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Sample records for chemical vapor infiltration

  1. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlin, W.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  2. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  3. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and test the materials in a static bath and lab-scale Hall cell.

  4. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  5. Interfacial studies of chemical-vapor-infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.J. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA))

    1990-06-15

    The objective of this program was to investigate the fiber-matrix interfacial chemistry in chemical-vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix composites utilizing NICALON SiC and Nextel 400 mullite fibers and how this interface influences composite properties such as strength, toughness and environmental stability. The SiC matrix was deposited using three different reactants: methyldichlorosilane, methyltrichlorosilane and dimethyldichlorosilane. It was found that by varying the reactant gas flow rates, the ratio of carrier gas to reactant gas, the type of carrier gas (hydrogen or argon), the flushing gas used in the reactor prior to deposition (hydrogen or argon) or the type of silane reactant gas used, the composition of the deposited SiC could be varied from very silicon rich (75 at.%) to carbon rich (60%) to almost pure carbon. Stoichiometric SiC was found to bond very strongly to both NICALON and Nextel fibers, resulting in a weak and brittle composite. A thin carbon interfacial layer deposited either deliberately by the decomposition of methane or inadvertently by the introduction of argon into the reactor prior to silane flow resulted in a weakly bonded fiber-matrix interface and strong and tough composites. However, composites with this type of interface were not oxidatively stable. Preliminary results point ot the use of a carbon-rich SiC (mixture of carbon plus SiC) interfacial zone to achieve a relatively weak, crack-deflecting fiber-matrix bond but also exhibiting oxidative stability. (orig.).

  6. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  7. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  8. An X-Ray Tomography Based Modeling Solution For Chemical Vapor Infiltration Of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, William; Vignoles, Gérard L.; Germain, Christian

    2010-05-01

    A numerical tool for the simulation of Chemical Vapor Infiltration of carbon/carbon composites is introduced. The structure of the fibrous medium can be studied by high resolution X-Ray Computed Micro Tomography. Gas transport in various regimes is simulated by a random walk technique whilst the morphological evolution of the fluid/solid interface is handled by a Marching Cube technique. The program can be used to evaluate effective diffusivity and first order reaction rate. The numerical tool is validated by comparing computed effective properties of a straight slit pore with reactive walls to their analytical expression. Simulation of CVI processing of a real complex media is then presented.

  9. Densification mechanism of chemical vapor infiltration technology for carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-xun; XIONG Xiang; HUANG Qi-zhong; YI Mao-zhong; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites were fabricated using pressure-gradient chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) technology with propane (C3H6) as the carbon precursor gas and nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. The chemical process of deposition of pyrolytic carbon was deduced by analyzing the component of molecules in gas phase and observing the microstructure of deposition carbon. The results show that the process of deposition starts from the breakdown of C-C single bond of propene (C3H6), and forms two kinds of active groups in the heterogeneous gas phase reaction. Afterwards, these active groups form many stable bigger molecules and deposit on carbon fiber surface. At the same time, hydrogen atoms of the bigger molecules absorbed on carbon fiber surface are eliminated and the solid pyrolytic carbon matrix is formed in the heterogeneous reaction process.

  10. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} fibrous composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This program is designed to develop a Hall-Heroult aluminum smelting cathode with substantially improved properties. The carbon cathodes in current use require significant anode-to-cathode spacing in order to prevent shorting, causing significant electrical inefficiencies. This is due to the non-wettability of carbon by aluminum which causes instability in the cathodic aluminum pad. It is suggested that a fiber reinforced-TiB{sub 2} matrix composite would have the requisite wettability, strength, strain-to-failure, cost, and lifetime to solve this problem. The approach selected to fabricate such a cathode material is chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This process produces high purity matrix TiB{sub 2} without damaging the relatively fragile fibers. The program is designed to evaluate potential fiber reinforcements, fabricate test specimens, and scale the process to provide demonstration components.

  11. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  12. Modeling of gas phase diffusion transport during chemical vapor infiltration process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖鹏; 李娣; 徐永东; 黄伯云

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the uniformity of both the concentration of gaseous reagent and the deposition of matrix within micro-pores during the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process, a calculation modeling of gas phase diffusion transport within micro-pores was established. Taken CH3SiCl3 as precursor for depositing SiC as example, the diffusion coefficient, decomposing reaction rate, concentration within the reactor, and concentration distributing profiling of MTS within micro-pore were accounted, respectively. The results indicate that, increasing the ratio of diffusion coefficient to decomposition rate constant of precursor MTS is propitious to decrease the densification gradient of parts, and decreasing the aspect ratio (L/D) of micro-pore is favorable to make the concentration uniform within pores.

  13. Forced chemical vapor infiltration of tubular geometries: Modeling, design, and scale-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M. [and others

    1995-06-01

    In advanced indirectly fired coal combustion systems and externally fired combined cycle concepts, ceramic heat exchangers are required to transfer heat from the hot combustion gases to the clean air that drives the gas turbines. For high efficiencies, the temperature of the turbine inlet needs to exceed 1100{degrees}C and preferably be about 1260{degrees}C. The heat exchangers will operate under pressure and experience thermal and mechanical stresses during heating and cooling, and some transients will be severe under upset conditions. Silicon carbide-matrix composites are promising for such applications because of their high strength at elevated temperature, light weight, thermal and mechanical resistance, damage tolerance, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Fiber-reinforced composite tubes of several fiber architectures were fabricated by forced chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) and characterized. Unfortunately, long times ({approximately}150 hours) were required to thoroughly density the tubes. An objective of the current investigation was to optimize the forced CVI process so that composite tubes could be fabricated in much shorter times. To aid in such optimization, a computer code which models the CVI process was used to identify critical process parameters. Finally, successful demonstration of the utility of composite tubes for these applications will require the testing of near-full scale components. As a result a new infiltration system was designed and constructed to prepare 10-cm diameter tubes, and is described in this report.

  14. GROWTH CHARACTERS AND MODEL OF PYROLYTIC CARBON IN CHEMICAL VAPOR INFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) processes are the essential techniques for fabrication of high performance carbon-carbon composites. Based on the polarized light and scanning electron analysis, the authors study the micro-morphology and texture characteristics of pyrolytic carbon deposited in CVI process, as well as the growth behavior of pyrolytic carbon. The research shows that Rough Laminar (RL) texture has the hierarchical and self-similar structural features, which reflects the stage-growth and self-similar behavior during the growth course of pyrolytic carbon. According to the two growth features, a laminated growth model of pyrolytic carbon is proposed with the concept of Cone-Growth Units (CGU). The laminated growth model can provide a fine description for the growth course of RL pyrolytic carbon. The model indicates that formation, developing and combination of local high-order structures (such as CGU structures) are the essential factors for the growth of RL texture. Smooth Laminar (SL) texture and ISO carbon come into being with long-range orderliness and isotropy structure respectively, which no local high-orderliness intermediate involves in.

  15. Robust numerical simulation of porosity evolution in chemical vapor infiltration III: three space dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Shi

    2003-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process is an important technology to fabricate ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). In this paper, a three-dimension numerical model is presented to describe pore microstructure evolution during the CVI process. We extend the two-dimension model proposed in [S. Jin, X.L. Wang, T.L. Starr, J. Mater. Res. 14 (1999) 3829; S. Jin. X.L. Wang, T.L. Starr, X.F. Chen, J. Comp. Phys. 162 (2000) 467], where the fiber surface is modeled as an evolving interface, to the three space dimension. The 3D method keeps all the virtue of the 2D model: robust numerical capturing of topological changes of the interface such as the merging, and fast detection of the inaccessible pores. For models in the kinetic limit, where the moving speed of the interface is constant, some numerical examples are presented to show that this three-dimension model will effectively track the change of porosity, close-off time, location and shape of all pores.

  16. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhan Jun [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Yang, Ying Chao [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Li, Kai Yuan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Tao, Xin Yong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Zhang, Li Tong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, China; Li, Xiao Dong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Pan, Zhengwei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  17. Rapid processing of carbon-carbon composites by forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyaraman, S.; Lackey, W.J.; Agrawal, P.K.; Freeman, G.B.; Langman, M.D. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Carbon fiber-carbon matrix composites were fabricated using the forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) process. Preforms were prepared by stacking 40 layers of plain weave carbon cloth in a graphite holder. The preforms were infiltrated using propylene, propane, and methane. The present work showed that the FCVI process is well suited for fabricating carbon-carbon composites; without optimization of the process, the authors have achieved uniform and thorough densification. Composites with porosities as low as 7% were fabricated in 8--12 h. The highest deposition rate obtained in the present study was {approximately}3 {micro}m/h which is more than an order of magnitude faster than the typical value of 0.1--0.25 {micro}m/h for the isothermal process. It was also found that the use of propylene and propane as reagents resulted in faster infiltration compared to methane.

  18. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  19. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克智; 李贺军; 姜开宇

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of prefo

  20. Modeling Forced Flow Chemical Vapor Infiltration Fabrication of SiC-SiC Composites for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P. Deck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide fiber/silicon carbide matrix (SiC-SiC composites exhibit remarkable material properties, including high temperature strength and stability under irradiation. These qualities have made SiC-SiC composites extremely desirable for use in advanced nuclear reactor concepts, where higher operating temperatures and longer lives require performance improvements over conventional metal alloys. However, fabrication efficiency advances need to be achieved. SiC composites are typically produced using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI, where gas phase precursors flow into the fiber preform and react to form a solid SiC matrix. Forced flow CVI utilizes a pressure gradient to more effectively transport reactants into the composite, reducing fabrication time. The fabrication parameters must be well understood to ensure that the resulting composite has a high density and good performance. To help optimize this process, a computer model was developed. This model simulates the transport of the SiC precursors, the deposition of SiC matrix on the fiber surfaces, and the effects of byproducts on the process. Critical process parameters, such as the temperature and reactant concentration, were simulated to identify infiltration conditions which maximize composite density while minimizing the fabrication time.

  1. Interfacial studies of chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) ceramic-matrix composites. Annual report, 1 August 1987-31 July 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the fiber/matrix interfacial chemistry in Chemical Vapor Infiltrated Silicon Carbide matrix composites utilizing Nicalon SiC and Nextel 440 mullite fibers and how this interface influences composite properties such as strength, toughness, and environmental stability. The SiC matrix was deposited using three different reactants; methyldichlorosilane (MDS), methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), and dimethyldichlorosilane (DMDS). It was found that by varying the reactant gas flow rates, the ratio of carrier gas to reactant gas, the type of carrier gas (hydrogen or argon), the flushing gas used in the reactor prior to deposition (hydrogen or argon), or the type of silane reactant gas used, the composition of the deposited SiC could be varied from very silicon rich (75 at %) to carbon rich (60%) to almost pure carbon. Stoichiometric SiC was found to bond very strongly to both Nicalon and Nextel fibers, resulting in a weak and brittle composite. A thin carbon interfacial layer deposited either deliberately by the decomposition of methane or inadvertently by the introduction of argon into the reactor prior to silane flow, resulted in a weakly bonded fiber/matrix interface and strong and tough composites. However, composites with this type of interface were not oxidatively stable. Preliminary results point to the use of a carbon-rich SiC interfacial zone to achieve a relatively weak, crack-deflecting fiber/matrix bond but also exhibiting oxidative stability.

  2. Thermal Shock Properties of a 2D-C/SiC Composite Prepared by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyu; Wang, Xuanwei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Yongsheng; Han, Dong; Qiao, Shengru; Guo, Yong

    2013-06-01

    The thermal shock properties of a two-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite with a multilayered self-healing coating (2D-C/SiC) were investigated in air. The composite was prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor infiltration. 2D-C/SiC specimens were thermally shocked for different cycles between 900 and 300 °C. The thermal shock resistance was characterized by residual tensile properties and mass variation. The change of the surface morphology and microstructural evolution of the composite were examined by a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the phase evolution on the surfaces was identified using an X-ray diffractometer. It is found that the composite retains its tensile strength within 20 thermal shock cycles. However, the modulus of 2D-C/SiC decreases gradually with increasing thermal shock cycles. Extensive pullout of fibers on the fractured surface and peeling off of the coating suggest that the damage caused by the thermal shock involves weakening of the bonding strength of coating/composite and fiber/matrix. In addition, the carbon fibers in the near-surface zone were oxidized through the matrix cracks, and the fiber/matrix interfaces delaminated when the composite was subjected to a larger number of thermal shock cycles.

  3. Effect of chemical vapor infiltration treatment on the wave-absorbing performance of carbon fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Short carbon fibers were treated at high temperatures around 1100℃ through chemical vapor infiltration technology.A thinner layer ofpyrocarbon was deposited on the fiber surface.The dispersion of carbon fibers in a cement matrix and the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cement composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other tests.The reflectivity of electromagnetic waves by the composites was measured in the frequency range of 8.0-18 GHz for different carbon fiber contents of 0.2wt%,0.4wt%,0.6wt% ,and 1.0wt%.The results show that the reflectivity tends to increase with the increase of fiber content above 0.4wt%.The minimum reflectivity is -19.3 dB and the composites exhibit wave-absorbing performances.After pyrocarbon is deposited on the fiber,all the reflectivity data are far greater.They are all above -10 dB and display mainly wave-reflecting performances.

  4. X-Ray Tomographic Characterization of the Macroscopic Porosity of Chemical Vapor Infiltration SiC/SiC Composites: Effects on the Elastic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelebart, L.; Chateau, C. [CEA Saclay, SRMA, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Chateau, C.; Bornert, M. [Ecole Polytech, LMS, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Crepin, J. [CDM Mines Paris Paristech, F-91003 Evry (France); Boller, E. [ESRF ID19, F-38043 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the macro-porosity, the porosity among the tows, observed in chemical vapor infiltration composites and on its effect on the thermo-mechanical behavior. The experimental characterization of macro-porosity is performed using an X-ray tomography technique. Numerical 3D images are used to describe the distribution of macro-porosity with respect to the position of the plies. It is clearly established that the stacking of the plies has a significant effect on the porosity distribution. As a consequence for the micromechanical modelling, a unique element that contains only one ply is not representative of the porosity distribution and is not sufficient to evaluate the 'effective' mechanical properties; several volume elements (VE), called 'statistical volume elements (SVE)', with at least two plies per VE have to be used in order to account for the variability of the stacking of the plies. Finally, such SVE are directly extracted from the tomographic image and the 'effective' elastic behavior is evaluated from the average of the 'apparent' behavior evaluated on each SVE. In spite of their quite important size, the 'apparent' behaviors evaluated for each SVE exhibit important fluctuations. (authors)

  5. Simulation of chemical vapor infiltration of propylene into C/C composites%丙烯CVI致密C/C复合材料的模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘育太; 白瑞成; 李红; 张家宝; 任慕苏; 孙晋良

    2011-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of propylene into C/C composites was studied by numeric simulation and an improved model for homogeneous gas-phase reactions of propylene pyrolysis was proposed. The model consists of 34 elementary reactions of 16 species. Then a bipore model for describing the changes of the pore topology with the progress of densification and a computer code for simulation of surface reactions by other authors were coupled together to predict the process. The numerical simulation showed that the density distribution of C/C composites is dependent on residence time of gas, densification temperature and densification time. There are two infiltration stages (rapid densification of micro-pores and successive densification of macro-pores) which act closely with the concentration distributions of main homogeneous pyrolytic products of propylene. Among them the concentration distribution of benzene seems most apparently to influence the densification speed and C/C density uniformity. The infiltration would be terminated when the benzene rich region becomes narrow, and the surface crusting of C/C appears. The present model is validated by comparing the predicted densities with the experimental ones.%通过模拟法对丙烯化学气相渗透(cvI)制备炭/炭复合材料(C/c)的工艺过程进行研究.基于16种反应物,建立了由34个基元反应组成的均相反应模型.引用双孔隙演化模型、非均相反应模型,对整个丙烯CVI模型进行耦合模拟.模拟结果表明,CVI法C/C复合材料的密度均匀性受沉积气体滞留时间、致密温度和致密时间等因素影响;致密化过程可分为微孔隙快速致密和大孔隙致密两个阶段,丙烯初级热解产物的浓度分布与这两个阶段关系密切;其中大分子气体苯的浓度分布对CVI沉积速度和C/C复合材料密度均匀性的影响明显,当苯浓度分布最高区严重变窄时,表明致密化过程结束,致密表面将出现结壳现象.验

  6. 化学气相渗透工艺制备陶瓷基复合材料%Manufacturing of CMCs by Chemical Vapor Infiltration Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成来飞; 张立同; 梅辉; 刘永胜; 曾庆丰

    2014-01-01

    综述了采用化学气相渗透(chemical vapor infiltration, CVI)工艺制备陶瓷基复合材料(ceramic matrix composites, CMCs)的模拟与可视化、柔性与鲁棒性以及强韧性控制与设计等研究的进展和趋势。陶瓷基复合材料气相制造过程模拟涉及气体传输、反应热力学与动力学、预制体的孔隙结构建模等理论,是一个典型的多尺度和多物理场问题。运用量子化学、化学热力学、微观动力学、有限元、水平集和人工智能等方法,实现了复合材料致密化过程的模拟和成分分析,更加精准地反映了气体在多孔预制体中的各向异性传输和沉积过程,为工艺优化提供更准确的控制参数。 CVI工艺制备陶瓷基复合材料具有柔性与鲁棒性等工艺特性,包括应用广泛性,可控制、可调整与可设计性,可连接与可组装性,可纠错、可修复与可兼容性等诸多特性,适用于陶瓷基复合材料微结构的调控,是陶瓷基复合材料领域最先进的基础制造方法。陶瓷基复合材料的强韧性一直是其发展中的核心问题,增强体纤维、基体及二者界面之间的模量匹配,以及热残余应力和纤维基体体积分数等参数的设计与控制是这个核心问题的关键。通过合理控制与设计这些参数,可以实现陶瓷基复合材料的强韧化控制与设计,从而适应不同使用环境条件的需求。%This paper reviews the development trends, and flexible, robust and toughness control and design in the simulation and visualization of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) manufacturing by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. The gaseous route involves gas transfer, reaction thermodynamics and kinetics, and pore structure modeling, which is a typical multi-scale and multi-physics problem. Quantum chemistry, chemical thermody-namics, microscopic kinetics, finite element, the level-set and artificial intelligence methods are applied to achieve

  7. TiO{sub 2} based photo-catalysts prepared by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) on micro-fibrous substrates; Photocatalyseurs a base de TiO{sub 2} prepares par infiltration chimique en phase vapeur (CVI) sur supports microfibreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantopoulos, Ch

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with micro-fibrous glass substrates functionalized with TiO{sub 2}. The oxide is deposited as a thin film onto the micro fibres by chemical vapour infiltration (CVI), yielding a photo-catalytic material usable for cleaning polluted air. We studied the relation between the structure of the material and its photo-catalytic efficiency. TiO{sub 2} thin films were prepared at low pressure, in a hot-wall CVD reactor, using Ti(O-iPr){sub 4} as a precursor. They were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, XPS and BET, and by recording the kinetics of decomposition of varied pollutants in solution (orange G, malic acid, imazapyr) and in air (toluene). The conditions favoring the growth of porous films through a columnar growth mode were established by MOCVD-depositing TiO{sub 2} thin films on flat substrates. The subsequent works with micro fibrous thick substrates showed the uniformity of infiltration to be the main factor governing the photo-catalytic efficiency. Operating parameters that optimize infiltration do not yield columnar growth mode. A compromise is necessary. Our photo-catalysts are showing high efficiency comparable, if not higher, to those actually commercialized. These promising results are opening real perspectives for the proposed process. (author)

  8. Effect of processing parameters on the deposition rate of Si3N4/Si2N2O by chemical vapor infiltration and the in situ thermal decomposition of Na2SiF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, M. I.; de La Peña, J. L.; Leal-Cruz, A. L.

    2007-11-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) and oxynitride (Si2N2O) were deposited by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) through a novel route involving the in-situ thermal decomposition of Na2SiF6 in commercial nitrogen precursors containing impurity oxygen. In addition, the quantitative effect of processing time (30, 60, 90, 120 min), temperature (1000, 1100, 1200 and 1300 °C), nitrogen precursor (N2 or N2-5%NH3) and gas flow rate (46.5, 93, 120 and 240 cm3/min) on phase percentage and deposition rate of Si3N4 and Si2N2O was investigated. Analysis of variance shows that the parameter that most significantly impacts the total amount of deposited phase is the processing temperature, followed by processing time and nitrogen precursor. Regardless of the nitrogen precursor, at 1300 °C, Si3N4 and Si2N2O depositions follow an S-like and parabolic behavior, respectively. The incubation period shown by Si3N4 in N2-5%NH3 is associated to a decrease in the O2 partial pressure during Si2N2O formation while the rapid increase at long processing times is attributed to the enhanced effect of hydrogen.

  9. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  10. Hierarchical Process Control of Chemical Vapor Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-31

    in these variables with reference to Figure 8. Conventional PID controllers are beneficially employed at this level in order to retain industry...to achieve minimum controlled-variable variations. PID controllers are beneficially employed at this level to retain industry standard functions useful

  11. Microwave and RF assisted chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Barbero, R.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Work during this reporting period has focused on the development of a CVI technique for rapid production of carbon/carbon and alumina composite systems. The focus of the alumina effort is towards porous materials for membrane supports and hot gas filtration. Industrial interest in these applications include companies such as: Dow, Westinghouse, Amoco and DuPont. Applications for the carbon materials are numerous and include: brakes, sporting goods, biomedical materials, flaps and seals for thrust control, after burner nozzles, turbine engine flaps and rotors. This effort will focus on aircraft brakes. A collaboration is underway with Hitco a major producer of carbon/carbon materials.

  12. 模型孔中化学气相渗透过程的热解碳沉积模拟%Modeling of Chemical Vapor Infiltration for Pyrocarbon within Capillaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤哲鹏; 张中伟; 房金铭; 彭雨晴; 李爱军; 张丹

    2016-01-01

    Coupling homogeneous gas-phase reaction mechanism with lumped reaction mechanism, the pyrocarbon deposition process of the methane pyrolysis was simulated within the capillaries. The initial concentrations for the in-volved gas-phase species at the mouth of capillary are obtained firstly by computation of the plug flow using homoge-neous gas-phase reaction mechanism during methane pyrolysis. Chemical vapor infiltration of pyrocarbon from meth-ane in the capillary is simulated by deposition model, hydrogen inhibition model and lumped reaction mechanism. Predicted results for the mean deposition rate along the capillary depth are well validated by previously published ex-perimental results, in which, at temperatures of 1373 and 1398 K, methane pressures are ranging from 10 to 20 kPa, and residence times are of 0.08 and 0.2 s. Simulated results show that the gradient of the mean deposition rate profile increases with methane pressure and capillary depth, and the deposition rate for transition capillary is lower than the corresponding closed capillary.%研究耦合均气相反应机理和总括反应机理,以模拟甲烷在模型孔中的热解碳沉积过程.在平推流反应器模型中,利用均气相反应机理对甲烷裂解的气相组分的变化进行模拟,并将平推流反应器相应位置的气体组分浓度作为模型孔入口初始浓度.运用包含总括反应机理及氢气抑制模型的热解碳沉积模型,对甲烷在模型孔中的化学气相渗透过程进行模拟.在温度1373和1398 K,甲烷压强10~20 kPa,停留时间0.08和0.2 s下,沿模型孔深度方向的热解碳平均沉积速率的模拟结果与文献报道的实验结果有较好的吻合.模拟结果表明:热解碳平均沉积速率随甲烷压强和模型孔深度的增加而增大,且通孔的沉积速率要低于相应实验条件下一端闭孔的模型孔沉积速率.

  13. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  14. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyildiz, Halil I. [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Mousa, Moataz Bellah M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Jur, Jesse S., E-mail: jsjur@ncsu.edu [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-O{sub x} product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  16. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  18. Making Ceramic Fibers By Chemical Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal V. S.; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1994-01-01

    Research and development of fabrication techniques for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ceramic fibers presented in two reports. Fibers of SiC, TiB2, TiC, B4C, and CrB2 intended for use as reinforcements in metal-matrix composite materials. CVD offers important advantages over other processes: fibers purer and stronger and processed at temperatures below melting points of constituent materials.

  19. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  20. Reducing chemical vapour infiltration time for ceramic matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, L. A.; Westby, W.; Prentice, C.; Jaglin, D.; Shatwell, R. A.; Binner, J. G. P.

    2001-02-01

    Conventional routes to producing ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require the use of high temperatures to sinter the individual ceramic particles of the matrix together. Sintering temperatures are typically much higher than the upper temperature limits of the fibres. This paper details preliminary work carried out on producing a CMC via chemical vapour infiltration (CVI), a process that involves lower processing temperatures, thus avoiding fibre degradation. The CVI process has been modified and supplemented in an attempt to reduce the CVI process time and to lower the cost of this typically expensive process. To this end microwave-enhanced CVI (MECVI) has been chosen, along with two alternative pre-infiltration steps: electrophoretic infiltration and vacuum bagging. The system under investigation is based on silicon carbide fibres within a silicon carbide matrix (SiCf/SiC). The results demonstrate that both approaches result in an enhanced initial density and a consequent significant reduction in the time required for the MECVI processing step. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used as a non-destructive, density evaluation technique. Initial results indicate that the presence of the SiC powder in the pre-form changes the deposition profile during the MECVI process.

