WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical weathering rates

  1. Sr isotope evolution during chemical weathering of granites -- impact of relative weathering rates of minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Sr isotopic systematics in the weathering profiles of biotite granite and granite porphyry in southern Jiangxi Province were investigated. The results showed that during the chemical weathering of granites, remarked fractionation occurred between Rb and Sr. During the early stages of chemical weathering of granites, the released Sr/Si and Sr/Ca ratios are larger than those of the parent rocks, and the leaching rate of Sr is higher than those of Si, Ca, K, Rb, etc. Dynamic variations in relative weathering rates of the main Sr-contributing minerals led to fluctuation with time in 87Sr/86Sr ratios of inherent and released Sr in the weathering crust of granite. Successive weathering of biotite, plagioclase and K-feldspar made 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the weathering residues show such a fluctuation trend as to decrease first, increase, and then decrease again till they maintain stable. This work further indicates that when Sr isotopes are used to trace biogeochemical processes on both the catchment and global scales, one must seriously take account of the prefer-ential release of Sr from dissolving solid phase and the fluctuation of 87Sr/86Sr ratios caused by the variations of relative weathering rates of Sr-contributing minerals.

  2. Sr isotope evolution during chemical weathering of granites -- impact of relative weathering rates of minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Yingjun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Ma, Y. J., Liu, C. Q., Geochemistry of strontium isotopes in the crust weathering system, Acta Mineralogica Sinica (in Chinese), 1998, 18(3): 350.[2]Ma, Y. J., Liu, C. Q., Using strontium isotopes to trace nutrient element circulation and hydrochemical evolution within an ecosystem, Advance in Earth Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 14 (4): 377.[3]Brantley, S. L., Chesley, J. T., Stillings, L. L., Isotopic ratios and release rates of strontium from weathering feldspars, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1998, 62(9): 1493.[4]Blum, J. D., Erel, Y., A silicate weathering mechanism linking increases in marine 87Sr/86Sr with global glaciation, Nature, 1995, 373: 415.[5]Blum, J. D., Erel, Y., Rb-Sr isotope systematics of granitic soil chronosequence: The importance of biotite weathering, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1997, 61(15): 3193.[6]Bullen, T., Krabbenhoft, D., Kendall, C., Kinetic and mineralogic controls on the evolution of groundwater chemistry and 87Sr/86Sr in a sandy silicate aquifer, northern Wisconsin, USA, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1996, 60: 1807.[7]Bullen, T., White, A., Blum, A. et al., Chemical weathering of a soil chronosequence on granitoid alluvium: Ⅱminer-alogic and isotopic constraints on the behavior of strontium, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1997, 61: 291.[8]Blum, J. D., Erel, Y., Brown, K., 87Sr/86Sr ratios of Sierra Nevada stream waters: Implications for relative mineral weath-ering rates, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1993, 57: 5019.[9]Ma Yingjun, Trace element and strontium isotope geochemistry during chemical weathering, Ph. D. Dissertation, 1999, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.[10]Nesbitt, H. W., Markovics, G., Price, R. C., Chemical processes affecting alkalis and alkaline earths during continental weathering, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1980, 44: 1659.[11]Clauer, N., Strontium and argon isotopes in naturally weathered biotites, muscovites and feldspars, Chem. Geol., 1981, 31: 325.[12

  3. Spatial patterns and controls of soil chemical weathering rates along a transient hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S.M.; Sanderman, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Blum, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hillslopes have been intensively studied by both geomorphologists and soil scientists. Whereas geomorphologists have focused on the physical soil production and transport on hillslopes, soil scientists have been concerned with the topographic variation of soil geochemical properties. We combined these differing approaches and quantified soil chemical weathering rates along a grass covered hillslope in Coastal California. The hillslope is comprised of both erosional and depositional sections. In the upper eroding section, soil production is balanced by physical erosion and chemical weathering. The hillslope then transitions to a depositional slope where soil accumulates due to a historical reduction of channel incision at the hillslope's base. Measurements of hillslope morphology and soil thickness were combined with the elemental composition of the soil and saprolite, and interpreted through a process-based model that accounts for both chemical weathering and sediment transport. Chemical weathering of the minerals as they moved downslope via sediment transport imparted spatial variation in the geochemical properties of the soil. Inverse modeling of the field and laboratory data revealed that the long-term soil chemical weathering rates peak at 5 g m- 2 yr- 1 at the downslope end of the eroding section and decrease to 1.5 g m- 2 yr- 1 within the depositional section. In the eroding section, soil chemical weathering rates appear to be primarily controlled by the rate of mineral supply via colluvial input from upslope. In the depositional slope, geochemical equilibrium between soil water and minerals appeared to limit the chemical weathering rate. Soil chemical weathering was responsible for removing 6% of the soil production in the eroding section and 5% of colluvial influx in the depositional slope. These were among the lowest weathering rates reported for actively eroding watersheds, which was attributed to the parent material with low amount of weatherable

  4. Amazonian chemical weathering rate derived from stony meteorite finds at Meridiani Planum on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christian; Bland, Phil A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Ashley, James W.; Warner, Nicholas H.; Grant, John A.

    2016-11-01

    Spacecraft exploring Mars such as the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, as well as the Mars Science Laboratory or Curiosity rover, have accumulated evidence for wet and habitable conditions on early Mars more than 3 billion years ago. Current conditions, by contrast, are cold, extremely arid and seemingly inhospitable. To evaluate exactly how dry today's environment is, it is important to understand the ongoing current weathering processes. Here we present chemical weathering rates determined for Mars. We use the oxidation of iron in stony meteorites investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani Planum. Their maximum exposure age is constrained by the formation of Victoria crater and their minimum age by erosion of the meteorites. The chemical weathering rates thus derived are ~1 to 4 orders of magnitude slower than that of similar meteorites found in Antarctica where the slowest rates are observed on Earth.

  5. Quantifying chemical weathering rates along a precipitation gradient on Basse-Terre Island, French Guadeloupe: New insight from U-series isotopes in weathering rinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jacqueline M.; Ma, Lin; Sak, Peter B.; Gaillardet, Jerome; Ren, Minghua; Engle, Mark A.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-12-01

    that multiple weathering clasts from the same watershed were analyzed for U-series isotope disequlibrian and show consistent results. The U-series disequilibria allowed for the determination of rind formation ages and weathering advance rates with a U-series mass balance model. The weathering advance rates generally decreased with decreasing curvature: ∼0.17 ± 0.10 mm/kyr for high curvature, ∼0.12 ± 0.05 mm/kyr for medium curvature, and ∼0.11 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.06 ± 0.03 mm/kyr for low curvature locations. The observed positive correlation between the curvature and the weathering rates is well supported by predictions of weathering models, i.e., that the curvature of the rind-core boundary controls the porosity creation and weathering advance rates at the clast scale. At the watershed scale, the new weathering advance rates derived on the low curvature transects for the relatively dry Deshaies watershed (average rate of 0.08 mm/kyr; MAP = 1800 mm and MAT = 23 °C) are ∼60% slower than the rind formation rates previously determined in the much wetter Bras David watershed (∼0.18 mm/kyr, low curvature transect; MAP = 3400 mm and MAT = 23 °C) also on Basse-Terre Island. Thus, a doubling of MAP roughly correlates with a doubling of weathering advance rate. The new rind study highlights the effect of precipitation on weathering rates over a time scale of ∼100 kyr. Weathering rinds are thus a suitable system for investigating long-term chemical weathering across environmental gradients, complementing short-term riverine solute fluxes.

  6. Tectonic uplift and denudation rate influence soil chemical weathering intensity in a semi-arid environment, southeast Spain: physico-chemical and mineralogical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Sonnet, Philippe; Delmelle, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic uplift is known to influence denudation rates. Denudation, including chemical weathering and physical erosion, affects soil production rates and weathering intensities. At topographic steady state, weathering can be transport- or weathering-limited. In the transport-limited regime, low denudation rates should lead to comparatively high weathering intensities, while in the weathering-limited case high denudation rates are associated with lower weathering intensities. Here, we test if this relationship applies to semi-arid environments where chemical weathering is generally slow. Three catchments (EST, FIL and CAB) were studied in the Internal Zone of the Betic Cordillera in southeast Spain, spanning a range of increasing uplift rates (10-170 mm/kyr) and increasing denudation rates (20-250 mm/kyr) from EST to CAB. In each catchment, two ridgetop soil profiles were sampled down to the bedrock. The three catchments have similar vegetation and climatic conditions, with precipitation of 250- 315 mm/yr and mean annual temperature of 15-17 °C. The mineralogy of the bedrock, as determined by XRD, is similar across the three catchments and is characterized by the presence of quartz, muscovite, clinochlore, biotite and plagioclase. This primary mineral assemblage is also found in the catchment soils, indicating that the soils studied derive from the same parent material. The soil clay-size fraction is dominated by kaolinite, vermiculite and illite. However, the proportions of the soil primary and secondary minerals vary between the catchment sites. The abundance of biotite decreases from CAB (14%) to EST (4%), whereas the quartz and clay contents show an opposite tendency (from 30 to 69% and 9.9 to 14.3%, respectively). Further, the abundance of vermiculite increases from CAB to EST. The results are interpreted in terms of increasing weathering intensity from CAB to EST by weathering of biotite into vermiculite and enrichment of soils on more weathering resistant

  7. Quantifying chemical weathering rates along a precipitation gradient on Basse-Terre Island, French Guadeloupe: new insight from U-series isotopes in weathering rinds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jacqueline M.; May, Linda; Sak, Peter B.; Gaillardet, Jerome; Ren, Minghua; Engle, Mark A.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    . This is the first time that multiple weathering clasts from the same watershed were analyzed for U-series isotope disequlibrian and show consistent results. The U-series disequilibria allowed for the determination of rind formation ages and weathering advance rates with a U-series mass balance model. The weathering advance rates generally decreased with decreasing curvature: ∼0.17 ± 0.10 mm/kyr for high curvature, ∼0.12 ± 0.05 mm/kyr for medium curvature, and ∼0.11 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.06 ± 0.03 mm/kyr for low curvature locations. The observed positive correlation between the curvature and the weathering rates is well supported by predictions of weathering models, i.e., that the curvature of the rind-core boundary controls the porosity creation and weathering advance rates at the clast scale.At the watershed scale, the new weathering advance rates derived on the low curvature transects for the relatively dry Deshaies watershed (average rate of 0.08 mm/kyr; MAP = 1800 mm and MAT = 23 °C) are ∼60% slower than the rind formation rates previously determined in the much wetter Bras David watershed (∼0.18 mm/kyr, low curvature transect; MAP = 3400 mm and MAT = 23 °C) also on Basse-Terre Island. Thus, a doubling of MAP roughly correlates with a doubling of weathering advance rate. The new rind study highlights the effect of precipitation on weathering rates over a time scale of ∼100 kyr. Weathering rinds are thus a suitable system for investigating long-term chemical weathering across environmental gradients, complementing short-term riverine solute fluxes.

  8. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  9. Chemical weathering in response to tectonic uplift and denudation rate in a semi-arid environment, southeast Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Opfergelt, Sophie; Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Sonnet, Philippe; Delmelle, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Soil thickness reflects the balance between soil production and denudation by chemical weathering and physical erosion. At topographic steady state, the soil weathering intensity is expected to be higher at low denudation rate (transport-limited) than at high denudation rate (weathering-limited). We tested this hypothesis for the first time in a semi-arid environment where chemical weathering processes are generally slow. The study site is the Internal Zone of the Betic Cordillera in Southeast Spain, Almeria province. The lithology is mainly mica-schist and quartzite with local presence of phyllite. Three catchments (EST, FIL, CAB) were selected upstream local faults along a gradient of increasing uplift rates (10-170 mm/kyr) and increasing denudation rates (20-250 mm/kyr), following the sequence ESTReserve in Bases (TRB = [Ca2+] + [Na+] + [K+] + [Mg2+]); the soil Fed/Fet ratio that reflects the formation of secondary Fe-oxides, and the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) that varies with the amount of secondary clay minerals and organic matter. The difference in TRB between the soil and the bedrock (ΔTRB = TRB soil - TRB bedrock) should be more negative as weathering increases, whereas the Fed/Fet ratio is expected to augment with the intensity of weathering. Since these soils have low organic carbon content, the CEC should increase with weathering degree. Our results indicate that the ΔTRB (cmolc.kg-1) is -8±14 (n=8), -79±2 (n=8) and -51±38 (n=9) for CAB, FIL and EST, respectively. The Fed/Fet ratio for CAB, FIL and EST is 0.20±0.05 (n=8), 0.20±0.03 (n=8) and 0.29±0.05 (n=9), respectively. The CEC (cmolc.kg-1) increases from 3.3±1.7 (n=8) to 8.2±1.3 (n=8) and 10.4±3.0 (n=9) from CAB to FIL and EST. Based on the CEC, and to a lesser extent the ΔTRB values, the soils from the CAB catchment appear less weathered than those from the two other catchments. However, using the Fed/Fet ratio, both CAB and FIL soils seem less weathered than EST. Overall, the

  10. Chemical weathering rates in deep-sea sediments: Comparison of multicomponent reactive transport models and estimates based on 234U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    Chemical weathering rates in natural systems are typically much slower than expected based on experiments and theory. There are several possible explanations. However, because it has been difficult to determine what effects in particular reduce the rates in specific settings, natural rates remain difficult to predict. Silicate-rich deep-sea sediments provide an ideal in-situ laboratory for investigating weathering rates because certain potentially important factors, such as advective transport through heterogeneous media, limitations on the availability of reactive surface area due to low porosity and/or cementation, unsaturated flow conditions, and seasonal variations in fluid flux and temperature, do not occur in this setting. Geochemical profiles from Site 984 in the North Atlantic are modeled using a multi-component reactive transport model (CRUNCH) to determine in-situ rates of plagioclase dissolution and other diagenetic processes, including sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation. Various possible processes which might contribute to slower rates in the field are considered, including the effect of mineral saturation state, secondary precipitation of clays, inhibition by dissolved aluminum, and the availability of reactive surface area. The reactive transport model includes an isotopic solid-solution formulation that tracks the isotopic composition of precipitating (calcite) and dissolving (plagioclase and calcite) phases, thus allowing the determination of plagioclase dissolution rates. The rate constants for plagioclase determined by geochemical transport modeling of major element profiles are within the same range determined from U-series calculations and suggest that natural weathering rates for this system are on the order of 10-17.5 to 10-17.7 mol/m2/sec assuming estimates of reactive surface area are correct, several orders of magnitude slower than laboratory-derived rates. The slow plagioclase rates are most likely due to the fact that

  11. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  12. Quantitative Chemical Indices of Weathered Igneous Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different weathering indices for characterising weathered igneous rocks of Hong Kong. Among eight chemical indices evaluated in this study, the Parker index has been found most suitable for a quantitative description of state of weathering. Based on geochemical results of 174 samples, the index decreases almost linearly with an increasing extent of weathering. The results enable a better understanding of the modification of geotechnical properties of igneous rocks associated with weathering processes.

  13. The chemical, mechanical, and hydrological evolution of weathering granitoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, Bradley W.; Hilley, George E.; Webb, Samuel M.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Moon, Seulgi; Olson, Christopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Surprisingly few studies connect the chemical, mechanical, and hydrological evolution of rock as it weathers to saprolite and soil. We assess this coevolution in granodiorite from Monterey Peninsula, California, by measuring changes in bulk chemistry, mineralogy, volumetric strain, the oxidation state of Fe in biotite crystals, tensile strength, abrasion rate, connected porosity, and hydraulic conductivity in samples covering a range of weathering grades. We identify the oxidative dissolution of biotite as the key chemical reaction because of the volumetric expansion that accompanies formation of altered biotite and precipitation of ferrihydrite. We show how the associated accumulation of elastic strain produces an energy density that is sufficient to support rock fracturing over length scales equivalent to constituent crystals. The resulting intragranular and intergranular cracking profoundly reduces tensile strength and increases the abrasion rate, connected porosity, and hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix. These changes increase the rate of plagioclase weathering, and ultimately the rock disintegrates into grus and clay. Major changes in rock properties can occur with only minor element leaching, and the threshold behavior of weathering that arises from the coevolution of chemical, hydrological, and mechanical properties may be difficult to capture using simplified weathering models that fail to incorporate these properties. Our results, which combine the mechanical and hydrological evolution of weathering rock with more common measurements of chemical changes, should help to more accurately model the effects of, and mechanical and hydrological feedbacks upon, chemical weathering of rock.

  14. Dual-Rate Transmission Reduces Weather Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    Scheme ensures maximum data received on average. Dual-rate scheme for maximizing data returned during spacecraft mission, adaptable, as is or with modifications, to high-frequency terrestrial data transmission. Data rate fixed in advance at minimum value guarantees reasonable prospect of success during bad weather. Dualrate strategy yields net data rate 2.5 times best achievable with single transmission rate.

  15. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  16. Age and weathering rate of sediments in small catchments: the role of hillslope erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseto, A.; Buss, H. L.; Chabaux, F.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion is intimately linked to chemical weathering, however we lack quantitative constraints on how erosion processes impact mineral weathering rates. Here we use the uranium-series isotope composition of river-borne material in small catchments of Puerto Rico and southeastern Australia to study the effect of contrasting erosion regimes on weathering. The U-series isotope composition of stream sediments was modelled to infer a weathering age, i.e. the average time elapsed since the sediment's minerals have started weathering. In southeastern Australia, the weathering age of stream sediments ranges between 346 ± 12 kyr and 1.78 ± 0.16 Myr, similar to values inferred from weathering profiles in the same catchment. Old weathering ages likely reflect the shallow origin of sediments mobilised via near-surface soil transport, the main mechanism of erosion in this catchment. Contrastingly, in Puerto Rico weathering ages are much younger, ranging from 5.1 ± 0.1 to 19.4 ± 0.4 kyr, reflecting that sediments are derived from less weathered, deeper saprolite, mobilised by landslides. Weathering ages of stream sediments are used to infer catchment-wide, mineral-specific weathering rates that are one to two orders of magnitude faster for Puerto Rico than for southeastern Australia. Thus, the type of erosion (near-surface soil transport vs. landslide) also affects the weathering rate of river sediments, because their weathering ages determine the potential for further weathering during sediment transport and storage in alluvial plains.

  17. Provenance control on chemical indices of weathering (Taiwan river sands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Geochemical parameters obtained from the analysis of sediments and sedimentary rocks are widely used to infer weathering and paleo-weathering conditions in source areas. Chemical indices of weathering, however, may not reflect weathering only, or even principally. The concentration of chemical elements in terrigenous sediments is constrained by the original mineralogy of source rocks, and is thus provenance-dependent. Moreover, the mineralogy and consequently the geochemistry of sediments may undergo substantial modifications by diverse physical processes during transport and deposition, including recycling and hydraulic sorting by size, density or shape, and/or by chemical dissolution and precipitation during diagenesis. Around the island of Taiwan, temperature and rainfall are consistently high and relatively homogeneous, and no significant correlation is observed between geochemical and climatic parameters. Physical erosion, fostered by landslides induced by frequent earthquakes and typhoons, prevails because of high relief and extreme rates of tectonic uplift. In such a dynamic orogenic setting, all chemical indices of weathering are controlled principally by the geology of source terranes. Sedimentaclastic and metasedimentaclastic sands carried by western Taiwan rivers draining the pro-wedge display the strongest depletion in Na, Ca, Mg and Sr relative to average upper continental crust, and no depletion or even enrichment in K, Rb and Ba. Low WIP indices reflect erosion of phyllosilicate-dominated rocks in the Slate Belt and extensive recycling of clastic rocks exposed in the Western Foothills. Instead, metamorphiclastic sands carried by eastern Taiwan rivers draining the retro-wedge show no depletion or even enrichment in Mg and Ca, and low CIA and PIA, reflecting contributions from the Tailuko Belt and Coastal Range. Volcaniclastic sands have the same CIA values of their andesitic source rocks (47 ± 1 versus 47 ± 7), indicating that weathering is

  18. Chemical weathering and runoff chemistry in a steep headwater catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Suzanne Prestrud; Dietrich, William E.

    2001-07-01

    We present here deductions about the location, rate, and mechanisms of chemical weathering in a small catchment based on a catchment-scale sprinkling experiment. In this experiment demineralized water was applied at an approximately steady rate in the CB1 catchment in the Oregon Coast Range to reach and maintain a quasi-steady discharge for a period of 4 days. Because of nearly steady flow conditions within the catchment, the contribution to solute fluxes from soil and bedrock could be partitioned. One half of the solute flux from the catchment derived from colluvial soil, and one half from weathering in bedrock. This implies more intense weathering in the thin colluvium mantling the catchment than in the thick underlying weathered bedrock. The annual solute flux from the catchment, scaled to the annual runoff from the catchment, is 32 +/- 10 t km-2 year-1, equivalent to published chemical denudation rates for nearby rivers with drainage areas 106 times greater than the experiment site. Soil waters sampled during the sprinkling experiment had steady compositions following a period of transient water flow conditions, implying steady-state chemical evolution in the soil. The waters leached organic anions from shallow depths in the soil, which solubilized aluminium and iron, indicating that podzolization is occurring in these soils. Carbonate dissolution appears to be an important source of solutes from the bedrock, despite being present as only a minor phase in the rock. Water balance suggests that the residence time of water in the catchment is about 2 months, and that typical 24 h storms displace only a fraction of the stored water. A consequence is that runoff chemistry is dominated by old water, which imposes strong limits on the variability of runoff composition.

  19. Space Weather Receives First "Impact Rating"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2007-08-01

    Journal Citation Reports, published by Thomson Scientific (http://scientific.thomson.com/isi/), has issued its first impact factor for Space Weather. It is 1.610. I consider this number to be very good, strongly validating the impact that Space Weather has already made in its short life within the community of space weather professionals.

  20. Integrating topography, hydrology and rock structure in weathering rate models of spring watersheds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, F.A.L.; Weijden, C.H. van der

    2012-01-01

    Weathering rate models designed for watersheds combine chemical data of discharging waters with morphologic and hydrologic parameters of the catchments. At the spring watershed scale, evaluation of morphologic parameters is subjective due to difficulties in conceiving the catchment geometry. Besides

  1. Reconnaissance of Field Sites for the Study of Chemical Weathering on the Guayana Shield, South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefell, C I

    2003-02-01

    Despite the fact that chemical weathering of silicate rocks plays an important role in the draw-down of CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales (Berner and Berner, 1996), the overall controls on the rate of chemical weathering are still not completely understood. Lacking a mechanistic understanding of these controls, it remains difficult to evaluate a hypothesis such as that presented by Raymo and Ruddiman (1992), who suggested that enhanced weathering and CO{sub 2} draw-down resulting from the uplift of the Himalayas contributed to global cooling during the Cenozoic. At an even more fundamental level, the three to four order of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates is still unresolved (White et al., 1996). There is as yet no comprehensive, mechanistic model for silicate chemical weathering that considers the coupled effects of precipitation, vadose zone flow, and chemical reactions. The absence of robust process models for silicate weathering and the failure to resolve some of these important questions may in fact be related-the controls on the overall rates of weathering cannot be understood without considering the weathering environment as one in which multiple, time-dependent chemical and physical processes are coupled (Malmstrom, 2000). Once chemical weathering is understood at a mechanistic process level, the important controls on chemical weathering (physical erosion, temperature, precipitation) can be folded into larger scale models tracking the global carbon cycle. Our goal in this study was to carry out the preliminary work needed to establish a field research site for chemical weathering om the Cuayana Shield in South America. The Guayana Shield is a Precambrian province greater than 1.5 billion years old covering portions of Venezuela, Guyana (the country), Surinam, French Guiana, and Brazil (Figure 1). More important than the age of the rocks themselves, however, is the age of the erosion surface developed on the Shield, with

  2. Soil weathering rates in 21 catchments of the Canadian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Houle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil mineral weathering represents an essential source of nutrient base cation (Ca, Mg and K for forest growth in addition to provide a buffering power against precipitation acidity for soils and surface waters. Weathering rates of base cations were obtained for 21 catchments located within the temperate and the boreal forest of the Canadian Shield with the geochemical model PROFILE. Weathering rates ranged from 0.58 to 4.46 kmolc ha−1 yr−1 and their spatial variation within the studied area was mostly in agreement with spatial variations in soil mineralogy. Weathering rates of Ca and Mg were significantly correlated (r = 0.80 and 0.64 with their respective lake concentrations. Weathering rates of K and Na did not correlate with lake concentrations of K and Na. The modeled weathering rates for each catchment were also compared with estimations of net catchment exportations. The result show that modeled weathering rates of Ca were not significantly different than the net catchment exportations while modeled weathering rates of Mg were higher by 51%. Larger differences were observed for K and Na weathering rates that were significantly different than net catchment exportations being 6.9 and 2.2 times higher than net exportations, respectively. The results for K were expected given its high reactivity with biotic compartments and suggest that most of the K produced by weathering reactions was retained within soil catchments and/or above ground biomass. This explanation does not apply to Na, however, which is a conservative element in forest ecosystems because of the insignificant needs of Na for soil microorganisms and above ground vegetations. It raises concern about the liability of the PROFILE model to provide reliable values of Na weathering rates. Overall, we concluded that the PROFILE model is powerful enough to reproduce spatial geographical gradients in weathering rates for relatively large areas

  3. Soil weathering rates in 21 catchments of the Canadian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Houle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil mineral weathering represents an essential source of nutrient base cation (Ca, Mg and K for forest growth in addition to provide a buffering power against precipitation acidity for soils and surface waters. Weathering rates of base cations were obtained for 21 catchments located within the temperate and the boreal forest of the Canadian Shield with the geochemical model PROFILE. Weathering rates ranged from 0.58 to 4.46 kmolc ha−1 yr−1 and their spatial variation within the studied area was mostly in agreement with spatial variations in soil mineralogy. Weathering rates of Ca and Mg were significantly correlated (r = 0.80 and 0.64 with their respective lake concentrations. Weathering rates of K and Na did not correlate with lake concentrations of K and Na. The modeled weathering rates for each catchment were also compared with estimations of net catchment exportations. The result show that modeled weathering rates of Ca were not significantly different than the net catchment exportations while modeled weathering rates of Mg were higher by 51 %. Larger differences were observed for K and Na weathering rates that were significantly different than net catchment exportations being 6.9 and 2.2 times higher than net exportations, respectively. The results for K were expected given its high reactivity with biotic compartments and suggest that most of the K produced by weathering reactions was retained within soil catchments and/or above ground biomass. This explanation does not apply to Na, however, which is a conservative element in forest ecosystems because of the insignificant needs of Na for soil microorganisms and above ground vegetations. It raises concern about the liability of the PROFILE model to provide reliable values of Na weathering rates. Overall, we concluded that the PROFILE model is powerful enough to reproduce spatial geographical gradients in weathering rates for relatively large areas

  4. Space Weathering Rates in Lunar and Itokawa Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering alters the chemistry, microstructure, and spectral proper-ties of grains on the surfaces of airless bodies by two major processes: micrometeorite impacts and solar wind interactions. Investigating the nature of space weathering processes both in returned samples and in remote sensing observations provides information fundamental to understanding the evolution of airless body regoliths, improving our ability to determine the surface composition of asteroids, and linking meteorites to specific asteroidal parent bodies. Despite decades of research into space weathering processes and their effects, we still know very little about weathering rates. For example, what is the timescale to alter the reflectance spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope from an S-type asteroid? One approach to answering this question has been to determine ages of asteroid families by dynamical modeling and determine the spectral proper-ties of the daughter fragments. However, large differences exist between inferred space weathering rates and timescales derived from laboratory experiments, analysis of asteroid family spectra and the space weathering styles; estimated timescales range from 5000 years up to 108 years. Vernazza et al. concluded that solar wind interactions dominate asteroid space weathering on rapid timescales of 10(exp 4)-10(exp 6) years. Shestopalov et al. suggested that impact-gardening of regolith particles and asteroid resurfacing counteract the rapid progress of solar wind optical maturation of asteroid surfaces and proposed a space weathering timescale of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) years.

  5. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M; Little, Mark G; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N; Leeman, William P; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-04-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms.

  6. Chemical element transfer of weathering granite regolith in the Three Gorges Dam region of Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Clearing up sediment and regolith on the foundation of the dam in the Three Gorges of the Yangtze River in 1999, riverbed were exposed. On the basis of weathering granite regolith sampled from different portions of the valley landforms, by analysing total chemical contents with X rays fluorescent slice and calculating proper value of chemical element transferring ratio and intensity, the transferring law of chemical elements in different portions of the landforms were concluded: 1) In various landforms of the river valley, the process of desilication is not distinct; 2) in weathering granite regolith of riverbed, easy soluble CaO and MgO are relatively enriched whereas A1203 tends to decrease. The enriching rate of Fe203 is the greatest in various landforms of the river valley; 3) in weathering granite regolith of flood-plain, K20 and MgO contents are relatively enriched; 4) the weathering granite regolith of valley slope is a typical north subtropical weathering regolith, and its chemical weathering degree is in the transition phase from early to middle period; and 5) there is an opposite layer where K20 is relatively leaching and Na20 relatively enriching in 6.5 m depth of all weathering granite regolith.

  7. Climate-driven thresholds for chemical weathering in postglacial soils of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jean L.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Vitousek, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    Chemical weathering in soils dissolves and alters minerals, mobilizes metals, liberates nutrients to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and may modulate Earth's climate over geologic time scales. Climate-weathering relationships are often considered fundamental controls on the evolution of Earth's surface and biogeochemical cycles. However, surprisingly little consensus has emerged on if and how climate controls chemical weathering, and models and data from published literature often give contrasting correlations and predictions for how weathering rates and climate variables such as temperature or moisture are related. Here we combine insights gained from the different approaches, methods, and theory of the soil science, biogeochemistry, and geomorphology communities to tackle the fundamental question of how rainfall influences soil chemical properties. We explore climate-driven variations in weathering and soil development in young, postglacial soils of New Zealand, measuring soil elemental geochemistry along a large precipitation gradient (400-4700 mm/yr) across the Waitaki basin on Te Waipounamu, the South Island. Our data show a strong climate imprint on chemical weathering in these young soils. This climate control is evidenced by rapid nonlinear changes along the gradient in total and exchangeable cations in soils and in the increased movement and redistribution of metals with rainfall. The nonlinear behavior provides insight into why climate-weathering relationships may be elusive in some landscapes. These weathering thresholds also have significant implications for how climate may influence landscape evolution and the release of rock-derived nutrients to ecosystems, as landscapes that transition to wetter climates across this threshold may weather and deplete rapidly.

  8. CHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF CERIUM ELEMENT IN ROCK WEATHERING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A study on existing valence state and chemical behavior of cerium element in two categories of rock weathering system in China has been carried out. In the granitoid weathering crust of Southern China,cerium as tetravalent hydroxide absorbed on clay minerals occupies 62.58 % of total amount of cerium and the cerium partitioning in the phase is 69.58 %. The depositing cerium stops its mobility downward, resulting in rare earth partitioning variation, the light rare earth partitioning is high at upper layer of weathering crust, the heavy rare earth partitioning is high at bottom layer of weathering crust, and the extracted product exists cerium lose effect. For Mn2+ as reducing agent existing in black weathering earth of Maoniuping rare earth ore,cerium is trivalent and absorbed on Mn-Fe oxide as colloid phase sediment. Colloid sediment phase can be divided into Mn-Fe combined phase and hydroxide sediment phase with cerium contents of 19.77% and 48.30%, and their cerium partitionings are 80.72% and 37.38% respectively. The Mn-Fe combined phase can selectively absorb cerium.

  9. Chemical weathering as a mechanism for the climatic control of bedrock river incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brendan P.; Johnson, Joel P. L.; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2016-04-01

    Feedbacks between climate, erosion and tectonics influence the rates of chemical weathering reactions, which can consume atmospheric CO2 and modulate global climate. However, quantitative predictions for the coupling of these feedbacks are limited because the specific mechanisms by which climate controls erosion are poorly understood. Here we show that climate-dependent chemical weathering controls the erodibility of bedrock-floored rivers across a rainfall gradient on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. Field data demonstrate that the physical strength of bedrock in streambeds varies with the degree of chemical weathering, which increases systematically with local rainfall rate. We find that incorporating the quantified relationships between local rainfall and erodibility into a commonly used river incision model is necessary to predict the rates and patterns of downcutting of these rivers. In contrast to using only precipitation-dependent river discharge to explain the climatic control of bedrock river incision, the mechanism of chemical weathering can explain strong coupling between local climate and river incision.

  10. Sensitivity of mineral dissolution rates to physical weathering : A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2015-04-01

    There is continued interest on accurate estimation of natural weathering rates owing to their importance in soil formation, nutrient cycling, estimation of acidification in soils, rivers and lakes, and in understanding the role of silicate weathering in carbon sequestration. At the same time a challenge does exist to reconcile discrepancies between laboratory-determined weathering rates and natural weathering rates. Studies have consistently reported laboratory rates to be in orders of magnitude faster than the natural weathering rates (White, 2009). These discrepancies have mainly been attributed to (i) changes in fluid composition (ii) changes in primary mineral surfaces (reactive sites) and (iii) the formation of secondary phases; that could slow natural weathering rates. It is indeed difficult to measure the interactive effect of the intrinsic factors (e.g. mineral composition, surface area) and extrinsic factors (e.g. solution composition, climate, bioturbation) occurring at the natural setting, in the laboratory experiments. A modeling approach could be useful in this case. A number of geochemical models (e.g. PHREEQC, EQ3/EQ6) already exist and are capable of estimating mineral dissolution / precipitation rates as a function of time and mineral mass. However most of these approaches assume a constant surface area in a given volume of water (White, 2009). This assumption may become invalid especially at long time scales. One of the widely used weathering models is the PROFILE model (Sverdrup and Warfvinge, 1993). The PROFILE model takes into account the mineral composition, solution composition and surface area in determining dissolution / precipitation rates. However there is less coupling with other processes (e.g. physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation) which could directly or indirectly influence dissolution / precipitation rates. We propose in this study a coupling between chemical weathering mechanism (defined as a function of reactive area

  11. Evolution of porosity and diffusivity associated with chemical weathering of a basalt clast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.; Tomutsa, L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-02-15

    Weathering of rocks as a result of exposure to water and the atmosphere can cause significant changes in their chemistry and porosity. In low-porosity rocks, such as basalts, changes in porosity, resulting from chemical weathering, are likely to modify the rock's effective diffusivity and permeability, affecting the rate of solute transport and thus potentially the rate of overall weathering to the extent that transport is the rate limiting step. Changes in total porosity as a result of mineral dissolution and precipitation have typically been used to calculate effective diffusion coefficients through Archie's law for reactive transport simulations of chemical weathering, but this approach fails to account for unconnected porosity that does not contribute to transport. In this study, we combine synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) and laboratory and numerical diffusion experiments to examine changes in both total and effective porosity and effective diffusion coefficients across a weathering interface in a weathered basalt clast from Costa Rica. The {mu}CT data indicate that below a critical value of {approx}9%, the porosity is largely unconnected in the basalt clast. The {mu}CT data were further used to construct a numerical pore network model to determine upscaled, effective diffusivities as a function of total porosity (ranging from 3 to 30%) for comparison with diffusivities determined in laboratory tracer experiments. By using effective porosity as the scaling parameter and accounting for critical porosity, a model is developed that accurately predicts continuum-scale effective diffusivities across the weathering interface of the basalt clast.

  12. CHEMICAL WEATHERING PROCESSES AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONSUMPTION OF HUANGHE RIVER AND CHANGJIANG RIVER BASINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-ying; ZHANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    Rock weathering plays an important role in studying the long-term carbon cycles and global climaticchange. According to the statistics analysis, the Huanghe (Yellow) River water chemistry was mainly controlled byevaporite and carbonate weathering, which were responsible for over 90% of total dissolved ions. As compared withthe Huanghe River basin, dissolved load of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River was mainly originated from the carbonate dissolution.The chemical weathering rates were estimated to be 39.29t/(km2·a)and 61.58t/(km2·a)by deduting the HCO3- derived from atmosphere in the Huanghe River and Changjiang River watersheds, respectively. The CO2 con-sumption rates by rock weathering were calculated to be 120.84 × 103mol/km2 and 452.46 × 103mol/km2 annually in thetwo basins, respectively. The total CO2 consumption of the two basins amounted to 918.51 × 109mol/a, accounting for3.83% of the world gross. In contrast to other world watersheds, the stronger evaporite reaction and infirm silicateweathering can explain such feature that CO2 consumption rates were lower than a global average, suggesting that thesequential weathering may be go on in the two Chinese drainage basins.

  13. Dissolved rhenium in river waters: Insight into the chemical weathering of fossil organic carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert; Gaillardet, Jerome

    2010-05-01

    The store of carbon in rock as fossil organic matter represents ~15x1021 g, which is almost 400 times the total amount of carbon present in the oceans and atmosphere. Oxidation of fossil organic carbon (FOC) during chemical weathering returns CO2 that was sequestered from the atmosphere in the geological past, back into the contemporary carbon cycle. Despite this recognition, the natural rates of FOC weathering are poorly constrained in the modern environment, as are the precise controls on its variability. This is primarily due to the difficultly in tracking the dissolved and gaseous carbon produced during FOC weathering, where biology and carbonate weathering mask its influence at a catchment-scale. Here we investigate the use of rhenium (Re) as a tracer of FOC weathering, focusing on a series of mountain catchments in Taiwan. We present dual methodology for determining dissolved Re content in river waters by ICP-MS, using pre-concentration and matrix removal via anion exchange chemistry and by direct analysis through standard-addition. Precision (2sigma) and accuracy at the ppt level are found to be better than 7%. In the 16 sampled catchments, the dissolved Re concentrations span the entire range from the published literature. We investigate the source of dissolved Re in the catchments using measurements of bedrocks and river sediments, and the comparative behavior of Re to major dissolved phases. A preliminary estimate of the Re budget derived from the weathering of FOC is presented, and the implications for the rates of FOC weathering discussed.

  14. High potential for chemical weathering and climate effects of early lichens and bryophytes in the Late Ordovician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Lenton, Tim; Pohl, Alexandre; Weber, Bettina; Mander, Luke; Donnadieu, Yannick; Beer, Christian; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician may have considerably increased global chemical weathering, thereby reducing atmospheric CO2 concentration and contributing to a decrease in global temperature and the onset of glaciations. Usually, enhancement of weathering by non-vascular vegetation is estimated using field experiments which are limited to small areas and a low number of species. This makes it difficult to extrapolate to the global scale and to climatic conditions of the past, which differ markedly from the recent climate. Here we present a global, spatially explicit modelling approach to estimate chemical weathering by non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician. During this period, vegetation probably consisted of early forms of today's lichens and bryophytes. We simulate these organisms with a process-based model, which takes into account their physiological diversity by representing multiple species. The productivity of lichens and bryophytes is then related to chemical weathering of surface rocks. The rationale is that the organisms dissolve rocks to extract phosphorus for the production of new biomass. To account for the limited supply of unweathered rock material in shallow regions, we cap biotic weathering at the erosion rate. We estimate a potential global weathering flux of 10.2 km3 yr-1 of rock, which is around 12 times larger than today's global chemical weathering. The high weathering potential implies a considerable impact of lichens and bryophytes on atmospheric CO2 concentration in the Ordovician. Moreover, we find that biotic weathering is highly sensitive to atmospheric CO2, which suggests a strong feedback between chemical weathering by lichens and bryophytes and climate.

  15. The Neogene Redbeds of Iceland - a High-Latitude Terrestrial Paleoclimate Monitor Driven by Chemical Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riishuus, M. S.; Bird, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering of tephra and aeolian dust of basaltic composition produces clays and iron oxide/hydroxide minerals preserved in reddened layers referred to as redbeds, boles or paleosols. We propose that the extent of weathering of Neogene redbeds in Iceland and the isotopic composition of structurally bound water in associated weathering clay preserve records of high-latitude paleoclimatic and hydrologic conditions. In support we present whole-rock geochemistry and smectite D/H compositions of redbed horizons from Iceland for comparative analysis with global paleoclimate trends and local independent proxy data. Smectite δD values of 35 basaltic tephras in Iceland (~15-2 Ma) display a general decrease in δD compositions from -110 to -105 ‰ at ~15-13 Ma to -115 to -118 ‰ at ~3-2 Ma which correlates well with the global cooling trend from the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-15 Ma) to present day. Furthermore, the extent of weathering expressed by the Chemical Index of Weathering increases from 40-50 at 2-3 Ma to 80-90 at 15-16 Ma suggesting enhanced chemical weathering rates during the warmer climate conditions. The weathering extent of modern andosols in Iceland is temperature-dependant and allows construction of a paleo-climate proxy [1]. Application of this proxy suggests that mean annual temperatures (MATs) increased from ~0°C at ~2 Ma to ~9°C at 15-16 Ma in general agreement with independent local proxy data. The δD values of paleo meteoric waters in Iceland, estimated using a smectite-water fractionation factor and model MATs, decrease from -41 ‰ at 15-16 Ma (9°C) to -45 ‰ at 2 Ma (0°C). The paleo meteoric water compositions are increasingly enriched in deuterium relative to present day meteoric water in Iceland (δD ≤ -50 ‰). This is in agreement with global cooling since Middle Miocene toward ice-dominated conditions with greater equator-to-pole temperature contrasts, affecting the distillation process between ocean, atmosphere and

  16. Sulfide mineralization: Its role in chemical weathering of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produced degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy with terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato- and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossans above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite) and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost, contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, etc., which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  17. Interplay between physical movements of soils and mineral grains and chemical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.

    2007-12-01

    Most soil biogeochemistry studies treat the soils and their inorganic and organic constituents as physically immobile. Those soil materials, however, are in perpetual motion due to the conversion of bedrock to soils, colluvial transport, and vertical mixing by various biophysical perturbations of the soils. Subsequently, a soil is continuously replaced by the materials from the neighboring soils and the underlying parent material, while its individual horizons are gradually mixed with the materials in the neighboring horizons. The movements of bulk soil materials are ultimately driven by moving individual mineral grains. While rarely appreciated, these physical movements of soil's mineral components operate in the presence of strong vertical and topographic gradients of the rates of mineral dissolution and leaching. The result is that the physical movement of soil constituents affects chemical weathering. The fluxes of soil materials (via physical movements and solute fluxes) in and out of a soil system defined by a researcher determine the time length that the materials reside in the system. The residence time, together with the system-specific rates of chemical weathering, determine the degree of weathering of the materials within the system. This presentation provides a new mathematical framework to consistently quantify the residence times of minerals, individual soil horizons, soil profiles, and an entire soil within a watershed boundary. Soil age, which is equivalent of the time length since the cessation of erosion or deposition on level grounds, becomes a special case of the residence time. The model is combined with empirical data to quantitatively illustrate the impacts that the physical motion of soil constituents have on the rates of chemical weathering. The data are drawn from ongoing field and laboratory studies focusing on the impact of river incision, colluvial flux, bioturbation, and agricultural tillage on the vertical and lateral variation of

  18. Chemical weathering and chemical runoffs in the seashore granite hills in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Surface runoffs and the contents of major ions and dissolved silicon were surveyed and analyzed based on weekly sampling for one year in a granite watershed of Zhuhai City, Guangdong Province. The results demonstrated that the slope runoff played an essential role in feeding the rivulet during precipitation, whereas the groundwater was more important for the rivulet in the non-raining stages. Dissolved silicon, Na+, HCO3-, and Clions constituted the major chemical components of the rivulet water. Atmospheric CO2 and H2SO4 sourced from the oxidation of pyrite were the main erosive mediums in the natural chemical weathering. Natural chemical weathering, the wet and dry deposition of sea-salt, and acids precipitation contributed approximately equal shares of anions to the rivulet water. The ratio of NO3- to SO42- was more than 1.0 in the runoff of the studied seashore watershed, whereas it is less than 1.0 in the Xijiang River that is adjacent to the study area. This implied that the chemical composition of runoff is controlled mainly by the differences in atmospheric acid precipitation caused by human activities and lithology within the catchments under the same bio-climate zone. The CO2 flux consumed by the rock chemical weathering processes within the seashore granite watershed in South China was (0.35-1.37)×105 mol km-2 a-1.

  19. Estimation of weathering rates and CO2 drawdown based on solute load: Significance of granulites and gneisses dominated weathering in the Kaveri River basin, Southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, J. K.; Balakrishnan, S.; Bhutani, R.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The solute load of the Kaveri River (South India) and its tributaries draining diverse Precambrian terrains during pre-monsoon and monsoon periods was determined. Using average annual flow, total drainage area and atmospheric input corrected major ion concentrations of these rivers chemical weathering rates, annual fluxes of different ionic species to the ocean and CO2 consumption rates were estimated. Bicarbonate is the most dominant ion (27-79% of anion budget) in all the river samples collected during monsoon period followed by Ca2+, whereas, in case of pre-monsoon water samples Na+ is the most dominant ion (in meq/l). Two approaches were adopted to estimate silicate and carbonate weathering rates in the drainage basin. At Musuri silicate weathering rate (SWR) is 9.44 ± 0.29 tons/km2/a and carbonate weathering rate (CWR) is 1.46 ± 0.16 tons/km2/a. More than 90% of the total ionic budget is derived from weathering of silicates in the Kaveri basin. CO2 consumption rate in the basin for silicate weathering FCO2sil is 3.83 ± 0.12 × 105 mol/km2/a (upper limit), which is comparable with the Himalayan rivers at upper reaches. For carbonate weathering (FCO2carb) CO2 consumption rate is 0.15 ± 0.03 × 105 mol/km2/a in the Kaveri basin. The lower limit of CO2 consumption rate corrected for H2SO4 during silicate and carbonate weathering is FCO2sil is 3.24 × 1005 mol/km2/a and FCO2carb 0.13 × 105 mol/km2/a respectively. CO2 sequestered due to silicate weathering in the Kaveri basin is 25.41 (±0.82) × 109 mol/a which represents 0.21 (±0.01)% of global CO2 drawdown. This may be due to tropical climatic condition, high rainfall during both SW and NE monsoon and predominance of silicate rocks in the Kaveri basin.

  20. An investigation of controls on chemical weathering in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The steep volcanic terrain on the wet western side of the Cascade Range is likely to support relatively fast chemical weathering rates. In this study we present preliminary data from an investigation of weathering in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, located in the central western Oregon Cascades. The H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest has long been the focus of watershed biogeochemistry and ecosystem studies. Within the forest, 7 small watersheds are gauged, with discharge, stream chemistry, and sediment flux records extending from 1968 to the present. Prior work at this site has focused on understanding the system response to timber harvest, fire, and road-building disturbance. The 6400 hectare landscape of the Andrews forest has been well-characterized for multiple variables, such as climate, aboveground net primary productivity, hydrologic flowpaths and disturbance regimes. Together with the long-term monitoring of stream fluxes, this provides context for our investigation of the controls on weathering processes and rates. We conducted a paired soil sampling regime in order to examine differences in weathering products based on bedrock type (basalt flow, andesite flow, and propylitically altered tuff and breccia), slope aspect, and elevation, in each case holding other soil forming state factors relatively constant. Soils were sampled by horizon down to bedrock or to ~1.5 m depth, and fully characterized including pH, bulk density, and particle size analysis. Fe, Al, Si, and Mn were analyzed on selective wet chemical extraction procedures to examine differences between soils in content of amorphous and crystalline Fe-oxides, allophane, and organo-mineral complexes. XRD analyses of phyllosilicate clay fractions from the deepest 2 horizons of each profile were also performed. Finally, we present bulk chemistry from total soil digestions, in order to assess the overall degree of chemical denudation from the soil profiles, as a function of elevation, slope

  1. Chemical weathering trends in fine-grained ephemeral stream sediments of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated chemical weathering trends within the fine-grained ( 40 m2/g. Utilization of MFW (mafic-felsic-weathered) and A-CN-K (Al2O3-CaO + Na2O-K2O) plots, however, are more effective in discerning the extent and nature of chemical weathering in these stream systems. Ca and Na depletion observed within the sediments exhibiting the highest surface area in Delta Stream suggest that chemical weathering may result in pitting and/or incongruent dissolution of pyroxenes and feldspars, as well as the development of amorphous and/or nanophase weathering products. In contrast, Clark Glacier stream sediments do not have similar leaching trends in the fine-grained sediment fraction and exhibit minimal weathering overall. This may suggest that fine-grained material is being trapped on top of the Clark Glacier surface and has not yet been transported into the weathering environment of the hyporheic zone due to timing of sampling. Alternatively, complete dissolution of very fine-grained sediment could be occurring in this stream transect, and is therefore not preserved in the fine sediment fraction. Overall, the magnitude of chemical weathering observed between the two stream systems is ultimately related to the nature of the underlying drift (cold and wet-based drift deposition), dispersal patterns of eolian fines, and variable stream discharge rates. Thus, incorporation of local fine-grained sediment derived from the underlying glacial drift deposits and distributed via the varying wind regimes within the hyper-arid climate into active stream channels may facilitate incongruent mineral dissolution and development of weathering products, and ultimately influence the composition and concentration of meltwater stream solutes.

  2. Uncertainty in silicate mineral weathering rate estimates: source partitioning and policy implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futter, M. N.; Klaminder, J.; Lucas, R. W.; Laudon, H.; Köhler, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    Precise and accurate estimates of silicate mineral weathering rates are crucial when setting policy targets for long-term forest sustainability, critical load calculations and assessing consequences of proposed geo-engineering solutions to climate change. In this paper, we scrutinize 394 individual silicate mineral weathering estimates from 82 sites on three continents. We show that within-site differences of several hundred per cent arise when different methods are used to estimate weathering rates, mainly as a result of uncertainties related to input data rather than conceptually different views of the weathering process. While different methods tend to rank sites congruently from high to low weathering rates, large within-site differences in estimated weathering rate suggest that policies relying on quantitative estimates based upon a single method may have undesirable outcomes. We recommend the use of at least three independent estimates when making management decisions related to silicate mineral weathering rates.

  3. Vadose Zone Weathering Rates Inferred from U-Series Disequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Depaolo, D. J.; Steefel, C.; Christensen, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    The U-series isotope system can be used to quantify reaction rates in aquifers and thick vadose zone environments. The approach is based on the α -recoil of 234Th atoms across grain boundaries, which enriches the pore fluid in 234U. Dissolution of the solid phase releases mainly 238U to the pore fluid, so that the 234U/238U activity ratio of the pore fluid is a measure of the local ratio of the dissolution U flux to the α -recoil flux. The interpretation of U-series disequilibrium in weathering environments depends on the α -recoil flux, which is highly dependent on both the distribution of U and the grain size distribution of the soil. The recoil length of the 234Th atom in a silicate is approximately 700 Å, therefore the fine-grained material, with a greater surface area to volume ratio, contributes a significant amount of the 234U to the porewater. As a result, estimates of the recoil flux based on the mean grain size may under predict the supply of 234U by over an order of magnitude. In order to quantify the reaction rate, this recoil flux must be accurately measured by consideration of the recoil contribution of the fine-grained material, despite the fact that it may only comprise a small fraction of the total mass of the sediment. U concentrations and high precision isotope measurements (234U/238U) of pore fluids, mineral separates, and grain size intervals are used to constrain reaction rates for a 70 m vadose zone core from eastern Washington State. The pore water 234U/238U activity ratios range from 1.04 to 1.20 in the pore fluids, and from 0.94 to 1.0 in the various size fractions. Data from the solid phases is used to construct a predictive model for α -recoil flux in heterogeneous soil. The calculated recoil loss, which considers each grain size interval, is up to 7 times greater than for a geometric prediction based on the mean grain size. The measured 234U/238U ratios for the vadose zone, in conjunction with the estimates for the a-recoil flux

  4. Hydrochemistry and weathering rates on Corumbataí River basin, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; Lima, Jorge Luis Nepomuceno de

    2010-03-01

    SummaryThis work was held at the Corumbataí River basin that is inserted within the giant Paraná sedimentary basin (Paleozoic-Cenozoic) in South America. The Corumbataí River is the major river draining the area and its water is extensively used by water supply systems in the basin. Its surface waters were collected at two sampling points, upstream and downstream from Rio Claro city, the principal municipality within the basin. We report chemical and radionuclides ( 222Rn and 210Po) analyses for rainwater and river water samples in order to estimate chemical weathering fluxes. All major chemical data indicated poorer conditions of the water quality in Corumbataí River after reaching Rio Claro city. However, one very important finding was that the weighted mean of the 210Po activity concentration is the same (0.21 dpm/L) upstream and downstream from Rio Claro city, indicating that 210Po is a conservative nuclide. The net output flux in Corumbataí River basin estimated from the difference between the total discharge flux and the input flux based on wet precipitation yielded a negative value for polonium as it is a very particle-reactive radionuclide, tending to accumulate into fluvial sediments. The chemical weathering rate (removed material quantity) corresponded to 76.5 t/km 2 yr when Po data in sediments and rocks were utilized in the calculations. This rate is compatible with others determined elsewhere, indicating the usefulness of Po in studies of weathering processes, even in areas characterized by anthropogenic inputs.

