between the coupling constant of electron-phonon interaction and covalency is employed to explain that the Cu(2)-O plane is more important than the Cu(1)-O chain on the superconductivity in the Y-123 compounds.

  12. Transport of chemically bonded nuclear energy in a closed cycle with special consideration to energy disconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossami, S.

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the utilisation of nuclear energy in the form of 'nuclear long-distance energy'. Heat produced by nuclear fission is bonded to a reversible chemical reaction (cracking gas) which release the heat again at the place of comsumption by catalytic transformation. The article deals in particular with the process of methane cracking/methanisation, the disconnection of the energy (heat) by the methanisation process and the decisive role of the methanisation catalyzers. (orig.) [de

  13. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  14. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  15. Stabilization of low-level mixed waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Sarkar, A.V.

    1994-06-01

    Mixed waste streams, which contain both chemical and radioactive wastes, are one of the important categories of DOE waste streams needing stabilization for final disposal. Recent studies have shown that chemically bonded phosphate ceramics may have the potential for stabilizing these waste streams, particularly those containing volatiles and pyrophorics. Such waste streams cannot be stabilized by conventional thermal treatment methods such as vitrification. Phosphate ceramics may be fabricated at room temperature into durable, hard and dense materials. For this reason room-temperature-setting phosphate ceramic waste forms are being developed to stabilize these to ''problem waste streams.''

  16. Reactivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) grout and various lithologies from the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1985-08-01

    Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian Beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC. (author)

  17. Physico-Chemical studies on irradiated polymer-reinforcement cement mortar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    The reinforced concrete suffers from corrosion by several salts, acids or alkalies and physico-mechanical properties are greatly affected. This leads to reduce the life of reinforced concrete structure. The present investigation deals with a comparison of corrosion presentation efficiency and passivity retention of reinforcement steel coated with methylethyl and propyl inhibitors which are prepared by using γ radiation and non-coated steel embedded in γ -induced polyester cement mortar composites. From the results of these studies several conclusions could be derived and these are summarized as follows: 1- The time required to reach passivation for coated steel embedded in the mortar after soaking in tap water for 28 days lies within the range 5-15 minutes; whereas, the time required to reach passivation for steel embedded in the polyester cement mortar composites is very short (1 minute). This result is related to the presence of copolymerized polyester in the pore system of the specimens. 2- The time required to reach passivation for steel coated by inhibitors in the mortar specimens after curing in tap water for 6 months is lower than that of non -coated steel embedded in the mortar specimens cured at the same conditions. 3- A relatively high degree of corrosion inhibition was obtained for the steel embedded in polyester-cement mortar composites after curing in sea water for 28 days, the time required to reach passivation is considered as moderate in the case of methyl and ethyl inhibitors the time to passivation (T.T.P.) = 9 minutes and the degree of inhibition of steel coated with the propyl inhibitor is comparatively low (T.T.P.=21 minutes)

  18. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  19. Evaluation method of radiation stability of hardened cement paste with chemical additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, Vyacheslav; Pustovgar, Andrey [National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation). Scientific Research Inst. of Constructional Materials and Technologies; Denisov, Alexander; Soloviev, Vitaly [National Research Univ. ' Moscow State Univ. of Civil Engineering' (MSUCE), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The influence of additives on the radiation resistance of the concrete will occur through the influence of radiation changes of hardened cement paste on radiation changes of concrete and can be quite significant. The test sequence was produced according to the modified method. The samples were prepared in the form of prisms with the following dimensions: 10 mm x 10 mm, 30 mm long. Measurement series were produced after each heating and cooling sequence. Then the difference between the values before and after heating was calculated. (orig.)

  20. Four chemical methods of porcelain conditioning and their influence over bond strength and surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, João Paulo Fragomeni; Oliveira, Andrea Becker; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Marquezan, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess four different chemical surface conditioning methods for ceramic material before bracket bonding, and their impact on shear bond strength and surface integrity at debonding. METHODS: Four experimental groups (n = 13) were set up according to the ceramic conditioning method: G1 = 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application; G2 = 37% liquid phosphoric acid etching, no rinsing, followed by silane application; G3 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching alone; and G4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid etching followed by silane application. After surface conditioning, metal brackets were bonded to porcelain by means of the Transbond XP system (3M Unitek). Samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests in a universal testing machine and the surfaces were later assessed with a microscope under 8 X magnification. ANOVA/Tukey tests were performed to establish the difference between groups (α= 5%). RESULTS: The highest shear bond strength values were found in groups G3 and G4 (22.01 ± 2.15 MPa and 22.83 ± 3.32 Mpa, respectively), followed by G1 (16.42 ± 3.61 MPa) and G2 (9.29 ± 1.95 MPa). As regards surface evaluation after bracket debonding, the use of liquid phosphoric acid followed by silane application (G2) produced the least damage to porcelain. When hydrofluoric acid and silane were applied, the risk of ceramic fracture increased. CONCLUSIONS: Acceptable levels of bond strength for clinical use were reached by all methods tested; however, liquid phosphoric acid etching followed by silane application (G2) resulted in the least damage to the ceramic surface. PMID:26352845

  1. Structure and Chemical Bond of Thermoelectric Ce-Co-Sb Skutterudites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The correlations among composition,structure,chemical bond and thermoelectric property of skutterudites CoSb3 and CeCo5Fe3Sb12 have been studied by using density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method.Three models for this study were proposed and calculated by which the "rattling" pattern was described.Model 1 is with Ce in the center,model 2 is with Ce away the center and near to Sb,and model 3 is also with Ce away the center but near to Fe.The calculated results show that in model 3,the ionic bond is the strongest,but the covalent bond is the weakest.Due to the different changes between ionic and covalent bond,there is less difference in the stability among the models 1,2 and 3.Therefore,these different models can exist at the same time,or can translate from one to another more easily.In other words,the "rattling" pattern has taken place.Unfilled model of CoSb3,without Ce and Fe,is called model 4.The covalent bond of Co-Sb or Fe-Sb in models 1,2 and 3 is weaker than that of Co-Sb in model 4,as some electrical cloud of Sb takes part in the covalent bond of Ce-Sb in the filled models.The result is consistent with the experimental result that the thermal conductivity of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is lower than that of CoSb3,and the thermoelectric property of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is superior to that of CoSb3.

  2. Front line of cement technolgy and control. Part 5. ; Baking process and chemical reactions. Cement saisentan sono gijutsu to kanri 5. ; Shosei katei to kagaku hanno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, M. (Ube Industries, Ltd., Yamaguchi (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    The baking process in cement production means the process that the raw materials which were mixed and pulverized in the raw material preparation process are charged into a reaction furnace which is called kiln, and clinders (intermediate product of cement) are generated. It is the process which affects quality as well as production cost of cement more significantly than anything else. In this article, an outline of the above baking facilities, how the raw materials change and clinkers are generated therein, and how they are controlled are introduced. Clinkers are composed of such products as alite, belite, aluminate and ferrite, etc. which were generated after decomposition reactions of such raw materials as lime stone, clay, silica rock and iron oxide in the above kiln. The essential ponts of the process control which makes the generation reactions of clinker compounds efficiently are such two points as well balanced raw materials to be charged into the baking facilities and stable operation of such facilities. The quality of cement which is required as finished goods is achieved by the quality control at each intermediate process and the quality tests of cement. 5 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Jeanette, E-mail: jeanette.netzel@uni-bayreuth.de; Smaalen, Sander van [University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  4. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, Jeanette; Smaalen, Sander van

    2014-01-01

    Chemical bonding at the active site of lysozyme is analyzed on the basis of a multipole model employing transferable multipole parameters from a database. Large B factors at low temperatures reflect frozen-in disorder, but therefore prevent a meaningful free refinement of multipole parameters. Chemical bonding at the active site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) is analyzed on the basis of Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules [QTAIM; Bader (1994 ▶), Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press] applied to electron-density maps derived from a multipole model. The observation is made that the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) of HEWL at a temperature of 100 K are larger than ADPs in crystals of small biological molecules at 298 K. This feature shows that the ADPs in the cold crystals of HEWL reflect frozen-in disorder rather than thermal vibrations of the atoms. Directly generalizing the results of multipole studies on small-molecule crystals, the important consequence for electron-density analysis of protein crystals is that multipole parameters cannot be independently varied in a meaningful way in structure refinements. Instead, a multipole model for HEWL has been developed by refinement of atomic coordinates and ADPs against the X-ray diffraction data of Wang and coworkers [Wang et al. (2007), Acta Cryst. D63, 1254–1268], while multipole parameters were fixed to the values for transferable multipole parameters from the ELMAM2 database [Domagala et al. (2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 337–351] . Static and dynamic electron densities based on this multipole model are presented. Analysis of their topological properties according to the QTAIM shows that the covalent bonds possess similar properties to the covalent bonds of small molecules. Hydrogen bonds of intermediate strength are identified for the Glu35 and Asp52 residues, which are considered to be essential parts of the active site of HEWL. Furthermore, a series of weak C

  5. STUDY OF CHEMICAL INTERACTION OF MAGNESIA CEMENT WITH HIGH CONCENTRATION MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEREVIANKO V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. In activating MgO by electrolyte salts, as a result of formation of non water-resist magnesium silicate hydrate are obtained the durable cement stone having the low water-resist. I. P. Vyrodov considers [9; 5], that magnesia cement curing in mixing with sufficiently concentrated (C > 20 % solutions MgCl2 is caused with the crystallization of oxyhydrochloride composition: 3MgO∙MgCl2∙11Н2О, 5MgO∙MgCl2∙13Н2О and 7MgO∙MgCl2∙15Н2О. In the lower concentration parts of MgCl2 solution is formed a transitional compound of Mg[(OHnCl2-n] with isomorphous Mg(OH2 structure. At very low Cl concentration only Mg(OH2 is practically formed. Purpose. The Formation of water-resist magnesium silicate hydrates for obtaining of fast curing and solid structure of the magnesia stone. Conclusion. The dependence of the formation of the magnesia stone from the ratio (MgO/MgCl2 of the magnesia cement (MgO and the magnesium chloride solution (MgCl2 of different density has been identified in order to obtain the best content for oxyhydrochloride 3MgO•MgCl2•11Н2О, 5MgO•MgCl2•13Н2О and magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2. In putting into the system MgO∙–∙H2О of the silicic acid or fine ground quartz grains with size of less than 20 – 30 microns, over 1 month for the magnesium silicate hydrates formation is needed, where from 2 to 5 % of the total number of newgrowths are created. The study is proved by the expert opinion, that magnesium silicate hydrates do not have binding properties, unlike calcium silicate hydrates, and the main role in the system curing is played with the Mg(OH2 gel recrystallization, which provides the acceptable stone strength (R ≈ 30MPa in a few years. It has been also established, that in mixing of cement with low concentration MgO solutions of less than 1,5 mol/l (or 13% 1,1g/sm3, the final product in the stone structure is Mg(OH2. With increasing the sealer (MgCl2 solution there is formed by turn in

  6. Characteristics of chemical bond and vacancy formation in chalcopyrite-type CuInSe2 and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    We studied characteristics of chemical bond and vacancy formation in chalcopyrite-type CuInSe 2 (CIS) by first principles calculations. The chalcopyrite-type CIS has two kinds of chemical bonds, Cu-Se and In-Se. The Cu-Se bond is a weak covalent bonding because electrons occupy both bonding and antibonding orbitals of Cu 3d and Se 4p and occupy only the bonding orbital (a 1 ) of Cu 4s and Se 4p and do not occupy the antibonding orbital (a 1 * ) of Cu 4s and Se 4p. On the other hand, the In-Se bond has a partially covalent and partially ionic character because the In 5s orbital covalently interacts with Se 4p; the In 5p orbital is higher than Se 4p and so the electron in the In 5p orbital moves to the Se 4p orbital. The average bond order of the Cu-Se and In-Se bonds can be calculated to be 1/4 and 1, respectively. The bond order of Cu-Se is smaller than that of In-Se. The characteristics of these two chemical bonds are related to the formation of Cu and In vacancies in CIS. The formation energy of the Cu vacancy is smaller than that of the In vacancy under both Cu-poor and In-poor conditions. The displacement (Δl) of the surrounding Se atoms after the formation of the Cu vacancy is smaller than the Δl after the formation of the In vacancy. The interesting and unique characteristics of CIS are discussed on the basis of the characteristics of the chemical bond. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Dilemmas in zirconia bonding: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review on the resin bond to zirconia ceramic. Modern esthetic dentistry has highly recognized zirconia, among other ceramic materials. Biocompatibility of zirconia, chemical and dimensional stability, excellent mechanical properties, all together could guarantee optimal therapeutical results in complex prosthodontic reconstruction. On the other hand, low thermal degradation, aging of zirconia as well as problematic bonding of zirconia framework to dental luting cements and tooth structures, opened the room for discussion concerning their clinical durability. The well known methods of mechanical and chemical bonding used on glass-ceramics are not applicable for use with zirconia. Therefore, under critical clinical situations, selection of the bonding mechanism should be focused on two important points: high initial bond strength value and long term bond strength between zirconia-resin interface. Also, this paper emphases the use of phosphate monomer luting cements on freshly air-abraded zirconia as the simplest and most effective way for zirconia cementation procedure today.