  1. A novel thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process for carbon-carbon composites%炭/炭复合材料新型热梯度制备工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shameel; Farhan; 李克智; 郭领军

    2007-01-01

    Solid cylindrical carbon-carbon composites were processed using conventional thermal gradient chemical cause of the difference in thermal conductivities. The hottest portion (900-1 200 ℃ ) was along the inserted carbon fibers, where the pyrolytic reaction of natural gas occurred. The densification radially moved outwards and ultimately a density of 1. 778 g/cm3 was obtained after67h. The process parameters such as the electric power of the furnace, electrical resistance of the sample, densification time, and the position of the deposition layer were studied. A densified sample having a volume fraction of carbon fibers of 10% was tested for ablation and erosion. The microstructure of the pyrolytic carbon matrix of the as-prepared sample was investigated by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscoPY.%对传统的热梯度化学气相渗透工艺进行了改进.把高热导率(55W/(m·℃))的48k炭纤维束穿入针刺炭毡预制体中心.利用炭纤维束和炭毡预制体热导率(0.15W/(m·℃))的差异,在预制体内部产生热梯度.在900℃~1200℃下,天然气首先在预制体中心的48k炭纤维处热解,致密化沿径向由中心向外部推进,67 h后材料的密度达1.778 g/cm3.研究了炉内输入电压、电阻、致密化时间、沉积层位置等工艺参数对材料性能的影响.通过偏光显微镜和扫描电子显微镜研究了基体热解碳的微观结构,并对炭纤维体积含量为10%的炭/炭试样进行了烧蚀性能测试.

  2. Study on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Carbon/Carbon Composite Obtained by Chemical Vapor Infiltration%化学气相渗透法制备炭/炭复合材料的显微结构和力学性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄群; 陈腾飞; 刘磊; 马艺林; 何平鸽

    2014-01-01

    以天然气为碳源,氢气为载气,采用等温化学气相渗透工艺对预制体初始密度为0.5 g/cm3(纤维体积分数为28%)的针刺整体毡进行致密化,在70 h内制备出表观密度为1.76 g/cm3的炭/炭复合材料。采用压汞法对复合材料的开孔孔径分布进行了分析,用偏光显微镜和扫描电镜观察了基体的微观组织,分析了三点抗弯试样的断口形貌。结果表明,复合材料中的开孔以小于40μm的微孔为主,基体热解炭几乎全部由粗糙层热解炭组成,仅在化学气相渗透的初始阶段在炭纤维的表面形成了很薄的一层各向同性热解炭,复合材料的抗弯强度达到210 MPa。%With natural gas as carbon source and hydrogen as carrier, carbon/carbon composite ( with an apparent density of 1.76 g/cm3 ) was prepared within 70 hours by densifying the preform of needle-punched integrated carbon felt with an initial density of 0.5 g/cm3( volume fraction of 28%) by chemical vapor infiltration. The size distribution of open pores of the C/C composite sample was measured by mercury intrusion method. The microstructure of the composite was investigated by polarized light microscope ( PLM) and scanning electron microscope. And the mechanical properties were tested by three point bending method. Results show that the size of most of open pores was less than 40 μm, and the matrix of pyrocarbon mostly consisted of rough laminar pyrocarbon, except for one layer of isotropic pyrocarbon around the carbon fiber, which was formed at the beginning of infiltration process. The flexural strength of the C/C composite was about 210 MPa.

  3. 三维打印结合化学气相渗透制备Si3N4-SiC复相陶瓷%Si3N4-SiC Composite Ceramic Prepared by Three Dimensional Printing and Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封立运; 殷小玮; 李向明

    2012-01-01

    采用三维打印(3DP)技术成型Si3N4多孔陶瓷并结合化学气相渗透( CVI) SiC制备了Si3N4-SiC复相陶瓷.研究了烧结工艺对3DP Si3N4陶瓷线收缩率和孔隙率的影响.结果表明,3DP Si3N4坯体经热解除碳后再烧结,可以获得较小的线收缩率(<6%)及较大的气孔率(77.5%).对其进行CVI SiC近尺寸强化,研究了Si3N4-SiC复相陶瓷的抗弯强度随SiC体积分数的变化规律.%Porous Si3N4 ceramics are formed by three-dimensional printing, SiC is subsequently introduced into the porous Si3N4 for consolidation by chemical vapor infiltration, thus Si3N4-SiC composite ceramics is formed. The influence of sintering process on the linear shrinkages and porosity of the 3DP Si3N4 is investigated. The sintered Si3N4 ceramics gets the smaller linear shrinkages (<6%), and bigger porosity (77.5%) after pyrolysis. Consolidation by CVI is made to these samples without changing their dimensions, the variation of the bending strength of the Si3N4-SiC composite with the volume fraction of CVI SiC is investigated.

  4. A visual and organic vapor sensitive photonic crystal sensor consisting of polymer-infiltrated SiO2 inverse opal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Qiu, Jianhua; Hu, Rongrong; Li, Pei; Gao, Loujun; Heng, Liping; Tang, Ben Zhong; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-21

    A photonic crystal (PC) sensor that can selectively detect organic vapors through visual color changes has been proposed. The sensor was fabricated by infiltrating a tetraphenylethene polymer (TPEP) into the voids of SiO2 inverse opal photonic crystal. When the sensor was exposed to tetrahydrofuran or acetone vapor, a red shift of the stopband of more than 50 nm could be clearly observed; meanwhile, the film's color changed from violet to cyan. Subsequently, when exposed to air, the stopband underwent a blue shift and the color returned to violet. The reason for the observed change is that a reversible adsorption-desorption process occurs on alternate exposure of the sensor to organic vapor and air, due to the high specific surface area of the inverse opal macroporous structure and the high affinity of TPEP to tetrahydrofuran and acetone. The adsorption of vapor analyte can increase the PC's effective refractive index, which will induce the stopband red shift and the resulting color change according to Bragg's Law. The reversible adsorption-desorption of organic vapors varied the effective refractive index of the sensor repeatedly, causing the reversible stopband shift and color change, and providing a general method for the design of visual vapor sensors.

  5. Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-08-28

    Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

  6. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  7. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  8. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  9. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  10. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  12. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  13. Fabrication of a multifunctional carbon nanotube "cotton" yarn by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ya-Li; Feng, Jian-Min; Kang, Yan-Ru; Han, Shuai-Shuai

    2012-09-21

    A continuous cotton-like carbon nanotube fiber yarn, consisting of multiple threads of high purity double walled carbon nanotubes, was fabricated in a horizontal CVD gas flow reactor with water vapor densification by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous shrinking of the CNT sock-like assembly in the gas flow. This allows well controlled continuous winding of the dense thread inside the reactor. The CNT yarn is quite thick (1-3 mm), has a highly porous structure (99%) while being mechanically strong and electrically conductive. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous oxidation of the CNTs, offering the yarn oxygen-functionalized surfaces. The unique structure and surface of the CNT yarn provide it multiple processing advantages and properties. It can be mechanically engineered into a dense yarn, infiltrated with polymers to form a composite and mixed with other yarns to form a blend, as demonstrated in this research. Therefore, this CNT yarn can be used as a "basic yarn" for various CNT based structural and functional applications.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  15. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  16. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition coating of fibers using microwave application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Hoover, Gordon (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition coating is carried out in a cylindrical cavity. The fibers are heated by a microwave source that is uses a TM0N0 mode, where O is an integer, and produces a field that depends substantially only on radius. The fibers are observed to determine their heating, and their position can be adjusted. Once the fibers are uniformly heated, a CVD reagent is added to process the fibers.

  18. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  19. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  20. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  1. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  2. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  3. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T P; Kooi, S E; Chang, S H; Sedransk, K L; Gleason, K K

    2007-02-01

    The vapor phase deposition of polymeric antimicrobial coatings is reported. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers on fragile substrates. For this work, finished nylon fabric is coated by iCVD with no affect on the color or feel of the fabric. Infrared characterization confirms the polymer structure. Coatings of poly(dimethylaminomethyl styrene) of up to 540 microg/cm2 were deposited on the fabric. The antimicrobial properties were tested using standard method ASTM E2149-01. A coating of 40 microg/cm2 of fabric was found to be very effective against gram-negative Escherichia coli, with over a 99.99%, or 4 log, kill in just 2 min continuing to over a 99.9999%, or 6 log, reduction in viable bacteria in 60 min. A coating of 120 microg/cm2 was most effective against the gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. Further tests confirmed that the iCVD polymer did not leach off the fabric.

  4. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut für Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekuléstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-07

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27 cm{sup −1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  5. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Jinhong [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78750 (United States); Waheed, Abdul [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Winkenwerder, Wyatt A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Agapiou, Kyriacos [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Jones, Richard A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hwang, Gyeong S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: ekerdt@che.utexas.edu

    2007-05-07

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO{sub 2} containing {approx} 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH{sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 4} (Me = CH{sub 3}) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase.

  7. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Department of Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10 nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870 V/μm for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200 nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of tunable unsubstituted polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Siamak; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2011-12-20

    Despite having exceptional electroactive properties, applications of unsubstituted polythiophene (PTh) have been limited due to its insolubility. To overcome this challenge, we have employed oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) as a unique liquid-free technique to enable the oxidative polymerization of PTh using thiophene as the starting monomer and vanadium oxytrichloride as an effective vaporizable oxidant initiator. Vibrational and phototelectron spectroscopy indicated the formation of unsubstituted polythiophene. Cyclic voltammetry revealed its electrochromic behavior in solution. Significantly, polymer conjugation length and electrical conductivity can be tuned by controlling oCVD process variables. Polymerization is found to be adsorption-limited, so by providing sufficient monomer and limiting the amount of initiator at the growth surface, PTh is believed to be formed through α-α thiophene linkages.

  9. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  10. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  11. Direct synthesis of large area graphene on insulating substrate by gallium vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa, E-mail: k.murakami@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hiyama, Takaki; Kuwajima, Tomoya; Fujita, Jun-ichi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tanaka, Shunsuke; Hirukawa, Ayaka [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Kano, Emi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2015-03-02

    A single layer of graphene with dimensions of 20 mm × 20 mm was grown directly on an insulating substrate by chemical vapor deposition using Ga vapor catalysts. The graphene layer showed highly homogeneous crystal quality over a large area on the insulating substrate. The crystal quality of the graphene was measured by Raman spectroscopy and was found to improve with increasing Ga vapor density on the reaction area. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the synthesized graphene had a perfect atomic-scale crystal structure within its grains, which ranged in size from 50 nm to 200 nm.

  12. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  13. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  14. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  15. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  16. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  17. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, V. I., E-mail: VZubkovspb@mail.ru; Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas' ev, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Butler, J. E. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), P.O. Box 37012 Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  18. Application of chemical vapor composites (CVC) to terrestrial thermionics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, Gabor; Reagan, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial flame fired thermionics took a great leap forward in the earlier 1980's with the development of reliable long-lived hot shells. These results were presented by Goodale (1981). The hot shell protects the fractory emitter from oxidizing in the combustion environment. In earlier efforts with supralloys emitters it was found that superalloys were poor thermionic emitters since they operated at too low a temperature for practical and economical use as discussed by Huffman (1978). With the development of Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) silicon carbide and CVD tungsten, it became possible to fabricate long-lived thermionic converters. These results were shown by Goodale (1980). Further improvements were achieved with the use of oxygen additives on the electrodes. These developments made thermionics attractive for topping a power plant or as the energy conversion part of a cogeneration plant as described by Miskolczy (1982) and Goodale (1983). The feasibility of a thermonic steam boiler and a thermionic topped gas turbine plant become a possibility, as shown by Miskolczy (1980).

  19. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  20. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China); Li, L. J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  1. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  2. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  3. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    peptide nanotubes, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nano assembly 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...Using physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...for the deposition of thin films (Figure 1b). A. B. Figure 1. (a) Illustration of physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) process of diphenylalanine

  4. All hot wire chemical vapor deposition low substrate temperature transparent thin film moisture barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; Schipper, M.R.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2013-01-01

    We deposited a silicon nitride/polymer hybrid multilayer moisture barrier for flexible electronics in a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process, entirely below 100 °C. We were able to reach a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) as low as 5×10−6 g/m2/day at a temperature of 60 °C and a relative h

  5. A new productivity function and stability criterion in chemical vapor transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klosse, K.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth rate in a chemical vapor transport process using a closed system is analyzed on the basis of a one-dimensional configuration. A simplified model of vapor transport enables one to obtain a set of equations yielding the rates of reaction without a complete evaluation of the partial

  6. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  7. Interfacial studies of chemical-vapor-infiltrated (CVI) ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.J.

    1990-03-31

    The objective of this program was to investigate the fiber/matrix interfacial chemistry in CVI SiC matrix composites utilizing Nicalon SiC and Nextel 440 mullite fibers and to determine how this interface influences composite properties such as strength, toughness, and environmental stability. The SiC matrix was deposited using three different reactants; methyldichlorosilane (MDS), methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), and dimethyldichlorosilane (DMDS). The fiber/matrix interface was tailored by means of introducing a carbon, BN, or carbon rich SiC interfacial layer. It was found that applying a carbon interfacial layer to either NICALON or Nextel 440 fibers prior to deposition of SiC resulted in a weakly bonded interface that imparted toughness to CVI matrix composite through its ability to deflect matrix cracks. This carbon layer can be applied either deliberately by the decomposition of methane or by utilizing an argon flushing gas in the reactor that apparently interrupted the normal deposition of SiC from silane precursors and instead allowed carbon to deposit. It was found that this carbon interfacial layer, no matter how it was deposited, was not oxidatively stable at elevated temperatures, leading to severe degradation of composite properties.

  8. Polymer-Silicon Flexible Structures for Fast Chemical Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Engineering and School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA) E-mail: vladimir@mse.gatech.edu Dr...induce differential stress in a bimaterial cantilever for vapor sensing.[40] However, these coatings, amongst others (such as spin-coating, and inkjet

  9. Potentiometric detection of chemical vapors using molecularly imprinted polymers as receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongning; Chen, Lusi; Qin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Ion-selective electrode (ISE) based potentiometric gas sensors have shown to be promising analytical tools for detection of chemical vapors. However, such sensors are only capable of detecting those vapors which can be converted into ionic species in solution. This paper describes for the first time a polymer membrane ISE based potentiometric sensing system for sensitive and selective determination of neutral vapors in the gas phase. A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is incorporated into the ISE membrane and used as the receptor for selective adsorption of the analyte vapor from the gas phase into the sensing membrane phase. An indicator ion with a structure similar to that of the vapor molecule is employed to indicate the change in the MIP binding sites in the membrane induced by the molecular recognition of the vapor. The toluene vapor is used as a model and benzoic acid is chosen as its indicator. Coupled to an apparatus manifold for preparation of vapor samples, the proposed ISE can be utilized to determine volatile toluene in the gas phase and allows potentiometric detection down to parts per million levels. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a general sensing principle for detection of neutral vapors using ISEs.

  10. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  11. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  12. Sequential Vapor Infiltration Treatment Enhances the Ionic Current Rectification Performance of Composite Membranes Based on Mesoporous Silica Confined in Anodic Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanyan; Liu, Zhengping

    2016-12-20

    Ionic current rectification of nanofluidic diode membranes has been studied widely in recent years because it is analogous to the functionality of biological ion channels in principle. We report a new method to fabricate ionic current rectification membranes based on mesoporous silica confined in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. Two types of mesostructured silica nanocomposites, hexagonal structure and nanoparticle stacked structure, were used to asymmetrically fill nanochannels of AAO membranes by a vapor-phase synthesis (VPS) method with aspiration approach and were further modified via sequence vapor infiltration (SVI) treatment. The ionic current measurements indicated that SVI treatment can modulate the asymmetric ionic transport in prepared membranes, which exhibited clear ionic current rectification phenomenon under optimal conditions. The ionic current rectifying behavior is derived from the asymmetry of surface conformations, silica species components, and hydrophobic wettability, which are created by the asymmetrical filling type, silica depositions on the heterogeneous membranes, and the condensation of silanol groups. This article provides a considerable strategy to fabricate composite membranes with obvious ionic current rectification performance via the cooperation of the VPS method and SVI treatment and opens up the potential of mesoporous silica confined in AAO membranes to mimic fluid transport in biological processes.

  13. Porous wall hollow glass microsphere as an optical microresonator for chemical vapor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Pienkowski, Edward; Xiao, Hai

    2012-02-01

    Optical microresonators have been proven effective for developing sensitive chemical and biological sensors by monitoring the changes in refractive index or mass near the resonator surface. The rotationally symmetric structures support high quality (Q) whispering gallery modes (WGMs) that interact with the local environment through the evanescent field. The long photon lifetime of the high-Q resonator (thus the long light-material interaction path) is the key reason that a microresonator can achieve very high sensitivity in detection. In this paper, we present our recent research on using porous wall hollow glass microsphere (PW-HGM) as an optical microresonator for chemical vapor detection. The diameter of the PW-HGM ranges from 10μm to 100μm. The wall thickness is about 2μm and the pore size is about 20nm. The Q-factors and free spectrum ranges (FSR) of PW-HGMs were measured by coupling light into the PW-HGM using a single mode fiber taper. Various types of chemical vapors were used to characterize the PW-HGM resonator. The resonant wavelength shift was measured as a function of vapor concentration. Comparisons between a PW-HGM and a solid glass microsphere indicated that a PW-HGM can effectively adsorb vapor molecules into its nanosized pores, providing a direct and long light-material interaction path for significant sensitivity enhancement for chemical vapor detection.

  14. Assessment and control of chemical risk from organic vapors for attendants in a gas station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ehmig Santillán

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research comprises monitoring, assessment and recommendations for chemical risk originating from organic vapors (benzene, toluene and xylene of fuel (super and extra gasoline to which attendants at a gas station are exposed. Given the concentration measured of organic vapors (benzene, toluene and xylene the chemical risk to which attendants are exposed in the supply area is acceptable. Control measures are recommended to ensure healthy working conditions for gas station attendants and also to avoid occurrence of occupational diseases in the medium or long term

  15. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  16. Mathematical Analysis and Optimization of Infiltration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-C.; Gottlieb, D.; Marion, M.; Sheldon, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of infiltration techniques can be used to fabricate solid materials, particularly composites. In general these processes can be described with at least one time dependent partial differential equation describing the evolution of the solid phase, coupled to one or more partial differential equations describing mass transport through a porous structure. This paper presents a detailed mathematical analysis of a relatively simple set of equations which is used to describe chemical vapor infiltration. The results demonstrate that the process is controlled by only two parameters, alpha and beta. The optimization problem associated with minimizing the infiltration time is also considered. Allowing alpha and beta to vary with time leads to significant reductions in the infiltration time, compared with the conventional case where alpha and beta are treated as constants.

  17. Removal of chemical oxygen demand and dissolved nutrients by a sunken lawn infiltration system during intermittent storm events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhu; Yang, Huan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Urban surface water runoff typically contains high but varying amounts of organic matter and nutrients that require removal before reuse. Infiltration systems such as sunken lawns can improve water quality. However, there is currently insufficient information describing the treatment efficiency of lawn-based infiltration systems. In this study, novel sunken lawn infiltration systems (SLISs) were designed and their pollutant removal effectiveness was assessed. The results revealed that SLISs with Poa pratensis and Lolium perenne effectively removed most chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and dissolved nutrients. Average CODCr, total nitrogen (TN), ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were reduced by 78.93, 66.64, 71.86 and 75.83%, respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations met the standard for urban miscellaneous water consumption in China. The NH4(+)-N in the synthetic runoff was shown to be removed by adsorption during the stormwater dosing and nitrification during subsequent dry days, as well as through uptake by plants. Phosphorus was mainly removed by adsorption and chemical precipitation. The NH4(+)-N and phosphorus Langmuir isotherm model fitted the clay loam soil adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. Overall, these results indicate that an SLIS provides an alternative means of removing runoff pollutants owing to its efficiency, easy operation and maintenance.

  18. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  19. Physico-chemical mechanism for the vapors sensitivity of photoluminescent InP quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosposito, P.; De Angelis, R.; De Matteis, F.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Zhang, H.; Casalboni, M.

    2016-03-01

    InP/InGaP surface quantum dots are interesting materials for optical chemical sensors since they present an intense emission at room temperature, whose intensity changes rapidly and reversibly depending on the composition of the environmental atmosphere. We present here their emission properties by time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy investigation and we discuss the physico-chemical mechanism behind their sensitivity to the surrounding atmosphere. Photoluminescence transients in inert atmosphere (N2) and in solvent vapours of methanol, clorophorm, acetone and water were measured. The presence of vapors of clorophorm, acetone and water showed a very weak effect on the transient times, while an increase of up to 15% of the decay time was observed for methanol vapour exposure. On the basis of the vapor molecule nature (polarity, proticity, steric hindrance, etc.) and of the interaction of the vapor molecules with the quantum dots surface a sensing mechanism involving quantum dots non-radiative surface states is proposed.

  20. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  1. Chemical hazards present in liquids and vapors of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Christoph; Paschke, Meike; Kruschinski, Svetlana; Henkler, Frank; Hahn, Jürgen; Luch, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Electronic (e-)cigarettes have emerged in recent years as putative alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. These products do not contain typical carcinogens that are present in tobacco smoke, due to the lack of combustion. However, besides nicotine, hazards can also arise from other constituents of liquids, such as solvents, flavors, additives and contaminants. In this study, we have analyzed 28 liquids of seven manufacturers purchased in Germany. We confirm the presence of a wide range of flavors to enhance palatability. Although glycerol and propylene glycol were detected in all samples, these solvents had been replaced by ethylene glycol as dominant compound in five products. Ethylene glycol is associated with markedly enhanced toxicological hazards when compared to conventionally used glycerol and propylene glycol. Additional additives, such as coumarin and acetamide, that raise concerns for human health were detected in certain samples. Ten out of 28 products had been declared "free-of-nicotine" by the manufacturer. Among these ten, seven liquids were identified containing nicotine in the range of 0.1-15 µg/ml. This suggests that "carry over" of ingredients may occur during the production of cartridges. We have further analyzed the formation of carbonylic compounds in one widely distributed nicotine-free brand. Significant amounts of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and propionaldehyde were only found at 150 °C by headspace GC-MS analysis. In addition, an enhanced formation of aldehydes was found in defined puff fractions, using an adopted machine smoking protocol. However, this effect was delayed and only observed during the last third of the smoking procedure. In the emissions of these fractions, which represent up to 40 % of total vapor volume, similar levels of formaldehyde were detected when compared to conventional tobacco cigarettes. By contrast, carbonylic compounds were hardly detectable in earlier collected fractions. Our data demonstrate the

  2. Density-controlled growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowires using chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were grown on Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the density of nanowires was related to the heating process and growth temperature.High-density ZnO nanowires were obtained under optimal conditions.The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanowires was presented as well.

  3. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occ...

  4. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique ar

  5. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  6. Growth Process Conditions of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.; Geus, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO3−x) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was

  7. Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Using Ultrashort Precursor Injection Pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    An alternative plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method is developed and applied for the deposition of high-quality aluminum oxide (AlOx) films. The PECVD method combines a continuous plasma with ultrashort precursor injection pulses. We demonstrate that the modulation of the precurs

  8. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely sublimate

  9. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Atomically-Thin Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    photoluminescence. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) Nanotechnology Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) Raman spectroscopy 16...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i CONTENTS Page Introduction 1...UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 1 INTRODUCTION Recently, an explosion of interest in low-dimensional

  11. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  12. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  13. Chemical vapor detection using a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoo J; Park, Kwan Kyu; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, O; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2011-12-15

    Distributed sensing of gas-phase chemicals using highly sensitive and inexpensive sensors is of great interest for many defense and consumer applications. In this paper we present ppb-level detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a common simulant for sarin gas, with a ppt-level resolution using an improved capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) as a resonant chemical sensor. The improved CMUT operates at a higher resonant frequency of 47.7 MHz and offers an improved mass sensitivity of 48.8 zg/Hz/μm(2) by a factor of 2.7 compared to the previous CMUT sensors developed. A low-noise oscillator using the CMUT resonant sensor as the frequency-selective device was developed for real-time sensing, which exhibits an Allan deviation of 1.65 Hz (3σ) in the presence of a gas flow; this translates into a mass resolution of 80.5 zg/μm(2). The CMUT resonant sensor is functionalized with a 50-nm thick DKAP polymer developed at Sandia National Laboratory for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection. To demonstrate ppb-level detection of the improved chemical sensor system, the sensor performance was tested at a certified lab (MIT Lincoln Laboratory), which is equipped with an experimental chemical setup that reliably and accurately delivers a wide range of low concentrations down to 10 ppb. We report a high volume sensitivity of 34.5 ± 0.79 pptv/Hz to DMMP and a good selectivity of the polymer to DMMP with respect to dodecane and 1-octanol.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  15. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jie; LI Zhengcao; ZHANG Zhengjun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we report a simple approach to synthesize silicon carbide(SiC)nanowires by solid phase source chemical vapor deposition(CVD) at relatively low temperatures.3C-SiC nanowires covered by an amorphous shell were obtained on a thin film which was first deposited on silicon substrates,and the nanowires are 20-80 am in diameter and several μm in length,with a growth direction of[200].The growth of the nanowires agrees well on vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)process and the film deposited on the substrates plays an important role in the formation of nanowires.