  5. Increased chemical weathering during the deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriyala, Pavan; Sukumaran, N. P.; Nath, B. Nagender; Ramamurty, P. B.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Vijayagopal, B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sebastian, Tyson

    2017-03-01

    Chemical weathering and the ensuing atmospheric carbon dioxide consumption has long been considered to work on geological time periods until recently when some modelling and natural records have shown that the weathering-related CO2 consumption can change at century to glacial-interglacial time scale. Last glacial to interglacial transition period is a best test case to understand the interplay between Pco2-temperature-chemical weathering when a pulse of rapid chemical weathering was initiated. Here we show, from a high resolution 54 ka record from the Andaman Sea in the northern Indian Ocean, that the chemical weathering responds to deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification in the Myanmar watersheds. The multi-proxy data (Al/K, CIA, Rb/Sr, 87Sr/86Sr for degree of weathering and 143Nd/144Nd for provenance) reveal an increase in silicate weathering with initiation of interglacial warm climate at ~17.7 ka followed by a major change at 15.5 ka. Inferred changes in chemical weathering have varied in tandem with the regional monsoonal proxies (δ18Osw-salinity changes of Northern Indian Ocean, effective Asian moisture content and δ18O records of Chinese caves) and are synchronous with changes in summer insolation at 30°N and δ18O of GISP2 implying that chemical weathering was not a later amplifier but worked in tandem with global climate change.

  6. Increased chemical weathering during the deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriyala, Pavan; Sukumaran, N. P.; Nath, B. Nagender; Ramamurty, P. B.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Vijayagopal, B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sebastian, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    Chemical weathering and the ensuing atmospheric carbon dioxide consumption has long been considered to work on geological time periods until recently when some modelling and natural records have shown that the weathering-related CO2 consumption can change at century to glacial-interglacial time scale. Last glacial to interglacial transition period is a best test case to understand the interplay between Pco2-temperature-chemical weathering when a pulse of rapid chemical weathering was initiated. Here we show, from a high resolution 54 ka record from the Andaman Sea in the northern Indian Ocean, that the chemical weathering responds to deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification in the Myanmar watersheds. The multi-proxy data (Al/K, CIA, Rb/Sr, 87Sr/86Sr for degree of weathering and 143Nd/144Nd for provenance) reveal an increase in silicate weathering with initiation of interglacial warm climate at ~17.7 ka followed by a major change at 15.5 ka. Inferred changes in chemical weathering have varied in tandem with the regional monsoonal proxies (δ18Osw-salinity changes of Northern Indian Ocean, effective Asian moisture content and δ18O records of Chinese caves) and are synchronous with changes in summer insolation at 30°N and δ18O of GISP2 implying that chemical weathering was not a later amplifier but worked in tandem with global climate change. PMID:28303943

  7. Hydrochemistry of inland rivers in the north Tibetan Plateau: Constraints and weathering rate estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weihua

    2016-01-15

    The geographic region around the northern and northeastern Tibetan Plateau is the source of several inland rivers (e.g. Tarim River) of worldwide importance that are generated in the surrounding mountains systems of Tianshan, Pamir, Karakorum, and Qilian. To characterize chemical weathering and atmospheric CO2 consumption in these regions, water samples from the Tarim, Yili, Heihe, Shule, and Shiyang Rivers were collected and analyzed for major ion concentrations. The hydrochemical characteristics of these inland rivers pronouncedly distinguish them from large exorheic rivers (e.g., the Yangtze River and the Yellow River), as reflected in very high total dissolution solids (TDS) values. TDS was 115-4345 mg l(-1) with an average of 732 mg l(-1), which is an order of magnitude higher than the mean value for world rivers (65 mg l(-1)). The Cheerchen River, Niya River, Keliya River and the terminal lakes of the Tarim River and the Heihe River have TDS values higher than 1 gl(-1), indicating saline water that cannot be directly consumed. Therefore, the problem of sufficient and safe drinking water has become increasingly prominent in the northwestern China arid zone. According to an inversion model, the contribution from evaporite dissolution to the dissolved loads in these rivers is 12.5%-99% with an average of 54%. The calculated silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 0.02-4.62 t km(-2)y(-1) and 0.01-11.7 t km(-2)y(-1) for these rivers. To reduce the influence of lithology, only the silicate weathering rates in different parts of the Tibetan Plateau are compared. A rough variation tendency can be seen in the rates: northern regional (0.15-1.73 t km(-2)y(-1))runoff, however, seems to have a positive correlation with silicate weathering rates.

  8. Weak chemical weathering during the Little Ice Age recorded by lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Low magnetic susceptibility, low Sr content and hence high Rb/Sr ratio in the lake sediment sequence indicate a weak chemical weathering process under arid and cold climate of the Little Ice Age in a single closed lake watershed. According to different geochemical behavior between rubidium and strontium in earth surface processes, variation of Rb/Sr ratios in the lake sediment sequence can be used as an effective geochemical proxy with definite climatic significance of chemical weathering in watershed. Unlike chemical weathering process in tropic zone and modern temperate-humid climate, concordant changes in both Sr content and magnetic susceptibility with d18O values of Dunde ice core suggest that the weak chemical weathering was controlled by air temperature during the Little Ice Age maximum. After the Little Ice Age, chemical weathering intensity was controlled also gradually by precipitation with increasing in temperature.

  9. The impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsath, Arjun M.; Burke, Benjamin C.

    2013-10-01

    Soil-mantled upland landscapes are widespread across the habitable world, support extensive life, and are the interface between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere but typically are not cultivated. Soil found across such landscapes fits the conceptual framework of a physically mobile layer derived from the underlying parent material along with some locally derived organic content. The extent and persistence of these upland soils depend on the long-term balance between soil production and erosion. Here we briefly review methods used to quantify the physical and chemical processes of soil production and erosion and revisit three granitic study areas in southeastern Australia and northern California that enabled early quantification of the soil production function and topographic controls on chemical weathering. We then present new major and trace element data from 2-m by 2-m pits dug at each field site to quantify local variability of Zr concentrations and the chemical index of alteration (CIA), weathering indices used to determine chemical weathering rates and extents in soils and saprolites. Using both new and previously published data, we compare differences between local variability and regional, as well as intersite variability of these important indices. For each of the 2-m pits, we collected 25 samples and found that the simple mean and the 2σ standard deviation best describe the local variation in the data. We also find that the variability in the 2-m pit data lies within variability observed in the same data from samples collected in individual soil pits across each of the field sites and that the differences between sites are consistent with previously published results. These observations highlight the importance of quantifying local scale variability in studies that use similar, multifaceted measurements to quantify hillslope soil production and erosion processes.

  10. Geophysical and Chemical Weathering Signatures Across the Deep Weathered-Unweathered Granite Boundary of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D., Jr.; Bacon, A. R.; Brantley, S. L.; Holbrook, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the relationship between geophysical measurements and chemical weathering at Earth's surface, we combine comprehensive chemical and physical analyses of a 70-m granite weathering profile in the Southern Piedmont in the southeastern United States. The research site is in the uplands of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory and is similar to many geomorphically stable, ancient, and highly-weathered Ultisol soils of the region. Surface and downhole geophysical analyses suggest significant physical changes to depths of about 40 m, where geophysical properties are consistent with competent and unweathered granite. At this depth, surface refraction velocities increase to >4.5 km/s; variations in downhole sonic velocities decrease by more than two-fold; and deviations in the downhole caliper log sharply decrease as well. Forty meters depth is also the depth of initiation of plagioclase feldspar weathering, as inferred from bulk geochemical measurement of the full 70-m deep core. Specifically, element-depth profiles, cast as mass transfer coefficient profiles using Ti and Zr as immobile elements, document inferred loss of plagioclase in the depth interval between 15 and 40-m depth. Plagioclase feldspar is the most abundant of the highly reactive minerals in the granite. Such a wide reaction front is characteristic of weathering granites. Some loss of K is observed at these depths but most K loss, as well as Mg loss, occurs at shallower depths. Nearby geophysical profiles and 3D stress models have been interpreted as showing that seismic velocities decrease at 40 m depth due to opening of fractures as rock is exhumed toward the surface. Given our interpretations of both the geochemical and geophysical data, we infer that the onset of chemical weathering of feldspar coincides with the opening of these fractures. The data highlight the ability of geochemistry and geophysics to complement each other and enrich our understanding of Earth's Critical Zone.

  11. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  12. Mass-balance modeling of mineral weathering rates and CO2 consumption in the forested, metabasaltic Hauver Branch watershed, Catoctin Mountain, Maryland, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen; Price, Jason R.; Szymanski, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral weathering rates and a forest macronutrient uptake stoichiometry were determined for the forested, metabasaltic Hauver Branch watershed in north-central Maryland, USA. Previous studies of Hauver Branch have had an insufficient number of analytes to permit determination of rates of all the minerals involved in chemical weathering, including biomass. More equations in the mass-balance matrix were added using existing mineralogic information. The stoichiometry of a deciduous biomass term was determined using multi-year weekly to biweekly stream-water chemistry for a nearby watershed, which drains relatively unreactive quartzite bedrock.At Hauver Branch, calcite hosts ~38 mol% of the calcium ion (Ca2+) contained in weathering minerals, but its weathering provides ~90% of the stream water Ca2+. This occurs in a landscape with a regolith residence time of more than several Ka (kiloannum). Previous studies indicate that such old regolith does not typically contain dissolving calcite that affects stream Ca2+/Na+ ratios. The relatively high calcite dissolution rate likely reflects dissolution of calcite in fractures of the deep critical zone.Of the carbon dioxide (CO2) consumed by mineral weathering, calcite is responsible for approximately 27%, with the silicate weathering consumption rate far exceeding that of the global average. The chemical weathering of mafic terrains in decaying orogens thus may be capable of influencing global geochemical cycles, and therefore, climate, on geological timescales. Based on carbon-balance calculations, atmospheric-derived sulfuric acid is responsible for approximately 22% of the mineral weathering occurring in the watershed. Our results suggest that rising air temperatures, driven by global warming and resulting in higher precipitation, will cause the rate of chemical weathering in the Hauver Branch watershed to increase until a threshold temperature is reached. Beyond the threshold temperature, increased recharge would

  13. A review of operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kukkonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed in this article include how weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry models are integrated into chemical weather forecasting systems, how physical processes are incorporated into the models through parameterization schemes, how the model architecture affects the predicted variables, and how air chemistry and aerosol processes are formulated. In addition, we discuss sensitivity analysis and evaluation of the models, user operational requirements, such as model availability and documentation, and output availability and dissemination. In this manner, this article allows for the evaluation of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the various modelling systems and modelling approaches. Finally, this article highlights the most prominent gaps of knowledge for chemical weather forecasting models and suggests potential priorities for future research directions, for the following selected focus areas: emission inventories, the integration of numerical weather prediction and atmospheric chemical transport models, boundary conditions and nesting of models, data assimilation of the various chemical species, improved understanding and parameterization of physical processes, better evaluation of models against data and the construction of model ensembles.

  14. Abrupt response of chemical weathering to Late Quaternary hydroclimate changes in northeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Luc; Revel, Marie; Bayon, Germain; Dufour, Aurélie; Vigier, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Chemical weathering of silicate rocks on continents acts as a major sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide and has played an important role in the evolution of the Earth’s climate. However, the magnitude and the nature of the links between weathering and climate are still under debate. In particular, the timescale over which chemical weathering may respond to climate change is yet to be constrained at the continental scale. Here we reconstruct the relationships between rainfall and chemical weathering in northeast Africa for the last 32,000 years. Using lithium isotopes and other geochemical proxies in the clay-size fraction of a marine sediment core from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, we show that chemical weathering in the Nile Basin fluctuated in parallel with the monsoon-related climatic evolution of northeast Africa. We also evidence strongly reduced mineral alteration during centennial-scale regional drought episodes. Our findings indicate that silicate weathering may respond as quickly as physical erosion to abrupt hydroclimate reorganization on continents. Consequently, we anticipate that the forthcoming hydrological disturbances predicted for northeast Africa may have a major impact on chemical weathering patterns and soil resources in this region. PMID:28290474

  15. Abrupt response of chemical weathering to Late Quaternary hydroclimate changes in northeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Luc; Revel, Marie; Bayon, Germain; Dufour, Aurélie; Vigier, Nathalie

    2017-03-01

    Chemical weathering of silicate rocks on continents acts as a major sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide and has played an important role in the evolution of the Earth’s climate. However, the magnitude and the nature of the links between weathering and climate are still under debate. In particular, the timescale over which chemical weathering may respond to climate change is yet to be constrained at the continental scale. Here we reconstruct the relationships between rainfall and chemical weathering in northeast Africa for the last 32,000 years. Using lithium isotopes and other geochemical proxies in the clay-size fraction of a marine sediment core from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, we show that chemical weathering in the Nile Basin fluctuated in parallel with the monsoon-related climatic evolution of northeast Africa. We also evidence strongly reduced mineral alteration during centennial-scale regional drought episodes. Our findings indicate that silicate weathering may respond as quickly as physical erosion to abrupt hydroclimate reorganization on continents. Consequently, we anticipate that the forthcoming hydrological disturbances predicted for northeast Africa may have a major impact on chemical weathering patterns and soil resources in this region.

  16. The Beryllium-10(meteoric)/ Beryllium-9 ratio as a new tracer of weathering and erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Bouchez, J.; Wittmann, H.; Dannhaus, N.

    2012-04-01

    A perfect clock of the stability of the Earth surface is one that combines a first isotope the flux of which depends on the release rate during erosion, and a second isotope produced at constant rate. The ratio of the meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be to stable 9Be, suggested to serve as proxy for weathering and erosion over the late Cenozoic [1], is such a system. We provide a quantitative framework for its use. In a weathering zone some of the 9Be, present typically in 2ppm concentrations in silicate minerals, is released and partitioned between a reactive phase (adsorbed to clay and hydroxide surfaces, given the high partition coefficients at intermediate pH), and into the dissolved phase. The combined mass flux of both phases is defined by the soil formation rate and a mineral dissolution rate - and is hence proportional to the chemical weathering rate and the denudation rate. At the same time, the surface of the weathering zone is continuously exposed to fallout of meteoric 10Be. This 10Be percolates into the weathering zone where it mixes with dissolved 9Be. Both isotopes may exchange with the adsorbed Be, given that equilibration rate of Be is fast relative to soil residence times. Hence a 10Be/9Be(reactive) ratio results from which the total denudation rate can be calculated. A prerequisite is that the flux of meteoric 10Be is known from field experiments or from global production models [2]. In rivers, when reactive Be and dissolved Be equilibrate, a catchment-wide denudation rate can be determined from both sediment and a sample of filtered river water. We have tested this approach in sediment-bound Be [3] and dissolved Be in water [4] of the Amazon and Orinoco basin. The reactive Be was extracted from sediment by combined hydroxylamine and HCl leaches. In the Amazon trunk stream, the Orinoco, Apure, and La Tigra river 10Be/9Be(dissolved) agrees well with 10Be/9Be(reactive), showing that in most rivers these two phases equilibrate. 10Be/9Be ratios range

  17. A Bibliography on the Chemical Weathering of Granitic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    in tropical regions). Livro de homenagem a Orlando Ribeiro, (CEG Lisboa), vol. 1, pp. Anand, R. R. and Gilkes, R. J. 1984. The retention of elements...by I. G. Simmons, Exeter: Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art , pp. 97-116. Bustin, R. M. and Mathews, W. H. 1979...of Science, Literature and Art , pp. 117-140. Clayton, J. L., Megahan, W. F. and Delon, H. 1979. Soil and bedrock properties.- weathering and alteration

  18. Chemical weathering history of the southern Tajikistan loess and paleoclimate implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Feng(丁峰); DING; Zhongli(丁仲礼)

    2003-01-01

    Major chemical elements and Rb, Sr, Ba abundances were measured for loess samples from Chashmanigar loess-soil sequence in southern Tajikistan. And the degree of element loss and intensity of weathering of the samples were calculated. From these calculations we found that the paleosol horizons of the Chashmanigar section were chemically weathered to some extent and the weathering intensity of the soils is stronger than that of loess horizons, indicating that paleosols in southern Tajikistan were deposited in relatively warm and humid interglacial ages. In addition, the southern Tajikistan loess deposited before 0.9Ma BP was more intensely weathered than that deposited after 0.9Ma BP, which may imply the intensification of aridity in this area since 0.9Ma BP.

  19. Influence of pH during chemical weathering of bricks: Long term exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Charola, A. Elena

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of environmental weathering of bricks in historical structures, this study focuses on new bricks currently employed for restoration projects. The bricks were subjected to an accelerated chemical weathering test by immersion in solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 13 for differ......Within the framework of environmental weathering of bricks in historical structures, this study focuses on new bricks currently employed for restoration projects. The bricks were subjected to an accelerated chemical weathering test by immersion in solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 13...... for different lengths of time up to 432 days, data to 288 days are presented since the project is still ongoing. The study analyzed the changes of pH induced in the solutions by the presence of the bricks (this also served to adjust the pH to the intended value), as well as the concentration of various ions...

  20. Weathering profiles in granitoid rocks of the Sila Massif uplands, Calabria, southern Italy: New insights into their formation processes and rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarciglia, Fabio; Critelli, Salvatore; Borrelli, Luigi; Coniglio, Sabrina; Muto, Francesco; Perri, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we characterized several weathering profiles developed on granitoid rocks in the Sila Massif upland (Calabria, southern Italy), integrating detailed macro- and micromorphological observations with physico-mechanical field tests and petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical analyses. We focused our attention on the main weathering and pedogenetic processes, trying to understand apparent discrepancies between weathering grade classes based on field description and geomechanical properties, and two common weathering indices, such as the micropetrographic index (Ip) and the chemical index of alteration (CIA). Our results showed that sericite on plagioclase and biotite chloritization, that represent inherited features formed during late-stage hydrothermal alteration of granitoid rocks, may cause an overestimation of the real degree of weathering of primary mineral grains under meteoric conditions, especially in lower weathering grade classes. Moreover, the frequent identification of Fe-Mn oxides and clay coatings of illuvial origin (rather than or in addition to those formed in situ), both at the macro- and microscale, may also explain an overestimation of the weathering degree with respect to field-based classifications. Finally, some apparent inconsistencies between field geomechanical responses and chemical weathering were interpreted as related to physical weathering processes (cryoclastism and thermoclastism), that lead to rock breakdown even when chemical weathering is not well developed. Hence, our study showed that particular caution is needed for evaluating weathering grades, because traditional field and geochemical-petrographic tools may be biased by inherited hydrothermal alteration, physical weathering and illuvial processes. On the basis of chronological constraints to soil formation obtained from a 42 ka-old volcanic input (mixed to granite parent materials) detected in the soil cover of the Sila Massif upland, a first attempt to estimate

  1. Inflation Rates, Car Devaluation, and Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliani, Lionello; Berberan-Santos, Màrio N.

    1996-10-01

    The inflation rate problem of a modern economy shows quite interesting similarities with chemical kinetics and especially with first-order chemical reactions. In fact, capital devaluation during periods of rather low inflation rates or inflation measured over short periods shows a dynamics formally similar to that followed by first-order chemical reactions and they can thus be treated by the aid of the same mathematical formalism. Deviations from this similarity occurs for higher inflation rates. The dynamics of price devaluation for two different types of car, a compact car and a luxury car, has been followed for seven years long and it has been established that car devaluation is a process that is formally similar to a zeroth-order chemical kinetic process disregarding the type of car, if car devaluation is much faster than money devaluation. In fact, expensive cars devaluate with a faster rate than inexpensive cars.

  2. Natural weathering in dry disposed ash dump: Insight from chemical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis of fresh and unsaturated drilled cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, S A; Akinlua, A; Gitari, W M; Khuse, N; Eze, P; Akinyeye, R O; Petrik, L F

    2012-07-15

    Some existing alternative applications of coal fly ash such as cement manufacturing; road construction; landfill; and concrete and waste stabilisation use fresh ash directly collected from coal-fired power generating stations. Thus, if the rate of usage continues, the demand for fresh ash for various applications will exceed supply and use of weathered dry disposed ash will become necessary alternative. As a result it's imperative to understand the chemistry and pH behaviour of some metals inherent in dry disposed fly ash. The bulk chemical composition as determined by XRF analysis showed that SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 were the major oxides in fresh ash and unsaturated weathered ashes. The unsaturated weathered ashes are relatively depleted in CaO, Fe2O3, TiO2, SiO2, Na2O and P2O5 due to dissolution and hydrolysis caused by chemical interaction with ingressing CO2 from the atmosphere and infiltrating rain water. Observed accumulations of Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, K2O, Na2O and SO3 and Zn, Zr, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr and Co in the lower layers indicate progressive downward movement through the ash dump though at a slow rate. The bulk mineralogy of unsaturated weathered dry disposed ash, as determined by XRD analysis, revealed quartz and mullite as the major crystalline phases; while anorthite, hematite, enstatite, lime, calcite, and mica were present as minor mineral phases. Pore water chemistry revealed a low concentration of readily soluble metals in unsaturated weathered ashes in comparison with fresh ash, which shows high leachability. This suggests that over time the precipitation of transient minor secondary mineral phases; such as calcite and mica might retard residual metal release from unsaturated weathered ash. Chloride and sulphate species of the water soluble extracts of weathered ash are at equilibrium with Na+ and K+; these demonstrate progressive leaching over time and become supersaturated at the base of unsaturated weathered ash. This suggests that the ash dump does not

  3. Towards an improved modeling of chemical weathering in the SoilGen soil evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2014-05-01

    As the need for soil information particularly in the fields of agriculture, land evaluation, hydrology, biogeochemistry and climate change keeps increasing, models for soil evolution are increasingly becoming valuable tools to provide such soil information. Although still limited, such models are progressively being developed. The SoilGen model is one of such models with capabilities to provide soil information such as soil texture, pH, base saturation, organic carbon, CEC, etc over multi-millennia time scale. SoilGen is a mechanistic water flow driven pedogenetic model describing soil forming processes such as carbon cycling, clay migration, decalcification, bioturbation, physical weathering and chemical weathering. The model has been calibrated and confronted with field measurements in a number of case studies, giving plausible results. Discrepancies between measured and simulated soil properties as concluded from case studies have been mainly attributed to (i) the simple chemical weathering system (ii) poor estimates of initial data inputs such as bulk density and element fluxes, and (iii) incorrect values of variables that describe boundary conditions such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. This study focuses on extending the chemical weathering system, such that it can deal with a more heterogeneous composition of primary minerals and includes more elements such as Fe and Si. We propose and discuss here an extended description of chemical weathering in the model that is based on more primary minerals, taking into account the role of the specific area of these minerals, and the effect of physical weathering on these specific areas over time. In the initial stage, the proposed chemical weathering mechanism is also implemented in PHREEQC (a widely applied geochemical code with capabilities to simulate equilibrium reactions involving water and minerals, surface complexes and ion exchangers, etc.) to facilitate comparison with the model results

  4. Interactions of physical, chemical, and biological weather calling for an integrated approach to assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Thomas; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Dahl, Aslög; Bossioli, Elissavet; Baklanov, Alexander; Vik, Aasmund Fahre; Agnew, Paul; Karatzas, Kostas D; Sofiev, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews interactions and health impacts of physical, chemical, and biological weather. Interactions and synergistic effects between the three types of weather call for integrated assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality. Today's air quality legislation falls short of addressing air quality degradation by biological weather, despite increasing evidence for the feasibility of both mitigation and adaptation policy options. In comparison with the existing capabilities for physical and chemical weather, the monitoring of biological weather is lacking stable operational agreements and resources. Furthermore, integrated effects of physical, chemical, and biological weather suggest a critical review of air quality management practices. Additional research is required to improve the coupled modeling of physical, chemical, and biological weather as well as the assessment and communication of integrated air quality. Findings from several recent COST Actions underline the importance of an increased dialog between scientists from the fields of meteorology, air quality, aerobiology, health, and policy makers.

  5. Investigating the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on chemical weathering in the critical zone using high resolution reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S.; Rajaram, H.

    2014-12-01

    The critical zone (CZ) represents a major life-sustaining realm of the terrestrial surface. The processes controlling the development and transformation of the CZ are important to continued health of the planet as human influence continues to grow. The CZ encompasses the shallow subsurface, a region of reaction, unsaturated flow, and transport. Chemical weathering in the subsurface is one of the important processes involved in the formation and functioning of the CZ. We present two case studies of reactive transport modeling to investigate the influence of subsurface heterogeneity and unsaturated flow on chemical weathering processes in the CZ. The model is implemented using the reactive transport code PFLOTRAN. Heterogeneity in subsurface flow is represented using multiple realizations of conductive fracture networks in a hillslope cross-section. The first case study is motivated by observations at the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BCCZO) including extensive hydrologic and geochemical datasets. The simulations show that fractures greatly enhance weathering as compared to a homogeneous porous medium. Simulations of north-facing slope hydrology with prolonged snowmelt pulses also increases weathering rates, showing the importance of slope aspect on weathering intensity. Recent work elucidates deteriorating water quality caused by climate change in the CZ of watersheds where acid rock drainage (ARD) occurs. The more complex reactions of ARD require a customized kinetic reaction module with PFLOTRAN. The second case study explores the mechanisms by which changes in hydrologic forcing, air and ground temperatures, and water table elevations influence ARD. For instance, unreacted pyrite exposed by a water table drop was shown to produce a 125% increase in annual pyrite oxidization rate, which provides one explanation for increased ARD.

  6. Salt-enhanced chemical weathering of building materials and bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate as a treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Jroundi, F.; Gonzalez-Muñoz, M. T.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2012-04-01

    Salt weathering is an important mechanism contributing to the degradation and loss of stone building materials. In addition to the physical weathering resulting from crystallization pressure, the presence of salts in solution greatly enhances the chemical weathering potential of pore waters. Flow through experiments quantify the dissolution rates of calcite and quartz grains (63-125 micrometer diameter) when subjected to 1.0 ionic strength solutions of MgSO4, MgCl, Na2SO4 or NaCl. Results indicate that the identity of the cation is the primary control over the dissolution rate of both calcite and quartz substrates, with salt-enhanced dissolution occurring most rapidly in Mg2+ bearing solutions. It has been observed that weathering rates of rocks in nature, as well as building stones, are slowed down by naturally occurring or artificially produced patinas. These tend to be bacterially produced, durable mineralized coatings that lend some degree of protection to the underlying stone surface [1]. Our research shows that bacterially produced carbonate coatings can be quite effective at reducing chemical weathering of stone by soluble salts. The calcite-producing-bacteria used in this study were isolated from stone monuments in Granada, Spain [2] and cultivated in an organic-rich culture medium on a variety of artificial and natural substrates (including limestone, marble, sandstone, quartz, calcite single crystals, glass cover-slips, and sintered porous glass). Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to image bacterial calcite growth and biofilm formation. In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) enabled calculation of dissolution rates of untreated and bacterially treated surfaces. 2D-XRD showed the mineralogy and crystallographic orientation of bacterial calcium carbonate. Results indicate that bacterially produced calcite crystals form a coherent, mechanically resistant surface layer in perfect crystallographic continuity with the calcite substrate (self

  7. Insights into chemical weathering of the upper continental crust from the geochemistry of ancient glacial diamictites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su; Gaschnig, Richard M.; Rudnick, Roberta L.

    2016-03-01

    Glacial diamictites, with ages ranging from ∼2900 to 0.01 Ma, record the changing composition of the upper continental crust through time (Gaschnig et al., 2014). Li concentrations and isotopic compositions, combined with Pb isotopic compositions, chemical index of alteration (CIA) values and relative Sr concentrations are used here to assess the degree of chemical weathering recorded in these deposits and the origin of this signature. The δ7Li values of most of the diamictites (ranging from -3.9 to +3.5) are lower than those of mantle-derived basalts (+3.7 ± 2, 2σ), and the low δ7Li values are generally accompanied by high CIA and low Sr/Sr∗ values (or Sr depletion factor, Sr/Sr∗ = Sr/(Ce∗Nd)0.5), reflecting a weathering signature that may have derived from pre-depositional, syn-depositional, and/or post-depositional weathering processes. Profiles through three glacial diamictites with relatively high CIA (a fresh road cut of the Neoproterozoic Nantuo Formation (CIA = 62-69), and drill cores through the Paleoproterozoic Timeball Hill (CIA = 66-75) and Duitschland Formations (CIA = 84-91)) do not show evidence of significant post-depositional weathering. High Th/U, reflecting loss of uranium during oxidative weathering, is seen in all Paleozoic and Neoproterozoic diamictites and a few Paleoproterozoic deposits. Pb isotopic systematics suggest that this signature was largely inherited from preexisting crust, although a subset of samples (the Neoproterozoic Konnarock, Paleozoic Dwyka, and several of the Paleoproterozoic Duitschland samples) appears to have experienced post-depositional U loss. Modern glaciomarine sediments record little weathering (CIA = 47, Sr/Sr∗ = 0.7, δ7Li = +1.8), consistent with the cold temperatures accompanying glacial periods, and suggesting that limited syn-depositional weathering has occurred. Thus, the chemical weathering signature observed in ancient glacial diamictites appears to be largely inherited from the upper

  8. Predictions of Chemical Weather in Asia: The EU Panda Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G. P.; Petersen, A. K.; Wang, X.; Granier, C.; Bouarar, I.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality has become a pressing problem in Asia and specifically in China due to rapid economic development (i.e., rapidly expanding motor vehicle fleets, growing industrial and power generation activities, domestic and biomass burning). In spite of efforts to reduce chemical emissions, high levels of particle matter and ozone are observed and lead to severe health problems with a large number of premature deaths. To support efforts to reduce air pollution, the European Union is supporting the PANDA project whose objective is to use space and surface observations of chemical species as well as advanced meteorological and chemical models to analyze and predict air quality in China. The Project involves 7 European and 7 Chinese groups. The paper will describe the objectives of the project and present some first accomplishments. The project focuses on the improvement of methods for monitoring air quality from combined space and in-situ observations, the development of a comprehensive prediction system that makes use of these observations, the elaboration of indicators for air quality in support of policies, and the development of toolboxes for the dissemination of information.

  9. Microclimatic, chemical, and mineralogical evidence for tafoni weathering processes on the Miaowan Island, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rihui; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Tafoni were widely distributed around the world; however, their processes of development remain unclear. In this study, the roles of microclimatic, geochemical and mineralogical processes on tafoni development along the subtropical coastline of the Miaowan Island, south China, are investigated. Field observations were carried out during three visits to the island over a four-year period (2011-2015). The orientation of 184 tafoni openings were measured, and micrometeorological changes of three tafoni on opposite sides of the island were monitored by pocket weather trackers (Kestrel 4500) in two periods. Samples of residual debris inside three tafoni hosted in a large boulder, the parent rock of the tafoni, and from the weathering profile of a nearby bedrock outcrop were collected for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The field observations showed that tafoni were of different sizes and constantly produced flakes and debris inside the tafoni caves, indicating their on-going active development. An increase in Na in residual debris in tafoni caves on the Miaowan Island is the most obvious evidence of salt weathering. Salt weathering inside tafoni caves is not intense and does not match the salt-rich environment outside the caves, indicating that the influence of salt is not strong. The loss of K, Ca, and Mg in the residue samples, and the appearance of the clay mineral montmorillonite are caused by chemical weathering. Most of the tafoni openings face mountains, demonstrating the effect of humidity in tafoni weathering. Tafoni cave shapes are related to the distribution of humid water vapour, which tends to collect at the top of the cave, and leads to more intensive development here than in other parts. Drastic daily changes in relative humidity inside tafoni caves accelerate mechanical weathering owing to swelling and shrinking of salt and clay minerals. The Miaowan Island tafoni are formed by weathering, but they cannot be simply

  10. COST ES0602: towards a European network on chemical weather forecasting and information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kukkonen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The COST ES0602 action provides a forum for benchmarking approaches and practices in data exchange and multi-model capabilities for chemical weather forecasting and near real-time information services in Europe. The action includes approximately 30 participants from 19 countries, and its duration is from 2007 to 2011 (http://www.chemicalweather.eu/. Major efforts have been dedicated in other actions and projects to the development of infrastructures for data flow. We have therefore aimed for collaboration with ongoing actions towards developing near real-time exchange of input data for air quality forecasting. We have collected information on the operational air quality forecasting models on a regional and continental scale in a structured form, and inter-compared and evaluated the physical and chemical structure of these models. We have also constructed a European chemical weather forecasting portal that includes links to most of the available chemical weather forecasting systems in Europe. The collaboration also includes the examination of the case studies that have been organized within COST-728, in order to inter-compare and evaluate the models against experimental data. We have also constructed an operational model forecasting ensemble. Data from a representative set of regional background stations have been selected, and the operational forecasts for this set of sites will be inter-compared and evaluated. The Action has investigated, analysed and reviewed existing chemical weather information systems and services, and will provide recommendations on best practices concerning the presentation and dissemination of chemical weather information towards the public and decision makers.

  11. Effect of Weather on the Predicted PMN Landmine Chemical Signature for Kabul, Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.; PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-11-01

    Buried landmines are often detected through the chemical signature in the air above the soil surface by mine detection dogs. Environmental processes play a significant role in the chemical signature available for detection. Due to the shallow burial depth of landmines, the weather influences the release of chemicals from the landmine, transport through the soil to the surface, and degradation processes in the soil. The effect of weather on the landmine chemical signature from a PMN landmine was evaluated with the T2TNT code for Kabul, Afghanistan. Results for TNT and DNT gas-phase and soil solid-phase concentrations are presented as a function of time of the day and time of the year.

  12. Basalt weathering rates on Earth and the duration of liquid water on the plains of Gusev Crater, Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl; Hausrath, E.M.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.K.; Sak, P.B.; Steefel, C.; Brantley, S.L.

    2008-03-15

    Where Martian rocks have been exposed to liquid water, chemistry versus depth profiles could elucidate both Martian climate history and potential for life. The persistence of primary minerals in weathered profiles constrains the exposure time to liquid water: on Earth, mineral persistence times range from {approx}10 ka (olivine) to {approx}250 ka (glass) to {approx}1Ma (pyroxene) to {approx}5Ma (plagioclase). Such persistence times suggest mineral persistence minima on Mars. However, Martian solutions may have been more acidic than on Earth. Relative mineral weathering rates observed for basalt in Svalbard (Norway) and Costa Rica demonstrate that laboratory pH trends can be used to estimate exposure to liquid water both qualitatively (mineral absence or presence) and quantitatively (using reactive transport models). Qualitatively, if the Martian solution pH > {approx}2, glass should persist longer than olivine; therefore, persistence of glass may be a pH-indicator. With evidence for the pH of weathering, the reactive transport code CrunchFlow can quantitatively calculate the minimum duration of exposure to liquid water consistent with a chemical profile. For the profile measured on the surface of Humphrey in Gusev Crater, the minimum exposure time is 22 ka. If correct, this estimate is consistent with short-term, episodic alteration accompanied by ongoing surface erosion. More of these depth profiles should be measured to illuminate the weathering history of Mars.

  13. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H. (FOI CBRN Defence and Security (Sweden)); Sidhu, R. (Institute of Energy Technology, Environmental Monitoring Section, Health and Safety Dept. (Norway))

    2010-03-15

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  14. Controls on chemical weathering on a mountainous volcanic tropical island: Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessert, C.; Lajeunesse, E.; Lloret, E.; Clergue, C.; Crispi, O.; Gorge, C.; Quidelleur, X.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe Island is a natural laboratory, ideally suited to the study of biogeochemical processes in tropical and mountainous volcanic environments. The island's east-west rainfall gradient (1200-8000 mm/yr) is superimposed on a north-south age gradient (2.7 Ma to present), providing a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of rainfall and rock age on the chemical weathering of volcanic terrains. Taking advantage of this configuration, we present the first temporal survey (2007-2013) of the geochemical composition of the dissolved load of rain and river waters in Guadeloupe. Our data demonstrate that the chemical composition of river water is influenced by rainfall abundance, hydrothermal alteration (from active or fossilized volcanic systems) and interactions between water and minerals during chemical weathering processes. The contribution of rain to the overall chemical balance is especially significant in the older northern part of the island, where the ferralitic soils are base-cation-depleted. Between 15% and 65% of the Ca or Mg riverine budgets comes from atmospheric deposits, highlighting the major role of rainfall in the geochemical budgets of small tropical and mountainous watersheds. The river water dataset indicates that different chemical weathering processes dominate the budget depending on the age of the local bedrock. In the younger, southern part of the island, a pool of easily-weatherable andesitic minerals from the bedrock dominates. The contribution from this pool decreases significantly (to 5-15 wt.% of the bulk soil) towards the older terrains in the north. The northern rivers are characterized by low Ca/Mg ratios (0.5-1.0), intermediate between those of fresh rocks (1.7-3.3) and soil (0.1). Weathering in the northern part of the island is therefore dominated by the dissolution of depleted secondary minerals into soils. The Ca/Mg ratio of the river water increases from north to south, eventually reaching values similar to those of the

  15. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Arthur F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds—Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico—were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages.Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time (weathered granitoids). Analysis of cumulative Na release indicated that plagioclase dissolution achieved steady state in 3 of the 4 fresh granitoids during the last decade of reaction. Surface-area normalized plagioclase dissolution rates exhibited a narrow range (0.95 to 1.26 10-13 moles m-2 s-1), in spite of significant stoichiometric differences (An0.21 to An0.50). Rates were an order of magnitude slower than previously reported in shorter duration experiments but generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding natural analogs. CrunchFlow simulations indicated that more than a hundredfold decrease in column flow rates would be required to produce near-saturation reaction affinities that would start to slow plagioclase weathering to real-world levels. Extending simulations to approximate long term weathering in naturally weathered profiles required additional decreases in the intrinsic plagioclase dissolution and

  16. Long-term flow-through column experiments and their relevance to natural granitoid weathering rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Art F.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Lawrence, Corey R.; Vivit, Davison V.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Four pairs of fresh and partly-weathered granitoids, obtained from well-characterized watersheds-Merced River, CA, USA; Panola, GA, USA; Loch Vale, CO, USA, and Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico-were reacted in columns under ambient laboratory conditions for 13.8 yrs, the longest running experimental weathering study to date. Low total column mass losses (convergence during the last decade of reaction. NETPATH/PHREEQC code simulations indicated non-stoichiometric dissolution involving Ca release from disseminated calcite and excess K release from interlayer biotite. Effluent 87Sr/85Sr ratios reflected a progressive weathering sequence beginning and ending with 87Sr/85Sr values of plagioclase with an additional calcite input and a radiogenic biotite excursion proportional to the granitoid ages. Effluents became thermodynamically saturated with goethite and gibbsite, slightly under-saturated with kaolinite and strongly under-saturated with plagioclase, consistent with kinetically-limited weathering in which solutes such as Na varied with column flow rates. Effluent Na concentrations showed no clear trend with time during the last decade of reaction (fresh granitoids) or increased slowly with time (weathered granitoids). Analysis of cumulative Na release indicated that plagioclase dissolution achieved steady state in 3 of the 4 fresh granitoids during the last decade of reaction. Surface-area normalized plagioclase dissolution rates exhibited a narrow range (0.95-1.26 10-13 moles m-2 s-1), in spite of significant stoichiometric differences (An0.21 to An0.50). Rates were an order of magnitude slower than previously reported in shorter duration experiments but generally 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than corresponding natural analogs. CrunchFlow simulations indicated that more than a hundredfold decrease in column flow rates would be required to produce near-saturation reaction affinities that would start to slow plagioclase weathering to real-world levels. Extending simulations

  17. Li isotopes reflect chemical weathering intensity in streams and ground waters draining basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Rudnick, R. L.; McDonough, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering has an important influence on continental crust evolution, as weathering of basalt preferentially removes soluble elements, such as Mg, and can shift the crust composition towards more andesitic compositions, thus helping to solve the crustal composition paradox [1]. The isotopic compositions of soluble elements (e.g., Li and Mg) provide a monitor of chemical weathering of the continents. Along with large isotopic fractionations [2], these elements are preferentially transferred to rivers during weathering, and are useful tracers of weathering processes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of streams and ground waters that reside entirely within the Columbia River Basalts (CRBs) reflect the processes associated with basalt weathering. In addition, stream samples from both west and east of the Cascades were collected during summer and late winter to evaluate seasonal changes in Li isotopic compositions. The Li concentrations ([Li]) vary from 0.2 to 4.7 μg/l in dissolved loads of streams for both sampling seasons; in ground waters, [Li] varies from 2 to 21 μg/l. δ7Li varies by up to 20‰ in streams and ground waters, demonstrating that lithology is not the only influence on water chemistry in the catchments. Calculated mineral saturation suggests that most streams and some ground waters were saturated with respect to most secondary minerals, implying that Li isotopic fractionation was influenced by the development of secondary minerals, such as kaolinite and hematite. The δ7Li and Li/Na in dissolved loads of streams are not sensitive to distance from the coast or climate, but likely reflect the local weathering intensity. The correlated variation in δ7Li and Li/Na ratios seem to have global significance, at least in streams that only drain basalts [3, 4, 5], suggesting that the streams within the CRBs cover a wide range of weathering intensity, with low δ7Li and high Li/Na corresponding to higher weathering intensity. In addition

  18. The Rise of Late Tertiary and Quaternary Erosion and Weathering Rates revisited (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-01

    The analyses of both modern river loads and chemical and physical hillslope denudation show that rates of weathering and erosion are tightly interlinked. An increase in silicate weathering through increased mountain erosion should therefore lead to global cooling by increased drawdown of atmospheric CO2. A five-fold increase of global sediment delivery was suggested for the last 5 Million years from a global compilation of sedimentation rates (1), and was also specifically suggested for the European Alps (2) and the India-Asia collisional area (3). While much research effort is currently being directed at explaining this increase, we should have been suspicious because this apparent increase in global erosion rate was not accompanied by a similar concomitant decrease in atmospheric CO2 as recorded by ocean alkalinity proxies. One possibility is that the increase in Neogene sedimentation rates is an artifact introduced by the discrepant time scale over which sedimentation is measured (4). The older the age, the longer the observational integration time will be, which in turn include longer periods of hiatus, and hence decreasing sedimentation rates with geologic time. An analysis of the records named above for time scale bias indeed suggests the possibility that erosion in these mountain belts might have been constant throughout the Neogene. An independent test of this hypothesis is provided by marine records of the isotopes of Beryllium (5). Be-10 is a rare radioactive cosmogenic nuclide, is produced mostly in the atmosphere and introduced to the surface oceans with a flux that can be considered to be globally uniform when averaged over time scales exceeding those of climate cycles. Be-9, in contrast, is stable, and enters the oceans from the continents mainly by river particulates (which are dissolved to some extent in the water column and during early diagenesis), in the dissolved form, and in minor amounts from dust. Should the global erosion rates have

  19. Trees and Weathering: Using Soil Petrographic and Chemical Analyses to Compare the Relative Weathering Effects of Gymnosperms and Angiosperms in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Y.; Ague, J. J.; Berner, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the long-term carbon cycle and its control on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the Phanerozoic is crucial to understanding the impending dynamics of contemporary anthropogenic carbon contributions to the atmosphere. One aspect of the long-term carbon cycle that is poorly understood is the role of large vascular plants (trees) in contributing to the chemical weathering of silicate minerals. In particular, little is known about the differences in weathering rates between gymnosperms and angiosperms and how these dissimilarities may have impacted the carbon cycle subsequent to the evolution of angiosperm trees in the Mesozoic. One approach to evaluating these potential differences in weathering is to examine and quantitatively compare the chemistry and petrology of the soil mineral constituents from beneath modern groves of each broad tree type, where the groves have been subject to nearly identical environmental and geological conditions. This particular study focuses on field samples collected along transects through adjacent groves of angiosperms and gymnosperms in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. Preliminary data demonstrate a significant difference in the soil texture and composition beneath the two types of trees. While soil at each field site has been generated from a homogeneous parent material, and subjected to similar inorganic environmental phenomena, soil density, particle size, and organic content vary across the transects. Soils beneath the angiosperms are denser and have a more clay-like texture, while soils beneath the gymnosperms are more organic-rich and have a sandy texture. Additional macroscopic and microscopic differences in the chemistry and petrology of these soils will illuminate the varied impacts these trees have on the silicate minerals in their immediate environment, and therefore lend insight into the potential impact these groups of organisms have had on the long-term carbon cycle over the past five hundred

  20. How is entropy production rate related to chemical reaction rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2013-01-01

    The entropy production rate is a key quantity in irreversible thermodynamics. In this work, we concentrate on the realization of entropy production rate in chemical reaction systems in terms of the experimentally measurable reaction rate. Both triangular and linear networks have been studied. They attain either thermodynamic equilibrium or a non-equilibrium steady state, under suitable external constraints. We have shown that the entropy production rate is proportional to the square of the reaction velocity only around equilibrium and not any arbitrary non-equilibrium steady state. This feature can act as a guide in revealing the nature of a steady state, very much like the minimum entropy production principle. A discussion on this point has also been presented.

  1. A spectrocolorimetric and chemical study on color modification of heat-treated wood during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the wood surface color modifications of three North American species (jack pine, aspen, and birch) heat-treated under different temperatures was studied by spectrocolorimetric colormeter (datacolor, CHECK TM). Data was analyzed using the reflectance spectra (400-700 nm) as well as the CIE-L*a*b* system and ΔE. Kubelka-Munk (K-M) spectra of samples were recorded as a function of artificial weathering time to obtain the absorption maxima of the chromophore woods formed during artificial weathering. The results were compared with those of the respective untreated (Kiln-dried) species. Analysis of chemical components shows that the lignin percent of jack pine, aspen, and birch increased after heat treatment (28.66-35.9%, 20.27-26.41%, and 19.04-22.71% respectively) which might be due to smaller influence of heat treatment on lignin content than hemicelluloses. This improves the resistance of heat-treated wood to photo-degradation. This is also supported by the smaller change observed in K-M spectra and total color parameters in CIE-L*a*b* system of heat-treated wood samples compared to those of untreated wood when weathered for72 h. However, the lignin percent of heat-treated woods reduce to maximum 2.5% after artificial weathering of 1512 h. This suggests that the weathering degrades most lignin matrix; consequently, both the colors of heat-treated woods and untreated woods are lighter and very similar after a long period of artificial weathering.

  2. A normalised seawater strontium isotope curve. Possible implications for Neoproterozoic-Cambrian weathering rates and the further oxygenation of the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, G.A. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Geologisch-Palaeontologisches Inst.

    2007-07-01

    The strontium isotope composition of seawater is strongly influenced on geological time scales by changes in the rates of continental weathering relative to ocean crust alteration. However, the potential of the seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr curve to trace globally integrated chemical weathering rates has not been fully realised because ocean {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr is also influenced by the isotopic evolution of Sr sources to the ocean. A preliminary attempt is made here to normalise the seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr curve to plausible trends in the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of the three major Sr sources: carbonate dissolution, silicate weathering and submarine hydrothermal exchange. The normalised curve highlights the Neoproterozoic-Phanerozoic transition as a period of exceptionally high continental influence, indicating that this interval was characterised by a transient increase in global weathering rates and/or by the weathering of unusually radiogenic crustal rocks. Close correlation between the normalised {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr curve, a published seawater {delta}{sup 34}S curve and atmospheric pCO{sub 2} models is used here to argue that elevated chemical weathering rates were a major contributing factor to the steep rise in seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr from 650 Ma to 500 Ma. Elevated weathering rates during the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian interval led to increased nutrient availability, organic burial and to the further oxygenation of Earth's surface environment. Use of normalised seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr curves will, it is hoped, help to improve future geochemical models of Earth System dynamics. (orig.)

  3. Changes in the Chemical Components of Light Crude Oil During Simulated Short Term Weathering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To unambiguously identify spilled oils and to link them to the known sources are extremely important in settling questions of environmental impact and legal liability. The fate and behavior of spilled oils in the environment depend on a number of physicochemical and biological factors. This paper presents the results regarding changes in chemical composition of light crude oil during simulated short-term weathering based on natural environmental conditions. The results show that the saturated hydrocarbons of the light crude oil mainly distribute between n-C8 and n-C23 and the most abundant n-alkanes are found in the n-C10 to n-C16. The main chemical components of the light crude oil are n-alkanes and isoprenoids. The aromatic compounds are subordinate chemical components. Under the conditions of the weathering simulation experiment, n-alkanes less than n-C12, toluene and 1,3-dimethyl benzene are lost after 1 d weathering, the n-C13, n-C14, naphthalene and 2-methyl-naphthalene are lost on the fifth day of weathering, and n-C15 alkane components show certain weatherproof capability. The ratios n-C17/pristane and n-C18/phytane are unaltered and can be used to identify the source of the light crude oil during the first 8 d of weathering. After 21 d, the ratio pristine/phytane can not provide much information on the source of the spilled light crude oil. Triterpanes (m/z 191) as biomarker compounds of light crude oil are more valuable.

  4. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  5. Hillslope chemical weathering across Paraná, Brazil: a data mining-GIS hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Fabio; Friedel, Michael J.; Filho, Carlos Roberto de Souza; Fraser, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-organizing map (SOM) and geographic information system (GIS) models were used to investigate the nonlinear relationships associated with geochemical weathering processes at local (~100 km2) and regional (~50,000 km2) scales. The data set consisted of 1) 22 B-horizon soil variables: P, C, pH, Al, total acidity, Ca, Mg, K, total cation exchange capacity, sum of exchangeable bases, base saturation, Cu, Zn, Fe, B, S, Mn, gammaspectrometry (total count, potassium, thorium, and uranium) and magnetic susceptibility measures; and 2) six topographic variables: elevation, slope, aspect, hydrological accumulated flux, horizontal curvature and vertical curvature. It is characterized at 304 locations from a quasi-regular grid spaced about 24 km across the state of Paraná. This data base was split into two subsets: one for analysis and modeling (274 samples) and the other for validation (30 samples) purposes. The self-organizing map and clustering methods were used to identify and classify the relations among solid-phase chemical element concentrations and GIS derived topographic models. The correlation between elevation and k-means clusters related the relative position inside hydrologic macro basins, which was interpreted as an expression of the weathering process reaching a steady-state condition at the regional scale. Locally, the chemical element concentrations were related to the vertical curvature representing concave–convex hillslope features, where concave hillslopes with convergent flux tends to be a reducing environment and convex hillslopes with divergent flux, oxidizing environments. Stochastic cross validation demonstrated that the SOM produced unbiased classifications and quantified the relative amount of uncertainty in predictions. This work strengthens the hypothesis that, at B-horizon steady-state conditions, the terrain morphometry were linked with the soil geochemical weathering in a two-way dependent process: the topographic relief was a factor on

  6. Glacial and Periglacial Chemical Weathering on Mars: New Results and New Questions from Field Analog Studies and Mars Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, B.; Scudder, N.; Rutledge, A.; Ackiss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ice has been a powerful physical weather agent on Mars through geologic time, however, it is less well understood how much chemical weathering ice has caused on Mars, and how the mode of alteration has changed with the climate over time.