  8. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  9. Change of chemical bond and wettability of polylacticacid implanted with high-flux carbon ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jizhong; Kang Jiachen; Zhang Xiaoji; Zhou Hongyu

    2008-01-01

    Polylacticacid (PLA) was submitted to high-flux carbon ion implantation with energy of 40 keV. It was investigated to the effect of ion fluence (1 x 10 12 -1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 ) on the properties of the polymer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), wettability, and roughness were employed to study change of structure and properties of the as-implanted PLA samples. Six carbon bonds, that is, C, C-H, C-O-C, C-O, O-C-O, and >C=O, were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted PLA samples. The intensities of various chemical bonds changed with increasing ion fluence. AFM images displayed that there was irradiation damage and that it was related closely with ion fluence. At fluence as high as 1 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 surface-restructuring phenomenum took place on the surface of the PLA. Wettability was also affected by the variation on the fluence. With increasing ion fluence, the water contact angle of the as-implanted PLA samples changed gradually reaching a maximum of 76.5 deg. with 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The experimental results revealed that carbon ion fluence strongly affected surface chemical bond, morphology, wettability, and roughness of the PLA samples

  10. Comparative analysis of compressive strength tests at age of 28 and 90 days and density of products using chemical additives in cementing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2013-01-01

    In this research it has been studied the effects of chemical additives (admixtures) in the cementation process of radioactive wastes, which are used to improve the properties of waste cementation process, both of the paste and of the solidified product. However there are a large variety of these materials that are frequently changed or taken out of the market, then it is essential to know the commercially available materials and their effects. The tests were carried out with a solution simulating the evaporator concentrate waste coming from PWR nuclear reactors. It was cemented using two formulations, A and B, incorporating higher or lower amount of waste, respectively. It was added chemical admixtures from two manufacturers (S and H), which were: accelerators, set retarders and superplasticizers. The experiments were organized by a factorial design 2 3 . The measured parameters were the viscosity, the setting time, the paste and product density and the compressive strength. In this study we performed comparative analyzes of the results of compressive strength at age of 28 and 90 days and between the densities of the samples at the same ages.The compressive strength test at age of 28 days is considered a parameter essential issues related to security handling, transport and storage of cemented waste product. The results showed that the addition of accelerators improved the compressive strength of the cemented product, but presented lower values density products. (author)

  11. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.F.; Nakhl, M.; Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N.; Chevalier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH X structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH 4 is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH 3 and YNiH 4 hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  12. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  13. Core level photoemission spectroscopy and chemical bonding in Sr2Ta2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parameters of constituent element core levels of strontium pyrotantalate (Sr2Ta2O7) were measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Sr2Ta2O7 powder sample was synthesized using standard solid state method. The valence electron transfer on the formation of the Sr-O and Ta......-O bonds was characterized by the binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core levels, Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d(5/2)) and Delta(O-Ta) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Ta 4f(7/2)). The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Ta2O7 and earlier published...

  14. Biasing hydrogen bond donating host systems towards chemical warfare agent recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Jennifer R; Wells, Neil J; Ede, Jayne A; Gale, Philip A; Sambrook, Mark R

    2016-10-12

    A series of neutral ditopic and negatively charged, monotopic host molecules have been evaluated for their ability to bind chloride and dihydrogen phosphate anions, and neutral organophosphorus species dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP) and the chemical warfare agent (CWA) pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GD, soman) in organic solvent via hydrogen bonding. Urea, thiourea and boronic acid groups are shown to bind anions and neutral guests through the formation of hydrogen bonds, with the urea and thiourea groups typically exhibiting higher affinity interactions. The introduction of a negative charge on the host structure is shown to decrease anion affinity, whilst still allowing for high stability host-GD complex formation. Importantly, the affinity of the host for the neutral CWA GD is greater than for anionic guests, thus demonstrating the potential for selectivity reversal based on charge repulsion.

  15. Chemical Bonding in Solids. On the Generalization of the Concept of Bond Order and Valence for Infinite Periodical Structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 114, 1-3 (2005), s. 208-212 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : bonding in solids * bond order * valence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2005

  16. A Coupled Transport and Chemical Model for Durability Predictions of Cement Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    The use of multi-physics numerical models to estimate different durability indicators and determine the service life of cement based materials is increasing. Service life documentation for concrete used in new infrastructure structures is required and the service life requirement....... The differential equations includes exchange terms between the phases and species accounting for the exchange of physical quantities which are essential for a stringent physical description of concrete. Balance postulates for, mass, momentum and energy, together with an entropy inequality are studied within...... mixture theories. Special attention is paid to the criteria for the exchange terms in the studied balance postulates. A simple case of mixture theory is used to demonstrate how constitutive assumptions are used to obtain the governing equations for a specific model. The governing equation system used...

  17. Durability of concrete: characterization and modeling of physical and chemical degradation of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenot, Frederic

    1992-01-01

    Within the frame of nuclear waste management, and more particularly waste storage by confinement in parcels, concrete and geological environment, this research aims at predicting the durability of a concrete paste and of all concrete works. This prediction is based on a material characterization (determination of the thickness and composition of the attacked area) whatever the degradation duration is. The adopted approach is to model concrete lixiviation and to compare model results with experimental results. The model is also used to assess the influence of a great number of parameters, and to simulate non experimented cases. Thus, the author reports a bibliographical study on cement, and presents the equations of a lixiviation model. He reports experiments aimed at verifying modelling hypotheses and at acquiring necessary data. The model is then numerically solved, and applied to an experimental case. Experimental results are compared with modelling results, and a prediction is performed for a 300 year-duration [fr

  18. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  19. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  20. Isomer shifts and chemical bonding in crystalline Sn(II) and Sn(IV) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, J.; Guenzburger, D.

    1991-01-01

    First-principles self-consistent Local Density calculations of the electronic structure of clusters representing Sn(II) (SnO, SnF 2 , SnS, SnSe) and Sn(IV) (SnO 2 , SnF 4 ) crystalline compounds were performed. Values of the electron density at the Sn nucleus were obtained and related to measured values of the Moessbauer Isomer Shifts reported in the literature. The nuclear parameter of 119 Sn derived was ΔR/R=(1.58±0.14)x10 -4 . The chemical bonding in the solids was analysed and related to the electron densities obtained. (author)

  1. Extended model of bond charges and its application in calculation of optical properties of crystals with different types of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsirelson, V.G.; Korolkova, O.V.; Rez, I.S.; Ozerov, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for calculating the optical characteristics of crystals with different types of chemical bonds within the framework of the dielectric theory of chemical bond put forward by Philips and Van Vechten is suggested. The calculating scheme which does not contain adjustable parameters is based on the bond charge model designed by Levine, which is generalized for the case of multiple bonds and modified involving the density functional method data on the spatial distribution of electrons in atoms. The structural elements of the method are: the screened Coulomb potentials and radii of the atomic core, bond lengths and charges, and the distances from the nuclei to the centers of gravity of the latter. The calculated characteristics of the crystals (dielectric permittivity, quadratic and cubic non-linear susceptibilities, electrooptical constants) are in good accordance with experimental findings. An attempt is made to predict the non-linear optical characteristics according to precision X-ray diffraction data on the electron structure of its only representative, lithium formate deuterate LiHCO 2 xD 2 O, whereby a fairly good fit with the experimental data is achieved. (author)

  2. Trigermanides AEGe{sub 3} (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba). Chemical bonding and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Schnelle, Walter; Baranov, Alexey I.; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Bobnar, Matej; Cardoso-Gil, Raul; Schwarz, Ulrich; Grin, Yuri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik Fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structures of the trigermanides AEGe{sub 3}(tI32) (AE = Ca, Sr, Ba; space group I4/mmm, for SrGe{sub 3}: a = 7.7873(1), c = 12.0622(3) Aa) comprise Ge{sub 2} dumbbells forming layered Ge substructures which enclose embedded AE atoms. The chemical bonding analysis by application of the electron localizability approach reveals a substantial charge transfer from the AE atoms to the germanium substructure. The bonding within the dumbbells is of the covalent two-center type. A detailed analysis of SrGe{sub 3} reveals that the interaction on the bond-opposite side of the Ge{sub 2} groups is not lone pair-like - as it would be expected from the Zintl-like interpretation of the crystal structure with anionic Ge layers separated by alkaline-earth cations - but multi-center strongly polar between the Ge{sub 2} dumbbells and the adjacent metal atoms. Similar atomic interactions are present in CaGe{sub 3} and BaGe{sub 3}. The variation of the alkaline-earth metal has a merely insignificant influence on the superconducting transition temperatures in the s,p-electron compounds AEGe{sub 3}.

  3. The refilling of pores in cement mortars treated by chemicals and desiccation at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez Pazos, Ignacio

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Bases under the law of solubility product, the pores of the cement mortar are refilled by impregnation with two salts that form another insoluble salt. The number of treatments to be underdone and the drying temperatures more suitable in each case. The calcium salts like impregnants and urea sodium oxalate and sugar like precipitates are employed, obtained in each case the corresponding pores are occupied, which depends generally on the number of treatments and in particular the drier temperature.

    Basados en los principios del producto de solubilidad, se rellenan los poros de las probetas de mortero de cemento por impregnación con dos sales que forman otra insoluble. Se determina el número de tratamientos a realizar y las temperaturas de secado más idóneas en cada caso. Se emplean sales cálcicas como impregnantes, y urea, oxalato sódico y azúcar como precipitantes, obteniéndose en cada caso las correspondientes ocupaciones de poros que dependen, por lo general, del número de tratamientos y, en particular, de la temperatura de secado.

  4. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, R.P.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8 , Tl 2 Ba 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 , and Tl 0.78 Bi 0.22 Ba 0.4 Sr 1.6 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 9-δ are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ and TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7-δ , comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E s -E m ) and a lower intensity ratio (I s /I m ) are found to correlate with higher values of T c . Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T c are related to low values of the O 2p→Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba 2+ ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T c is observed to occur when the Tl 4f 7/2 binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f 7/2 binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl 1+ , are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Novel Nanotechnology of TiO2 Improves Physical-Chemical and Biological Properties of Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Dellosso Cibim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the performance of glass ionomer cement (GIC added with TiO2 nanotubes. TiO2 nanotubes [3%, 5%, and 7% (w/w] were incorporated into GIC’s (Ketac Molar EasyMix™ powder component, whereas unblended powder was used as control. Physical-chemical-biological analysis included energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, surface roughness (SR, Knoop hardness (SH, fluoride-releasing analysis, cytotoxicity, cell morphology, and extracellular matrix (ECM composition. Parametric or nonparametric ANOVA were used for statistical comparisons (α≤0.05. Data analysis revealed that EDS only detected Ti at the 5% and 7% groups and that GIC’s physical-chemical properties were significantly improved by the addition of 5% TiO2 as compared to 3% and GIC alone. Furthermore, regardless of TiO2 concentration, no significant effect was found on SR, whereas GIC-containing 7% TiO2 presented decreased SH values. Fluoride release lasted longer for the 5% and 7% TiO2 groups, and cell morphology/spreading and ECM composition were found to be positively affected by TiO2 at 5%. In conclusion, in the current study, nanotechnology incorporated in GIC affected ECM composition and was important for the superior microhardness and fluoride release, suggesting its potential for higher stress-bearing site restorations.

  6. Atomic resolution chemical bond analysis of oxygen in La2CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M.; Nagai, T.; Lugg, N. R.; Neish, M. J.; Nagao, M.; Kurashima, K.; Allen, L. J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Kimoto, K.

    2013-08-01

    The distorted CuO6 octahedron in La2CuO4 was studied using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. The near-edge structure in the oxygen K-edge electron energy-loss spectrum was recorded as a function of the position of the electron probe. After background subtraction, the measured spectrum image was processed using a recently developed inversion process to remove the mixing of signals on the atomic columns due to elastic and thermal scattering. The spectra were then compared with first-principles band structure calculations based on the local-density approximation plus on-site Coulomb repulsion (LDA + U) approach. In this article, we describe in detail not only anisotropic chemical bonding of the oxygen 2p state with the Cu 3d state but also with the Cu 4p and La 5d/4f states. Furthermore, it was found that buckling of the CuO2 plane was also detectable at the atomic resolution oxygen K-edge. Lastly, it was found that the effects of core-hole in the O K-edge were strongly dependent on the nature of the local chemical bonding, in particular, whether it is ionic or covalent.

  7. Chemical bonding and the equilibrium composition of Grignard reagents in ethereal solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, André M; Barbosa, André G H

    2011-11-10

    A thorough analysis of the electronic structure and thermodynamic aspects of Grignard reagents and its associated equilibrium composition in ethereal solutions is performed. Considering methylmagnesium halides containing fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, we studied the neutral, charged, and radical species associated with their chemical equilibrium in solution. The ethereal solvents considered, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and ethyl ether (Et(2)O), were modeled using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) and also by explicit coordination to the Mg atoms in a cluster. The chemical bonding of the species that constitute the Grignard reagent is analyzed in detail with generalized valence bond (GVB) wave functions. Equilibrium constants were calculated with the DFT/M06 functional and GVB wave functions, yielding similar results. According to our calculations and existing kinetic and electrochemical evidence, the species R(•), R(-), (•)MgX, and RMgX(2)(-) must be present in low concentration in the equilibrium. We conclude that depending on the halogen, a different route must be followed to produce the relevant equilibrium species in each case. Chloride and bromide must preferably follow a "radical-based" pathway, and fluoride must follow a "carbanionic-based" pathway. These different mechanisms are contrasted against the available experimental results and are proven to be consistent with the existing thermodynamic data on the Grignard reagent equilibria.

  8. State of chemical modeling modules for the degradation of concrete and cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.

    1997-04-15

    This report describes the conceptual framework upon which modeling activities will be needed to predict the chemistry of water in contact with concrete and its degradation products cover a broad area, from developing databases for existing abiotic codes, to developing codes that can simulate the chemical impact of microbial activities at a level of sophistication equivalent to that of the abiotic modeling codes, and ultimately, to simulating drift-scale chemical systems in support of hydrological, geochemical,a nd engineering efforts.

  9. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation and sandblasting treatment on bond strengths between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation and sandblasting treatment on the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin. Three types of commercial polyamides were treated using UV irradiation, sandblasting treatment, and a combining sandblasting and UV irradiation. The shear bond strength was measured and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Comparing shear bond strengths without surface treatment, from 4.1 to 5.7 MPa, the UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths except for Valplast, whose shear bond strengths ranged from 5.2 to 9.3 MPa. The sandblasting treatment also significantly increased the shear bond strengths (8.0 to 11.4 MPa). The combining sandblasting and UV irradiation significantly increased the shear bond strengths (15.2 to 18.3 MPa) comparing without surface treatment. This combined treatment was considered the most effective at improving the shear bond strength between polyamide and chemical-cured resin.