  16. PARTICLE COATING BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION IN A FLUIDI7ED BED REACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregor; Czok; Joachim; Werther

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum coatings were created onto glass beads by chemical vapor deposition in a fluidized bed reactor at different temperatures. Nitrogen was enriched with Triisobutylaluminum (TIBA) vapor and the latter was thermally decomposed inside the fluidized bed to deposit the elemental aluminum. To ensure homogeneous coating on the bed material, the fluidizing conditions necessary to avoid agglomeration were investigated for a broad range of temperatures.The deposition reaction was modeled on the basis of a discrete particle simulation to gain insight into homogeneity and thickness of the coating throughout the bed material. In particular, the take-up of aluminum was traced for selected particles that exhibited a large mass of deposited aluminum.

  17. Discrete formulation of mixed finite element methods for vapor deposition chemical reaction equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhen-dong; ZHOU Yan-jie; ZHU Jiang

    2007-01-01

    The vapor deposition chemical reaction processes, which are of extremely extensive applications, can be classified as a mathematical modes by the following governing nonlinear partial differential equations containing velocity vector,temperature field,pressure field,and gas mass field.The mixed finite element(MFE)method is employed to study the system of equations for the vapor deposition chemical reaction processes.The semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE formulations are derived.And the existence and convergence(error estimate)of the semidiscrete and fully discrete MFE solutions are deposition chemical reaction processes,the numerical solutions of the velocity vector,the temperature field,the pressure field,and the gas mass field can be found out simultaneonsly.Thus,these researches are not only of important theoretical means,but also of extremely extensive applied vistas.

  18. Chemical vapor synthesis of size-selected zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polarz, Sebastian; Roy, Abhijit; Merz, Michael; Halm, Simon; Schröder, Detlef; Schneider, Lars; Bacher, Gerd; Kruis, Frank E; Driess, Matthias

    2005-05-01

    ZnO can be regarded as one of the most important metal oxide semiconductors for future applications. Similar to silicon in microelectronics, it is not only important to obtain nanoscale building blocks of ZnO, but also extraordinary purity has to be ensured. A new gas-phase approach to obtain size-selected, nanocrystalline ZnO particles is presented. The tetrameric alkyl-alkoxy zinc compound [CH(3)ZnOCH(CH(3))(2)](4) is chemically transformed into ZnO, and the mechanism of gas-phase transformation is studied in detail. Furthermore, the morphological genesis of particles via gas-phase sintering is investigated, and for the first time a detailed model of the gas-phase sintering processes of ZnO is presented. Various analytical techniques (powder XRD, TEM/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, etc.) are used to investigate the structure and purity of the samples. In particular, the defect structure of the ZnO was studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  19. Self-Catalytic Growth of Tin Oxide Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongani S. Thabethe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis of tin oxide (SnO2 nanowires by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process. Commercially bought SnO nanopowders were vaporized at 1050°C for 30 minutes with argon gas continuously passing through the system. The as-synthesized products were characterized using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The band gap of the nanowires determined from UV-visible absorption was around 3.7 eV. The SEM micrographs revealed “wool-like” structure which contains nanoribbons and nanowires with liquid droplets at the tips. Nanowires typically have diameter in the range of 50–200 nm and length 10–100 μm. These nanowires followed the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism.

  20. Effects of growth pressure on morphology of ZnO nanostructures by chemical vapor transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Eadi Sunil; Kim, Sungjin; Song, Jung-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Ku

    2016-08-01

    The effect of growth pressure on the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures in chemical vapor transport by using Zn powder and oxygen as source materials has been investigated. Highly uniform aligned ZnO nanorods or multifaceted tripod structures were grown depending on the growth pressure. The mechanism governing the morphology change was explained by the relative concentration of Zn vapor and supersaturation based on experimental observations. It was concluded that heterogeneous nucleation on the substrate is enhanced at low growth pressure, while homogeneous nucleation from vapor phase is enhanced at high growth pressure. The difference resulted in different morphology of ZnO nanostructures. ZnO nanorods grown at optimized condition were used for the fabrication of gas sensor for the detection of H2 gas.

  1. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  2. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  3. [The discussion of the infiltrative model of chemical knowledge stepping into genetics teaching in agricultural institute or university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Luo, Pei-Gao

    2010-05-01

    Chemistry is an important group of basic courses, while genetics is one of the important major-basic courses in curriculum of many majors in agricultural institutes or universities. In order to establish the linkage between the major course and the basic course, the ability of application of the chemical knowledge previously learned in understanding genetic knowledge in genetics teaching is worthy of discussion for genetics teachers. In this paper, the authors advocate to apply some chemical knowledge previously learned to understand genetic knowledge in genetics teaching with infiltrative model, which could help students learn and understand genetic knowledge more deeply. Analysis of the intrinsic logistic relationship among the knowledge of different courses and construction of the integral knowledge network are useful for students to improve their analytic, comprehensive and logistic abilities. By this way, we could explore a new teaching model to develop the talents with new ideas and comprehensive competence in agricultural fields.

  4. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamasaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist-CVD) were experimentally investigated from the viewpoint of mist behaviors and chemical reactions. The proper growth model, either vaporization or the Leidenfrost model, was studied by supplying two kinds of mists with different kinds of sources, such as H2 16O and H2 18O for ZnO growth and ZnCl2 and thiourea for ZnS growth. Moreover, the origin of the oxygen atoms of ZnO was investigated using a quantitative analysis. The role of chloro complex of zinc in the growth of ZnS from aqueous solutions was also examined by systematic studies.

  6. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  7. Low Temperature Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes via Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.R. Atiyan; D.R. Awang Biak; F. Ahmadun; I.S. Ahamad; F. Mohd Yasin; H. Mohamed Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) below 600℃ using supporting catalyst chemical vapor deposition method was reported by many research groups. However, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition received less attention due to imperfect nanotubes produced. In this work, the effects of varying the preheating temperature on the synthesis of CNT were investigated. The reaction temperature was set at 570℃. The preheating set temperature was varied from 150 to 400℃ at 50℃ interval. Three O-ring shape heating mantels were used as heating source for the preheater. In situ monitoring device was used to observe the temperature profile in the reactor. Benzene and ferrocene were used as the carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively. Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized when the preheating temperature was set at 400℃. When the preheating temperature was increased up to 400℃, both the length and the alignment of CNTs produced were improved.

  8. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  9. High index of refraction films for dielectric mirrors prepared by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusasco, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of metal oxides with high index of refraction can be prepared by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. We present some recent optical and laser damage results on oxide films prepared by MOCVD which could be used in a multilayer structure for highly reflecting (HR) dielectric mirror applications. The method of preparation affects both optical properties and laser damage threshold. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. TiOxNy coatings grown by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Francis; Duminica, Florin-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Titanium oxynitride coatings were deposited on various substrates by an original atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process using titanium tetra-iso-propoxide as titanium and oxygen precursors and hydrazine as a nitrogen source. The films composition was monitored by controlling the N2H4 mole fraction in the initial reactive gas phase. The variation of the N content in the films results in significant changes in morphological, structur...

  11. Theoretical Descriptions of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis in a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lubej, M.; Plazl, I.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which carbon nanotubes nucleate and grow are still poorly understood. Understanding and mathematically describing the process is crucial for its optimization. This paper reviews different models which have been proposed to explain carbon nanotube growth in the chemical vapor deposition process. The review is divided into two sections, the first section describes some nucleation, growth and termination simulations based on molecular dynamics, and the second section describes ...

  12. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium ...

  13. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes through Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新; 满卫东

    2005-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on glass by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases at the low temperature of 550 ℃. The experimental results show that both the self-bias potential and the density of the catalyst particles are responsible for the alignment of CNTs. When the catalyst particle density is high enough, strong interactions among the CNTs can inhibit CNTs from growing randomly and result in parallel alignment.

  14. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage.

  15. Synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with full in situ atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Vangelista, S.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Cocco, S.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Mameli, D. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita degli studi Milano-Bicocca, Via R Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions, i.e. the combination of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by an ultrathin tunnel oxide barrier, are core elements in a large variety of spin-based devices. We report on the use of combined chemical vapor and atomic layer deposition processes for the synthesis of magnetic tunnel junctions with no vacuum break. Structural, chemical and morphological characterizations of selected ferromagnetic and oxide layers are reported, together with the evidence of tunnel magnetoresistance effect in patterned Fe/MgO/Co junctions.

  16. Conducting Graphite/Cellulose Composite Film as a Candidate for Chemical Vapor-Sensing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihua Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A type of conductive graphite/cellulose composite film used for chemical vapor-sensing material was prepared at room temperature in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIm]Cl. Graphite was pretreated with both oxidation and reduction processes. Due to the use of N,N-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI, as a covalent cross-linking agent in [BMIm]Cl, there were limited chemical bonds between the graphite and cellulose. The composite film was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XRD. When these conducting films were exposed to certain organic vapors, their electrical resistances quickly changed, showing gas sensitivity. The percolation threshold of the conducting film was about 5 wt%. The gas-sensing behavior of these films in solvent were the opposite of those gas-sensing materials based on a non-polar polymer matrix. A typical negative vapor coefficient (NVC was observed when the film was placed in polar organic solvents such as methanol, ethanol, and acetone.

  17. Flexible electrochemical capacitors based on polypyrrole/carbon fibers via chemical polymerization of pyrrole vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Han, Gaoyi; Xiao, Yaoming; Chang, Yunzhen; Liu, Cuixian; Li, Miaoyu; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has been deposited on the carbon fibers (CFs) via chemical oxidation of monomer vapor strategy, during which FeCl3·6H2O in acetonitrile adsorbed on CFs acts as oxidant to polymerize the pyrrole vapor. The morphologies and capacitive properties of the PPy deposited on CFs (PPy/CFs) are strongly influenced by the concentration of oxidant used in the process. The assembled flexible capacitors by using PPy/CFs as electrodes and LiCl/polyvinyl alcohol as gel electrolyte have been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the composites of PPy/CFs prepared by using 350 mg mL-1 FeCl3·6H2O as oxidant (PPy/CFs-350) exhibit relatively higher specific capacitance and good rate capability. Compared with PPy/CFs prepared by electrochemical deposition (retaining 5% of the initial capacitance), the PPy/CFs prepared by chemically polymerizing monomer vapor shows excellent stability (retaining 85% of initial capacitance after 5000 cycles). Furthermore, cells fabricated by PPy/CFs show a fairly good performance under various bending states, three cells of PPy/CFs-350 connected in series can light up a light emitting diode with a voltage threshold of about 2.5 V for approximate 10 min after being charged for about 3 min, revealing the potential of the cells' practical applications.

  18. Hydrological, chemical, and isotopic budgets of Lake Chad: a quantitative assessment of evaporation, transpiration and infiltration fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchez, Camille; Goncalves, Julio; Deschamps, Pierre; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Hamelin, Bruno; Doumnang, Jean-Claude; Sylvestre, Florence

    2016-04-01

    In the Sahelian belt, Lake Chad is a key water body for 13 million people, who live on its resources. It experiences, however, substantial and frequent surface changes. Located at the centre of one of the largest endorheic basins in the world, its waters remain surprisingly fresh. Its low salinity has been attributed to a low infiltration flow whose value remains poorly constrained. Understanding the lake's hydrological behaviour in response to climate variability requires a better constraint of the factors that control its water and chemical balance. Based on the three-pool conceptualization of Lake Chad proposed by Bader et al. (2011), this study aims to quantify the total water outflow from the lake, the respective proportions of evaporation (E), transpiration (T), and infiltration (I), and the associated uncertainties. A Bayesian inversion method based on lake-level data was used, leading to total water loss estimates in each pool (E + T + I = ETI). Sodium and stable isotope mass balances were then used to separate total water losses into E, T, and I components. Despite the scarcity of representative data available on the lake, the combination of these two geochemical tracers is relevant to assess the relative contribution of these three outflows involved in the control of the hydrological budget. Mean evapotranspiration rates were estimated at 2070 ± 100 and 2270 ± 100 mm yr-1 for the southern and northern pools, respectively. Infiltration represents between 100 and 300 mm yr-1 but most of the water is evapotranspirated in the first few kilometres from the shorelines and does not efficiently recharge the Quaternary aquifer. Transpiration is shown to be significant, around 300 mm yr-1 and reaches 500 mm yr-1 in the vegetated zone of the archipelagos. Hydrological and chemical simulations reproduce the marked hydrological change between the normal lake state that occurred before 1972 and the small lake state after 1972 when the lake surface shrunk to a one

  19. MICHIGAN SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION REMEDIATION (MISER) MODEL: A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO MODEL SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND BIOVENTING OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN UNSATURATED GEOLOGICAL MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and bioventing (BV) are proven strategies for remediation of unsaturated zone soils. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can be used to integrate and quantify the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in field sc...

  20. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  2. MgB{sub 2} thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, X.X. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: xxx4@psu.edu; Pogrebnyakov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xu, S.Y.; Chen, K.; Cui, Y.; Maertz, E.C. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhuang, C.G. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Qi [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]|[Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liu, Z.K.; Soukiassian, A.; Schlom, D.G.; Weng, X.J.; Dickey, E.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chen, Y.B.; Tian, W.; Pan, X.Q. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cybart, S.A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dynes, R.C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) has been the most effective technique for depositing MgB{sub 2} thin films. It generates high magnesium vapor pressures and provides a clean environment for the growth of high purity MgB{sub 2} films. The epitaxial pure MgB{sub 2} films grown by HPCVD show higher-than-bulk T {sub c} due to tensile strain in the films. The HPCVD films are the cleanest MgB{sub 2} materials reported, allowing basic research, such as on magnetoresistance, that reveals the two-band nature of MgB{sub 2}. The carbon-alloyed HPCVD films demonstrate record-high H {sub c2} values promising for high magnetic field applications. The HPCVD films and multilayers have enabled the fabrication of high quality MgB{sub 2} Josephson junctions.

  3. Copper-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition for high-quality and metal-free single-layer graphene on amorphous SiO2 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungki; Song, Intek; Park, Chibeom; Son, Minhyeok; Hong, Misun; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jun Sung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2013-08-27

    We report that high-quality single-layer graphene (SLG) has been successfully synthesized directly on various dielectric substrates including amorphous SiO2/Si by a Cu-vapor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The Cu vapors produced by the sublimation of Cu foil that is suspended above target substrates without physical contact catalyze the pyrolysis of methane gas and assist nucleation of graphene on the substrates. Raman spectra and mapping images reveal that the graphene formed on a SiO2/Si substrate is almost defect-free and homogeneous single layer. The overall quality of graphene grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is comparable to that of the graphene grown by regular metal-catalyzed CVD on a Cu foil. While Cu vapor induces the nucleation and growth of SLG on an amorphous substrate, the resulting SLG is confirmed to be Cu-free by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SLG grown by Cu-vapor-assisted CVD is fabricated into field effect transistor devices without transfer steps that are generally required when SLG is grown by regular CVD process on metal catalyst substrates. This method has overcome two important hurdles previously present when the catalyst-free CVD process is used for the growth of SLG on fused quartz and hexagonal boron nitride substrates, that is, high degree of structural defects and limited size of resulting graphene, respectively.

  4. Electroluminescence and photoluminescence of conjugated polymer films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of naphthalene

    CERN Document Server

    Rajabi, Mojtaaba; Firouzjah, Marzieh Abbasi; Hosseini, Seyed Iman; Shokri, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Polymer light-emitting devices were fabricated utilizing plasma polymerized thin films as emissive layers. These conjugated polymer films were prepared by RF Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using naphthalene as monomer. The effect of different applied powers on the chemical structure and optical properties of the conjugated polymers was investigated. The fabricated devices with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ plasma polymerized Naphthalene/Alq3/Al showed broadband Electroluminescence (EL) emission peaks with center at 535-550 nm. Using different structural and optical tests, connection between polymers chemical structure and optical properties under different plasma powers has been studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies confirmed that a conjugated polymer film with a 3-D cross-linked network was developed. By increasing the power, products tended to form as highly cross-linked polymer films. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of plasma polymers showed different excimerc ...

  5. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  7. Chemical Species in the Vapor Phase of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks: Potential Impacts on Waste Tank Corrosion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2010-09-22

    The presence of corrosive and inhibiting chemicals on the tank walls in the vapor space, arising from the waste supernatant, dictate the type and degree of corrosion that occurs there. An understanding of how waste chemicals are transported to the walls and the affect on vapor species from changing supernatant chemistry (e.g., pH, etc.), are basic to the evaluation of risks and impacts of waste changes on vapor space corrosion (VSC). In order to address these issues the expert panel workshop on double-shell tank (DST) vapor space corrosion testing (RPP-RPT-31129) participants made several recommendations on the future data and modeling needs in the area of DST corrosion. In particular, the drying of vapor phase condensates or supernatants can form salt or other deposits at the carbon steel interface resulting in a chemical composition at the near surface substantially different from that observed directly in the condensates or the supernatants. As a result, over the past three years chemical modeling and experimental studies have been performed on DST supernatants and condensates to predict the changes in chemical composition that might occur as condensates or supernatants equilibrate with the vapor space species and dry at the carbon steel surface. The experimental studies included research on both the chemical changes that occurred as the supernatants dried as well as research on how these chemical changes impact the corrosion of tank steels. The chemical modeling and associated experimental studies were performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the research on tank steel corrosion at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This report presents a summary of the research conducted at PNNL with special emphasis on the most recent studies conducted in FY10. An overall summary of the project results as well as their broader implications for vapor space corrosion of the DST’s is given at the end of this report.

  8. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parame...

  11. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer Graphene on Copper Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Víctor-Manuel Freire; Badia-Canal, Jordi; Roca, Carles Corbella; Miralles, Esther Pascual; Serra, Enric Bertran; Bella, José-Luís Andújar

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on copper is an efficient technology for producing high-quality graphene for large areas. The objective of this work is to deposit graphene/few-layer graphene (FLG) using different types of copper substrate by a new hot-wire CVD process. We carried out the processes at temperatures below 1000 °C with acetylene (C2H2) as a precursor gas. After a general characterization of the samples, the results mostly indicate the formation of FLG on copper samples by this method. Nevertheless, the presence of pure, crystalline, and sufficiently flat surfaces is needed for depositing high-quality graphene layers.

  12. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  13. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  14. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  15. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  16. Shape correction of optical surfaces using plasma chemical vaporization machining with a hemispherical tip electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2012-01-20

    We propose a plasma chemical vaporization machining device with a hemispherical tip electrode for optical fabrication. Radio-frequency plasma is generated close to the electrode under atmospheric conditions, and a workpiece is scanned relative to the stationary electrode under three-axis motion control to remove target areas on a workpiece surface. Experimental results demonstrate that surface removal progresses although process gas is not forcibly supplied to the plasma. The correction of shape errors on conventionally polished spheres is performed. As a result, highly accurate smooth surfaces with the desired rms shape accuracy of 3 nm are successfully obtained, which confirms that the device is effective for the fabrication of optics.

  17. Fabrication of Isotropic Pyrocarbon at 1400℃ by Thermal Gradient Chemical Vapor Deposition Apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lingjun; ZHANG Dongsheng; LI Kezhi; LI Hejun

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was designed to prepare isotropic pyrocarbon by thermal gradient chemical vapor deposition apparatus.The deposition was performed under ambient atmosphere at 1400℃,with natural gas volume flow of 3.5 m~3/h for 80 h.The results show that the thickness and the bulk density of the deposit are about 1.95 g/cm~3 and 10 mm,respectively.The microstructure of the deposit was examined by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy,which shows that the deposit is constituted of sphere isotropic pyrocarbon,pebble pyrocarbon and laminar pyrocarbon.

  18. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  19. High efficiency AIGaAs/Si monolithic tandem solar cell grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuo, Soga; T.", "Kato; M., Yang; Masayoshi, Umeno; Takashi, Jimbo

    1995-01-01

    The improvements of the AlGaAs solar cell grown on the Si substrate and the AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition have been investigated. The active‐area conversion efficiency of the Al0.1Ga0.9As solar cell on the Si substrate as high as 12.9% has been obtained by improving the growth sequence and adopting an Al compositionally graded band emitter layer. A high efficiency monolithic AlGaAs/Si tandem solar cell with the active‐area conversion efficiency of 19.9%...

  20. In-situ preparation of polymer-coated alumina nanopowders by chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schallehn, M.; Winterer, M.; Weirich, T.E.; Hahn, H. [Inst. of Materials Science, Darmstadt Univ. of Technology, Darmstadt (Germany); Keiderling, U. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst., Berlin (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline alumina particles coated with polyethylene have been prepared by a two-step chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) process using a hot-wall reactor to synthesize the nanocrystalline alumina core, and a RF plasma reactor for the subsequent polymer coating. The particle radius is about 4 nm, with the radius of the ceramic core being about 2.5 nm and the coating thickness about 1.5 nm. The powders have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). (orig.)

  1. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  2. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  3. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  4. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  5. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Acharya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc and high critical current density (Jc. The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  7. Growth and characterization of Bi2Se3 crystals by chemical vapor transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Jiao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly-shaped high-quality Bi2Se3 crystals were grown by a chemical vapor transport using iodine as the transport agent. In addition to exhibiting a characteristic Dirac cone for a topological insulator, the Bi2Se3 crystals show some outstanding properties including additional crystallographic surfaces, large residual resistance ratio (∼10, and high mobility (∼8000 cm2·V−1·s−1. The low-temperature resistivity abnormally increases with applying pressures up to 1.7 GPa, and no superconductivity was observed down to 0.4 K.

  8. MgB2 ultrathin films fabricated by hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition and ion milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Lee, Namhoon; Lang, Andrew C.; Taheri, Mitra; Cunnane, Dan; Karasik, Boris. S.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we report on the structural and transport measurements of ultrathin MgB2 films grown by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition followed by low incident angle Ar ion milling. The ultrathin films as thin as 1.8 nm, or 6 unit cells, exhibit excellent superconducting properties such as high critical temperature (Tc) and high critical current density (Jc). The results show the great potential of these ultrathin films for superconducting devices and present a possibility to explore superconductivity in MgB2 at the 2D limit.

  9. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  10. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  11. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  12. Functionalized bioinspired microstructured optical fiber pores for applications in chemical vapor sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Jacob A.

    Chemical vapor sensing for defense, homeland security, environmental, and agricultural application is a challenge, which due combined requirements of ppt sensitivity, high selectivity, and rapid response, cannot be met using conventional analytical chemistry techniques. New sensing approaches and platforms are necessary in order to make progress in this rapidly evolving field. Inspired by the functionalized nanopores on moth sensilla hairs that contribute to the high selectivity and sensitivity of this biological system, a chemical vapor sensor based on the micro to nanoscale pores in microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) was designed. This MOF based chemical vapor sensor design utilizes MOF pores functionalized with organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for selectivity and separations and a gold plasmonic sensor for detection and discrimination. Thin well-controlled gold films in MOF pores are critical components for the fabrication of structured plasmonic chemical vapor sensors. Thermal decomposition of dimethyl Au(II) trifluoroacetylacetonate dissolved in near-critical CO2 was used to deposit gold island films within the MOF pores. Using a 3mercatopropyltrimethoxysilane adhesion layer, continuous gold thin films as thin as 20--30 nm were deposited within MOF pores as small as 500 nm in diameter. The gold island films proved to be SERS active and were used to detect 900 ppt 2,4 DNT vapor in high pressure nitrogen and 6 ppm benzaldehyde. MOF based waveguide Raman (WGR), which can probe the air/silica interface between a waveguiding core and surrounding pores, was developed to detect and characterize SAMs and other thin films deposited in micro to nanoscale MOF pores. MOF based WGR was used to characterize an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAM deposited in 1.6 mum diameter pores iv to demonstrate that the SAM was well-formed, uniform along the pore length, and only a single layer. MOF based WGR was used to detect a human serum albumin monolayer deposited on the

  13. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  14. Chemical sensing of copper phthalocyanine sol-gel glass through organic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridhi, R.; Gawri, Isha; Abbas, Saeed J.; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K. [Department of Physics, Center of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014 (INDIA) Fax: +91-172-2783336; Tel.:+91-172-2544362 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The sensitivities of metallophthalocyanine to vapor phase electron donors has gained significance in many areas and disciplines due to their sensing properties and ease of operation. In the present study the interaction mechanism of organic vapors in Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc) sol-gel glass has been studied. The interaction mechanism is affected by many factors like morphology, electrical or optical properties of film. CuPc sol-gel glass has been synthesized using chemical route sol-gel method. Its structural characterization was conducted using XRD and the amorphous nature of the silicate glass was observed with characteristic α polymorph phase of CuPc at around 6.64° with 13.30Å interplanar spacing. The size of the particle as determined using Debbye Scherre’s formula comes out around 15.5 nm. The presence of α phase of CuPc was confirmed using FTIR with the appearance of crystal parameter marker band at 787 cm-1. Apart from this A2u and Eu symmetry bands of CuPc have also been observed. The UV absorption spectrum of CuPc exhibits absorption peaks owing to π→ π* and n→ π* transitions. A blue shift in the prepared CuPc glass has been observed as compared to the dopant CuPc salt indicating increase of band gap. A split in B (Soret) band and Q band appears as observed with the help of Lorentzian fitting. CuPc sol gel glass has been exposed with chemical vapors of Methanol, Benzene and Bromine individually and the electrical measurements have been carried out. These measurements show the variation in conductivity and the interaction mechanism has been analyzed.