  7. The contribution of changes in P release and CO2 consumption by chemical weathering to the historical trend in land carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, D. S.; Moosdorf, N.; Brovkin, V.; Hartmann, J.

    2013-12-01

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased to a level unprecedented in the last 2 million years, and the concentration is projected to increase further with a rate unseen in geological past. The increase in CO2 cause a rise in surface temperatures and changes in the hydrological cycle through the redistribution of rainfall patterns. All of these changes will impact the weathering of rocks, which in turn affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations via two different pathways. On the one hand, CO2 is consumed by the dissolution reaction of the exposed minerals. And on the other hand, biological CO2 fixation is affected due to changes in phosphorus release from minerals, as biological activity is constrained by phosphorus availability at large scales. The traditional view is that both effects are negligible on a centennial time scale, but recent work on catchment scale challenge this view in favor of a potential high sensitivity of weathering to ongoing climate and land use changes. To globally quantify the contribution of CO2 fixation associated with weathering on the historical trend in terrestrial CO2 uptake, we applied a model of chemical weathering and phosphorus release under climate reconstructions from four Earth System Models. The simulations indicate that changes in weathering could have contributed considerably to the trend in terrestrial CO2 uptake since the pre-industrial revolution, with warming being the main driver of change. The increase in biological CO2 fixation is of comparable magnitude as the increase in CO2 consumption by chemical weathering. Our simulations support the previous findings on catchment scale that weathering can change significantly on a centennial time scale. This finding has implications for 21st century climate projections, which ignore changes in weathering, as well as for long-term airborne fraction of CO2 emissions, whose calculation usually neglects changes in phosphorus availability.

  8. Physical vs. Chemical Weathering Controls of Soils' Capacity to Store Carbon: Hillslope Transects under Different Climatic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Wackett, A.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil C storage is balanced by photosynthetic production and microbial decomposition of organic matter (OM). Recently, this view has been expanded to account for the effects of physical erosion of OM in determining soil C storage. In parallel, the focus on OM quality as a primary determinant of C turnover has shifted to OM-mineral interactions. These recent advances necessitates our ability to discern how physical erosion, which controls the production, breakdown, and removal of colluvial soils, and chemical weathering, which generates secondary phyllosilicate and iron oxides, independently and collaboratively affect soils' capacity to store C. Here we present soil organic C contents and storages as a function of soil properties that are controlled by physical vs. chemical weathering processes. The study site includes two hillslopes under different climates in SW Australia. The wetter site has continuous canopy of eucalyptus, while the drier site is covered by grasses with scattered eucalyptus overstorey. The two hillslope transects share similar granodiorite parent materials and denudation rates. Bioturbation-driven soil creep appears equally effective at both sites. In eroding areas, chemical weathering has created greater mineral surface area in the soils of wetter site, while physical soil production and erosion resulted in forming the eroding soils of similar thicknesses at both sites. In the drier site, however, vegetation density varies significantly with topography-dependent soil moisture, which appears to have resulted in a soil toposequence where impacts of localized overland-flow erosion is evident through soil mineral surface area, texture, and C contents. These soil properties, in contrast, are largely homogeneous across the wetter hillslope transect presumably because of the lack of localized overland-flow erosion. As a result, at the depositional areas, the drier site exhibits greater or similar soil C storages, which sharply contrasts with the

  9. Oxidative weathering chemical migration under variably saturated conditions and supergene copper enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

    1999-04-01

    Transport of oxygen gas from the land surface through an unsaturated zone has a strong influence on oxidative weathering processes. Oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), one of the most common naturally occurring minerals, is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. Here we present a detailed numerical model of supergene copper enrichment that involves the oxidative weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), and acidification that causes mobilization of metals in the unsaturated zone, with subsequent formation of enriched ore deposits of chalcocite (CuS) and covellite (Cu{sub 2}S) in the reducing conditions below the water table. We examine and identify some significant conceptual and computational issues regarding the oxidative weathering processes through the modeling tool. The dissolution of gaseous oxygen induced by the oxidation reduces oxygen partial pressure, as well as the total pressure of the gas phase. As a result, the gas flow is modified, then the liquid phase flow. Results indicate that this reaction effect on the fluid flow may not be important under ambient conditions, and gas diffusion can be a more important mechanism for oxygen supply than gas or liquid advection. Acidification, mobilization of metals, and alteration of primary minerals mostly take place in unsaturated zone (oxidizing), while precipitation of secondary minerals mainly occurs in saturated zone (reducing). The water table may be considered as an interface between oxidizing and reducing zones. Moving water table due to change of infiltration results in moving oxidizing zone and redistributing aqueous chemical constitutes and secondary mineral deposits. The oxidative weathering processes are difficult to model numerically, because concentrations of redox sensitive chemical species such as O{sub 2}(aq), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and HS{sup -} may change over tens of orders of magnitude between oxidizing and reducing

  10. High continental weathering rate during Early Cambrian: Evidence from Os isotopic composition of Early Cambrian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Yang, J.-H.; Ling, H.-F.; Feng, H.-Z.; Chen, Y.-Q.; Chen, J.-H.

    2003-04-01

    The paleo-ocean environmental change during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition is a key issue related to the causes for an explosive radiation of different metazoan phyla during Early Cambrian. The chemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediments and chemical precipitates such as carbonates, phosphorites, siliceous rocks, and black shales record the changing composition and physical conditions of the seawater in which these rocks accumulated. Organic carbon-rich black shales from marine environments are commonly enriched in a number of trace elements such as Ni, Mo, V, Co, Cr, Au, U, As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Re, and platinum-group-elements (PGE). Recent researches have demonstrated that Re-Os isotopes and PGE contents in black shales are useful proxies for seawater chemistry. It is believed that Re and Os in orgainc-carbon rich black shales are mostly hydrogeneous in origin which were largely sequestered from seawater at the time of deposition. In South China, the Lower Cambrian black shale sequence of the Niutitang Formation (and lateral equivalents) exists broadly several thousands kilometers. The lowermost sequence of this formation contain a thin sulfide ore horizon with an apparently unique and extreme case of metal enrichments such as Mo, Ni, Se, Re, Os, As, Hg, Sb, Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd. In this study, we conducted a preliminary investigation of Re-Os isotopes and Plantium Group Element (PGE) distribution patterns of the balck shales and intercalated Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide bed from Guizhou and Hunan Provinces. The high rOs(t) values of the black shales indicate that the Early Cambrian ocean in Yangtze Platform had a highly radiogenic Os, possibly as a result of high continental weathering rate at that time. The Ni-Mo polymetallic sulfide ores within the black shales have lower rOs(t) values than the black shales, and they show similar REE and PGE patterns as the hydrothermal siliceous rocks within the Lower Cambrian strata, which suggest that the Ni

  11. A model for late Archean chemical weathering and world average river water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jihua; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Interpretations of the geologic record of late Archean near-surface environments depend very strongly on an understanding of weathering and resultant riverine transport to the oceans. The late Archean atmosphere is widely recognized to be anoxic (pO2,g =10-5 to 10-13 bars; pH2,g =10-3 to 10-5 bars). Detrital siderite (FeCO3), pyrite (FeS2), and uraninite (UO2) in late Archean sedimentary rocks also suggest anoxic conditions. However, whether the observed detrital minerals could have been thermodynamically stable during weathering and riverine transport under such an atmosphere remains untested. Similarly, interpretations of fluctuations recorded by trace metals and isotopes are hampered by a lack of knowledge of the chemical linkages between the atmosphere, weathering, riverine transport, and the mineralogical record. In this study, we used theoretical reaction path models to simulate the chemistry involved in rainwater and weathering processes under present-day and hypothetical Archean atmospheric boundary conditions. We included new estimates of the thermodynamic properties of Fe(II)-smectites as well as smectite and calcite solid solutions. Simulation of present-day weathering of basalt + calcite by world-average rainwater produced hematite, kaolinite, Na-Mg-saponite, and chalcedony after 10-4 moles of reactant minerals kg-1 H2O were destroyed. Combination of the resultant water chemistry with results for granitic weathering produced a water composition comparable to present-day world average river water (WARW). In contrast, under late Archean atmospheric conditions (pCO2,g =10-1.5 and pH2,g =10-5.0 bars), weathering of olivine basalt + calcite to the same degree of reaction produced kaolinite, chalcedony, and Na-Fe(II)-rich-saponite. Late Archean weathering of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) formed Fe(II)-rich beidellite and chalcedony. Combining the waters from olivine basalt and TTG weathering resulted in a model for late Archean WARW with the

  12. Quantum theory of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1994-10-01

    If one wishes to describe a chemical reaction at the most detailed level possible, i.e., its state-to-state differential scattering cross section, then it is necessary to solve the Schroedinger equation to obtain the S-matrix as a function of total energy E and total angular momentum J, in terms of which the cross sections can be calculated as given by equation (1) in the paper. All other physically observable attributes of the reaction can be derived from the cross sections. Often, in fact, one is primarily interested in the least detailed quantity which characterizes the reaction, namely its thermal rate constant, which is obtained by integrating Eq. (1) over all scattering angles, summing over all product quantum states, and Boltzmann-averaging over all initial quantum states of reactants. With the proper weighting factors, all of these averages are conveniently contained in the cumulative reaction probability (CRP), which is defined by equation (2) and in terms of which the thermal rate constant is given by equation (3). Thus, having carried out a full state-to-state scattering calculation to obtain the S-matrix, one can obtain the CRP from Eq. (2), and then rate constant from Eq. (3), but this seems like ``overkill``; i.e., if one only wants the rate constant, it would clearly be desirable to have a theory that allows one to calculate it, or the CRP, more directly than via Eq. (2), yet also correctly, i.e., without inherent approximations. Such a theory is the subject of this paper.

  13. Putting weathering into a landscape context: Variations in exhumation rates across the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Suzanne P.; Foster, Melissa A.; Anderson, Scott W.; Dühnforth, Miriam; Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Erosion rates are expected vary with lithology, climate, and topographic slope, yet assembling these variations for an entire landscape is rarely done. The Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado, USA, exhibits contrasts in all three parameters. The range comprises ~2300 m in relief from the Plains to the crags of the Continental Divide. Its abrupt mountain front coincides closely with the boundary between marine sedimentary rocks to the east and Proterozoic crystalline rocks (primarily granodiorite and gneiss) to the west. Mean annual temperature declines and mean annual precipitation increases with elevation, from ~11° C/490 mm at the western edge of the Plains to -3.7° C/930 mm on Niwot Ridge near the range crest. The range contains regions of low relief with rolling topography, in which slopes rarely exceed 20° , as well as deeply incised glacial valleys and fluvial canyons lined by steep slopes (>25° ). Cosmogenic 10Be based erosion rates vary by a factor of ~5 within crystalline rock across the range. The lowest rates (5-10 mm/ka) are found on low relief summit tors in the alpine, where temperatures are low and precipitation is high. Slightly higher erosion rates (20-30 mm/ka) are found in low relief crystalline rock areas with montane forest cover. Taken together, these rates suggest that on low slopes, rock-weathering rates (which place a fundamental limit on erosion rates) are lower in cold alpine settings. Over the 40-150 ka averaging time of 10Be erosion rates, lower rates are found where periglacial/tundra conditions have prevailed, while moderate rates occur where conditions have varied from periglacial/tundra in the past to frigid regime/montane forest in the Holocene. Higher basin-averaged erosion rates of 40-60 mm/ka are reported for 'canyon edge' basins (Dethier et al., 2014, Geology), which are small, steep basins responding to fluvial bedrock incision that formed the canyons in the late Cenozoic. Are higher erosion rates in

  14. The fluvial geochemistry, contributions of silicate, carbonate and saline-alkaline components to chemical weathering flux and controlling parameters: Narmada River (Deccan Traps), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harish; Chakrapani, Govind J.; Selvaraj, Kandasamy; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2011-02-01

    The Narmada River in India is the largest west-flowing river into the Arabian Sea, draining through the Deccan Traps, one of the largest flood basalt provinces in the world. The fluvial geochemical characteristics and chemical weathering rates (CWR) for the mainstream and its major tributaries were determined using a composite dataset, which includes four phases of seasonal field (spot) samples (during 2003 and 2004) and a decade-long (1990-2000) fortnight time series (multiannual) data. Here, we demonstrate the influence of minor lithologies (carbonates and saline-alkaline soils) on basaltic signature, as reflected in sudden increases of Ca 2+-Mg 2+ and Na + contents at many locations along the mainstream and in tributaries. Both spot and multiannual data corrected for non-geological contributions were used to calculate the CWR. The CWR for spot samples (CWR spot) vary between 25 and 63 ton km -2 year -1, showing a reasonable correspondence with the CWR estimated for multiannual data (CWR multi) at most study locations. The weathering rates of silicate ( SilWR), carbonate ( CarbWR) and evaporite ( Sal-AlkWR) have contributed ˜38-58, 28-45 and 8-23%, respectively to the CWR spot at different locations. The estimated SilWR (11-36 ton km -2 year -1) for the Narmada basin indicates that the previous studies on the North Deccan Rivers (Narmada-Tapti-Godavari) overestimated the silicate weathering rates and associated CO 2 consumption rates. The average annual CO 2 drawdown via silicate weathering calculated for the Narmada basin is ˜0.032 × 10 12 moles year -1, suggesting that chemical weathering of the entire Deccan Trap basalts consumes approximately 2% (˜0.24 × 10 12 moles) of the annual global CO 2 drawdown. The present study also evaluates the influence of meteorological parameters (runoff and temperature) and physical weathering rates (PWR) in controlling the CWR at annual scale across the basin. The CWR and the SilWR show significant correlation with runoff

  15. Temporal variation of chemical and mechanical weathering in NE Iceland: Evaluation of a steady-state model of erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksdottir, E. S.; Louvat, P.; Gislason, S. R.; Óskarsson, N.; Hardardóttir, J.

    2008-07-01

    mechanical denudation rates of 1.3-3.0 kg/m 2/yr whereas the average measured rates were 0.8-3.5 kg/m 2/yr which are among the highest on Earth. This study validates the use of a steady-state model of erosion to estimate mechanical weathering rates at the scale of a river catchment when the collected riverine dissolved load represents the average chemical composition over a mean hydrological year.

  16. Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on Basalt Weathering Rates under Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C. I.; Chorover, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Rock weathering is an important aspect of soil formation that is tightly coupled to the progressive colonization of grain surfaces by microorganisms and plant tissue, both of which are associated with the exudation of complexing ligands and reducing equivalents that are incorporated into dissolved organic matter. As part of a larger hillslope experimental study being designed for Biosphere 2 (Oracle, AZ), we seek to determine how the presence and concentration of dissolved organic matter affects the incongruent dissolution rates of basaltic tuff. Saturated flow column experiments are being conducted using plant-derived soluble organic matter solutions of variable concentrations, and comparisons are being made to experiments conducted with malic acid, a low-molecular weight organic acid commonly exuded into the rhizosphere. Dissolved organic matter was extracted from Ponderosa Pine forest floor and was characterized for aqueous geochemical parameters (pH, EC, ion balance, DOC/TN) and also for DOC composition (UV-Vis, FTIR spectroscopy). Column effluents are being analyzed for major and trace cations, anions, silica and organic solutes. Dissolution rates of primary minerals and precipitation rates of secondary phases will be estimated by fitting the data to a numerical reactive transport model, CrunchFlow2007. At the end of the fluid flow experiment, column materials will be analyzed for biogeochemical composition to detect preferential dissolution of specific phases, the precipitation of new ones, and to monitor the associated formation of biofilms. The influence of organic solutions on weathering patterns of basalt will be discussed.

  17. Chemical weathering in Zhujiang River Drainage%珠江流域的化学侵蚀

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高全洲; 沈承德; 孙彦敏; 易熙; 邢长平; 陶贞

    2001-01-01

    he chemical weathering processes on the continental carbonate and silicate minerals consume a large amount of carbon dioxide both from atmosphere and soil air. This gaseous substance, which is the dominating greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, was transformed into fluid substance and transported into the ocean by rivers in the form of bicarbonate ion. In this aspect, the weathering and transportation of bicarbonate ion in river system stand for an important linkage in the global carbon cycle. The range of global climate change in the geological history was weakened through this kind of negative feedback mechanism, i.e., the higher the atmospheric temperature is, the intense the chemical weathering process will be. However, an intense chemical weathering process will consume much greater amount of carbon dioxide, which can drop down the atmospheric temperature.   The Xijiang and Beijiang river drainage areas, which buildup most of the area of the Zhujiang (Pearl) river drainage, located in the typical sub tropical region in South China, are about 353 120 and 46 710 km2 in area, respectively. The discharge is about 230× 109 m3/a for Xijiang River, and 51× 109 m3/a for Beijiang River. The two drainage areas, characterized by the superposition temporarily of the high atmospheric temperature and plenty of precipitation, are the only areas of highest yield of biomass in mid low latitude zone in Northern Hemisphere. The carbonate rocks distribute widely in the two drainage basins. Red regolith crust and limestone red earth are the main soil forming material in those areas. The surficial geochemistry process taken place in the two drainage areas is intense due to the high degree of plant coverage, and due to the plenty of precipitation and a high atmospheric temperature. On the other hand, the mechanical erosion is also intense due to the precipitous topography, and due to high population density, which lead to a high ratio of cultivated area.

  18. A test of the cosmogenic 10Be(meteoric)/9Be proxy for simultaneously determining basin-wide erosion rates, denudation rates, and the degree of weathering in the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, H.; Blanckenburg, F.; Dannhaus, N.; Bouchez, J.; Gaillardet, J.; Guyot, J. L.; Maurice, L.; Roig, H.; Filizola, N.; Christl, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an extensive investigation of a new erosion and weathering proxy derived from the 10Be(meteoric)/9Be(stable) ratio in the Amazon River basin. This new proxy combines a radioactive atmospheric flux tracer, meteoric cosmogenic 10Be, with 9Be, a trace metal released by weathering. Results show that meteoric 10Be concentrations ([10Be]) and 10Be/9Be ratios increase by >30% from the Andes to the lowlands. We can calculate floodplain transfer times of 2-30 kyr from this increase. Intriguingly however, the riverine exported flux of meteoric 10Be shows a deficit with respect to the atmospheric depositional 10Be flux. Most likely, the actual area from which the 10Be flux is being delivered into the mainstream is smaller than the basin-wide one. Despite this imbalance, denudation rates calculated from 10Be/9Be ratios from bed load, suspended sediment, and water samples from Amazon Rivers agree within a factor of 2 with published in situ 10Be denudation rates. Erosion rates calculated from meteoric [10Be], measured from depth-integrated suspended sediment samples, agree with denudation rates, suggesting that grain size-induced variations in [10Be] are minimized when using such sampling material instead of bed load. In addition, the agreement between erosion and denudation rates implies minor chemical weathering intensity in most Amazon tributaries. Indeed, the Be-specific weathering intensity, calculated from mobilized 9Be comprising reactive and dissolved fractions that are released during weathering, is constant at approximately 40% of the total denudation from the Andes across the lowlands to the Amazon mouth. Therefore, weathering in the Amazon floodplain is not detected.

  19. Chemical Weathering Records of Martian Soils Preserved in the Martian Meteorite EET79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Impact-melt glasses, rich in Martian atmospheric gases, contain Martian soil fines (MSF) mixed with other coarse-grained regolith fractions which are produced during impact bombardment on Mars surface. An important characteristic of the MSF fraction is the simultaneous enrichment of felsic component accompanied by the depletion of mafic component relative to the host phase in these glasses. In addition, these glasses yield large sulfur abundances due to the occurrence of secondary mineral phases such as sulfates produced during acid-sulfate weathering of the regolith material near the Martian surface. Sulfurous gases released into atmosphere by volcanoes on Mars are oxidized to H2SO4 which deposit back on the surface of Mars as aerosol particles. Depending on the water availability, sulfuric acids dissolve into solutions which aggressively decompose the Fe-Mg silicates in the Martian regolith. During chemical weathering, structural elements such as Fe, Mg and Ca (among others) are released into the transgressing solutions. These solutions leach away the soluble components of Mg, Ca and Na, leaving behind insoluble iron as Fe3(+) hydroxysulfate mixed with poorly crystalline hydroxide- precipitates under oxidizing conditions. In this study, we focus on the elemental distribution of FeO and SO3 in the glass veins of EET79001, 507 sample, determined by Electron Microprobe and FE SEM measurements at JSC. This glass sample is an aliquot of a bigger glass inclusion ,104 analysed by where large concentrations of Martian atmospheric noble gases are found.

  20. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  1. Redetermination of the space weathering rate using spectra of Iannini asteroid family members

    CERN Document Server

    Willman, Mark; Nesvorný, David; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Ivezić, Željko; Fevig, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    We obtained moderate S/N ($\\sim85$) spectra at a realized resolution of R $\\sim100$ for 11 members of the Iannini family, until recently the youngest known family at under 5 million years of age \\citep{bib.nes03}. The spectra were acquired using the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager in its low-resolution prism mode on the Keck II telescope. The family members belong to the S-complex of asteroids with perhaps some K class members. The Iannini family members's average spectral slope, defined as the slope of the best-fit line constrained to pivot about 1 at 550 nm, is $(0.30\\pm0.04)/\\mu m$, matching the $(0.26\\pm0.03)/\\mu m$ reported by \\citet{bib.jed04} using SDSS \\citep{bib.ive02} color photometry. Using our spectra for this family as well as new observations of Karin family members \\citep{bib.ver06} and new classifications of some older families we revised the space weathering rate of S-complex asteroids originally determined by \\citet{bib.jed04}. Following \\citet{bib.jed04} we parameterize the space weather...

  2. Evaluating sensitivity of silicate mineral dissolution rates to physical weathering using a soil evolution model (SoilGen2.25)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolot, E.; Finke, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Silicate mineral dissolution rates depend on the interaction of a number of factors categorized either as intrinsic (e.g. mineral surface area, mineral composition) or extrinsic (e.g. climate, hydrology, biological factors, physical weathering). Estimating the integrated effect of these factors on the silicate mineral dissolution rates therefore necessitates the use of fully mechanistic soil evolution models. This study applies a mechanistic soil evolution model (SoilGen) to explore the sensitivity of silicate mineral dissolution rates to the integrated effect of other soil-forming processes and factors. The SoilGen soil evolution model is a 1-D model developed to simulate the time-depth evolution of soil properties as a function of various soil-forming processes (e.g. water, heat and solute transport, chemical and physical weathering, clay migration, nutrient cycling, and bioturbation) driven by soil-forming factors (i.e., climate, organisms, relief, parent material). Results from this study show that although soil solution chemistry (pH) plays a dominant role in determining the silicate mineral dissolution rates, all processes that directly or indirectly influence the soil solution composition play an equally important role in driving silicate mineral dissolution rates. Model results demonstrated a decrease of silicate mineral dissolution rates with time, an obvious effect of texture and an indirect but substantial effect of physical weathering on silicate mineral dissolution rates. Results further indicated that clay migration and plant nutrient recycling processes influence the pH and thus the silicate mineral dissolution rates. Our silicate mineral dissolution rates results fall between field and laboratory rates but were rather high and more close to the laboratory rates possibly due to the assumption of far from equilibrium reaction used in our dissolution rate mechanism. There is therefore a need to include secondary mineral precipitation mechanism in our

  3. Snowfall Rate Retrieval Using Passive Microwave Measurements and Its Applications in Weather Forecast and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Yan, Banghua; Zavodsky, Bradley; Zhao, Limin; Dong, Jun; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has also been developed. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. It employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derives the probability of snowfall. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model. A method adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The SFR products are being used mainly in two communities: hydrology and weather forecast. Global blended precipitation products traditionally do not include snowfall derived from satellites because such products were not available operationally in the past. The ATMS and AMSU/MHS SFR now provide the winter precipitation information for these blended precipitation products. Weather forecasters mainly rely on radar and station observations for snowfall forecast. The SFR products can fill in gaps where no conventional snowfall data are available to forecasters. The products can also be used to confirm radar and gauge snowfall data and increase forecasters' confidence in their prediction.

  4. Role of hydraulic diffusivity in the decrease of weathering rates over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2014-05-01

    Springs emerging within massifs of crystalline rocks were monitored for discharge rate (Q), and the Q values combined with geomorphic and hydrographic parameters in a hydrologic model to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) and effective porosity (ne) of the spring watersheds. The spring waters, several borehole waters and rain water were analyzed for major dissolved compounds, strontium and isotopes (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C and 87Sr/86Sr). With a shift to less negative values, δ18O and δ2H were fitted by a line approximately parallel to the GMWL, but no significant dependence on altitude was found. The δ18O and δ2H values correlate better with those of precipitation amount. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in drilled well waters correlate positively with the depth of water circulation reported in the borehole logs. The corresponding regression equations were used to extrapolate the depth of hydraulic circuits within the spring watersheds. The previous data, together with groundwater travel times calculated by a water balance model, and with reactions of granite/metassediment plagioclase and biotite precipitating halloysite, gibbsite and vermiculite, were assembled in a mass balance model to calculate solute-flux weathering rates of plagioclase (WPl). The WPl's were described as a function of √{D}∝√{K/n}, where D is the hydraulic diffusivity. The discrepancies between the WPl values and solid-state rates, based on the differences between elemental, isotopic and mineral compositions measured in present-day regoliths and in the assumed protolith, were assigned to a decrease in D over time, from values in the protolith to values in the weathered aquifer.

  5. Analyzing the Chemical and Spectral Effects of Pulsed Laser Irradiation to Simulate Space Weathering of a Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. S.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering processes alter the chemical composition, microstructure, and spectral characteristics of material on the surfaces of airless bodies. The mechanisms driving space weathering include solar wind irradiation and the melting, vaporization and recondensation effects associated with micrometeorite impacts e.g., [1]. While much work has been done to understand space weathering of lunar and ordinary chondritic materials, the effects of these processes on hydrated carbonaceous chondrites is poorly understood. Analysis of space weathering of carbonaceous materials will be critical for understanding the nature of samples returned by upcoming missions targeting primitive, organic-rich bodies (e.g., OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2). Recent experiments have shown the spectral properties of carbonaceous materials and associated minerals are altered by simulated weathering events e.g., [2-5]. However, the resulting type of alteration i.e., reddening vs. bluing of the reflectance spectrum, is not consistent across all experiments [2-5]. In addition, the microstructural and crystal chemical effects of many of these experiments have not been well characterized, making it difficult to attribute spectral changes to specific mineralogical or chemical changes in the samples. Here we report results of a pulsed laser irradiation experiment on a chip of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite to simulate micrometeorite impact processing.

  6. Chemical weathering and long-term CO2 consumption in the Ayeyarwady and Mekong river basins in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaka, Takuya; Otani, Souya; Inamura, Akihiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Aung, Thura; Roachanakanan, Raywadee; Ishiwa, Takeshige; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2015-06-01

    The role of terrestrial river systems in the global carbon cycle on a long timescale has been a subject of interest, especially in the context of past climate changes such as the global cooling in the Cenozoic. The discharges of water and carbon into the ocean from the Himalayan watersheds are among the highest in the world. However, there are few reliable geochemical data from the Ayeyarwady River. This study focused on reevaluating chemical weathering in the Himalayan watersheds based on samples taken from the Ayeyarwady, Mekong, and Chao Phraya Rivers and on chemical analysis of the composition of dissolved substances in these rivers. Comparisons of water quality showed that, unlike in previous studies, the total alkalinity budgets of the Ayeyarwady are dominated by carbonate rather than silicate weathering. Long-term CO2 consumption by silicate weathering in the Ayeyarwady is estimated to be only 63-145 × 109 mol yr-1, which is only 10% of the previous estimate. Our results also suggest that the total Himalayan watersheds account for only about 10% of the total global CO2 consumption by silicate weathering. Although we need further studies, chemical weathering and associated CO2 uptake in the Himalayas likely played a lesser role in long-term global cooling in the past than previously appreciated.

  7. Chemical emission rates from personal computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, T.; Wargocki, Pawel; Tanabe, S.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical emission measurements from different brands of personal computers (PCs) were conducted in a 1 m3 glass chamber. Eight PCs were tested individually. Each consisted of the same brand of PC tower and one of the 4 different brands of PC monitors. Within each brand both cathode-ray tube (CRT...

  8. 流域化学风化过程的碳汇能力%CARBON SEQUESTRATION CAPACITY OF THE CHEMICAL WEATHERING PROCESSES WITHIN DRAINAGE BASINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶贞; 高全洲; 刘昆

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 uptake by the chemical weathering of river basins was reviewed based on pioneering works.The chemical weathering of continents is the key linkage connecting the major carbon pools in the Earth. The chemical weathering of rocks, especially of silicate rocks, constitmes a major carbon sink in tbe global biogechemical cycles on a geological rime scale ,which is an important surficial geological proess that regulates the Earth's climate and makes the global changes relalively smooth. Rivers play a crucial role in the transferring of terrestrial material to the ocean, and the river system also records the signatures of various natural processes and human activities within the drainage basins. The contributions from chemical weathering of various rocks to the chemical runoff can be estimated and traced by surveying the chemical composition of river water and application of Gibbs diagram,mass balance method and isotopic tracer techniques. The rate of chemical weathering of rocks and consumption fluxes of atmospheric/soil CO2 can be calculated according to the chemical composition of river water within the drainage basins. Environmental factors affecting the rate of chemical weathering are different in different areas,which causes a significant difference in spatial distribution of geological carbon sequestration. The geological carbon sequestration potential of chemical weathering of rocks in humid tropieal and subtropical areas is about the mean annual fixing of 55kg CO2 per capita of China, which offsets partiaaly the earbon emissions in China.%通过对已有工作较为全面的分析,综述了流域化学风化过程对大气CO的吸收能力.陆地岩石的化学风化过程是联接地球各大碳库的关键环节.在地质时间尺度上陆地岩石的化学风化,尤其是硅酸盐岩的化学风化构成全球生物地球化学循环的重要碳汇,是调节地球气候性质使之相对稳定的关键表生地质过程.河流在陆地向海洋

  9. Diabatic heating rate estimates from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertically integrated diabatic heating rate estimates (H) calculated from 32 months of European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts daily analyses (May 1985-December 1987) are determined as residuals of the thermodynamic equation in pressure coordinates. Values for global, hemispheric, zonal, and grid point H are given as they vary over the time period examined. The distribution of H is compared with previous results and with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements. The most significant negative correlations between H and OLR occur for (1) tropical and Northern-Hemisphere mid-latitude oceanic areas and (2) zonal and hemispheric mean values for periods less than 90 days. Largest positive correlations are seen in periods greater than 90 days for the Northern Hemispheric mean and continental areas of North Africa, North America, northern Asia, and Antarctica. The physical basis for these relationships is discussed. An interyear comparison between 1986 and 1987 reveals the ENSO signal.

  10. Mass discharge rate retrieval combining weather radar and thermal camera observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Ripepe, Maurizio; Valade, Sebastien

    2016-08-01

    The mass discharge rate is a key parameter for initializing volcanic ash dispersal models. Commonly used empirical approaches derive the discharge rate by the plume height as estimated by remote sensors. A novel approach based on the combination of weather radar observations and thermal camera imagery is presented here. It is based on radar ash concentration estimation and the retrieval of the vertical exit velocities of the explosive cloud using thermal camera measurements. The applied radar retrieval methodology is taken from a revision of previously presented work. Based on the analysis of four eruption events of the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) that occurred in December 2015, the proposed methodology is tested using observations collected by three radar systems (at C and X band) operated by the Italian Department of Civil Protection. The total erupted mass was estimated to be about 9·109 kg and 2.4·109 kg for the first and second events, respectively, while it was about 1.2·109 kg for both the last two episodes. The comparison with empirical approaches based on radar-retrieved plume height shows a reasonably good agreement. Additionally, the comparative analysis of the polarimetric radar measurements provides interesting information on the vertical structure of the ash plume, including the size of the eruption column and the height of the gas thrust region.

  11. Rates of consumption of atmospheric CO2 through the weathering of loess during the next 100 yr of climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pollard

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying how C fluxes will change in the future is a complex task for models because of the coupling between climate, hydrology, and biogeochemical reactions. Here we investigate how pedogenesis of the Peoria loess, which has been weathering for the last 13 kyr, will respond over the next 100 yr of climate change. Using a cascade of numerical models for climate (ARPEGE, vegetation (CARAIB and weathering (WITCH we explore the effect of an increase in CO2 of 315 ppmv (1950 to 700 ppmv (2100 projection. The increasing CO2 results in an increase in temperature along the entire transect. In contrast, drainage increases slightly for a focus pedon in the South but decreases strongly in the North. These two variables largely determine the behavior of weathering. In addition, although CO2 production rate increases in the soils in response to global warming, the rate of diffusion back to the atmosphere also increases, maintaining a roughly constant or even decreasing CO2 concentration in the soil gas phase. Our simulations predict that temperature increasing in the next 100 yr causes the weathering rates of the silicates to increase into the future. In contrast, the weathering rate of dolomite – which consumes most of the CO2-decreases due to its retrograde solubility in both end members (South and North of the transect. We thus infer slower rates of advance of the dolomite reaction front into the subsurface, and faster rates of advance of the silicate reaction front. However, additional simulations for 9 pedons located along the North–South transect show that dolomite weathering will increase in the central part of the Mississippi Valley, owing to a maximum in the response of vertical drainage to the ongoing climate change. The carbonate reaction front can be likened to a terrestrial lysocline because it represents a depth interval over which carbonate dissolution rates increase drastically. However, in contrast to the lower pH and shallower

  12. Efficiency and resistance of the artificial oxalate protection treatment on marble against chemical weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, B. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy); Pamplona, M. [Centro de Petrologia e Geoquimica do Instituto Superior Tecnico Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Selvaggi, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy); Miliani, C. [Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (ISTM), Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy)]. E-mail: miliani@thch.unipg.it; Matteini, M. [CNR Istituto, Conservazione e Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali (ICVBC), Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Edifico C-50019, Florence (Italy); Sgamellotti, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (ISTM), Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy); Brunetti, B. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto, 8, I-60123 Perugia (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    The artificial oxalate protection method was analyzed in laboratory experiments in order to achieve an optimum treatment application and concentration giving rise to its most effective protective nature. Spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared, Micro-Raman and UV-vis colorimetry), microscopic (scanning electron microscope) and contact-angle analyses were carried out to characterize Carrara marble samples before and after application of the treatment to validate its efficiency. The resistance effects against chemical weathering were subsequently observed in a lab-controlled weak acid rain experiment. An acid spray at pH 5.5, representative of normal rain was used to provoke degrade of natural marble, marble treated with the artificial oxalate protective at concentrations of 0.4 and 5% and marble treated with a commercial organic silicon product. Run-off solutions sampled at timely intervals were tested for any change in pH followed by ion chromatography measurements for the presence of calcium ions in solution. The chromatography results of the oxalate treatment applied at a 5% concentration are analogous to an organic commercial product indicating its validity as a method for the conservation of carbonate substrates conferring protection to stone materials against acid environments.

  13. AB Blanket for Cities (for continual pleasant weather and protection from chemical, biological and radioactive weapons)

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previous articles (see references) the author offered to cover a city or other important large installations or subregions by a transparent thin film supported by a small additional air overpressure under the form of an AB Dome. The building of a gigantic inflatable AB Dome over an empty flat surface is not difficult. However, if we want to cover a city, garden, forest or other obstacle course we cannot easily deploy the thin film over building or trees. In this article is suggested a new method which solves this problem. The idea is to design a double film blanket filled by light gas (for example, methane, hydrogen, or helium). Sections of this AB Blanket are lighter then air and fly in atmosphere. They can be made on a flat area (serving as an assembly area) and delivered by dirigible or helicopter to station at altitude over the city. Here they connect to the already assembled AB Blanket subassemblies, cover the city in an AB Dome and protect it from bad weather, chemical, biological and rad...

  14. Unweathered and weathered aviation kerosine: Chemical characterization and effects on hatching success of duck eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.; Gay, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of weathered aviation kerosine from a pipeline rupture in northern Virginia on mallard egg hatchability. Artificially-incubated mallard eggs were exposed by eggshell application to several amounts of weathered and unweathered aviation kerosine on day 6 of incubation. Measured hatching success of eggs and characterized the kerosine according to 14 aliphatic and 9 aromatic compounds.

  15. CFORS - Regional Chemical and Weather Forecast System in Support of Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yienger, J. J.; Uno, I.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Tang, Y.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Woo, J.; Dorwart, J.; Streets, D.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we will present the development, evaluation, and use of improved modeling techniques and methodologies for the integration of meteorological forecasts with air pollution forecasts in support of field operations during the TRACE-P and Ace-Asia experiments in East Asia. During the campaign period we provided a variety of forecast products using our regional modeling system built upon the dynamic meteorological model RAMS and the 3-D regional chemical transport models STEM-III. These models were run in both on-line and off-line modes, and the results integrated into an interactive web-based data mining and analysis framework. This resulting Chemical Weather Forecasting System CFORS, was run operationally for the period February through May 2001, and provided 72-hr forecasts of a variety of aerosol, chemical and air mass and emission marker quantities. These included aerosol mass distribution and optical depth by major component (e.g., dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and sulfate), photochemical quantities including ozone and OH/HO2, and air mass & emissions markers including lightning, volcanic, mega-cities, and biomass burning. These model products were presented along with meteorological forecasts and satellite products, and used to help determine the flight plans, the positioning of the ship, and to alert surface stations of upcoming events (such as dust storms). The use of CFORS forecasts (along with other model results) models were shown to provide important new information and level of detail into mission planning. For example many of the mission objectives required designing flight paths that sampled across gradients of optical depth, or flew above, below and through vertical layers of aerosol, intercepted biomass emission plumes, or sampled dust storms. CFORS, forecasts of dust outbreaks and plume locations, etc., proved to be very useful in designing missions that meet these objective. In this paper we will present an overview of

  16. Influence of geomagnetic activity and earth weather changes on heart rate and blood pressure in young and healthy population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozheredov, V. A.; Chibisov, S. M.; Blagonravov, M. L.; Khodorovich, N. A.; Demurov, E. A.; Goryachev, V. A.; Kharlitskaya, E. V.; Eremina, I. S.; Meladze, Z. A.

    2016-11-01

    There are many references in the literature related to connection between the space weather and the state of human organism. The search of external factors influence on humans is a multi-factor problem and it is well known that humans have a meteo-sensitivity. A direct problem of finding the earth weather conditions, under which the space weather manifests itself most strongly, is discussed in the present work for the first time in the helio-biology. From a formal point of view, this problem requires identification of subset (magnetobiotropic region) in three-dimensional earth's weather parameters such as pressure, temperature, and humidity, corresponding to the days when the human body is the most sensitive to changes in the geomagnetic field variations and when it reacts by statistically significant increase (or decrease) of a particular physiological parameter. This formulation defines the optimization of the problem, and the solution of the latter is not possible without the involvement of powerful metaheuristic methods of searching. Using the algorithm of differential evolution, we prove the existence of magnetobiotropic regions in the earth's weather parameters, which exhibit magneto-sensitivity of systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate of healthy young subjects for three weather areas (combinations of atmospheric temperature, pressure, and humidity). The maximum value of the correlation confidence for the measurements attributable to the days of the weather conditions that fall into each of three magnetobiotropic areas is an order of 0.006, that is almost 10 times less than the confidence, equal to 0.05, accepted in many helio-biological researches.

  17. Late Cenozoic Chemical Weathering and Environmental Changes Recorded in the Co Ngoin Sediments, Central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shiyue; JIN Zhangdong; WANG Sumin; SHEN Ji

    2005-01-01

    A series of faulted inland basins were developed in the central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, among which the Co Ngoin Basin containing thick lacustrine sediments is located in the peripheral area of the Indian monsoon. In this paper, we present the weathering history and paleoclimatic changes in the last 2.8 Ma based on studies of high-resolution temporal distributions of Sr, Rb and Zr concentrations, Rb/Sr and Zr/Rb ratios and δ 13C and TOC for the Co Ngoin sediments, in combination with the sediment properties, grain size distribution and clay mineralogy. The sedimentary records indicate three environmental stages in the last 2.8 Ma. At the core depth of 197-170 m (about 2.8-2.5 Ma), low-intensity chemical weathering in the Co Ngoin catchment was experienced under warm-dry to cool-wet climate conditions with relatively low Sr concentration and high Rb/Sr and Zr/Rb ratios. The sudden occurrence of both subalpine coniferous forest and coarse sand and gravel sediments in the Co Ngoin core reflects a strong tectonic uplift. The high Sr concentrations and low Rb/Sr and Zr/Rb ratios reflect a relatively strong chemical weathering between 2.5 Ma and 0.8 Ma (at the core depth of 170-38.5m) under a temperate/cool and wet climate, characterized by mud and silt with fine sand, probably indicating a stable process of denudation and planation of the plateau. Above the depth of 38.5 m (about 0.8-0 Ma), the coarsening of sediments indicates a strong tectonic uplift and a relatively low intensity of chemical weathering as supported by the record of sediments having relatively low Sr concentrations and high Rb/Sr and Zr/Rb ratios. Since then, the plateau has taken the shape of the modern topographic pattern above 4000 m a.s.1.

  18. Impact of sediment-seawater cation exchange on Himalayan chemical weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupker, Maarten; France-Lanord, Christian; Lartiges, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Continental-scale chemical weathering budgets are commonly assessed based on the flux of dissolved elements carried by large rivers to the oceans. However, the interaction between sediments and seawater in estuaries can lead to additional cation exchange fluxes that have been very poorly constrained so far. We constrained the magnitude of cation exchange fluxes from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system based on cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements of riverine sediments. CEC values of sediments are variable throughout the river water column as a result of hydrological sorting of minerals with depth that control grain sizes and surface area. The average CEC of the integrated sediment load of the Ganga-Brahmaputra is estimated ca. 6.5 meq 100 g-1. The cationic charge of sediments in the river is dominated by bivalent ions Ca2+ (76 %) and Mg2+ (16 %) followed by monovalent K+ (6 %) and Na+ (2 %), and the relative proportion of these ions is constant among all samples and both rivers. Assuming a total exchange of exchangeable Ca2+ for marine Na+ yields a maximal additional Ca2+ flux of 28 × 109 mol yr-1 of calcium to the ocean, which represents an increase of ca. 6 % of the actual river dissolved Ca2+ flux. In the more likely event that only a fraction of the adsorbed riverine Ca2+ is exchanged, not only for marine Na+ but also Mg2+ and K+, estuarine cation exchange for the Ganga-Brahmaputra is responsible for an additional Ca2+ flux of 23 × 109 mol yr-1, while ca. 27 × 109 mol yr-1 of Na+, 8 × 109 mol yr-1 of Mg2+ and 4 × 109 mol yr-1 of K+ are re-absorbed in the estuaries. This represents an additional riverine Ca2+ flux to the ocean of 5 % compared to the measured dissolved flux. About 15 % of the dissolved Na+ flux, 8 % of the dissolved K+ flux and 4 % of the Mg2+ are reabsorbed by the sediments in the estuaries. The impact of estuarine sediment-seawater cation exchange appears to be limited when evaluated in the context of the long-term carbon cycle and

  19. Determination of weathering rate of the Morro do Ferro Th-REEs deposit, Brazil using U-isotope method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, D.M. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus de Rio Claro, Avnue 24-A No.1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: dbonotto@rc.unesp.br; Fujimori, K. [In Memoriam, Departamento de Geofisica, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas (IAG-USP), Rua do Matao No. 1226, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moreira-Nordemann, L.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE-MCT-CNPq), Av. dos Astronautas No. 1758, CEP 12227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    The weathering rate was estimated by changes in {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio (AR) and U content of rocks, borehole spoil and surface water samples at the Morro do Ferro Th-REEs deposit. The deposit is situated in the Pocos de Caldas alkaline massif, Brazil. The south stream basin investigated in this paper has not been significantly affected by anthropogenic inputs of pollutants as compared to the Corumbatai River basin in Sao Paulo State, where the method was previously applied. The weathering rate derived utilizing the U-isotopes modeling corresponded to 0.015 mm/yr (67,000 years to weather 1 m of rock under the actual climatic conditions). The estimated rate is very reasonable in comparison with the range of 0.015-0.05 mm/yr of land surface lowering within the entire caldera. It is also compatible with a rate of 0.013 mm/yr determined for the Salgado River basin in a semi-arid region in Bahia State, Brazil. The value generated is reliable and increases the potential use of the method for other different areas in Brazil and elsewhere, because it may be used in regions with different climatic conditions and (un)polluted basins.

  20. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy Studies of Meteorites: Implications for Weathering Rates, Meteorite Flux, and Early Solar System Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, P. A. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom); Berry, F. J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Jull, A. J. T. [University of Arizona, NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analyses (United States); Smith, T. B. [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bevan, A. W. R. [Western Australian Museum, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (Australia); Cadogan, J. M. [University of New South Wales, School of Physics (Australia); Sexton, A. S.; Franchi, L. A.; Pillinger, C. T. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-15

    Ordinary chondrite finds, terrestrial age dated using {sup 14}C analyses, from different meteorite accumulation sites, have been examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy to quantitatively determine terrestrial oxidation. We observe differences in weathering rates between sites, and also between different chondrite groups. A comparison of weathering over time, and its effect in 'eroding' meteorites, together with the number and mass distribution of meteorites in each region, enables us to derive estimates of the number of meteorite falls over a given mass per year. Studies of how the oxygen isotopic composition of samples varies with weathering indicate that incipient alteration may occur without a pronounced isotopic effect, possibly due to weathering of silicates to topotactically oriented smectite confined spaces where the water volume is limited. This finding has profound implications for the use of oxygen isotopes as a tool in understanding water-rock interaction. It also may reconcile previously contradictory data regarding the nebular or asteroidal location of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration. Finally, Moessbauer spectroscopy is also found to be a useful tool in determining mineral abundance in carbonaceous chondrites, where a fine-grained matrix makes traditional approaches inapplicable. Again, the results have implications for the modification of chondritic materials in the early solar system.

  1. Biofilm adaptation to iron availability in the presence of biotite and consequences for chemical weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria in nature often live within biofilms, exopolymeric matrices that provide a favorable environment that can differ markedly from their surroundings. Biofilms have been found growing on mineral surfaces and are expected to play a role in weathering those surfaces, but this role is not well und...

  2. Effect of woody and herbaceous plants on chemical weathering of basalt material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, N.; Dontsova, K.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, semi-arid landscapes are transitioning from shallow-rooted grasslands to mixed vegetation savannas composed of deeper-rooted shrubs. These contrasting growth forms differentially drive below-ground processes because they occupy different soil horizons, are differentially stressed by periods of drought, and unequally stimulate soil weathering. Our study aims to determine the effect of woody and herbaceous plants on weathering of granular basalt serving as a model for soil. We established pots with velvet mesquite (Prosopis veluntina), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), and bare-soil pots within two temperature treatments in University of Arizona Biosphere 2. The Desert biome served as the ambient temperature treatment, while the Savanna biome was maintained 4°C warmer to simulate projected air temperatures if climate change continues unabated. Rhizon water samplers were installed at a depth of one inch from the soil surface to monitor root zone exudates (total dissolved carbon and nitrogen), dissolved inorganic carbon, and lithogenic elements resulting from basalt weathering. Soil leachates were collected through the course of the experiment. The anion content of the leachates was determined using the ICS-5000 Reagent-Free ion chromatography system. Dissolved carbon and nitrogen were analyzed by combustion using the Shimadzu TOC-VCSH with TN module. Metals and metalloids were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Irrigation of the pots was varied in time to simulate periods of drought and determine the effect of stress on root exudation. Leachates from all treatments displayed higher pH and electrical conductivity than water used for irrigation indicating weathering. On average, leachates from the potted grasses displayed higher pH and electrical conductivity than mesquites. This agreed with higher concentrations of organic carbon, a measure of root exudation, and inorganic carbon, measure of soil respiration. Both organic

  3. Dual-polarization C-band weather radar algorithms for rain rate estimation and hydrometeor classification in an alpine region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Paulitsch

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dual polarization is becoming the standard for new weather radar systems. In contrast to conventional weather radars, where the reflectivity is measured in one polarization plane only, a dual polarization radar provides transmission in either horizontal, vertical, or both polarizations while receiving both the horizontal and vertical channels simultaneously. Since hydrometeors are often far from being spherical, the backscatter and propagation are different for horizontal and vertical polarization. Comparing the reflected horizontal and vertical power returns and their ratio and correlation, information on size, shape, and material density of cloud and precipitation particles can be obtained. The use of polarimetric radar variables can therefore increase the accuracy of the rain rate estimation compared to standard Z-R relationships of non-polarimetric radars. It is also possible to derive the type of precipitation from dual polarization parameters, although this is not an easy task, since there is no clear discrimination between the different values. Fuzzy logic approaches have been shown to work well with overlapping conditions and imprecisely defined class output.

    In this paper the implementation of different polarization algorithms for the new Austrian weather radar on Mt. Valluga is described, and first results from operational use are presented. This study also presents first observations of rain events in August 2007 during the test run of the radar. Further, the designated rain rate estimation and hydrometeor classification algorithms are explained.

  4. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  5. Weak chemical weathering during the Little Ice Age recorded by lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Zhangdong

    2001-01-01

    Bulletin, 1999, 44 (supplement 1): 20-25.[12]Ding, Z. L., Yu, Z. W., Rutter, N. W. et al., Towards an orbital time scale for Chinese loess deposits, Quaternary Science Review, 1994,13: 39-70.[13]Duchaufour, Ph., Pedologie, Tome 1: Pedogenese et Classification, Paris-New York-Barcelone-Milan: Masson, 1983, 1-477.[14]Singer, M. J., Bowen, L. H., Verosub, K. L. et al., Mossbauer spectroscopic evidence for citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite ex-traction of maghemite from soils, Clays and Clay Minerals,1995, 43: 1-7.[15]Hunt, C. P., Singer, M. J., Kletetschka, G. et al., Effect of citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite treatment on fine-grained mag-netite and maghemite, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 1995, 130: 87-94.[16]Mehra, O., Jackson, M. L., Iron oxide removal from soil and clay by a dithionite-citrate system buffered with sodium bi-carbonate, Clay and Clay Minerals, 1960, 7: 317-327.[17]McKeague, J. A., Manual on soil sampling and methods of analysis, Toronto: Canadian Society of Soil Science, 1981, 1-212.[18]Kukla, G., An, Z. S., Melice, J. L. et al., Magnetic susceptibility record of Chinese loess, Transaction of Royal Society of Edinburgh, Earth Sciences, 1990, 81: 263-288.[19]Guo, Z. T., Wei, L. Y., Lu, H. Y. et al., Changes in the composition of Late Pleistocene aeolian dust and the environmental significance, Quaternary Sciences (in Chinese), 1999, 19(1): 41-48.[20]Heller, F., Liu, X. M., Liu, T. S. et al., Magnetic susceptibility of loess in China, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 1991,103: 301-310.[21]Yang, J. D., Chen, J., An, Z. S. et al., Variations in 87Sr/86Sr Ratios of calcites in Chinese loess: A proxy for chemical weathering associated with the East Asian Summer monsoon, Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, 2000,157: 151-159.[22]Verosub, K. L., Fine, P., Singer, M. J. et al., Pedogenesis and paleoclimate: Interpretation of the magnetic susceptibility record of Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, Geology, 1993, 21

  6. Updating of the hierarchical rock mass rating (HRMR) system and a new subsystem developed for weathered granite formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miranda Tiago; e Sousa L. Ribeiro; Tinoco Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    The RMR system is still very much applied in rock mechanics engineering context. It is based on the eval-uation of six weights to obtain a final rating. To obtain the final rating a considerable amount of informa-tion is needed concerning the rock mass which can be difficult to obtain in some projects or project stages at least with accuracy. In 2007 an alternative classification scheme based on the RMR, the Hierarchical Rock Mass Rating (HRMR) was presented. The main feature of this system was the adaptation to the level of knowledge existent about the rock mass to obtain the classification of the rock mass since it followed a decision tree approach. However, the HRMR was only valid for hard rock granites with low fracturing degrees. In this work, the database was enlarged with approximately 40%more cases considering other types of granite rock masses including weathered granites and based on this increased database the sys-tem was updated. Granite formations existent in the north of Portugal including Porto city are predom-inantly granites. Some years ago a light rail infrastructure was built in the city of Porto and surrounding municipalities which involved considerable challenges due to the high heterogeneity levels of the granite formations and the difficulties involved in their geomechanical characterization. In this work it is intended to provide also a contribution to improve the characterization of these formations with special emphasis to the weathered horizons. A specific subsystem applicable to the weathered formations was developed. The results of the validation of these systems are presented and show acceptable perfor-mances in identifying the correct class using less information than with the RMR system.