  10. Effect of chemical treatments on the mechanical properties of peanut shell and cement blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatani, M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An abundance of agri-food waste in the area around Cordoba, Argentina, has driven the development of new construction materials. This study explored the applicability of peanut shells as additions in cement blends and the suitability of the properties of the resulting mixes for use in construction materials. The mechanical properties of the specimens were observed to improve when the shells were previously treated with quicklime (CaO or when sodium silicate and aluminium sulphate were added to the blend. While the resulting materials did not exhibit the same mechanical properties as traditional mortars and concretes, they do appear to be apt for use in lightweight and non-bearing structures.

    La abundante disponibilidad de residuos de la agroindustria local (Córdoba, Argentina, ha promovido el desarrollo de nuevos materiales para la construcción. Este trabajo de investigación se desarrolla a partir de la utilización de cáscara de maní como agregado en mezclas de cemento a fin de conocer las propiedades obtenidas en relación al tratamiento de dicho agregado, para la producción de materiales de construcción. Los ensayos demostraron mejoras en las propiedades mecánicas de las probetas realizadas con cemento y cáscaras previamente tratadas con cal viva (CaO, también en aquéllas aditivadas con silicato de sodio y sulfato de aluminio. Si bien los materiales resultantes no tienen las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros y hormigones tradicionales, parecen interesantes para ser aplicadas en componentes de construcción livianos y de uso no portante.

  11. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  12. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO 2 (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO 2+x . Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  13. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  14. Comparative examination of the microstructure and high temperature oxidation performance of NiCrBSi flame sprayed and pack cementation coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Skolianos, S.; Chrissafis, K.; Stergioudis, G.

    2009-01-01

    Coatings formed from NiCrBSi powder were deposited by thermal spray and pack cementation processes on low carbon steel. The microstructure and morphology of the coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Flame sprayed coatings exhibited high porosity and were mechanically bonded to the substrate while pack cementation coatings were more compact and chemically bonded to the substrate. The microhardness and the high temperature oxidation resistance of the coated samples were evaluated by a Vickers microhardness tester and by thermogravimetric measurements (TG), respectively. Pack cementation coatings showed higher hardness and were more protective to high temperature environments than the flame sprayed coatings.

  15. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  16. 23 Effects of Groundnut Husk Ash-blended Cement on Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    OPC/GHA concrete after curing in three chemical solutions (MgSO4, NaCl and H2SO4) at 14, 21 .... greatest production is in the northern parts of ..... Steel Reinforcement. ... Asia Publishing Limited, England, Longman Malaysia, VVP2000.

  17. Mechanical properties of chemically bonded sand core materials dipped in sol-gel coating impregnated with filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force-...... of the chemically bonded sand core materials, a combination of flexural and compression tests is suggested for improving the casting quality. © 2012 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.......A novel sol-gel coating impregnated with filter dust was applied on chemically bonded sand core materials by dipping. After curing, the strengths of the core materials were measured under uniaxial loading using a new strength testing machine (STM). The STM presents the loading history as a force...... the strengths were increased under compression. The mode of fracture of the chemically bonded sand core materials was observed to be intergranular through the binder. The stiffness of the chemically bonded sand core materials was determined. For better understanding of the mechanical properties...

  18. Investigation of thermal expansion and compressibility of rare-earth orthovanadates using a dielectric chemical bond method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Li, Huaiyong; Li, Ling

    2008-09-01

    The chemical bond properties, lattice energies, linear expansion coefficients, and mechanical properties of ReVO 4 (Re = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Sc, Y) are investigated systematically by the dielectric chemical bond theory. The calculated results show that the covalencies of Re-O bonds are increasing slightly from La to Lu and that the covalencies of V-O bonds in crystals are decreasing slightly from La to Lu. The linear expansion coefficients decrease progressively from LaVO 4 to LuVO 4; on the contrary, the bulk moduli increase progressively. Our calculated results are in good agreement with some experimental values for linear expansion coefficients and bulk moduli.

  19. Diagraphies de cimentation : vers une analyse de la qualité du contact ciment-formation Cement Logging: Toward an Analysis of the Quality of Cement-Formation Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isambourg P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les compagnies pétrolières ont un réel besoin d'évaluer correctement les cimentations de leurs puits : l'étanchéité entre les différentes zones est-elle assurée? Pour ce faire, les outils soniques et ultra-soniques ont été mis au point. Jusqu'à présent, la qualité du contactcasing-ciment était analysée quantitativement et celle du contactciment-formation était analysée qualitativement par les spécialistes (outil VDL. Le progrès le plus important que l'on pouvait apporter dans les logsde cimentation était de détecter les défauts à l'interface ciment-formation. C'est ce que nous avons fait dans le cadre d'un projet financé par l'ARTEP (Association de Recherche sur les Techniques d'Exploitation du Pétrole comprenant Total, Gaz de France GDF, Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP, et Elf Aquitaine Production (EAP. Les expériences laboratoires effectuées au Service Analyse FLuides de Boussens ont été conçues en injectant du ciment entre un casing et une formation-simulée avec présence, ou non, de boue d'épaisseur variable. Des formations rapides ou lentes, ainsi que des ciments, rapides ou lents, ont été utilisés. Les échos ultrasoniques, obtenus à l'aide d'une sonde CET en céramique, ont été enregistrés et analysés. La théorie, comme les expériences, ont montré que les échos ultrasoniques sont modifiés en présence de boue et/ou de gaz. Les relations entre la forme de l'onde ultrasonique et la présence de boue et de gaz entre le ciment et la formation ont été établies. Une procédure de traitement est proposée avec ses limites. Oil companies have a real need to make a correct assessment of cementing jobs in their wells. Is the seal ensured between different zones? To do this, sonic and ultrasonic logging tools have been developed. Up to now, the quality of the casing-cement contacthas been analyzed quantitatively, and that of the cement-formation contacthas been analyzed qualitatively by

  20. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A crystal chemical approach to superconductivity. I. A bond-valence sum analysis of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebau, Friedrich; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Wang, Xiqu

    2011-01-01

    A crystal-chemical approach to superconductivity is described that is intended to complement the corresponding physical approach. The former approach takes into account the distinction between the stoichiometric valence ( stoich V) and the structural valence ( struct V) which is represented by the bond-valence sums (BVS). Through calculations of BVS values from crystal-structure data determined at ambient temperature and pressure it has been found that in chalcogenides und pnictides of the transition metals Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, Hf, and Zr the atoms of the potential superconducting units yield values of vertical stroke BVS vertical stroke = vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke ≥ 1.11 x vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke, whereas the atoms of the charge reservoirs have in general values of vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke. In corresponding compounds which contain the same elements but are not becoming superconducting, nearly all atoms are found to have vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke. For atoms of oxocuprates that are not becoming superconducting and for atoms of the charge reservoirs of oxocuprates that become superconducting, the relation vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke seems also to be fulfilled, with the exception of Ba. However, in several oxocuprates the relation vertical stroke struct V vertical stroke = 1.11 x vertical stroke stoich V vertical stroke for the atoms that become superconducting units is violated. These violations seem to indicate that in oxocuprates it is the local bond-valence distribution rather than the bond-valence sums that is essential for superconductivity. The present analysis can possibly be used to predict, by a simple consideration of ambient-T, P structures, whether a compound can become an unconventional superconductor at low T, under high P and/or by doping, or not. (orig.)

  2. Carol Anne Bond v the United States of America: how a woman scorned threatened the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Anna; Kornblet, Sarah; Katz, Rebecca

    2011-09-01

    The case of Carol Anne Bond v the United States of America stemmed from a domestic dispute when Ms. Bond attempted to retaliate against her best friend by attacking her with chemical agents. What has emerged is a much greater issue--a test of standing on whether a private citizen can challenge the Tenth Amendment. Instead of being prosecuted in state court for assault, Ms. Bond was charged and tried in district court under a federal criminal statute passed as part of implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Ms. Bond's argument rests on the claim that the statute exceeded the federal government's enumerated powers in criminalizing her behavior and violated the Constitution, while the government contends legislation implementing treaty obligations is well within its purview. This question remains unanswered because there is dispute among the lower courts as to whether Ms. Bond, as a citizen, even has the right to challenge an amendment guaranteeing states rights when a state is not a party to the action. The Supreme Court heard the case on February 22, 2011, and, if it decides to grant Ms. Bond standing to challenge her conviction, the case will be returned to the lower courts. Should the court decide Ms. Bond has the standing to challenge her conviction and further questions the constitutionality of the law, it would be a significant blow to implementation of the CWC in the U.S. and the effort of the federal government to ensure we are meeting our international obligations.

  3. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  4. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Chemical-Bonding Analysis of BaZn(NCN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Corkett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ternary carbodiimide BaZn(NCN2 was prepared by a solid-state metathesis reaction between BaF2, ZnF2, and Li2NCN in a 1:1:2 molar ratio, and its crystal structure was determined from Rietveld refinement of X-ray data. BaZn(NCN2 represents the aristotype of the LiBa2Al(NCN4 structure which is unique to carbodiimide/cyanamide chemistry and is well regarded as being constructed from ZnN4 tetrahedra, sharing edges and vertices through NCN2− units to form corrugated layers with Ba2+ in the interlayer voids. Structural anomalies in the shape of the cyanamide units are addressed via IR spectrometry and DFT calculations, which suggest the presence of slightly bent N=C=N2− carbodiimide units with C2v symmetry. Moreover, chemical-bonding analysis within the framework of crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP reveals striking similarities between the bonding interactions in BaZn(NCN2 and SrZn(NCN2 despite their contrasting crystal structures. BaZn(NCN2 is only the second example of a ternary post-transition metal carbodiimide, and its realization paves the way for the preparation of analogues featuring divalent transition metals at the tetrahedral Zn2+ site.

  5. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, A.; Kuligin, K.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Nickolskiy, M.; Boulahya, K.; Portillo, J.; Lepeshov, G.; Sobolev, B.; Collette, J.P.; Martin, N.; Robins, A.C.; Fischione, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession 'Spinning Star' system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF 2 as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry

  6. Nb 3d and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kalabin, I.E.; Kesler, V.G.; Pervukhina, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    A set of available experimental data on binding energies of Nb 3d 5/2 and O 1s core levels in niobates has been observed with using energy difference (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) as a robust parameter for compound characterization. An empirical relationship between (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values measured with XPS for Nb 5+ -niobates and mean chemical bond length L(Nb-O) has been discussed. A range of (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values possible in Nb 5+ -niobates has been defined. An energy gap ∼1.4-1.8 eV is found between (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values reasonable for Nb 5+ and Nb 4+ states in niobates

  7. Nb 3d and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in niobates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Kalabin, I.E. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Technical Center, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pervukhina, N.V. [Laboratory of Crystal Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2005-02-01

    A set of available experimental data on binding energies of Nb 3d{sub 5/2} and O 1s core levels in niobates has been observed with using energy difference (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) as a robust parameter for compound characterization. An empirical relationship between (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values measured with XPS for Nb{sup 5+}-niobates and mean chemical bond length L(Nb-O) has been discussed. A range of (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values possible in Nb{sup 5+}-niobates has been defined. An energy gap {approx}1.4-1.8 eV is found between (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values reasonable for Nb{sup 5+} and Nb{sup 4+} states in niobates.

  8. Development of a method to accurately calculate the Dpb and quickly predict the strength of a chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method from new respect to characterize and measure the bond strength is proposed. ► We calculate the D pb of a series of various bonds to justify our approach. ► A quite good linear relationship of the D pb with the bond lengths for series of various bonds is shown. ► Take the prediction of strengths of C–H and N–H bonds for base pairs in DNA as a practical application of our method. - Abstract: A new approach to characterize and measure bond strength has been developed. First, we propose a method to accurately calculate the potential acting on an electron in a molecule (PAEM) at the saddle point along a chemical bond in situ, denoted by D pb . Then, a direct method to quickly evaluate bond strength is established. We choose some familiar molecules as models for benchmarking this method. As a practical application, the D pb of base pairs in DNA along C–H and N–H bonds are obtained for the first time. All results show that C 7 –H of A–T and C 8 –H of G–C are the relatively weak bonds that are the injured positions in DNA damage. The significance of this work is twofold: (i) A method is developed to calculate D pb of various sizable molecules in situ quickly and accurately; (ii) This work demonstrates the feasibility to quickly predict the bond strength in macromolecules

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  10. Layer-by-layer fabrication of chemical-bonded graphene coating for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2011-10-01

    A new fabrication strategy of the graphene-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber is developed. Graphite oxide was first used as starting coating material that covalently bonded to the fused-silica substrate using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as cross-linking agent and subsequently deoxidized by hydrazine to give the graphene coating in situ. The chemical bonding between graphene and the silica fiber improve its chemical stability, and the obtained fiber was stable enough for more than 150 replicate extraction cycles. The graphene coating was wrinkled and folded, like the morphology of the rough tree bark. Its performance is tested by headspace (HS) SPME of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) followed by GC/MS analysis. The results showed that the graphene-coated fiber exhibited higher enrichment factors (EFs) from 2-fold for naphthalene to 17-fold for B(b)FL as compared to the commercial polydimethylsioxane (PDMS) fiber, and the EFs increased with the number of condensed rings of PAHs. The strong adsorption affinity was believed to be mostly due to the dominant role of π-π stacking interaction and hydrophobic effect, according to the results of selectivity study for a variety of organic compounds including PAHs, the aromatic compounds with different substituent groups, and some aliphatic hydrocarbons. For PAHs analysis, the graphene-coated fiber showed good precision (<11%), low detection limits (1.52-2.72 ng/L), and wide linearity (5-500 ng/L) under the optimized conditions. The repeatability of fiber-to-fiber was 4.0-10.8%. The method was applied to simultaneous analysis of eight PAHs with satisfactory recoveries, which were 84-102% for water samples and 72-95% for soil samples, respectively.