  15. Simultaneous Chemical and Optical Patterning of Polyacrylonitrile Film by Vapor-Based Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Lee, Choonghyeon; Cha, Sang-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2015-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film is treated with ethyleneamines (EDA) in a simple chemical vapor phase reaction. Successful introduction of amine functional groups on the cyano group of PAN backbone is verified by FT-IR and NMR measurements. Further UV-vis and photoluminescence analyses show a red shift of the emission peak after repeated EDA treatment, which might be attributed to the formation of imine conjugation from newly formed carbon-nitrogen bonds on the PAN backbone. Further confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that selective patterning of EDA on PAN films is possible via local polydimethylsiloxane masking. The results indicate that both chemical and optical patterning on PAN film can be realized via a single reaction and show the potential of this novel methodology in selective patterning.

  16. Laterally Stitched Heterostructures of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide: Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth on Lithographically Patterned Area

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2016-10-31

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have shown great promise in electronics and optoelectronics due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Heterostructured TMDC layers such as the laterally stitched TMDCs offer the advantages of better electronic contact and easier band offset tuning. Here, we demonstrate a photoresist-free focused ion beam (FIB) method to pattern as-grown TMDC monolayers by chemical vapor deposition, where the exposed edges from FIB etching serve as the seeds for growing a second TMDC material to form desired lateral heterostructures with arbitrary layouts. The proposed lithographic and growth processes offer better controllability for fabrication of the TMDC heterostrucuture, which enables the construction of devices based on heterostructural monolayers. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  17. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  18. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source....... This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  19. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  20. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  1. Stability increase of fuel clad with zirconium oxynitride thin film by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Seung Hyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk [Recycled Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Joo [Materials Research and Education Center, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 275 Wilmore Labs, AL 36849-5341 (United States); Kang, Seong Sik [Regulatory Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Soo, E-mail: yoonys@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon Dong, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    A zirconium oxynitride (ZON) thin film was deposited onto HT9 steel as a cladding material by a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in order to prevent a fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) between a U-10 wt% Zr metal fuel and a clad material. X-ray diffraction spectrums indicated that the mixture of structures of zirconium nitride, oxide and carbide in the MOCVD grown ZON thin films. Also, typical equiaxial grain structures were found in plane and cross sectional images of the as-deposited ZON thin films with a thickness range of 250-500 nm. A depth profile using auger electron microscopy revealed that carbon and oxygen atoms were decreased in the ZON thin film deposited with hydrogen gas flow. Diffusion couple tests at 800 Degree-Sign C for 25 hours showed that the as-deposited ZON thin films had low carbon and oxygen content, confirmed by the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, which showed a barrier behavior for FCCI between the metal fuel and the clad. This result suggested that ZON thin film cladding by MOCVD, even with the thickness below the micro-meter level, has a high possibility as an effective FCCI barrier. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zirconium oxynitride (ZON) deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prevention of fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfusion reduced by between metal fuel (U-10 wt% Zr) and a HT9 cladding material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation of the ZON during growth improved the FCCI barrier performance.

  2. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  3. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  4. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R. [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  5. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  6. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamat, S., E-mail: shumailakaramat@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 54000 (Pakistan); Sonuşen, S. [Sabancı Üniversitesi (SUNUM), İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Çelik, Ü. [Nanomagnetics Instruments, Ankara (Turkey); Uysallı, Y. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Oral, A., E-mail: orahmet@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene layers were grown on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition method and for the delicate removal of graphene from metal catalysts, electrolysis method was used by using different alkaline (sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide and barium hydroxide). • The delamination speed of PMMA/graphene stack was higher during the KOH and LiOH electrolysis as compare to NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. Ba(OH){sub 2} is not advisable because of the residues left on the graphene surface which would further trapped in between graphene and SiO{sub 2}/Si surface after transfer. The average peeling time in case of Pt electrode is ∼6 min for KOH and LiOH and ∼15 min for NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2}. • Electrolysis method also works for the Cu catalyst. The peeling of graphene was faster in the case of Cu foil due to small size of bubbles which moves faster between the stack and the electrode surface. The average peeling time was ∼3–5 min. • XPS analysis clearly showed that the Pt substrates can be re-used again. Graphene layer was transferred to SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates and to the flexible substrate by using the same peeling method. - Abstract: In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2} for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and Li

  7. Temperature regulated-chemical vapor deposition for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Il Hee; Kim, Dae Han; Park, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Young Dok

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a novel strategy for incorporating NiO nanoparticles into mesoporous Al2O3 with a mean pore size of ∼12 nm and particle size of ∼1 mm. Ni-precursor vapor and ambient atmosphere were filled in a closed chamber with mesoporous Al2O3, and the chamber was initially heated at ∼100 °C, at which no chemical reaction between the inorganic precursor, oxygen, water vapor in the atmosphere, and the surface of Al2O3 took place. Next, the temperature of the system was increased to 260 °C for deposition of NiO. We found that NiO nanoparticles were not only deposited on the surface, but were also incorporated in a 50 μm-deep region of the mesoporous Al2O3 gel. We also demonstrated high CO oxidation activity and reusability of the deactivated NiO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the aforementioned method. These results suggest that our strategy could be widely applicable to the incorporation of various nanoparticles into mesoporous supports.

  8. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of thermoresponsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) thin films for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Jiao, Alex; Yu, Seungjung; You, Jae Bem; Kim, Deok-Ho; Im, Sung Gap

    2013-08-01

    Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) is a thermoresponsive polymer known to be nontoxic, water soluble and biocompatible. Here, PNVCL homopolymer was successfully synthesized for the first time by use of a one-step vapor-phase process, termed initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed that radical polymerization took place from N-vinylcaprolactam monomers without damaging the functional caprolactam ring. A sharp lower critical solution temperature transition was observed at 31°C from the iCVD poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) film. The thermoresponsive PNVCL surface exhibited a hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration with external temperature change, which enabled the thermally modulated attachment and detachment of cells. The conformal coverage of PNVCL film on various substrates with complex topography, including fabrics and nanopatterns, was successfully demonstrated, which can further be utilized to fabricate cell sheets with aligned cell morphology. The advantage of this system is that cells cultured on such thermoresponsive surfaces could be recovered as an intact cell sheet by simply lowering the temperature, eliminating the need for conventional enzymatic treatments.

  9. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  10. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  11. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  12. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  13. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4 μm, with a peak responsivity of up to ∼100 μA/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140 K.

  14. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  15. AB-stacked multilayer graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition: a characterization by hot carrier transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pinto, Carlos; De, Debtanu; Hadjiev, Viktor G; Peng, Haibing

    2012-02-28

    We report the synthesis of AB-stacked multilayer graphene via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu foils and demonstrate a method to construct suspended multilayer graphene devices. In four-terminal geometry, such devices were characterized by hot carrier transport at temperatures down to 240 mK and in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The differential conductance (dI/dV) shows a characteristic dip at longitudinal voltage bias V = 0 at low temperatures, indicating the presence of hot electron effect due to a weak electron-phonon coupling. Under magnetic fields, the magnitude of the dI/dV dip diminishes through the enhanced intra-Landau level cyclotron phonon scattering. Our results provide new perspectives in obtaining and understanding AB-stacked multilayer graphene, important for future graphene-based applications.

  16. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  17. Growth of carbon nanotubes by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor processes on silicon-based substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Renato; Rizzoli, Rita; Vinciguerra, Vincenzo; Fortuna Bevilacqua, Maria; Guerri, Sergio; Corticelli, Franco; Passini, Mara

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, a site-selective catalytic chemical vapor deposition synthesis of carbon nanotubes on silicon-based substrates has been developed in order to get horizontally oriented nanotubes for field effect transistors and other electronic devices. Properly micro-fabricated silicon oxide and polysilicon structures have been used as substrates. Iron nanoparticles have been obtained both from a thin Fe film evaporated by e-gun and from iron nitrate solutions accurately dispersed on the substrates. Single-walled nanotubes with diameters as small as 1 nm, bridging polysilicon and silicon dioxide “pillars”, have been grown. The morphology and structure of CNTs have been characterized by SEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Controlling nucleation of monolayer WSe2 during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichfeld, Sarah M.; Oliveros Colon, Víctor; Nie, Yifan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-06-01

    Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) is a semiconducting, two-dimensional (2D) material that has gained interest in the device community recently due to its electronic properties. The synthesis of atomically thin WSe2, however, is still in its infancy. In this work we elucidate the requirements for large selenium/tungsten precursor ratios and explain the effect of nucleation temperature on the synthesis of WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The introduction of a nucleation-step prior to growth demonstrates that increasing nucleation temperature leads to a transition from a Volmer-Weber to Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. Additionally, the nucleation step prior to growth leads to an improvement of WSe2 layer coverage on the substrate. Finally, we note that the development of this two-step technique may allow for improved control and quality of 2D layers grown via CVD and MOCVD processes.

  19. Characterization of nanocarbon deposited on insulator substrate by alcohol chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Marina; Murata, Hidenobu; Tachibana, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer-graphene-like nanocarbon materials were directly deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition with ethanol as a carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the deposited materials have sheetlike grains of around 100 nm diameter. Most of them have “hills” with 32 nm diameter on the grains. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, the height of the sheetlike grains is below 1 nm, which is comparable to that of single-layer graphene, while the hills have a height of several nm. Raman spectra show that the material is similar to graphitic nanocarbon, which has a strong D band. This result implies that there are a number of defects in the nanocarbon materials.

  20. Synthesis of zirconia (ZrO2) nanowires via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, M. K.; Park, S. J.; Choi, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Monoclinic zirconia nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using ZrCl4 powder as a starting material at 1200 °C and 760 Torr. Graphite was employed as a substrate, and an Au thin film was pre-deposited on the graphite as a catalyst. The zirconia nanostructure morphology was observed through scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy data, the resulting crystal structure was found to be single crystalline monoclinic zirconia. The homogeneous distributions of Zr, O and Au were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and there was no metal droplet at the nanowire tips despite the use of an Au metal catalyst. This result is apart from that of conventional metal catalyzed nanowires.

  1. Preparation of diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学璋; 罗浩; 苏栩; 余志明

    2015-01-01

    A Ti interlayer with thickness about 300 nm was sputtered on Cu microchannels, followed by an ultrasonic seeding with nanodiamond powders. Adherent diamond film with crystalline grains close to thermal equilibrium shape was tightly deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The nucleation and growth of diamond were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Results show that the nucleation density is found to be up to 1010 cm−2. The enhancement of the nucleation kinetics can be attributed to the nanometer rough Ti interlayer surface. An improved absorption of nanodiamond particles is found, which act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD process. Furthermore, finite element simulation was conducted to understand the thermal management properties of prepared diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink.

  2. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  3. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  4. FABRICATION OF DIAMOND TUBES IN BIAS-ENHANCED HOT-FILAMENT CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; MA Yuping; XIANG Daohui; SUN Fanghong

    2007-01-01

    Deposition of diamond thin films on tungsten wire Substrate with the gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen by using bias-enhanced hol filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with the tantalum wires being optimized arranged is investigated. The self-supported diamond tubes are obtained by etching away the tungsten Substrates. The quality of the diamond film before and after the removal of Substrates is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectrum. The results show that the cylindrical diamond tubes with good quality and uniform thickness are obtained on tungsten wires by using bias enhanced hot filament CVD. The compressive stress in diamond film formed during the deposition is released after the Substrate etches away by mixture of H202 and NH4OH. There is no residual stress in diamond tube after Substrate removal.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  6. Study of surface morphology and alignment of MWCNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrullah, S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, M. S., E-mail: zshukrullah@gmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Yasar, M., E-mail: Muhammad.yasar@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    In this research work, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized successfully by using floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Different ferrocene amounts (0.1, 0.125 and 0.15 g) were used as catalyst and ethylene was used as a carbon precursor at reaction temperature of 800°C. Characterization of the grown MWCNTs was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed that the catalyst weight affects the nanotubes diameter, alignment, crystallinity and growth significantly, whereas negligible influence was noticed on CNTs forest length. The dense, uniform and meadow like patterns of grown CNTs were observed for 0.15 g ferrocene. The average diameter of the grown CNTs was found in the range of 32 to 75 nm. Close inspection of the TEM images also confirmed the defects in some of the grown CNTs, where few black spots were evident in CNTs structure.

  7. Low temperature metal free growth of graphene on insulating substrates by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, R.; Munuera, C.; Martínez, J. I.; Azpeitia, J.; Gómez-Aleixandre, C.; García-Hernández, M.

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650 °C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  8. Non-classical crystallization of silicon thin films during hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Da-Seul; Kim, Kun-Su; Park, Soon-Won; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The deposition behavior of silicon films by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) was approached by non-classical crystallization, where the building block of deposition is a nanoparticle generated in the gas phase of the reactor. The puzzling phenomenon of the formation of an amorphous incubation layer on glass could be explained by the liquid-like property of small charged nanoparticles (CNPs), which are generated in the initial stage of the HWCVD process. Using the liquid-like property of small CNPs, homo-epitaxial growth as thick as 150 nm could be successfully grown on a silicon wafer at 600 °C under the processing condition where CNPs as small as possible could be supplied steadily by a cyclic process which periodically resets the process. The size of CNPs turned out to be an important parameter in the microstructure evolution of thin films.

  9. Structure and magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles synthesized by chemical vapor condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. H.; Jang, T. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, B. K.

    2004-06-01

    Iron nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) without the aid of LN2 chiller. The powder synthesized at 400 °C was a mixture of amorphous and crystalline -Fe. Fully crystallized iron particles were then obtained at and above 600 °C. When the reactor temperature was 1000 °C, however, nonmagnetic -Fe was stabilized together with -Fe. The synthesized particles, mostly possessing the core-shell type structure, were all nearly spherical, but the average particle size rapidly increased as the temperature increased. The surface layer that enclosed the iron core and became thicker in smaller particles was Fe3O4 or Fe3O4-related amorphous. Except for the one synthesized at 1000 °C, the iron nanoparticles were not fully saturated. The iron nanoparticles (20 nm) synthesized at 600 °C exhibited iHc 1.0 kOe and Ms 170 emu/g.

  10. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, Wilfried; Nguyen, Luan; Bhaktha, S N B; Sebbah, Patrick; Pal, Bishnu P; Dussardier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium co-doped fibers were fabricated. Optical transmission in term of loss due to scattering as well as some spectroscopic characteristics of the erbium ions was studied. For low Mg content, nano-scale particles could be grown with and relatively low scattering losses were obtained, whereas large Mg-content causes the growth of larger particles resulting in much higher loss. However in the latter case, certain interesting alteration of the spectroscopic properties of the erbium ions were observed. These initial studies should be useful in incorporati...

  11. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  12. Ultrahigh-mobility graphene devices from chemical vapor deposition on reusable copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Dauber, Jan; Oellers, Martin; Haupt, Federica; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Graphene research has prospered impressively in the past few years, and promising applications such as high-frequency transistors, magnetic field sensors, and flexible optoelectronics are just waiting for a scalable and cost-efficient fabrication technology to produce high-mobility graphene. Although significant progress has been made in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth of graphene, the carrier mobility obtained with these techniques is still significantly lower than what is achieved using exfoliated graphene. We show that the quality of CVD-grown graphene depends critically on the used transfer process, and we report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD growth and making devices with mobilities as high as 350,000 cm2 V–1 s–1, thus rivaling exfoliated graphene. PMID:26601221

  13. Tungsten-Carbon X-ray Multilayered Mirror Prepared by Photo-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    1989-05-01

    A tungsten-carbon(W/C) X-ray multilayered mirror was prepared by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) using a low-pressure mercury lamp and an argon-fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. The 40% reflectivity of this mirror was measured using a small-angle X-ray diffractometer with Cu-Kα radiation. This reflectivity is lower than the theoretical reflectivity of 80%. From observations of the transmission electron micrograph from this multilayered mirror, it seems that the reduction of the reflectivity was caused by the indistinct interfaces of the diffused films, and by the roughness of the films introduced by partial crystallization of the tungsten films.

  14. Influence of gas phase equilibria on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda M; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-04-23

    We have investigated the influence of gas phase chemistry on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene in a hot wall reactor. A new extended parameter space for graphene growth was defined through literature review and experimentation at low pressures (≥0.001 mbar). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dark field optical microscopy, with the latter showing promise as a rapid and nondestructive characterization technique for graphene films. The equilibrium gas compositions have been calculated across this parameter space. Correlations between the graphene films grown and prevalent species in the equilibrium gas phase revealed that deposition conditions associated with a high acetylene equilibrium concentration lead to good quality graphene deposition, and conditions that stabilize large hydrocarbon molecules in the gas phase result in films with multiple defects. The transition between lobed and hexagonal graphene islands was found to be linked to the concentration of the monatomic hydrogen radical, with low concentrations associated with hexagonal islands.

  15. Growth inhibition to enhance conformal coverage in thin film chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Daly, Scott R; Girolami, Gregory S; Abelson, John R

    2008-12-31

    We introduce the use of a growth inhibitor to enhance thin film conformality in low temperature chemical vapor deposition. Films of TiB(2) grown from the single source precursor Ti(BH(4))(3)(dme) are much more highly conformal when grown in the presence of one of the film growth byproducts, 1,2-dimethoxyethane (dme). This effect can be explained in terms of two alternative inhibitory mechanisms: one involving blocking of surface reactive sites, which is equivalent to reducing the rate of the forward reaction leading to film growth, the other analogous to Le Chatelier's principle, in which the addition of a reaction product increases the rate of the back reaction. The reduction in growth rate corresponds to a reduction in the sticking probability of the precursor, which enhances conformality by enabling the precursor to diffuse deeper into a recessed feature before it reacts.

  16. Plasma environment during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓东; 詹如娟; 周海洋; 胡敏; 温晓辉; 周贵恩; 李凡庆

    1999-01-01

    The plasma characteristics have been investigated in situ by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and the Langmuir probe during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The changes of atomic H and CH radical in the ground state have been calculated quantitatively according to the results of OES and the Langmuir probe measurement as discharge current density varied. It is shown that atomic H and CH radicals both in the ground state and in the excited state increase with the enhancement of the discharge current density in the plasma. The electron density and CH emission intensity increase linearly with the enhancement of discharge current densities. The generation of different carbon-containing radicals is related to the elevation of electron temperature. Combining the growth process of diamond films and the diagnostic results, it is shown that atomic H in the excited state may improve the diamond growth efficiently, and the increase of electron temperat

  17. Chemical vapor deposition polymerization the growth and properties of parylene thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jeffrey B

    2004-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition Polymerization - The Growth and Properties of Parylene Thin Films is intended to be valuable to both users and researchers of parylene thin films. It should be particularly useful for those setting up and characterizing their first research deposition system. It provides a good picture of the deposition process and equipment, as well as information on system-to-system variations that is important to consider when designing a deposition system or making modifications to an existing one. Also included are methods to characterizae a deposition system's pumping properties as well as monitor the deposition process via mass spectrometry. There are many references that will lead the reader to further information on the topic being discussed. This text should serve as a useful reference source and handbook for scientists and engineers interested in depositing high quality parylene thin films.

  18. MICROSTRUCTURE OF SiOx:H FILMS PREPARED BY PLASMA ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA ZHI-XUN; LIAO XIAN-BO; KONG GUANG-LIN; CHU JUN-HAO

    2000-01-01

    The micro-Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been performed for the study of the microstructure of amorphous hydrogenated oxidized silicon (a-SiOx:H) films prepared by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. It is found that a-SiOx :H consists of two phases: an amorphous silicon-rich phase and an oxygen-rich phase mainly comprised of HSi-SiO2 and HSi-O3. The Raman scattering results exhibit that the frequency of TO-like mode of amorphous silicon red-shifts with decreasing size of silicon-rich region. This is related to the quantum confinement effects, similar to the nanocrystalline silicon.

  19. Preparation of nanosized sililcon carbide powders by chemical vapor deposition at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; ZHANG Changrui; HU Haifeng; QI Gongjin

    2007-01-01

    Liquid carbosilane was synthesized and analyzed by infrared(IR) and H-NMR(nuclear magnetic resonance)spectroscopy.Silicon carbide(SiC)powders were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)at 850℃ and 900℃ from liquid carbosilanes.The product powders were characterized by IR spectroscopy,X-ray diffractometry(XRD)and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Results show that liquid carbosilane synthesized was the mixture of several oligomers that had a Si-C backbone.The powders prepared at 850℃ contain some organic segments,and those prepared at 900℃ are pure nanosized SiC powders,which are partly crystallized,the size of which is about 50-70 nm.

  20. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.

  1. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ˜1 μm and a length of ˜15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm-2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  2. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  3. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  5. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  6. Influences of H+ Implantation on the Boron-Doped Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang-Bao

    2000-01-01

    Diamond films (DF) were preliminarily B doped in situ during chemical vapor deposition. Subsequently, the films were implanted with 120keV H+ to dose of 5 × 1014 ~ 5 × 1016cm-2. After the implantation, the B doped DF become insulating and Raman measurements indicate that the implantation has amorphous carbon and graphite etched. It is known that the formation of H-B pairs plays an important pole in property changes. However, for larger dose cases, the electrical resistance of DF is influenced by radiation damage and/or non-diamond phases. In addition to them, annealing makes the specimens conducting again. This phenomenon maybe has potential for application in designing DF device.

  7. Fabrication of copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods within SBA-15 by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods grown in channels of mesoporous silica SBA-15 by chemical vapor deposition method has been synthesized. The morphology and microstructure of the resulting product were characterized by XRD patters, TEM images, EDS analysis and Raman spectra. The XRD and TEM revealed that the Cu3N phase was confined in channels of SBA-15 forming continuous nanowires with 6 nm around and hundreds of nanometers in length. Raman spectra of the final product and pure Cu3N showed peaks shift due to the quantum confinement effect of the nanowires. This preparation methodology only requires a mild working condition and is capable of template synthesis of other binary nitride nanostructures with controlled morphology inside the channels of mesoporous materials.

  8. Fabrication of copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods within SBA-15 by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; Frank Leung-Yuk Lam; YAN ZiFeng; HU XiJun

    2009-01-01

    Copper (Ⅰ) nitride nanorods grown in channels of mesoporous silica SBA-15 by chemical vapor depo- sition method has been synthesized. The morphology and microstructure of the resulting product were characterized by XRD patters, TEM images, EDS analysis and Raman spectra. The XRD and TEM re-vealed that the Cu3N phase was confined in channels of SBA-15 forming continuous nanowires with 6 nm around and hundreds of nanometers in length. Raman spectra of the final product and pure Cu3N showed peaks shift due to the quantum confinement effect of the nanowires. This preparation meth-odology only requires a mild working condition and is capable of template synthesis of other binary nitride nanostructures with controlled morphology inside the channels of mesoporous materials.

  9. Controlled Synthesis of Atomically Layered Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN is an attractive material for many applications including electronics as a complement to graphene, anti-oxidation coatings, light emitters, etc. However, the synthesis of high-quality h-BN is still a great challenge. In this work, via controlled chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN films with a controlled thickness down to atomic layers. The quality of as-grown h-BN is confirmed by complementary characterizations including high-resolution transition electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. This work will pave the way for production of large-scale and high-quality h-BN and its applications as well.

  10. Faraday effect of polycrystalline bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Kamakura, Ryosuke; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized polycrystalline thin film composed of a single phase of metastable bismuth iron garnet, Bi3Fe5O12, on a fused silica substrate, one of the most widely utilized substrates in the solid-state electronics, by using mist chemical vapor deposition (mist CVD) method. The phase purity and stoichiometry are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The resultant thin film shows a small surface roughness of 3.251 nm. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is 1200 G, and the Faraday rotation angle at 633 nm reaches -5.2 deg/μm. Both the magnetization and the Faraday rotation angles are somewhat higher than those of polycrystalline BIG thin films prepared by other methods.