  7. Weather in Your Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannegieter, Sandy; Wirkler, Linda

    Facts and activities related to weather and meteorology are presented in this unit. Separate sections cover the following topics: (1) the water cycle; (2) clouds; (3) the Beaufort Scale for rating the speed and force of wind; (4) the barometer; (5) weather prediction; (6) fall weather in Iowa (sleet, frost, and fog); (7) winter weather in Iowa…

  8. Tropical chemical weathering of a garnet rich micaschist in the rainforest zone of Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désiré Tsozué

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils developed on garnet-rich micaschist in the Southern Cameroon plateau were investigated. Morphologically, two weathering materials constituted the study profile, fine earth and nodules. Each material has a singular evolution from the coarse saprolite to the upper set of clayey and loose horizons. There is Al2O3 enrichment in the fine earth concomitantly to Fe2O3, Na2O and K2O enrichment in nodules in major element–Al2O3 variation diagrams. A–CN–K and A–CNK–FM diagrams show a progressive depletion of Al in nodules concomitantly to an enrichment of this element in the fine earth. Three pedogenetic processes emerge from the evolution of weathering products. There is a ferruginization process whose importance increases from the coarse saprolite to the upper set of clayey and loose horizons, giving rise to the formation of dense nodules composed of hematite, goethite and gibbsite. This ferruginization occurs concomitantly with a desaluminization process, which causes Al2O3 depletion in nodules. These nodules are formed by the process of induration where the hydrated amorphous hydroxide and oxides are dehydrated to their crystalline oxide form, due to condensation. In addition, there is aluminization, which occurs in the fine earth, leading to the development of a red clayey material composed of kaolinite and gibbsite.

  9. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  10. The effect of wet-dry weathering on the rate of bedrock river channel erosion by saltating gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Satomi; Nelson, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the bedrock erosion rate E because of collisions of saltating bedload can be expressed by E = βqb(1-Pc), where qb is the sediment transport rate, Pc is the extent of alluvial cover, and β is the abrasion coefficient. However, the dependence of the abrasion coefficient on the physical characteristics of the bedrock material is poorly known, and in particular, the effects of wet-dry weathering on the saltation-abrasion bedrock incision has not been specifically characterized. Observation suggests that the typical wet-dry cycling of exposed bedrock in river beds gives rise to cracks and voids that are likely to alter the incision rate of the material when subjected to impacts of moving sediment. In this study, flume experiments are performed to develop an understanding of how wet-dry cycling affects the rock tensile strength and the bedrock erosion rate. To represent the physical effects of weathering, boring cores taken from natural bedrock channel are exposed to artificial wet-dry cycles. The experimental results suggest the following: (1) the abrasion coefficient for fresh bedrock is estimated by β = 1.0 × 10− 4σT− 2(d/ksb)0.5, where σT is the tensile strength, d is the diameter of colliding gravel, and ksb is the hydraulic roughness height of bedrock; (2) the tensile strength of the bedrock decreases exponentially as a result of repeated wet-dry cycles, σT/σT0 = exp (-CTNWa0/σT0), where σT0 is the initial tensile strength, Wa0 is the initial normalized rate of water absorption., N is the number of wet-dry cycles, and CT is a constant; (3) the erosion rate of fresh bedrock depends on the inverse of the square of tensile strength, but the erosion rate of weathered bedrock depends on the − 1.5 power of tensile strength.

  11. Transport and chemical loss rates in Saturn's inner plasma disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, M. K. G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Vigren, E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Andrews, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Kronian moon Enceladus is constantly feeding its surrounding with new gas and dust, from cryovolcanoes located in its south polar region. Through photoionization and impact ionization of these neutrals, a plasma disk is created, which mainly contains hydrogen ions and water group ions. This paper investigates the importance of ion loss by outward radial transport and ion loss by dissociative recombination, which is the dominant chemical loss process in the inner plasma disk. We use plasma densities derived from several years of measurements by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science electric field power spectral density and Langmuir probe to calculate the total flux tube content NL2. Our calculation shows that NL2 agrees well with earlier estimates within dipole L shell 8. We also show that loss by transport dominates chemical loss between L shells 4 and 10. Using extrapolation of available measurements, we extend the study to include L shells 2.5 to 4. The results indicate that loss by transport dominates chemical loss also between L shells 2.5 and 4. The loss rate by transport is around five times larger at L shell 5, and the difference increases as L7.7 beyond L = 5, for the net ion population. Chemical loss may still be important for the structure of the plasma disk in the region closest to Enceladus (around ±0.5 RS) at 3.95 RS (1 RS = Saturn's equatorial radius = 60,268 km), since the transport and chemical loss rates only differ by a factor of ˜2 in this region. We also derive the total plasma content of the plasma disk between L shells 4 and 10 to be 1.9 × 1033 ions and the total ion source rate for the same region to be 5.8 × 1027 s-1. The estimated equatorial ion production rate P ranges from 2.6 × 10-5 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 10) to 1.1 × 10-4 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 4.8). The net mass loading rate is derived to be 123 kg/s for L shells 4 to 10.

  12. Weathering, Soil Production, and Erosion Across Climatic and Tectonic Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, K. P.; Larsen, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    Weathering is one of the fundamental processes that sustain life on our planet. Physical weathering breaks down rock for soil production and chemical weathering is thought to operate as the ultimate long-term negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. There remains, however, uncertainty as to the relationship between chemical and physical weathering at very fast rates. If chemical weathering becomes kinetically limited at rapid erosion rates, as has been shown in a number of locations around the globe, then the fastest erosion rates will be associated with reduced chemical weathering. This has led to a debate as to whether tectonically active mountain ranges or rolling plains are the main source of CO2 drawdown through silicate weathering. At the heart of this debate is the dearth of chemical weathering data at fast erosion rates. New cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from the West Coast of the New Zealand Southern Alps are among the fastest in the world and are linearly correlated with chemical weathering rates. The associated soil production rates reach an order of magnitude faster than previous estimates and far exceed the suggested maximum soil production rate. This suggests that very fast weathering and soil production is possible in such active landscapes and extreme climates. We investigate the controls on these rapid rates with a climate-driven soil production model. At the most basic level, soil production requires chemical weathering of primary minerals to secondary minerals. We apply soil production models with both exponential and hump-shaped dependencies on soil thickness. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are incorporated in the form of a modified Arrhenius equation that controls the maximum soil production rate. When applied to the Southern Alps, the model predicts very rapid soil production that matches the magnitude of the cosmogenic nuclide-derived rates. High annual precipitation in the Southern Alps supports rapid

  13. The Influence of Radon (Gas and Progeny) and Weather Conditions on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, J L; Benito, G; Saez, J C; Navarro, N; Alvarez, A; Quiñones, J

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this study is to identify the influence of radon (gas and progeny) on the ambient dose equivalent rate measured at the reference station ESMERALDA, where continuous measurements of the ambient dose equivalent rate (every 10 min) combined with activity concentration measurements of radon gas and radon progeny as well as meteorological parameters have been collected. This study has been performed using a correlation study based on a principal components analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient.

  14. Chemical weathering intensity and terrigenous flux in South China during the last 90,000 years - evidence from magnetic signals in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoqiang; Peng, Xuechao; Qiang, Xiaoke; Li, Niu; Zhou, Qixian; Yuejun, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The level of chemical weathering is strongly affected by climate. We presented magnetic properties associated with element ratios from the northern part of the South China Sea to denote links between chemical weathering intensity and monsoon changes in the previous 90,000 years. The magnetic parameter IRMAF80mT/SIRM, representing the variations of high coercivity minerals in marine sediments accompanied with the Al2O3/TiO2 and the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), demonstrates strong chemical and physical weathering processes during the last 84-40 kyr when intensified Asian monsoon and warm climate occurred. High susceptibility, TiO2 content, and relatively coarser magnetic mineral grain (relatively low ARM/SIRM ratio) also suggest more terrigenous clastic flux resulting from intensified physical erosion and river transport ability. During the 40-15 kyr period, a low IRMAF80mT/SIRM as well as chemical proxies indicate weak weathering as the climate cooled and precipitation decreased.

  15. Chemical, mineralogical and morphological changes in weathered coal fly ash: a case study of a brine impacted wet ash dump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Chuks P; Nyale, Sammy M; Akinyeye, Richard O; Gitari, Wilson M; Akinyemi, Segun A; Fatoba, Olanrewaju O; Petrik, Leslie F

    2013-11-15

    The mobility of species in coal fly ash (FA), co-disposed with brine using a wet ash handling system, from a coal fired power generating utility has been investigated. The study was conducted in order to establish if the wet ash dump could act as a salt sink. The ash was dumped as a slurry with 5:1 brine/ash ratio and the dam was in operation for 20 years. Weathered FA samples were collected along three cores at a South African power station's wet ash dump by drilling and sampling the ash at 1.5 m depth intervals. A fresh FA sample was collected from the hoppers in the ash collection system at the power station. Characterization of both fresh FA and weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1, S2 and S3 was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for chemical composition and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology. Analysis of extracted pore water and moisture content determination of the fresh FA and the weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1, S2 and S3 was done in order to evaluate the physico-chemical properties of the FA. The XRD analysis revealed changes in mineralogy along cores S1, S2 and S3 in comparison with the fresh FA. The SEM analysis revealed spherical particles with smooth outer surfaces for the fresh FA while the weathered ash samples obtained from cores S1, S2 and S3 consisted of agglomerated, irregular particles appearing to be encrusted, etched and corroded showing that weathering and leaching had occurred in the ash dump. The moisture content (MC) analysis carried out on the fresh FA (1.8%) and the weathered FA obtained from the drilled cores S1 (41.4-73.2%), S2 (30.3-94%) and S3 (21.7-76.2%)indicated that the ash dump was water logged hence creating favourable conditions for leaching of species. The fresh fly ash (n = 3) had a pH of 12.38 ± 0.15, EC value of 4.98 ± 0.03 mS/cm and TDS value of 2.68 ± 0.03 g/L, the pH of the drilled core S1 (n = 45) was 10.04 ± 0

  16. Geochemistry of late Quaternary tephra-sediment sequence from north-eastern Basin of Mexico (Mexico): implications to tephrochronology, chemical weathering and provenance

    OpenAIRE

    Priyadarsi D. Roy; José Luis Arce; Rufino Lozano; M.P. Jonathan; Elena Centeno; Socorro Lozano

    2012-01-01

    A ca.30 m thick tephra-sediment sequence from the north-eastern Basin of Mexico (Pachuca subbasin, central Mexico) is investigated for stratigraphy and multi-element geochemistry to understand the tephrochronology, provenance and conditions of chemical weathering during Late Quaternary. Chemical compositions of tephra layers are compared with products from surrounding volcanic structures (Apan- Tezontepece, Acoculco, Huichapan, Sierra de las Cruces and Tláloc) in order to identify their sourc...

  17. Operational on-line coupled chemical weather forecasts for Europe with WRF/Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtl, Marcus; Mantovani, Simone; Krüger, Bernd C.; Flandorfer, Claudia; Langer, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Air quality is a key element for the well-being and quality of life of European citizens. Air pollution measurements and modeling tools are essential for the assessment of air quality according to EU legislation. The responsibilities of ZAMG as the national weather service of Austria include the support of the federal states and the public in questions connected to the protection of the environment in the frame of advisory and counseling services as well as expert opinions. ZAMG conducts daily Air-Quality forecasts using the on-line coupled model WRF/Chem. Meteorology is simulated simultaneously with the emissions, turbulent mixing, transport, transformation, and fate of trace gases and aerosols. The emphasis of the application is on predicting pollutants over Austria. Two domains are used for the simulations: the mother domain covers Europe with a resolution of 12 km, the inner domain includes the alpine region with a horizontal resolution of 4 km; 45 model levels are used in the vertical direction. The model runs 2 times per day for a period of 72 hours and is initialized with ECMWF forecasts. On-line coupled models allow considering two-way interactions between different atmospheric processes including chemistry (both gases and aerosols), clouds, radiation, boundary layer, emissions, meteorology and climate. In the operational set-up direct-, indirect and semi-direct effects between meteorology and air chemistry are enabled. The model is running on the HPCF (High Performance Computing Facility) of the ZAMG. In the current set-up 1248 CPUs are used. As the simulations need a big amount of computing resources, a method to safe I/O-time was implemented. Every MPI task writes all its output into the shared memory filesystem of the compute nodes. Once the WRF/Chem integration is finished, all split NetCDF-files are merged and saved on the global file system. The merge-routine is based on parallel-NetCDF. With this method the model runs about 30% faster on the SGI

  18. Gap-filling of dry weather flow rate and water quality measurements in urban catchments by a time series modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, Santiago; Vezzaro, Luca; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Flow rate and water quality dry weather time series in combined sewer systems might contain an important amount of missing data due to several reasons, such as failures related to the operation of the sensor or additional contributions during rainfall events. Therefore, the approach hereby proposed...... seeks to evaluate the potential of the Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), a time-series modelling/gap-filling method, to complete dry weather time series. The SSA method is tested by reconstructing 1000 artificial discontinuous time series, randomly generated from real flow rate and total suspended...

  19. Global chemical weather forecasts for field campaign planning: predictions and observations of large-scale features during MINOS, CONTRACE, and INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The first global tropospheric forecasts of O3 and its precursors have been used in the daily flight planning of field measurement campaigns. The 3-D chemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC is driven by meteorological data from a weather center (NCEP to produce daily 3-day forecasts of the global distributions of O3 and related gases, as well as regional CO tracers. This paper describes the forecast system and its use in three field campaigns, MINOS, CONTRACE and INDOEX. An overview is given of the forecasts by MATCH-MPIC and by three other chemical weather forecast models (EURAD, ECHAM, and FLEXPART, focusing on O3 and CO. Total CO and regional CO tracers were found to be the most valuable gases for flight planning, due to their relatively well-defined anthropogenic source regions and lifetimes of one to a few months. CO was in good agreement with the observations on nearly all the flights (generally  r > 0.7, RMS  < 20%. In every case in which the chemical weather forecasts were primarily responsible for the flight plans, the targeted features were observed. Two forecasted phenomena are discussed in detail: outflow from Asia observed in the Mediterranean upper troposphere during MINOS, and outflow from North America observed in the middle troposphere over northern Europe during CONTRACE. It is shown that although such pollution plumes occur repeatedly during the months around the campaigns, their frequency is sufficiently low (~10--30% of the time that global chemical weather forecasts are important for enabling them to be observed during limited-duration field campaigns. The MATCH-MPIC chemical weather forecasts, including an interface for making customized figures from the output, are available for community use via  http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~lawrence/forecasts.html .

  20. Landslides as weathering reactors; links between physical erosion and weathering in rapidly eroding mountain belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, R.; Hovius, N.; Galy, A.

    2014-12-01

    The link between physical erosion and chemical weathering is generally modelled with a surface-blanketing weathering zone, where the supply of fresh minerals is tied to the average rate of denudation. In very fast eroding environments, however, sediment production is dominated by landsliding, which acts in a stochastic fashion across the landscape, contrasting strongly with more uniform denudation models. If physical erosion is a driver of weathering at the highest erosion rates, then an alternative weathering model is required. Here we show that landslides can be effective 'weathering reactors'. Previous work modelling the effect of landslides on chemical weathering (Gabet 2007) considered the fresh bedrock surfaces exposed in landslide scars. However, fracturing during the landslide motion generates fresh surfaces, the total surface area of which exceeds that of the exposed scar by many orders of magnitude. Moreover, landslides introduce concavity into hillslopes, which acts to catch precipitation. This is funnelled into a deposit of highly fragmented rock mass with large reactive surface area and limited hydraulic conductivity (Lo et al. 2007). This allows percolating water reaction time for chemical weathering; any admixture of macerated organic debris could yield organic acid to further accelerate weathering. In the South island of New Zealand, seepage from recent landslide deposits has systematically high solute concentrations, far outstripping concentration in runoff from locations where soils are present. River total dissolved load in the western Southern Alps is highly correlated with the rate of recent (erosion; this contrasts with persistent and ubiquitous weathering associated with soil production. Solute fluxes from fast eroding landscapes therefore likely depend on climatic or tectonic forcing of mass wasting; greater precipitation would drive increased weathering, while earthquakes, in generating landslides (Dadson et al. 2003; Chen & Hawkins 2009

  1. Rapid soil production and weathering in the Southern Alps, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Isaac J; Almond, Peter C; Eger, Andre; Stone, John O; Montgomery, David R; Malcolm, Brendon

    2014-02-07

    Evaluating conflicting theories about the influence of mountains on carbon dioxide cycling and climate requires understanding weathering fluxes from tectonically uplifting landscapes. The lack of soil production and weathering rate measurements in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountains has made it difficult to determine whether weathering rates increase or decline in response to rapid erosion. Beryllium-10 concentrations in soils from the western Southern Alps, New Zealand, demonstrate that soil is produced from bedrock more rapidly than previously recognized, at rates up to 2.5 millimeters per year. Weathering intensity data further indicate that soil chemical denudation rates increase proportionally with erosion rates. These high weathering rates support the view that mountains play a key role in global-scale chemical weathering and thus have potentially important implications for the global carbon cycle.

  2. Effect of a chemical manufacturing plant on community cancer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churches Tim

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a retrospective study to determine if potential past exposure to dioxin had resulted in increased incidence of cancer in people living near a former manufacturing plant in New South Wales, Australia. During operation, from 1928 to 1970, by-products of the manufacturing process, including dioxin and other chemical waste, were dumped into wetlands and mangroves, discharged into a nearby bay and used to reclaim land along the foreshore, leaving a legacy of significant dioxin contamination. Methods We selected 20 Census Collector Districts within 1.5 kilometres of the former manufacturing plant as the study area. We obtained data on all cases of cancer and deaths from cancer in New South Wales from 1972 to 2001. We also compared rates for some cancer types that have been associated with dioxin exposure. Based on a person's residential address at time of cancer diagnosis, or at time of death due to cancer, various geo-coding software and processes were used to determine which collector district the case or death should be attributed to. Age and sex specific population data were used to calculate standardised incidence ratios and standardised mortality ratios, to compare the study area to two comparison areas, using indirect standardisation. Results During the 30-year study period 1,106 cases of cancer and 524 deaths due to cancer were identified in the study area. This corresponds to an age-sex standardised rate of 3.2 cases per 1,000 person-years exposed and 1.6 deaths per 1,000 person-years exposed. The study area had a lower rate of cancer and deaths from cancer than the comparison areas. The case incidence and mortality due to lung and bronchus carcinomas and haematopoietic cancers did not differ significantly from the comparison areas for the study period. There was no obvious geographical trend in ratios when comparing individual collector districts to New South Wales according to distance from the potential

  3. Element geochemistry of weathering profile of dolomitite and its implications for the average chemical composition of the upper-continental crust--Case studies from the Xinpu profile,northern Guizhou Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical behavior of chemical elements is studied in a dolomitite weathering profile in upland of karst terrain in northern Guizhou.Two stages can be recognized during the process of in situ weathering of dolomitite:the stage of sedentary accumulation of leaching residue of dolomitite and the stage of chemical weathering evolution of sedentary soil.Ni,Cr,Mo,W and Ti are the least mobile elements with reference to Al.The geochemical behavior of REE is similar to that observed in weathering of other types of rocks.Fractionation of REE is noticed during weathering,and the two layers of REE enrichments are thought to result from downward movement of the weathering front in response to changes in the environment.It is considered that the chemistry of the upper part of the profile,which was more intensively weathered,is representative of the mobile components of the upper curst at the time the dolomitite was formed,while the less weathered lower profile is chemically representative of the immobile constitution.Like glacial till and loess,the "insoluble" materials in carbonate rocks originating from chemical sedimentation may also provide valuable information about the average chemical composition of the upper continental crust.

  4. Weather Conditions, Weather Information and Car Crashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan Perrels

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic safety is the result of a complex interaction of factors, and causes behind road vehicle crashes require different measures to reduce their impacts. This study assesses how strongly the variation in daily winter crash rates associates with weather conditions in Finland. This is done by illustrating trends and spatiotemporal variation in the crash rates, by showing how a GIS application can evidence the association between temporary rises in regional crash rates and the occurrence of bad weather, and with a regression model on crash rate sensitivity to adverse weather conditions. The analysis indicates that a base rate of crashes depending on non-weather factors exists, and some combinations of extreme weather conditions are able to substantially push up crash rates on days with bad weather. Some spatial causation factors, such as variation of geophysical characteristics causing systematic differences in the distributions of weather variables, exist. Yet, even in winter, non-spatial factors are normally more significant. GIS data can support optimal deployment of rescue services and enhance in-depth quantitative analysis by helping to identify the most appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. However, the supportive role of GIS should not be inferred as existence of highly significant spatial causation.

  5. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of a weathering mantle developing on peridotite of the mining area for nickel in Cerro Matoso, Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, C.M.; Fabris, J.D. [Departamento de Quimica, UFMG (Brazil)], E-mail: claudiag@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br, E-mail: fabris@dedalus.lcc.ufmg.br; Pacheco Serrano, W.A. [Departamento de Fisica (Colombia)], E-mail: wpacheco@donato.uptc.edu.co

    1999-11-15

    Four samples were collected at several depths in a weathering mantle developing on peridotite, found in a mining area for nickel of Cerro Matoso, about 20 km southwest of Monte Libano, Department of Cordoba, Colombia. Samples represent the main stratigraphy of the mantle. Powder X-ray diffractometry, RT Moessbauer spectroscopy, saturation magnetization measurements and conventional chemical analysis on the whole and chemically treated samples, and on some of their magnetic extracts, were used to give some details of the main occurring mineralogical phases in the mantle, particular of the magnetic iron oxides.

  6. Physical weathering and regolith behaviour in a high erosion rate badland area at the Pyrenees: research design and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regües, D.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on badland areas in the Vallcebre basin (High Llobregat suggested that the erosion rates are controlled by weathering rate of mudrocks. The present work was started to characterize the physical weathering processes and rates in relationship with thermal and moisture conditions.
    The method used consists of the continuous monitoring of regolith temperatures at different conditions of aspect, depth and lithology (color, and the periodical sampling of regolith moisture and bulk density, the last taken as an indicator of the weathering status. Besides this quantitative information, the changes of the surface of the regolith have been monitored with the help of photographic techniques, using a especially designed tripod. To complete the field observations, a laboratory experiment is being performed, analyzing the volumetric changes suffered by undisturbed rock samples subject to thermal and moisture oscillations.
    The results obtained emphasize the role of frost action, especially during wet conditions. Aspect and lithologic differences introduce significant nuances in thermal regime and volumetric changes respectively.

    [es] Estudios anteriores en zonas acarcavadas de la cuenca de Vallcebre (Alto Llobregat sugieren que las tasas de erosión están limitadas por la meteorización de las rocas arcillosas que las constituyen. El presente trabajo ha sido planteado para caracterizar y evaluar los procesos de meteorización física en relación con los regímenes térmico e hídrico.
    El método empleado consiste en la monitorización continua de temperaturas del aire y del regolito en diversas condiciones de profundidad, exposición y litología (color, así como el muestreo periódico de humedad y densidad aparente, considerada ésta última como indicadora del grado de meteorización. Además de esta información cuantitativa, se ha realizado un seguimiento de los cambios en la micromorfología superficial, mediante

  7. Experimental research on the mixed sand ratio and initial dry density of weathered sand improved expansive soil free load swelling rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jun; Yang Zhi; Zhang Guodong; Tang Yunwei; Chen Hongping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, through the indoor free load swelling rate test, expansive soil in a section of a first- class highway reconstruction project in Yichang City was studied. It emphatically analyzed the interrelations among free load swelling rate, non-load time, the proportion of mixed sand and initial dry density. Experimen- tal studies have shown that: Free load swelling deformation is mainly divided into three stages of rapid expan- sion, slow expansion and final stability; when the initial dry density is constant, free load swelling rate of the weathered sand modified soil will reduce rapidly before they slow down with the increase of sand proportion, and weathered sand modified soil free load swelling rate is not sensitive to the large amount of sand mixed; in the same mixed sand ratio, weathered sand modified soil free load swelling rate increases rapidly with the in- crease of initial dry density, there is a good linear correlation between them. To take appropriate control of the initial dry density during the expansive soil subgrade construction helps to reduce its swelling deformation and ensures the stability of the embankment.

  8. Global chemical weather forecasts for field campaign planning: predictions and observations of large-scale features during MINOS, CONTRACE, and INDOEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The first global tropospheric forecasts of O3 and its precursors have been used in the daily flight planning of field measurement campaigns. The 3-D chemistry-transport model MATCH-MPIC is driven by meteorological data from a weather center (NCEP to produce daily 3-day forecasts of the global distributions of O3 and related gases, as well as regional CO tracers. This paper describes the forecast system and its use in three field campaigns, MINOS, CONTRACE and INDOEX. An overview is given of the forecasts by MATCH-MPIC and by three other chemical weather forecast models (EURAD, ECHAM, and FLEXPART, focusing on O3 and CO. Total CO and regional CO tracers were found to be the most valuable gases for flight planning, due to their relatively well-defined anthropogenic source regions and lifetimes of one to a few months. CO was in good agreement with the observations on nearly all the flights (generally  r > 0.7, and the relative RMS differences for the deviations from the means was less than 20%. In every case in which the chemical weather forecasts were primarily responsible for the flight plans, the targeted features were observed. Three forecasted phenomena are discussed in detail: outflow from Asia observed in the Mediterranean upper troposphere during MINOS, outflow from North America observed in the middle troposphere over northern Europe during CONTRACE, and the location of the "chemical ITCZ'' over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX. In particular it is shown that although intercontinental pollution plumes such as those observed during MINOS and CONTRACE occur repeatedly during the months around the campaigns, their frequency is sufficiently low (~10--30% of the time that global chemical weather forecasts are important for enabling them to be observed during limited-duration field campaigns. The MATCH-MPIC chemical weather forecasts, including an interface for making customized figures from the output, are available for community use via http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~lawrence/forecasts.html.

  9. Element geochemistry of weathering profile of dolomitite and its implications for the average chemical composition of the upper-continental crust——Case studies from the Xinpu profile, northern Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季宏兵; 欧阳自远; 王世杰; 周德全

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical behavior of chemical elements is studied in a dolomitite weathering profile in upland of karst terrain in northern Guizhou. Two stages can be recognized during the process of in situ weathering of dolomitite: the stage of sedentary accumulation of leaching residue of dolomitite and the stage of chemical weathering evolution of sedentary soil. Ni, Cr, Mo, W and Ti are the least mobile elements with reference to Al. The geochemical behavior of REE is similar to that observed in weathering of other types of rocks. Fractionation of REE is noticed during weathering, and the two layers of REE enrichments are thought to result from downward movement of the weathering front in response to changes in the environment. It is considered that the chemistry of the upper part of the profile, which was more intensively weathered, is representative of the mobile components of the upper curst at the time the dolomitite was formed, while the less weathered lower profile is chemically representative of the immo

  10. Detection and estimation of volcanic eruption onset and mass flow rate using weather radar and infrasonic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Frank S.; Mereu, Luigi; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico; Di Fabio, Saverio; Bonadonna, Costanza; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The explosive eruption of sub-glacial Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010 was of modest size, but ash was widely dispersed over Iceland and Europe. The Eyjafjallajökull pulsating explosive activity started on April 14 and ended on May 22. The combination of a prolonged and sustained ejection of volcanic ash and persistent northwesterly winds resulted in dispersal the volcanic cloud over a large part of Europe. Tephra dispersal from an explosive eruption is a function of multiple factors, including magma mass flow rate (MFR), degree of magma fragmentation, vent geometry, plume height, particle size distribution (PSD) and wind velocity. One of the most important geophysical parameters, derivable from the analysis of tephra deposits, is the erupted mass, which is essential for the source characterization and assessment of the associated hazards. MFR can then be derived by dividing the erupted mass by the eruption duration (if known) or based on empirical and analytical relations with plume height. Microwave weather radars at C and X band can provide plume height, ash concentration and loading, and, to some extent, PSD and MFR. Radar technology is well established and can nowadays provide fast three-dimensional (3D) scanning antennas together with Doppler and dual polarization capabilities. However, some factors can limit the detection and the accuracy of the radar products aforementioned. For example, the sensitivity of microwave radar measurements depends on the distance between the radar antenna and the target, the transmitter central wavelength, receiver minimum detachable power and the resolution volume. In addition, radar measurements are sensitive to particle sizes larger than few tens of microns thus limiting the radar-based quantitative estimates to the larger portion of the PSD. Volcanic activity produces infrasonic waves (i.e., acoustic waves below 20 Hz), which can propagate in the atmosphere useful for the remote monitoring of volcanic activity. Infrasound

  11. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for Differential Comminution/Aeolian Sorting and Chemical Weathering of Martian Soils Preserved in Mars Meteorite EET79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; McKay, David S.

    2004-01-01

    Impact-melt glasses containing Martian atmospheric gases in Mars meteorite EET79001 are formed from Martian soil fines that had undergone meteoroid-comminution and aeolian sorting accompanied by chemical weathering near Mars surface. Using SiO2 and SO3 as proxy for silicates and salts respectively in Mars soils, we find that SiO2 and SO3 correlate negatively with FeO and MgO and positively with Al2O3 and CaO in these glasses, indicating that the mafic and felsic components are depleted and enriched relative to the bulk host (Lith A/B) respectively as in the case of Moon soils. Though the overall pattern of mineral fractionation is similar between the soil fines on Mars and Moon, the magnitudes of the enrichments/depletions differ between these sample-suites because of pervasive aeolian activity on Mars. In addition to this mechanical processing, the Martian soil fines, prior to impact-melting, have undergone acid-sulfate dissolution under oxidizing/reducing conditions. The S03 content in EET79001,507 (Lith B) glass is approx.18% compared to < 2% in EET79001, 506 (Lith A). SiO2 and SO3 negatively correlate with each other in ,507 glasses similar to Pathfinder soils. The positive correlation found between FeO and SO3 in ,507 glasses as well as Pathfinder rocks and soils is consistent with the deposition of ferric-hydroxysulfate on regolith grains in an oxidizing environment. As in the case of Pathfinder soils, the Al 2O3 vs SiO2 positive correlation and FeO VS S102 negative correlation observed in ,507 glasses indicate that SiO2 from the regolith is mobilized as soluble silicic acid at low pH. The large off-set in the end-member FeO abundance ( SO3=0) between Pathfinder soil-free rock and sulfur-free rock in ,507 glass precursors suggests that the soils comprising the ,507 glasses contain much larger proportion of fine-grained Martian soil fraction that registers strong mafic depletion relative to Lith B. This inference is strongly supported by the Al2O3 - SO3

  13. GEM-AQ, an on-line global multiscale chemical weather system: model description and evaluation of gas phase chemistry processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Kaminski

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric chemistry and air quality processes were implemented on-line in the Global Environmental Multiscale model. The integrated model, GEM-AQ, has been developed as a platform to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban. The model was exercised for five years (2001–2005 to evaluate its ability to simulate seasonal variations and regional distributions of trace gases such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide on the global scale. The model results presented are compared with observations from satellites, aircraft measurement campaigns and balloon sondes.

  14. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  15. Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals and industrial wastes as a Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is attributed to rising consumption of fossil fuels around the world. The development of solutions to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is one of the most urgent needs of today's society. One of the most stable and long-term solutions for storing CO2 is via carbon mineralization, where minerals containing metal oxides of Ca or Mg are reacted with CO2 to produce thermodynamically stable Ca- and Mg-carbonates that are insoluble in water. Carbon mineralization can be carried out in-situ or ex-situ. In the case of in-situ mineralization, the degree of carbonation is thought to be limited by both mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction kinetics, and must be well understood to predict the ultimate fate of CO2 within geological reservoirs. While the kinetics of in-situ mineral trapping via carbonation is naturally slow, it can be enhanced at high temperature and high partial pressure of CO2. The addition of weak organic acids produced from food waste has also been shown to enhance mineral weathering kinetics. In the case of the ex-situ carbon mineralization, the role of these ligand-bearing organic acids can be further amplified for silicate mineral dissolution. Unfortunately, high mineral dissolution rates often lead to the formation of a silica-rich passivation layer on the surface of silicate minerals. Thus, the use of novel solvent mixture that allows chemically catalyzed removal of this passivation layer during enhanced Mg-leaching surface reaction has been proposed and demonstrated. Furthermore, an engineered biological catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, has been developed and evaluated to accelerate the hydration of CO2, which is another potentially rate-limiting step of the carbonation reaction. The development of these novel catalytic reaction schemes has significantly improved the overall efficiency and sustainability of in-situ and ex-situ mineral carbonation technologies and allowed direct

  16. Nucleation rate of the quark-gluon plasma droplet at finite quark chemical potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Gosain; S Somorendro Singh; Agam K Jha

    2012-05-01

    The nucleation rate of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) droplet is computed at finite quark chemical potential. In the course of computing the nucleation rate, the finite size effects of the QGP droplet are taken into account. We consider the phenomenological flow parameter of quarks and gluons, which is dependent on quark chemical potential and we calculate the nucleation rate of the QGP droplet with this parameter. While calculating the nucleation rate, we find that for low values of quark phenomenological parameter $ q$, nucleation rate is negligible and when increases, nucleation rate increases significantly.

  17. Demographic effects of extreme weather events: snow storms, breeding success, and population growth rate in a long-lived Antarctic seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Sébastien; Tarroux, Arnaud; Varpe, Øystein; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Tveraa, Torkild; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    Weather extremes are one important element of ongoing climate change, but their impacts are poorly understood because they are, by definition, rare events. If the frequency and severity of extreme weather events increase, there is an urgent need to understand and predict the ecological consequences of such events. In this study, we aimed to quantify the effects of snow storms on nest survival in Antarctic petrels and assess whether snow storms are an important driver of annual breeding success and population growth rate. We used detailed data on daily individual nest survival in a year with frequent and heavy snow storms, and long term data on petrel productivity (i.e., number of chicks produced) at the colony level. Our results indicated that snow storms are an important determinant of nest survival and overall productivity. Snow storm events explained 30% of the daily nest survival within the 2011/2012 season and nearly 30% of the interannual variation in colony productivity in period 1985-2014. Snow storms are a key driver of Antarctic petrel breeding success, and potentially population dynamics. We also found state-dependent effects of snow storms and chicks in poor condition were more likely to die during a snow storm than chicks in good condition. This stresses the importance of considering interactions between individual heterogeneity and extreme weather events to understand both individual and population responses to climate change.

  18. Blockfields in Reinheimen Nationalpark, Norway – Neogene weathering remnants or Quaternary periglacial origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou;

    rates of landscape evolution of the mountain summit. References Goodfellow B W, 2012. A granulometry and secondary mineral fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes and its application to blockfield origins. Quaternary Science Reviews, 57, 121- 135. Strømsøe J R, Paasche Ø, 2011....... Weathering patterns in high-latitude regolith. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 116 (F3)...

  19. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in chemically enhanced reactive systems. Part I : Chemical enhancement factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical enhancement factors have been measured in a controlled environment for absorption and desorption mass transfer processes in aqueous 2.0 M MDEA solutions at temperatures of 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15 K and the loading of CO2 ranging from 0 to 0.8 in a batch-operated stirred tank reactor.

  20. Silica- and sulfate-bearing rock coatings in smelter areas: Products of chemical weathering and atmospheric pollution I. Formation and mineralogical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Nathalie M.; Schindler, Michael; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2012-05-01

    Black rock-coatings occur in proximity to smelters and roast yards of the Greater Sudbury area, Ontario, Canada and contain information about the past interactions between surface minerals, and gaseous and particulate atmospheric components, many of which were pollutants. Rock-coatings were collected from various locations within the Sudbury area and are characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Acidic fumigations and rain, the result of vast quantities of SO2 released from smelting, increased the chemical weathering rate of exposed rocks in the Sudbury area. Non-stoichiometric dissolution of the silicate minerals under acidic conditions resulted in the accumulation of silicic acid and the subsequent formation of a silica-gel type coating. The silica gel transformed overtime into amorphous silica, opal (opal C and opal-CT) and cristobalite. Dissolution of the underlying rock and also of metal-bearing particles by sulfuric acid resulted in the in situ formation of metal-sulfate-rich layers on the interfaces between the atmosphere and the silica-rich coating (atmosphere-coating interface, ACI) and between the silica-rich coating and the underlying rock (rock-coating interface, RCI). These metal-sulfate-rich layers contain nanometer aggregates of Fe-Cu-sulfate-hydroxide, goldichite, mereiterite, guildite, butlerite and antlerite. The silica-rich matrix also contains a mix of detrital grains from adjacent rocks and soils (feldspar, quartz, hematite, chlorite, montmorillonite) and non-dissolved smelter-derived nano- to micro-size particulates (metal-silicates, metal-oxides, C-spheres). The apparent disequilibrium between the embedded particles and the Fe-Cu-sulfates suggests that trapped nanoparticles were encapsulated into pores which prevented their equilibration with acidic metal-sulfate-bearing fluids. An XPS depth

  1. Catchment-scale denudation and chemical erosion rates determined from 10Be and mass balance geochemistry (Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestland, Erick A.; Liccioli, Caterina; Soloninka, Lesja; Chittleborough, David J.; Fink, David

    2016-10-01

    Global biogeochemical cycles have, as a central component, estimates of physical and chemical erosion rates. These erosion rates are becoming better quantified by the development of a global database of cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be (CRN) analyses of soil, sediment, and outcrops. Here we report the denudation rates for two small catchments (~ 0.9 km2) in the Mt. Lofty Ranges of South Australia as determined from 10Be concentrations from quartz sand from the following landscape elements: 1) dissected plateaux, or summit surfaces (14.10 ± 1.61 t km- 2 y- 1), 2) sandstone outcrops (15.37 ± 1.32 t km- 2 y- 1), 3) zero-order drainages (27.70 ± 1.42 t km- 2 y- 1), and 4) stream sediment which reflect a mix of landscape elements (19.80 ± 1.01 t km- 2 y- 1). Thus, the more slowly eroding plateaux and ridges, when juxtaposed with the more rapidly eroding side-slopes, are leading to increased relief in this landscape. Chemical erosion rates for this landscape are determined by combining cosmogenic denudation rates with the geochemical mass balance of parent rock, soil and saprolite utilizing zirconium immobility and existing mass balance methods. Two different methods were used to correct for chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite zone that is shielded at depth from CRN production. The corrected values are higher than uncorrected values: total denudation of 33.24 or 29.11 t km- 2 y- 1, and total chemical erosion of 15.64 or 13.68 t km- 2 y- 1. Thus, according to these methods, 32-40% of the denudation is taking place by chemical weathering and erosion in the saprolite below CRN production depth. Compared with other similar areas, the overall denudation and chemical erosion rates are low. In most areas with sub-humid climates and tectonic uplift, physical erosion is much greater than chemical erosion. The low physical erosion rates in these Mt. Lofty Range catchments, in what is a relatively active tectonic setting, are thought to be due to low rainfall intensity

  2. Novel Method of Estimating Metabolic Rates of Soldiers Engaged in Chemical Biological Defense Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    SOLDIERS ENGAGED IN CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE TRAINING DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the...USARIEM TECHNICAL REPORT TR17-02 NOVEL METHOD OF ESTIMATING METABOLIC RATES OF SOLDIERS ENGAGED IN CHEMICAL BIOLOGICAL DEFENSE TRAINING ...Volunteers ............................................................................................................ 2 Training Activities

  3. Chemical Reaction Rate Coefficients from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Aoiz, F Javier; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-03

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze the RPMD approach and its connection to quantum transition-state theory. We then focus on its practical applications to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rate coefficients in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rate coefficients. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  4. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze theory and its connection to quantum transition state theory. We then focus on its practical application to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rates in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rates. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  5. GEM-AQ/EC, an on-line global multi-scale chemical weather modelling system: model development and evaluation of global aerosol climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Gong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A global air quality modeling system GEM-AQ/EC was developed by implementing tropospheric chemistry and aerosol processes on-line into the Global Environmental Multiscale weather prediction model – GEM. Due to the multi-scale features of the GEM, the integrated model, GEM-AQ/EC, is able to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban domains. The current chemical mechanism is comprised of 50 gas-phase species, 116 chemical and 19 photolysis reactions, and is complemented by a sectional aerosol module CAM (The Canadian Aerosol Module with 5 aerosols types: sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea-salt and soil dust. Monthly emission inventories of black carbon and organic carbon from boreal and temperate vegetation fires were assembled using the most reliable areas burned datasets by countries, from statistical databases and derived from remote sensing products of 1995–2004. The model was run for ten years from from 1995–2004 with re-analyzed meteorology on a global uniform 1° × 1° horizontal resolution domain and 28 hybrid levels extending up to 10 hPa. The simulating results were compared with various observations including surface network around the globe and satellite data. Regional features of global aerosols are reasonably captured including emission, surface concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For various types of aerosols, satisfactory correlations were achieved between modeled and observed with some degree of systematic bias possibly due to large uncertainties in the emissions used in this study. A global distribution of natural aerosol contributions to the total aerosols is obtained and compared with observations.

  6. GEM-AQ/EC, an on-line global multiscale chemical weather modelling system: model development and evaluations of global aerosol climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Gong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A global air quality modeling system GEM-AQ/EC was developed by implementing tropospheric chemistry and aerosol processes on-line into the Global Environmental Multiscale weather prediction model – GEM. Due to the multi-scale features of the GEM, the integrated model, GEM-AQ/EC, is able to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban domains. The current chemical mechanism is comprised of 50 gas-phase species, 116 chemical and 19 photolysis reactions, and is complemented by a sectional aerosol module CAM (The Canadian Aerosol Module with 5 aerosols types: sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea-salt and soil dust. Monthly emission inventories of black carbon and organic carbon from boreal and temperate vegetation fires were assembled using the most reliable areas burned datasets by countries, from statistical databases and derived from remote sensing products of 1995–2004. The model was run for ten years from from 1995–2004 with re-analyzed meteorology on a global uniform 1 × 1° horizontal resolution domain and 28 hybrid levels extending up to 10 hPa. The simulating results were compared with various observations including surface network around the globe and satellite data. Regional features of global aerosols are reasonably captured including emission, surface concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For various types of aerosols, satisfactory correlations were achieved between modeled and observed with some degree of systematic bias possibly due to large uncertainties in the emissions used in this study. A global distribution of natural aerosol contributions to the total aerosols is obtained and compared with observations.

  7. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  8. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  9. CHEMICAL WEATHERING OF LARGE RIVER CATCHMENTS IN CHINA AND THE GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE%中国河流流域化学风化和全球碳循环

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴卫华; 郑洪波; 杨杰东; 罗超; 周斌

    2011-01-01

    通过研究中国境内九大水系中大河流域的河水、大气降水、沉积物和岩体中的化学成分并结合水文信息,对流域中的化学风化作用及其消耗大气CO的能力与机制进行了粗略的调查,探讨了不同气候、岩性、地形、植被等条件下化学风化的变化趋势,分析了控制风化反应的因素,为在我国境内进行CO捕获与封存的场地、矿物类型选择提供了参考和依据.研究结果表明,我国境内河流流域硅酸盐和碳酸盐风化所消耗的大气CO分别为421×10~627×10mol/a和1323×10~2025×10mol/a,占全球河流消耗总量的4.8%~7.1%和11.1%~16.1%,显示我国作为岩溶大量分布的国家,碳酸盐风化作为一个短时间尺度上的碳汇对全球碳循环的影响更为突出.长江、黄河和珠江3条河流流域硅酸盐风化所消耗的大气CO量占全国河流的约2/3,而碳酸盐风化消耗的大气CO量占全国河流的近90%.通过对比一些典型硅酸盐岩地区河流的化学风化特征发现,热带气候条件下流经玄武岩地层的海南南渡江有着最高的硅酸盐风化速率(7.2×10mol/km·a),与赤道附近的新几内亚岛上河流相近.而在岩性相似的情况下,大气CO消耗速率与气温和降雨量呈正相关,与海拔成反相关关系.%By analyzing the chemical compositions of river waters, rain waters, surface sediments, and rocks of large river catchments in China, combining with hydrological information, this paper uses the forward model to assess the chemical weathering rates, capacity and mechanism of the atmospheric CO2 consumption and then discusses the behaviors of chemical weathering under various conditions including climate, lithology, topography, and vegetation.The study also provides reference and basic information for selecting of sites and mineral types for CO2 capture and storage in China. The atmospheric CO2 consumptions derived from silicate and carbonate weathering in China are 421

  10. Interindividual differences in chemosensory perception: Toward a better understanding of perceptual ratings during chemical exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacharra, Marlene; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Schäper, Michael; Juran, Stephanie A; Hey, Kathrin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Golka, Klaus; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Perceptions that arise from stimulation of olfactory and trigeminal receptors in the nasal cavity guide the evaluation of chemical environment in humans. Strong interindividual differences in these assessments may be attributed to nonsensory factors such as gender, anxiety, and chemical sensitivity. Knowledge regarding the influence of these factors originates mainly from basic odor research using short-term exposure scenarios. In situations with continuous chemical exposures-common in the working environment-their impact is less clear. To investigate their role during the exposure to workplace chemicals, 4-hour experimental exposure studies (total N = 105) using nine different airborne chemicals were summarized. In each study, subjects evaluated a single chemical in a controlled environment by rating five chemosensory perceptions, including odor intensity, disgust, annoyance, pungency, and burning, several times during occupational limit and low exposures. It was investigated whether the effects of trait-like modulators, such as anxiety and self-reported chemical sensitivity, depend on exposure-related factors and gender. Trait-like modulators markedly affected ratings by women, but not men. Highly anxious women reported more intense annoyance and disgust than less anxious women. Stronger self-reported chemical sensitivity was associated with increased ratings of pungency and burning in women exposed to occupational limit concentrations. This study demonstrates that a complex interplay of exposure-related factors, gender, and trait-like individual differences affects perceptual ratings during continuous chemical exposure. It seems necessary to incorporate the assessment of specific as well as general trait-like modulators into future experimental exposure studies.

  11. Wacky Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  12. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V. [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr., 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  13. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N2 across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  14. Oxidation of sulfides and rapid weathering in recent landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, Robert; Hovius, Niels; Galy, Albert; Marc, Odin

    2016-09-01

    Linking together the processes of rapid physical erosion and the resultant chemical dissolution of rock is a crucial step in building an overall deterministic understanding of weathering in mountain belts. Landslides, which are the most volumetrically important geomorphic process at these high rates of erosion, can generate extremely high rates of very localised weathering. To elucidate how this process works we have taken advantage of uniquely intense landsliding, resulting from Typhoon Morakot, in the T'aimali River and surrounds in southern Taiwan. Combining detailed analysis of landslide seepage chemistry with estimates of catchment-by-catchment landslide volumes, we demonstrate that in this setting the primary role of landslides is to introduce fresh, highly labile mineral phases into the surface weathering environment. There, rapid weathering is driven by the oxidation of pyrite and the resultant sulfuric-acid-driven dissolution of primarily carbonate rock. The total dissolved load correlates well with dissolved sulfate - the chief product of this style of weathering - in both landslides and streams draining the area (R2 = 0.841 and 0.929 respectively; p governed by the same weathering reactions. The predominance of coupled carbonate-sulfuric-acid-driven weathering is the key difference between these sites and previously studied landslides in New Zealand (Emberson et al., 2016), but in both settings increasing volumes of landslides drive greater overall solute concentrations in streams. Bedrock landslides, by excavating deep below saprolite-rock interfaces, create conditions for weathering in which all mineral phases in a lithology are initially unweathered within landslide deposits. As a result, the most labile phases dominate the weathering immediately after mobilisation and during a transient period of depletion. This mode of dissolution can strongly alter the overall output of solutes from catchments and their contribution to global chemical cycles if

  15. Calibration and evaluation of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System for improved wildland fire danger rating in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mark C.; Wooster, Martin J.; Kitchen, Karl; Manley, Cathy; Gazzard, Rob; McCall, Frank F.

    2016-05-01

    Wildfires in the United Kingdom (UK) pose a threat to people, infrastructure and the natural environment. During periods of particularly fire-prone weather, wildfires can occur simultaneously across large areas, placing considerable stress upon the resources of fire and rescue services. Fire danger rating systems (FDRSs) attempt to anticipate periods of heightened fire risk, primarily for early-warning and preparedness purposes. The UK FDRS, termed the Met Office Fire Severity Index (MOFSI), is based on the Fire Weather Index (FWI) component of the Canadian Forest FWI System. The MOFSI currently provides daily operational mapping of landscape fire danger across England and Wales using a simple thresholding of the final FWI component of the Canadian FWI System. However, it is known that the system has scope for improvement. Here we explore a climatology of the six FWI System components across the UK (i.e. extending to Scotland and Northern Ireland), calculated from daily 2km × 2km gridded numerical weather prediction data and supplemented by long-term meteorological station observations. We used this climatology to develop a percentile-based calibration of the FWI System, optimised for UK conditions. We find this approach to be well justified, as the values of the "raw" uncalibrated FWI components corresponding to a very "extreme" (99th percentile) fire danger situation vary by more than an order of magnitude across the country. Therefore, a simple thresholding of the uncalibrated component values (as is currently applied in the MOFSI) may incur large errors of omission and commission with respect to the identification of periods of significantly elevated fire danger. We evaluate our approach to enhancing UK fire danger rating using records of wildfire occurrence and find that the Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC), Initial Spread Index (ISI) and FWI components of the FWI System generally have the greatest predictive skill for landscape fire activity across Great

  16. Seafloor Weathering As a Long-Term Climate Regulation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, N. X.; Abbot, D. S.; Archer, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The global carbon cycle determines the distribution of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean, and solid earth. Carbon from the mantle enters the Earth's surficial environment as CO2 by volcanic outgassing, and carbon is buried in the oceanic crust as carbonate rocks during silicate rock weathering. The subduction of carbonate-rich oceanic plates returns carbon to the mantle, closing the cycle. Subtle adjustments in continental silicate weathering, widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled by climate, are believed to have maintained habitable conditions throughout Earth's history. This long term climate regulation mechanism is known as a climate-weathering feedback. Seafloor weathering, low-temperature basalt alteration and carbonate precipitation in the permeable upper oceanic crust, has been proposed as a climate-weathering feedback as well, but the link to climate is presently poorly understood. Such a climate regulation mechanism would be particularly important on waterworld planets where continental silicate weathering cannot regulate climate. It has so far not been possible to determine whether changes in seafloor weathering could contribute to climate regulation on Earth or in a waterworld scenario because the necessary modeling framework has not yet been developed. However, advances in porous media flow modeling and reactive transport modeling, as well as the availability of inexpensive computational power, allow the seafloor weathering problem to be looked at in greater detail. We have developed a spatially resolved two-dimmensional (2D) numerical model of seafloor weathering in the permeable upper oceanic crust. This model simulates 2D off-axis hydrothermal flow coupled to geochemical alteration of seafloor basalt by modeling reactive transport of chemical species in seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids. The focus of this research is to use the model to determine the effect of geological and climatic factors on seafloor weathering, which

  17. Mirador - Weather

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Our weather system includes the dynamics of the atmosphere and its interaction with the oceans and land. The improvement of...