  11. Chemical Bonding in Tl Cuprates Studied by X-Ray Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, J.Y.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Siegal, M.P.; Vasquez, R.P.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-04-05

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and TL{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}-E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O 2p {r_arrow} Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding.

  12. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, R.P. [Center for Space Microelectronics Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and Tl{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}{minus}E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O&hthinsp;2p{r_arrow}Cu&hthinsp;3d charge transfer energy. In the O&hthinsp;1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl&hthinsp;4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O&hthinsp;1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  14. The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1): A study of chemical bonding and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirillo, S.; López-Corral, I.; Germán, E.; Juan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Study of acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption using ab-initio and semiempirical methods. ► Geometry optimization and DOS curves were carried out using VASP code. ► Study of chemical bonding evolution using COOP and OP analysis. ► After adsorption Pt-Pt, C=O and C=C bonds are weakened. ► η 3 -cis and η 4 -trans most stable adsorption modes, η 1 -trans less favored one. - Abstract: The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1) surface was studied using ab-initio and semiempirical calculations. Geometry optimization and densities of states (DOS) curves were carried out using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. We started our study with the preferential geometries corresponding to the different acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption modes previously reported. Then, we examined the evolution of the chemical bonding in these geometries, using the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and overlap population (OP) analysis of selected pairs of atoms. We analyzed the acrolein intramolecular bonds, Pt (1 1 1) superficial bonds and new molecule-surface formed bonds after adsorption. We found that Pt-Pt bonds interacting with the molecule and acrolein C=O and C=C bonds are weakened after adsorption; this last bond is significantly linked to the surface. The obtained C-Pt and O-Pt OP values suggest that the most stable adsorption modes are η 3 -cis and η 4 -trans, while the η 1 -trans is the less favored configuration. We also found that C p z orbital and Pt p z and d z 2 orbitals participate strongly in the adsorption process.

  15. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  16. Influence of the mineralogical composition of cement in the diffusion of chemical species; Influencia de la composicion mineralogica del cemento en la difusion de especies quimicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, E.

    2015-07-01

    , setting time, color and others. Portland cements commonly used in the construction industry, they are based primarily on the mineral phases of limestone and silica. In conventional cement admixtures the chemical reactivity depends on the ratio of tricalcium and dicalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S/C{sub 2}S), the tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) influences in the setting time and tetra calcium ferro aluminate (C{sub 4}AF) gives a different color to the cement. In this research the mineralogical composition of two commercial cements is studied and its influence on the phenomenon of radionuclides retention. For this particular concrete discs were manufactured with water, sand and two commercial cements: Tolteca Extra CPC 30-RRS and Cruz Azul CPC Type II 30-R. The solid observation techniques used for analysis of the cement paste and concrete they are: X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy, as well as the nuclear analytic techniques of Moessbauer and X-ray Fluorescence. (Author)

  17. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Alam, A.F.

    2009-06-01

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe 2 ) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi 5 ) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U 2 Ni 2 Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  18. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  19. The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1): A study of chemical bonding and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirillo, S.; López-Corral, I.; Germán, E.; Juan, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption of acrolein on a Pt (1 1 1) surface was studied using ab-initio and semiempirical calculations. Geometry optimization and densities of states (DOS) curves were carried out using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. We started our study with the preferential geometries corresponding to the different acrolein/Pt (1 1 1) adsorption modes previously reported. Then, we examined the evolution of the chemical bonding in these geometries, using the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and overlap population (OP) analysis of selected pairs of atoms. We analyzed the acrolein intramolecular bonds, Pt (1 1 1) superficial bonds and new moleculesbnd surface formed bonds after adsorption. We found that Ptsbnd Pt bonds interacting with the molecule and acrolein Cdbnd O and Cdbnd C bonds are weakened after adsorption; this last bond is significantly linked to the surface. The obtained Csbnd Pt and Osbnd Pt OP values suggest that the most stable adsorption modes are η3-cis and η4-trans, while the η1-trans is the less favored configuration. We also found that C pz orbital and Pt pz and d orbitals participate strongly in the adsorption process.

  20. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  1. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen; Hoeltzl, Tibor; Gopakumar, G.; Veszpremi, Tamas; Peeters, Jozef; Minh Tho Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C 6 H 3 , TDB) and its anion (C 6 H 3 - ), cation (C 6 H 3 + ) and protonated form (C 6 H 4 + ). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet 2 A 1 ground state with a 4 B 2 - 2 A 1 energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C 6 H 3 - anion in the triplet 3 B 2 being 4kcal/mol below the 1 A 1 state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation ΔH f(298K,1atm) (TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the 2 A 2 state of C 6 H 4 + (MBZ + ) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the 2 A 1 state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the 2 B 2 state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the 4 B 2 state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same radical character. There is no C3-C5 bond in the 2 A 1 state of TDB, but the interaction between these atoms is strong. The ground state of cation C 6 H 3 + (DHP), 1 A 1 , is

  2. Energetics and chemical bonding of the 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical and its protonated form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hue Minh Thi Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Education, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoeltzl, Tibor [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Gopakumar, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Veszpremi, Tamas [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Technology and Economics Gellert ter 4, H-1521-Budapest (Hungary); Peeters, Jozef [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium); Minh Tho Nguyen [Department of Chemistry, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee, Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: minh.nguyen@chem.kuleuven.be

    2005-09-19

    Quantum chemical calculations were applied to investigate the electronic structure of the parent 1,3,5-tridehydrobenzene triradical (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, TDB) and its anion (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -}), cation (C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup +}) and protonated form (C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +}). Our results obtained using the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by second-order multi-state multi-configuration perturbation theory, MS-CASPT2, and MRMP2 in conjunction with the large ANO-L and 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set, confirm and reveal the followings: (i) TDB has a doublet {sup 2}A{sub 1} ground state with a {sup 4}B{sub 2}-{sup 2}A{sub 1} energy gap of 29kcal/mol, (ii) the ground state of the C{sub 6}H{sub 3}{sup -} anion in the triplet {sup 3}B{sub 2} being 4kcal/mol below the {sup 1}A{sub 1} state. (iii) the electron affinity (EA), ionization energy (IE) and proton affinity (PA) are computed to be: EA=1.6eV, IE=7.2eV, PA=227kcal/mol using UB3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)+ZPE; standard heat of formation {delta}H{sub f(298K,1atm)}(TDB)=179+/-2kcal/mol was calculated with CBS-QB3 method. An atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis of the structure reveals that the topology of the electron density is similar in all compounds: hydrogens connect to a six-membered ring, except for the case of the {sup 2}A{sub 2} state of C{sub 6}H{sub 4}{sup +} (MBZ{sup +}) which is bicyclic with fused five- and three-membered rings. Properties of the chemical bonds were characterized with Electron Localization Function (ELF) analysis, as well as Wiberg indices, Laplacian and spin density maps. We found that the radicals form separate monosynaptic basins on the ELF space, however its pair character remains high. In the {sup 2}A{sub 1} state of TDB, the radical center is mainly localized on the C1 atom, while in the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state it is equally distributed between the C3 and C5 atoms and, due to the symmetry, in the {sup 4}B{sub 2} state the C1, C2 and C3 atoms have the same

  3. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  4. Characterization of Cement Particles Found in Peri-implantitis-Affected Human Biopsy Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Maria; Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan; Wadhwani, Chandur P K; Choudhary, Pankaj K; Rodriguez, Lucas C; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a disease characterized by soft tissue inflammation and continued loss of supporting bone, which can result in implant failure. Peri-implantitis is a multifactorial disease, and one of its triggering factors may be the presence of excess cement in the soft tissues surrounding an implant. This descriptive study evaluated the composition of foreign particles from 36 human biopsy specimens with 19 specimens selected for analysis. The biopsy specimens were obtained from soft tissues affected by peri-implantitis around cement-retained implant crowns and compared with the elemental composition of commercial luting cement. Nineteen biopsy specimens were chosen for the comparison, and five test cements (TempBond, Telio, Premier Implant Cement, Intermediate Restorative Material, and Relyx) were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. This enabled the identification of the chemical composition of foreign particles embedded in the tissue specimens and the composition of the five cements. Statistical analysis was conducted using classification trees to pair the particles present in each specimen with the known cements. The particles in each biopsy specimen could be associated with one of the commercial cements with a level of probability ranging between .79 and 1. TempBond particles were found in one biopsy specimen, Telio particles in seven, Premier Implant Cement particles in four, Relyx particles in four, and Intermediate Restorative Material particles in three. Particles found in human soft tissue biopsy specimens around implants affected by peri-implant disease were associated with five commercially available dental cements.

  5. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun

    2017-08-04

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of 30 isomers of six MS 4 molecules (M=Group 8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density functional theory and correlated wavefunction approaches. The MS 4 species were compared to analogous MO 4 species recently investigated (W. Huang, W.-H. Xu, W. H. E. Schwarz, J. Li, Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55, 4616). A metal oxidation state (MOS) with a high value of eight appeared in the low-spin singlet T d geometric species (Os,Hs)S 4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O 4 , whereas a low MOS of two appeared in the high-spin septet D 2d species Fe(S 2 ) 2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O 2 ) 2 . The ground states of all other molecules had intermediate MOS values, with S 2- , S 2 2- , S 2 1- (and O 2- , O 1- , O 2 2- , O 2 1- ) ligands bonded by ionic, covalent, and correlative contributions. The known tendencies toward lower MOS on going from oxides to sulfides, from Hs to Os to Ru, and from Pu to Sm, and the specific behavior of Fe, were found to arise from the different atomic orbital energies and radii of the (n-1)p core and (n-1)d and (n-2)f valence shells of the metal atoms in row n of the periodic table. The comparative results of the electronic and geometric structures of the MO 4 and MS 4 species provides insight into the periodicity of oxidation states and bonding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Study of the structure and chemical bonding of crystalline Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 using first principle calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Satvinder; Tripathi, S. K.; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman

    2016-01-01

    The atomic arrangements and chemical bonding of stable Ge_4Sb_2Te_7 (GeTe rich), a phase-change material, have been investigated by means of ab initio total energy calculations. To study the atomic arrangement, GeTe block is considered into -TeSbTeSbTe- block and -Te-Te- layer in the stacking I and II respectively. The stacking I is energetically more stable than the stacking II. The reason for more stability of the stacking I has been explained. The chemical bonding has been studied with the electronic charge density distribution around the atomic bonds. The quantity of electronic charge loosed or gained by atoms has been calculated using the Bader charge analysis. The metallic character has been studied using band structures calculations. The band gap for the stacking I and II is 0.463 and 0.219 eV respectively.

  7. Trends in Strong Chemical Bonding in C2, CN, CN-, CO, N2, NO, NO+, and O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The strong chemical bonds between C, N, and O play a central role in chemistry, and their formation and cleavage are critical steps in very many catalytic processes. The close-lying molecular orbital energies and large correlation effects pose a challenge to electronic structure calculations and ...

  8. Sealing of exploratory boreholes in clay reactivity of ordinary portland cement (OPC) grouts and various lithologies from the Harwell research site. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; George, I.A.; Bloodworth, A.J.; Robins, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a research programme on the disposal of radioactive wastes in clay, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has been used in the completion of boreholes on the Harwell Research Site, AERE, Oxfordshire. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of OPC and the alkaline pore fluids generated during its setting on the various lithological types encountered in the boreholes. To facilitate this, samples of core representing the various rock types were selected and cement-rock composites were prepared from these in the laboratory to simulate the borehole cements. After a curing period of 15 months the cores and associated cement plugs were examined for any signs of reactivity or bonding. The best cement-rock bonding was shown by naturally well-cemented sandstone and limestone lithologies. Although no significant chemical reaction was seen to have occurred between OPC and rock, the OPC appears able to bind onto the rock surface because of the rigidity of the rock surface. Therefore, the best cement rock bonding and seal with OPC may be expected in the limestones of the Great Oolite Group, Inferior Oolite Group and parts of the Corallian beds. Because of the reactivity of OPC towards certain lithologies a better borehole seal in such a sedimentary sequence might be achieved using a bentonite backfill in those parts of the sequence which either react with or bond only weakly to OPC

  9. Study of chloride ion transport of composite by using cement and starch as a binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armynah, Bidayatul; Halide, Halmar; Zahrawani,; Reski, Nurhadi; Tahir, Dahlang, E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id [Department of Physics, Hasanuddin University, Makassar 90245 Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    This study presents the chemical bonding and the structural properties of composites from accelerator chloride test migration (ACTM). The volume fractions between binder (cement and starch) and charcoal in composites are 20:80 and 60:40. The effect of the binder to the chemical composition, chemical bonding, and structural properties before and after chloride ion passing through the composites was determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), by Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. From the XRD data, XRF data, and the FTIR data shows the amount of chemical composition, the type of binding, and the structure of composites are depending on the type of binder. The amount of chloride migration using starch as binder is higher than that of cement as a binder due to the density effects.

  10. Chemical bonding analysis for solid-state systems using intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical bonding scheme is presented for the analysis of solid-state systems. The scheme is based on the intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals (IO-QUAMBOs) previously developed by Ivanic and Ruedenberg for molecular systems. In the solid-state scheme, IO-QUAMBOs are generated by a unitary transformation of the quasiatomic orbitals located at each site of the system with the criteria of maximizing the sum of the fourth power of interatomic orbital bond order. Possible bonding and antibonding characters are indicated by the single particle matrix elements, and can be further examined by the projected density of states. We demonstrate the method by applications to graphene and (6,0) zigzag carbon nanotube. The oriented-orbital scheme automatically describes the system in terms of sp 2 hybridization. The effect of curvature on the electronic structure of the zigzag carbon nanotube is also manifested in the deformation of the intrinsic oriented orbitals as well as a breaking of symmetry leading to nonzero single particle density matrix elements. In an additional study, the analysis is performed on the Al 3 V compound. The main covalent bonding characters are identified in a straightforward way without resorting to the symmetry analysis. Our method provides a general way for chemical bonding analysis of ab initio electronic structure calculations with any type of basis sets.