  11. Spiral growth of few-layer MoS2 by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X.; Yan, C.; Tomer, D.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.

    2016-08-01

    Growth spirals exhibit appealing properties due to a preferred layer stacking and lack of inversion symmetry. Here, we report spiral growth of MoS2 during chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si and epitaxial graphene/SiC substrates, and their physical and electronic properties. We determine the layer-dependence of the MoS2 bandgap, ranging from 2.4 eV for the monolayer to a constant of 1.3 eV beyond the fifth layer. We further observe that spirals predominantly initiate at the step edges of the SiC substrate, based on which we propose a growth mechanism driven by screw dislocation created by the coalescence of two growth fronts at steps.

  12. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S., E-mail: michael.fuhrer@monash.edu [Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA and School of Physics, Monash University, 3800 Victoria (Australia)

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (∼8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  13. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  14. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  15. Fabrication of copper nanorods by low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; Frank Leung-Yuk Lam; HU Xijun; YAN Zifeng

    2006-01-01

    Copper nanorods have been synthesized in mesoporous SBA-15 by a low-temperature metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)employing copper (Ⅱ) acetylacetonate, Cu(acac)2,and hydrogen as a precursor and reactant gas, respectively. The hydrogen plays an important role in chemical reduction of oganometallic precursor which enhances mass transfer in the interior of the SBA-15 porous substrate. Such copper nanostructures are of great potentials in the semiconductor due to their unusual optical, magnetic and electronic properties.In addition, it has been found that chemically modifying the substrate surface by carbon deposition is crucial to such synthesis of copper nanostructures in the interior of the SBA-15, which is able to change the surface properties of SBA-15 from hydrophilic to hydrophobic to promote the adsorption of organic cupric precursor. It has also been found that the copper nanoparticles deposited on the external surface are almost eliminated and the copper nanorods are more distinct while the product was treated with ammonia. This approach could be achieved under a mild condition: a low temperature (400℃) and vacuum (2 kPa) which is extremely milder than the conventional method. It actually sounds as a foundation which is the first time to synthesize a copper nanorod at a mild condition of a low reaction temperature and pressure.

  16. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  17. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R.; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-01

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er2O3 and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO3 and ErFe2O4 phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N2. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  18. Prediction of aqueous solubility, vapor pressure and critical micelle concentration for aquatic partitioning of perfluorinated chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-10-01

    The majority of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of increasing risk to biota and environment due to their physicochemical stability, wide transport in the environment and difficulty in biodegradation. It is necessary to identify and prioritize these harmful PFCs and to characterize their physicochemical properties that govern the solubility, distribution and fate of these chemicals in an aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, available experimental data (10-35 compounds) of three important properties: aqueous solubility (AqS), vapor pressure (VP) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) on per- and polyfluorinated compounds were collected for quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) modeling. Simple and robust models based on theoretical molecular descriptors were developed and externally validated for predictivity. Model predictions on selected PFCs were compared with available experimental data and other published in silico predictions. The structural applicability domains (AD) of the models were verified on a bigger data set of 221 compounds. The predicted properties of the chemicals that are within the AD, are reliable, and they help to reduce the wide data gap that exists. Moreover, the predictions of AqS, VP, and CMC of most common PFCs were evaluated to understand the aquatic partitioning and to derive a relation with the available experimental data of bioconcentration factor (BCF).

  19. SiO{sub 2} coating of silver nanoparticles by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boies, Adam M; Girshick, Steven L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Roberts, Jeffrey T [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Zhang Bin; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Mochizuki, Amane, E-mail: jtrob@umn.ed, E-mail: slg@umn.ed [Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2009-07-22

    Gas-phase silver nanoparticles were coated with silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD). Silver nanoparticles, produced by inert gas condensation, and a SiO{sub 2} precursor, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at atmospheric pressure and varying temperatures. The VUV photons dissociate the TEOS precursor, initiating a chemical reaction that forms SiO{sub 2} coatings on the particle surfaces. Coating thicknesses were measured for a variety of operation parameters using tandem differential mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the particle coatings was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest purity films were produced at 300-400 {sup 0}C with low flow rates of additional oxygen. The photo-CVD coating technique was shown to effectively coat nanoparticles and limit core particle agglomeration at concentrations up to 10{sup 7} particles cm{sup -3}.

  20. Development of aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition for thin film fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Marthatika, Dian; Panatarani, Camellia; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to grow a thin film applied in many industrial applications. This paper report the development of an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) which is one of the CVD methods. Newly developed AACVD system consists of a chamber of pyrex glass, two wire-heating elements placed to cover pyrex glass, a substrate holder, and an aerosol generator using an air brush sprayer. The temperature control system was developed to prevent condensation on the chamber walls. The control performances such as the overshoot and settling time were obtained from of the developed temperature controller. Wire-heating elements were controlled at certain setting value to heat the injected aerosol to form a thin film in the substrate. The performance of as-developed AACVD system tested to form a thin film where aerosol was sprayed into the chamber with a flow rate of 7 liters/minutes, and vary in temperatures and concentrations of precursor. The temperature control system have an overshoot around 25 °C from the desired set point temperature, very small temperature ripple 2 °C and a settling time of 20 minutes. As-developed AACVD successfully fabricated a ZnO thin film with thickness of below 1 µm. The performances of system on formation of thin films influenced by the generally controlled process such as values of setting temperature and concentration where the aerosol flow rate was fixed. Higher temperature was applied, the more uniform ZnO thin films were produced. In addition, temperature of the substrate also affected on surface roughness of the obtained films, while concentration of ZnO precursor determined the thickness of produce films. It is concluded that newly simple AACVD can be applied to produce a thin film.

  1. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  2. Industrialization of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition for thin film applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, R.E.I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl

    2015-11-30

    The consequences of implementing a Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) chamber into an existing in-line or roll-to-roll reactor are described. The hardware and operation of the HWCVD production reactor is compared to that of existing roll-to-roll reactors based on Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The most important consequences are the technical consequences and the economic consequences, which are both discussed. The technical consequences are adaptations needed to the hardware and to the processing sequences due to the different interaction of the HWCVD process with the substrate and already deposited layers. The economic consequences are the reduced investments in radio frequency (RF) supplies and RF components. This is partially offset by investments that have to be made in higher capacity pumping systems. The most mature applications of HWCVD are moisture barrier coatings for thin film flexible devices such as Organic Light Emitting Diodes and Organic Photovoltaics, and passivation layers for multicrystalline Si solar cells, high mobility field effect transistors, and silicon heterojunction cells (also known as heterojunction cells with intrinsic thin film layers). Another example is the use of Si in thin film photovoltaics. The cost perspective per unit of thin film photovoltaic product using HWCVD is estimated at 0.07 €/Wp for the Si thin film component. - Highlights: • Review of consequences of implementing Hot Wire CVD into a manufacturing plant • Aspects of scaling up to large area and continuous manufacturing are discussed • Economic advantage of introducing a HWCVD process in a production system is estimated • Using HWCVD, the cost for the Si layers in photovoltaic products is 0.08 €/Wp.

  3. Synthesis of nanoscale materials via a novel chemical vapor deposition based apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Kevin L.

    Nanoscale materials are of interest due to the unusual properties afforded by their size. Two such morphologies, nanoparticles and the recently discovered "nanobelt" materials, are explored in this thesis. A novel nanoscale material synthesis apparatus was constructed. It consists of four primary components: an evaporation chamber, a chemical vapor deposition furnace, a collection chamber, and a powder reservoir. A two-stage subsonic jet separates the first two components, permitting nanoparticle production to occur independently of subsequent chemical and thermal treatment. An experimental design was conducted to examine the roles of several variables during the formation of graphite-encapsulated nickel nanoparticles. Coating morphology was strongly dependent on furnace temperature, which exhibited a more subtle influence on mean particle size. The percentage of nickel surviving acid treatment depended primarily on hydrocarbon identity, as well as furnace temperature and carbon atom flux. Acetylene at high temperature yielded crystalline carbon coatings and the greatest percentage of protected nickel achieved, but with an excess of carbon in the product. Additional encapsulated nickel experiments were conducted with reduced acetylene flowrates and a staggered furnace temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis of the as-collected powder revealed that the coating was a crystalline and amorphous carbon hybrid. While this coating effectively protected large clumps of embedded nickel, removal of the amorphous carbon by oxidation rendered individual particles susceptible to hydrochloric acid attack. Amorphous silica was introduced as an alternative coating material via tetraethoxysilane decomposition. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the production of well-dispersed, acid-resistant particles with a nickel core and silica shell. The synthesis of nanoscale alumina heterogeneous catalyst substrates was investigated. Exposure of aluminum nanoparticles to large

  4. Dynamics of chemical vapor sensing with MoS2 using 1T/2H phase contacts/channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam L.; Perkins, F. Keith; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Culbertson, James C.; Campbell, Paul M.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) films show remarkable potential for use in chemical vapor sensing devices. Electronic devices fabricated from TMD films are inexpensive, inherently flexible, low-power, amenable to industrial-scale processing because of emergent growth techniques, and have shown high sensitivity and selectivity to electron donor analyte molecules important for explosives and nerve gas detection. However, for devices reported to date, the conductance response to chemical vapors is dominated by Schottky contacts, to the detriment of the sensitivity, selectivity, recovery, and obscuring their intrinsic behavior. Here, we use contact engineering to transition the contacts in a MoS2 FET-based chemical vapor sensor to the 1T conducting phase, while leaving the channel in the 2H semiconducting state, and thus providing Ohmic contacts to the film. We demonstrate that the resultant sensors have much improved electrical characteristics, are more selective, and recover fully after chemical vapor exposure--all major enhancements to previously MoS2 sensor devices. We identify labile nitrogen-containing electron donors as the primary species that generate a response in MoS2, and we study the dynamics of the sensing reactions, identifying two possible qualitative models for the chemical sensing reaction.

  5. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hao [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States)]. E-mail: hao.jiang@wpafb.af.mil; Hong Lianggou [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States); Venkatasubramanian, N. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Eyink, Kurt [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Wiacek, Kevin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Fries-Carr, Sandra [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Enlow, Jesse [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2007-02-26

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} {sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F {sub b}) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F{sub b} of 610 V/{mu}m, an {epsilon} {sub r} of 3.07, and a tan {delta} of 7.0 x 10{sup -3} at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss.

  6. Nonradioactive Environmental Emissions Chemical Source Term for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Vapor Space During Waste Retrieval Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY, T.H.

    2000-04-21

    A nonradioactive chemical vapor space source term for tanks on the Phase 1 and the extended Phase 1 delivery, storage, and disposal mission was determined. Operations modeled included mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers. Concentrations of ammonia, specific volatile organic compounds, and quantitative volumes of aerosols were estimated.

  7. The influence of methanol addition during the film growth of SnO 2 by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volintiru, I.; Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Undoped tin oxide (SnO2) thin films have been deposited in a stagnant point flow chemical vapor deposition reactor from a water/tin tetrachloride mixture. By adding methanol during the deposition process the film electrical properties change significantly: ten times more conductive SnO 2 films are o

  8. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films for optical waveguide bridges for use in mechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Leistiko, Otto

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the influence of RF power, ammonia flow, annealing temperature, and annealing time on the optical and mechanical properties of plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon oxynitride films, is presented. A low refractive index (1.47 to 1.48) film having tensile stress has been...

  9. Continuous, Highly Flexible, and Transparent Graphene Films by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Organic Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Gomez De Arco, Lewis

    2010-05-25

    We report the implementation of continuous, highly flexible, and transparent graphene films obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) in organic photovoltaic cells. Graphene films were synthesized by CVD, transferred to transparent substrates, and evaluated in organic solar cell heterojunctions (TCE/poly-3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene:poly styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/copper phthalocyanine/fullerene/bathocuproine/aluminum). Key to our success is the continuous nature of the CVD graphene films, which led to minimal surface roughness (∼ 0.9 nm) and offered sheet resistance down to 230 Ω/sq (at 72% transparency), much lower than stacked graphene flakes at similar transparency. In addition, solar cells with CVD graphene and indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were fabricated side-by-side on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and were confirmed to offer comparable performance, with power conversion efficiencies (η) of 1.18 and 1.27%, respectively. Furthermore, CVD graphene solar cells demonstrated outstanding capability to operate under bending conditions up to 138°, whereas the ITO-based devices displayed cracks and irreversible failure under bending of 60°. Our work indicates the great potential of CVD graphene films for flexible photovoltaic applications. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Monolayer MoSe 2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition for Fast Photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yung-Huang

    2014-08-26

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has become a promising building block in optoelectronics for its high photosensitivity. However, sulfur vacancies and other defects significantly affect the electrical and optoelectronic properties of monolayer MoS2 devices. Here, highly crystalline molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) monolayers have been successfully synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Low-temperature photoluminescence comparison for MoS2 and MoSe 2 monolayers reveals that the MoSe2 monolayer shows a much weaker bound exciton peak; hence, the phototransistor based on MoSe2 presents a much faster response time (<25 ms) than the corresponding 30 s for the CVD MoS2 monolayer at room temperature in ambient conditions. The images obtained from transmission electron microscopy indicate that the MoSe exhibits fewer defects than MoS2. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the differences in optoelectronic behaviors between MoSe2 and MoS2 and is useful for guiding future designs in 2D material-based optoelectronic devices. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Unraveling the complex chemistry using dimethylsilane as a precursor gas in hot wire chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukabri, Rim; Shi, Yujun

    2014-05-07

    The gas-phase reaction chemistry when using dimethylsilane (DMS) as a source gas in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has been studied in this work. The complex chemistry is unraveled by using a soft 10.5 eV single photon ionization technique coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry in combination with the isotope labelling and chemical trapping methods. It has been demonstrated that both free-radical reactions and those involving silylene/silene intermediates are important. The reaction chemistry is characterized by the formation of 1,1,2,2-tetramethyldisilane (TMDS) from dimethylsilylene insertion into the Si-H bond of DMS, trimethylsilane (TriMS) from free-radical recombination, and 1,3-dimethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (DMDSCB) from the self dimerization of either dimethylsilylene or 1-methylsilene. At low filament temperatures and short reaction time, silylene chemistry dominates. The free-radical reactions become more important with increasing temperature and time. The same three products have been detected when using tantalum and tungsten filaments, indicating that changing the filament material from Ta to W does not affect much the gas-phase reaction chemistry when using DMS as a source gas in a hot-wire CVD reactor.

  12. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Nanocrystalline Tungsten Carbide Thin Film and Its Electro-catalytic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajun ZHENG; Chunan MA; Jianguo HUANG; Guohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten carbide thin films were fabricated on graphite substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at H2 and Ar atmosphere, using WF6 and CH4 as precursors. The crystal phase, structure and chemical components of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), respectively. The results show that the film prepared at CH4/WF6concentration ratio of 20 and at 800℃ is composed of spherical particles with a diameter of 20~35 nm. Electrochemical investigations show that the electrochemical real surface area of electrode of the film is large, and the electrode of the film exhibits higher electro-catalytic activity in the reaction of methanol oxidation. The designated constant current of the film catalyst is 123.6 mA/cm2 in the mixture solution of H2SO4 and CH3OH at the concentration of 0.5 and 2.0 mol/L at 70℃, and the designated constant potential is only 0.306 V (vs SCE).

  13. Chemical vapor transport and solid-state exchange synthesis of new copper selenite bromides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Kayukov, Roman A.; Zagidullin, Karim A.; Siidra, Oleg I.

    2017-02-01

    A new dimorphic copper selenite bromide, Cu5(SeO3)4Br2 was obtained via chemical transport reactions. α-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, monoclinic (1m) and β-Cu5(SeO3)4Br2, triclinic (1a) polymorphs were produced simultaneously upon reaction of amorphous, partially dehydrated copper selenite and copper bromide. 1m is similar to Cu5(SeO3)4Cl2, whereas 1a is distantly related to Ni5(SeO3)4Br2 and Co5(SeO3)4Br2. Attempts to reproduce synthesis of 1a via exchange reaction between Na2SeO3 and CuBr2 resulted in a new Na2[Cu7O2](SeO3)4Br4 (2). Current study demonstrates for the first time, that both chemical vapor and exchange reactions can be employed in preparation of new selenite halides.

  14. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  15. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  16. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  17. Gas temperature measurements inside a hot wall chemical vapor synthesis reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notthoff, Christian; Schilling, Carolin; Winterer, Markus

    2012-11-01

    One key but complex parameter in the chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) of nanoparticles is the time temperature profile of the gas phase, which determines particle characteristics such as size (distribution), morphology, microstructure, crystal, and local structure. Relevant for the CVS process and for the corresponding particle characteristics is, however, not the T(t)-profile generated by an external energy source such as a hot wall or microwave reactor but the temperature of the gas carrying reactants and products (particles). Due to a complex feedback of the thermodynamic and chemical processes in the reaction volume with the external energy source, it is very difficult to predict the real gas phase temperature field from the externally applied T(t)-profile. Therefore, a measurement technique capable to determine the temperature distribution of the gas phase under process conditions is needed. In this contribution, we demonstrate with three proof of principle experiments the use of laser induced fluorescence thermometry to investigate the CVS process under realistic conditions.

  18. Vapor Phase Alkyne Coating of Pharmaceutical Excipients: Discrimination Enhancement of Raman Chemical Imaging for Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Mayumi; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Moriyama, Kei

    2015-12-01

    Raman chemical imaging has become a powerful analytical tool to investigate the crystallographic characteristics of pharmaceutical ingredients in tablet. However, it is often difficult to discriminate some pharmaceutical excipients from each other by Raman spectrum because of broad and overlapping signals, limiting their detailed assessments. To overcome this difficulty, we developed a vapor phase coating method of excipients by an alkyne, which exhibits a distinctive Raman signal in the range of 2100-2300 cm(-1) . We found that the combination of two volatile reagents, propargyl bromide and triethylamine, formed a thin and nonvolatile coating on the excipient and observed the Raman signal of the alkyne at the surface. We prepared alkyne-coated cellulose by this method and formed a tablet. The Raman chemical imaging of the tablet cross-section using the alkyne peak area intensity of 2120 cm(-1) as the index showed a much clearer particle image of cellulose than using the peak area intensity of 1370 cm(-1) , which originated from the cellulose itself. Our method provides an innovative technique to analyze the solid-state characteristics of pharmaceutical excipients in tablets.

  19. Superhydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membrane fabricated by chemical vapor deposition from solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhenrong [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Gu Zhenya, E-mail: zhenyagu@hotmail.com [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Huo Ruiting; Ye Yonghong [College of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China)

    2009-05-30

    Due to the chemical stability and flexibility, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes are widely used as the topcoat of architectural membrane structures, roof materials of vehicle, tent fabrics, and so on. Further modified PVDF membrane with superhydrophobic property may be even superior as the coating layer surface. The lotus flower is always considered to be a sacred plant, which can protect itself against water, dirt, and dust. The superhydrophobic surface of lotus leaf is rough, showing the micro- and nanometer scale morphology. In this work, the microreliefs of lotus leaf were mimicked using PVDF membrane and the nanometer scale peaks on the top of the microreliefs were obtained by the method of chemical vapor deposition from solution. The surface morphology of PVDF membrane was investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Elemental composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the material of the nanostructure of PVDF membrane was polymethylsiloxane. On the lotus-leaf-like PVDF membrane, the water contact angle and sliding angle were 155 deg. and 4 deg., respectively, exhibiting superhydrophobic property.

  20. Superhydrophobicity of polyvinylidene fluoride membrane fabricated by chemical vapor deposition from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenrong; Gu, Zhenya; Huo, Ruiting; Ye, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    Due to the chemical stability and flexibility, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes are widely used as the topcoat of architectural membrane structures, roof materials of vehicle, tent fabrics, and so on. Further modified PVDF membrane with superhydrophobic property may be even superior as the coating layer surface. The lotus flower is always considered to be a sacred plant, which can protect itself against water, dirt, and dust. The superhydrophobic surface of lotus leaf is rough, showing the micro- and nanometer scale morphology. In this work, the microreliefs of lotus leaf were mimicked using PVDF membrane and the nanometer scale peaks on the top of the microreliefs were obtained by the method of chemical vapor deposition from solution. The surface morphology of PVDF membrane was investigated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Elemental composition analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the material of the nanostructure of PVDF membrane was polymethylsiloxane. On the lotus-leaf-like PVDF membrane, the water contact angle and sliding angle were 155° and 4°, respectively, exhibiting superhydrophobic property.

  1. Gas temperature measurements inside a hot wall chemical vapor synthesis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notthoff, Christian; Schilling, Carolin; Winterer, Markus

    2012-11-01

    One key but complex parameter in the chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) of nanoparticles is the time temperature profile of the gas phase, which determines particle characteristics such as size (distribution), morphology, microstructure, crystal, and local structure. Relevant for the CVS process and for the corresponding particle characteristics is, however, not the T(t)-profile generated by an external energy source such as a hot wall or microwave reactor but the temperature of the gas carrying reactants and products (particles). Due to a complex feedback of the thermodynamic and chemical processes in the reaction volume with the external energy source, it is very difficult to predict the real gas phase temperature field from the externally applied T(t)-profile. Therefore, a measurement technique capable to determine the temperature distribution of the gas phase under process conditions is needed. In this contribution, we demonstrate with three proof of principle experiments the use of laser induced fluorescence thermometry to investigate the CVS process under realistic conditions.

  2. Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition of polymeric thin films using a volatile photoinitiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kelvin; Gleason, Karen K

    2005-12-06

    Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition (piCVD) is an evolutionary CVD technique for depositing polymeric thin films in one step without using any solvents. The technique requires no pre- or post-treatment and uses a volatile photoinitiator to initiate free-radical polymerization of gaseous monomers under UV irradiation. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was used as a test monomer for its ability to undergo free-radical polymerization, and 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropane) (ABMP) was used as the photoinitiator, as it is known to produce radicals when excited by photons. GMA and ABMP vapors were fed into a vacuum chamber in which film growth was observed on a substrate exposed to UV irradiation. The resulting poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) thin films were comprised of linear chains and had high structural resemblance to conventionally polymerized PGMA, as shown by the high solubility in tetrahydrofuran and the infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The introduction of ABMP into the vacuum chamber significantly increased growth rates. The maximum growth rate achieved was approximately 140 nm/min and represents a 7-fold enhancement over the case without ABMP. The molecular weight was found to increase with increasing monomer-to-initiator (M/I) feed ratio, and the polydispersity indexes (PDIs) of the samples were between 1.8 and 2.2, lower than the values obtained in conventional batch polymerization but in agreement with the theoretical expressions developed for low-conversion solution-phase polymerization, which are applicable to continuous processes such as piCVD. Molecular-weight distributions can be narrowed by filtering out wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, which induce branching and/or cross-linking. The strong dependence of the molecular weight on the M/I ratio, the rate enhancement due to the use of a radical photoinitiator, the good agreement between the experimental, and the theoretical PDIs provide evidence of a free-radical mechanism in pi

  3. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  4. Microstructural, chemical and textural characterization of ZnO nanorods synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Pérez-García, S.A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Unidad Monterrey, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto TiO{sub 2} covered borosilicate glass substrates. Deposition parameters were optimized and kept constant. Solely the effect of different nozzle velocities on the growth of ZnO nanorods was evaluated in order to develop a dense and uniform structure. The crystalline structure was characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence and Bragg–Brentano configurations. In addition, two-dimensional grazing incidence synchrotron radiation diffraction was employed to determine the preferred growth direction of the nanorods. Morphology and growth characteristics analyzed by electron microscopy were correlated with diffraction outcomes. Chemical composition was established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of wurtzite ZnO and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. Morphological changes noticed when the deposition velocity was lowered to the minimum, indicated the formation of relatively vertically oriented nanorods evenly distributed onto the TiO{sub 2} buffer film. By coupling two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and computational modeling with ANAELU it was proved that a successful texture determination was achieved and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Texture analysis led to the conclusion of a preferred growth direction in [001] having a distribution width Ω = 20° ± 2°. - Highlights: • Uniform and pure single-crystal ZnO nanorods were obtained by AACVD technique. • Longitudinal and transversal axis parallel to the [001] and [110] directions, respectively. • Texture was determined by 2D synchrotron diffraction and electron microscopy analysis. • Nanorods have its [001] direction distributed close to the normal of the substrate. • Angular spread about the preferred orientation is 20° ± 2°.