  18. Cockpit weather information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  19. Deuterium Isotope Effects During HMX Combustion: Chemical Kinetic Burn Rate Control Mechanism Verified

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    propellant contain- controls the I-IMX burn rate in the pressure range cited. The ing a chemically modified double base ( CMDB ) high oxygen 1.41 KDIE...controlling the observed overall or global burn rate of the could expect from the deuterium labeled HMX methylene HMX/ CMDB composite propellant. It is...measured in the HMX/ CMDB system. A graphic representa- densed phase KDIE investigation of thermochemical decom- non of one cornposic HMX binder

  20. Sinking rates of microplastics and potential implications of their alteration by physical, biological, and chemical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Nicole; Reichardt, Aurelia M; Waniek, Joanna J

    2016-08-15

    To follow the pathways of microplastics in aquatic environments, profound knowledge about the behaviour of microplastics is necessary. Therefore, sinking experiments were conducted with diverse polymer particles using fluids with different salinity. Particles ranged from 0.3 and 3.6mm with sinking rates between 6 and 91×10(-3)ms(-1). The sinking velocity was not solely related to particle density, size and fluid density but also to the particles shape leading to considerable deviation from calculated theoretical values. Thus, experimental studies are indispensable to get basic knowledge about the sinking behaviour and to gain representative datasets for model approaches estimating the distribution of microplastics in aquatic systems. The sinking behaviour may be altered considerably by weathering and biofouling demanding further studies with aged and fouled plastic particles. Furthermore, assumptions are made about the influence of sinking fouled microplastics on the marine carbon pump by transferring organic carbon to deeper water depths.

  1. Mathematical Formalism of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics for Nonlinear Chemical Reaction Systems with General Rate Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies a mathematical formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemical reaction models with N species, M reactions, and general rate law. We establish a mathematical basis for J. W. Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics under G. N. Lewis' kinetic law of entire equilibrium (detailed balance in nonlinear chemical kinetics). In doing so, the equilibrium thermodynamics is then naturally generalized to nonequilibrium settings without detailed balance. The kinetic models are represented by a Markovian jumping process. A generalized macroscopic chemical free energy function and its associated balance equation with nonnegative source and sink are the major discoveries. The proof is based on the large deviation principle of this type of Markov processes. A general fluctuation dissipation theorem for stochastic reaction kinetics is also proved. The mathematical theory illustrates how a novel macroscopic dynamic law can emerges from the mesoscopic kinetics in a multi-scale system.

  2. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  3. A new modified-rate approach for gas-grain chemical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T

    2008-01-01

    Understanding grain-surface processes is crucial to interpreting the chemistry of the ISM. However, accurate surface chemistry models are computationally expensive and are difficult to integrate with gas-phase simulations. A new modified-rate method for solving grain-surface chemical systems is presented. Its purpose is accurately to model highly complex systems that can otherwise only be treated using the sometimes inadequate rate-equation approach. In contrast to previous rate-modification techniques, the functional form of the surface production rates was modified, and not simply the rate coefficient. This form is appropriate to the extreme "small-grain" limit, and can be verified using an analytical master-equation approach. Various further modifications were made to this basic form, to account for competition between processes, to improve estimates of surface occupation probabilities, and to allow a switch-over to the normal rate equations where these are applicable. The new method was tested against sys...

  4. How to distinguish conformational selection and induced fit based on chemical relaxation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Protein binding often involves conformational changes. Important questions are whether a conformational change occurs prior to a binding event ('conformational selection') or after a binding event ('induced fit'), and how conformational transition rates can be obtained from experiments. In this article, we present general results for the chemical relaxation rates of conformational-selection and induced-fit binding processes that hold for all concentrations of proteins and ligands and, thus, go beyond the standard pseudo-first-order approximation of large ligand concentration. These results allow to distinguish conformational-selection from induced-fit processes - also in cases in which such a distinction is not possible under pseudo-first-order conditions - and to extract conformational transition rates of proteins from chemical relaxation data.

  5. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  6. Exploring the use of weathering indexes in an alluvial fan chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardenbicker, Ulrike; Watanabe, Makiko; Kotowich, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fan sediments can act as an archive of local environmental history. Two borehole cores (FN 350 cm and AG 850cm) from Holocene alluvial fans located in the Qu'Appelle Valley in southern Saskatchewan were analyzed in order to identify how changes in land use of upland catchment plateaus modified the pattern and rate of sediment delivery to the fan. Due to the lack of material for radiometric dating a chronology of depositional events within the alluvial fans was established by using lithostratigraphy data of soils and sediments. In order to establish a more detailed relative chronology we evaluated if weathering indexes (the Parker Index, the CaO/ZrO2 molar ratio, the Product Index) originally developed for studies of in situ weathering of bedrock, are suitable to assess sediment weathering within alluvial fan sediments. To quantify the degree of weathering within the sediment samples the three indexes of weathering were calculated using the proportions of elements measure by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and there is an inverse relationship between weathering index and sample age. For further statistical analyses the fan sediments were classified into three groups: a sheet flow facies of well sorted silt loam and sandy loam textures, bed load facies characterized by high sand and gravel content and layers with high organic matter in combination with higher clay content indicative of in situ weathering and soil development. First results show that the Product Index may be the most suitable weathering index to indicate weathering or input of less weathered sediment within the sheet flow and bed load facies. In general, the weathering indexes do not take into account complexities of the weathering processes nor the overall environmental conditions in an alluvial fan. But chemical weathering indexes accompanied by geophysical and geo-chemical information have value, especially when the amount of sample material is limited.

  7. Calibration and evaluation of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI System for improved wildland fire danger rating in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. De Jong

    2015-11-01

    can periodically place considerable stress upon the resources of Fire and Rescue Services. "Fire danger" rating systems (FDRS attempt to anticipate periods of heightened fire risk, primarily for early-warning purposes. The UK FDRS, termed the Met Office Fire Severity Index (MOFSI is based on the Fire Weather Index (FWI component of the Canadian Forest FWI System. MOFSI currently provides operational mapping of landscape fire danger across England and Wales using a simple thresholding of the final FWI component of the Canadian System. Here we explore a climatology of the full set of FWI System components across the entire UK (i.e. extending to Scotland and Northern Ireland, calculated from daily 2 km gridded numerical weather prediction data, supplemented by meteorological station observations. We used this to develop a percentile-based calibration of the FWI System optimised for UK conditions. We find the calibration to be well justified, since for example the values of the "raw" uncalibrated FWI components corresponding to a very "extreme" (99th percentile fire danger situation can vary by up to an order of magnitude across UK regions. Therefore, simple thresholding of the uncalibrated component values (as is currently applied may be prone to large errors of omission and commission with respect to identifying periods of significantly elevated fire danger compared to "routine" variability. We evaluate our calibrated approach to UK fire danger rating against records of wildfire occurrence, and find that the Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC, Initial Spread Index (ISI and final FWI component of the FWI system generally have the greatest predictive skill for landscape fires in Great Britain, with performance varying seasonally and by land cover type. At the height of the most recent severe wildfire period in the UK (2 May 2011, 50 % of all wildfires occurred in areas where the FWI component exceeded the 99th percentile, and for each of the ten most serious wildfire events

  8. Automated Discovery of New Chemical Reactions and Accurate Calculation of Their Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-02

    of the Search Space Thermochemistry Calculations. Even for a small hydrocarbon system, the number of reaction pathways which can be generated using... reaction is considered to be too endothermic to be interesting if the standard enthalpy of reaction (denoted as Hr0 in Tables 2-5) is higher than 20 kcal...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0169 Automated discovery of new chemical reactions and accurate calculation of their rates William Green MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE

  9. Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M.; Watson, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered—contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500–500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time. PMID:24927553

  10. Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M; Watson, Andrew J

    2014-06-24

    A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered--contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500-500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time.

  11. Comparison of mineral weathering and biomass nutrient uptake in two small forested watersheds underlain by quartzite bedrock, Catoctin Mountain, Maryland, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen; Price, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    To quantify chemical weathering and biological uptake, mass-balance calculations were performed on two small forested watersheds located in the Blue Ridge Physiographic Province in north-central Maryland, USA. Both watersheds, Bear Branch (BB) and Fishing Creek Tributary (FCT), are underlain by relatively unreactive quartzite bedrock. Such unreactive bedrock and associated low chemical-weathering rates offer the opportunity to quantify biological processes operating within the watershed. Hydrologic and stream-water chemistry data were collected from the two watersheds for the 9-year period from June 1, 1990 to May 31, 1999. Of the two watersheds, FCT exhibited both higher chemical-weathering rates and biomass nutrient uptake rates, suggesting that forest biomass aggradation was limited by the rate of chemical weathering of the bedrock. Although the chemical-weathering rate in the FCT watershed was low relative to the global average, it masked the influence of biomass base-cation uptake on stream-water chemistry. Any differences in bedrock mineralogy between the two watersheds did not exert a significant influence on the overall weathering stoichiometry. The difference in chemical-weathering rates between the two watersheds is best explained by a larger proportion of reactive phyllitic layers within the bedrock of the FCT watershed. Although the stream gradient of BB is about two-times greater than that of FCT, its influence on chemical weathering appears to be negligible. The findings of this study support the biomass nutrient uptake stoichiometry of K1.0Mg1.1Ca0.97 previously determined for the study site. Investigations of the chemical weathering of relatively unreactive quartzite bedrock may provide insight into critical zone processes.

  12. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurry, Peter [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Smuth, James [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  13. A comparison of the efficiency of numerical methods for integrating chemical kinetic rate equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of several algorithms used for numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations was compared. The methods examined included two general purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes were applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. It is shown that an iterative solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature can be more efficient then evaluating the temperature by integrating its time-derivative.

  14. Chemical sympathectomy restores baroreceptor-heart rate reflex and heart rate variability in rats with chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaswal, M; Das, S; Prasad, J; Katyal, A; Fahim, M

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role not only in regulation of blood pressure but also in maintenance of cardiac autonomic tone and its deficiency induced hypertension is accompanied by cardiac autonomic dysfunction. However, underlying mechanisms are not clearly defined. We hypothesized that sympathetic activation mediates hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic changes consequent to deficient NO synthesis. We used chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine to examine the influence of sympathetic innervation on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and heart rate variability (HRV) of chronic N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treated adult Wistar rats. BRS was determined from heart rate responses to changes in systolic arterial pressure achieved by intravenous administration of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Time and frequency domain measures of HRV were calculated from 5-min electrocardiogram recordings. Chronic L-NAME administration (50 mg/kg per day for 7 days orally through gavage) in control rats produced significant elevation of blood pressure, tachycardia, attenuation of BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex and fall in time as well as frequency domain parameters of HRV. Sympathectomy completely abolished the pressor as well as tachycardic effect of chronic L-NAME. In addition, BRS and HRV improved after removal of sympathetic influence in chronic L-NAME treated rats. These results support the concept that an exaggerated sympathetic activity is the principal mechanism of chronic L-NAME hypertension and associated autonomic dysfunction.

  15. Oxidation mechanism and overall removal rates of endocrine disrupting chemicals by aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A R; Tabei, K; Sakakibara, Y

    2014-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate experimentally and theoretically the oxidation mechanisms and overall removal rates of phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by aquatic plants. EDCs used in this study were bisphenol-A (BPA), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Referring to reported detection levels in aquatic environments and contaminated sites, the feed concentration of each EDC was set from 1 to 100μg/L. Experimental results showed that, except for PCP, phenolic EDCs were stably and concurrently removed by different types of aquatic plants over 70 days in long-term continuous treatments. Primal enzymes responsible for oxidation of BPA, 2,4-DCP, and 4-t-OP were peroxidases (POs). Moreover, enzymatic removal rates of BPA, 2,4-DCP, and 4-t-OP by POs were more than 2 orders of magnitude larger than those by aquatic plants. Assuming that overall removal rates of EDCs are controlled by mass transfer rates onto liquid films on the surface of aquatic plants, an electrochemical method based on the limiting current theory was developed to measure the mass transfer rates of EDCs. Because of extremely large removal rates of EDCs by POs, observed removal rates by aquatic plants were in reasonably good agreement with calculated results by a mathematical model developed based on an assumption that mass transfer limitation is a rate-limiting step.

  16. Twelve testable hypotheses on the geobiology of weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S L; Megonigal, J P; Scatena, F N; Balogh-Brunstad, Z; Barnes, R T; Bruns, M A; Van Cappellen, P; Dontsova, K; Hartnett, H E; Hartshorn, A S; Heimsath, A; Herndon, E; Jin, L; Keller, C K; Leake, J R; McDowell, W H; Meinzer, F C; Mozdzer, T J; Petsch, S; Pett-Ridge, J; Pregitzer, K S; Raymond, P A; Riebe, C S; Shumaker, K; Sutton-Grier, A; Walter, R; Yoo, K

    2011-03-01

    Critical Zone (CZ) research investigates the chemical, physical, and biological processes that modulate the Earth's surface. Here, we advance 12 hypotheses that must be tested to improve our understanding of the CZ: (1) Solar-to-chemical conversion of energy by plants regulates flows of carbon, water, and nutrients through plant-microbe soil networks, thereby controlling the location and extent of biological weathering. (2) Biological stoichiometry drives changes in mineral stoichiometry and distribution through weathering. (3) On landscapes experiencing little erosion, biology drives weathering during initial succession, whereas weathering drives biology over the long term. (4) In eroding landscapes, weathering-front advance at depth is coupled to surface denudation via biotic processes. (5) Biology shapes the topography of the Critical Zone. (6) The impact of climate forcing on denudation rates in natural systems can be predicted from models incorporating biogeochemical reaction rates and geomorphological transport laws. (7) Rising global temperatures will increase carbon losses from the Critical Zone. (8) Rising atmospheric P(CO2) will increase rates and extents of mineral weathering in soils. (9) Riverine solute fluxes will respond to changes in climate primarily due to changes in water fluxes and secondarily through changes in biologically mediated weathering. (10) Land use change will impact Critical Zone processes and exports more than climate change. (11) In many severely altered settings, restoration of hydrological processes is possible in decades or less, whereas restoration of biodiversity and biogeochemical processes requires longer timescales. (12) Biogeochemical properties impart thresholds or tipping points beyond which rapid and irreversible losses of ecosystem health, function, and services can occur.

  17. Responses of gas-exchange rates and water relations to annual fluctuations of weather in three species of urban street trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osone, Yoko; Kawarasaki, Satoko; Ishida, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Akari; Yazaki, Kenichi; Aikawa, Shin-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Genki I

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of extreme weather has been rising in recent years. A 3-year study of street trees was undertaken in Tokyo to determine whether: (i) street trees suffer from severe water stress in unusually hot summer; (ii) species respond differently to such climatic fluctuations; and (iii) street trees are also affected by nitrogen (N) deficiency, photoinhibition and aerosol pollution. During the study period (2010-12), midsummers of 2010 and 2012 were unusually hot (2.4-2.8 °C higher maximum temperature than the long-term mean) and dry (6-56% precipitation of the mean). In all species, street trees exhibited substantially decreased photosynthetic rate in the extremely hot summer in 2012 compared with the average summer in 2011. However, because of a more conservative stomatal regulation (stomatal closure at higher leaf water potential) in the hot summer, apparent symptoms of hydraulic failure were not observed in street trees even in 2012. Compared with Prunus × yedoensis and Zelkova serrata, Ginkgo biloba, a gymnosperm, was high in stomatal conductance and midday leaf water potential even under street conditions in the unusually hot summer, suggesting that the species had higher drought resistance than the other species and was less susceptible to urban street conditions. This lower susceptibility might be ascribed to the combination of higher soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance and more conservative water use. Aside from meteorological conditions, N deficiency affected street trees significantly, whereas photoinhibition and aerosol pollution had little effect. The internal CO2 and δ(13)C suggested that both water and N limited the net photosynthetic rate of street trees simultaneously, but water was more limiting. From these results, we concluded that the potential risk of hydraulic failure caused by climatic extremes could be low in urban street trees in temperate regions. However, the size of the safety margin might be different between species.

  18. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey; Harden, Jennifer; Maher, Kate

    2014-08-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  19. Modeling the influence of organic acids on soil weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Biological inputs and organic matter cycling have long been regarded as important factors in the physical and chemical development of soils. In particular, the extent to which low molecular weight organic acids, such as oxalate, influence geochemical reactions has been widely studied. Although the effects of organic acids are diverse, there is strong evidence that organic acids accelerate the dissolution of some minerals. However, the influence of organic acids at the field-scale and over the timescales of soil development has not been evaluated in detail. In this study, a reactive-transport model of soil chemical weathering and pedogenic development was used to quantify the extent to which organic acid cycling controls mineral dissolution rates and long-term patterns of chemical weathering. Specifically, oxalic acid was added to simulations of soil development to investigate a well-studied chronosequence of soils near Santa Cruz, CA. The model formulation includes organic acid input, transport, decomposition, organic-metal aqueous complexation and mineral surface complexation in various combinations. Results suggest that although organic acid reactions accelerate mineral dissolution rates near the soil surface, the net response is an overall decrease in chemical weathering. Model results demonstrate the importance of organic acid input concentrations, fluid flow, decomposition and secondary mineral precipitation rates on the evolution of mineral weathering fronts. In particular, model soil profile evolution is sensitive to kaolinite precipitation and oxalate decomposition rates. The soil profile-scale modeling presented here provides insights into the influence of organic carbon cycling on soil weathering and pedogenesis and supports the need for further field-scale measurements of the flux and speciation of reactive organic compounds.

  20. Weathering and Chemical Degradation of Methyl Eugenol and Raspberry Ketone Solid Dispensers for Detection, Monitoring, and Male Annihilation of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Nkomo, Eddie; Cook, Peter J; Mackey, Bruce; Stark, John D

    2015-08-01

    Solid male lure dispensers containing methyl eugenol (ME) and raspberry ketone (RK), or mixtures of the lures (ME + RK), and dimethyl dichloro-vinyl phosphate (DDVP) were evaluated in area-wide pest management bucket or Jackson traps in commercial papaya (Carica papaya L.) orchards where both oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), and melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), are pests. Captures of B. dorsalis with fresh wafers in Jackson and bucket traps were significantly higher on the basis of ME concentration (Mallet ME [56%] > Mallet MR [31.2%] > Mallet MC [23.1%]). Captures of B. cucurbitae with fresh wafers in Jackson and bucket traps were not different regardless of concentration of RK (Mallet BR [20.1%] = Mallet MR [18.3%] = Mallet MC [15.9%]). Captures of B. dorsalis with fresh wafers, compared with weathered wafers, were significantly different after week 12; captures of B. cucurbitae were not significantly different after 16 wk. Chemical analyses revealed presence of RK in dispensers in constant amounts throughout the 16-wk trial. Degradation of both ME and DDVP over time was predicted with a high level of confidence by nonlinear asymptotic exponential decay curves. Results provide supportive data to deploy solid ME and RK wafers (with DDVP) in fruit fly traps for detection programs, as is the current practice with solid TML dispensers placed in Jackson traps. Wafers with ME and RK might be used in place of two separate traps for detection of both ME and RK responding fruit flies and could potentially reduce cost of materials and labor by 50%.

  1. Application of transient burning rate model of solid propellant in electrothermal-chemical launch simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-jie Ni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 30 mm electrothermal-chemical (ETC gun experimental system is employed to research the burning rate characteristics of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant. Enhanced gas generation rates (EGGR of propellants during and after electrical discharges are verified in the experiments. A modified 0D internal ballistic model is established to simulate the ETC launch. According to the measured pressure and electrical parameters, a transient burning rate law including the influence of EGGR coefficient by electric power and pressure gradient (dp/dt is added into the model. The EGGR coefficient of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant is equal to 0.005 MW−1. Both simulated breech pressure and projectile muzzle velocity accord with the experimental results well. Compared with Woodley's modified burning rate law, the breech pressure curves acquired by the transient burning rate law are more consistent with test results. Based on the parameters calculated in the model, the relationship among propellant burning rate, pressure gradient (dp/dt and electric power is analyzed. Depending on the transient burning rate law and experimental data, the burning of solid propellant under the condition of plasma is described more accurately.

  2. Application of transient burning rate model of solid propellant in electrothermal-chemical launch simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jie NI; Yong JIN; Gang WAN; Chun-xia YANG; Hai-yuan LI; Bao-ming LI

    2016-01-01

    A 30 mm electrothermal-chemical (ETC) gun experimental system is employed to research the burning rate characteristics of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant. Enhanced gas generation rates (EGGR) of propellants during and after electrical discharges are verified in the experiments. A modified 0D internal ballistic model is established to simulate the ETC launch. According to the measured pressure and electrical parameters, a transient burning rate law including the influence of EGGR coefficient by electric power and pressure gradient (dp/dt) is added into the model. The EGGR coefficient of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant is equal to 0.005 MW−1. Both simulated breech pressure and projectile muzzle velocity accord with the experimental results well. Compared with Woodley’s modified burning rate law, the breech pressure curves acquired by the transient burning rate law are more consistent with test results. Based on the parameters calculated in the model, the relationship among propellant burning rate, pressure gradient (dp/dt) and electric power is analyzed. Depending on the transient burning rate law and experimental data, the burning of solid propellant under the condition of plasma is described more accurately.

  3. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and "other". Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective

  4. Stormy Weather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the deep abyss of the unknown; a constant source for investigation and discovery, heating and destruction, all simultaneously. Beneath the deep darkness, millions of species vibrantly thrive in another universe wholly untouched by human hands, though affected by their choices. The weathered pieces and people associated with seaside villages, the deep wrinkles that tell a story of one's life and experiences like

  5. Ultrasensitive anion detection by NMR spectroscopy: a supramolecular strategy based on modulation of chemical exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruchoud, Loïse H; Hadzovic, Alen; Zhang, Xiao-An

    2015-06-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for monitoring molecular interactions and is widely used to characterize supramolecular systems at the atomic level. NMR is limited for sensing purposes, however, due to low sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as conformational changes or binding events can induce drastic effects on NMR spectra in response to variations in chemical exchange (CE) rate, which can lead to new strategies in the design of supramolecular sensors through the control and monitoring of CE rate. Here, we present an indirect NMR anion sensing technique in which increased CE rate, due to anion-induced conformational flexibility of a relatively rigid structure of a novel sensor, allows ultrasensitive anion detection as low as 120 nM.

  6. Experimental design strategy: weak reinforcement leads to increased hit rates and enhanced chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Mateusz; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Glick, Meir; Lounkine, Eugen

    2015-05-26

    High Throughput Screening (HTS) is a common approach in life sciences to discover chemical matter that modulates a biological target or phenotype. However, low assay throughput, reagents cost, or a flowchart that can deal with only a limited number of hits may impair screening large numbers of compounds. In this case, a subset of compounds is assayed, and in silico models are utilized to aid in iterative screening design, usually to expand around the found hits and enrich subsequent rounds for relevant chemical matter. However, this may lead to an overly narrow focus, and the diversity of compounds sampled in subsequent iterations may suffer. Active learning has been recently successfully applied in drug discovery with the goal of sampling diverse chemical space to improve model performance. Here we introduce a robust and straightforward iterative screening protocol based on naı̈ve Bayes models. Instead of following up on the compounds with the highest scores in the in silico model, we pursue compounds with very low but positive values. This includes unique chemotypes of weakly active compounds that enhance the applicability domain of the model and increase the cumulative hit rates. We show in a retrospective application to 81 Novartis assays that this protocol leads to consistently higher compound and scaffold hit rates compared to a standard expansion around hits or an active learning approach. We recommend using the weak reinforcement strategy introduced herein for iterative screening workflows.

  7. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  8. Practical Weathering for Geology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, A. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The design and data management of an activity to study weathering by increasing the rate of mineral dissolution in a microwave oven is described. Data analysis in terms of parabolic and first-order kinetics is discussed. (CW)

  9. Chemical characteristics and chemical weathering of surface runoff in typical granitic watersheds of subtropical China%亚热带典型花岗岩小流域径流化学特征与化学风化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄来明; 张甘霖; 杨金玲

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of biogeochemical cycling processes on surface runoff and the consumption of CO2 by chemical weathering of granite at small-watershed scale,the surface runoffs in two small watersheds(F-forest,FA-forest/farmland) with different land uses,which located in the typical granitic region of subtropical China,were monitored continuously for three years,and the major ions and dissolved Si were analyzed.The results showed that the dissolved Si,Na+ and HCO-3 were the predominant ions in the chemical composition of surface runoffs,and the total dissolved salts of FA watershed were higher than those of F watershed,showing the contribution of agricultural activities in FA watershed to the chemical runoffs.The ratios of Sidiss/Na+ and NO-3/SO2-4 in typical granitic watersheds(F,FA) of south Anhui Province were much higher than those in the Taihu Basin,which was rich in carbonate rocks and located in the same bioclimatic zone,indicating that the lithology and the chemical composition of acid deposition caused by human activities were the primary factors controlling the chemical runoffs.The contribution of precipitation to the chemical composition of surface runoffs in the granitic watersheds(F,FA) of south Anhui Province was 43% and 38% respectively,and the contribution of rock weathering was 57% and 50% respectively,while the contribution of the agricultural activities in the FA watershed was 12%.The consumption of CO2 by chemical weathering of granite in the small watersheds(F,FA) of south Anhui Province was(0.67—0.96)×105 mol · km-2 · a-1 and(0.64—1.05)×105 mol · km-2 · a-1 respectively,which were much lower than those of watersheds with carbonate rocks.%为了解小流域尺度下生物地球化学过程对径流水体的影响及花岗岩化学风化对CO2的吸收,对亚热带典型花岗岩区不同利用条件下的2个相邻小流域(F-森林、FA-森林/农田)的地表径流及其常量离子

  10. Evaluation of Cu Ion Concentration Effects on Cu Etching Rate in Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hideaki; Sugiura, Osamu; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2007-04-01

    The effects of Cu ion concentration of the different solutions on Cu etching rate were investigated. From the dipping experiment of Cu substrates in different solutions of malic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), benzotriazole (BTA), and Cu ions, it was revealed that Cu etching rate is increased if the concentration of Cu(II) ions added in the solution is high. This is considered to be caused by the effect of Cu(II) ions on H2O2 molecules. In the solution of pH 7, the Cu etching rate increased markedly between 1.7× 10-4 and 3.4× 10-4 M Cu(II) ion concentrations. The maximum increase in the etching rate was from 990 to 2200 nm/min at a H2O2 concentration of 2 wt %. In the solution of pH 3, a marked change in the etching rate was not observed. Our results show that the concentration of Cu ions on the polishing pad in chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process is very important.

  11. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); McMurry, Peter H. [NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  12. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  13. Chemical weathering and CO2 consumption in the Dongjiang River Basin%东江流域化学风化对大气CO2的吸收

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解晨骥; 高全洲; 陶贞; 刘龙海; 李珊迟

    2013-01-01

    Chemical runoff of Dongjiang River was investigated,and the mass balance approach and deduction methods were used to estimate the uptake of atmospheric CO2 through rock chemical weathering.We conclude that the concentration of total dissolved solids in the Dongjiang River (59.88mg· L-1) is far lower than the averages of rivers worldwide (100 mg· L-1) and the chemical composition of the river is dominated with Ca2 +,Na + and HCO3-,followed by dissolved Si.The dilution effect of the surface runoff on riverine total dissolved solids is not obvious due to human activities.Chemical runoff of the Dongjiang River is mainly derived from the chemical weathering of silicate mineral (72.46% ~ 81.54%),followed by sea salt (17.65 % ~ 26.05%),while the contribution from the chemical weathering of carbonate minerals (0.81% ~ 3.87 %) is insignificant.Atmospheric CO2 is the main aggressive medium in the rocks chemical weathering within the basin.The CO2 consumption flux (3.02 x 105 ~ 3.08 x 105 mol· km-2· a-1)of chemical weathering processes in the Dongjiang River Basin is higher than that of the global average,which constitutes an important component of CO2 consumption in the global rocks chemical weathering.%对东江化学径流进行分析,使用质量平衡法和扣除法估算了流域化学风化对大气CO2的吸收通量.结果表明,东江水体的总溶解性固体(TDS)含量均值(59.88 mg·L-1)远低于世界河流均值(100 mg·L-1);离子组成以Ca2、Na+和HCO3-为主,可溶性Si次之,径流对总溶解固体的稀释效应由于受人类活动影响表现得并不明显.东江化学径流组成主要源自硅酸盐矿物的化学风化过程的贡献(72.46%~81.54%),其次为海盐贡献(17.65%~26.05%),碳酸盐矿物的贡献很少(0.81% ~3.87%);大气CO2是流域内岩石化学风化的主要侵蚀介质,但H2SO4和HNO3的作用也不可忽视;东江流域岩石化学风化过程对大气CO2的消耗通量(3.02~3

  14. Rock-weathering by lichens in Antarctic:patterns and mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Saxicolous species of lichens are able to induce and accelerate weathering of their rocksubstrate, and effects of lichens on substrate can be attributed to both physical and chemical causes.This paper is focused on biotic weathering actions of epilithic and endolithic species on the differentrock types (sandstones and volcanogenic rocks) in Antarctica. The patterns, mechanisms, processes andneoformations of rock-weathering resulting from lichen colonization are expounded in detail.Furthermore, it is pointed out that, for a better understanding of the impacts of lichens onenvironments, the studies on the rate of biotic weathering and the comprehensive involvement of thelichen effects on weathering of natural rocks remain to be carried out in Antarctica.

  15. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  16. Chemical denudation rates of a small torrential catchment in the Northern Calcareous Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Georg; Robl, Jörg; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Hilberg, Sylke; Schmidt, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding on the decay of alpine landscapes and the pace of landscape adjustment to climatic or tectonic changes rely on catchment wide erosion rates. In general, these data stem from cosmogenic isotope dating of quartz grains and are therefore only applicable at catchments providing suitable bedrock. However, denudation caused by the dissolution of rocks is not explicitly considered by this method. In the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) crystalline rocks are missing and intensive karstification suggests that chemical denudation is an important player for destroying topography. In this study we present chemical denudation rates derived from measuring the dissolved load of an alpine catchment located in the country of Salzburg, Austria. The catchment has a drainage area of about 7 km2 and is predominantly covered by limestone rich glacial deposits and carbonatic rocks as characteristic for the NCA. In order to obtain catchment wide chemical denudation rates we have integrated discharge time series that where measured by a permanent water gauge of the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control to compute the total discharge of the investigated catchment over a period of one year. During the same period samples were taken at several campaigns to consider variations of the dissolved load. Samples were taken at high and low run-off conditions to study the effect of precipitation and at different locations along the tributaries to account for lithological variations of the river beds on the dissolved load. The concentrations of various cations in water samples were measured by the ICP-MS facility at the University of Graz. For the investigation period of one year 3.02 ∗ 106m3 of discharge was measured at the catchment outlet. The summed cation-concentration is varying between about 85 mg/l for dry-conditions and 75 mg/l for rainy-conditions at the gauge and consists predominantly of Ca+ cations. Based on the total discharge of the river integrated over a

  17. Areosynchronous weather imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschell, Jeffery J.; Lock, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Mars is characterized by rapidly changing, poorly understood weather that is a concern for future human missions. Future Areosynchronous Mars Orbit (AMO) communication satellites offer possible platforms for Mars weather imagers similar to the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) weather imagers that have been observing Earth since 1966. This paper describes an AReosynchronous Environmental Suite (ARES) that includes two imagers: one with two emissive infrared bands (10.8 μm and 12.0 μm) at 4 km resolution and the other with three VNIR bands (500 nm, 700 nm, 900 nm) at 1 km resolution. ARES stares at Mars and provides full disk coverage as fast as every 40 sec in the VNIR bands and every 2 min in the emissive bands with good sensitivity (SNR 200 in the VNIR for typical radiances and NEDT 0.2K at 180 K scene temperature in the emissive infrared). ARES size, mass, power and data rate characteristics are compatible with expectations for hosted payloads onboard future AMO communication satellites. Nevertheless, more work is needed to optimize ARES for future missions, especially in terms of trades between data rate, full disk coverage rate, sensitivity, number of spectral bands and spatial resolution and in study of approaches for maintaining accurate line of sight knowledge during data collection.

  18. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  19. Effect of chemical and physical factors to improve the germination rate of Echinacea angustifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanren, Duan; Bochu, Wang; Wanqian, Liu; Jing, Chen; Jie, Lian; Huan, Zhao

    2004-09-01

    Seeds of Echinacea angustifolia are known for their deep dormancy. In this paper, we studied the responses of E. angustifolia seeds to some chemical and physical factors, such as scarification, chilling (5 degrees C) period, light and applied BA (6-benzylaminopurine), GA3 (gibberellic acid) and sound stimulation. When the seed coat layers were removed, the germination rate grew up from 6 to 20% (incubated in light) and the mean time germination (MTG) was reduced from 18 to 6.6 days. On the basis of layers-removed, chilling and continuous light gave significantly higher germination rate (up to 70%). Compare the data of seeds chilled by 0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 days, the maximum germination rate (up to 70%) achieved at 18-days chilling treatment. Further increases in the chilling period could slightly improve germination. Exogenous application of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mg/L GA3 or BA in the previous pretreatment increased germination to 78, 90 and 84% or 76, 86 and 84%, respectively. Obviously, the best concentration of GA or BA is 0.3 mg/L. And the GA3 or BA treatment shortened the MTG to about 4 days. The influence of sound stimulation was also tested in the experiment. The result showed that one 100 dB and 1000 Hz sound wave (sine-wave) was beneficial to the germination of E. angustifolia seeds.

  20. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  1. Changes in Soil Chemical Properties and Lettuce Yield Response Following Incorporation of Biochar and Cow Dung to Highly Weathered Acidic Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyei Frimpong, Kwame; Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Osei, Benjamin A;

    2016-01-01

    imposed on two highly weathered, acidic soils from the coastal savanna and tropical rainforest agroecological zones of Ghana, respectively, to elucidate their effect on yield of lettuce. The study showed that application of biochar solely or in combination with cow dung increased soil pH, total organic...

  2. Extreme Weather and Natural Disasters

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Australia is a vast land in which weather varies significantly in different parts of the continent. Recent extreme weather events in Australia, such as the Queensland floods and Victorian bushfires, are brutal reminders of nature's devastating power. Is global warming increasing the rate of natural disasters? What part do La Niña and El Niño play in the extreme weather cycle? Cyclones, floods, severe storms, bushfires, landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis - what are the natural and man-made causes of these phenomena, how predictable are they, and how prepared are we for the impacts of natural dis

  3. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky, USA: I. Weathering zones defined by mineralogy and major-element composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of chemical and mineralogical changes induced by weathering is valuable information when considering the supply of nutrients and toxic elements from rocks. Here minerals that release and fix major elements during progressive weathering of a bed of Devonian New Albany Shale in eastern Kentucky are documented. Samples were collected from unweathered core (parent shale) and across an outcrop excavated into a hillside 40 year prior to sampling. Quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogical data record progressive shale alteration across the outcrop. Mineral compositional changes reflect subtle alteration processes such as incongruent dissolution and cation exchange. Altered primary minerals include K-feldspars, plagioclase, calcite, pyrite, and chlorite. Secondary minerals include jarosite, gypsum, goethite, amorphous Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)-Al sulfate salt (efflorescence). The mineralogy in weathered shale defines four weathered intervals on the outcrop-Zones A-C and soil. Alteration of the weakly weathered shale (Zone A) is attributed to the 40-a exposure of the shale. In this zone, pyrite oxidization produces acid that dissolves calcite and attacks chlorite, forming gypsum, jarosite, and minor efflorescent salt. The pre-excavation, active weathering front (Zone B) is where complete pyrite oxidation and alteration of feldspar and organic matter result in increased permeability. Acidic weathering solutions seep through the permeable shale and evaporate on the surface forming abundant efflorescent salt, jarosite and minor goethite. Intensely weathered shale (Zone C) is depleted in feldspars, chlorite, gypsum, jarosite and efflorescent salts, but has retained much of its primary quartz, illite and illite-smectite. Goethite and amorphous FE(III) oxides increase due to hydrolysis of jarosite. Enhanced permeability in this zone is due to a 14% loss of the original mass in parent shale. Denudation rates suggest that characteristics of Zone C

  4. [Relation between oxygen uptake rate and biosorption of activated sludge against chemical substance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Yuichi; Inoue, Tatsuaki; Yokota, Katsushi

    2005-02-01

    In this study, the elucidation of the toxicity mechanism was undertaken regarding the IC(50) of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) with relevance to the biosorption as a toxicity evaluation of chemical substances for activated sludge (AS). At the IC(50) oflinear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS), alkyl ethoxy sulfonate (AES), alpha-olefine sulfonate (AOS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), formaldehyde (FA), benzalkonium chloride (BZaC), benzethonium chloride (BZeC), rhodamine 6G (R-6G) and fuchsine (Fuc) in which the IC(50) belonged to the 100-1000 mg/l group, when it was compared with CV and MG. In ethanol (EtOH), isopropanol (PrOH), nile blue (NB), evans blue (EB), methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), paraquat (PQ), chlorophyllin (Chl) and auramine (Aur), the IC(50) was large, and the biosorption of AS was weak at 0-15%. The biosorption of MG for AS followed the adsorption isotherm equation Y=0.002X(0.511) of Freundrich. The correlation coefficient was gamma=0.998 (n=8), and a very high correlation was obtained. In the qualitative OUR curve by AS pretreated with MG or CV which belonged to the IC(50) small group, the inhibition of remarkable OUR was observed. Therefore, the findings of the present investigation suggest that the inhibition of the OUR for AS by the tested chemical substances was markedly affected by the biosorption.

  5. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals – Part 1: Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Peltzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean warming will reduce dissolved oxygen concentrations which can pose challenges to marine life. Oxygen limits are traditionally reported simply as a static concentration thresholds with no temperature, pressure or flow rate dependency. Here we treat the oceanic oxygen supply potential for heterotrophic consumption as a dynamic molecular exchange problem analogous to familiar gas exchange processes at the sea surface. A combination of the purely physico-chemical oceanic properties temperature, hydrostatic pressure, and oxygen concentration defines the ability of the ocean to supply oxygen to any given animal. This general oceanic oxygen supply potential is modulated by animal specific properties such as the diffusive boundary layer thickness to define and limit maximal oxygen supply rates. Here we combine all these properties into formal, mechanistic equations defining novel oceanic properties that subsume various relevant classical oceanographic parameters to better visualize, map, comprehend, and predict the impact of ocean deoxygenation on aerobic life. By explicitly including temperature and hydrostatic pressure into our quantities, various ocean regions ranging from the cold deep-sea to warm, coastal seas can be compared. We define purely physico-chemical quantities to describe the oceanic oxygen supply potential, but also quantities that contain organism-specific properties which in a most generalized way describe general concepts and dependencies. We apply these novel quantities to example oceanic profiles around the world and find that temperature and pressure dependencies of diffusion and partial pressure create zones of greatest physical constriction on oxygen supply typically at around 1000 m depth, which coincides with oxygen concentration minimum zones. In these zones, which comprise the bulk of the world ocean, ocean warming and deoxygenation have a clear negative effect for aerobic life. In some shallow and warm waters the

  6. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    KAUST Repository

    Regnery, J.

    2015-05-29

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.

  7. Combining chemical and isotopic measurements to estimate pesticide degradation rates in a fractured-rock aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Gallé, Tom; Bayerle, Michael; Pittois, Denis; El-Khabbaz, Hassanya; Schreglmann, Kathrin; Höche, Martina; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Encouraged by new regulatory requirements for pesticide registration and authorization, the transport and environmental fate of these compounds in the different environmental compartments has been studied extensively. Degradation rates vary widely depending on hydraulic and chemical characteristics, with the strongest degradation usually occuring in the topsoil. Nonetheless, significant pesticide attenuation may still take place during transport in the aquifer, since residence times are generally much longer than in the soil. Ideally, pesticide transformation in the aquifer needs to be determined under real field conditions. Mass balance calculations however are complicated by the fact that the initial pesticide mass leached from the soil is often not known precisely enough. In this study, isotopic and classical pesticide concentration measurements were combined with groundwater dating techniques to assess the degradation rate of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine in a fractured sandstone. The mass balance problem was solved by introducing the desethylatrazine to atrazine ratio, a relative measure which was used to quantify the advancement of atrazine degradation with increasing transport time in the subsurface. The extent of transformation of the parent compound was finally estimated from the shift in the isotopic signal between soil application and the outlet of the groundwater system.

  8. High-Rate Growth and Nitrogen Distribution in Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposited Single-crystal Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Dong; ZOU Guang-Tian; WANG Qi-Liang; CHENG Shao-Heng; LI Bo; L(U) Jian-Nan; L(U) Xian-Yi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2008-01-01

    High rate (> 50 μm/h) growth of homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond (SCD) is carried out by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) with added nitrogen in the reactant gases of methane and hydrogen,using a polycrystalline-CVD-diamond-film-made seed holder. Photoluminescence results indicate that the nitrogen concentration is spatially inhomogeneous in a large scale,either on the top surface or in the bulk of those as-grown SCDs.The presence of N-distribution is attributed to the facts: (I) a difference in N-incorporation efficiency and (ii) N-diffusion,resulting from the local growth temperatures changed during the high-rate deposition process.In addition,the formed nitrogen-vacancy centres play a crucial role in N-diffusion through the growing crystal.Based on the N-distribution observed in the as-grown crystals,we propose a simple method to distinguish natural diamonds and man-made CVD SCDs.Finally,the disappearance of void defect on the top surface of SCDs is discussed to be related to a filling-in mechanism.

  9. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  10. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  11. Weather Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    Awareness of weather and concern about weather in the proximate future certainly must have accompanied the emergence of human self-consciousness. Although weather is a basic idea in human existence, it is difficult to define precisely.

  12. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in chemically enhanced reactive systems. Part II : Reverse kinetic rate parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2012-01-01

    The forward and reverse kinetic rate parameters have been determined for CO2 absorption and desorption mass transfer processes in aqueous 2.0 M MDEA solutions at temperatures of 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15 K and the loading of CO2 ranging from 0 to 0.8. The derived kinetic rate parameters have been b

  13. A quest for the right order : biodegradation rates in the scope of environmental risk assessment of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The biodegradation of chemicals in sewage treatment plants is a key issue of environmental risk assessment. To predict the residual concentration the rate of the biodegradation process has to be estimated. This rate is the result of microbial adaptation of the micro-flora in the system. Therefore th

  14. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  15. Strong climate and tectonic control on plagioclase weathering in granitic terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Brantley, S.; Richter, D.D.B.; Blum, A.; Dixon, J.; White, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations to understand linkages among climate, erosion and weathering are central to quantifying landscape evolution. We approach these linkages through synthesis of regolith data for granitic terrain compiled with respect to climate, geochemistry, and denudation rates for low sloping upland profiles. Focusing on Na as a proxy for plagioclase weathering, we quantified regolith Na depletion, Na mass loss, and the relative partitioning of denudation to physical and chemical contributions. The depth and magnitude of regolith Na depletion increased continuously with increasing water availability, except for locations with mean annual temperature reaction enthalpy for albite. Water availability is suggested as the dominant factor limiting rate kinetics in the water-limited systems. Together, these data demonstrate marked transitions and nonlinearity in how climate and tectonics correlate to plagioclase chemical weathering and Na mass loss. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman-Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  17. Theoretical determination of chemical rate constants using novel time-dependent methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    1994-01-01

    The work completed within the grant period 10/1/91 through 12/31/93 falls primarily in the area of reaction dynamics using both quantum and classical mechanical methodologies. Essentially four projects have been completed and have been or are in preparation of being published. The majority of time was spent in the determination of reaction rate coefficients in the area of hydrocarbon fuel combustion reactions which are relevant to NASA's High Speed Research Program (HSRP). These reaction coefficients are important in the design of novel jet engines with low NOx emissions, which through a series of catalytic reactions contribute to the deterioration of the earth's ozone layer. A second area of research studied concerned the control of chemical reactivity using ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses. Recent advances in pulsed-laser technologies have opened up a vast new field to be investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photodissociation of molecules adsorbed on surfaces using novel time-independent quantum mechanical methods was a third project. And finally, using state-of-the-art, high level ab initio electronic structure methods in conjunction with accurate quantum dynamical methods, the rovibrational energy levels of a triatomic molecule with two nonhydrogen atoms (HCN) were calculated to unprecedented levels of agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Analytical solution of steady-state equations for chemical reaction networks with bilinear rate laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Adám M; Lai, Hong-Jian; McCabe Pryor, Meghan; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2013-01-01

    True steady states are a rare occurrence in living organisms, yet their knowledge is essential for quasi-steady-state approximations, multistability analysis, and other important tools in the investigation of chemical reaction networks (CRN) used to describe molecular processes on the cellular level. Here, we present an approach that can provide closed form steady-state solutions to complex systems, resulting from CRN with binary reactions and mass-action rate laws. We map the nonlinear algebraic problem of finding steady states onto a linear problem in a higher-dimensional space. We show that the linearized version of the steady-state equations obeys the linear conservation laws of the original CRN. We identify two classes of problems for which complete, minimally parameterized solutions may be obtained using only the machinery of linear systems and a judicious choice of the variables used as free parameters. We exemplify our method, providing explicit formulae, on CRN describing signal initiation of two important types of RTK receptor-ligand systems, VEGF and EGF-ErbB1.

  19. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  20. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua I; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates⩾30s(-1)) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5s(-1)) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  1. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  2. The effects of weathering and chemical dispersion on Deepwater Horizon crude oil toxicity to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, Andrew J; Mager, Edward M; Stieglitz, John D; Hoenig, Ronald; Brown, Tanya L; French, Barbara L; Linbo, Tiffany L; Lay, Claire; Forth, Heather; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Incardona, John P; Morris, Jeffrey M; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the impact of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) incident on commercially and ecologically important pelagic fish species, a mahi-mahi spawning program was developed to assess the effect of embryonic exposure to DWH crude oil with particular emphasis on the effects of weathering and dispersant on the magnitude of toxicity. Acute lethality (96 h LC50) ranged from 45.8 (28.4-63.1) μg l(-1) ΣPAH for wellhead (source) oil to 8.8 (7.4-10.3) μg l(-1) ΣPAH for samples collected from the surface slick, reinforcing previous work that weathered oil is more toxic on a ΣPAH basis. Differences in toxicity appear related to the amount of dissolved 3 ringed PAHs. The dispersant Corexit 9500 did not influence acute lethality of oil preparations. Embryonic oil exposure resulted in cardiotoxicity after 48 h, as evident from pericardial edema and reduced atrial contractility. Whereas pericardial edema appeared to correlate well with acute lethality at 96 h, atrial contractility did not. However, sub-lethal cardiotoxicity may impact long-term performance and survival. Dispersant did not affect the occurrence of pericardial edema; however, there was an apparent reduction in atrial contractility at 48 h of exposure. Pericardial edema at 48 h and lethality at 96 h were equally sensitive endpoints in mahi-mahi.

  3. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  4. The effect of rock composition on cyanobacterial weathering of crystalline basalt and rhyolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson-Francis, K; Simpson, A E; Wolff-Boenisch, D; Cockell, C S

    2012-09-01

    The weathering of volcanic rocks contributes significantly to the global silicate weathering budget, effecting carbon dioxide drawdown and long-term climate control. The rate of chemical weathering is influenced by the composition of the rock. Rock-dwelling micro-organisms are known to play a role in changing the rate of weathering reactions; however, the influence of rock composition on bio-weathering is unknown. Cyanobacteria are known to be a ubiquitous surface taxon in volcanic rocks. In this study, we used a selection of fast and slow growing cyanobacterial species to compare microbial-mediated weathering of bulk crystalline rocks of basaltic and rhyolitic composition, under batch conditions. Cyanobacterial growth caused an increase in the pH of the medium and an acceleration of rock dissolution compared to the abiotic controls. For example, Anabaena cylindrica increased the linear release rate (R(i)(l)) of Ca, Mg, Si and K from the basalt by more than fivefold (5.21-12.48) and increased the pH of the medium by 1.9 units. Although A. cylindrica enhanced rhyolite weathering, the increase in R(i)(l) was less than threefold (2.04-2.97) and the pH increase was only 0.83 units. The R(i)(l) values obtained with A. cylindrica were at least ninefold greater with the basalt than the rhyolite, whereas in the abiotic controls, the difference was less than fivefold. Factors accounting for the slower rate of rhyolite weathering and lower biomass achieved are likely to include the higher content of quartz, which has a low rate of weathering and lower concentrations of bio-essential elements, such as, Ca, Fe and Mg, which are known to be important in controlling cyanobacterial growth. We show that at conditions where weathering is favoured, biota can enhance the difference between low and high Si-rock weathering. Our data show that cyanobacteria can play a significant role in enhancing rock weathering and likely have done since they evolved on the early Earth.

  5. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Chemistry of Weathering

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    Several important developments in our understanding of the chemistry of weathering have occurred in the last few years: 1. There has been a major breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the kinetics of sil icate dissolution, and there have been major advances in computer modeling of weathering processes. 2. There has been a growing recognition of the importance of organic solutes in the weathering process, and hence of the inter-relationships between mineral weathering and the terrestrial ecosystem. 3. The impact of acid deposition ("acid rain") has been widely recognized. The processes by which acid deposition is neutral ized are closely related to the processes of normal chemical weathering; an understanding of the chemistry of weathering is thus essential for predicting the effects of acid deposition. 4. More high-qual ity data have become available on the chemical dynamics of smal I watersheds and large river systems, which represent the integrated effects of chemical weathering.

  7. Effects of different land use on soil chemical properties, decomposition rate and earthworm communities in tropical Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geissen, V.; Peña-Peña, K.; Huerta, E.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of land use on soil chemical properties were evaluated, and earthworm communities and the decomposition rate of three typical land use systems in tropical Mexico, namely banana plantations (B), agroforestry systems (AF) and a successional forest (S) were compared. The study was carried o

  8. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  9. A non-permselective membrane reactor for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, H.J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    A novel type of membrane reactor with separated feeding of the reactants is presented for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of premixed reactants. The reactants are fed in the reactor to the different sides of a porous membrane which is impregnated with a catalys

  10. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  11. Orbital forcing of glacial/interglacial variations in chemical weathering and silicon cycling within the upper White Nile basin, East Africa: Stable-isotope and biomarker evidence from Lakes Victoria and Edward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerton, Helen E.; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Barker, Philip A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Ficken, Katherine J.

    2015-12-01

    On Quaternary time scales, the global biogeochemical cycle of silicon is interlocked with the carbon cycle through biotic enhancement of silicate weathering and uptake of dissolved silica by vascular plants and aquatic microalgae (notably diatoms, for which Si is an essential nutrient). Large tropical river systems dominate the export of Si from the continents to the oceans. Here, we investigate variations in Si cycling in the upper White Nile basin over the last 15 ka, using sediment cores from Lakes Victoria and Edward. Coupled measurements of stable O and Si isotopes on diatom separates were used to reconstruct past changes in lake hydrology and Si cycling, while the abundances of lipid biomarkers characteristic of terrestrial/emergent higher plants, submerged/floating aquatic macrophytes and freshwater algae document past ecosystem changes. During the late-glacial to mid-Holocene, 15-5.5 ka BP, orbital forcing greatly enhanced monsoon rainfall, forest cover and chemical weathering. Riverine inputs of dissolved silica from the lake catchments exceeded aquatic demand and may also have had lower Si-isotope values. Since 5.5 ka BP, increasingly dry climates and more open vegetation, reinforced by the spread of agricultural cropland over the last 3-4 ka, have reduced dissolved silica inputs into the lakes. Centennial-to millennial-scale dry episodes are also evident in the isotopic records and merit further investigation.