  11. Chemical Bonding of Transition-Metal Co13 Clusters with Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2015-12-01

    We carried out density functional calculations to study the adsorption of Co13 clusters on graphene. Several free isomers were deposited at different positions with respect to the hexagonal lattice nodes, allowing us to study even the hcp 2d isomer, which was recently obtained as the most stable one. Surprisingly, the Co13 clusters attached to graphene prefer icosahedron-like structures in which the low-lying isomer is much distorted; in such structures, they are linked with more bonds than those reported in previous works. For any isomer, the most stable position binds to graphene by the Co atoms that can lose electrons. We find that the charge transfer between graphene and the clusters is small enough to conclude that the Co-graphene binding is not ionic-like but chemical. Besides, the same order of stability among the different isomers on doped graphene is kept. These findings could also be of interest for magnetic clusters on graphenic nanostructures such as ribbons and nanotubes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemical Bonding States of TiC Films before and after Hydrogen Ion Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    TiC films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering followed by Ar+ ion bombardment were irradiated with a hydrogen ion beam. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for characterization of the chemical bonding states of C and Ti elements of the TiC films before and after hydrogen ion irradiation, in order to understand the effect of hydrogen ion irradiation on the films and to study the mechanism of hydrogen resistance of TiC films. Conclusions can be drawn that ion bombardment at moderate energy can cause preferential physical sputtering of carbon atoms from the surface of low atomic number (Z) material. This means that ion beam bombardment leads to the formation of a non-stoichiometric composition of TiC on the surface.TiC films prepared by ion beam mixing have the more excellent characteristic of hydrogen resistance. One important cause, in addition to TiC itself, is that there are many vacant sites in TiC created by ion beam mixing.These defects can easily trap hydrogen and effectively enhance the effect of hydrogen resistance.

  13. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics containing TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Monize Aparecida; de Lima, Bruna de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leticia Patrício; Colonetti, Emerson; Feltrin, Jucilene; De Noni, Agenor

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide was incorporated into chemically-bonded phosphate ceramic for use as photocatalytic inorganic coating. The coatings obtained were applied to unglazed ceramic tiles and cured at 350 °C. The surfaces were characterized by photocatalytic activity, determined in aqueous medium, based on the degradation of methylene blue dye. The effects of the percentage of TiO2 and the thickness of the layer on the photocatalytic efficiency were evaluated. The influence of the incorporation of TiO2 on the consolidation of the phosphate matrix coating was investigated using the wear resistance test. The crystalline phases of the coatings obtained were determined by XRD. The microstructure of the surfaces was analyzed by SEM. The thermal curing treatment did not cause a phase transition from anatase to rutile. An increase in the photocatalytic activity of the coating was observed with an increase in the TiO2 content. The dye degradation indices ranged from 14.9 to 44.0%. The photocatalytic efficiency was not correlated with the thickness of the coating layer deposited. The resistance to wear decreased with an increase in the TiO2 content. Comparison with a commercial photocatalytic ceramic coating indicated that there is a range of values for the TiO2 contents which offer potential for photocatalytic applications.

  14. An Investigation of Fiber Reinforced Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Composites at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhu; Li, Yu-Yu; Lu, Can; Liu, Jian

    2018-05-21

    In this study, chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) fiber reinforced composites were made at indoor temperatures. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the CBPC composites were studied. The CBPC matrix of aluminum phosphate binder, metakaolin, and magnesia with different Si/P ratios was prepared. The results show that when the Si/P ratio was 1.2, and magnesia content in the CBPC was 15%, CBPC reached its maximum flexural strength. The fiber reinforced CBPC composites were prepared by mixing short polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers or unidirectional continuous carbon fiber sheets. Flexural strength and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined, and the microstructures of specimens were analyzed by scanning electron micrography, X-ray diffraction, and micro X-ray computed tomography. The flexural performance of continuous carbon fiber reinforced CBPC composites was better than that of PVA fiber composites. The elastic modulus, loss modulus, and loss factor of the fiber composites were measured through dynamic mechanical analysis. The results showed that fiber reinforced CBPC composites are an inorganic polymer viscoelastic material with excellent damping properties. The reaction of magnesia and phosphate in the matrix of CBPC formed a different mineral, newberyite, which was beneficial to the development of the CBPC.

  15. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  16. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  17. Nanoscaled Mechanical Properties of Cement Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Barbhuiya, Salim; Chow, PengLoy

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on nanoscaled mechanical properties of cement composites. CNFs were added to cement composites at the filler loading of 0.2 wt % (by wt. of cement). Micrographs based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that CNFs are capable of forming strong interfacial bonding with cement matrices. Experimental results using nanoindentation reveal that the addition of CNFs in cement composites increases the proportions of high-density calcium...

  18. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  19. Modeling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behavior of ion exchange resins encapsulated into a cement-based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neji, Mejdi

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IER) are widely used in the nuclear industry to purge non directly storable infected effluents. IER then become a solid waste which could be stored as any classical nuclear waste. One way of conditioning consists in embedding it into a cement paste matrix. This process raises some concerns regarding the cohesiveness of the composite. Once embedded, the IER might indeed interact with the cement paste which would lead, in some cases, to the swelling of the composite. This thesis has been set up to address this potential issue, with the aim to develop a numerical tool able to predict the mechanical behavior of this kind of material. This work only focuses on the long term behavior and more specifically on the potential degradations of the cement paste/IER composite due to cationic IER. (author)

  20. Effect of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding characterization between porcelain and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-H; Lin, M-C; Lee, T-H; Yang, H-W; Chen, F-L; Wu, S-C; Hsu, C-C

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding behaviour between porcelain and metal. A three-point bending test was used to measure the fracture load of alloy after porcelain firing. A scanning electron microscope, accompanied by an energy dispersion spectrometer, was used to analyse the morphology and chemical composition of the fracture surface. An X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and glow discharge spectrometer were used to identify the structure and cross-sectional chemical composition, respectively, of oxide layers on Ni-Cr alloys after heat treatment at 990 degrees C for 5 min. Results showed that the oxide layers formed on all Ni-Cr alloys contained mainly Cr2O3, NiO, and trace MoO3. The Ni-Cr alloy with a higher Cr content had a thicker oxide layer, as well as a weaker bonding behaviour of porcelain/metal interface. The presence of Al (as Al2O3) and Be (as BeO) on the oxide layer suppressed the growth of the oxide layer, leading to a better porcelain/metal bonding behaviour. However, the presence of a small amount of Ti (as TiO2) on the oxide layer did not have any influence on the bonding behaviour. The fracture propagated along the interface between the opaque porcelain and metal, and exhibited an adhesive type of fracture morphology.

  1. Role of the chemical bonding for the time-dependent electron transport through an interacting quantum dot

    KAUST Repository

    Goker, Ali

    2011-06-01

    A combination of ab initio and many-body calculations is utilized to determine the effects of the bonding in Au electrodes on the time dependent current through a quantum dot suddenly shifted into the Kondo regime by a gate voltage. For an asymmetrically coupled system the instantaneous conductance exhibits fluctuations. The frequencies of the fluctuations turn out to be proportional to the energetic separation between the dominating peaks in the density of states and the Fermi level. The chemical bonding in the electrodes, thus, drastically alters the transient current, which can be accessed by ultrafast pump-probe techniques. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the chemical bonding for the time-dependent electron transport through an interacting quantum dot

    KAUST Repository

    Goker, Ali; Zhu, Zhiyong; Manchon, Aurelien; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    A combination of ab initio and many-body calculations is utilized to determine the effects of the bonding in Au electrodes on the time dependent current through a quantum dot suddenly shifted into the Kondo regime by a gate voltage. For an asymmetrically coupled system the instantaneous conductance exhibits fluctuations. The frequencies of the fluctuations turn out to be proportional to the energetic separation between the dominating peaks in the density of states and the Fermi level. The chemical bonding in the electrodes, thus, drastically alters the transient current, which can be accessed by ultrafast pump-probe techniques. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical origin of blue- and redshifted hydrogen bonds: intramolecular hyperconjugation and its coupling with intermolecular hyperconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An Yong

    2007-04-21

    Upon formation of a H bond Y...H-XZ, intramolecular hyperconjugation n(Z)-->sigma*(X-H) of the proton donor plays a key role in red- and blueshift characters of H bonds and must be introduced in the concepts of hyperconjugation and rehybridization. Intermolecular hyperconjugation transfers electron density from Y to sigma*(X-H) and causes elongation and stretch frequency redshift of the X-H bond; intramolecular hyperconjugation couples with intermolecular hyperconjugation and can adjust electron density in sigma*(X-H); rehybridization causes contraction and stretch frequency blueshift of the X-H bond on complexation. The three factors--intra- and intermolecular hyperconjugations and rehybridization--determine commonly red- or blueshift of the formed H bond. A proton donor that has strong intramolecular hyperconjugation often forms blueshifted H bonds.

  4. Control of chemical bonding of the ZnO surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, K.; Komuro, T.; Hama, K.; Koike, K.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Yano, M.

    2004-01-01

    Toward the fabrication of enzyme modified field effect transistors (EnFETs) as one of organic/inorganic hybridized structures, surface bonding of the ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy was controlled by ex situ treatments. Angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement revealed that O-H bonds exist at the surface of ZnO. It was found that the number of O-H bond could be changed with reversibility using plasma and thermal treatments

  5. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoglu, Salih Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ), photon interaction cross sections (σ t ), effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25 keV and γ-rays at 88 keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition.

  6. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  7. Chemical Bond Energies of 3d Transition Metals Studied by Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltved, Klaus A.d; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2018-01-01

    Despite their vast importance to inorganic chemistry, materials science and catalysis, the accuracy of modelling the formation or cleavage of metal-ligand (M-L) bonds depends greatly on the chosen functional and the type of bond in a way that is not systematically understood. In order to approach...

  8. Effect of Rebonding on the Bond Strength of Orthodontic Tubes: A Comparison of Light Cure Adhesive and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aleksiejunaite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different enamel preparation procedures and compare light cure composite (LCC and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI on the bond strength of orthodontic metal tubes rebonded to the enamel. Twenty human molars were divided into two groups (n=10. Tubes were bonded using LCC (Transbond XT in group 1 and RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC in group 2. The tubes in each group were bonded following manufacturers’ instructions (experiment I and then debonded using testing machine. Then, the same brackets were sandblasted and rebonded twice. Before the first rebonding, the enamel was cleaned using carbide bur (experiment II and before second rebonding, it was cleaned using carbide bur and soda blasted (experiment III. Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed no significant difference between RMGI and LCC bond strengths in case of normal bonding and rebonding, when enamel was cleaned using carbide bur before rebonding. Enamel soda blasting before rebonding significantly increased RMGI tensile bond strength value compared to LLC (p<0.05. LCC and RMGI (especially RMGI provide sufficient bond strengths for rebonding of molar tubes, when residual adhesive from previous bonding is removed and enamel soda blasted.

  9. Iron-phosphate-based chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Jeong, S.Y.; Singh, D.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for mixed waste stabilization, a collaborative project to develop iron-phosphate based ceramics has been initiated between Argonne National Laboratory and the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The starter powders are oxides of iron that are generated as inexpensive byproduct materials in the iron and steel industry. They contain iron oxides as a mixture of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and haematite (Fe 2 O 3 ). In this initial phase of this project, both of these compounds were investigated independently. Each was reacted with phosphoric acid solution to form iron phosphate ceramics. In the case of magnetite, the reaction was rapid. Adding ash as the waste component containing hazardous contaminants resulted in a dense and hard ceramic rich in glassy phase. On the other hand, the reaction of phosphoric acid solution with a mixture of haematite and ash waste contaminated with cesium and americium was too slow. Samples had to be molded under pressure. They were cured for 2-3 weeks and then hardened by heating at 350 degrees C for 3 h. The resulting ceramics in both cases were subjected to physical tests for measurement of density, open porosity, compression strength, phase analyses using X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis, and leaching tests using toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and ANS 16.1 with 7 days of leaching. Using the preliminary information obtained from these tests, we evaluated these materials for stabilization of Department of Energy's mixed waste streams

  10. Chemical bonding and magnetic properties of gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas; Adireddy, Shiva; Ramana, C.V.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature Raman spectra of CoFe 2−x Gd x O 4 (CFGO, x = 0.0–0.3) compounds as a function of wavenumber (cm −1 ). - Highlights: • Gd substituted ferrites were synthesized under controlled concentration. • Gd ion induced lattice dynamical changes are significant. • Enhanced magnetization is observed upon Gd-incorporation in cobalt ferrite. • A correlation between lattice dynamics and magnetic properties is established. - Abstract: Polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe 2−x Gd x O 4 ; x = 0–0.3, referred to CFGO) ceramics have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. Chemical bonding, crystal structure and magnetic properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated as a function of Gd-content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic analyses confirmed the formation of inverse spinel cubic structure. However, a secondary ortho-ferrite phase (GdFeO 3 ) nucleates for higher values of Gd-content. A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization has been observed upon the initial substitution of Gd (x = 0.1). The saturation magnetization drastically decreases at higher Gd content (x ⩾ 0.3). No contribution from ortho-ferrite GdFeO 3 phase is noted to the magnetic properties. The increase in the magnetic saturation magnetization is attributed to the higher magnetic moment of Gd 3+ (4f 7 ) residing in octahedral sites is higher when compared to that of Fe 3+ (3d 5 ) and as well due to the migration of Co 2+ (3d 7 ) ions from the octahedral to the tetrahedral sites with a magnetic moment aligned anti-parallel to those of rare earth (RE 3+ ) ions in the spinel lattice. Increase in coercivity with increase in Gd 3+ is content is attributed to magnetic anisotropy in the ceramics

  11. Estimation of strength in different extra Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds in DNA double helices through quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, D; Bhattacharyya, D

    2006-10-15

    It was shown earlier, from database analysis, model building studies, and molecular dynamics simulations that formation of cross-strand bifurcated or Extra Watson-Crick hydrogen (EWC) bonds between successive base pairs may lead to extra rigidity to DNA double helices of certain sequences. The strengths of these hydrogen bonds are debatable, however, as they do not have standard linear geometry criterion. We have therefore carried out detailed ab initio quantum chemical studies using RHF/6-31G(2d,2p) and B3LYP/6-31G(2p,2d) basis sets to determine strengths of several bent hydrogen bonds with different donor and acceptors. Interaction energy calculations, corrected for the basis set superposition errors, suggest that N-H...O type bent EWC hydrogen bonds are possible along same strands or across the strands between successive base pairs, leading to significant stability (ca. 4-9 kcal/mol). The N-H...N and C-H...O type interactions, however, are not so stabilizing. Hence, consideration of EWC N-H...O H-bonds can lead to a better understanding of DNA sequence directed structural features. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  13. The development of learning materials based on core model to improve students’ learning outcomes in topic of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avianti, R.; Suyatno; Sugiarto, B.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to create an appropriate learning material based on CORE (Connecting, Organizing, Reflecting, Extending) model to improve students’ learning achievement in Chemical Bonding Topic. This study used 4-D models as research design and one group pretest-posttest as design of the material treatment. The subject of the study was teaching materials based on CORE model, conducted on 30 students of Science class grade 10. The collecting data process involved some techniques such as validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. The findings were that: (1) all the contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the contents were good. The conclusion of this research was that the CORE model is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes for studying Chemical Bonding.