  5. Nanostructure and nanochemistry of gate dielectrics and processing of tunable dielectrics by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang-Gong

    2002-01-01

    PbTiO3-SrTiO3 (PST) thin films that are voltage tunable were developed for high-frequency application by a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique at rates of 10--15 nm/min. PST films (90--150nm) were deposited on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si and Sapphire (0001) substrates and characterized by various techniques to control the composition and structure. The tunability and dielectric loss (tandelta) of a 90nm PST film were 37% and 0.02, respectively, at 1MHz and 3V in a parallel plates capacitor (Pt/PST/Pt) configuration. PST films on (0001) Sapphire were epitaxial with an orientation relationship of PST [1 1 1]// Sapphire [0 0 0 1], and in-plane alignment of PST [1 i 0]// Sapphire [2 i i 0] and PST [i i 2]// Sapphire [0 1 i 0]. A coplanar waveguide structure was used to determine the tunability (31.3%) and figure of merit (13 degrees/dB) of an epitaxial 100nm PST film on Sapphire at 12 GHz. The tandelta, derived from transmission-type resonator, is explained in terms of composition inhomogeneities and in-plane biaxial stress due to lattice mismatch between PST and Sapphire. A 4nm-ZrOx/1.2nm-SiOx layer structure was formed on 200mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) technique for advanced metal oxide semiconductor gate dielectrics. The nanostructure and nanochemistry of this gate stack were investigated by various techniques, before and after oxygen annealing (700°C). The results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, defined as Zr-O/interlayer(IL)/Si stack. The critical parameters that control the nanostructural and nanochemical evolution are discussed using some simple mechanistic explanations and literature data. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric and electrical properties using a Pt/Zr-O/IL/Si capacitor configuration. The flat band shift (DeltaV FB), capacitance voltage hysteresis, and leakage current density were correlated with defects and roughness of the interface, thickness of IL

  6. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  7. Propeller-Shaped ZnO Nanostructures Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition: Photoluminescence and Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Propeller-shaped and flower-shaped ZnO nanostructures on Si substrates were prepared by a one-step chemical vapor deposition technique. The propeller-shaped ZnO nanostructure consists of a set of axial nanorod (50 nm in tip, 80 nm in root and 1 μm in length, surrounded by radial-oriented nanoribbons (20–30 nm in thickness and 1.5 μm in length. The morphology of flower-shaped ZnO nanostructure is similar to that of propeller-shaped ZnO, except the shape of leaves. These nanorods leaves (30 nm in diameter and 1–1.5 μm in length are aligned in a radial way and pointed toward a common center. The flower-shaped ZnO nanostructures show sharper and stronger UV emission at 378 nm than the propeller-shaped ZnO, indicating a better crystal quality and fewer structural defects in flower-shaped ZnO. In comparison with flower-shaped ZnO nanostructures, the propeller-shaped ZnO nanostructures exhibited a higher photocatalytic property for the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B under UV-light illumination.

  8. Chemical vapor transport and characterization of MnBi2Se4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowka, Christian; Gellesch, Markus; Enrique Hamann Borrero, Jorge; Partzsch, Sven; Wuttke, Christoph; Steckel, Frank; Hess, Christian; Wolter, Anja U. B.; Teresa Corredor Bohorquez, Laura; Büchner, Bernd; Hampel, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Layered metal chalcogenides such as MnBi2Se4 are interesting candidates for a wide field of applications such as for thermo- and photoelectrics. High-quality single crystals are necessary in order to investigate their properties which can be prepared by chemical vapor transport (CVT). The CVT of MnBi2Se4 has not been investigated until this point and is subject of the presented paper. We obtained needle-like MnBi2Se4 single crystals with a length up to 15 mm. The magnetic characterization has shown an antiferromagnetic transition around 14 K. Additionally, electrical transport described MnBi2Se4 as a narrow band-gap semiconductor (EGap=0.15 eV). Thermodynamic data for MnBi2Se4 at room temperature were determined to H ° = - 305 KJ ·mol-1 , S=321 J K-1·mol-1 and Cp = 167.568 + 25.979 ·10-3 · TJ ·K-1 ·mol-1 , respectively. Our results on CVT-grown single crystals confirm reported data from literature and complete the data set for MnBi2Se4.

  9. Nucleation and growth of single layer graphene on electrodeposited Cu by cold wall chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shantanu; Drucker, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    The nucleation density and average size of graphene crystallites grown using cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 4 μm thick Cu films electrodeposited on W substrates can be tuned by varying growth parameters. Growth at a fixed substrate temperature of 1000 °C and total pressure of 700 Torr using Ar, H2 and CH4 mixtures enabled the contribution of total flow rate, CH4:H2 ratio and dilution of the CH4/H2 mixture by Ar to be identified. The largest variation in nucleation density was obtained by varying the CH4:H2 ratio. The observed morphological changes are analogous to those that would be expected if the deposition rate were varied at fixed substrate temperature for physical deposition using thermal evaporation. The graphene crystallite boundary morphology progresses from irregular/jagged through convex hexagonal to regular hexagonal as the effective C deposition rate decreases. This observation suggests that edge diffusion of C atoms along the crystallite boundaries, in addition to H2 etching, may contribute to shape evolution of the graphene crystallites. These results demonstrate that graphene grown using cold wall CVD follows a nucleation and growth mechanism similar to hot wall CVD. As a consequence, the vast knowledge base relevant to hot wall CVD may be exploited for graphene synthesis by the industrially preferable cold wall method.

  10. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  11. Effect of Chemical Composition on Enthalpy of Evaporation and Equilibrium Vapor Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Dobruskin, Vladimir Kh

    2010-01-01

    Proceeding from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, the relation is derived that establishes a correlation between the partial enthalpy of evaporation from binary solutions, concentrations of components, and equilibrium vapor pressures. The difference between enthalpies of evaporation of components from solutions and those from the pure liquids, D(DH), depends on the chemical nature and concentrations, X, of solutions. The effect of concentrations on D(DH) makes different appearances in ideal and non-ideal solutions, although, as a whole, D(DH) increases with the growth of concentration of the second component. A model is introduced, which considers D(DH) as the sum of energetic changes of three sequential stages: passage of molecules from the bulk liquid into the surface layer, exit of the molecules on the outer side of the interface, and the following desorption into the gas phase. In the framework of the model, the main contribution to enthalpy of evaporation comes from the processes in the surface layer. It ...

  12. Feasibility study of the microforming combined with selective chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microforming has been received much attention in the recent decades due to the wide use of microparts in electronics and medical applications. For the further functionalization of these micro devices, high functional surfaces with noble metals and nanomaterials are strongly required in bio- and medical fields, such as bio-sensors. To realize an efficient manufacturing process, which can deform the submillimeter scale bulk structure and can construct the micro to nanometer scale structures in one process, the present study proposes a combined process of microforming for metal foils with a selective chemical vapor deposition (SCVD on the active surfaces of the working material. To demonstrate feasibility of this proposed process, feasibility of SCVD of functional materials onto active surfaces of titanium (Ti was investigated. CVD of iron (Fe and carbon nanotubes (CNTs which construct CNTs on the patterned surfaces of the active Ti and non-active Ti oxidation layers were conducted. Ti thin films on silicon substrate and Fe were used as working materials and functional materials respectively. CNTs were grown only on the Ti surface. Consequently, selectivity of the active surface of Ti to the synthesis of Fe particles in CVD was confirmed.

  13. Synthesis of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Kang; Hsu, Allen; Jia, Xiaoting; Kim, Soo Min; Shi, Yumeng; Hofmann, Mario; Nezich, Daniel; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Palacios, Tomas; Kong, Jing

    2012-01-11

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is very attractive for many applications, particularly, as protective coating, dielectric layer/substrate, transparent membrane, or deep ultraviolet emitter. In this work, we carried out a detailed investigation of h-BN synthesis on Cu substrate using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with two heating zones under low pressure (LP). Previous atmospheric pressure (AP) CVD syntheses were only able to obtain few layer h-BN without a good control on the number of layers. In contrast, under LPCVD growth, monolayer h-BN was synthesized and time-dependent growth was investigated. It was also observed that the morphology of the Cu surface affects the location and density of the h-BN nucleation. Ammonia borane is used as a BN precursor, which is easily accessible and more stable under ambient conditions than borazine. The h-BN films are characterized by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses. Our results suggest that the growth here occurs via surface-mediated growth, which is similar to graphene growth on Cu under low pressure. These atomically thin layers are particularly attractive for use as atomic membranes or dielectric layers/substrates for graphene devices.

  14. Experimental study of flow and heat transfer in a rotating chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun

    An experimental model was set up to study the rotating vertical impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid characteristic and heat transfer of the system will provide a good basis to understand the full model. Growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in CVD process and it is depended on the flow and thermal characteristic within the system. Optimizing the operating parameters will result in better growth rate and uniformity. Operating parameters such as inflow velocity, inflow diameter and rotational speed are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and various temperatures are recorded to see the effects of the different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using flow meter and hot wire anemometer. Temperatures are recorded by using various thermocouples and infrared thermometer. The result should provide a quantitative basis for the prediction, design and optimization of the system and process for design and fabrication of future CVD reactors. Further assessment of the system results will be discuss in detail such as effects of buoyancy and effects of rotation. The experimental study also coupled with a numerical study for further validation of both model. Comparisons between the two models are also presented.

  15. SiGeSn growth studies using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition towards optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirths, S., E-mail: s.wirths@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI 9-IT) and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 (Germany); Buca, D. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI 9-IT) and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 (Germany); Ikonic, Z.; Harrison, P. [Institute of Microwaves and Photonics, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Tiedemann, A.T.; Holländer, B.; Stoica, T.; Mussler, G. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI 9-IT) and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 (Germany); Breuer, U. [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 (Germany); Hartmann, J.M. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Grützmacher, D.; Mantl, S. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI 9-IT) and JARA-FIT, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 (Germany)

    2014-04-30

    In this contribution, we propose a laser concept based on a double heterostructure consisting of tensile strained Ge as the active medium and SiGeSn ternaries as cladding layers. Electronic band-structure calculations were used to determine the Si and Sn concentrations yielding a type I heterostructure with appropriate band-offsets (50 meV) between strained Ge and SiGeSn. Reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system was employed to study the laser structure growth. Detailed analyses regarding layer composition, crystal quality, surface morphology and elastic strain are presented. A strong temperature dependence of the Si and Sn incorporation has been obtained, ranging from 4 to 19 at.% Si and from 4 to 12 at.% Sn (growth temperatures between 350 °C and 475 °C). The high single crystalline quality and low surface roughness of 0.5–0.75 nm demonstrate that our layers are suitable for heterostructure laser fabrication. - Highlights: • Sn based group IV materials for photonics • Bandstructure calculations of SiGeSn/strained Ge double heterostructures. • Si and Sn concentrations in SiGeSn layers between 4 and 19 at.% and 4 and 11 at.%, respectively. • Growth of SiGeSn layers with high crystalline quality for optoelectronic applications.

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Spray Chemical Vapor Deposited CuInS2 Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. D.; Raffaelle, R. P.; Banger, K. K.; Smith, M. A.; Scheiman, D. A.; Hepp, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    Solar cells have been prepared using atmospheric pressure spray chemical vapor deposited CuInS2 absorbers. The CuInS2 films were deposited at 390 C using the single source precursor (PPh3)2CuIn(SEt)4 in an argon atmosphere. The absorber ranges in thickness from 0.75 - 1.0 micrometers, and exhibits a crystallographic gradient, with the leading edge having a (220) preferred orientation and the trailing edge having a (112) orientation. Schottky diodes prepared by thermal evaporation of aluminum contacts on to the CuInS2 yielded diodes for films that were annealed at 600 C. Solar cells were prepared using annealed films and had the (top down) composition of Al/ZnO/CdS/CuInS2/Mo/Glass. The Jsc, Voc, FF and (eta) were 6.46 mA per square centimeter, 307 mV, 24% and 0.35%, respectively for the best small area cells under simulated AM0 illumination.

  17. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  18. Nucleation and growth of chemically vapor deposited tungsten on various substrate materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.

    1987-11-01

    W films produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD), typically via reduction of WF/sub 6/, are being used for numerous applications in very large scale integrated circuit technology. Blanket and selectively deposited films require nucleation and growth on a specific underlayer material: Si, metal, or metal silicide. The compatibility of CVD W with various underlayers is reviewed for the device applications of contact/via fill, diffusion barrier, metal interconnect, and source/drain coating. Nucleation of W directly on single crystal Si can sometimes produce tunnel-defect structures at the edges or along the entire interface of the deposit. Sputtered Mo and W, and to some extent TiW and TiN, have been shown to be suitable nucleation layers for CVD W, yielding a fluorine-free interface with low-electrical contact resistance. A sputtered W/Ti adhesion bilayer is demonstrated for a blanket W deposition+etchback process. CoSi/sub 2/ appears an appropriate choice where CVD W and salicide technologies are combined.

  19. Incremental growth of short SWNT arrays by pulsed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Jackson, Jeremy [Sentech, Inc.; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Thonnard, Norbert [ORNL; Readle, Jason D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Very short, aligned arrays of continuous single wall carbon nanotubes were grown incrementally in steps as small as 25 nm using pulsed chemical vapor deposition. In situ optical extinction measurements indicate that over 98% of the nanotubes reinitiate growth on successive gas pulses, and HRTEM images show that the SWNTs do not exhibit segments, caps, or noticeable sidewall defects resulting from repeatedly stopping and restarting growth. Time-resolved laser reflectivity (3-ms temporal resolution) was used to record the nucleation and growth kinetics for each fast (0.2 second) gas pulse and measure the height increase of the array in situ, providing a "digital" method to incrementally grow short nanotube arrays to precise heights. Derivatives of the optical reflectivity signal reveal distinct temporal signatures for both nucleation and growth kinetics, with their amplitude ratio on the first gas pulse serving as a good predictor for aligned vs. unaligned growth. Incremental growth by pulsed CVD is interpreted in the context of autocatalytic kinetic models as a special processing window in which a sufficiently high flux of feedstock gas drives the nucleation and rapid growth phases of a catalyst nanoparticle ensemble to occur within the temporal period of the gas pulse, but without inducing growth termination.

  20. Incremental growth of short SWNT arrays by pulsed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Jackson, Jeremy J; Pannala, Sreekanth; Eres, Gyula; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren L; Thonnard, Norbert; Readle, Jason D

    2012-05-21

    Very short arrays of continuous single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown incrementally in steps as small as 25 nm using pulsed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In-situ optical extinction measurements indicate that over 98% of the nanotubes reinitiate growth on successive gas pulses, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images show that the SWNTs do not exhibit segments, caps, or noticeable sidewall defects resulting from repeatedly stopping and restarting growth. Time-resolved laser reflectivity (3-ms temporal resolution) is used to record the nucleation and growth kinetics for each fast (0.2 s) gas pulse and to measure the height increase of the array in situ, providing a method to incrementally grow short nanotube arrays to precise heights. Derivatives of the optical reflectivity signal reveal distinct temporal signatures for both nucleation and growth kinetics, with their amplitude ratio on the first gas pulse serving as a good predictor for the evolution of the growth of the nanotube ensemble into a coordinated array. Incremental growth by pulsed CVD is interpreted in the context of autocatalytic kinetic models as a special processing window in which a sufficiently high flux of feedstock gas drives the nucleation and rapid growth phases of a catalyst nanoparticle ensemble to occur within the temporal period of the gas pulse, but without inducing growth termination.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition fabrication and characterization of silica-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Giolando, D M; Kirchhoff, J R

    1995-08-01

    Carbon fiber disk ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) with well-defined geometries were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques. Transparent silica films with thicknesses from 1 to 600 microns were deposited on the cylindrical length of 5 and 10 microns carbon fibers from a SiCl4, H2, and O2 ternary precursor system at 850-1150 degrees C or sequential deposition from Si(OEt)4 as a single source precursor at 700 degrees C followed by the SiCl4, H2, and O2 precursor system. Film thickness, film adhesion to the fiber substrate, and the overall dimensions of the silica-coated carbon fiber were studied and found to be a function of the precursor system, precursor concentrations, fiber diameter, deposition time, and fiber temperature. The silica films were found to be free of microcracks and characterized by a quality seal between the carbon fiber and the coating. As a result, the silica-coated disk UME exhibits an excellent electrochemical response without the need to use an epoxy sealant at the electrode tip. Furthermore, the deposition of hard and inert ceramic materials imparts durability to fragile carbon fibers and facilitates the handling of UMEs in microenvironments. Finally, the advantage of concentric deposition about the fibers to produce a disk UME in the center of an insulating plane was used to examine the effect of the thickness of the insulating coating on the limiting current response.

  2. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  3. High-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ferromagnetic ruthenium-containing carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav O., E-mail: V.Khavrus@ifw-dresden.de; Ibrahim, E. M. M.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the high-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of ruthenium nanoparticles (NPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of gas-phase decomposition of acetonitrile and ruthenocene in a tubular quartz flow reactor at 950 Degree-Sign C and at elevated pressures (between 2 and 8 bar). The deposited material consists of Ru metal cores with sizes ranging between 1 and 3 nm surrounded by a carbon matrix. The high-pressure CCVD seems to be an effective route to obtain composite materials containing metallic NPs, Ru in this work, inside a nanostructured carbon matrix protecting them from oxidation in ambient air. We find that in contradiction to the weak paramagnetic properties characterizing bulk ruthenium, the synthesized samples are ferromagnetic as predicted for nanosized particles of nonmagnetic materials. At low pressure, the very small ruthenium catalyst particles are able to catalyze growth of SWCNTs. Their yield decreases with increasing reaction pressure. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to analyze and confirm properties of the synthesized NPs and nanotubes. A discussion on the growth mechanism of the Ru-containing nanostructures is presented.

  4. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results.

  5. Equilibrium chemical vapor deposition growth of Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Kim, Sungjin; Chen, Xiao; Einarsson, Erik; Wang, Miao; Song, Yenan; Wang, Hongtao; Chiashi, Shohei; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2014-11-25

    Using ethanol as the carbon source, self-limiting growth of AB-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) has been achieved on Cu via an equilibrium chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. We found that during this alcohol catalytic CVD (ACCVD) a source-gas pressure range exists to break the self-limitation of monolayer graphene on Cu, and at a certain equilibrium state it prefers to form uniform BLG with a high surface coverage of ∼94% and AB-stacking ratio of nearly 100%. More importantly, once the BLG is completed, this growth shows a self-limiting manner, and an extended ethanol flow time does not result in additional layers. We investigate the mechanism of this equilibrium BLG growth using isotopically labeled (13)C-ethanol and selective surface aryl functionalization, and results reveal that during the equilibrium ACCVD process a continuous substitution of graphene flakes occurs to the as-formed graphene and the BLG growth follows a layer-by-layer epitaxy mechanism. These phenomena are significantly in contrast to those observed for previously reported BLG growth using methane as precursor.

  6. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  7. Growth of High TcYBaCuO Thin Films by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirlin, Peter S.; Binder, R.; Gardiner, R.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1990-03-01

    Thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-x were grown on MgO(100) by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Low pressure growth studies were carried out between 400 and 600°C using metal β-diketonate complexes as source reagents for Y, Ba, and Cu. As-deposited films were amorphous and a two stage annealing protocol was used in which fluorine was first removed in a Ar/H20 stream between 700 and 850°C, followed by calcination in flowing oxygen between 500 and 950°C. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analysis indicate that good compositional and dimensional uniformity could be achieved. The temperature of the oxygen annealing step was shown to have a dramatic impact on the physical and electrical properties of the YBa2Cu307-x thin films. Annealing temperatures exceeding 910°C gave large crystallites and semiconducting resistivity above Tc; annealing temperatures below 910°C yielded films with metallic conductivity whose density and superconducting transition varied inversely with maximum annealing temperature. Optimized deposition/annealing protocols yielded films with a preferred c-axis orientation, R273/R100 ratios of 2, onsets as high as 94K and zero resistance exceeding 90K.

  8. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  9. Structural and electronic characterization of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joucken, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.joucken@unamur.be; Colomer, Jean-François; Sporken, Robert; Reckinger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • CVD graphene is transferred onto sapphire. • Transport measurements reveal relatively low charge carriers mobility. • Scanning probe microscopy experiments reveal the presence of robust contaminant layers between the graphene and the sapphire, responsible for the low carriers mobility. - Abstract: We present a combination of magnetotransport and local probe measurements on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil and subsequently transferred onto a sapphire substrate. A rather strong p-doping is observed (∼9 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) together with quite low carrier mobility (∼1350 cm{sup 2}/V s). Atomic force and tunneling imaging performed on the transport devices reveals the presence of contaminants between sapphire and graphene, explaining the limited performance of our devices. The transferred graphene displays ridges similar to those observed whilst graphene is still on the copper foil. We show that, on sapphire, these ridges are made of different thicknesses of the contamination layer and that, contrary to what was reported for hBN or certain transition metal dichalcogenides, no self-cleansing process of the sapphire substrate is observed.

  10. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films on Silicon From Ethanol and Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 汪建华; 王传新; 满卫东

    2003-01-01

    Diamond films with very smooth surface and good optical quality have been deposited onto silicon substrate using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from a gas mixture of ethanol and hydrogen at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃. The effects of the substrate temperature on the diamond nucleation and the morphology of the diamond film have been investigated and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure and the phase of the film have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The diamond nucleation density significantly decreases with the increasing of the substrate temperature. There are only sparse nuclei when the substrate temperature is higher than 800 ℃ although the ethanol concentration in hydrogen is very high. That the characteristic diamond peak in the Raman spectrum of a diamond film prepared at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃ extends into broadband indicates that the film is of nanophase. No graphite peak appeared in the XRD pattern confirms that the film is mainly composed of SP3 carbon. The diamond peak in the XRD pattern also broadens due to the nanocrystalline of the film.

  11. Study of filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen dissociation in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) is a promising method for commercial production of diamond films.Filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen decomposition in reactive environment was investigated. Power consumption by the filament in vacuum, helium and 2% CH4/H2 was experimentally determined in temperature range 1300℃-2200℃. Filament heat transfer mechanism in C-H reactive environment was calculated and analyzed. The result shows that due to surface carburization and slight carbon deposition, radiation in stead of hydrogen dissociation, becomes the largest contributor to power consumption. Filament-surface dissociation of H2 was observed at temperatures below 1873K, demonstrating the feasibility of diamond growth at low filament temperatures. The effective activation energies of hydrogen dissociation on several clean refractory filaments were derived from power consumption data in literatures. They are all lower than that of thermal dissociation of hydrogen, revealing the nature of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen on filament surface. Observation of substrate temperature suggested a weakerrole of atomic hydrogen recombination in heating substrates in C-H environment than in pure hydrogen.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition graphene transfer process to a polymeric substrate assisted by a spin coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Felipe; da Rocha, Caique O. C.; Medeiros, Gabriela S.; Fechine, Guilhermino J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new method to transfer chemical vapor deposition graphene to polymeric substrates is demonstrated here, it is called direct dry transfer assisted by a spin coater (DDT-SC). Compared to the conventional method DDT, the improvement of the contact between graphene-polymer due to a very thin polymeric film deposited by spin coater before the transfer process prevented air bubbles and/or moisture and avoided molecular expansion on the graphene-polymer interface. An acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer, a high impact polystyrene, polybutadiene adipate-co-terephthalate, polylactide acid, and a styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer are the polymers used for the transfers since they did not work very well by using the DDT process. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to identify, to quantify, and to qualify graphene transferred to the polymer substrates. The quantity of graphene transferred was substantially increased for all polymers by using the DDT-SC method when compared with the DDT standard method. After the transfer, the intensity of the D band remained low, indicating low defect density and good quality of the transfer. The DDT-SC transfer process expands the number of graphene applications since the polymer substrate candidates are increased.

  13. Raman mapping investigation of chemical vapor deposition-fabricated twisted bilayer graphene with irregular grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Meng, Lijuan; Zhao, Weiwei; Liang, Zheng; Wu, Xing; Nan, Haiyan; Wu, Zhangting; Huang, Shan; Sun, Litao; Wang, Jinlan; Ni, Zhenhua

    2014-10-21

    Bilayer graphene as a prototype of two-dimensional stacked material has recently attracted great attention. The twist angle between graphene layers adds another dimension to control its properties. In this study, we used Raman mapping to investigate the twist angle dependence of properties of twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) with irregular grains that was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different Raman parameters including intensity, width, and position of G and 2D peaks were used to distinguish TBG with different twist angles. The statistical results from Raman imaging on the distribution of twist angle are consistent with the results from selected area election diffraction (SAED). Finally, the Raman peak at approximately 1347 cm(-1) for TBG with a large twist angle was assigned to the D-like peak, although it has similar excitation energy dependence of frequency as the defect-induced D peak. Theoretical calculation further confirmed that vacancy-like defect is not favored in the formation energy for TBG with a large twist angle as compared to monolayer graphene or TBG with other twist angles. These results will help to advance the understanding of TBG properties, especially for CVD samples with irregular grains.