  12. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics transport and rate processes in physical, chemical and biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Demirel, Yasar

    2014-01-01

    Natural phenomena consist of simultaneously occurring transport processes and chemical reactions. These processes may interact with each other and may lead to self-organized structures, fluctuations, instabilities, and evolutionary systems. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics, 3rd edition emphasizes the unifying role of thermodynamics in analyzing the natural phenomena. This third edition updates and expands on the first and second editions by focusing on the general balance equations for coupled processes of physical, chemical, and biological systems. The new edition contains a new chapte

  13. Enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands: A sink for atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shiming; Clift, Peter D.; Zhao, Debo; Hovius, Niels; Munhoven, Guy; France-Lanord, Christian; Wang, Yinxi; Xiong, Zhifang; Huang, Jie; Yu, Zhaojie; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Wentao; Zhang, Guoliang; Li, Anchun; Li, Tiegang

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and global climate are closely coupled. Since 800 ka CO2 concentrations have been up to 50% higher during interglacial compared to glacial periods. Because of its dependence on temperature, humidity, and erosion rates, chemical weathering of exposed silicate minerals was suggested to have dampened these cyclic variations of atmospheric composition. Cooler and drier conditions and lower non-glacial erosion rates suppressed in situ chemical weathering rates during glacial periods. However, using systematic variations in major element geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopes and clay mineral records from Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1143 and 1144 in the South China Sea spanning the last 1.1 Ma, we show that sediment deposited during glacial periods was more weathered than sediment delivered during interglacials. We attribute this to subaerial exposure and weathering of unconsolidated shelf sediments during glacial sealevel lowstands. Our estimates suggest that enhanced silicate weathering of tropical shelf sediments exposed during glacial lowstands can account for ∼9% of the carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere during the glacial and thus represent a significant part of the observed glacial-interglacial variation of ∼80 ppmv. As a result, if similar magnitudes can be identified in other tropical shelf-slope systems, the effects of increased sediment exposure and subsequent silicate weathering during lowstands could have potentially enhanced the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 during cold stages of the Quaternary. This in turn would have caused an intensification of glacial cycles.

  14. Combined effect of chemical and electrical synapses in Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks on synchronization and the rate of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M S; Moukam Kakmeni, F M; Grebogi, C

    2010-09-01

    In this work we studied the combined action of chemical and electrical synapses in small networks of Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neurons on the synchronous behavior and on the rate of information produced (per time unit) by the networks. We show that if the chemical synapse is excitatory, the larger the chemical synapse strength used the smaller the electrical synapse strength needed to achieve complete synchronization, and for moderate synaptic strengths one should expect to find desynchronous behavior. Otherwise, if the chemical synapse is inhibitory, the larger the chemical synapse strength used the larger the electrical synapse strength needed to achieve complete synchronization, and for moderate synaptic strengths one should expect to find synchronous behaviors. Finally, we show how to calculate semianalytically an upper bound for the rate of information produced per time unit (Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy) in larger networks. As an application, we show that this upper bound is linearly proportional to the number of neurons in a network whose neurons are highly connected.

  15. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  16. Winter Weather Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  17. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  18. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  19. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  20. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  1. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  2. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  3. Internet Weather Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Weather Service (NWS) National Telecommunications Gateway provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its...

  4. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  5. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  6. Geochemistry of the Dissolved Load of the Changjiang Basin Rivers: Anthropogenic Impacts and Chemical Weathering, Evidences from Major Elements, Sr and B Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Chetelat; LIU Cong-qiang

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Rivers provide a unique opportunity to have average information about chemical and physical erosion, about the major geochemical fractionations created by these major geological processes but also about the impact and disturbances of human activities on the Earth Engine.

  7. The power of weather

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Huurman; Francesco Ravazzolo; Chen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the predictive power of weather for electricity prices in day ahead markets in real time. We find that next-day weather forecasts improve the forecast accuracy of Scandinavian day-ahead electricity prices substantially in terms of point forecasts, suggesting that weather forecasts can price the weather premium. This improvement strengthens the confidence in the forecasting model, which results in high center-mass predictive densities. In density forecast, such a predictive...

  8. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  9. Hot Weather Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A + A You are here Home HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and those ... conditions such as vascular disease or diabetes, the weather does not have to hit 100 degrees to ...

  10. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports A A A What's in this article? ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  11. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  12. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky: II. Redistribution of minor and trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.W.; Breit, G.N.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    During weathering, elements enriched in black shale are dispersed in the environment by aqueous and mechanical transport. Here a unique evaluation of the differential release, transport, and fate of Fe and 15 trace elements during progressive weathering of the Devonian New Albany Shale in Kentucky is presented. Results of chemical analyses along a weathering profile (unweathered through progressively weathered shale to soil) describe the chemically distinct pathways of the trace elements and the rate that elements are transferred into the broader, local environment. Trace elements enriched in the unweathered shale are in massive or framboidal pyrite, minor sphalerite, CuS and NiS phases, organic matter and clay minerals. These phases are subject to varying degrees and rates of alteration along the profile. Cadmium, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn are removed from weathered shale during sulfide-mineral oxidation and transported primarily in aqueous solution. The aqueous fluxes for these trace elements range from 0.1 g/ha/a (Cd) to 44 g/ha/a (Mn). When hydrologic and climatic conditions are favorable, solutions seep to surface exposures, evaporate, and form Fe-sulfate efflorescent salts rich in these elements. Elements that remain dissolved in the low pH (reactions that increase pH. Neutralization of the weathering solution in local streams results in elements being adsorbed and precipitated onto sediment surfaces, resulting in trace element anomalies. Other elements are strongly adsorbed or structurally bound to solid phases during weathering. Copper and U initially are concentrated in weathering solutions, but become fixed to modern plant litter in soil formed on New Albany Shale. Molybdenum, Pb, Sb, and Se are released from sulfide minerals and organic matter by oxidation and accumulate in Fe-oxyhydroxide clay coatings that concentrate in surface soil during illuviation. Chromium, Ti, and V are strongly correlated with clay abundance and considered to be in the structure of

  13. Weathering of the New Albany Shale, Kentucky: II. Redistribution of minor and trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, Michele L.W., E-mail: mtuttle@usgs.gov [US Geological Survey, MS 964D, Box 25046, Denver, CO 80215 (United States); Breit, George N.; Goldhaber, Martin B. [US Geological Survey, MS 964D, Box 25046, Denver, CO 80215 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    During weathering, elements enriched in black shale are dispersed in the environment by aqueous and mechanical transport. Here a unique evaluation of the differential release, transport, and fate of Fe and 15 trace elements during progressive weathering of the Devonian New Albany Shale in Kentucky is presented. Results of chemical analyses along a weathering profile (unweathered through progressively weathered shale to soil) describe the chemically distinct pathways of the trace elements and the rate that elements are transferred into the broader, local environment. Trace elements enriched in the unweathered shale are in massive or framboidal pyrite, minor sphalerite, CuS and NiS phases, organic matter and clay minerals. These phases are subject to varying degrees and rates of alteration along the profile. Cadmium, Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn are removed from weathered shale during sulfide-mineral oxidation and transported primarily in aqueous solution. The aqueous fluxes for these trace elements range from 0.1 g/ha/a (Cd) to 44 g/ha/a (Mn). When hydrologic and climatic conditions are favorable, solutions seep to surface exposures, evaporate, and form Fe-sulfate efflorescent salts rich in these elements. Elements that remain dissolved in the low pH (<4) streams and groundwater draining New Albany Shale watersheds become fixed by reactions that increase pH. Neutralization of the weathering solution in local streams results in elements being adsorbed and precipitated onto sediment surfaces, resulting in trace element anomalies. Other elements are strongly adsorbed or structurally bound to solid phases during weathering. Copper and U initially are concentrated in weathering solutions, but become fixed to modern plant litter in soil formed on New Albany Shale. Molybdenum, Pb, Sb, and Se are released from sulfide minerals and organic matter by oxidation and accumulate in Fe-oxyhydroxide clay coatings that concentrate in surface soil during illuviation. Chromium, Ti, and V are

  14. Characterization of pore system and their influence on decay rates caused by salt weathering on limestones and dolostones quarried in Abanto (Zaragoza, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisbert, J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Abanto natural stone is a rock used in modern constructions and currently quarried as an ornamental rock in Abanto, Zaragoza. The varieties described here are a limestone with depositional texture and a crystalline limestone. In this work we have carried out a detailed study of the mineralogy, texture, hydric behaviour, pore system characteristics, dynamic behaviour and behaviour against the effects of salt crystallisation. After 30 cycles of salts crystallization, the weight loss in these rocks is lower than 0.5%. This low weathering is a consequence of the configuration of their pore system, characterised by a low open porosity and high percentages of microporosity with pore-throat sizes on average of less than a 0.2 µm. The petrographical and physical characteristics, as well as its high resistance against salt crystallisation confer these rocks a high technical quality for their use as building stones in modern construction.

    La piedra natural de Abanto es un material utilizado en obra civil moderna y explotado como roca Ornamental en Abanto (Zaragoza. Las variedades caracterizadas son una caliza con textura deposicional y una caliza cristalina. En este trabajo se ha realizado un detallado estudio de su mineralogía, textura, características del sistema poroso, comportamiento hídrico, comportamiento dinámico y de su comportamiento frente a la cristalización de sales. La pérdida en peso en estas rocas es inferior al 0,5% tras realizar 30 ciclos de cristalización de sales. Esta baja alterabilidad es consecuencia de la configuración del sistema poroso, caracterizado por presentar una baja porosidad abierta y porcentajes elevados de microporosidad con tamaños de radios de acceso de poro preferentemente inferiores a 0,2 µm. Sus características petrográficas y físicas, así como su elevada resistencia frente a la cristalización de sales, les confieren unas buenas cualidades técnicas para su utilización como

  15. Low-Temperature, Chemically Grown Titanium Oxide Thin Films with a High Hole Tunneling Rate for Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tsu Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a chemically grown titanium oxide (TiO2 on Si to form a heterojunction for photovoltaic devices. The chemically grown TiO2 does not block hole transport. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy was used to study the band alignment. A substantial band offset at the TiO2/Si interface was observed. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS revealed that the chemically grown TiO2 is oxygen-deficient and contains numerous gap states. A multiple-trap-assisted tunneling (TAT model was used to explain the high hole injection rate. According to this model, the tunneling rate can be 105 orders of magnitude higher for holes passing through TiO2 than for flow through SiO2. With 24-nm-thick TiO2, a Si solar cell achieves a 33.2 mA/cm2 photocurrent on a planar substrate, with a 9.4% power conversion efficiency. Plan-view scanning electron microscopy images indicate that a moth-eye-like structure formed during TiO2 deposition. This structure enables light harvesting for a high photocurrent. The high photocurrent and ease of production of chemically grown TiO2 imply that it is a suitable candidate for future low-cost, high-efficiency solar cell applications.

  16. Enhanced Weathering Strategies for Stabilizing Climate and Averting Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m(exp -2) yr (exp -1)) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  17. Enhanced weathering strategies for stabilizing climate and averting ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m-2 yr-1) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  18. Rate enhancement in microfabricated chemical reactors under fast forced temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heine Anton; Olsen, Jakob L.; Jensen, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of CO under fast forced temperature oscillations shows increased reaction rate compared to steady state. A maximum increase of 40% is observed relative to steady state. The reaction rate is investigated for varying mean temperature, amplitude and frequency. As function of mean temperature...

  19. An alternative empirical model for the relationship between the bond valence and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between the bond valence s and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds (dr/dT) has been closely approximated by using the alternative three-parameter empirical model (dr/dT) = (u + vs)(-1/w), where u, v and w are the refinable parameters. Unlike the s-(dr/dT) model developed by Brown et al. [(1997), Acta Cryst. B53, 750-761], this alternative model can be optimized for particular s-(dr/dT) datasets in the least-squares refinement procedure. For routine calculations of the thermal expansion rates of chemical bonds, the alternative model with the parameters u = -63.9, v = 2581.0 and w = 0.647 can be recommended.

  20. Accelerating finite-rate chemical kinetics with coprocessors: comparing vectorization methods on GPUs, MICs, and CPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Efficient ordinary differential equation solvers for chemical kinetics must take into account the available thread and instruction-level parallelism of the underlying hardware, especially on many-core coprocessors, as well as the numerical efficiency. A stiff Rosenbrock and nonstiff Runge-Kutta solver are implemented using the single instruction, multiple thread (SIMT) and single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) paradigms with OpenCL. The performances of these parallel implementations were measured with three chemical kinetic models across several multicore and many-core platforms. Two runtime benchmarks were conducted to clearly determine any performance advantage offered by either method: evaluating the right-hand-side source terms in parallel, and integrating a series of constant-pressure homogeneous reactors using the Rosenbrock and Runge-Kutta solvers. The right-hand-side evaluations with SIMD parallelism on the host multicore Xeon CPU and many-core Xeon Phi co-processor performed approximately three ti...

  1. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad.

  2. Influence of the Chemical Interactions on the Removal Rate of Different Salts in Electrokinetic Desalination Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic desalination techniques have been successfully applied for the prevention of salt-induced deterioration problems of masonry and other construction materials. A mathematical model for electrochemical desalination treatments is described, based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system...... and sculptures. Simulations of the desalination treatment of brick samples contaminated with these target contaminants are shown. The influence of the chemical interactions on the efficiency is highlighted in the results....

  3. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes, while ensuring their health and safety.

  4. Unimolecular Rate Expression for Cyclohexene Decomposition and Its Use in Chemical Thermometry under Shock Tube Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Wing; Rosado-Reyes, Claudette M

    2015-07-16

    The methods used in deriving the rate expressions from comparative rate single-pulse shock tube studies, recent direct shock tube studies, and high-pressure flow experiments bearing on the data for the reverse Diels-Alder decomposition of cyclohexene to form ethylene and 1,3-butadiene are reviewed. This current interest is due to the increasing need for accurate kinetics and physical data (particularly the temperature) for realistic simulations in practical areas such as combustion. The rate constants derived from the direct shock tube studies and high-pressure flow experiments are somewhat larger than those used in comparative rate single-pulse shock tube experiments. For the latter, it is shown that they have been derived from a variety of independent experiments that include rate constants for unimolecular decomposition and isomerization processes that are considered to be well understood. The possibility of non-Arrhenius behavior in the unimolecular rate constants as a consequence of the large range covered in rate constants (as much as 12 orders of magnitude) for the comparative rate experiments has been examined and ruled out as a source of the discrepancy. Our analysis shows that there is the need to consider the possibility of radical-induced decompositions for verifying the correctness of the reaction mechanisms in studying unimolecular reactions. In the case of cyclohexene decomposition, recent experiments demonstrating the presence of residual amounts of H atoms in shock tube experiments suggest that addition to the double bond can also lead to the formation of ethylene and 1,3-butadiene and hence to rate constants larger than the true values. This possibility is even more likely to occur in high-pressure flow experiments. As a result, the internal standard method must be used with care and a radical inhibitor should always be present in sufficiently large quantities to suppress possible chain reactions. The present analysis results have important

  5. Two Optimization Methods to Determine the Rate Constants of a Complex Chemical Reaction Using FORTRAN and MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Latif A. Seoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: For chemical reactions, the determination of the rate constants is both very difficult and a time consuming process. The aim of this research was to develop computer programs for determining the rate constants for the general form of any complex reaction at a certain temperature. The development of such program can be very helpful in the control of industrial processes as well as in the study of the reaction mechanisms. Determination of the accurate values of the rate constants would help in establishing the optimum conditions of reactor design including pressure, temperature and other parameters of the chemical reaction. Approach: From the experimental concentration-time data, initial values of rate constants were calculated. Experimental data encountered several types of errors, including temperature variation, impurities in the reactants and human errors. Simulations of a second order consecutive irreversible chemical reaction of the saponification of diethyl ester were presented as an example of the complex reactions. The rate equations (system of simultaneous differential equations of the reaction were solved to get the analytical concentration versus time profiles. The simulation results were compared with experimental results at each measured point. All deviations between experimental and calculated values were squared and summed up to form a new function. This function was fed into a minimizer routine that gave the optimal rate constants. Two optimization techniques were developed using FORTRAN and MATLAB for accurately determining the rate constants of the reaction at certain temperature from the experimental data. Results: Results showed that the two proposed programs were very efficient, fast and accurate tools to determine the true rate constants of the reaction with less 1% error. The use of the MATLAB embedded subroutines for simultaneously solving the differential equations and minimization of the error function

  6. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Yang; Batista, Bruno; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Cardoso, Silvana S. S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a two-dimensional microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydro...

  7. Modeling of photolysis rates over Europe: impact on chemical gaseous species and aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact of photolysis rate calculation on European air composition and air quality monitoring. In particular, the impact of cloud parametrisation and the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates are analysed. Photolysis rates are simulated using the Fast-JX photolysis scheme and gas and aerosol concentrations over Europe are simulated with the regional model Polair3D of the Polyphemus platform. The photolysis scheme is first use to update the clear sky tabulation used in the previous Polair3D version. Important differences in photolysis rates are simulated, mainly due to updated cross-sections in the Fast-JX scheme. In the previous Polair3D version, clouds were taken into account by multiplying the clear-sky photolysis rates using a correction factor. In a second stage, the impact of clouds is taken into account more accurately by simulating them directly in the photolysis scheme. Differences in photolysis rates inside clouds are as high as differences between simulations with and without clouds. Outside clouds, the differences are small. The largest difference in gas concentrations is simulated for OH with a mean increase of its tropospheric burden of 4 to 5%.

    To take into account the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates, Polair3D and Fast-JX are coupled. Photolysis rates are updated every hour. Large impact on photolysis rates is observed at the ground, decreasing with altitude. The aerosol species that impact the most photolysis rates is dust especially in South Europe. Strong impact is also observed over anthropogenic emission regions (Paris, The Po and the Ruhr Valley where mainly nitrate and sulphate reduced the incoming radiation. Differences in photolysis rates lead to changes in gas concentrations, with the largest impact simulated for OH and NO concentrations. At the ground, monthly mean concentrations of both species are reduced over Europe by around 10 to 14% and their tropospheric burden by around 10

  8. The influence of condensed tannin structure on rate of microbial mineralization and reactivity to chemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte E; Preston, Caroline M; Hogg, Karen E; Titus, Brian D

    2011-03-01

    We examined how tannin structure influences reactivity in tannin assays and carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Condensed tannins from the foliage of ten tree and shrub species and from pecan shells (Carya illinoensis) had different proportions of: (a) epicatechin (cis) and catechin (trans) isomers, (b) procyanidin (PC) and prodelphinidin (PD) monomers, and (c) different chain lengths. The response of each tannin to several widely used tannin assays was determined. Although there was some variation in response to proanthocyanidin (butanol/HCl) and Folin Ciocalteu assays, we did not deduce any predictable relationship between tannin structure and response to either assay. There was little variation in protein precipitation among the different tannins. To assess biological activity, six of the tannins were incubated with forest humus for 22 days. We determined that, while PC-based tannins remained at least partly extractable for the duration of the incubation, tannins with a high proportion of PD subunits rapidly became unextractable from soil. There was a positive correlation between net nitrogen mineralization and cis chemical structure. Carbon mineralization was enhanced initially by the addition of tannins to humus, but after 22 days, a negative correlation between the proportion of cis subunits and respiration was determined. Overall, we were not able to demonstrate consistent effects of structure on either microbial mineralization or reactivity to chemical assays; such relationships remain elusive.

  9. Relaxation rate for an ultrafast folding protein is independent of chemical denaturant concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellmer, Troy; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2007-11-28

    The connection between free-energy surfaces and chevron plots has been investigated in a laser temperature jump kinetic study of a small ultrafast folding protein, the 35-residue subdomain from the villin headpiece. Unlike all other proteins that have been studied so far, no measurable dependence of the unfolding/refolding relaxation rate on denaturant concentration was observed over a wide range of guanidinium chloride concentration. Analysis with a simple Ising-like theoretical model shows that this denaturant-invariant relaxation rate can be explained by a large movement of the major free energy barrier, together with a denaturant- and reaction coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  10. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  11. Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Galen T; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-01-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product -for example, an energy barrier- becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically-expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  12. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Review of denudation processes and quantification of weathering and erosion rates at a 0.1 to 1 Ma time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvmo, Mats (Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    2010-06-15

    The Forsmark and Laxemar areas are quite similar from a geomorphological point of view. Both sites are situated within intact parts of the Sub-Cambrian Peneplain with extremely low relief. The peneplain is considered to be intact at both sites, i.e. the present relief is quite close to the original surface of this old denudation surface. The total amount of glacial erosion up to present is estimated to be relatively low at both sites (less than 10 m on average), but may have been quite important for stripping of old regolith, especially along fracture zones. This is most obvious in the vicinity of the Forsmark site where the dissected coastline 15 km south of the site is interpreted as a result of glacial erosion along old fracture zones. Therefore, from a strict glacial erosion perspective the Laxemar site is somewhat better than Forsmark. However, given the presented long-term denudation up to present, the expected amount of glacial erosion during a future glacial cycle, if similar to the last glacial cycle, is probably very limited for both sites, in the order of 2-5 m. Excluding glacial erosion, the long-term denudation rates of the two sites is fairly low as a consequence of the very low relief and the proximity to base level. The figures estimated for the long term denudation rates are in agreement with reports of denudation rates in shield areas and lie within the range 0 to 10 m/Ma for both sites. A scenario with a five-fold increase of relief that could be the effect of tectonic uplift, in a time perspective considerably longer than the coming 100,000 years, does not significantly change the picture. Even if the local relief is raised to above 100 m at both sites the estimated non-glacial denudation is very low. However, it should be noted that the effect of a relief change on the glacial system is not included in the calculations. Again, such a change on the pattern of glacial erosion would be more pronounced in the Forsmark area, since the coastline is

  14. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  15. Is Weather Chaotic?

    CERN Document Server

    Raidl, A

    1998-01-01

    The correlation dimension and K2-entropy are estimated from meteorological time- series. The results lead us to claim that seasonal variability of weather is under influence of low dimensional dynamics, whereas changes of weather from day to day are governed by high dimensional system(s). Error-doubling time of this system is less than 3 days. We suggest that the outstanding feature of the weather dynamics is deterministic chaos.

  16. Benign Weather Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    operational interest in modifying weather to support combat operations increased, ultimately leading to a multi-service effort called PROJECT POPEYE . The goal...This, coupled with the revelations concerning weather modification use in the Vietnam War (PROJECT POPEYE ), was a double blow to weather modification...AWS-TR-74-247, June 1984. Cobb, James T., Jr., et. al. Project Popeye : Final Report. China Lake, CA: Naval Weapons Center, 1967. Langmuir, Irving

  17. I. Determination of chemical reaction rate constants by numerical nonlinear analysis: differential methods

    CERN Document Server

    Jesudason, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    The primary emphasis of this work on kinetics is to illustrate the a posteriori approach to applications, where focus on data leads to novel outcomes, rather than the a priori tendencies of applied analysis which imposes constructs on the nature of the observable. The secondary intention is the development of appropriate methods consonant with experimental definitions. By focusing on gradients, it is possible to determine both the average and instantaneous rate constants that can monitor changes in the rate constant with concentration changes as suggested by this theory. Here, methods are developed and discussed utilizing nonlinear analysis which does not require exact knowledge of initial concentrations. These methods are compared with those derived from standard methodology. These gradient methods are shown to be consistent with the ones from standard methods and could readily serve as alternatives for studies where there are limits or unknowns in the initial conditions, such as in the burgeoning fields of ...

  18. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yang; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-01-01

    In order to model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a two-dimensional microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydroxide and metal ions is approximately linear and quadratic, respectively. We show that such a difference in ionic transport dynamics arises from the enhanced transport of metal ions across a thin gel layer present at the surface of the precipitate. The fluctuations in transverse velocity in this wavy porous gel layer allow an enhanced transport of the cation, so that the effective diffusivity is about an order of magnitude higher than that expected from molecular diffusion alone. Our theoretical predictions are in excellen...

  19. Space Weather Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Space Weather Analysis archives are model output of ionospheric, thermospheric and magnetospheric particle populations, energies and electrodynamics

  20. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  1. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  2. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorotilin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into "active" and "passive" classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  3. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations.

  4. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals - Part 2: Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2013-04-01

    Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑ CO2], etc.) as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell formation. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyse the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T) and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas, since with CO2 the influence of the seawater carbonate acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and fluid flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations. The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor, similar to that widely used for CO2 invasion at the sea surface. While organisms do need to actively regulate flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer to take up enough O2, this seems to be not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Instead, the main impacts of rising oceanic CO2 will most likely be those associated with classical ocean acidification science. Regionally, as with O2, the combination of T, P and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth.

  5. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals – Part 2: Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Hofmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑ CO2], etc. as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell formation. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyse the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas, since with CO2 the influence of the seawater carbonate acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and fluid flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations. The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor, similar to that widely used for CO2 invasion at the sea surface. While organisms do need to actively regulate flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer to take up enough O2, this seems to be not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Instead, the main impacts of rising oceanic CO2 will most likely be those associated with classical ocean acidification science. Regionally, as with O2, the combination of T, P and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth.

  6. Effect of Solution Spray Rate on the Properties of Chemically Sprayed ZnO:In Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merike Kriisa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO:In thin films were grown from 100 mL of spray solution on glass substrates by chemical spray at Ts=400°C using solution spray rates of 0.5–6.7 mL/min. Zinc acetate and indium(IIIchloride were used as Zn and In sources, respectively, with [In]/[Zn] = 3 at.%. Independent of solution spray rate, the crystallites in ZnO:In films grow preferentially in the (101 plane parallel to the substrate. The solution spray rate influences the surface morphology, grain size, film thickness, and electrical and optical properties. According to SEM and AFM studies, sharp-edged pyramidal grains and canvas-resembling surfaces are characteristic of films grown at spray rates of 0.5 and 3.3 mL/min, respectively. To obtain films with comparable film thickness and grain size, more spray solution should be used at low spray rates. The electrical resistivity of sprayed ZnO:In films is controlled by the solution spray rate. The carrier concentration increases from 2·1019 cm−3 to 1·1020 cm−3 when spray rate is increased from 0.5 mL/min to 3.3 mL/min independent of the film thickness; the carrier mobilities are always lower in slowly grown films. Sprayed ZnO:In films transmit 75–80% of the visible light while the increase in solution spray rate from 0.5 mL/min to 3.3 mL/min decreases the transmittance in the NIR region and increases the band gap in accordance with the increase in carrier concentration. Lower carrier concentration in slowly sprayed films is likely due to the indium oxidation.

  7. Chemical reaction rates using the semiclassical Van-Vleck initialvalue representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Miller, William H.

    2006-11-29

    A semiclassical IVR formulation using the Van-Vleck propagator has been used to calculate the flux correlation function and thereby reaction rate constants. This Van-Vleck formulation of the flux-flux correlation function is computationally as simple as the classical Wigner model. However unlike the latter, it has the ability to capture quantum interference/coherence effects. Classical trajectories are evolved starting from the dividing surface that separates reactants and products, and are evolved negatively in time. This formulation has been tested on model problems ranging from the Eckart barrier, double well to the collinear H + H{sub 2}.

  8. Chemical rate model for the surface pyrolysis of tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium to form titanium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprac, Anthony J.; Iacoponi, John A.; Littau, Karl A.

    1998-09-01

    A chemical kinetic rate model for the deposition of titanium nitride films from the surface reaction of tetrakis(dimethyl-amido)titanium (TDMAT) was developed. Without ammonia addition, TDMAT forms a titanium nitride film by pyrolyzing on the hot substrate surface. Experimental data from the applied materials 5000 deposition tool was modeled using a CSTR formulation. With the parameters of the surface reaction model regressed to fit portions of the experimental results, reasonably accurate model predictions over the entire domain of experimental data were obtained.

  9. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Batista, Bruno; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-08-16

    To model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a 2D microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydroxide and metal ions is approximately linear and quadratic, respectively. We show that such a difference in ionic transport dynamics arises from the enhanced transport of metal ions across a thin gel layer present at the surface of the precipitate. The fluctuations in transverse velocity in this wavy porous gel layer allow an enhanced transport of the cation, so that the effective diffusivity is about one order of magnitude higher than that expected from molecular diffusion alone. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with our laboratory measurements of the growth of a manganese hydroxide membrane in a microfluidic channel, and this enhanced transport is thought to have been needed to account for the bioenergetics of the first single-celled organisms.

  10. Weather and emotional state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions

  11. Moball-Buoy Network: A Near-Real-Time Ground-Truth Distributed Monitoring System to Map Ice, Weather, Chemical Species, and Radiations, in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, F.; Shahabi, C.; Burdick, J.; Rais-Zadeh, M.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The work had been funded by NASA HQ's office of Cryospheric Sciences Program. Recent observations of the Arctic have shown that sea ice has diminished drastically, consequently impacting the environment in the Arctic and beyond. Certain factors such as atmospheric anomalies, wind forces, temperature increase, and change in the distribution of cold and warm waters contribute to the sea ice reduction. However current measurement capabilities lack the accuracy, temporal sampling, and spatial coverage required to effectively quantify each contributing factor and to identify other missing factors. Addressing the need for new measurement capabilities for the new Arctic regime, we propose a game-changing in-situ Arctic-wide Distributed Mobile Monitoring system called Moball-buoy Network. Moball-buoy Network consists of a number of wind-propelled self-powered inflatable spheres referred to as Moball-buoys. The Moball-buoys are self-powered. They use their novel mechanical control and energy harvesting system to use the abundance of wind in the Arctic for their controlled mobility and energy harvesting. They are equipped with an array of low-power low-mass sensors and micro devices able to measure a wide range of environmental factors such as the ice conditions, chemical species wind vector patterns, cloud coverage, air temperature and pressure, electromagnetic fields, surface and subsurface water conditions, short- and long-wave radiations, bathymetry, and anthropogenic factors such as pollutions. The stop-and-go motion capability, using their novel mechanics, and the heads up cooperation control strategy at the core of the proposed distributed system enable the sensor network to be reconfigured dynamically according to the priority of the parameters to be monitored. The large number of Moball-buoys with their ground-based, sea-based, satellite and peer-to-peer communication capabilities would constitute a wireless mesh network that provides an interface for a global

  12. Questa Baseline and Pre-mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation, 7. A Pictorial Record of Chemical Weathering, Erosional Processes, and Potential Debris-flow Hazards in Scar Areas Developed on Hydrothermally Altered Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Ludington, Steve; Vincent, Kirk R.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Livo, K. Eric

    2009-01-01

    Erosional scar areas developed along the lower Red River basin, New Mexico, reveal a complex natural history of mineralizing processes, rapid chemical weathering, and intense physical erosion during periodic outbursts of destructive, storm-induced runoff events. The scar areas are prominent erosional features with craggy headwalls and steep, denuded slopes. The largest scar areas, including, from east to west, Hottentot Creek, Straight Creek, Hansen Creek, Lower Hansen Creek, Sulfur Gulch, and Goat Hill Gulch, head along high east-west trending ridges that form the northern and southern boundaries of the lower Red River basin. Smaller, topographically lower scar areas are developed on ridge noses in the inner Red River valley. Several of the natural scar areas have been modified substantially as a result of large-scale open-pit and underground mining at the Questa Mine; for example, much of the Sulfur Gulch scar was removed by open pit mining, and several scars are now partially or completely covered by mine waste dumps.

  13. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals II: Carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Peltzer, E. T.; Brewer, P. G.

    2012-11-01

    Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑CO2] etc.) as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell dissolution. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T) and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2-HCO3--CO32- acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations.The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor. For organisms, this means mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress seems not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Nevertheless the elevated pCO2 cost most likely is non-zero. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth. But the net result is that, for the problem of gas exchange with the bulk ocean, the combination of an increasing T combined with declining O2 poses a greater challenge to marine life than does increasing CO2. The relationships developed here allow a more accurate prediction of the impacts on marine life

  14. Modeling comprehensive chemical composition of weathered oil following a marine spill to predict ozone and potential secondary aerosol formation and constrain transport pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Greg T.; Worton, David R.; Aeppli, Christoph; Reddy, Christopher M.; Zhang, Haofei; Variano, Evan; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2015-11-01

    Releases of hydrocarbons from oil spills have large environmental impacts in both the ocean and atmosphere. Oil evaporation is not simply a mechanism of mass loss from the ocean, as it also causes production of atmospheric pollutants. Monitoring atmospheric emissions from oil spills must include a broad range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including intermediate-volatile and semivolatile compounds (IVOC, SVOC), which cause secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone production. The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster in the northern Gulf of Mexico during Spring/Summer of 2010 presented a unique opportunity to observe SOA production due to an oil spill. To better understand these observations, we conducted measurements and modeled oil evaporation utilizing unprecedented comprehensive composition measurements, achieved by gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-VUV-HR-ToFMS). All hydrocarbons with 10-30 carbons were classified by degree of branching, number of cyclic rings, aromaticity, and molecular weight; these hydrocarbons comprise ˜70% of total oil mass. Such detailed and comprehensive characterization of DWH oil allowed bottom-up estimates of oil evaporation kinetics. We developed an evaporative model, using solely our composition measurements and thermodynamic data, that is in excellent agreement with published mass evaporation rates and our wind-tunnel measurements. Using this model, we determine surface slick samples are composed of oil with a distribution of evaporative ages and identify and characterize probable subsurface transport of oil.

  15. Chemical and mineralogical transformations caused by weathering in anti-tank DU penetrators ("the silver bullets") discharged during the Kosovo war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellini, Marcello; Riccobono, Francesco

    2005-09-01

    A depleted-uranium penetrator, shot in 1999 at Djakovica, Western Kosovo, and there collected in June 2001, shows evident alteration processes, perceivable as black and yellow coatings. XRD indicates that the black coating mostly consists of uraninite, UO2, with possible presence of other more oxidized uranium forms, such as U3O8. The yellow material is mostly amorphous, with variable weak diffraction lines, due to minor embedded uraninite grains, or possibly to schoepite, UO3 x 2H2O. SEM-EDS reveals only uranium. Whereas uraninite does not show any crystal shape, the yellow material recrystallizes to flattened pseudo-hexagonal prisms, approximately 2-10 microm wide and 1-4 microm long. Raman spectra of the yellow material have peaks at 3474 and 3222 cm(-1), indicative for OH groups, plus at 812 and 744 cm(-1), indicative for UO2(2+) uranyl ions. Based on the different data, the yellow material covering the depleted-uranium dart is an oxidized corrosion product, containing uranyl ions and hydroxyls and/or water molecules, akin to schoepite. Therefore, the Djakovica dart shows evident oxidation and leaching processes, progressively releasing mobile uranium forms. As uranium will be progressively dispersed far from the impact sites, at a rate controlled by the presence of effective fixing mechanisms, we feel necessary to maintain long term geochemical control of water pollution within the battlefield surroundings.

  16. Designing a Weather Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  17. Evaporation and weather

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, H.A.R. de; Feddes, R.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Lablans, W.N.; Schuurmans, C.J.E.; Shuttleworth, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Data on evaporation to be used in agriculture, hydrology, forestry, etc. are usually supplied by meteorologists. Meteorologists themselves also use evaporation data. Air mass properties determining weather are strongly dependent on the input of water vapour from the surface. So for weather predictio

  18. Effect of Complexation with Hydroxylpropyl-β-Cyclodextrin on Solubility, Dissolution Rate and Chemical Stability of Prostaglandin E1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUFu-gen; CUIFu-de; GAOYong-liang

    2004-01-01

    Aim To study the effect of complexation with hydroxylpmpyl-β-cycledextrin (HP-β-CD) on the solubility, dissolution rate and chemical stability of pmstaglandin E1 (PGE1), thereby providing a basis for preparing a stable solid or aqueous preparation of PGF1 formulated with HP-β-CD. Methods The effect of HP-β-CD on the solubility of PGF1 was studied by phase solubility method. The formation of inclusion complexes of PGE1 with HP-β-CD in the aqueous solution was confirmed by UV spectra, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and that in the solid state by IR spectra and X-ray diffractometry. An solid inclusion complex of PGF1 with HP-β-CD was prepared by lyophilization. The dissolution rate and stability of the inclusion complex were determined and compared with those of PGE1 alone. Meanwhile, the stability of PGF1 aqueous solutions in the presence of HP-β-CD was studied under different pH conditions. Results The solubility of PGF1 increased linearly with increasing HP-β-CD concentration in various pH buffered solutions, showing typical AL-type phase solubility diagrams. The stability and dissolution rate of the solid inclusion complex of PGE1 were significantly increased, compared with those of pure PGE1 . The stability of PGEI in HP-β-CD solutions was also obviously improved under acidic and basic conditions, but the stabilizing effect was absent under neutral conditions. Conclulsions The solubility, dissolution rate and chemical stability of PGE1 are markedly improved by complexation with HP-β-CD. It is quite possible to prepare a stable PGE1 inclusion complex-containing solid dosage forms, but almost impossible to obtain a stable aqueous preparation of PGE1 formulated with HP-β-CD.

  19. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals II: Carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Hofmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑CO2] etc. as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell dissolution. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2-HCO3-CO32– acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations.The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor. For organisms, this means mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress seems not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Nevertheless the elevated pCO2 cost most likely is non-zero. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around

  20. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore......, the capacity of the highway seems to be reduced in bad weather and there are indications that travel time variability is also increased, at least in free-flow conditions. Heavy precipitation reduces speed and capacity by around 5-8%, whereas snow primarily reduces capacity. Other weather variables......-parametrically against traffic density and in step 2 the residuals from step 1 are regressed linearly against the weather variables. The choice of a non-parametric method is made to avoid constricting ties from a parametric specification and because the focus here is not on the relationship between traffic flow...

  1. Lithological influences on contemporary and long-term regolith weathering at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Heather L.; Chapela Lara, María; Moore, Oliver W.; Kurtz, Andrew C.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; White, Art F.

    2017-01-01

    -2 s-1 and kaolinite: 4.0 × 10-14 mol m-2 s-1. Long-term weathering fluxes are several orders of magnitude lower in the granitic regolith than in the volcaniclastic, despite higher abundances of several elements in the granitic regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes were determined from net (rain-corrected) solute profiles and thus represent rates over the residence time of water in the regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes within the granitic regolith are similar to the long-term fluxes. In contrast, the long-term fluxes are faster than the contemporary fluxes in the volcaniclastic regolith. Contemporary fluxes in the granitic regolith are generally also slightly faster than in the volcaniclastic. The differences in weathering fluxes over space and time between these two watersheds indicate significant lithologic control of chemical weathering mechanisms and rates.

  2. Lithological influences on contemporary and long-term regolith weathering at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Heather L.; Lara, Maria Chapela; Moore, Oliver; Kurtz, Andrew C.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; White, Arthur F.

    2017-01-01

    × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1 and kaolinite: 4.0 × 10−14 mol m−2 s−1. Long-term weathering fluxes are several orders of magnitude lower in the granitic regolith than in the volcaniclastic, despite higher abundances of several elements in the granitic regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes were determined from net (rain-corrected) solute profiles and thus represent rates over the residence time of water in the regolith. Contemporary weathering fluxes within the granitic regolith are similar to the long-term fluxes. In contrast, the long-term fluxes are faster than the contemporary fluxes in the volcaniclastic regolith. Contemporary fluxes in the granitic regolith are generally also slightly faster than in the volcaniclastic. The differences in weathering fluxes over space and time between these two watersheds indicate significant lithologic control of chemical weathering mechanisms and rates.

  3. Chemical reaction rates of ozone in water infusions of wheat, beech, oak and pine leaves of different ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, Elise; Loubet, Benjamin; Durand, Brigitte; Flura, Dominique; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Ciuraru, Raluca; Ogée, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    In this study we present results from a laboratory experiment designed to evaluate the first-order chemical reaction rate (k) of ozone in water films on plant leaves occurring during dew or rain events. Ozone deposition to wet cuticles is indeed known to be a significant pathway of ozone deposition, but the underlying processes are not yet well understood. Leaf infusions obtained by infusing plant leaves with water at room temperature were introduced into a wet effluent denuder fed with a flux of ozone-rich air. Ozone, water vapour concentrations and temperature were measured in both inlet and outlet airflows in order to compute ozone reaction rates kr using an ozone reaction-diffusion model in the water film. Ascorbate solutions were used to validate the set up and led to kr = 3.6 107 M-1 s-1 consistent with the literature. Ozone reaction rates were determined for wheat, beech, oak and pine leaves infusions at several developmental stages, as well as for rain samples. Leaf infusions reaction rates were between 240 s-1 and 3.4 105 s-1 depending on species and developmental stage, while k for rain water ranged from 130 to 830 s-1. Wheat leaves solutions showed significantly (P ascorbate and VOCs as well as the reaction products of ozone with these compounds.

  4. Weathering-limited hillslope evolution in carbonate landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Vincent; Ollivier, Vincent; Bellier, Olivier; Miramont, Cécile; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Fleury, Jules; Benedetti, Lucilla; Guillou, Valéry

    2016-07-01

    Understanding topographic evolution requires integrating elementary processes acting at the hillslope scale into the long-wavelength framework of landscape dynamics. Recent progress has been made in the quantification of denudation of eroding landscapes and its links with topography. Despite these advances, data is still sparse in carbonate terrain, which covers a significant part of the Earth's surface. In this study, we measured both long-term denudation rates using in situ-produced 36Cl concentrations in bedrock and regolith clasts and surface convexity at 12 sites along ridges of the Luberon carbonate range in Provence, Southeastern France. Starting from ∼30 mm/ka for the lowering of the summit plateau surface, denudation linearly increases with increasing hilltop convexity up to ∼70 mm/ka, as predicted by diffusive mass transport theory. Beyond this point denudation rates appear to be insensitive to the increase in hilltop convexity. We interpret this constant denudation as indicating a transition from a regime where hillslope evolution is primarily controlled by diffusive downslope regolith transport, toward a situation in which denudation is limited by the rate at which physical and chemical weathering processes can produce clasts and lower the hilltop. Such an abrupt transition into a weathering-limited dynamics may prevent hillslope denudation from balancing the rate of base level fall imposed by the river network and could potentially explain the development of high local relief in many Mediterranean carbonate landscapes.

  5. Effects of chemical modification on in vitro rate and extent of food starch digestion: an attempt to discover a slowly digested starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, B W; Bauer, L L; Fahey, G C

    1999-10-01

    Differences in glycemic and insulinemic responses to dietary starch are directly related to the rate of starch digestion. Chemical modification of starch may allow for the production of a slowly digested starch that could be used for the treatment of certain medical modalities. An in vitro method was utilized to evaluate the effects of chemical modification on the rate and extent of raw and cooked starch digestion. The extent of starch digestion was significantly reduced by dextrinization, etherification, and oxidation. However, the rate of starch digestion was not significantly affected by chemical modification. For most modified starches, as the degree of modification increased, the extent of digestion decreased, suggesting an increase in the amount of resistant starch. The results of this study suggest that chemically modified starch has a metabolizable energy value of <16.7 kJ/g. Chemically modified starch ingredients may serve as a good source of resistant starch in human and animal diets.

  6. Changes in Global Silicate Weathering Feedbacks over Phanerozoic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The release of carbon from the solid Earth exerts a first-order control on the evolution of the planetary environment. This basic climate forcing is modulated by a host of chemical reactions at the Earth's surface, the pace of which are in turn regulated by tectonic forces. Together, these various pieces in the puzzle of the global carbon cycle have been identified for decades, but understanding of how they fit together has remained elusive and continues to be much debated. In particular, we now know the climate-dependence of silicate mineral weathering may vary as a function of denudation rate, which is related to tectonic drivers. This variation suggests that the strength of the weathering feedback may have varied in the past, with consequent implications for the past state of global climate. This work will survey and synthesize approaches to representing changes in the weathering feedback, showing that relatively simple parameterizations yield similar results as recently developed reactive transport approaches. This similarity gives confidence in applying the simple parameterizations to reconstructing changes in feedback strength in the geologic past, at least over Phanerozoic timescales, and allows inclusion of this effect explicitly in carbon cycle models.

  7. Weathering the financial storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Tjörvi; Pétursson, Thórarinn G.

    2011-01-01

    The recent global financial tsunami has had economic consequences that have not been witnessed since the Great Depression. But while some countries suffered a particularly large contraction in economic activity on top of a system-wide banking collapse, others came off relatively lightly. In this ......The recent global financial tsunami has had economic consequences that have not been witnessed since the Great Depression. But while some countries suffered a particularly large contraction in economic activity on top of a system-wide banking collapse, others came off relatively lightly...... and severity of the crisis. In particular, we find that the pre-crisis rate of inflation is important in explaining the post-crisis experience. Our results also suggest an important role for financial factors. In particular, we find that large banking systems tended to be associated with a deeper and more...... of the crisis and, in particular, that countries with sound fundamentals and flexible economic frameworks were better able to weather the financial storm....

  8. Enhanced oxidative weathering in glaciated mountain catchments: A stabilising feedback on atmospheric carbon dioxide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, K.; Hilton, R. G.; Burton, K. W.; Selby, D. S.; Ottley, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain belts act as sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere if physical erosion and exhumation expose rock-derived organic carbon ('petrogenic' organic carbon, OCpetro) to chemical weathering. Estimates suggest 15x1021g of carbon is stored in rocks globally as OCpetro, ~25,000 times the amount of carbon in the pre-industrial atmosphere. Alongside volcanic and metamorphic degassing, OCpetro weathering is thought to be the main source of CO2 to the atmosphere over geological timescales. Erosion in mountain river catchments has been shown to enhance oxidative weathering and CO2 release. However, we still lack studies which quantify this process. In addition, it is not clear how glaciation may impact OCpetro oxidation. In analogy with silicate weathering, large amounts of fine sediment in glacial catchments may enhance oxidative weathering. Here we quantify oxidative weathering in nine catchments draining OCpetro bearing rocks in the western Southern Alps, New Zealand. Using rhenium (Re) as a tracer of oxidative weathering, we develop techniques to precisely measure Re concentration at sub-ppt levels in river waters. Using [Re]water/[Re]rock as a weathering tracer, we estimate that the weathering efficiency in glacial catchments is >4 times that of non-glacial catchments. Combining this with the OCpetro content of rocks and dissolved Re flux, we estimate the CO2 release by OCpetro oxidation. The analysis suggests that non-glacial catchments in the western Southern Alps release similar amounts of CO2 as catchments in Taiwan where erosion rates are comparable. In this mountain belt, the CO2 release does not negate CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering and by riverine transfer of organic matter. Based on our results, we propose that mountain glaciation may greatly enhance OCpetro oxidation rates. Depending on the global fluxes involved, this provides a feedback to damp low atmospheric CO2 levels and global cooling. During glacial periods (low CO2, low global

  9. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  10. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  11. Monthly Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  12. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  13. Cape Kennedy Weather Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from original weather observations taken at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station, Florida. Elements recorded are wind speed and direction,...

  14. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  15. Space Weather Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of space weather datasets from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and from the World Data Service for Geophysics,...

  16. Weather Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  17. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  18. Genetically optimizing weather predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. B.; Staats, Kai; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni

    2016-07-01

    humidity, air pressure, wind speed and wind direction) into a database. Built upon this database, we have developed a remarkably simple approach to derive a functional weather predictor. The aim is provide up to the minute local weather predictions in order to e.g. prepare dome environment conditions ready for night time operations or plan, prioritize and update weather dependent observing queues. In order to predict the weather for the next 24 hours, we take the current live weather readings and search the entire archive for similar conditions. Predictions are made against an averaged, subsequent 24 hours of the closest matches for the current readings. We use an Evolutionary Algorithm to optimize our formula through weighted parameters. The accuracy of the predictor is routinely tested and tuned against the full, updated archive to account for seasonal trends and total, climate shifts. The live (updated every 5 minutes) SALT weather predictor can be viewed here: http://www.saao.ac.za/ sbp/suthweather_predict.html

  19. The role of forest trees and their mycorrhizal fungi in carbonate rock weathering and its significance for global carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Rachel M S; Taylor, Lyla L; Banwart, Steve A; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2015-09-01

    On million-year timescales, carbonate rock weathering exerts no net effect on atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, on timescales of decades-to-centuries, it can contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and increase land-ocean alkalinity flux, counteracting ocean acidification. Historical evidence indicates this flux is sensitive to land use change, and recent experimental evidence suggests that trees and their associated soil microbial communities are major drivers of continental mineral weathering. Here, we review key physical and chemical mechanisms by which the symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi of forest tree roots potentially enhance carbonate rock weathering. Evidence from our ongoing field study at the UK's national pinetum confirms increased weathering of carbonate rocks by a wide range of gymnosperm and angiosperm tree species that form arbuscular (AM) or ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partnerships. We demonstrate that calcite-containing rock grains under EM tree species weather significantly faster than those under AM trees, an effect linked to greater soil acidification by EM trees. Weathering and corresponding alkalinity export are likely to increase with rising atmospheric CO2 and associated climate change. Our analyses suggest that strategic planting of fast-growing EM angiosperm taxa on calcite- and dolomite-rich terrain might accelerate the transient sink for atmospheric CO2 and slow rates of ocean acidification.

  20. Impact of exogenous organic carbon on the removal of chemicals of concern in the high rate nitrifying trickling filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Lei; van den Akker, Ben; Du, Jun; Kookana, Rai S; Fallowfield, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The application of fixed bed high rate nitrifying trickling filters (NTFs) for the removal of track organic chemicals of concern (CoC) is less well known than their application to nutrient removal in water treatment. Particularly, the effect of exogenous organic carbon substrate (sucrose) loading on the performance of NTFs is not well understood. A laboratory-scale NTF system was operated in recirculation mode, with the objective of removing ammonia and CoC simultaneously. The efficiency of a high rate NTF for removal both of low concentration of ammonia (5 mg NH4-N L(-1)) and different concentrations of CoC in the presence of an exogenous organic carbon substrate (30 mg total organic carbon (TOC) L(-1)) was investigated. In the presence of exogenous organic carbon, the results demonstrated that the high rate NTF was able to successfully remove most of the CoCs investigated, with the removal ranging from 20.2% to 87.54%. High removal efficiencies were observed for acetaminophen (87.54%), bisphenol A (86.60%), trimethoprim (86.24%) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (80.60%). It was followed by the medium removal efficiency for N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide (61.31%) and atrazine (56.90%). In contrast, the removal of caffeine (28.43%) and benzotriazole (20.20%) was poorer in the presence of exogenous organic carbon. The removal efficiency for CoC was also compared with the results obtained in our previous study in the absence of exogenous organic carbon. The results showed that the addition of exogenous organic carbon was able to improve the removal of some of the CoC. Significant TOC percentage removals (45.68%-84.43%) and ammonia removal rate (mean value of 0.44 mg NH4-N L(-1) h(-1)) were also achieved in this study. The findings from this study provide valuable information for optimising the efficiency of high rate NTF for the removal of ammonia, CoC and TOC.

  1. Biologically-Mediated Weathering of Minerals From Nanometre Scale to Environmental Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. J.; Banwart, S. A.; Smits, M. M.; Leake, J. R.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Haward, S. J.; Ragnarsdottir, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Weathering Science Consortium is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to create a step change in understanding how biota control mineral weathering and soil formation (http://www.wun.ac.uk/wsc). Our hypothesis is that rates of biotic weathering are driven by the energy supply from plants to the organisms, controlling their biomass, surface area of contact with minerals and their capacity to interact chemically with minerals. Symbiotic fungal mycorrhiza of 90% of plant species are empowered with an available carbohydrate supply from plants that is unparalleled amongst soil microbes. They develop extensive mycelial networks that intimately contact minerals, which they weather aggressively. We hypothesise that mycorrhiza play a critical role through their focussing of photosynthate energy from plants into sub-surface weathering environments. Our work identifies how these fungal cells, and their secretions, interact with mineral surfaces and affect the rates of nutrient transfer from minerals to the organism. Investigating these living systems allows us to create new concepts and mathematical models that can describe biological weathering and be used in computer simulations of soil weathering dynamics. We are studying these biochemical interactions at 3 levels of observation: 1. At the molecular scale to understand interactions between living cells and minerals and to quantify the chemistry that breaks down the mineral structure; 2. At the soil grain scale to quantify the activity and spatial distribution of the fungi, roots and other organisms (e.g. bacteria) and their effects on the rates at which minerals are dissolved to release nutrients; 3. At soil profile scale to test models for the spatial distribution of active fungi and carbon energy and their seasonal variability and impact on mineral dissolution rates. Here we present early results from molecular and soil grain scale experiments. We have grown pure culture (Suillus bovinus, Paxillus involutus

  2. Field Guide to Rock Weathering. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Robert E.

    Highlighted are the effects of weathering through field investigations of the environment, both natural rocks, and the urban environment's pavements, buildings, and cemeteries. Both physical weathering and chemical weathering are discussed. Questions are presented for post-field trip discussion. References and a glossary are provided. (Author/RE)

  3. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  4. Introducing GFWED: The Global Fire Weather Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R. D.; Spessa, A. C.; Aziz, N. A.; Camia, A.; Cantin, A.; Carr, R.; de Groot, W. J.; Dowdy, A. J.; Flannigan, M. D.; Manomaiphiboon, K.; Pappenberger, F.; Tanpipat, V.; Wang, X.