  14. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  15. Morphology of root canal surface: A reflection on the process of cementation of the composite relined glass fiber post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate the bond strength in the different root thirds (premolars and maxillary central incisors of composite relined glass fiber posts compared to untreated glass fiber posts cemented with dual- or chemical-cure cements. Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted premolars (flat canal (n = 15 and 12 maxillary central incisors were used (round canal (n = 3. The teeth were sectioned, and the roots received endodontic treatment. The standardized preparation of the canals was carried out, and the roots were randomly divided into four groups according to the cementation systems: G1: cemented posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G2: relined posts (dual: Ambar/Allcem; G3: cemented posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post; and G4: relined posts (chemical: Fusion Duralink/Cement Post. The roots were cut to give two slices of each third of the root canal per specimen. Push-out test was conducted at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the premolars (flat canal (P = 0.959. There was a significant difference in the central incisors between the middle and apical thirds in the cemented group when using the dual system (P = 0.04 and between the middle and apical thirds (P = 0.003 and cervical and apical thirds (P = 0.033 when using the chemical system. Conclusion: Due to the anatomy of the root canal, flat canal of the premolars does not require relining, but round canal of the maxillary central incisors demands it for more secure in the bond strength.

  16. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  17. Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements Resistência à tração de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10: Group 1 - resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2 - resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3 - resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4 - resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1 - 247.6 N; Group 2 - 256.7 N; Group 3 - 502.1 N; Group 4 - 477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult.A seleção adequada do agente cimentante é essencial para evitar falhas por perda de retenção em coroas retidas por núcleos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à tração e o tipo de falha de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais. Cimentaram-se pinos de fibra de vidro em 40 pré-molares inferiores, divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10: Grupo 1 - ionômero de vidro modificado

  18. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  19. Chemical bonding and magnetic properties of gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas, E-mail: vspuli@utep.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Adireddy, Shiva [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Ramana, C.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature Raman spectra of CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} (CFGO, x = 0.0–0.3) compounds as a function of wavenumber (cm{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Gd substituted ferrites were synthesized under controlled concentration. • Gd ion induced lattice dynamical changes are significant. • Enhanced magnetization is observed upon Gd-incorporation in cobalt ferrite. • A correlation between lattice dynamics and magnetic properties is established. - Abstract: Polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}; x = 0–0.3, referred to CFGO) ceramics have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. Chemical bonding, crystal structure and magnetic properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated as a function of Gd-content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic analyses confirmed the formation of inverse spinel cubic structure. However, a secondary ortho-ferrite phase (GdFeO{sub 3}) nucleates for higher values of Gd-content. A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization has been observed upon the initial substitution of Gd (x = 0.1). The saturation magnetization drastically decreases at higher Gd content (x ⩾ 0.3). No contribution from ortho-ferrite GdFeO{sub 3} phase is noted to the magnetic properties. The increase in the magnetic saturation magnetization is attributed to the higher magnetic moment of Gd{sup 3+} (4f{sup 7}) residing in octahedral sites is higher when compared to that of Fe{sup 3+} (3d{sup 5}) and as well due to the migration of Co{sup 2+} (3d{sup 7}) ions from the octahedral to the tetrahedral sites with a magnetic moment aligned anti-parallel to those of rare earth (RE{sup 3+}) ions in the spinel lattice. Increase in coercivity with increase in Gd{sup 3+} is content is attributed to magnetic anisotropy in the ceramics.

  20. Stabilization of contaminated soil and wastewater with chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Jeong, S.Y.; Singh, D.

    1997-01-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed chemically Bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) technology to stabilize the U.S. Department of Energy's problem mixed waste streams, for which no other stabilization technology is suitable. In this technology, solid waste is mixed with MgO and reacted with aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid or acid phosphates at room temperature to form a slurry that sets in ∼2 h into a hard and dense ceramic waste form. Initial studies involved stabilizing the surrogate waste streams and then testing the waste forms for leaching of contaminants. After achieving satisfactory performance of the waste forms, we next incorporated actual waste streams at bench scale and produced waste forms that were then tested with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). This presentation deals with stabilization of soil contaminated with Cd, Cr, Pb, Ag, Ba, and Hg, and of low-level radioactive wastewater. To enhance the contaminant levels in the soil, we further spiked the soil with additional amounts of Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg. Both the soil and the wastewater were incorporated in the same waste form by stabilizing them with the CBPC process. The waste forms had a total waste loading of ∼77 wt.% and were dense with an open porosity of 2.7 vol.% and a density of 2.17 g/cm 3 . Compression strength was 4910 psi. The TCLP results showed excellent immobilization of all the RCRA metals, and radioactive contaminant levels were below the detection limit of 0.2 pCi/mL. Long-term leaching studies using the ANS 16.1 procedure showed that the retention of contaminants is excellent and comparable to or better than most of other stabilization processes. These results demonstrate that the CBPC process is a very superior process for treatment of low level mixed wastes; we therefore conclude that the CBPC process is well suited to the treatment of low-level mixed waste streams with high waste loading

  1. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  2. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  3. [PVD-silicoating before cementation of zirconia-based knee prostheses effects better cement adhesion and lower aseptic loosening rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, R; Faramarzi, R; Oberbach, T; Begand, S; Grätz, N; Wirtz, D C

    2012-02-01

    CoCrMo alloys are contraindicated for allergy patients. For these patients, cemented or uncemented prostheses made of titanium alloy are indicated. Uncemented prostheses, however, have low primary retention, particularly the tibial components of knee joint prostheses because of the lack of a positive locking. Therefore, for knee replacement cemented CoCrMo prostheses may be suitable also for allergy sufferers if these are masked by ZrN or TiNbN layers. Alternatively the CoCrMo alloy may be replaced by high-strength oxide ceramics. For adhesion of bone cement to the ceramic surface, however, only inefficient mechanical retention spots are exposed as compared with a metal surface. Undercuts generated by corundum blasting, although highly efficient on a CoCrMo surface, are not such efficient centres on a ceramic surface due to its brittleness. Therefore, the mechanical component of retention is significantly reduced. When specific adhesion between bone cement and surface does not exist due to physical and chemical forces, the hydrolytic stability will be insufficient. Micromotions are promoted and early aseptic loosening is predictable. Silicoating of the ceramic surface will allow specific adhesion and can result in better hydrolytic stability of bonding. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of silicoating the bond strengths of blasted (mean size of corundum grains 50 µm) and silicate layered alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ) surfaces were compared with "as fired" surfaces by utilising TiAlV probes (diameter 6 mm) for traction-adhesive strength testing. Samples machined out of CoCrMo alloy were utilised for reference. After preparing the samples for traction-adhesive strength testing (sequence: substrate, silicate and silane, protective lacquer [PolyMA], bone cement, TiAlV probe) they were aged up to 360 days at 37 °C in Ringer's solution. The bond strengths observed for all ageing intervals were well above 20 MPa and much higher and more hydrolytically

  4. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichienberger, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  5. The electrical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition Ga doped ZnO thin films depending on chemical bonding configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hanearl [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoung [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ulsan College, 57 Daehak-ro, Nam-gu, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Undoped and Ga doped ZnO thin films were deposited using DEZ and TMGa. • Effects of Ga doping using TMGa in Ga doped ZnO were investigated. • Degraded properties from excessive doping were analyzed using chemical bondings. - Abstract: The electrical and chemical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) films were systematically investigated using Hall measurement and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Diethylzinc (DEZ) and O{sub 2} gas were used as precursor and reactant gas, respectively, and trimethyl gallium (TMGa) was used as a Ga doping source. Initially, the electrical properties of undoped LP-CVD ZnO films depending on the partial pressure of DEZ and O{sub 2} ratio were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) by changing partial pressure of DEZ from 40 to 140 mTorr and that of O{sub 2} from 40 to 80 mTorr. The resistivity was reduced by Ga doping from 7.24 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm for undoped ZnO to 2.05 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm for Ga doped ZnO at the TMG pressure of 8 mTorr. The change of electric properties of Ga doped ZnO with varying the amount of Ga dopants was systematically discussed based on the structural crystallinity and chemical bonding configuration, analyzed by XRD and XPS, respectively.

  6. Mechanical, electronic, chemical bonding and optical properties of cubic BaHfO3: First-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qijun; Liu Zhengtang; Feng Liping; Tian Hao

    2010-01-01

    We have performed ab-initio total energy calculations using the plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential technique based on the first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) to study structural parameters, mechanical, electronic, chemical bonding and optical properties of cubic BaHfO 3 . The calculated lattice parameter and independent elastic constants are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work. The bulk, shear and Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient, compressibility and Lame constants are obtained using Voigt-Reuss-Hill method and the Debye temperature is estimated using Debye-Grueneisen model, which are consistent with previous results. Electronic and chemical bonding properties have been studied from the calculations of band structure, density of states and charge densities. Furthermore, in order to clarify the mechanism of optical transitions of cubic BaHfO 3 , the complex dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, reflectivity, absorption efficient, loss function and complex conductivity function are calculated. Then, we have explained the origins of spectral peaks on the basis of the theory of crystal-field and molecular-orbital bonding.

  7. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  8. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheen Juneja Arora

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The temporary cements with eugenol showed more microleakage than those without eugenol. SC-10 crowns showed more microleakage compared to Protemp 4 crowns. SC-10 crowns cemented with Kalzinol showed maximum microleakage and Protemp 4 crowns cemented with HY bond showed least microleakage.

  9. Anisotropic electrical conduction and reduction in dangling-bond density for polycrystalline Si films prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Chisato; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    Polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films with high crystalline fraction and low dangling-bond density were prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD. Directional anisotropy in electrical conduction, probably due to structural anisotropy, was observed for Cat-CVD poly-Si films. A novel method to separately characterize both crystalline and amorphous phases in poly-Si films using anisotropic electrical conduction was proposed. On the basis of results obtained by the proposed method and electron spin resonance measurements, reduction in dangling-bond density for Cat-CVD poly-Si films was achieved using the condition to make the quality of the included amorphous phase high. The properties of Cat-CVD poly-Si films are found to be promising in solar-cell applications.

  10. Electronic parameters of Sr2M2O7 (M = V, Nb, Ta) and Sr-O chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2010-01-01

    XPS measurements were carried out on Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 powder samples, which were synthesized using standard solid state method. The binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core level, Δ(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d5/2), was used to characterize the valence electron transfer...... on the formation of the Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 and the previously published structural and XPS data for other Sr-oxide compounds. A new empirical relationship between Δ(O-Sr) and L(Sr-O) was obtained. Possible applications...

  11. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF2/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-01-01

    CaF 2 films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF 2 /H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  12. Effect of addition of nano-hydroxyapatite on physico-chemical and antibiofilm properties of calcium silicate cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2 and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn. Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil; PC (70%+ZrO2 (30%; PC (60%+ZrO2 (30%+HAn (10%; PC (50%+ZrO2 (30%+HAn (20% were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1 in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10% and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20% (p>0.05 and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05. The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10% and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20% (p<0.05. MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05. All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05. Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05 after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%, the final setting time and

  13. Physico-chemical investigation of cement carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a controlled CO2 partial pressure at 25 and 50 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, Laure; Trepy, Nadia; Le Bescop, Patrick; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Monguillon, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of radioactive waste geological disposal, structural concretes have to be adapted to underground chemical conditions. For concrete in water saturated medium, it is believed that carbonation will have a major impact on the interaction between concrete and the geological medium. So, to understand the complex degradation of the cement paste in that context, it is interesting to study a simplified system such as degradation in carbonated water solution. This solution must be at equilibrium with a CO 2 partial pressure 30 times higher than the atmospheric pCO 2 , to reproduce underground natural conditions of Callovo-Oxfordian clayey rock of Bure (France). In this study, the behaviour of a new low pH material (CEM I + silica fume + fly ashes) is compared with a CEM I cement paste, both of them being submitted to carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a pCO 2 equal to 1.32 kPa (1.3 10 -2 atm). Two different temperatures, 25 and 50 C, are considered. To realize these experiments, two different original types of devices were developed

  14. Pressure dependence of morphology and phase composition of SiC films deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on cemented carbide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Shengwang, E-mail: bkdysw@yahoo.cn; Fan Pengwei; Tang Weizhong; Li Xiaojing; Hu Haolin; Hei Hongjun; Zhang Sikai; Lu Fanxiu

    2011-11-01

    SiC films were deposited on cemented carbide substrates by employing microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method using tetramethylsilane (Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) diluted in H{sub 2} as the precursor. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scratching technique were used to characterize morphology, composition, phases present and adhesion of the films. Experimental results show that the deposition pressure has great influence on morphologies and phase composition of the films. In sequence, SiC films with a cauliflower-like microstructure, granular films with terrace-featured SiC particles coexisting with Co{sub 2}Si compound and clusters of nanometer SiC nanoplatelets appear as a function of the deposition pressure. In terms of plasma density and substrate temperature, this sequential appearance of microstructures of SiC films was explained. Adhesion tests showed that among the three types of films studied, the films with the terrace-featured SiC particles have relatively higher adhesion. Such knowledge will be of importance when the SiC films are used as interlayer between diamond films and cemented carbide substrates.