  14. What are the active carbon species during graphene chemical vapor deposition growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Haibo; Tao, Xiao-Ming; Ding, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The dissociation of carbon feedstock is a crucial step for understanding the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Using first-principles calculations, we performed a comprehensive theoretical study for the population of various active carbon species, including carbon monomers and various radicals, CHi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4), on four representative transition-metal surfaces, Cu(111), Ni(111), Ir(111) and Rh(111), under different experimental conditions. On the Cu surface, which is less active, the population of CH and C monomers at the subsurface is found to be very high and thus they are the most important precursors for graphene CVD growth. On the Ni surface, which is more active than Cu, C monomers at the subsurface dominate graphene CVD growth under most experimental conditions. In contrast, on the active Ir and Rh surfaces, C monomers on the surfaces are found to be very stable and thus are the main precursors for graphene growth. This study shows that the mechanism of graphene CVD growth depends on the activity of catalyst surfaces and the detailed graphene growth process at the atomic level can be controlled by varying the temperature or partial pressure of hydrogen.

  15. Conformal encapsulation of three-dimensional, bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J; Pegalajar-Jurado, Adoracion; Fisher, Ellen R

    2014-10-21

    Bioresorbable polymers such as poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have a multitude of potential biomaterial applications such as controlled-release drug delivery and regenerative tissue engineering. For such biological applications, the fabrication of porous three-dimensional bioresorbable materials with tunable surface chemistry is critical to maximize their surface-to-volume ratio, mimic the extracellular matrix, and increase drug-loading capacity. Here, two different fluorocarbon (FC) precursors (octofluoropropane (C3F8) and hexafluoropropylene oxide (HFPO)) were used to deposit FC films on PCL scaffolds using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These two coating systems were chosen with the intent of modifying the scaffold surfaces to be bio-nonreactive while maintaining desirable bulk properties of the scaffold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed high-CF2 content films were deposited on both the exterior and interior of PCL scaffolds and that deposition behavior is PECVD system specific. Scanning electron microscopy data confirmed that FC film deposition yielded conformal rather than blanket coatings as the porous scaffold structure was maintained after plasma treatment. Treated scaffolds seeded with human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) demonstrate that the cells do not attach after 72 h and that the scaffolds are noncytotoxic to HDF. This work demonstrates conformal FC coatings can be deposited on 3D polymeric scaffolds using PECVD to fabricate 3D bio-nonreactive materials.

  16. Impedance spectroscopy of manganite films prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro; Homma, Kohei; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2011-09-01

    Polycrystalline Pr(1-x)CaxMnO3 (PCMO) films were prepared by liquid source metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using in situ infrared spectroscopic monitoring. The electric properties of the PCMO-based devices with Ni and Al electrodes (Ni-PCMO-Ni and Al-PCMO-Al devices) were studied by dc current-voltage (I-V) measurements and ac impedance spectroscopy. The current varied linearly with the applied voltage in Ni-PCMO-Ni devices, while nonlinear behavior was observed in I-V curves for Al-PCMO-Al devices. Impedance spectra were also different between Ni-PCMO-Ni and Al-PCMO-Al devices. The Cole-Cole plots for the Ni-PCMO-Ni devices showed only a single semicircular arc, which was assigned to the PCMO bulk impedance. Impedance spectra for the Al-PCMO-Al devices had two distinct components, which could be attributed to the PCMO bulk and to the interface between the PCMO film and the Al electrode, respectively. The bias dependence of the impedance spectra suggested that the resistance switching in the Al-PCMO-Al devices was mainly due to the resistance change in the interface between the film and the electrode. The metal electrode plays an important role in the resistance switching in the PCMO-based devices. The choice of the optimum metal electrodes is essential to the ReRAM application of the manganite-based devices.

  17. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride coatings on carbon fibers from borazine by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junsheng, E-mail: charlesljs@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China); Zhang Changrui; Li Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using borazine as single source precursor. The deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperatures on growth kinetics, morphology, composition and structure of the coatings was investigated. In the low temperature range of 900 deg. C-1000 deg. C, the growth rate increased with increasing temperature complying with Arrhenius law, and an apparent active energy of 72 kJ/mol was calculated. The coating surface was smooth and compact, and the coatings uniformly deposited on individual fibers of carbon fiber bundles. The growth was controlled by surface reaction. At 1000 deg. C, the deposition rate reached a maximum (2.5 {mu}m/h). At the same time, the limiting step of the growth translated to be mass-transportation. Above 1100 deg. C, the growth rate decreased drastically due to the occurrence of gas-phase nucleation. Moreover, the coating surface became loose and rough. Composition and structure examinations revealed that stoichiometric BN coatings with turbostratic structure were obtained below 1000 deg. C, while hexagonal BN coatings were deposited above 1100 deg. C. A penetration of carbon element from the fibers to the coatings was observed.

  18. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  19. FTIR Characterization of Fluorine Doped Silicon Dioxide Thin Films Deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-Fei; DING Shi-Jin; ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Jian-Yun; WANGJi-Tao; WEI William Lee

    2000-01-01

    Fluorine doped silicon dioxide (SiOF) thin films have been prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor depo sition. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) spectra of SiOF films are deliberated to reveal the structure change of SiO2 and the mechanism of dielectric constant reduction after doping fluorine. When F is doped in SiO2 films, the Si-O stretching absorption peak will have a blue-shift due to increase of the partial charge of the O atom. The FTIR spectra indicate that some Si-OH components in the thin film can be removed after doping fluorine. These changes reduce the ionic and orientational polarization, and result in the reduction in dielectric constant of the film. According to Gaussian fitting, it is found that the Si-F2 bonds will appear in the SiOF film with increase of the fluorine content. The Si-F2 structures are liable to react with water, and cause the same increase of absorbed moisture in the film.

  20. Current-Perpendicular-to-Plane Magnetoresistance in Chemical Vapor Deposition-Grown Multilayer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Pramanik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP magnetoresistance (MR effects are often exploited in various state-of-the-art magnetic field sensing and data storage technologies. Most of the CPP-MR devices are artificial layered structures of ferromagnets and non-magnets, and in these devices, MR manifests, due to spin-dependent carrier transmission through the constituent layers. In this work, we explore another class of artificial layered structure in which multilayer graphene (MLG is grown on a metallic substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD. We show that depending on the nature of the graphene-metal interaction, these devices can also exhibit large CPP-MR. Magnetoresistance ratios (>100% are at least two orders of magnitude higher than “transferred” graphene and graphitic samples reported in the literature, for a comparable temperature and magnetic field range. This effect is unrelated to spin injection and transport and is not adequately described by any of the MR mechanisms known to date. The simple fabrication process, large magnitude of the MR and its persistence at room temperature make this system an attractive candidate for magnetic field sensing and data storage applications and, also, underscore the need for further fundamental investigations on graphene-metal interactions.

  1. Uniformly Distributed Graphene Domain Grows on Standing Copper via Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hao Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniformly distributed graphene domains were synthesized on standing copper foil by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. This method improved the distribution of the graphene domains at different positions on the same piece of copper foil along the forward direction of the gas flow. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the average size of the graphene domains to be about ~20 m. This results show that the sheet resistance of monolayer graphene on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate is about ~359 /□ whereas that of the four-layer graphene films is about ~178 /□, with a transmittance value of 88.86% at the 550 nm wavelength. Furthermore, the sheet resistance can be reduced with the addition of HNO3 resulting in a value of 84 /□. These values meet the absolute standard for touch sensor applications, so we believe that this method can be a candidate for some transparent conductive electrode applications.

  2. Amorphous inclusions during Ge and GeSn epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gencarelli, F., E-mail: federica.gencarelli@imec.be [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Shimura, Y. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kumar, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vincent, B.; Moussa, A.; Vanhaeren, D.; Richard, O.; Bender, H. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Caymax, M.; Loo, R. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heyns, M. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we discuss the characteristics of particular island-type features with an amorphous core that are developed during the low temperature epitaxial growth of Ge and GeSn layers by means of chemical vapor deposition with Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Although further investigations are needed to unambiguously identify the origin of these features, we suggest that they are originated by the formation of clusters of H and/or contaminants atoms during growth. These would initially cause the formation of pits with crystalline rough facets over them, resulting in ring-shaped islands. Then, when an excess surface energy is overcome, an amorphous phase would nucleate inside the pits and fill them. Reducing the pressure and/or increasing the growth temperature can be effective ways to prevent the formation of these features, likely due to a reduction of the surface passivation from H and/or contaminant atoms. - Highlights: • Island features with amorphous cores develop during low T Ge(Sn) CVD with Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6.} • These features are thoroughly characterized in order to understand their origin. • A model is proposed to describe the possible evolution of these features. • Lower pressures and/or higher temperatures avoid the formation of these features.

  3. Direct-Liquid-Evaporation Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Metal for Nanoscale Copper Interconnect Encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Gong, Xian; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2017-03-29

    In advanced microelectronics, precise design of liner and capping layers become critical, especially when it comes to the fabrication of Cu interconnects with dimensions lower than its mean free path. Herein, we demonstrate that direct-liquid-evaporation chemical vapor deposition (DLE-CVD) of Co is a promising method to make liner and capping layers for nanoscale Cu interconnects. DLE-CVD makes pure, smooth, nanocrystalline, and highly conformal Co films with highly controllable growth characteristics. This process allows full Co encapsulation of nanoscale Cu interconnects, thus stabilizing Cu against diffusion and electromigration. Electrical measurements and high-resolution elemental imaging studies show that the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer can improve the reliability and thermal stability of Cu interconnects. Also, with the high conductivity of Co, the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer have the potential to further decrease the power consumption of nanoscale Cu interconnects, paving the way for Cu interconnects with higher efficiency in future high-end microelectronics.

  4. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  5. Chemical vapor deposition based tungsten disulfide (WS2) thin film transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-04-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a reported band gap of 1.8 eV in bulk and 1.32-1.4 eV in its thin film form. 2D atomic layers of metal dichalcogenides have shown changes in conductivity with applied electric field. This makes them an interesting option for channel material in field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, we show a highly manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) based simple process to grow WS2 directly on silicon oxide in a furnace and then its transistor action with back gated device with room temperature field effect mobility of 0.1003 cm2/V-s using the Schottky barrier contact model. We also show the semiconducting behavior of this WS2 thin film which is more promising than thermally unstable organic materials for thin film transistor application. Our direct growth method on silicon oxide also holds interesting opportunities for macro-electronics applications. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Graphene Coating of Silicon Nanoparticles with CO2 -Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, In Hyuk; Park, Jong Hwan; Kwon, Soonchul; Choi, Jang Wook; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2016-02-03

    Understanding the growth of graphene over Si species is becoming ever more important as the huge potential for the combination of these two materials becomes more apparent, not only for device fabrication but also in energy applications, particularly in Li-ion batteries. Thus, the drive for the direct fabrication of graphene over Si is crucial because indirect approaches, by their very nature, require processing steps that, in general, contaminate, damage, and are costly. In this work, the direct chemical vapor deposition growth of few-layer graphene over Si nanoparticles is systematically explored through experiment and theory with the use of a reducer, H2 or the use of a mild oxidant, CO2 combined with CH4 . Unlike the case of CH4 , with the use of CO2 as a mild oxidant in the reaction, the graphene layers form neatly over the surface and encapsulate the Si particles. SiC formation is also prevented. These structures show exceptionally good electrochemical performance as high capacity anodes for lithium-ion batteries. Density functional theory studies show the presence of CO2 not only prevents SiC formation but helps enhance the catalytic activity of the particles by maintaining an SiOx surface. In addition, CO2 can enhance graphitization.

  7. Synthesis of high performance ceramic fibers by chemical vapor deposition for advanced metallics reinforcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of fibers capable of effectively reinforcing intermetallic matrices at elevated temperatures which can be used for potential applications in high temperature composite materials is described. This process was used due to its advantage over other fiber synthesis processes. It is extremely important to produce these fibers with good reproducible and controlled growth rates. However, the complex interplay of mass and energy transfer, blended with the fluid dynamics makes this a formidable task. The design and development of CVD reactor assembly and system to synthesize TiB2, CrB, B4C, and TiC fibers was performed. Residual thermal analysis for estimating stresses arising form thermal expansion mismatch were determined. Various techniques to improve the mechanical properties were also performed. Various techniques for improving the fiber properties were elaborated. The crystal structure and its orientation for TiB2 fiber is discussed. An overall view of the CVD process to develop CrB2, TiB2, and other high performance ceramic fibers is presented.

  8. Improving source efficiency for aluminum nitride grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Laurent, Matthew A.; Yonkee, Benjanim; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic pre-reactions are known to play a role in the growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) via metal organic chemical vapor deposition, where they can deplete precursor molecules before reaching the substrate, leading to poor growth efficiency. Studies have shown that reducing the growth pressure and growth temperature results in improved growth efficiency of AlN; however, superior crystal quality and reduced impurity incorporation are generally best obtained when growing at high temperatures. This study shows that, with proper alkyl source dilution, parasitic pre-reactions can be suppressed while maintaining high growth temperatures. The results show an 18× increase in growth rate and efficiency of AlN films: from 0.04 μm h-1 to 0.73 μm h-1, and 26 μm mol-1 to 502 μm mol-1, respectively; under constant TMAl flow and a small change in total gas flow. This results in 6.8% of Al atoms from the injected TMAl being utilized for AlN layer growth for this reactor configuration. This is better than the standard GaN growth, where 6.0% of the Ga atoms injected from TMGa are utilized for GaN growth.

  9. Effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwong, Philip; Seidel, Scott; Gupta, Malancha, E-mail: malanchg@usc.edu [Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, 925 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this work, the effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The polymerizations of 4-vinyl pyridine and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate were studied using copper(II) chloride (CuCl{sub 2}) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) as the transition metal salts. It was found that the surface coverages of both poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) and poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) were decreased on CuCl{sub 2}, while the surface coverage of only P4VP was decreased on FeCl{sub 3}. The decreased polymer surface coverage was found to be due to quenching of the propagating radicals by the salt, which led to a reduction of the oxidation state of the metal. The identification of this reaction mechanism allowed for tuning of the effectiveness of the salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage through the adjustment of processing parameters such as the filament temperature. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the ability of transition metal salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage could be extended to the fabrication of patterned cross-linked coatings, which is important for many practical applications such as sensors and microelectronics.

  10. Growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S W; Moon, J Y; Ahn, S S; Kim, H Y; Shin, D H

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using SiH sub 4 , CH sub 4 , and H sub 2 gases. The effects of gas mixing ratio (CH sub 4 /SiH sub 4), deposition temperature, and RF power on the film properties have been studied. The growth rate, refractive index, and the optical energy gap depends critically on the growth conditions. The dependence of the growth rate on the gas flow ratio is quite different from the results obtained for the growth using C sub 2 H sub 2 gas instead of CH sub 4. As the deposition temperature is increased from 300 .deg. C to 600 .deg. C, hydrogen and carbon content in the film decreases and as a result the optical gap decreases. At the deposition temperature of 600 .deg. C and RF power of 150 W, the film structure si nanocrystalline, As the result of the nanocrystallization the dark conductivity is greatly improved. The nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films may be used for large area optoelectronic devices...

  11. Super-Hydrophobic and Oloephobic Crystalline Coatings by Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coclite, Anna Maria; Shi, Yujun; Gleason, Karen K.

    Preferred crystallographic orientation (texture) in thin films frequently has a strong effect on the properties of the materials and it is important for stable surface properties. Organized molecular films of poly-perfluorodecylacrylate p(PFDA) were deposited by initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD). The high tendency of p(PFDA) to crystallize has been fully retained in the polymers prepared by iCVD. The degree of crystallinity and the preferred orientation of the perfluoro side chains, either parallel or perpendicular to the surface, were controlled by tuning the CVD process parameters (i.e. initiator to monomer flow rate ratio, filament temperature, and substrate temperature). Super- hydrophobicity (advancing water contact angle, WCA, of 160°, low hysteresis of 5°), and oleophobicity (advancing CA with mineral oil of 120°) were achieved. Low hysteresis was associated with high crystallinity, particularly when the orientation of the crystallites resulted in the perfluoro side groups being oriented parallel to the surface. The latter texture resulted in smoother film (RMS roughness < 30 nm) than the texture with the chains oriented perpendicularly to the surface. This can be very advantageous for applications that require smooth but still crystalline films.

  12. Structural properties of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles prepared by chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgul, Guvenc, E-mail: guvencakgul@gmail.com [Bor Vocational School, Nigde University, 51700 Nigde (Turkey); Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Akgul, Funda Aksoy [Physics Department, Nigde University, 51240 Nigde (Turkey); Attenkofer, Klaus [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Winterer, Markus [Nanoparticle Process Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, and Center for NanoIntegration Duisburg-Essen, CeNIDE, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2013-03-25

    Highlights: ► Local structure determination of ZnO and TiO{sub 2} nanostructures by XANES and EXAFS. ► Zn K and Ti K absorption edge XANES investigations of nanopowder samples. ► Investigation of pre-edge peak features of TiO{sub 2} nanosamples. ► Obtaining of local structure parameters of nano ZnO and TiO{sub 2} using EXAFS. ► Good agreement of EXAFS results and crystal structure datas. -- Abstract: Transition metal (TM) oxides provide a wide range of functional materials especially when nanostructured. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and wurtzite type zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructured materials were fabricated by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). Crystal and local structures of the prepared nanosamples were ascertained using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. Based on the XRD data, a second phase(s) was not found in both samples. A single wurtzite and anatase type structures were observed in ZnO and TiO{sub 2} nanosamples, respectively. Ti K pre-edge features of XANES spectrum indicated the presence of sixfold coordinated Ti in TiO{sub 2} nanosamples. The results showed that CVS is quite useful method to produce high crystalline nanoparticles.

  13. Kinetics of diamond-like film growth using filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsuch, G.; Jin, Y.; Ingle, N.K.; Mountziaris, T.J.; Yu, W.Y.; Petrou, A. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A detailed kinetic model of diamond-like film growth from methane diluted in hydrogen using low-pressure, filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) has been developed. The model includes both gas-phase and surface reactions. The surface kinetics include adsorption of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} and H{center_dot}, abstraction reactions by gas phase radicals, desorption, and two pathways for diamond (sp{sup 3}) and graphitic carbon (sp{sup 2}) growth. It is postulated that adsorbed CH{sub 2}{center_dot} species are the major film precursors. The proposed kinetic model was incorporated into a transport model describing flow, heat and mass transfer in stagnation flow FACVD reactors. Diamond-like films were deposited on preceded Si substrates in such a reactor as a pressure of 26 Torr, inlet gas composition ranging from 0.5% to 1.5% methane in hydrogen and substrate temperatures ranging from 600 to 950 C. The best films were obtained at low methane concentrations and substrate temperature of 700 C. The films were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Observations from their experiments and growth rates, compositions and stable species distributions in the gas phase. It is the first complete model of FACVD that includes gas-phase and surface kinetics coupled with transport phenomena.

  14. Formation and Transport of Atomic Hydrogen in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we focus on diamond film hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactors where the only reactant ishydrogen so as to study the formation and transport of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of dimensionless numbers forheat and mass transfer reveals that thermal conduction and diffusion are the dominant mechanisms for gas-phaseheat and mass transfer, respectively. A simplified model has been established to simulate gas-phase temperature andH concentration distributions between the filament and the substrate. Examination of the relative importance ofhomogeneous and heterogeneous production of H atoms indicates that filament-surface decomposition of molecularhydrogen is the dominant source of H and gas-phase reaction plays a negligible role. The filament-surface dissociationrates of H2 for various filament temperatures were calculated to match H-atom concentrations observed in the liter-ature or derived from power consumption by filaments. Arrhenius plots of the filament-surface hydrogen dissociationrates suggest that dissociation of H2 at refractory filament surface is a catalytic process, which has a rather lowereffective activation energy than homogeneous thermal dissociation. Atomic hydrogen, acting as an important heattransfer medium to heat the substrate, can freely diffuse from the filament to the substrate without recombination.

  15. Extent of hydrogen coverage of Si(001) under chemical vapor deposition conditions from ab initio approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Phil; Tonner, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The extent of hydrogen coverage of the Si(001) c(4 × 2) surface in the presence of hydrogen gas has been studied with dispersion corrected density functional theory. Electronic energy contributions are well described using a hybrid functional. The temperature dependence of the coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium was studied computing the phonon spectrum in a supercell approach. As an approximation to these demanding computations, an interpolated phonon approach was found to give comparable accuracy. The simpler ab initio thermodynamic approach is not accurate enough for the system studied, even if corrections by the Einstein model for surface vibrations are considered. The on-set of H2 desorption from the fully hydrogenated surface is predicted to occur at temperatures around 750 K. Strong changes in hydrogen coverage are found between 1000 and 1200 K in good agreement with previous reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy experiments. These findings allow a rational choice for the surface state in the computational treatment of chemical reactions under typical metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions on Si(001).

  16. High Luminescence Efficiency in MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Matin; Burke, Robert A; Ji, Xiang; Zhao, Peida; Lien, Der-Hsien; Taheri, Peyman; Ahn, Geun Ho; Kirya, Daisuke; Ager, Joel W; Yablonovitch, Eli; Kong, Jing; Dubey, Madan; Javey, Ali

    2016-07-26

    One of the major challenges facing the rapidly growing field of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) is the development of growth techniques to enable large-area synthesis of high-quality materials. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the leading techniques for the synthesis of TMDCs; however, the quality of the material produced is limited by defects formed during the growth process. A very useful nondestructive technique that can be utilized to probe defects in semiconductors is the room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY). It was recently demonstrated that a PL QY near 100% can be obtained in MoS2 and WS2 monolayers prepared by micromechanical exfoliation by treating samples with an organic superacid: bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (TFSI). Here we have performed a thorough exploration of this chemical treatment on CVD-grown MoS2 samples. We find that the as-grown monolayers must be transferred to a secondary substrate, which releases strain, to obtain high QY by TFSI treatment. Furthermore, we find that the sulfur precursor temperature during synthesis of the MoS2 plays a critical role in the effectiveness of the treatment. By satisfying the aforementioned conditions we show that the PL QY of CVD-grown monolayers can be improved from ∼0.1% in the as-grown case to ∼30% after treatment, with enhancement factors ranging from 100 to 1500× depending on the initial monolayer quality. We also found that after TFSI treatment the PL emission from MoS2 films was visible by eye despite the low absorption (5-10%). The discovery of an effective passivation strategy will speed the development of scalable high-performance optoelectronic and electronic devices based on MoS2.

  17. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of iron doped thin dioxide films, their structure and photowetting effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk-Guzenda, A., E-mail: anna.sobczyk-guzenda@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Owczarek, S.; Szymanowski, H. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Wypych-Puszkarz, A. [Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Volesky, L. [Technical University of Liberec, Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Studentska 1402/2, 461 17 Liberec 1 (Czech Republic); Gazicki-Lipman, M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    Radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) technique was applied for the purpose of deposition of iron doped titanium dioxide coatings from a gaseous mixture of oxygen with titanium (IV) chloride and iron (0) pentacarbonyl. Glass slides and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The coatings morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental and chemical composition was studied with the help of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively, while their phase composition was analyzed with the Raman spectroscopy. For the determination of the film optical properties, ultraviolet (UV–Vis) spectroscopy techniques were used. Iron content in the range of 0.07 to 11.5 at.% was found in the coatings. FTIR studies showed that iron was built-in in the structure of TiO{sub 2} matrix. Surface roughness, assessed with the SEM and AFM techniques, increases with an increasing content of this element. Trace amounts of iron resulted in a lowering of an absorption threshold of the films and their optical gap, but the tendency was reversed for high concentrations of that element. The effect of iron doping on UV photowettability of the films was also studied and, for coatings containing up to 5% of iron, it was stronger than that exhibited by pure TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Iron doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited with the PECVD method. • Differences of surface morphology of the films with different iron content were shown. • Depending on the iron content, the film structure is either amorphous or crystalline. • A parabolic character of the optical gap dependence on the concentration of iron was observed. • Up to a concentration of 5% of iron, doped TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a super-hydrophilic effect.

  18. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  19. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  20. VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasisolid-solid) mechanism lays down general platform for the syntheses of graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Mohammad, S.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene is a relatively new material. The current state-of-the-art of the graphene synthesis has been reviewed. Existing mechanism for the graphene synthesis has been examined. The flaws of this mechanism have been described. Attempts have been made to present a new mechanism called the vapor-quasiliquid (quasisolid)-solid mechanism. For this, various physicochemical processes contributing to graphene synthesis have been considered. These processes include the substrate surface morphology, substrate surface energy, carbon solubility in the substrate surface, temperature, and pressure. Surface disturbance and surface amorphicity of the substrate, together with Knudsen diffusion of the carbon species through this surface, are the key elements of the proposed mechanism. This mechanism appears to have a common platform and a number of ground rules. It describes, for the first time, essentially all possible graphene syntheses, including the synthesis of single-layer, bilayer, few-layer, and multilayer graphene films on all possible substrates, such as metal foils, evaporated metal films, semiconductors, ceramics, and dielectrics. It addresses important features of graphene synthesis as well, namely, the role of permeability, substrate surface orientation, edge effects, etc. The results based on the proposed mechanism are in good agreements with the available experiments.