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System is the mostly widely used fire danger rating system in the world. We have developed a global database of daily FWI System calculations, beginning in 1980, called the Global Fire WEather Database (GFWED) gridded to a spatial resolution of 0.5 latitude by 2-3 longitude. Input weather data were obtained from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and two different estimates of daily precipitation from rain gauges over land. FWI System Drought Code calculations from the gridded data sets were compared to calculations from individual weather station data for a representative set of 48 stations in North, Central and South America, Europe, Russia,Southeast Asia and Australia. Agreement between gridded calculations and the station-based calculations tended to be most different at low latitudes for strictly MERRA based calculations. Strong biases could be seen in either direction: MERRA DC over the Mato Grosso in Brazil reached unrealistically high values exceeding DCD1500 during the dry season but was too low over Southeast Asia during the dry season. These biases are consistent with those previously identified in MERRAs precipitation, and they reinforce the need to consider alternative sources of precipitation data. GFWED can be used for analyzing historical relationships between fire weather and fire activity at continental and global scales, in identifying large-scale atmosphereocean controls on fire weather, and calibration of FWI-based fire prediction models.

  5. Development of a Global Fire Weather Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R. D.; Spessa, A. C.; Aziz, N. A.; Camia, A.; Cantin, A.; Carr, R.; de Groot, W. J.; Dowdy, A. J.; Flannigan, M. D.; Manomaiphiboon, K.; Pappenberger, F.; Tanpipat, V.; Wang, X.

    2015-06-01

    The Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System is the mostly widely used fire danger rating system in the world. We have developed a global database of daily FWI System calculations, beginning in 1980, called the Global Fire WEather Database (GFWED) gridded to a spatial resolution of 0.5° latitude by 2/3° longitude. Input weather data were obtained from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and two different estimates of daily precipitation from rain gauges over land. FWI System Drought Code calculations from the gridded data sets were compared to calculations from individual weather station data for a representative set of 48 stations in North, Central and South America, Europe, Russia, Southeast Asia and Australia. Agreement between gridded calculations and the station-based calculations tended to be most different at low latitudes for strictly MERRA-based calculations. Strong biases could be seen in either direction: MERRA DC over the Mato Grosso in Brazil reached unrealistically high values exceeding DC = 1500 during the dry season but was too low over Southeast Asia during the dry season. These biases are consistent with those previously identified in MERRA's precipitation, and they reinforce the need to consider alternative sources of precipitation data. GFWED can be used for analyzing historical relationships between fire weather and fire activity at continental and global scales, in identifying large-scale atmosphere-ocean controls on fire weather, and calibration of FWI-based fire prediction models.

  6. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  7. The acid and alkalinity budgets of weathering in the Andes-Amazon system: Insights into the erosional control of global biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mark A.; West, A. Joshua; Clark, Kathryn E.; Paris, Guillaume; Bouchez, Julien; Ponton, Camilo; Feakins, Sarah J.; Galy, Valier; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-09-01

    The correlation between chemical weathering fluxes and denudation rates suggests that tectonic activity can force variations in atmospheric pCO2 by modulating weathering fluxes. However, the effect of weathering on pCO2 is not solely determined by the total mass flux. Instead, the effect of weathering on pCO2 also depends upon the balance between 1) alkalinity generation by carbonate and silicate mineral dissolution and 2) sulfuric acid generation by the oxidation of sulfide minerals. In this study, we explore how the balance between acid and alkalinity generation varies with tectonic uplift to better understand the links between tectonics and the long-term carbon cycle. To trace weathering reactions across the transition from the Peruvian Andes to the Amazonian foreland basin, we measured a suite of elemental concentrations (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Si, Li, SO4, and Cl) and isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr and δ34S) on both dissolved and solid phase samples. Using an inverse model, we quantitatively link systematic changes in solute geochemistry with elevation to downstream declines in sulfuric acid weathering as well as the proportion of cations sourced from silicates. With a new carbonate-system framework, we show that weathering in the Andes Mountains is a CO2 source whereas foreland weathering is a CO2 sink. These results are consistent with the theoretical expectation that the ratio of sulfide oxidation to silicate weathering increases with increasing erosion. Altogether, our results suggest that the effect of tectonically-enhanced weathering on atmospheric pCO2 is strongly modulated by sulfide mineral oxidation.

  8. Space weather & telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, John M

    2006-01-01

    This book is both a survey of practical concepts for forecasting the performance of various telecommunication systems as well as a balanced treatment of space-weather phenomena that give rise to telecommunication impairment episodes. It bridges the gap in the relationship that exists between the following two disciplines: space weather and telecommunication system performance. There are a number of books that address one of the two disciplines in some detail, but only merely mention the other as an afterthought. In this book the author has married the two disciplines so that the readership can

  9. Utilization of Live Localized Weather Information for Sustainable Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Usher, J.

    2010-09-01

    Authors: Jim Anderson VP, Global Network and Business Development WeatherBug® Professional Jeremy Usher Managing Director, Europe WeatherBug® Professional Localized, real-time weather information is vital for day-to-day agronomic management of all crops. The challenge for agriculture is twofold in that local and timely weather data is not often available for producers and farmers, and it is not integrated into decision-support tools they require. Many of the traditional sources of weather information are not sufficient for agricultural applications because of the long distances between weather stations, meaning the data is not always applicable for on-farm decision making processes. The second constraint with traditional weather information is the timeliness of the data. Most delivery systems are designed on a one-hour time step, whereas many decisions in agriculture are based on minute-by-minute weather conditions. This is especially true for decisions surrounding chemical and fertilizer application and frost events. This presentation will outline how the creation of an agricultural mesonet (weather network) can enable producers and farmers with live, local weather information from weather stations installed in farm/field locations. The live weather information collected from each weather station is integrated into a web-enabled decision support tool, supporting numerous on-farm agronomic activities such as pest management, or dealing with heavy rainfall and frost events. Agronomic models can be used to assess the potential of disease pressure, enhance the farmer's abilities to time pesticide applications, or assess conditions contributing to yield and quality fluctuations. Farmers and industry stakeholders may also view quality-assured historical weather variables at any location. This serves as a record-management tool for viewing previously uncharted agronomic weather events in graph or table form. This set of weather tools is unique and provides a

  10. The First Attempt at Non-Linear in Silico Prediction of Sampling Rates for Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Modeling and prediction of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) sampling rates (Rs) for 73 compounds using artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented for the first time. Two models were constructed: the first was developed ab initio using a genetic algorithm (GSD-model) to shortlist 24 descriptors covering constitutional, topological, geometrical and physicochemical properties and the second model was adapted for Rs prediction from a previous chromatographic retention model (RTD-model). Mechanistic evaluation of descriptors showed that models did not require comprehensive a priori information to predict Rs. Average predicted errors for the verification and blind test sets were 0.03 ± 0.02 L d–1 (RTD-model) and 0.03 ± 0.03 L d–1 (GSD-model) relative to experimentally determined Rs. Prediction variability in replicated models was the same or less than for measured Rs. Networks were externally validated using a measured Rs data set of six benzodiazepines. The RTD-model performed best in comparison to the GSD-model for these compounds (average absolute errors of 0.0145 ± 0.008 L d–1 and 0.0437 ± 0.02 L d–1, respectively). Improvements to generalizability of modeling approaches will be reliant on the need for standardized guidelines for Rs measurement. The use of in silico tools for Rs determination represents a more economical approach than laboratory calibrations. PMID:27363449

  11. Using the pseudophase kinetic model to interpret chemical reactivity in ionic emulsions: determining antioxidant partition constants and interfacial rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2013-06-15

    Kinetic results obtained in cationic and anionic emulsions show for the first time that pseudophase kinetic models give reasonable estimates of the partition constants of reactants, here t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) between the oil and interfacial region, P(O)(I), and the water and interfacial region, P(W)(I), and of the interfacial rate constant, k(I), for the reaction with an arenediazonium ion in emulsions containing a 1:1 volume ratio of a medium chain length triglyceride, MCT, and aqueous acid or buffer. The results provide: (a) an explanation for the large difference in pH, >4 pH units, required to run the reaction in CTAB (pH 1.54, added HBr) and SDS (pH 5.71, acetate buffer) emulsions; (b) reasonable estimates of PO(I) and k(I) in the CTAB emulsions; (c) a sensible interpretation of added counterion effects based on ion exchange in SDS emulsions (Na(+)/H3O(+) ion exchange in the interfacial region) and Donnan equilibrium in CTAB emulsions (Br(-) increasing the interfacial H3O(+)); and (d) the significance of the effect of the much greater solubility of TBHQ in MCT versus octane, 1000/1, as the oil. These results should aid in interpreting the effects of ionic surfactants on chemical reactivity in emulsions in general and in selecting the most efficient antioxidant for particular food applications.

  12. Climate-dependent sediment production: numerical modeling and field observations of variable grain size distributions from heterogeneous hillslope weathering of fractured basalt flows, Kohala Peninsula, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. P.; Johnson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a numerical model for hillslope sediment production that includes climate-dependent chemical weathering rates and bedrock fracture spacings, and predicts how grain size distributions vary with climate and hillslope erosion rate. Understanding sediment preparation, or the in situ reduction of fractured bedrock to coarse sediment by heterogeneous weathering on hillslopes, is critical to understanding the evolution of mountainous landscapes, as sediment supply rates and size distributions can strongly influence river incision rates. The majority of soil production models assume a homogenous substrate and uniform weathering front, and therefore do not track the size of rock fragments and corestones, which become the sediment supplied to channels by hillslope erosion. Our model is inspired by the Kohala Peninsula on the big island of Hawaii, which has a gradient of mean annual precipitation (MAP) spanning over an order of magnitude that has been shown to influence the weathering rates of the basalt. Previous geochemical studies have constrained climate-dependent weathering rates for local soil production. Using these inputs, we developed a kinetics-based numerical model for the chemical weathering of initially fractured basalt into soil and coarse sediment over 150ky. Following first-order reaction kinetics, chemical weathering in the model decreases exponentially with both depth below the surface and time. The model starts with a column of repeating basalt flows (typically 1 m thick), each with fracture spacing distributions consistent with thermal-mechanical cooling characteristics. Each individual fracture-bound block is assumed to weather from the surface inwards, similar in form to a weathering rind. Since the model is constructed of discrete blocks, larger blocks remain as unweathered corestones (the "sediment"), surrounded by weathered material. In addition to a MAP-dependent initial surface weathering rate and rate constant, climate is also reflected

  13. High potential for weathering and climate effects of non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, P.; Lenton, T. M.; Pohl, A.; Weber, B.; Mander, L.; Donnadieu, Y.; Beer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Kleidon, A.

    2016-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that predecessors of today's bryophytes significantly increased global chemical weathering in the Late Ordovician, thus reducing atmospheric CO2 concentration and contributing to climate cooling and an interval of glaciations. Studies that try to quantify the enhancement of weathering by non-vascular vegetation, however, are usually limited to small areas and low numbers of species, which hampers extrapolating to the global scale and to past climatic conditions. Here we present a spatially explicit modelling approach to simulate global weathering by non-vascular vegetation in the Late Ordovician. We estimate a potential global weathering flux of 2.8 (km3 rock) yr-1, defined here as volume of primary minerals affected by chemical transformation. This is around three times larger than today's global chemical weathering flux. Moreover, we find that simulated weathering is highly sensitive to atmospheric CO2 concentration. This implies a strong negative feedback between weathering by non-vascular vegetation and Ordovician climate.

  14. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, William J.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of outdoor air ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants to which occupants are exposed. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially older homes, weather-driven infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the total ventilation. As we seek to provide good indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to evaluate correctly the contribution infiltration makes to the total outdoor air ventilation rate. Because weather-driven infiltration is dependent on building air leakage and weather-induced pressure differences, a given amount of air leakage will provide different amounts of infiltration. Varying rates of infiltration will provide different levels of contaminant dilution and hence effective ventilation. This paper derives these interactions and then calculates the impact of weather-driven infiltration for different climates. A new “N-factor” is introduced to provide a convenient method for calculating the ventilation contribution of infiltration for over 1,000 locations across North America. The results of this work could be used in indoor air quality standards (specifically ASHRAE 62.2) to account for the contribution of weather-driven infiltration towards the dilution of indoor pollutants.

  15. Dress for the Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Smetana, Lara K.

    2010-01-01

    "If someone were traveling to our area for the first time during this time of year, what would you tell them to bring to wear? Why?" This question was used to engage students in a guided-inquiry unit about how climate differs from weather. In this lesson, students explored local and national data sets to give "travelers" advice…

  16. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  17. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  18. Winter Weather Checklists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  19. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Weather at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, David Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This report gives general information about how to become a meteorologist and what kinds of jobs exist in that field. Then it goes into detail about why weather is monitored at LANL, how it is done, and where the data can be accessed online.

  1. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they can be knocked over, potentially starting a fire. Check your furnace before the cold weather sets in to make ... avoided because of the risk of burns or fire. Heated pet mats should also be used ... to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of ...

  2. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  3. Effect of fuel injection rate and timing on the physical, chemical, and biological character of particulate emissions from a direct injection diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.; Scholl, J.; Hibbler, F.; Bagley, S.; Leddy, D.; Abata, D.; Johnson, J.

    1981-01-01

    Formation of pollutants from diesel combustion and methods for their control have been reviewed. Of these methods, fuel injection rate and timing were selected for a parametric study relative to total particulate, soluble organic fraction (SOF), sulfates, solids and NO and NO/sub 2/ emissions from a heavy-duty, turbocharged, after-cooled, direct-injection (DI) diesel. Chemical analyses of the SOF were performed at selected engine conditions to determine the effects of injection rate and timing on each of the eight chemical subfractions comprising the SOF. Biological character of the SOF was determined using the Ames Salmonella/microsome bioassay. 54 refs.

  4. Weathering of a liquid solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Commercially available flate plate hot water solar collector is characterized in report that presents 10 month weathering study of system. Collector efficiency was calculated and plotted from measurements of fluid temperature and flow rate, ambient temperature and solar flux. Windspeed and wind direction were also measured during tests.

  5. Weathering approaches to carbon dioxide sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of enhanced weathering is to capture CO2 by the carbonation of silicates, or by dissolution of these silicates during which the greenhouse gas CO2 is converted to bicarbonate in solution. Research in this field is still focused on increasing the rate of reaction, but the required additional

  6. Weatherization Works: An interim report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation is the first comprehensive evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program since 1984. The evaluation was designed to accomplish the following goals: Estimate energy savings and cost effectiveness; Assess nonenergy impacts; Describe the weatherization network; Characterize the eligible population and resources; and Identify factors influencing outcomes and opportunities for the future. As a national program, weatherization incorporates considerable diversity due to regional differences. Therefore, evaluation results are presented both in aggregate and for three climate regions: cold, moderate and hot.

  7. Salt-Induced Physical Weathering of Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2010-12-01

    Salt weathering is recognized as an important mechanism that contributes to the modeling and shaping of the earth’s surface, in a range of environments spanning from the Sahara desert to Antarctica. It also contributes to the degradation and loss of cultural heritage, particularly carved stone and historic buildings. Soluble salts have recently been suggested to contribute to the shaping of rock outcrops on Mars and are being identified in other planetary bodies such as the moons of Jupiter (Europa and IO)1. Soluble salts such as sulfates, nitrates, chlorides and carbonates of alkali and alkali earth metals can crystallize within the porous system of rocks and building stones, exerting sufficient pressure against the pore walls to fracture the substrate. This physical damage results in increased porosity, thus providing a higher surface area for salt-enhanced chemical weathering. To better understand how salt-induced physical weathering occurs, we have studied the crystallization of the particularly damaging salt, sodium sulfate2, in a model system (a sintered porous glass of controlled porosity and pore size). For this elusive task of studying sub-surface crystallization in pores, we combined a variety of instruments to identify which phases crystallized during evaporation and calculated the supersaturation and associated crystallization pressure that caused damage. The heat of crystallization was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), providing the timing of crystallization events and phase transitions3, while the evaporation rate was recorded using thermal gravimetry (TG). These methods enabled calculation of the sodium sulfate concentration in solution at every point during evaporation. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D-XRD) performs synchrotron-like experiments in a normal lab by using a Molybdenum X-ray source (more than 5 times more penetrative than conventional Copper source). Using this method, we determined that the first phase to

  8. WEATHERING PROCESS IN EOCENE FLYSCH IN REGION OF SPLIT (CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Miščević

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene flysh in the region of Split (Dalmatia, Croatia is char¬acterized by the presence of layers with different characteristics. It mainly includes thin-layered marls, clayey marls, calcareous marls, clastic lay¬ered limestones, calcarenites and breccias. Those parts that can be de¬scribed as the soft rocks or hard clays by the mechanical means, exposed to weathering reduce the durability within "an engineering time scale". The paper deals with the factors that influence the weathering process. The analyzed weathering is a combination of processes acting simulta¬neously. Most of these processes depend on the change of the water con¬tent, thus the weathering process mainly develops when a material is subjected to the wetting-drying process, On the base of these results form of degradation process is modeled. The weathering process can be main¬ly described as physical weathering combined with chemical weathering on the free surfaces and on the cracks walls. Erosion as a result of weath¬ering, is the dominant geomorphic process on analyzed flysch terrain. According to the analysis, as the most appropriate due to the characteris¬tics the tests are chosen as index properties. Some of these tests are modified in order to adapt them to the determined characteristics of ma¬terials from flysch layers. The correlations between the measured values are used as the basis for the classification proposal of the analyzed mate¬rial, according to its resistance to weathering processes. Roughly, three main groups of samples are recognizable: the first one with carbonate content more then 90% is not weathered at the engineers time scale; the second group with carbonate content from 75% to 90% include samples susceptible to weathering in engineers time scale; the third group with carbonate content less then 75% include samples in which the weather¬ing occurs immediately after the exposition to the weathering factors.

  9. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497

  10. The rise and fall of continental arcs: Interplays between magmatism, uplift, weathering, and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Thurner, Sally; Paterson, Scott; Cao, Wenrong

    2015-09-01

    Continental arcs, such as the modern Andes or the Cretaceous Sierra Nevada batholith, are some of the highest topographic features on Earth. Continental arc volcanoes may produce more CO2 than most other types of volcanoes due to the interaction of magmas with sedimentary carbonates stored in the continental upper plate. As such, global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism may amplify atmospheric CO2 concentrations, leading to climatic warming. However, the high elevations of continental arcs may also enhance orographic precipitation and change global atmospheric circulation patterns, possibly increasing the efficiency of chemical weathering and drawdown of atmospheric CO2, which may subdue the climatic warming response to volcanic activity. To better evaluate the climatic response, we develop models that integrate magmatic crustal thickening, topographic uplift, isostasy and erosion. The topographic response is used to predict how soil formation rates, soil residence times, and chemical weathering rates vary during and after a magmatic episode. Although magmatism leads to crustal thickening, which requires topographic uplift, highest elevations peak ∼10 My after magmatism ends. Relatively high elevations, which enhance erosion and chemical weathering of the continental arc, persist for tens of million years after magmatism ends, depending on erosion kinetics. It has recently been suggested that the Cretaceous-Paleogene greenhouse (high atmospheric CO2 and warm climate) coincided with a global chain of continental arcs, whereas mid- to late Cenozoic icehouse conditions (low atmospheric CO2 and cold climate) coincided with a lull in continental arc activity after 50 Ma. Application of our models to the Sierra Nevada (California, USA) continental arc, which represents a segment of this global Cretaceous-Paleogene continental arc, reproduces the observed topographic and erosional response. Our models require that the newly formed continental arc crust remained

  11. Weathering by tree-root-associating fungi diminishes under simulated Cenozoic atmospheric CO2 decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, J.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.; Taylor, L. L.; Beerling, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Trees dominate terrestrial biotic weathering of silicate minerals by converting solar energy into chemical energy that fuels roots and their ubiquitous nutrient-mobilising fungal symbionts. These biological activities regulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]a) over geologic timescales by driving calcium and magnesium fluvial ion export and marine carbonate formation. However, the important stabilising feedbacks between [CO2]a and biotic weathering anticipated by geochemical carbon cycle models remain untested. We report experimental evidence for a negative feedback across a declining Cenozoic [CO2]a range from 1500 to 200 ppm, whereby low [CO2]a curtails mineral surface alteration via trenching and etch pitting by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partners of tree roots. Optical profile imaging using vertical scanning interferometry reveals changes in nanoscale surface topography consistent with a dual mode of attack involving delamination and trenching by AM and EM fungal hyphae on phyllosilicate mineral flakes. This is consistent with field observations of micropores in feldspar, hornblende and basalt, purportedly caused by EM fungi, but with little confirmatory evidence. Integrating these findings into a process-based biotic weathering model revealed that low [CO2]a effectively acts as a "carbon starvation" brake, causing a three-fold drop in tree-driven fungal weathering fluxes of calcium and magnesium from silicate rock grains as [CO2]a falls from 1500 to 200 ppm. The feedback is regulated through the action of low [CO2]a on host tree productivity and provides empirical evidence for the role of [CO2]a starvation in diminishing the contribution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi to rates of biological weathering. More broadly, diminished tree-driven weathering under declining [CO2]a may provide an important contributory mechanism stabilising Earth's [CO2]a minimum over the past 24 million years.

  12. Weathering by tree root-associating fungi diminishes under simulated Cenozoic atmospheric CO2 decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, J.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.; Taylor, L. L.; Beerling, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    Trees dominate terrestrial biotic weathering of silicate minerals by converting solar energy into chemical energy that fuels roots and their ubiquitous nutrient-mobilising fungal symbionts. These biological activities regulate atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]a) over geologic timescales by driving calcium and magnesium fluvial ion export and marine carbonate formation, but the important stabilising feedbacks between [CO2]a and biotic weathering anticipated by geochemical carbon cycle models remain untested. We report experimental evidence for a negative feedback across a declining Cenozoic [CO2]a range from 1500 ppm to 200 ppm, whereby low [CO2]a curtails mineral surface alteration via trenching and etch pitting by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partners of tree roots. Optical profile imaging using vertical scanning interferometry reveals changes in nanoscale surface topography consistent with a dual mode of attack involving delamination and trenching by AM and EM fungal hyphae on phyllosilicate mineral flakes. This is consistent with field observations of micropores in feldspar, hornblende and basalt, purportedly caused by EM fungi, but with little confirmatory evidence. Integrating these findings into a process-based biotic weathering model revealed that low [CO2]a effectively acts as a "carbon starvation" brake, causing a three-fold drop in tree-driven fungal weathering fluxes of calcium and magnesium from silicate rock grains as [CO2]a falls from 1500 ppm to 200 ppm. The feedback is regulated through the action of low [CO2]a on host tree productivity and provides empirical evidence for the role of [CO2]a starvation in diminishing the contribution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi to rates of biological weathering. More broadly, diminished tree-driven weathering under declining [CO2]a may provide an important contributory mechanism stabilising Earth's [CO2]a minimum over the past 24 million years.

  13. Weathering by tree root-associating fungi diminishes under simulated Cenozoic atmospheric CO2 decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Quirk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Trees dominate terrestrial biotic weathering of silicate minerals by converting solar energy into chemical energy that fuels roots and their ubiquitous nutrient-mobilising fungal symbionts. These biological activities regulate atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]a over geologic timescales by driving calcium and magnesium fluvial ion export and marine carbonate formation, but the important stabilising feedbacks between [CO2]a and biotic weathering anticipated by geochemical carbon cycle models remain untested. We report experimental evidence for a negative feedback across a declining Cenozoic [CO2]a range from 1500 ppm to 200 ppm, whereby low [CO2]a curtails mineral surface alteration via trenching and etch pitting by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM and ectomycorrhizal (EM fungal partners of tree roots. Optical profile imaging using vertical scanning interferometry reveals changes in nanoscale surface topography consistent with a dual mode of attack involving delamination and trenching by AM and EM fungal hyphae on phyllosilicate mineral flakes. This is consistent with field observations of micropores in feldspar, hornblende and basalt, purportedly caused by EM fungi, but with little confirmatory evidence. Integrating these findings into a process-based biotic weathering model revealed that low [CO2]a effectively acts as a "carbon starvation" brake, causing a three-fold drop in tree-driven fungal weathering fluxes of calcium and magnesium from silicate rock grains as [CO2]a falls from 1500 ppm to 200 ppm. The feedback is regulated through the action of low [CO2]a on host tree productivity and provides empirical evidence for the role of [CO2]a starvation in diminishing the contribution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi to rates of biological weathering. More broadly, diminished tree-driven weathering under declining [CO2]a may provide an important contributory mechanism stabilising Earth's [CO2]a minimum over the past 24 million years.

  14. Bay of Bengal: Recording the Weathering Evolution of the Ganga and Brahmaputra Basin during Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupker, M.; France-Lanord, C.; Galy, V.; Kudrass, H.

    2010-12-01

    Continental weathering has been the focus of intense research for the past decades highlighting its central role in earth surface processes: weathering releases the elements that are essential to various biogeochemical cycles, it favors physical erosion through mineral break-down that in turn creates new reactive surfaces making physical and chemical erosion closely linked. Silicate weathering also uptakes atmospheric CO2 that eventually precipitates as carbonates in the ocean. Hitherto, only few studies have addressed the response of weathering intensity to changes in external forcing. Here we report the evolution of sediment chemistry in sediment cores from the Bay of Bengal (BoB) spanning from the last glacial maximum to present. These cores document the sedimentary repository of Himalayan erosion products transported by the Ganga and Brahmaputra (G&B) through the Gangetic plain. The morphology and tectonic setting of the G&B basin remained essentially constant over the Quaternary; hence the impact of climate change on continental-scale weathering can be assessed. In the G&B system, silicate weathering mainly releases Na and K. The loss of Na and K relative to immobile elements can be easily traced in river sediments. In the marine environment, however, tracing Na is hampered by marine Na adsorption onto the sediment. Here we therefore trace weathering via: (1) sediment hydration (H2O+) and, (2) K/Al ratio. Hydration is directly linked to the weathering state of the sediments because mineral hydrolysis and secondary mineral formation result in an increase of hydration. This tracer can thus be used both on- and off-shore. We measured hydration of bulk sediments from the BoB by CF-IRMS, along with D/H isotopic composition. A composite record of five 14C-dated short cores from the BoB (Galy et al. 2008) reveals that weathering during late glacial times was significantly less intense compared to that observed in sediments currently exported by the G&B and Holocene

  15. How MAG4 Improves Space Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Khazanov, Igor; Barghouty, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Dangerous space weather is driven by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). Forecasting flares and CMEs is the first step to forecasting either dangerous space weather or All Clear. MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events.

  16. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  17. Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) is an integrated database of severe weather records for the United States. SWDI enables a user to search through a variety...

  18. Controls on rind thickness on basaltic andesite clasts weathering in Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, P.B.; Navarre-Sitchler, A. K.; Miller, C.E.; Daniel, C.C.; Gaillardet, J.; Buss, H.L.; Lebedeva, M.I.; Brantley, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    quantified as a function of interface curvature using bulk chemical analysis (500weathering advance rate (ms-1) for the entire Bras David watershed can be extrapolated from the clast weathering rate if roughness at the watershed scale equals values of approximately 400-800. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. What characterizes planetary space weather?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Space weather has become a mature discipline for the Earth space environment. With increasing efforts in space exploration, it is becoming more and more necessary to understand the space environments of bodies other than Earth. This is the background for an emerging aspect of the space weather discipline: planetary space weather. In this article, we explore what characterizes planetary space weather, using some examples throughout the solar system. We consider energy s...

  20. Space weather and space anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dorman

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A large database of anomalies, registered by 220 satellites in different orbits over the period 1971-1994 has been compiled. For the first time, data from 49 Russian Kosmos satellites have been included in a statistical analysis. The database also contains a large set of daily and hourly space weather parameters. A series of statistical analyses made it possible to quantify, for different satellite orbits, space weather conditions on the days characterized by anomaly occurrences. In particular, very intense fluxes (>1000 pfu at energy >10 MeV of solar protons are linked to anomalies registered by satellites in high-altitude (>15000 km, near-polar (inclination >55° orbits typical for navigation satellites, such as those used in the GPS network, NAVSTAR, etc. (the rate of anomalies increases by a factor ~20, and to a much smaller extent to anomalies in geostationary orbits, (they increase by a factor ~4. Direct and indirect connections between anomaly occurrence and geomagnetic perturbations are also discussed.

  1. Severe Weather Planning for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Barbara McNaught; Strong, Christopher; Bunting, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Flash floods, severe thunderstorms, and tornadoes occur with rapid onset and often no warning. Decisions must be made quickly and actions taken immediately. This paper provides tips for schools on: (1) Preparing for Severe Weather Emergencies; (2) Activating a Severe Weather Plan; (3) Severe Weather Plan Checklist; and (4) Periodic Drills and…

  2. Benefits of chemical fibre industry down evidently in the first half of 2008 Industrial production growth rate dropped slightly, imports decreased evidently while exports grew steadily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gracie; Guo

    2008-01-01

    Production From January to May, China’s chemical fiber production rose 7.4 percent from a year earlier to 10.04 million tons, but that was 10.49 percentage points less than the growth rate during the same five- month period last year,the China National Textile and Apparel

  3. Implementation of 5E Inquiry Incorporated with Analogy Learning Approach to Enhance Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Reaction Rate for Grade 11 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supasorn, Saksri; Promarak, Vinich

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to enhance student understanding of the scientific concepts of chemical reaction rate. Forty-four grade 11 students were the target group. The treatment tools were seven learning plans of 5E inquiry incorporated with an analogy learning approach during 15 hours of class time. In each learning plan, the students…

  4. Use of formulated Trichoderma sp. Tri-1 in combination with reduced rates of chemical pesticide for control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorium on oilseed rape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable strategies for control of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape are needed. Here we tested combinations of Trichoderma sp. Tri-1, formulated with oilseed rape seedcake and straw, with reduced application rates of the chemical pesticide Carbendazim for control of this pathogen on oils...

  5. Whether weather affects music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen L.; Williams, Paul D.

    2012-09-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London [Richardson, 2012]. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for artists Claude Monet, John Constable, and William Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies [e.g., Baker and Thornes, 2006].

  6. Space Weather Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tony; Johnson, Sam; Koske-Phillips, Amelia; White, Michael; Yarborough, Amelia; Lamb, Aaron; Herbst, Anna; Molina, Ferris; Gilpin, Justin; Grah, Olivia; Perez, Ginger; Reid, Carson; Harvey, Joey; Schultz, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a "Space Weather Buoy" for measuring upper atmospheric radiation from cosmic rays and solar storms. The Buoy, which is carried to the stratosphere by helium balloons, is relatively inexpensive and uses off-the-shelf technology accessible to small colleges and high schools. Using this device, we have measured two Forbush Decreases and a small surge in atmospheric radiation during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm of March 2015.

  7. The Weather Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋涵毅

    2009-01-01

    Secondly. the weather man一定会告诉我们每天的最高和最低温度(the highest and the lowest temperature)。我们用℃来表示摄氏度,有的地方则用°F,那是华氏温度。°F=9/5×℃+32

  8. Enhanced Weathering Strategies for Stabilizing Climate and Averting Ocean Acidification - Supplementary Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m(exp. -2) yr (exp -1)) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  9. Weather Monitoring Station: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Dipak V. Sose

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weather monitoring plays a very important role in human life hence study of weather system is necessary. Currently there are two types of the weather monitoring stations available i.e. wired and wireless. Wireless system has some advantages over the wired one hence popular now a days. The parameters are include in weather monitoring usually temperature, humidity atmospheric pressure, light intensity, rainfall etc. There are many techniques existed using different processor such as PIC, AVR, ARM etc. Analog to digital channel are used to fetch the analog output of the sensors. The wireless techniques used in the weather monitoring having GSM, FM channel, Zigbee, RF etc Protocols

  10. Enhanced weathering strategies for stabilizing climate and averting ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M S; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliora...

  11. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Year-Old Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Can the Weather Affect My ... empeorar el asma de mi hijo? Weather and Asthma The effect of weather on asthma symptoms isn' ...

  12. Oil sheen weathering post Deepwater Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, M. Y.; Redmond, M. C.; Reddy, C. M.; Aeppli, C.; Nelson, R. K.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    A recently published study identified the source of the reoccurred oil sheens close to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster site as a finite contamination most likely derived from tanks and pits on the DWH wreckage itself. Here we use geochemical fingerprinting and microbial community analysis to better understand the fate and weathering processes affecting these surface oils. Both, alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are shown to reflect a linear decrease of hydrocarbon compounds with increasing distance to the DWH wreckage site (equivalent to exposure time on the sea surface). These results indicate that in the early stage of weathering the combined effects of dissolution and evaporation dominate the degradation of these surface oils. Sheen microbial communities were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Flavobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria, with low relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria likely to be hydrocarbon degraders (no more than 15% of sequences in each sample). However, some of these Gammaproteobacteria were closely related to putative hydrocarbon degraders observed in abundance in deep water plumes during the primary Deepwater Horizon spill, suggesting that very low levels of biodegradation may be also occurring. This in situ weathering experiment provides new insights in hydrocarbon weathering dynamics and shows how chemical and biological changes can potentially be masked by large evaporative losses of compounds smaller than C18 n-alkanes.

  13. Space Weather Services of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  14. Municipalities' Preparedness for Weather Hazards and Response to Weather Warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehiriz, Kaddour; Gosselin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The study of the management of weather-related disaster risks by municipalities has attracted little attention even though these organizations play a key role in protecting the population from extreme meteorological conditions. This article contributes to filling this gap with new evidence on the level and determinants of Quebec municipalities’ preparedness for weather hazards and response to related weather warnings. Using survey data from municipal emergency management coordinators and secondary data on the financial and demographic characteristics of municipalities, the study shows that most Quebec municipalities are sufficiently prepared for weather hazards and undertake measures to protect the population when informed of imminent extreme weather events. Significant differences between municipalities were noted though. Specifically, the level of preparedness was positively correlated with the municipalities’ capacity and population support for weather-related disaster management policies. In addition, the risk of weather-related disasters increases the preparedness level through its effect on population support. We also found that the response to weather warnings depended on the risk of weather-related disasters, the preparedness level and the quality of weather warnings. These results highlight areas for improvement in the context of increasing frequency and/or severity of such events with current climate change. PMID:27649547

  15. Meteoritic Constraints on Temperatures, Pressures, Cooling Rates, Chemical Compositions and Modes of Condensation in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaev, M. I.; Wood, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Monotonic, equilibrium condensation of nebular materials from a chemically homogeneous solar nebula is unlikely. Condensation of nebular gas was quite rapid, resulting in significant deviations from chemical equilibrium between condensed phases and the residual gas. A few primitive nebular components condensed from a gas of solar composition; most of them formed in fractionated nebular systems. Local chemical variations caused by both depletion and enrichment in dust relative to gas were commonplace in the solar nebula. Local variations of nebular pressure were, in general, in the range of ~10-4 - 6×10-6 bar. Short-lived temperature excursions might have exceeded 2000 K, with the sustained temperatures in the 16O-rich nebular source regions of CAIs and AOAs being in the range of 1230-1350 K. Silicate melts might have been temporarily stable in nebular source regions heavily enriched in dust.

  16. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  17. Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.; Short, David A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a 15-year climatological study of severe weather events and related severe weather atmospheric parameters. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. The local forecast rules were used to set threat assessment thresholds for stability parameters that were derived from the sounding data. The severe weather events databases were used to identify days with reported severe weather and the CGLSS data was used to differentiate between lightning and non-lightning days. These data sets provided the foundation for analyzing the stability parameters and synoptic patterns that were used to develop an objective tool to aid in forecasting severe weather events. The period of record for the analysis was May - September, 1989 - 2003. The results indicate that there are certain synoptic patterns more prevalent on days with severe weather and some of the stability parameters are better predictors of severe weather days based on locally tuned threat values. The results also revealed the stability parameters that did not display any skill related to severe weather days. An interactive web-based Severe Weather Decision Aid was developed to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters, CGLSS data, and synoptic-scale dynamics. The tool will be tested and evaluated during the 2005 warm season.

  18. The Weather in Richmond

    OpenAIRE

    Harless, William Edwin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Weather in Richmond is a short documentary about the Oilers, the football team at Richmond High School in downtown Richmond, California, as they struggle in 2012 with the legacy of winning no games, with the exception of a forfeit, in two years. The video documents the city of Richmond’s poverty and violence, but it also is an account of the city’s cultural diversity, of the city’s industrial history and of the hopes of some of the people who grow up there. The...

  19. Combating bad weather

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Every year lives and properties are lost in road accidents. About one-fourth of these accidents are due to low vision in foggy weather. At present, there is no algorithm that is specifically designed for the removal of fog from videos. Application of a single-image fog removal algorithm over each video frame is a time-consuming and costly affair. It is demonstrated that with the intelligent use of temporal redundancy, fog removal algorithms designed for a single image can be extended to the real-time video application. Results confirm that the presented framework used for the extension of the

  20. The importance of terrestrial weathering for climate system modelling on extended timescales: a study with the UVic ESCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Marc-Olivier; Matthews, Damon; Mysak, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    The chemical erosion of carbonate and silicate rocks is a key process in the global carbon cycle and, through its coupling with calcium carbonate deposition in the ocean, is the primary sink of carbon on geologic timescales. The dynamic interdependence of terrestrial weathering rates with atmospheric temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations is crucial to the regulation of Earth's climate over multi-millennial timescales. However any attempts to develop a modeling context for terrestrial weathering as part of a dynamic climate system are limited, mostly because of the difficulty in adapting the multi-millennial timescales of the implied negative feedback mechanism with those of the atmosphere and ocean. Much of the earlier work on this topic is therefore based on box-model approaches, abandoning spatial variability for the sake of computational efficiency and the possibility to investigate the impact of weathering on climate change over time frames much longer than those allowed by traditional climate system models. As a result we still have but a rudimentary understanding of the chemical weathering feedback mechanism and its effects on ocean biogeochemistry and atmospheric CO2. Here, we introduce a spatially-explicit, rock weathering model into the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). We use a land map which takes into account a number of different rock lithologies, changes in sea level, as well as an empirical model of the temperature and NPP dependency of weathering rates for the different rock types. We apply this new model to the last deglacial period (c. 21000BP to 13000BP) as well as a future climate change scenario (c. 1800AD to 6000AD+), comparing the results of our 2-D version of the weathering feedback mechanism to simulations using only the box-model parameterizations of Meissner et al. [2012]. These simulations reveal the importance of two-dimensional factors (i.e., changes in sea level and rock type distribution) in the

  1. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  2. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  3. Road Weather and Connected Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, P.; Boyce, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    On average, there are over 5.8 M vehicle crashes each year of which 23% are weather-related. Weather-related crashes are defined as those crashes that occur in adverse weather or on slick pavement. The vast majority of weather-related crashes happen on wet pavement (74%) and during rainfall (46%). Connected vehicle technologies hold the promise to transform road-weather management by providing improved road weather data in real time with greater temporal and geographic accuracy. This will dramatically expand the amount of data that can be used to assess, forecast, and address the impacts that weather has on roads, vehicles, and travelers. The use of vehicle-based measurements of the road and surrounding atmosphere with other, more traditional weather data sources, and create road and atmospheric hazard products for a variety of users. The broad availability of road weather data from mobile sources will vastly improve the ability to detect and forecast weather and road conditions, and will provide the capability to manage road-weather response on specific roadway links. The RWMP is currently demonstrating how weather, road conditions, and related vehicle data can be used for decision making through an innovative Integrated Mobile Observations project. FHWA is partnering with 3 DOTs (MN, MI, & NV) to pilot these applications. One is a mobile alerts application called the Motorists Advisories and Warnings (MAW) and a maintenance decision support application. These applications blend traditional weather information (e.g., radar, surface stations) with mobile vehicle data (e.g., temperature, brake status, wiper status) to determine current weather conditions. These weather conditions, and other road-travel-relevant information, are provided to users via web and phone applications. The MAW provides nowcasts and short-term forecasts out to 24 hours while the EMDSS application can provide forecasts up to 72 hours in advance. The three DOTs have placed readers and external

  4. Modeling the role of weathering in shore platform development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenhaile, Alan S.

    2008-02-01

    A mathematical, wave-erosional model was modified to study the additional effect of weathering by wetting and drying and salt weathering on the development of shore platforms in macro- to mesotidal environments. Model rates of downwearing by these processes, at different tidal elevations, were based on data obtained from a series of laboratory experiments on sandstones from eastern Canada. Backwearing by mechanical wave erosion was calculated using basic wave equations. There were several types of run which were designed to determine the effect of: weathering and the production of fine-grained sediment; the periodic accumulation of debris on weathering in the upper intertidal zone; and weathering in reducing rock resistance and facilitating wave quarrying. The results implied that, compared to mechanical wave erosion, the direct effect of weathering and fine-grained sediment production makes only a small contribution to the long-term development of shore platforms. The relationship between cliff-foot debris occurrence and platform development and morphology was inconsistent because of the negative feedback relationship between erosion rates, surface gradients, and rates of wave attenuation. The model suggested that weathering can play an important, indirect role in assisting wave quarrying of joint blocks and other rock fragments.

  5. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  6. Weatherization Apprenticeship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Eric J

    2012-12-18

    Weatherization improvement services will be provided to Native people by Native people. The proposed project will recruit, train and hire two full-time weatherization technicians who will improve the energy efficiency of homes of Alaska Natives/American Indians residing in the Indian areas, within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska. The Region includes Anchorage as well as 8 small tribal villages: The Native Villages of Eklutna, Knik, Chickaloon, Seldovia, Ninilchik, Kenaitze, Salamatof, and Tyonek. This project will be a partnership between three entities, with Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) as the lead agency: CITCA's Employment and Training Services Department, Cook Inlet Housing Authority and Alaska Works Partnership. Additionally, six of the eight tribal villages within the Cook Inlet Region of Alaska have agreed to work with the project in order to improve the energy efficiency of their tribally owned buildings and homes. The remaining three villages will be invited to participate in the establishment of an intertribal consortium through this project. Tribal homes and buildings within Anchorage fall under Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI) tribal authority.

  7. Weather Forecasting Systems and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecikalski, John (Inventor); MacKenzie, Wayne M., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, John Robert (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A weather forecasting system has weather forecasting logic that receives raw image data from a satellite. The raw image data has values indicative of light and radiance data from the Earth as measured by the satellite, and the weather forecasting logic processes such data to identify cumulus clouds within the satellite images. For each identified cumulus cloud, the weather forecasting logic applies interest field tests to determine a score indicating the likelihood of the cumulus cloud forming precipitation and/or lightning in the future within a certain time period. Based on such scores, the weather forecasting logic predicts in which geographic regions the identified cumulus clouds will produce precipitation and/or lighting within during the time period. Such predictions may then be used to provide a weather map thereby providing users with a graphical illustration of the areas predicted to be affected by precipitation within the time period.

  8. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  9. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    o-Ps yields were determined in various liquid hydrocarbons, tetramethylsilane, and mixtures thereof as a function of C2H5Br and CCll concentration. These molecules are known to be good electron scavengers and positronium inhibitors as well. The spur reaction model of Ps formation predicts...... a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane...

  10. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Zero Point Energy Conservation in Mu + H2 → MuH + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Aoiz, F J; Suleimanov, Yury V; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-02-16

    A fundamental issue in the field of reaction dynamics is the inclusion of the quantum mechanical (QM) effects such as zero point energy (ZPE) and tunneling in molecular dynamics simulations, and in particular in the calculation of chemical reaction rates. In this work we study the chemical reaction between a muonium atom and a hydrogen molecule. The recently developed ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) technique is used, and the results are compared with those of other methods. For this reaction, the thermal rate coefficients calculated with RPMD are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of an accurate QM calculation. The very minor discrepancies are within the convergence error even at very low temperatures. This exceptionally good agreement can be attributed to the dominant role of ZPE in the reaction, which is accounted for extremely well by RPMD. Tunneling only plays a minor role in the reaction.

  11. Effects of chemical compositions and ensiling on the biogas productivity and degradation rates of agricultural and food processing by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Gopi Krishna; Kim, Sang Hun

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of chemical compositions and ensiling on the biogas productivity and degradation rates of agricultural and food processing by-products (AFPBPs) using the biogas potential test. The AFPBPs were classified based on their chemical compositions (i.e., carbohydrate, protein and fat contents). The biogas and methane potentials of AFPBPs were calculated to range from 450 to 777 mL/g volatile solids (VS) and 260-543 mL/g VS, respectively. AFPBPs with high fat and protein contents produced significantly higher amounts of biogas than AFPBPs with high carbohydrate and low fat contents. The degradation rate was faster for AFPBPs with high carbohydrate contents compared to AFPBPs with high protein and fat contents. The lag phase and biogas production duration were lower when using ensiled AFPBPs than when using nonsilage AFPBPs. Among the four different silages tested, two silages significantly improved biogas production compared to the nonsilage AFPBPs.

  12. A Skeletal, Gas Phase, Finite Rate, Chemical Kinetics Mechanism for Modeling the Deflagration of Ammonium Perchlorate - Hydroxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene Composite Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    expressions that sensitivity analyses indicated were important. Addressing this issue through the application of computational - chemistry -based methods...Lin MC. Computational studies on the kinetics and mechanisms for NH3 reactions with ClOx (x = 0 - 4) radicals. Journal of Physical Chemistry A...ABSTRACT A (full) detailed, gas-phase, finite-rate chemical kinetics mechanism for representing the combustion- chemistry -associated ammonium

  13. Evaporation Rates of Chemical Warfare Agents Measured Using 5 CM Wind Tunnels. 2. Munitions Grade Sulfur Mustard From Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    was obtained from the back gate of Cannon AFB, New Mexico , and is a surface sample. Chemical analyses are in Appendix E, and surface area data are...m t*5 ft ft cO o o . a* a* «•! if- 6* s* £ aci/i^iotr- vino *» in K c\\ v " tv O O O) 00 f* tf- (T rf

  14. Small Sensors for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is actively pursuing enhancing the nation's space weather sensing capability. One aspect of this plan is the concept of flying Space Weather sensor suites on host spacecraft as secondary payloads. The emergence and advancement of the CubeSat spacecraft architecture has produced a viable platform for scientifically and operationally relevant Space Weather sensing. This talk will provide an overview of NRL's low size weight and power sensor technologies targeting Space Weather measurements. A summary of on-orbit results of past and current missions will be presented, as well as an overview of future flights that are manifested and potential constellation missions.

  15. Bishop Paiute Weatherization Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez

    2010-01-28

    The DOE Weatherization Training Grant assisted Native American trainees in developing weatherization competencies, creating employment opportunities for Bishop Paiute tribal members in a growing field. The trainees completed all the necessary training and certification requirements and delivered high-quality weatherization services on the Bishop Paiute Reservation. Six tribal members received all three certifications for weatherization; four of the trainees are currently employed. The public benefit includes (1) development of marketable skills by low-income Native individuals, (2) employment for low-income Native individuals in a growing industry, and (3) economic development opportunities that were previously not available to these individuals or the Tribe.

  16. Oxygen Consumption by Red Wines. Part I: Consumption Rates, Relationship with Chemical Composition, and Role of SO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vicente; Carrascon, Vanesa; Bueno, Mónica; Ugliano, Maurizio; Fernandez-Zurbano, Purificación

    2015-12-30

    Fifteen Spanish red wines extensively characterized in terms of SO2, color, antioxidant indexes, metals, and polyphenols were subjected to five consecutive sensor-controlled cycles of air saturation at 25 °C. Within each cycle, O2 consumption rates cannot be interpreted by simple kinetic models. Plots of cumulated consumed O2 made it possible to define a fast and highly wine-dependent initial O2 consumption rate and a second and less variable average O2 consumption rate which remains constant in saturations 2 to 5. Both rates have been satisfactorily modeled, and in both cases they were independent of Fe and SO2 and highly dependent on Cu levels. Average rates were also related to Mn, pH, Folin, protein precipitable proanthocyanidins (PPAs), and polyphenolic profile. Initial rates were strong and negatively correlated to SO2 consumption, indicating that such an initial rate is either controlled by an unknown antioxidant present in some wines or affected by a poor real availability of SO2. Remaining unreacted SO2 is proportional to initial combined SO2 and to final free acetaldehyde.

  17. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  18. Forecasting Space Weather from Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Large flares and fast CMEs are the drivers of the most severe space weather including Solar Energetic Particle Events (SEP Events). Large flares and their co-produced CMEs are powered by the explosive release of free magnetic energy stored in non-potential magnetic fields of sunspot active regions. The free energy is stored in and released from the low-beta regime of the active region s magnetic field above the photosphere, in the chromosphere and low corona. From our work over the past decade and from similar work of several other groups, it is now well established that (1) a proxy of the free magnetic energy stored above the photosphere can be measured from photospheric magnetograms, maps of the measured field in the photosphere, and (2) an active region s rate of production of major CME/flare eruptions in the coming day or so is strongly correlated with its present measured value of the free-energy proxy. These results have led us to use the large database of SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning Solar Cycle 23 to obtain empirical forecasting curves that from an active region s present measured value of the free-energy proxy give the active region s expected rates of production of major flares, CMEs, fast CMEs, and SEP Events in the coming day or so (Falconer et al 2011, Space Weather, 9, S04003). For each type of event, the expected rate is readily converted to the chance that the active region will produce such an event in any given forward time window of a day or so. If the chance is small enough (e.g. <5%), the forecast is All Clear for that type of event. We will present these forecasting curves and demonstrate the accuracy of their forecasts. In addition, we will show that the forecasts for major flares and fast CMEs can be made significantly more accurate by taking into account not only the value of the free energy proxy but also the active region s recent productivity of major flares; specifically, whether the active region has produced a major flare

  19. Evaporation Rates of Chemical Warfare Agents Measured using 5 cm Wind Tunnels III. Munition-Grade Sulfur Mustard on Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    from glass occurred from a sessile droplet with a constant base and the contact angle changing during the evaporation.1" Previous studies also...Hg Parameters Adv. Contact Angle : 130.000 degrees Rec. Contact Angle : Hg Surface Tension: 485.000 dynes/cm Hg Density: Low Pressure...temperature, drop size, and air flow rate using the same instrumentation as prior studies on glass and sand. The evaporation rate increased with higher

  20. Regolith evolution on the millennial timescale from combined U-Th-Ra isotopes and in situ cosmogenic 10Be analysis in a weathering profile (Strengbach catchment, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerer, J.; Chabaux, F.; Van der Woerd, J.; Viville, D.; Pelt, E.; Kali, E.; Lerouge, C.; Ackerer, P.; di Chiara Roupert, R.; Négrel, P.