  15. Pressure dependence of morphology and phase composition of SiC films deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on cemented carbide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shengwang; Fan Pengwei; Tang Weizhong; Li Xiaojing; Hu Haolin; Hei Hongjun; Zhang Sikai; Lu Fanxiu

    2011-01-01

    SiC films were deposited on cemented carbide substrates by employing microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method using tetramethylsilane (Si(CH 3 ) 4 ) diluted in H 2 as the precursor. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scratching technique were used to characterize morphology, composition, phases present and adhesion of the films. Experimental results show that the deposition pressure has great influence on morphologies and phase composition of the films. In sequence, SiC films with a cauliflower-like microstructure, granular films with terrace-featured SiC particles coexisting with Co 2 Si compound and clusters of nanometer SiC nanoplatelets appear as a function of the deposition pressure. In terms of plasma density and substrate temperature, this sequential appearance of microstructures of SiC films was explained. Adhesion tests showed that among the three types of films studied, the films with the terrace-featured SiC particles have relatively higher adhesion. Such knowledge will be of importance when the SiC films are used as interlayer between diamond films and cemented carbide substrates.

  16. Dispersibility and chemical bonds between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether ether ketone) in nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanmei, Jin; Haihui, Liu; Ning, Wang; Lichen, Hou; Xing-Xiang, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) nanocomposite fibers were fabricated by mixing, melt extruding PEEK with different loadings and species of MWNTs, and melt-spun the blended chips. Nanocomposite fibers were heat-stretched and heat-treated. The morphology and dispersibility of MWNTs in nanocomposite fibers were observed using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and crystallization behavior of nanocomposite fibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Mechanical properties were tested using a tensile strength tester. MWNTs tend to aggregate when the loading exceeds 0.8 wt%. Functional groups on MWNTs improve the hydrophobicity and the dispersibility of MWNTs in PEEK matrix. The enhancement of mechanical properties depends on the loading and species of functional groups. The most effectively reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs (MWNT–COOH) > hydroxyl MWNTs (MWNT–OH) > MWNTs, which can be explained by the strong hydrogen bonding and the affinity between MWNT–COOH and PEEK, MWNT–OH and PEEK, and possible formation of a chemical bond between MWNT–COOH and PEEK. A nanocomposite fiber with excellent mechanical property was fabricated using 0.8 wt% MWNT–COOH as filler. The Young's modulus is 1.7 GPa; and the stress is 648 MPa. -- Highlights: ► Functional groups on MWNTs improve their hydrophobility and dispersability. ► Mechanical properties depend on the content and species of the functional groups. ► The reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs > hydroxyl MWNTs > MWNTs. ► The strength behavior was result of hydrogen bond, affinity and chemical bond. ► Dispersability of MWNTs in matrix was analyzed by calculating solubility parameter.

  17. Bonding Characteristics and Chemical Inertness of Zr–Si–N Coatings with a High Si Content in Glass Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Chang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available High-Si-content transition metal nitride coatings, which exhibited an X-ray amorphous phase, were proposed as protective coatings on glass molding dies. In a previous study, the Zr–Si–N coatings with Si contents of 24–30 at.% exhibited the hardness of Si3N4, which was higher than those of the middle-Si-content (19 at.% coatings. In this study, the bonding characteristics of the constituent elements of Zr–Si–N coatings were evaluated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicated that the Zr 3d5/2 levels were 179.14–180.22 and 180.75–181.61 eV for the Zr–N bonds in ZrN and Zr3N4 compounds, respectively. Moreover, the percentage of Zr–N bond in the Zr3N4 compound increased with increasing Si content in the Zr–Si–N coatings. The Zr–N bond of Zr3N4 dominated when the Si content was >24 at.%. Therefore, high Si content can stabilize the Zr–N compound in the M3N4 bonding structure. Furthermore, the thermal stability and chemical inertness of Zr–Si–N coatings were evaluated by conducting thermal cycle annealing at 270 °C and 600 °C in a 15-ppm O2–N2 atmosphere. The results indicated that a Zr22Si29N49/Ti/WC assembly was suitable as a protective coating against SiO2–B2O3–BaO-based glass for 450 thermal cycles.

  18. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N 2 and F 2 , which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  19. Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrode activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Mi; Lee, Eunsil; Adpakpang, Kanyaporn; Patil, Sharad B.; Park, Mi Jin; Lim, Young Soo; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jong-Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is easily prepared by high energy mechanical milling process. • The bond covalency of In 4 Se 2.85 is notably changed upon the composite formation with graphene. • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite shows promising anode performance for lithium ion battery. -- Abstract: Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrochemical activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with carbon species is systematically investigated. Nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black are synthesized via a solid state reaction between In and Se elements, and the following high energy mechanical milling of In 4 Se 2.85 with graphene and carbon-black, respectively. The high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) of In 4 Se 2.85 with carbon species gives rise to a decrease of particle size with a significant depression of the crystallinity of In 4 Se 2.85 phase. In contrast to the composite formation with carbon-black, that with graphene induces a notable decrease of (In−Se) bond covalency, underscoring significant chemical interaction between graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 . Both the nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black show much better anode performance for lithium ion batteries with larger discharge capacity and better cyclability than does the pristine In 4 Se 2.85 material, indicating the beneficial effect of composite formation on the electrochemical activity of indium selenide. Between the present nanocomposites, the electrode performance of the In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is superior to that of the In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black nanocomposite, which is attributable to the weakening of (In−Se) bonds upon the composite formation with graphene as well as to the better mixing between In 4 Se 2.85 and graphene. The present study clearly demonstrates that the composite formation with graphene has strong influence

  20. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  1. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  2. High pressure stability analysis and chemical bonding of Ti1-xZrxN alloy: A first principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Mamta; Gupta, Dinesh C.

    2016-01-01

    First-principles pseudo-potential calculations have been performed to analyze the stability of Ti 1-x Zr x N alloy under high pressures. The first order phase transition from B1 to B2 phase has been observed in this alloy at high pressure. The variation of lattice parameter with the change in concentration of Zr atom in Ti 1-x Zr x N is also reported in both the phases. The calculations for density of states have been performed to understand the alloying effects on chemical bonding of Ti-Zr-N alloy.

  3. Ti 2p and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in titanium-bearing oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Kesler, Valery G.; Pervukhina, Natalia V.; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2006-01-01

    A set of available experimental data on the binding energies of Ti 2p 3/2 and O 1s core levels in titanium-bearing oxides has been presented by using the binding energy difference (O 1s-Ti 2p 3/2 ) as a robust parameter to characterize these compounds. An empirical relationship between the (O 1s-Ti 2p 3/2 ) values measured with XPS and the mean chemical bond length L(Ti-O) in these crystals has been discussed for Ti 4+ -compounds

  4. Ti 2p and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in titanium-bearing oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, Victor V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Kesler, Valery G. [Technical Centre, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pervukhina, Natalia V. [Laboratory of Crystal Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Zhaoming [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A set of available experimental data on the binding energies of Ti 2p{sub 3/2} and O 1s core levels in titanium-bearing oxides has been presented by using the binding energy difference (O 1s-Ti 2p{sub 3/2}) as a robust parameter to characterize these compounds. An empirical relationship between the (O 1s-Ti 2p{sub 3/2}) values measured with XPS and the mean chemical bond length L(Ti-O) in these crystals has been discussed for Ti{sup 4+}-compounds.

  5. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  6. Annihilation of positrons with the electrons of chemical bonds of the superconducting CuO-polyhedrons in the HTSC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunov, N.Yu.; Trashchakov, V.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    Angular distribution parameters of annihilation photon pairs emitted from R-Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (x≤0.2; R=Y, Nd, Lu) specimens after injection and subsequent annihilation of positrons in them. It is shown that annihilation of thermalized positrons proceeds advantageously with electrons of chemical bonds of O(4)-Cu(I)-O(I) polyhedrons in R-Ba-Cu-O oxides. In an orthorhombic phase positrons are mostly delocalized in rows of ordered stoichiometric vacancies. The result obtained provides to recommend the methods of positron diagnostics for studying parameters of electron state density in superconducting structural groups of high-temperature superconductors. 2 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  8. Preparation of magnesium phosphate cement by recycling the product of thermal transformation of asbestos containing wastes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, April (2014), s. 56-66 ISSN 0008-8846 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : cement-asbestos * chemically bonded ceramics * waste management * X-ray diffraction * amorphous material Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000888461400012X

  9. Investigation of chemical bond characteristics, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk moduli of alpha-R2MoO6 and R2Mo2O7 (R = rare earths) by using a dielectric chemical bond method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiyong; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Cao, Xueqiang

    2009-09-01

    Theoretical researches are performed on the alpha-R2MoO6 (R = Y, Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb) and pyrochlore-type R2Mo2O7 (R = Y, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy) rare earth molybdates by using chemical bond theory of dielectric description. The chemical bonding characteristics and their relationship with thermal expansion property and compressibility are explored. The calculated values of linear thermal expansion coefficient (LTEC) and bulk modulus agree well with the available experimental values. The calculations reveal that the LTECs and the bulk moduli do have linear relationship with the ionic radii of the lanthanides: the LTEC decreases from 6.80 to 6.62 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus increases from 141 to 154 GPa when R goes in the order Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb in the alpha-R2MoO6 series; while in the R2Mo2O7 series, the LTEC ranges from 6.80 to 6.61 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus ranges from 147 to 163 GPa when R varies in the order Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Physical-Chemical and Mechanical characterization of some cement products in Madagascar by using Technical Analysis X-ray Fluorescence and tests receptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasolondraibe, I.P.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is completely realized at the 'Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN - Madagascar)' and 'Laboratoire National des Travaux Publics et du Batiment (LNTPB)'. Its purpose is to carry out the physico - chemical and mechanical analysis of the cements products present in Madagascar in order to ensure their qualities in case of Building and Publics Works construction safety. The necessary chemical elements in cements are the loss in ignition (LOI), the insoluble residues (RI), the silica (SiO 2 ), the lime (CaO), the alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), the iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ), the magnesia (MgO) and the sulfate (SO 3 ). In this work, analytical laboratory in X - Ray fluorescence department of INSTN - Madagascar using the direct excitation X - Ray fluorescence technique outline their research on lime and iron oxide while L.N.T.P.B materials laboratory can make all using test method by gravimetry and titrimetry according to EN 196 - 2. The results of INSTN - Madagascar show that the concentrations of calcium oxide and iron oxide are consistent with the concentration range provided by the laboratory materials L.N.T.P.B respectively equal to 50.00 % - 65.00 % and 1.00 % - 5.00 %. The results between the two laboratories have a - 4.76 % iron oxide maximum relative deviation and 4,77 % calcium oxide maximum relative deviation. Complementary physical and mechanical tests were performed at L.N.T.P.B materials laboratory respectively in accordance with EN 196 - 3 and EN 196 - 1. The used conventional X - ray fluorescence method fulfill the scope of application needed with good correlation less than ± 5 %. [fr

  11. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Aiwei; Wang Yu; Ye Haihang; Zhou Chao; Yang Chunhe; Li Xu; Peng Hongshang; Zhang Fujun; Hou Yanbing; Teng Feng

    2013-01-01

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag 2 S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S–C bonds or Ag–S bonds. Pure Ag 2 S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag 2 S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S–C and Ag–S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag–S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals. (paper)

  12. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in N-salicylideneaniline: FT-IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Dastani, Najmeh

    2015-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of N-salicylideneaniline (SAn) and its deuterated analogue (D-SAn) are recorded, and the theoretical calculations are performed on their molecular structures and vibrational frequencies. The same calculations are performed for SAn in different solutions using the polarizable conductor continuum model (CPCM) method. Comparisons between the spectra obtained and the corresponding theoretical calculations are used to assign the vibrational frequencies for these compounds. The spectral behavior of SAn upon deuteration is also used to distinguish the positions of OH vibrational frequencies. The hydrogen bond strength of SAn is investigated by applying the atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and geometry calculations. The harmonic vibrational frequencies of SAn are calculated at B3LYP and X3LYP levels of theory using 6-31G*, 6-311G**, and 6-311++G** basis sets. The AIM results support a medium hydrogen bonding in SAn. The observed νOH/νOD and γOH/γOD for SAn appear at 2940/2122 and 830/589 cm-1, respectively.