    2016-11-01

    U-Th-Ra disequilibria, cosmogenic in situ 10Be concentrations and major and trace element concentrations have been analyzed in a 2 m-deep weathering profile sampled at the summit of the granitic Strengbach catchment (France). The data have been used to independently estimate both the long-term regolith production and denudation rates and the weathering and erosion rates. Modeling of the 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibrium variations in the lower part of the profile yields a regolith production rate of 12 ± 4 mm/kyr (30 ± 10 T/km2/yr), while modeling of the high-resolution 10Be concentration profile leads to an exposure age of 19.7 ± 2.2 kyr, an inherited concentration of 15,000 ± 1,000 at/g in quartz and a mean denudation rate of 22 ± 10 mm/kyr (37 ± 15 T/km2/yr). The consistency between production and denudation rates suggests that, on a millennial timescale, the regolith mass balance at the summit of the catchment is close to a steady state, even if the watershed may have been impacted by Quaternary climatic changes and by recent anthropogenic perturbations (e.g., 20th century acid rain and recent afforestation efforts). The results also indicate that physical erosion is likely the dominant long-term process of regolith denudation in the catchment. Furthermore, the comparison of the long-term production and denudation rates and of weathering and erosion rates determined from the depth profile analyses with the current weathering and erosion rates estimated at the outlet of the watershed based on monitoring of the water chemistry and sediment fluxes suggests that physical erosion may have varied more than the chemical weathering flux during the last 150 kyr. Although very few other sites with U-series, in situ 10Be and stream monitoring data are available for comparison, the current data suggest that (1) the mass balance steady state of regolith might be commonly achieved in soil mantled landscapes, and (2) physical erosion has varied much more than

  1. The Nature of Reduction in Space Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Allen, C. C.

    1993-07-01

    Space weathering is a broad term that includes a number of complex effects of the exposure of materials to the environment of space. The processes that drive space weathering include micrometeorite impact, radiation from the Sun and cosmic rays, and exposure to the vacuum of space. One of the important effects caused by these processes is the tendency for chemical reduction of oxide and silicate materials (including glasses), with accompanying loss of oxygen and production of reduced metal. Such chemical reduction and accompanying metal production may have an important influence on the chemistry of the outermost volume of individual grains as well as on the optical properties of this material. Hapke [1] discussed five processes that have been suggested for producing submicroscopic iron metal in the lunar soil: (1) shock reduction, (2) heating in a thermal blanket in vacuum, (3) shock heating of solar-wind-impregnated grains, (4) coatings deposited by solar wind sputtering, and (5) coatings deposited by impact vaporization. As noted by Hapke, "Processes (1) and (2) have been refuted by laboratory experiments. Processes (4) and (5) have produced submicroscopic iron metal in laboratory simulations. Although no experiments have been done to simulate process (3), it is widely accepted." We have been performing experimental reduction of simulated and actual lunar materials [2-5] and have shown that, under conditions of exposure to hydrogen at elevated temperatures, reduction of FeO readily occurs in ilmenite and lunar composition glass, and occurs at a slower rate in pyroxene and olivine. Even plagioclase feldspar containing minor FeO is readily reduced with formation of metallic iron blebs on surfaces [4]. A comparison of natural lunar samples to hydrogen-reduced samples or simulants in which we are searching for reduction evidence in various soil phases is underway. Preliminary data for mature soils show, in agreement with earlier results, that reduced iron produced in

  2. Physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency in integration of chemical kinetic rate equations: Etiology, treatment and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D. T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a very fast, automatic black-box code for homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems requires an understanding of the physical and numerical sources of computational inefficiency. Some major sources reviewed in this report are stiffness of the governing ordinary differential equations (ODE's) and its detection, choice of appropriate method (i.e., integration algorithm plus step-size control strategy), nonphysical initial conditions, and too frequent evaluation of thermochemical and kinetic properties. Specific techniques are recommended (and some advised against) for improving or overcoming the identified problem areas. It is argued that, because reactive species increase exponentially with time during induction, and all species exhibit asymptotic, exponential decay with time during equilibration, exponential-fitted integration algorithms are inherently more accurate for kinetics modeling than classical, polynomial-interpolant methods for the same computational work. But current codes using the exponential-fitted method lack the sophisticated stepsize-control logic of existing black-box ODE solver codes, such as EPISODE and LSODE. The ultimate chemical kinetics code does not exist yet, but the general characteristics of such a code are becoming apparent.

  3. Peak expiratory flow rate in asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes, in various industries of Hyderabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padaki Samata K, Dambal Amrut , Kokiwar Prashant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: The prevalence of occupational health hazards and mortality has been reported to be unusually high among people of India. Although developed countries are very much careful about the health in occupations it is quite neglected in the developing countries like India. Aims: To record PEFR in asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes for more than 2 years and compare the results with age matched unexposed, healthy male controls. Methods and Material: This was a comparative study between 50 asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes for more than 2 years in various industries located at Jeedimetla Industrial Area and 50 unexposed healthy male individuals from general population. The sampling was done by simple random sampling (lottery method. The data was collected in the Research Laboratory of Physiology. Anthropometry like weight, height, was measured and the PEFR test was performed in the standing position by taking a deep inspiration and then blowing out as hard and as quickly as possible with their nose closed. Data was analyzed by using SPSS package and was expressed in terms of mean ± SD. Results: It was observed that mean PEFR was statistically highly significant in cases (p = 0.0001, and PEFR decreased with increase in duration of exposure. Conclusions: Thus, it can be concluded that apparently healthy individuals may also have abnormal PEFR findings. Hence, a regular check on these parameters will help them in reducing the chances of its manifestation at a future date.

  4. Tibetan History of Weather Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Modem weather monitoring began in Tibet at the end of the 19th century. In 1894, the British set up a weather monitoting station in Chunpei of Yadong,which continued to operate until August 1956. In the 1940s, the Nationalist Govemment's Ministry of Communications set up a rainfall measuring station in Qamdo, Xikang Province.

  5. Weather to Make a Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Julie E.; Mjelde, James W.; Litzenberg, Kerry K.

    2006-01-01

    DECIDE is a teacher-friendly, integrated approach designed to stimulate learning by allowing students to make decisions about situations they face in their lives while using scientific weather principles. This learning unit integrates weather science, decision theory, mathematics, statistics, geography, and reading in a context of decision…

  6. SirX: a selective inversion recovery experiment on X-nuclei for the determination of the exchange rate of slow chemical exchanges between two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiulan; Bönisch, Friedrich

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has proven to be powerful for the study of dynamic processes. A new pulse sequence, SirX, is designed to provide boundary conditions that simplify the McConnell equations. Both an initial rate approximation and a whole curve fitting to the time course of magnetization can be used to calculate the exchange rate. These methods were used to study the exchange kinetics of N,N-dimethylacetamide. As compared with the well-established exchange spectroscopy suitable to studies of slow exchange, SirX has the advantage of being less time consuming and capable of providing more reliable kinetic data. Furthermore, by setting the observation on X-nuclei with larger chemical shift dispersion as compared with an observation on (1)H resonance, SirX extends the upper limit of a reliable determination of exchange rates.

  7. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality....... Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  8. Cool Stars and Space Weather

    CERN Document Server

    Vidotto, A A; Cameron, A C; Morin, J; Villadsen, J; Saar, S; Alvarado, J; Cohen, O; Holzwarth, V; Poppenhaeger, K; Reville, V

    2014-01-01

    Stellar flares, winds and coronal mass ejections form the space weather. They are signatures of the magnetic activity of cool stars and, since activity varies with age, mass and rotation, the space weather that extra-solar planets experience can be very different from the one encountered by the solar system planets. How do stellar activity and magnetism influence the space weather of exoplanets orbiting main-sequence stars? How do the environments surrounding exoplanets differ from those around the planets in our own solar system? How can the detailed knowledge acquired by the solar system community be applied in exoplanetary systems? How does space weather affect habitability? These were questions that were addressed in the splinter session "Cool stars and Space Weather", that took place on 9 Jun 2014, during the Cool Stars 18 meeting. In this paper, we present a summary of the contributions made to this session.

  9. Production, chemical composition and stocking rate of forage systems compounds for coastcross-1 intercropped with ryegrass and clovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Schalemberg Diehl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the forage production, crude protein and neutral detergent fiber level, stocking rate of three forage systems compounds for Coastcross-1 (Cynodon dactylon L. Pers. + ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., cv. Comum; Coastcross-1 + ryegrass + red clover (Trifolium pratense L., cv. Estanzuela 116 and Coastcross-1 + ryegrass + white clover (Trifolium repens L., cv. Yi. The experiment was carried out from April 2007 to April 2008, for 11 grazing cycles, six in winter season and five in summer season. Holstein cows receiving 0.9% of body weight/day feed supplement concentrate were used. The herbage mass of pre and post-grazing, botanical and morphological composition crude protein and neutral detergent fiber level were evaluated. A randomized complete design was used with three treatments (forage systems two replications (paddocks and independent evaluations (grazing cycles. Superior value (P<0.05 of forage production and daily dry matter accumulation rate were found in winter season for the forage systems with legume. No differences in dry matter disappearance rate and stocking rate averages were detected among pastures. Residual effects of red clover were observed on Coastcross-1 + ryegrass with superior result (P<0.05 on crude protein and lower neutral detergent fiber level.

  10. Oil field chemicals synergistic effects on the corrosion rate of L-80 steel in sea and formation waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Hashem, A.; Carew, J. [Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat Kuwait (Kuwait); Al-Borno, A. [Charter Coating Service (2000) Ltd., no 6, 4604, 13 Street N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 6P1 (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion rate of tubular grade L-80 carbon steel under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait was investigated. This was done using the injection seawater, formation water and a 50:50 mixture of both waters in the presence of commercially available corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor, and biocide products separately and in combination with each other. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the corrosion inhibitor and its interaction with the scale inhibitor and the biocide, as seen in the corrosion rate of L80 carbon steel. This was done using the manufacturers' recommended dosage levels of the corrosion inhibitor, scale inhibitor and biocide. The corrosion rates were measured by linear polarization. Tests were conducted using the rotating cylinder electrode method with rotational speeds of 1000 and 2000 rpm at 80 deg. C. The seawater results indicated that the corrosion-scale inhibitor and biocide-scale inhibitor combinations provided the best protection at both rotation speeds. In formation water, the effects of rotation speed were more apparent with higher corrosion rates of L-80 carbon steel accompanying higher shear forces. In the 50: 50 mix waters and the formation water, the corrosion-scale inhibitors-biocide combination provided the best protection at both rotational speeds under downhole conditions of a northern oil field of Kuwait. (authors)

  11. Bioremediation of severely weathered hydrocarbons: is it possible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J. R.; Villa, R.; Sierra, C.; Sotres, A.; Pelaez, A. I.; Sanchez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Weathering processes of spilled hydrocarbons promote a reduced biodegradability of petroleum compounds mixtures, and consequently bioremediation techniques are often ruled out within the selection of suitable remediation approaches. This is truly relevant wherever old spills at abandoned industrial sites have to be remediated. However it is well known most of the remaining fractions and individual compounds of weathered oil are still biodegradable, although at slow rates than alkanes or no and two-ring aromatics. (Author)

  12. Artificial weathering of granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes a series of artificial weathering tests run on granite designed to: simulate the action of weathering agents on buildings and identify the underlying mechanisms, determine the salt resistance of different types of rock; evaluate consolidation and water-repellent treatment durability; and confirm hypotheses about the origin of salts such as gypsum that are often found in granite buildings. Salt crystallization tests were also conducted, using sodium chloride, sodium sulphate, calcium sulphate and seawater solutions. One of these tests was conducted in a chamber specifically designed to simulate salt spray weathering and another in an SO2 chamber to ascertain whether granite is subject to sulphation. The test results are analyzed and discussed, along with the shortcomings of each type of trial as a method for simulating the decay observed in monuments. The effect of factors such as wet-dry conditions, type of saline solution and the position of the planes of weakness on the type of decay is also addressed.En este trabajo se hace una síntesis de varios ensayos de alteración artificial realizados con rocas graníticas. Estos ensayos tenían distintos objetivos: reproducir las formas de alteración encontradas en los edificios para llegar a conocer los mecanismos que las generan, determinar la resistencia de las diferentes rocas a la acción de las sales, evaluar la durabilidad de tratamientos de consolidación e hidrofugación y constatar hipótesis acerca del origen de algunas sales, como el yeso, que aparecen frecuentemente en edificios graníticos. En los ensayos de cristalización de sales se utilizaron disoluciones de cloruro de sodio, sulfato de sodio, sulfato de calcio y agua de mar. Uno de estos ensayos se llevó a cabo en una cámara especialmente diseñada para reproducir la alteración por aerosol marino y otro se realizó en una cámara de SO2, con el objeto de comprobar si en rocas graníticas se puede producir

  13. Multi-path variational transition state theory for chemical reaction rates of complex polyatomic species: ethanol + OH reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-01-01

    Complex molecules often have many structures (conformations) of the reactants and the transition states, and these structures may be connected by coupled-mode torsions and pseudorotations; some but not all structures may have hydrogen bonds in the transition state or reagents. A quantitative theory of the reaction rates of complex molecules must take account of these structures, their coupled-mode nature, their qualitatively different character, and the possibility of merging reaction paths at high temperature. We have recently developed a coupled-mode theory called multi-structural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) and an extension, called multi-path variational transition state theory (MP-VTST), that includes a treatment of the differences in the multi-dimensional tunneling paths and their contributions to the reaction rate. The MP-VTST method was presented for unimolecular reactions in the original paper and has now been extended to bimolecular reactions. The MS-VTST and MP-VTST formulations of variational transition state theory include multi-faceted configuration-space dividing surfaces to define the variational transition state. They occupy an intermediate position between single-conformation variational transition state theory (VTST), which has been used successfully for small molecules, and ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory (EA-VTST), which has been used successfully for enzyme kinetics. The theories are illustrated and compared here by application to three thermal rate constants for reactions of ethanol with hydroxyl radical--reactions with 4, 6, and 14 saddle points.

  14. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongmin; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Huffman, George J.; Rossow, William B.; Kang, In-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states in the extended tropics (35 deg S to 35 deg N) for a 10-year period. Our main precipitation data set is the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 data set, but Global Precipitation Climatology Project daily data are also used for comparison. We find that the most convective weather state (WS1), despite an occurrence frequency below 10%, is the most dominant state with regard to surface precipitation, producing both the largest mean precipitation rates when present and the largest percent contribution to the total precipitation of the tropical zone of our study; yet, even this weather state appears to not precipitate about half the time. WS1 exhibits a modest annual cycle of domain-average precipitation rate, but notable seasonal shifts in its geographic distribution. The precipitation rates of the other weather states tend to be stronger when occurring before or after WS1. The relative contribution of the various weather states to total precipitation is different between ocean and land, with WS1 producing more intense precipitation on average over ocean than land. The results of this study, in addition to advancing our understanding of the current state of tropical precipitation, can serve as a higher order diagnostic test on whether it is distributed realistically among different weather states in atmospheric models.

  15. Correlation between the inhibition of positronium formation by scavenger molecules, and chemical reaction rate of electrons with these molecules in nonpolar liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O.E.

    1977-03-10

    o-Ps yields were determined in various liquid hydrocarbons, tetramethylsilane, and mixtures thereof as a function of C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br and CCl/sub 4/ concentration. These molecules are known to be good electron scavengers and positronium inhibitors as well. The spur reaction model of Ps formation predicts a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (V/sub 0/) of electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of V/sub 0/ had a maximum for C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V/sub 0/ for CCl/sub 4/. The inhibition coefficient for C/sub 2/H/sub 5/Br in a 1 : 1 molar tetramethylsilane-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation method from the point of view of radiation chemistry is also emphasized.

  16. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification

    KAUST Repository

    Sudhakaran, Sairam

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (kOH and kO3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O3 and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, kOH and kO3, were predicted based on target compound properties. The kO3 and kOH values ranged from 5 * 10-4 to 105 M-1s-1 and 0.04 to 18 * (109) M-1 s-1, respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O3 and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r2 (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. In vitro Starch Hydrolysis Rate, Physico-chemical Properties and Sensory Evaluation of Butter Cake Prepared Using Resistant Starch Type III Substituted for Wheat Flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongjanta, J; Utaipattanaceep, A; Naivikul, O; Piyachomkwan, K

    2008-09-01

    Resistant starch type III (RS III) derived from enzymatically debranched high amylose rice starch was prepared and used to make butter cake at different levels (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) in place of wheat flour. Physico-chemical properties, sensory evaluation, and in vitro starch hydrolysis rate of the developed butter cake were investigated. This study showed that the content of resistant starch in butter cake increased significantly (Pstarch hydrolysis rate compared to the control cake (0% RS III). The rates of starch hydrolysis from 0 to 180 min digestion time for 0, 5, 10 15, and 20% RS III in place of wheat flour in butter cakes were 3.70 to 67.65%, 2.97 to 64.86%, 2.86 to 59.99%, 2.79 to 55.96 and 2.78 to 53.04% respectively. The physico-chemical properties of 5 to 10% RS III substituted with wheat flour in the butter cake were not significantly different from the control cake and were moderately accepted by panellists in the sensory evaluation test.

  18. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  19. Calculated rate constants of the chemical reactions involving the main byproducts SO2F, SOF2, SO2F2 of SF6 decomposition in power equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuwei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Kang; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Dingxin; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-04-01

    SF6 is widely used in electrical equipment as an insulating gas. In the presence of an electric arc, partial discharge (PD) or spark, SF6 dissociation products (such as SF2, SF3 and SF4) react with the unavoidable gas impurities (such as water vapor and oxygen), electrodes and surrounding solid insulation materials, forming several toxic and corrosive byproducts. The main stable decomposition products are SO2F, SO2F2 and SOF2, which have been confirmed experimentally to have a direct relationship with discharge faults, and are thus expected to be useful in the fault diagnosis of power equipment. Various studies have been performed of the main SF6 decomposition species and their concentrations under different types of faults. However, most of the experiments focused on the qualitative analysis of the relationship between the stable products and discharge faults. Although some theoretical research on the formation of main SF6 derivatives have been carried out using chemical kinetics models, the basic data (chemical reactions and their rate constants) adopted in the model are inaccurate and incomplete. The complex chemical reactions of SF6 with the impurities are ignored in most cases. The rate constants of some reactions obtained at ambient temperature or in a narrow temperature range are adopted in the models over a far greater range, for example up to 12 000 K, due to the difficulty in the experimental measurement and theoretical estimation of rate coefficients, particularly at high temperatures. Therefore, improved theoretical models require not only the consideration of additional SF6 decomposition reactions in the presence of impurities but also on improved values of rate constants. This paper is devoted to determining the rate constants of the chemical reactions relating to the main byproducts of SF6 decomposition in SF6 gas-insulated power equipment: SO2F, SOF2 and SO2F2. Quantum chemistry calculations with density functional theory, conventional

  20. Space weathering of asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Shestopalov, D I; Cloutis, E A

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of laboratory experiments simulating space weathering optical effects on atmosphereless planetary bodies reveals that the time needed to alter the spectrum of an ordinary chondrite meteorite to resemble the overall spectral shape and slope of an S-type asteroid is about ~ 0.1 Myr. The time required to reduce the visible albedo of samples to ~ 0.05 is ~ 1 Myr. Since both these timescales are much less than the average collisional lifetime of asteroids larger than several kilometers in size, numerous low-albedo asteroids having reddish spectra with subdued absorption bands should be observed instead of an S-type dominated population. It is not the case because asteroid surfaces cannot be considered as undisturbed, unlike laboratory samples. We have estimated the number of collisions occurring in the time of 105 yr between asteroids and projectiles of various sizes and show that impact-activated motions of regolith particles counteract the progress of optical maturation of asteroid surfaces. Continual r...

  1. Space weathering on airless bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Noble, Sarah K.

    2016-10-01

    Space weathering refers to alteration that occurs in the space environment with time. Lunar samples, and to some extent meteorites, have provided a benchmark for understanding the processes and products of space weathering. Lunar soils are derived principally from local materials but have accumulated a range of optically active opaque particles (OAOpq) that include nanophase metallic iron on/in rims formed on individual grains (imparting a red slope to visible and near-infrared reflectance) and larger iron particles (which darken across all wavelengths) such as are often found within the interior of recycled grains. Space weathering of other anhydrous silicate bodies, such as Mercury and some asteroids, produces different forms and relative abundance of OAOpq particles depending on the particular environment. If the development of OAOpq particles is minimized (such as at Vesta), contamination by exogenic material and regolith mixing become the dominant space weathering processes. Volatile-rich bodies and those composed of abundant hydrous minerals (dwarf planet Ceres, many dark asteroids, and outer solar system satellites) are affected by space weathering processes differently than the silicate bodies of the inner solar system. However, the space weathering products of these bodies are currently poorly understood and the physics and chemistry of space weathering processes in different environments are areas of active research.

  2. Space Weather Forecasting: An Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The space age began in earnest on October 4, 1957 with the launch of Sputnik 1 and was fuelled for over a decade by very strong national societal concerns. Prior to this single event the adverse effects of space weather had been registered on telegraph lines as well as interference on early WWII radar systems, while for countless eons the beauty of space weather as mid-latitude auroral displays were much appreciated. These prior space weather impacts were in themselves only a low-level science puzzle pursued by a few dedicated researchers. The technology boost and innovation that the post Sputnik era generated has almost single handedly defined our present day societal technology infrastructure. During the decade following Neil's walk on the moon on July 21, 1969 an international thrust to understand the science of space, and its weather, was in progress. However, the search for scientific understand was parsed into independent "stove pipe" categories: The ionosphere-aeronomy, the magnetosphere, the heliosphere-sun. The present day scientific infrastructure of funding agencies, learned societies, and international organizations are still hampered by these 1960's logical divisions which today are outdated in the pursuit of understanding space weather. As this era of intensive and well funded scientific research progressed so did societies innovative uses for space technologies and space "spin-offs". Well over a decade ago leaders in technology, science, and the military realized that there was indeed an adverse side to space weather that with each passing year became more severe. In 1994 several U.S. agencies established the National Space Weather Program (NSWP) to focus scientific attention on the system wide issue of the adverse effects of space weather on society and its technologies. Indeed for the past two decades a significant fraction of the scientific community has actively engaged in understanding space weather and hence crossing the "stove

  3. STEREO Space Weather and the Space Weather Beacon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Webb, D F.; SaintCyr, O. C.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is first and foremost a solar and interplanetary research mission, with one of the natural applications being in the area of space weather. The obvious potential for space weather applications is so great that NOAA has worked to incorporate the real-time data into their forecast center as much as possible. A subset of the STEREO data will be continuously downlinked in a real-time broadcast mode, called the Space Weather Beacon. Within the research community there has been considerable interest in conducting space weather related research with STEREO. Some of this research is geared towards making an immediate impact while other work is still very much in the research domain. There are many areas where STEREO might contribute and we cannot predict where all the successes will come. Here we discuss how STEREO will contribute to space weather and many of the specific research projects proposed to address STEREO space weather issues. We also discuss some specific uses of the STEREO data in the NOAA Space Environment Center.

  4. Reduction of Large Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Autoignition Using Joint Analyses of Reaction Rates and Sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylam, A; Ribaucour, M; Pitz, W J; Minetti, R

    2006-11-29

    A new technique of reduction of detailed mechanisms for autoignition, which is based on two analysis methods is described. An analysis of reaction rates is coupled to an analysis of reaction sensitivity for the detection of redundant reactions. Thresholds associated with the two analyses have a great influence on the size and efficiency of the reduced mechanism. Rules of selection of the thresholds are defined. The reduction technique has been successfully applied to detailed autoignition mechanisms of two reference hydrocarbons: n-heptane and iso-octane. The efficiency of the technique and the ability of the reduced mechanisms to reproduce well the results generated by the full mechanism are discussed. A speedup of calculations by a factor of 5.9 for n-heptane mechanism and by a factor of 16.7 for iso-octane mechanism is obtained without losing accuracy of the prediction of autoignition delay times and concentrations of intermediate species.

  5. Modelling Chemical Kinetics of Soybean Oil Transesterification Process for Biodiesel Production: An Analysis of Molar Ratio between Alcohol and Soybean Oil Temperature Changes on the Process Conversion Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Tait

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model describing chemical kinetics of transesterification of soybean oil for biodiesel production has been developed. The model is based on the reverse mechanism of transesterification reactions and describes dynamics concentration changes of triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, biodiesel, and glycerol production. Reaction rate constants were written in the Arrhenius form. An analysis of key process variables such as temperature and molar ratio soybean oil- alcohol using response surface analysis was performed to achieve the maximum soybean conversion rate to biodiesel. The predictive power of the developed model was checked for the very wide range of operational conditions and parameters values by fitting different experimental results for homogeneous catalytic and non-catalytic processes published in the literature. A very good correlation between model simulations and experimental data was observed.

  6. Ga N nano wires and nano tubes growth by chemical vapor deposition method at different NH{sub 3} flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, P.; Liu, Y.; Meng, X. [Wuhan University, School of Physics and Technology, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro and Nanostructures of Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Ga N nano wires and nano tubes have been successfully synthesized via the simple chemical vapor deposition method. NH{sub 3} flow rate was found to be a crucial factor in the synthesis of different type of Ga N which affects the shape and the diameter of generated Ga N nano structures. X-ray diffraction confirms that Ga N nano wires grown on Si(111) substrate under 900 degrees Celsius and with NH{sub 3} flow rate of 50 sc cm presents the preferred orientation growth in the (002) direction. It is beneficial to the growth of nano structure through catalyst annealing. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to measure the size and structures of the samples. (Author)

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Venu, E-mail: venuanand@cense.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A. [Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics (IAP), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  8. Surface Weather Observations (Pre-1893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly weather records from U.S. Army Forts stations (~1820-1871), U.S. Army Signal Service Stations (1871-1892), Smithsonian Institution voluntary observer network...

  9. KZMA Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  10. WARP Weather Information Network Server

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — WINS is the dissemination module of the WARP system that provides an interface to various NAS Users/systems that require weather data/products/information from WARP...

  11. KZLC Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  12. The science of space weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Jonathan P

    2008-12-13

    The basic physics underpinning space weather is reviewed, beginning with a brief overview of the main causes of variability in the near-Earth space environment. Although many plasma phenomena contribute to space weather, one of the most important is magnetic reconnection, and recent cutting edge research in this field is reviewed. We then place this research in context by discussing a number of specific types of space weather in more detail. As society inexorably increases its dependence on space, the necessity of predicting and mitigating space weather will become ever more acute. This requires a deep understanding of the complexities inherent in the plasmas that fill space and has prompted the development of a new generation of scientific space missions at the international level.

  13. KZBW Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  14. US Weather Bureau Storm Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Bureau and US Army Corps and other reports of storms from 1886-1955. Hourly precipitation from recording rain gauges captured during heavy rain, snow,...

  15. KZOA Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  16. KZSE Center Weather Advisory (CWA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CWA is an aviation weather warning for conditions meeting or approaching national in-flight advisory (AIRMET, SIGMET or SIGMET for convection) criteria. CWAs are...

  17. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  18. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Salewski

    Full Text Available Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and

  19. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  20. How accurate are the weather forecasts for Bierun (southern Poland)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawor, J.

    2012-04-01

    Weather forecast accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to significant development of numerical weather prediction models. Despite the improvements, the forecasts should be verified to control their quality. The evaluation of forecast accuracy can also be an interesting learning activity for students. It joins natural curiosity about everyday weather and scientific process skills: problem solving, database technologies, graph construction and graphical analysis. The examination of the weather forecasts has been taken by a group of 14-year-old students from Bierun (southern Poland). They participate in the GLOBE program to develop inquiry-based investigations of the local environment. For the atmospheric research the automatic weather station is used. The observed data were compared with corresponding forecasts produced by two numerical weather prediction models, i.e. COAMPS (Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System) developed by Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, USA; it runs operationally at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling in Warsaw, Poland and COSMO (The Consortium for Small-scale Modelling) used by the Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management. The analysed data included air temperature, precipitation, wind speed, wind chill and sea level pressure. The prediction periods from 0 to 24 hours (Day 1) and from 24 to 48 hours (Day 2) were considered. The verification statistics that are commonly used in meteorology have been applied: mean error, also known as bias, for continuous data and a 2x2 contingency table to get the hit rate and false alarm ratio for a few precipitation thresholds. The results of the aforementioned activity became an interesting basis for discussion. The most important topics are: 1) to what extent can we rely on the weather forecasts? 2) How accurate are the forecasts for two considered time ranges? 3) Which precipitation threshold is the most predictable? 4) Why

  1. Kinetics of the benzyl + O(3P) reaction: a quantum chemical/statistical reaction rate theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriel; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2012-12-14

    The resonance stabilized benzyl radical is an important intermediate in the combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons and in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in flames. Despite being a free radical, benzyl is relatively stable in thermal, oxidizing environments, and is predominantly removed through bimolecular reactions with open-shell species other than O(2). In this study the reaction of benzyl with ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), is examined using quantum chemistry and statistical reaction rate theory. C(7)H(7)O energy surfaces are generated at the G3SX level, and include several novel pathways. Transition state theory is used to describe elementary reaction kinetics, with canonical variational transition state theory applied for barrierless O atom association with benzyl. Apparent rate constants and branching ratios to different product sets are obtained as a function of temperature and pressure from solving the time-dependent master equation, with RRKM theory for microcanonical k(E). These simulations indicate that the benzyl + O reaction predominantly forms the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) plus formaldehyde (HCHO), with lesser quantities of the C(7)H(6)O products benzaldehyde, ortho-quinone methide, and para-quinone methide (+H), along with minor amounts of the formyl radical (HCO) + benzene. Addition of O((3)P) to the methylene site in benzyl produces a highly vibrationally excited C(7)H(7)O* adduct, the benzoxyl radical, which can β-scission to benzaldehyde + H and phenyl + HCHO. In order to account for the experimental observation of benzene as the major reaction product, a roaming radical mechanism is proposed that converts the nascent products phenyl and HCHO to benzene + HCO. Oxygen atom addition at the ortho and para ring sites in benzyl, which has not been previously considered, is shown to lead to the quinone methides + H; these species are less-stable isomers of benzaldehyde that are proposed as important combustion intermediates, but

  2. Titan: Callisto With Weather?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2008-12-01

    , Titan might have accreted relatively cold. Without being in a forced resonance, Titan's interior may have never undergone significant tidal heating. Analogous to Callisto's tenuous CO2 atmosphere, believed to be generated by sublimation of interior ices, interior clathrated methane within Titan may slowly diffuse outward from the cold interior, rather than the atmosphere being replenished by cryovolcanism. The hypothesis that Titan is "Callisto with weather" -- with geological processes that are principally exogenic -- can be tested through geophysical and thermal modeling, and by modeling the evolution of landscapes that are shaped by exogenic processes alone.

  3. Diurnal cycling of urban aerosols under different weather regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Asta; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Remškar, Maja; Vaupotič, Janja; Stanič, Samo

    2016-04-01

    A one month measurement campaign was performed in summer 2014 in Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia (population 280,000), aiming to study temporal and spatial distribution of urban aerosols and the mixing state of primary and secondary aerosols. Two background locations were chosen for this purpose, the first one in the city center (urban background - KIS) and the second one in the suburban background (Brezovica). Simultaneous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle number size distribution of submicron aerosols (PM1) were conducted at both locations. In the summer season emission from traffic related sources is expected to be the main local contribution to BC concentration. Concentrations of aerosol species and gaseous pollutants within the planetary boundary layer are controlled by the balance between emission sources of primary aerosols and gases, production of secondary aerosols, chemical reactions of precursor gases under solar radiation and the rate of dilution by mixing within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) as well as with tropospheric air. Only local emission sources contribute to BC concentration during the stable PBL with low mixing layer height, whereas during the time of fully mixed PBL, regionally transported BC and other aerosols can contribute to the surface measurements. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol at the urban and suburban background location under different weather regimes. Particles in three size modes - nucleation (black carbon concentrations were observed at the urban background (KIS) than at the suburban background location (Brezovica). Significant diurnal pattern of total particle concentration and black carbon concentration was observed at both locations, with a distinct morning and late afternoon peak. As a consequence of different PBL dynamics and atmospheric processes (photochemical effects, humidity, wind speed and direction), diurnal profile differs for sunny, cloudy and rainy days

  4. Vegetation controls on weathering intensity during the last deglacial transition in southeast Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sarah J; McGlue, Michael M; Ellis, Geoffrey S; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Cohen, Andrew S; Vincens, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Tropical climate is rapidly changing, but the effects of these changes on the geosphere are unknown, despite a likelihood of climatically-induced changes on weathering and erosion. The lack of long, continuous paleo-records prevents an examination of terrestrial responses to climate change with sufficient detail to answer questions about how systems behaved in the past and may alter in the future. We use high-resolution records of pollen, clay mineralogy, and particle size from a drill core from Lake Malawi, southeast Africa, to examine atmosphere-biosphere-geosphere interactions during the last deglaciation (∼ 18-9 ka), a period of dramatic temperature and hydrologic changes. The results demonstrate that climatic controls on Lake Malawi vegetation are critically important to weathering processes and erosion patterns during the deglaciation. At 18 ka, afromontane forests dominated but were progressively replaced by tropical seasonal forest, as summer rainfall increased. Despite indication of decreased rainfall, drought-intolerant forest persisted through the Younger Dryas (YD) resulting from a shorter dry season. Following the YD, an intensified summer monsoon and increased rainfall seasonality were coeval with forest decline and expansion of drought-tolerant miombo woodland. Clay minerals closely track the vegetation record, with high ratios of kaolinite to smectite (K/S) indicating heavy leaching when forest predominates, despite variable rainfall. In the early Holocene, when rainfall and temperature increased (effective moisture remained low), open woodlands expansion resulted in decreased K/S, suggesting a reduction in chemical weathering intensity. Terrigenous sediment mass accumulation rates also increased, suggesting critical linkages among open vegetation and erosion during intervals of enhanced summer rainfall. This study shows a strong, direct influence of vegetation composition on weathering intensity in the tropics. As climate change will likely

  5. Vegetation controls on weathering intensity during the last deglacial transition in southeast Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sarah J.; McGlue, Michael M.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Cohen, Andrew S.; Vincens, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Tropical climate is rapidly changing, but the effects of these changes on the geosphere are unknown, despite a likelihood of climatically-induced changes on weathering and erosion. The lack of long, continuous paleo-records prevents an examination of terrestrial responses to climate change with sufficient detail to answer questions about how systems behaved in the past and may alter in the future. We use high-resolution records of pollen, clay mineralogy, and particle size from a drill core from Lake Malawi, southeast Africa, to examine atmosphere-biosphere-geosphere interactions during the last deglaciation (~18–9 ka), a period of dramatic temperature and hydrologic changes. The results demonstrate that climatic controls on Lake Malawi vegetation are critically important to weathering processes and erosion patterns during the deglaciation. At 18 ka, afromontane forests dominated but were progressively replaced by tropical seasonal forest, as summer rainfall increased. Despite indication of decreased rainfall, drought-intolerant forest persisted through the Younger Dryas (YD) resulting from a shorter dry season. Following the YD, an intensified summer monsoon and increased rainfall seasonality were coeval with forest decline and expansion of drought-tolerant miombo woodland. Clay minerals closely track the vegetation record, with high ratios of kaolinite to smectite (K/S) indicating heavy leaching when forest predominates, despite variable rainfall. In the early Holocene, when rainfall and temperature increased (effective moisture remained low), open woodlands expansion resulted in decreased K/S, suggesting a reduction in chemical weathering intensity. Terrigenous sediment mass accumulation rates also increased, suggesting critical linkages among open vegetation and erosion during intervals of enhanced summer rainfall. This study shows a strong, direct influence of vegetation composition on weathering intensity in the tropics. As climate change will likely impact

  6. Rock weathering Tendency at Different Stages of Soil—Forming Processes in Fildes Peninsula,Antarctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENJIE; GONGZITONG

    1996-01-01

    From the view of energy state of material,this paper introduces a concept a concept of weathering potential in carrying out quantitative calculation of the relevant products at different stages of rock-weathering and primary soil-forming processes,elaborates respectively on weathering degree in the bio-weathering layer of rocks and during the formation of soil material and clay,and evaluats the further tendency of weathering in the above-mentioned stages.The authors have discovered that the scales of weathering potential of the materials increase successively in the three stages,which indicates that the products in the above-mentioned three stages must have undergone stronger and stronger weathering in the primitive forming process of soil in Fildes Peninsula,Antarctic.But,Because of relatively weak chemical weathering,it is reasonable that there are much more skeleton grains and little clay in priamry soils in this region.Meanwhile the authors have also verified that the weathering potential of crde rock determines to some extent decrease in the products' weathering potential in the different stages in primary soil-forming,thereby plays an important role in the genesis and development of the primary soil in the studied area.

  7. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws)) with experimental factor-compensated and T(1) -normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant radio frequency (RF) irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (k(ws)) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI.

  8. Space weather monitoring by groundbased means

    CERN Document Server

    Troshichev, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    This book demonstrates that the method, based on the ground polar cap magnetic observations is a reliable diagnosis of the solar wind energy coming into the magnetosphere Method for the uninterruptive monitoring of the magnetosphere state (i.e. space weather). It shows that the solar wind energy pumping power, can be described by the PC growth rate, thus, the magnetospheric substorms features are predetermined by the PC dynamics. Furthermore, it goes on to show that the beginning and ending of magnetic storms is predictable. The magnetic storm start only if the solar energy input into the magn

  9. Lithium isotope behaviour during weathering in the Ganges Alluvial Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Frings, Patrick J.; Murphy, Melissa J.

    2017-02-01

    The Ganges river system is responsible for the transportation of a large flux of dissolved materials derived from Himalayan weathering to the oceans. Silicate weathering-driven cooling resulting from uplift of the Himalayas has been proposed to be a key player in Cenozoic climate variation. This study has analysed Li isotope (δ7Li) ratios from over 50 Ganges river waters and sediments, in order to trace silicate weathering processes. Sediments have δ7Li of ∼0‰, identical to bulk continental crust, however suspended sediment depth profiles do not display variations associated with grain size that have been observed in other large river systems. Dissolved δ7Li are low (∼11‰) in the Ganges headwaters, but reach a constant value of 21 ± 1.6‰ within a relatively short distance downstream, which is then maintained for almost 2000 km to the Ganges mouth. Given that Li isotopes are controlled by the ratio of primary mineral dissolution to secondary mineral formation, this suggests that the Ganges floodplain is at steady-state in terms of these processes for most of its length. Low δ7Li in the mountainous regions suggest silicate weathering is therefore at its most congruent where uplift and fresh silicate exposure rates are high. However, there is no correlation between δ7Li and the silicate weathering rate in these rivers, suggesting that Li isotopes cannot be used as a weathering-rate tracer, although they do inform on weathering congruency and intensity. The close-to-constant δ7Li values for the final 2000 km of Ganges flow also suggest that once the size of the alluvial plain reached more than ∼500 km (the flow distance after which riverine δ7Li stops varying), the Ganges exerted little influence on the changing Cenozoic seawater δ7Li, because riverine δ7Li attained a near steady-state composition.

  10. Anthropogenic Space Weather

    CERN Document Server

    Gombosi, T I; Balogh, A; Erickson, P J; Huba, J D; Lanzerotti, L J

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic effects on the space environment started in the late 19th century and reached their peak in the 1960s when high-altitude nuclear explosions were carried out by the USA and the Soviet Union. These explosions created artificial radiation belts near Earth that resulted in major damages to several satellites. Another, unexpected impact of the high-altitude nuclear tests was the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that can have devastating effects over a large geographic area (as large as the continental United States). Other anthropogenic impacts on the space environment include chemical release ex- periments, high-frequency wave heating of the ionosphere and the interaction of VLF waves with the radiation belts. This paper reviews the fundamental physical process behind these phenomena and discusses the observations of their impacts.

  11. Characterization of performance reference compound kinetics and analyte sampling rate corrections under three flow regimes using nylon organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B

    2016-09-30

    Performance reference compounds (PRCs) can be spiked into passive samplers prior to deployment. If the dissipation kinetics of PRCs from the sampler corresponds to analyte accumulation kinetics, then PRCs can be used to estimate in-situ sampling rates, which may vary depending on environmental conditions. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the effectiveness of PRC corrections on prediction accuracy of water concentrations were evaluated using nylon organic chemical integrative samplers (NOCIS). Results from PRC calibrations suggest that PRC elimination occurs faster under higher flow conditions; however, minimal differences were observed for PRC elimination between fast flow (9.3cm/s) and slow flow (5.0cm/s) conditions. Moreover, minimal differences were observed for PRC elimination from Dowex Optipore L-493; therefore, PRC corrections did not improve results for NOCIS configurations containing Dowex Optipore L-493. Regardless, results suggest that PRC corrections were beneficial for NOCIS configurations containing Oasis HLB; however, due to differences in flow dependencies of analyte sampling rates and PRC elimination rates across the investigated flow regimes, the use of multiple PRC corrections was necessary. As such, a "Best-Fit PRC" approach was utilized for Oasis HLB corrections using caffeine-(13)C3, DIA-d5, or no correction based on the relative flow dependencies of analytes and these PRCs. Although PRC corrections reduced the variability when in-situ conditions differed from laboratory calibrations (e.g. static versus moderate flow), applying PRC corrections under similar flow conditions increases variability in estimated values.

  12. Using Uranium-series Isotopes to Trace Water Sources to Streamflow and Estimate Soil Formation Rates in a Semiarid Montane Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, D. M.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, J. C.; Rasmussen, C.; Chorover, J.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering is an important earth surface process that transfers nutrients from earth materials to the biosphere and provides a drawdown of CO2 over geologic timescales. Understanding controls on chemical weathering and soil formation rates is important to understanding long term landscape evolution and sustainability of the Critical Zone, the dynamic region of earth's surface where bedrock, water, soil, and life chemically and physically interact. The La Jara catchment (LJC), part of the Jemez-Santa Catalina Critical Zone Observatory, drains a portion of the southeast side of the resurgent volcanic dome Redondo Peak in New Mexico's Valles Caldera National Preserve and is well suited to study how aspect and lithology control chemical weathering rates. We will focus on two hillslopes in a zero-order basin within LJC: One east-facing hillslope of predominantly tuff lithology and one west-facing hillslope of rhyolite lithology. Several variables play a role in chemical weathering rates in this system, including water availability, lithology, temperature, vegetation, and atmospheric dust deposition. This study will use uranium-series isotopes, as well as major elemental chemistry, soil mineralogy, and particle size distributions to calculate soil formation rates and identify dominant controls on chemical and physical weathering processes. We hypothesize the east-facing hillslope will receive less solar radiation, leading to cooler temperatures and less sublimation of the snowpack, which will result in a larger volume of water input to soils and thus greater soil formation rates compared to the west-facing hillslope. This study will also use uranium-series isotopes to study modern hydrologic partitioning and trace source water contributions to streamflow during wet and dry seasons along La Jara stream. We hypothesize that the longitudinal evolution of streamwater chemistry and uranium-series isotopes will show increasing influence from deeper flowpaths with

  13. The Impact of Organo-Mineral Complexation on Mineral Weathering in the Soil Zone: Column Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, F.; Dever, S.; Yoo, K.; Imhoff, P. T.; Michael, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    While it is well known that organo-mineral complexes can protect organic matter (OM) from degradation, its impact on soil mineral weathering is not clear. Strong evidence has shown that the adsorption of OM to mineral surface accelerates the dissolution of some minerals, but these observations are limited to bench-scale experiments that focus on specific OM and minerals. In this study, soil samples prepared from an undisturbed forest site were used to determine mineral weathering rates under differing OM sorption on minerals. Soil samples from two depths, 0-6cm and 84-100cm, were chosen to represent different soil OM content and soil mineralogy. Soil OM was removed stepwise by heating samples to 350℃ for different durations (0-6cm: 100% removed, ~50% removed, and no removal; 84-100cm: 100% removed and no removal). Pretreated soil samples were subjected to flow-through, saturated column experiments using 0.01M LiCl and 5%CO2/95%air gas saturated (pH = 4.5) influent solution. Each column treatment was run in duplicate under a constant flow rate (Darcy velocity ≈ 8cm/hr). All columns reached a steady state after 600~700 pore volumes at which effluent pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and element concentrations were constant. At the 95% significance level, the DOC from OM-present columns was significantly higher, as expected. Correspondingly, effluent pH was lower in higher OM content columns. The chemical denudation rates were calculated from the effluent concentrations of the elements of interest. For the soil columns from both depths, silicon (Si) leaching rate showed that dissolution of silicate minerals was 2-3 times higher in OM-removed columns, suggesting that organo-mineral complexes suppress mineral dissolution. The N2-BET specific surface area (SSA) measurement also showed that the removal of OM increased SSA, which supported the idea that OM adsorption had decreased mineral exposure and thus decreased mineral dissolution. The leaching rates of some

  14. Acidic weathering of carbonate building stones: experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Kryza

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Three types of carbonate rocks, travertine, limestone and marble have been studied to determine their selected technical parameters (water absorption, resistance to salt crystallization damage and reaction to experimentally modelled acid rain weathering imitating the polluted urban atmospheric conditions. The acidic agents present in natural acid rain precipitation, H2SO4, HCl, HNO3, CH3COOH and mixture of all the acids, “Acid mix”, were tested. The initial stages of acid weathering involve, apart from chemical dissolution, particularly intense physical detachment of rock particles (granular disintegration significantly contributing to the total mass loss. Travertine was found to be most prone to salt crystallization damage and to acid weathering, and these features should be taken into account especially in external architectural usage of this stone in cold climate conditions and polluted urban atmosphere.

  15. Space Weather - the Economic Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, M. M.; Gibbs, M.

    2015-12-01

    Following on from the UK Government's placement of space weather on it's National Risk Register, in 2011, and the Royal Academy of Engineering's study into the impacts of a severe space weather event, the next piece of key evidence, to underpin future investment decisions, is understanding the socio-economic impact of space weather This poster outlines a study, funded by the UK Space Agency, which will assess the socio-economic cost of space weather, both severe events, such as 1989 & a modern day repeat of the Carrington storm and also the cost of day-to-day impacts. The study will go on to estimate the cost benefit of forecasting and also investigate options for an operational L5 spacecraft mission and knowledge exchange activities with the South African Space Agency. The findings from the initial space weather socio-economic literature review will be presented along with other findings to date and sets out the tasks for the remainder of this programme of work.

  16. Space Weather Research: Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Choudhary, R. K.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather, just like its meteorological counterpart, is of extreme importance when it comes to its impact on terrestrial near- and far-space environments. In recent years, space weather research has acquired an important place as a thrust area of research having implications both in space science and technology. The presence of satellites and other technological systems from different nations in near-Earth space necessitates that one must have a comprehensive understanding not only of the origin and evolution of space weather processes but also of their impact on technology and terrestrial upper atmosphere. To address this aspect, nations across the globe including India have been investing in research concerning Sun, solar processes and their evolution from solar interior into the interplanetary space, and their impact on Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. In India, over the years, a substantial amount of work has been done in each of these areas by various agencies/institutions. In fact, India has been, and continues to be, at the forefront of space research and has ambitious future programs concerning these areas encompassing space weather. This review aims at providing a glimpse of this Indian perspective on space weather research to the reader and presenting an up-to-date status of the same.

  17. Application of a Genetic Algorithm to the Optimization of Rate Constants in Chemical Kinetic Models for Combustion Simulation of HCCI Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kyu; Ito, Kazuma; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Wakisaka, Tomoyuki

    For numerically predicting the combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, practical chemical kinetic models have been explored. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied to the optimization of the rate constants in detailed chemical kinetic models, and a detailed kinetic model (592 reactions) for gasoline reference fuels with arbitrary octane number between 60 and 100 has been obtained from the detailed reaction schemes for iso-octane and n-heptane proposed by Golovitchev. The ignition timing in a gasoline HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well by zero-dimensional simulation using the CHEMKIN code with this detailed kinetic model. An original reduced reaction scheme (45 reactions) for dimethyl ether (DME) has been derived from Curran’s detailed scheme, and the combustion process in a DME HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well in a practical computation time by three-dimensional simulation using the authors’ GTT code, which has been linked to the CHEMKIN subroutines with the proposed reaction scheme and also has adopted a modified eddy dissipation combustion model.

  18. The Chemically Homogeneous Evolutionary Channel for Binary Black Hole Mergers: Rates and Properties of Gravitational-Wave Events Detectable by Advanced Ligo

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E

    2016-01-01

    We explore the predictions for detectable gravitational-wave signals from merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in massive short-period stellar binaries. We find that ~500 events per year could be detected with advanced ground-based detectors operating at full sensitivity. We analyze the distribution of detectable events, and conclude that there is a very strong preference for detecting events with nearly equal components (mass ratio >0.66 at 90% confidence in our default model) and high masses (total source-frame mass between 57 and $103\\, M_\\odot$ at 90% confidence). We consider multiple alternative variations to analyze the sensitivity to uncertainties in the evolutionary physics and cosmological parameters, and conclude that while the rates are sensitive to assumed variations, the mass distributions are robust predictions. Finally, we consider the recently reported results of the analysis of the first 16 double-coincident days of the O1 LIGO observing run, and find tha...

  19. Application of information statistical theory to the description of the effect of heat conduction on the chemical reaction rate in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, J. [Seccio de Fisica, Escola Politecnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Girona (Spain); Cukrowski, A.S. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Institute of Chemisty, Pedagogical University, Kielce (Poland)

    1998-06-01

    The effect of the heat flux on the rate of chemical reaction in dilute gases is shown to be important for reactions characterized by high activation energies and in the presence of very large temperature gradients. This effect, obtained from the second-order terms in the distribution function (similar to those obtained in the Burnett approximation to the solution of the Boltzmann equation), is derived on the basis of information theory. It is shown that the analytical results describing the effect are simpler if the kinetic definition for the nonequilibrium temperature is introduced than if the thermodynamic definition is introduced. The numerical results are nearly the same for both definitions. (author) 35 refs, 2 figs

  20. Shake-flask test for determination of biodegradation rates of 14C-labelled chemicals at low concentrations in surface water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, F.; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A simple shake-flask surface water biodegradability die away test with C-14-labeled chemicals added to microgram per liter concentrations (usually 1-100 mu g/L) is described and evaluated. The aim was to provide information on biodegradation behavior and kinetic rates at environmental (low......) concentrations in surface water systems. The basic principle of measurement was to determine evolved CO2 indirectly from measurements of total organic activity in subsamples after stripping off their content of CO2, Used with surface water alone the test simulates a pelagic environment and amended with sediments...... regular reinoculation with freshly collected surface water could, however, overcome the problems of false-negative results. (C) 2000 Academic Press....

  1. Surface Exposure Ages of Space-Weathered Grains from Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Space weathering processes such as solar wind ion irradiation and micrometeorite impacts are widely known to alter the properties of regolith materials exposed on airless bodies. The rates of space weathering processes however, are poorly constrained for asteroid regoliths, with recent estimates ranging over many orders of magnitude. The return of surface samples by JAXA's Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa, and their laboratory analysis provides "ground truth" to anchor the timescales for space weathering processes on airless bodies.

  2. Space Weather, Environment and Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Our planet exists within a space environment affected by constantly changing solar atmosphere producing cosmic particles and electromagnetic waves. This "space weather" profoundly influences the performance of our technology because we primarily use two means for transmitting information and energy; namely, electromagnetic waves and electricity. On an everyday basis, we have developed methods to cope with the normal conditions. However, the sun remains a fiery star whose 'angry' outbursts can potentially destroy spacecrafts, kill astronauts, melt electricity transformers, stop trains, and generally wreak havoc with human activities. Space Weather is the developing field within astronomy that aims at predicting the sun’s violent activity and minimizing the impacts on our daily lives. Space Weather, Environment, and Societies explains why our technological societies are so dependent on solar activity and how the Sun disturbs the transmission of information and energy. Footnotes expand specific points and the ...

  3. Weathering Effects on Technetium Leachability from Ceramicrete Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Kwon; Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Um, Woo Yong [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Ceramicrete waste form was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management program to stabilize and contain volatile radioactive contaminant such as technetium ({sup 99}Tc). Ceramicrete processing technology has been demonstrated on various waste streams and has shown to retain both radioactive and hazardous contaminants effectively. Radioactive Tc is highly soluble and mobile in the environment as pertechnetate anion. Tc is also easily volatilized. Tc can be in the waste in two oxidation states . IV and VII. Tc is volatilized even during the evaporation stage when removing excess water from HLW that contains acidic solutions of Tc(VII) as pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}){sup -}. Common chemical weathering process to occur within waste forms in the nuclear waste repository is carbonation. In addition, since technetium ({sup 99}Tc) leachability is closely related with oxidation condition and the oxidized Tc species, pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) shows much higher leachability, oxidative weathering pre-treatment of waste form is important, especially for the shallow-depth radioactive waste repositories. In 2011, an evaluation of weathering effects on Tc release from different waste forms (Cast