  13. HR-EELS study of hydrogen bonding configuration, chemical and thermal stability of detonation nanodiamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, Sh.; Akhvlediani, R. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Petit, T.; Girard, H.A.; Arnault, J.C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hoffman, A., E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-06-01

    Nano-diamond films composed of 3–10 nm grains prepared by the detonation method and deposited onto silicon substrates by drop-casting were examined by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The impact of (i) ex-situ ambient annealing at 400 °C and (ii) ex-situ hydrogenation on hydrogen bonding and its thermal stability were examined. In order to clarify the changes in hydrogen bonding configuration detected on the different surfaces as a function of thermal annealing, in-situ hydrogenation by thermally activated atomic hydrogen was performed and examined. This study provides direct evidence that the exposure to ambient conditions and medium temperature ambient annealing have a pronounced effect on the hydrogen-carbon bonding configuration onto the nano-diamond surfaces. In-situ 1000 °C annealing results in irreversible changes of the film surface and partial nano-diamond silicidation.

  14. Ab initio investigations of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li2ZrN2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.F.; Pöttgen, R.; Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure of the ternary nitride Li 2 ZrN 2 is examined from ab initio with DFT computations for an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding. The compound is found insulating with 1.8 eV band gap; it becomes metallic and less ionic upon removal of one equivalent of Li. The chemical interaction is found mainly between Zr and N on one hand and Li and N on the other hand. While all pair interactions are bonding, antibonding N–N interactions are found dominant at the top of the valence band of Li 2 ZrN 2 and they become less intense upon removal of Li. From energy differences the partial delithiation leading to Li 2−x ZrN 2 (x=∼1) is favored. - Graphical abstract: Trigonal structure of Li 2 ZrN 2 showing the Zr–N–Li layers along the c-axis. Highlights: ► Li 2 ZrN 2 calculated insulating with a 1.8 eV gap in agreement with its light green color. ► Lithium de-intercalation is energetically favored for one out of two Li equivalents. ► Li plays little role in the change of the structure, ensured by Zr and N binding. ► Similar changes in the electronic structure as for various intercalated phases of ZrN.

  15. Several new phases in RE-Mg-Ge systems (RE = rare earth metal) - syntheses, structures, and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Bobev, Svilen

    2012-01-01

    Reported are the synthesis and structural characterization of Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 (its own structure type), CeMg_2_-_xGe_2_+_x (BaAl_4-type structure), RE_4Mg_7Ge_6 (RE = Ce-Nd, Sm; La_4Mg_7Ge_6-type structure), and RE_4Mg_5Ge_6 (RE = Ce, Pr; Tm_4Zn_5Ge_6-type structure). The structures of these compounds have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. These compounds are closely related to each other not only in their chemical compositions but also in their structures. A common structural feature of all are MgGe_4 tetrahedra, which are connected by corner- and/or edge-sharing into complex polyanionic frameworks with the rare-earth metal atoms filling the ''empty'' space. The structures are compared to known types of structures, and we have investigated the chemical bonding in Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 with electronic structure calculations, which were carried out by the tight-bonding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlOxNy/Si gate stacks revealed by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, G.; Toyoda, S.; Shimogaki, Y.; Oshima, M.

    2010-01-01

    Annealing-temperature dependence of the thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlO x N y /SiO 2 /Si gate stacks grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using new chemistry was investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES). Results have confirmed the formation of the AlN and AlNO compounds in the as-deposited samples. Annealing the AlO x N y samples in N 2 ambient in 600-800 deg. C promotes the formation of SiO 2 component. Meanwhile, there is no formation of Al-O-Si and Al-Si binding states, suggesting no interdiffusion of Al with the Si substrate. A thermally induced reaction between Si and AlO x N y to form volatile SiO and Al 2 O is suggested to be responsible for the full disappearance of the Al component that accompanies annealing at annealing temperature of 1000 deg. C. The released N due to the breakage of the Al-N bonding will react with the SiO 2 interfacial layer and lead to the formation of the Si 3 -N-O/Si 2 -N-O components at the top of Si substrate. These results indicate high temperature processing induced evolution of the interfacial chemistry and application range of AlO x N y /Si gate stacks in future CMOS devices.

  17. Physical and chemical characterization of pastes of bone cements with ZrO{sub 2}; Caracterizacion fisica y quimica de pastas de cementos oseos con ZrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto H, A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, A.P. 45, 62900 Zacatepec, Morelos (Mexico); Pina B, M.C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Setting times and temperature of sixteen calcium phosphate cements added with ZrO{sub 2} were evaluated. Their behaviors were analysed to be used like injectable formulations in surgery of bone. Two cements of calcium phosphates enriched with ZrO{sub 2} with the best characteristics in setting times and temperature, were mechanically tested after 1 and 7 days of prepared. Density was determined using a pycnometer, chemical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction and the molecular structure was determined by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  18. Shear Bond Strength of a Novel Porcelain Repair System for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... ceramic restorations are cemented with resin cements, removing ... causes physical alteration to increase the bonding of the resin to the ceramic ..... Static and fatigue mechanical behavior of three dental CAD/CAM ceramics.

  19. The Synthesis, Structures and Chemical Properties of Macrocyclic Ligands Covalently Bonded into Layered Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The immobilization of crown ethers tends to limit the leveling effect of solvents making the macrocycles more selective. In addition immobilization has the added advantage of relative ease of recovery of the otherwise soluble crown. We have affixed CH2PO3H2 groups to azacrown ethers. The resultant phosphorylated macrocycles may spontaneously aggregate into crystalline supramolecular linear arrays or contacted with cations produce layered or linear polymers. In the linear polymers the metal and phosphonic acids covalently bond into a central stem with the macrocyclic rings protruding from the stem as leaves on a twig. Two types of layered compounds were obtained with group 4 metals. Monoaza-crown ethers form a bilayer where the M4+ plus phosphonic acid groups build the layer and the rings fill the interlayer space. 1, 10-diazadiphosphonic acids cross-link the metal phosphonate layers forming a three-dimensional array of crown ethers. In order to improve diffusion into these 3-D arrays they are spaced by inclusion of phosphate or phosphate groups. Two series of azamacrocylic crown ethers were prepared containing rings with 20 to 32 atoms. These larger rings can complex two cations per ring. Methylene phosphonic acid groups have been bonded to the aza ring atoms to increase the complexing ability of these ligands. Our approach is to carry out acid-base titrations in the absence and presence of cations to determine the pKa values of the protons, both those bonded to aza groups and those associated with the phosphonic acid groups. From the differences in the titration curves obtained with and without the cations present we obtain the stoichiometry of complex formation and the complex stability constants. Some of the applications we are targeting include phase transfer catalysis, separation of cations and the separation of radioisotopes for diagnostic and cancer therapeutic purposes

  20. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  1. Electric dipole moments and chemical bonding of diatomic alkali-alkaline earth molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V; Hauser, Andreas W; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2016-02-17

    We investigate the properties of alkali-alkaline earth diatomic molecules in the lowest Σ(+) states of the doublet and quartet multiplicity by ab initio calculations. In all sixteen cases studied, the permanent electric dipole moment points in opposite directions for the two spin states. This peculiarity can be explained by molecular orbital theory. We further discuss dissociation energies and bond distances. We analyze trends and provide an empirically motivated model for the prediction of the permanent electric dipole moment for combinations of alkali and alkaline earth atoms not studied in this work.

  2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding analysis of BaPtCd{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulo, Fakhili [Department of Chemical Education, Sriwijaya University, Inderalaya 30662, South Sumatra (Indonesia); Koehler, Juergen [Max Planck Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    The new ternary intermetallic phase, BaPtCd{sub 2}, was synthesized by solid-state reaction from direct combination of the elements in a stoichiometric mixture. The reaction was done at 850 C for 15 h, followed by an equilibration at 600 C for 4 d. The crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction method on a single crystal. BaPtCd{sub 2} is isotypic to MgCuAl{sub 2} and crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm [a = 4.467(2), b = 11.143(4), c = 8.240(3) Aa, V = 410.2(3) Aa{sup 3}, and Z = 4]. Barium atoms are linked together forming zigzag chains. Cadmium atoms are bonded to each other forming six-membered rings of platinum centered boat and anti-boat conformations. BaPtCd{sub 2} contains 16 electrons per formula unit and belongs to the electron poorest compounds with MgCuAl{sub 2} type structure. Calculations based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in the atomic spheres approximation show that significant bonding states in BaPtCd{sub 2} are unoccupied. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Mechanical properties and chemical bonding of the Os–B system: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Zongwei; Hu Chaohao; Wang Dianhui; Zhong Yan; Yang Jiong; Zhang Wenqing; Zhou Huaiying

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Os–B compounds containing different boron contents have been investigated systemically by first-principles calculations. Two previously unreported crystal structures of Os 2 B 5 and OsB 3 , crystallizing in space groups R3m and P-6m2 respectively, are determined using the ab initio evolutionary structure prediction. The calculated elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and hardness for Os–B compounds are in good agreement with the available experimental values. Our results show that the hardness of osmium borides increases with increasing boron content. Os 2 B 5 and OsB 3 , with hardnesses of 34.4 and 36.9 GPa respectively, can almost be considered as potential superhard materials. Further analyses on density of states, crystal orbital Hamilton population, and electron localization function demonstrate that the electronic structure of Os–B compounds is directly responsible for their particular mechanical properties. High hardness in Os 2 B 5 and OsB 3 is mainly attributed to the occurrence of strong B–B covalent bonds and the disappearance of some ductile Os–Os metallic bonds.

  4. Chemical bonding and electronic localization in a Ga(I) amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Maja K; Dange, Deepak; Jones, Cameron; Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-10-05

    The electron density in a one-coordinate [Ga(I) N(SiMe3 )R] complex has been determined from ab initio calculations and multipole modeling of 90 K X-ray data. The topologies of the Laplacian distribution and the ELI-D match a situation having an sp(3) -hybridized nitrogen with a tetrahedral arrangement of two single σ-bonds (to carbon and silicon) and two lone pairs pointing towards gallium in a scissor-grasping fashion. The analysis of the Laplacian distribution furthermore reveals a ligand-induced charge concentration (LICC) in the outer core of gallium oriented directly towards the nitrogen atom, and thus in between the two lone pairs. These observations might suggest that the trigonal planar nitrogen geometry result from a dative GaN bond, in which the roles of the metal and the ligand have been reversed with respect to a "standard" metal-ligand interaction, that is, the metal is here electron-donating. The ELI-D reveals a diffuse and directional lone pair on gallium, suggesting that this complex could serve as a σ-donor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. An Experimental Study on Effect of Palm – Shell Waste Additive to Cement Strenght Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Novriansyah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the cement strength through attaching chemical additive has been popular to meet the required condition for a particular well-cementing job. However, due to a low oil-price phenomenon, pouring and additive should be reconsidered because it can raise the cost and make the project become uneconomic. Another additive material in nanocomposite form will be introduced through this experimental study. The nanocomposite material consist of silica nanoparticle, known as “Nanosilica” and a palm-shell-waste, which is abundant in Indonesia. Before making a nanocomposite, the palm-shell should be burned to obtain a charcoal form, ground and sieved to attain a uniform size.   The study focuses on the two parameters, compressive strength and shear bond strength, which can reflect the strength of the cement. These values are obtained by performing a biaxial loading test to the cement sample. Various samples with different concentration of nanocomposite should be prepared and following the mixing, drying, and hardening process before the loading test is carried out. The result from the test shows a positive indication for compressive strength and shear bond strength values, according to the representative well cementing standards. Increasing the nanocomposite concentration on the cement will increase these values. Furthermore, an investigation on the temperature effect confirms that the sample with 700oC burning temperature have highest compressive-strength and shear-bond-strength values. This is a potential opportunity utilizing a waste-based material to produce another product with higher economic value.

  6. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  7. Tensile bond strength between different glass ionomer cement and composite resin using three adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência de união interfacial entre diferentes cimentos de ionômero de vidro e resina composta, usando três sistemas adesivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among a Composite Resin (Filtek Z250 and six conventional Glass Ionomer Cements, three used for lining (Bioglass F, Vidrion F and Glass Ionomer L.C. and three for restorations (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R and Glass Ionomer type II etched and non etched, using three adhesive systems (Single Bond, Bond 1 and Stae. Thirty-six groups were made, ten samples for each group, totalizing 360 specimens. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. Group 31 (Glass Ionomer Cement type II showed the highest TBS (9.65 MPa in comparison to other tested groups. Group 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C presented the lowest TBS (2.72 MPa in comparison to all the other groups. Therefore, it can be concluded that the acid etching of the Glass Ionomer Cement is not necessary. Foi avaliada, ">in vitro, a resistência de união, por tração, entre uma Resina Composta micro-híbrida (Filtek Z-250 e seis Cimentos de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV convencionais: três utilizados para base/forramento (Bioglass F, Vidrion F e Glass Ionomer Lining Cement e três para restauração (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R e Glass Ionomer Cement type II, sem e com condicionamento ácido ortofosfórico a 37%, usando três sistemas adesivos (Single Bond, Bond 1 e Stae. Foram confeccionados 36 grupos de 10 corpos-de-prova cada, totalizando 360 espécimes. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste de Tukey-Kramer. Dentre os três CIV de base/forramento, os grupos 2 e 5 (Bioglass F apresentaram valores mais altos de adesividade à resina (7,24 e 6,03 MPa respectivamente. Quanto aos três CIV de restauração, todos apresentaram maior resistência de união, superior aos de base/forramento, sendo que o Glass Ionomer Cement type II (Grupo 31 e Vidrion R apresentaram maior força de adesão (9,65 e 7,47 MPa à resina composta. O grupo 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C. mostrou menor adesividade à resina (2,72 MPa. Houve diferenças significantes

  8. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  9. Effects of Jigsaw Cooperative Learning and Animation Techniques on Students' Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Their Conceptions of the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacop, Ataman; Doymus, Kemal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of jigsaw cooperative learning and computer animation techniques on academic achievements of first year university students attending classes in which the unit of chemical bonding is taught within the general chemistry course and these students' learning of the particulate nature of matter of this unit. The sample of this study consisted of 115 first-year science education students who attended the classes in which the unit of chemical bonding was taught in a university faculty of education during the 2009-2010 academic year. The data collection instruments used were the Test of Scientific Reasoning, the Purdue Spatial Visu