  1. Infiltrative Cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejar, David; Colombo, Paolo C; Latif, Farhana; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies can result from a wide spectrum of both inherited and acquired conditions with varying systemic manifestations. They portend an adverse prognosis, with only a few exceptions (ie, glycogen storage disease), where early diagnosis can result in potentially curative treatment. The extent of cardiac abnormalities varies based on the degree of infiltration and results in increased ventricular wall thickness, chamber dilatation, and disruption of the conduction system. These changes often lead to the development of heart failure, atrioventricular (AV) block, and ventricular arrhythmia. Because these diseases are relatively rare, a high degree of clinical suspicion is important for diagnosis. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are helpful, but advanced techniques including cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear imaging are increasingly preferred. Treatment is dependent on the etiology and extent of the disease and involves medications, device therapy, and, in some cases, organ transplantation. Cardiac amyloid is the archetype of the infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is discussed in great detail in this review. PMID:26244036

  2. CRYOCHEM, Thermodynamic Model for Cryogenic Chemical Systems: Solid-Vapor and Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Equilibria Toward Applications on Titan and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. P.; Kargel, J. S.; Adidharma, H.; Marion, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Until in-situ measurements can be made regularly on extraterrestrial bodies, thermodynamic models are the only tools to investigate the properties and behavior of chemical systems on those bodies. The resulting findings are often critical in describing physicochemical processes in the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface in planetary geochemistry and climate studies. The extremely cold conditions on Triton, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt Objects, and Titan introduce huge non-ideality that prevents conventional models from performing adequately. At such conditions, atmospheres as a whole—not components individually—are subject to phase equilibria with their equilibrium solid phases or liquid phases or both. A molecular-based thermodynamic model for cryogenic chemical systems, referred to as CRYOCHEM, the development of which is still in progress, was shown to reproduce the vertical composition profile of Titan's atmospheric methane measured by the Huygens probe (Tan et al., Icarus 2013, 222, 53). Recently, the model was also used to describe Titan's global circulation where the calculated composition of liquid in Ligeia Mare is consistent with the bathymetry and microwave absorption analysis of T91 Cassini fly-by data (Tan et al., 2014, submitted). Its capability to deal with equilibria involving solid phases has also been demonstrated (Tan et al., Fluid Phase Equilib. 2013, 360, 320). With all those previous works done, our attention is now shifting to the lower temperatures in Titan's tropopause and on Pluto's surface, where much technical development remains for CRYOCHEM to assure adequate performance at low temperatures. In these conditions, solid-vapor equilibrium (SVE) is the dominant phase behavior that determines the composition of the atmosphere and the existing ices. Another potential application is for the subsurface phase equilibrium, which also involves liquid, thus three-phase equilibrium: solid-liquid-vapor (SLV). This presentation will discuss the

  3. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  4. Highly vibrationally excited CO generated in a low-temperature chemical reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, E.; Frederickson, K.; Yurkovich, M.; Musci, B.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A chemical flow reactor is used to study the vibrational population distribution of CO produced by a reaction between carbon vapor generated in an arc discharge and molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate formation of highly vibrationally excited CO, up to vibrational level v = 14, at low temperatures, T = 400-450 K, with population inversion at v = 4-7, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of reaction enthalpy. The results show feasibility of development of a new CO chemical laser using carbon vapor and oxygen as reactants.

  5. Controllable Growth of the Graphene from Millimeter-Sized Monolayer to Multilayer on Cu by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyang; Huang, Zhigao; Lai, Fachun; Lin, Limei; Xu, Yangyang; Zuo, Chuandong; Zheng, Weifeng; Qu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    As is well established, mastery to precise control of the layer number, stacking order of graphene, and the size of single-crystal monolayer graphene is very important for both fundamental interest and practical applications. In this report, millimeter-sized single-crystal monolayer graphene has been synthesized to multilayer graphene on Cu by chemical vapor deposition. The relationship of the growth process between monolayer graphene and multilayer graphene is investigated carefully. Besides the general multilayer graphene with Bernal stacking order, parts of multilayer graphene with non-Bernal stacking order were modulated under optimized growth conditions. The oxide nanoparticle on the Cu surface derived from annealing has been found to play the key role in nucleation. In addition, the hydrogen concentration impacts significantly on the layer number and shape of the graphene. Moreover, a possible mechanism was proposed to understand the growth process discussed above, which may provide an instruction to graphene growth on Cu by chemical vapor deposition.

  6. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of MoS2 on SiO2/Si by chemical vapor deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, single layer MoS2 with a direct band gap of 1.9 eV has been proposed as a candidate for two dimensional nanoelectronic devices. However, the synthetic approach to obtain high-quality MoS2 atomic thin layers is still problematic. Spectroscopic and microscopic results reveal that both single layers and tetrahedral clusters of MoS2 are deposited directly on the SiO2/Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition. The tetrahedral clusters are mixtures of 2H- and 3R-MoS2. By ex situ optical analysis, both the single layers and tetrahedral clusters can be attributed to van der Waals epitaxial growth. Due to the similar layered structures we expect the same growth mechanism for other transition-metal disulfides by chemical vapor deposition. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Pore-scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters...... of the Fick-Jacobs equation. We thus conclude that for a single, axisymmetric pore, the enhancement factor depends upon relative humidity boundary conditions at the liquid bridge interfaces, distance between liquid bridges, and bridge lengths....

  8. Stable dropwise condensation for enhancing heat transfer via the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of grafted polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Adam T; Yagüe, Jose L; Gleason, Karen K; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-22

    Ultra-thin copolymer films are deposited by initiated chemical deposition (iCVD) to investigate their performance under the condensation of water vapor. By forming a grafted interface between the coating and the substrate, the films exhibit stable dropwise condensation even when subjected to 100 °C steam. The applicability of the iCVD to complex substrate geometries is demonstrated on a copper condenser coil.

  9. SiC coatings grown by liquid injection chemical vapor deposition using single source metal-organic precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Boisselier, Guilhaume; Maury, Francis; Schuster, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    International audience; SiC coatings have been grown by direct liquid injection of organosilanes in a hot-wall chemical vapor depositionreactor (DLICVD). 1,3-disilabutane (DSB) and polysilaethylene (PSE) were used as single-source precursors. Amorphous and stoichiometric SiC coatings were deposited under low pressure on various substrates in the temperature range of 923–1073 K. Thickness gradients due to the temperature profiles and the precursor depletion were observed along the reactor axis...

  10. Growth of thick MgB{sub 2} films by impinging-jet hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamborn, D.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wilke, R.H.T.; Li, Q. [Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xi, X. [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801 (United States); Snyder, D.W. [Applied Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Redwing, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2008-01-18

    Thick MgB{sub 2} films are grown using a novel impinging-jet hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition process. An increased amount of the boron source gas generates high growth rates. Superconducting properties of the thick films are comparable to previous results from other processes, which indicate that this is a promising new process for MgB{sub 2} deposition for coated conductor applications, such as wires and tapes for MRI magnets. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Characterization of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition-Physical Vapor Deposition transparent deposits on textiles to trigger various antimicrobial properties to food industry textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunon, Celine [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Chadeau, Elise; Oulahal, Nadia [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Grossiord, Carol [Science et Surface, 64, Chemin des Mouilles, F-69130 Ecully (France); Dubost, Laurent [HEF, ZI SUD, Rue Benoit Fourneyron, F-42166 Andrezieux Boutheon (France); Bessueille, Francois [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Simon, Farida [TDV Industrie, 43 Rue du Bas des Bois, BP 121, F-53012 Laval Cedex (France); Degraeve, Pascal [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire de Recherche en Genie Industriel Alimentaire (LRGIA, E.A. 3733), Rue Henri de Boissieu, F-01000 Bourg en Bresse (France); Leonard, Didier, E-mail: didier.leonard@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques (LSA), CNRS, UMR 5180, Bat. J. Raulin 5eme etage, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    Textiles for the food industry were treated with an original deposition technique based on a combination of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Physical Vapor Deposition to obtain nanometer size silver clusters incorporated into a SiOCH matrix. The optimization of plasma deposition parameters (gas mixture, pressure, and power) was focused on textile transparency and antimicrobial properties and was based on the study of both surface and depth composition (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, SIMS depth profiling and XPS depth profiling on treated glass slides). Deposition conditions were identified in order to obtain a variable and controlled quantity of {approx} 10 nm size silver particles at the surface and inside of coatings exhibiting acceptable transparency properties. Microbiological characterization indicated that the surface variable silver content as calculated from XPS and ToF-SIMS data directly influences the level of antimicrobial activity.

  12. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  13. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlome, Richard, E-mail: richard.bartlome@alumni.ethz.ch; De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71b, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios [University of Patras, Department of Chemical Engineering, Plasma Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 1407, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  14. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McMaster, M.C. [IBM San Jose, CA (United States); Tung, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  15. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo, Wenlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji, E-mail: hongjili@yeah.net [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Xu, Sheng [School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g{sup −1}. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  16. Growth process conditions of tungsten oxide thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z. Silvester, E-mail: Z.S.Houweling@uu.nl [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, John W. [Electron Microscopy, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Michiel de; Harks, Peter-Paul R.M.L.; Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process parameters to control hot-wire CVD of WO{sub 3-x} are categorized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth time, oxygen partial pressure, filament and substrate temperature are varied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and crystal structure, optical bandgap and morphology are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen partial pressure determines the deposition rate up to as high as 36 {mu}m min{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructures, viz. wires, crystallites and closed crystallite films, are controllably deposited. - Abstract: We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3-x}) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was varied from 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 1.0 mbar and the current through the filaments was varied from 4.0 to 9.0 A, which constitutes a filament temperature of 1390-2340 Degree-Sign C in vacuum. It is observed that the deposition rate of the films is predominantly determined by the oxygen partial pressure; it changes from about 1 to about 36,000 nm min{sup -1} in the investigated range. Regardless of the oxygen partial pressure and filament temperature used, thin films with a nanogranular morphology are obtained, provided that the depositions last for 30 min or shorter. The films consist either of amorphous or partially crystallized WO{sub 3-x} with high averaged transparencies of over 70% and an indirect optical band gap of 3.3 {+-} 0.1 eV. A prolonged deposition time entails an extended exposure of the films to thermal radiation from the filaments, which causes crystallization to monoclinic WO{sub 3} with diffraction maxima due to the (0 0 2), (2 0 0) and (0 2 0) crystallographic planes, furthermore the nanograins sinter and the films exhibit a cone

  17. Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether during Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Xiang, Rong; Inoue, Taiki; Einarsson, Erik; Chiashi, Shohei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Akira; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we investigated carbon feedstock decomposition conditions on the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition. We simulated gas-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) at typical SWNT growth conditions using the chemical kinetic model, and confirmed the reaction trends and primary products using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Molar fractions were correlated against residence time in the reactor by adjusting the volumetric gas flow rate, and concentration profiles of reaction species were compared to the predicted decomposition mechanism. Signature peak intensities indicated concentrations of both ethanol and DME.

  18. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  19. Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources to Atmosphere as Affected by Shallow Subsurface and Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Hosken, K.; Schulte, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movement and modeling of chemical vapor through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface when subjected to natural atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land surface is of importance to applications such as landmine detection and vapor intrusion into subsurface structures. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of these sensor signals to make assessment of source conditions remains a challenge. Chemical signatures are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the unsaturated soil environment, attenuating signal strength and masking contaminant source conditions. The dominant process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal or no quantification of other processes contributing to vapor migration, such as thermal diffusion, convective gas flow due to the displacement of air, expansion/contraction of air due to temperature changes, temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and fluctuations in atmospheric pressure. Soil water evaporation and interfacial mass transfer add to the complexity of the system. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmosphere interface and use the resulting dataset to test existing theories on subsurface gas flow and iterate between numerical modeling efforts and experimental data. Ultimately, we aim to update conceptual models of shallow subsurface vapor transport to include conditionally significant transport processes and inform placement of mobile sensors and/or networks. We have developed a two-dimensional tank apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and a flow-through head space for simulation of the atmospheric interface. A detailed matrix of realistic atmospheric boundary conditions was applied in a series of

  20. Optical Properties of One-Dimensional Structured GaN:Mn Fabricated by a Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Ui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group III nitride semiconductors with direct band gaps have recently become increasingly important in optoelectronics and microelectronics applications due to their direct band gaps, which cover the whole visible spectrum and a large part of the UV range. Major developments in wide band gap III–V nitride semiconductors have recently led to the commercial production of high-temperature, high-power electronic devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, and laser diodes (LDs. In this study, GaN nanowires were grown on horizontal reactors by chemical vapor deposition (CVD employing a vapor-solid mechanism. Many studies have described how to control the diameters of wires in the liquid phase catalytic process, but one-dimensional nanostructures, which are grown using a noncatalytic process, are relatively unexplored due to the challenge of producing high-quality synthetic materials of controlled size. However, vapor-solid mechanisms to make synthesized nanowires are simple to implement. We obtained results from GaN nanostructures that were a preferential c-axis orientation from the substrate. The morphology and crystallinity of the GaN nanowires were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical compositions of GaN with Mn were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Optical properties were investigated using photo luminescence and cathode-luminescence measurements.

  1. Spray Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Source Precursors for Chalcopyrite I-III-VI2 Thin-Film Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Harris, Jerry D.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Dickman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provide an attractive approach to fabricating solar arrays with high mass-specific power. A polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer is among the new generation of photovoltaic device technologies for thin film solar cells. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have focused on the development of new single-source precursors (SSPs) for deposition of semiconducting chalcopyrite materials onto lightweight, flexible substrates. We describe the syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering. Copper indium disulfide and related thin-film materials were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SSPs. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties to optimize device quality. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hotwall reactor at 395 C yielded the best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier-, smoother-, and denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was one percent.

  2. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  3. Filling high aspect ratio trenches by superconformal chemical vapor deposition: Predictive modeling and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjiao B.; Abelson, John R.

    2014-11-01

    Complete filling of a deep recessed structure with a second material is a challenge in many areas of nanotechnology fabrication. A newly discovered superconformal coating method, applicable in chemical vapor deposition systems that utilize a precursor in combination with a co-reactant, can solve this problem. However, filling is a dynamic process in which the trench progressively narrows and the aspect ratio (AR) increases. This reduces species diffusion within the trench and may drive the component partial pressures out of the regime for superconformal coating. We therefore derive two theoretical models that can predict the possibility for filling. First, we recast the diffusion-reaction equation for the case of a sidewall with variable taper angle. This affords a definition of effective AR, which is larger than the nominal AR due to the reduced species transport. We then derive the coating profile, both for superconformal and for conformal coating. The critical (most difficult) step in the filling process occurs when the sidewalls merge at the bottom of the trench to form the V shape. Experimentally, for the Mg(DMADB)2/H2O system and a starting AR = 9, this model predicts that complete filling will not be possible, whereas experimentally we do obtain complete filling. We then hypothesize that glancing-angle, long-range transport of species may be responsible for the better than predicted filling. To account for the variable range of species transport, we construct a ballistic transport model. This incorporates the incident flux from outside the structure, cosine law re-emission from surfaces, and line-of-sight transport between internal surfaces. We cast the transport probability between all positions within the trench into a matrix that represents the redistribution of flux after one cycle of collisions. Matrix manipulation then affords a computationally efficient means to determine the steady-state flux distribution and growth rate for a given taper angle. The

  4. Model reduction and temperature uniformity control for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulou, Artemis-Georgia

    The consideration of Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) in semiconductor manufacturing has recently been increasing. As a result, control of RTP systems has become of great importance since it is expected to help in addressing uniformity problems that, so far, have been obstructing the acceptance of the method. The spatial distribution appearing in RTP models necessitates the use of model reduction in order to obtain models of a size suitable for use in control algorithms. This dissertation addresses model reduction as well as control issues for RTP systems. A model of a three-zone Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) system is developed to study the effects of spatial wafer temperature patterns on polysilicon deposition uniformity. A sequence of simulated runs is performed, varying the lamp power profiles so that different wafer temperature modes are excited. The dominant spatial wafer thermal modes are extracted via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and subsequently used as a set of trial functions to represent both the wafer temperature and deposition thickness. A collocation formulation of Galerkin's method is used to discretize the original modeling equations, giving a low-order model which loses little of the original, high-order model's fidelity. We make use of the excellent predictive capabilities of the reduced model to optimize power inputs to the lamp banks to achieve a desired polysilicon deposition thickness at the end of a run with minimal deposition spatial nonuniformity. Since the results illustrate that the optimization procedure benefits from the use of the reduced-order model, we further utilize the reduced order model for real time Model Based Control. The feedback controller is designed using the Internal Model Control (IMC) structure especially modified to handle systems described by ordinary differential and algebraic equations. The IMC controller is obtained using optimal control theory on singular arcs extended for multi input systems

  5. The Tribological Behaviors of Three Films Coated on Biomedical Titanium Alloy by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-11-01

    Three thin films (DLC, a-C, and TiN) were performed on Ti6Al4V by chemical vapor deposition. Carbon ion implantation was pretreated for DLC and a-C films while Ti transition layer was pretreated for TiN film to strengthen the bonding strength. X-ray diffraction, Raman measurement, nano-hardness and nano-scratch tester, and cross-section etching by FIB method were used to analyze film characteristics. Tribological behaviors of these coatings were studied by articulation with both ZrO2 and UHMWPE balls using ball-on-disk sliding. The thickness values reached ~0.46, ~0.33, and ~1.67 μm for DLC, a-C, and TiN film, respectively. Nano-hardness of the coatings compared with that of untreated and bonding strength (critical load in nano-scratch test) values of composite coatings compared with that of monolayer film all increased significantly, respectively. Under destructive test (ZrO2 ball conterface) in bovine serum lubrication, TiN coating revealed the best wear resistance while DLC showed the worst. Film failure was mainly attributed to the plowing by hard ZrO2 ball characterized by abrasive and adhesive wear. Under normal test (UHMWPE ball conterface), all coatings showed significant improvement in wear resistance both in dry sliding and bovine serum lubrication. Both DLC and a-C films showed less surface damage than TiN film due to the self-lubricating phenomenon in dry sliding. TiN film showed the largest friction coefficient both in destructive and normal tests, devoting to the big TiN grains thus leading to much rougher surface and then a higher value. The self-lubricating film formed on DLC and a-C coating could also decrease their friction coefficients. The results indicated that three coatings revealed different wear mechanisms, and thick DLC or a-C film was more promising in application in lower stress conditions such as artificial cervical disk.

  6. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  7. Effects of Atmospheric Conditions and the Land/Atmospheric Interface on Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Howington, S. E.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the movement of chemical vapors and gas through variably saturated soil subjected to atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land/atmospheric interface is important to many applications, including landmine detection, methane leakage during natural gas production from shale and CO2 leakage from deep geologic storage. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures and gas leakage at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of sensor signals remains a challenge. Chemical vapors are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the soil environment, masking source conditions. The process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal quantification of other processes, such as convective gas flow and temporal or spatial variation in soil moisture. Vapor migration is affected by atmospheric conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature, wind velocity), soil thermal and hydraulic properties and contaminant properties, all of which are physically and thermodynamically coupled. The complex coupling of two drastically different flow regimes in the subsurface and atmosphere is commonly ignored in modeling efforts, or simplifying assumptions are made to treat the systems as de-coupled. Experimental data under controlled laboratory settings are lacking to refine the theory for proper coupling and complex treatment of vapor migration through porous media in conversation with atmospheric flow and climate variations. Improving fundamental understanding and accurate quantification of these processes is not feasible in field settings due to lack of controlled initial and boundary conditions and inability to fully characterize the subsurface at all relevant scales. The goal of this work is to understand the influence of changes in atmospheric conditions to transport of vapors through variably saturated soil. We have developed a tank apparatus

  8. Structural and electrical characterization of Bi₂Se₃ nanostructures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria, L D; Schroer, M D; Chatterjee, A; Poirier, G R; Pretko, M; Patel, S K; Petta, J R

    2012-09-12

    We characterize nanostructures of Bi(2)Se(3) that are grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using the precursors diethyl selenium and trimethyl bismuth. By adjusting growth parameters, we obtain either single-crystalline ribbons up to 10 μm long or thin micrometer-sized platelets. Four-terminal resistance measurements yield a sample resistivity of 4 mΩ·cm. We observe weak antilocalization and extract a phase coherence length l(ϕ) = 178 nm and spin-orbit length l(so) = 93 nm at T = 0.29 K. Our results are consistent with previous measurements on exfoliated samples and samples grown via physical vapor deposition.

  9. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  10. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, Valeria [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Biagi, Simona [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici - IPCF-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ghimenti, Silvia [University of Pisa, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Onor, Massimo; D' Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici - ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg{sup 0}, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H{sub 2} microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L{sup -1} (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 {mu}mol L{sup -1} were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were

  11. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2011-11-01

    Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 μmol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection-chemical

  12. Single- and few-layer graphene growth on stainless steel substrates by direct thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Robin; Ashokreddy, A.; Vijayan, C.; Pradeep, T.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing interest in graphene research in basic sciences and applications emphasizes the need for an economical means of synthesizing it. We report a method for the synthesis of graphene on commercially available stainless steel foils using direct thermal chemical vapor deposition. Our method of synthesis and the use of relatively cheap precursors such as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) as a source of carbon and SS 304 as the substrate proved to be economically viable. The presence of single- and few-layer graphene was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy/spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements were further used to establish the influence of various elemental species present in stainless steel on graphene growth. The role of cooling rate on surface migration of certain chemical species (oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn) that promote or hinder the growth of graphene is probed. Such analysis of the chemical species present on the surface can be promising for graphene based catalytic research.

  13. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 Crystals with Tunable Band Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Pan; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ning, Shoucong; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiko; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-02-22

    Band gap engineering of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2 and WS2, is essential for the applications of the two-dimensional (2D) crystals in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although it is known that chemical mixture can evidently change the band gaps of alloyed Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 crystals, the successful growth of Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 monolayers with tunable Mo/W ratios has not been realized by conventional chemical vapor deposition. Herein, we developed a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) method to grow monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 (x = 0-1) 2D crystals with a wide range of Mo/W ratios. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrate the homogeneous mixture of Mo and W in the 2D alloys. Photoluminescence measurements show that the optical band gaps of the monolayer Mo(1-x)W(x)S2 crystals strongly depend on the Mo/W ratios and continuously tunable band gap can be achieved by controlling the W or Mo portion by the LP-CVD.

  14. Pathways for synthesis of new selenium-containing oxo-compounds: Chemical vapor transport reactions, hydrothermal techniques and evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrugin, Vadim M.; Colmont, Marie; Siidra, Oleg I.; Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Mentré, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Due to the low and close melting and sublimation temperatures (340 and 350 °C, respectively), the crystal growth of selenates and/or selenites is generally achieved using either chemical vapor transport routes, hydrothermal methods due to the good solubility and reactivity of (SeO3)2- anions or isothermal evaporation synthesis. Here we report examples many new crystal structures obtained using these synthesis routes. Particularly, description of each process is given with theoretical and practical information assorted with description of selected structures.

  15. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  16. Chemical Vapor Deposition of GeSbTe Thin Films for Next-Generation Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Hideaki; Hamada, Seichi; Horiike, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Masato; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Ohba, Takayuki

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we describe chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of GeSbTe (GST) films for fabricating phase change memory. A low-carbon-impurity GST film was deposited by CVD. Film composition and structure varied significantly depending on deposition temperature and pressure. The tendency of composition variation on a TiN substrate was the same as that on a SiO2 substrate. Finally, flat Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films were obtained below 300 °C using tert-butylgermanium, triisopropylantimony and diisopropyltellurium as precursors.

  17. INTERACTION-MEDIATED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON ACICULAR SILICA-COATED α-Fe CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiang Wang; Guoqing Ning; Fei Wei; Guohua Luo

    2003-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with 20 nm outer diameter were prepared by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene using ultrafine surface-modified acicular α-Fe catalyst particles. The growth mechanism of MWNTs on the larger catalyst particles are attributed to the interaction between the Fe nanoparticles with the surface-modified silica layer. This interaction-mediated growth mechanism is illustrated by studying the electronic, atomic and crystal properties of surface-modified catalysts and MWNTs products by characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman spectra.

  18. Effect of MoO3 constituents on the growth of MoS2 nanosheets by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Yong Ping; Qian Chen, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    The highly crystalline and uniform MoS2 film was grown on Si substrate by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method using S and MoO3 as precursors at an elevated temperature. The structures and properties of MoS2 nanosheets vary greatly with the content of MoO3 constituents in the films. The nanostructured MoS2 film exhibits strong photoluminescence in the visible range. This work may provide a pathway to synthesizing MoS2 nanosheets and facilitate the development of applicable devices.

  19. High-efficiency CdTe thin-film solar cells using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Stirn, R. J.; Meyers, P. V.; Liu, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency of metalorganic chemical vapor deposited CdTe as an intrinsic active layer in n-i-p solar cell structures is reported. Small-area devices with efficiencies over 9 percent have been demonstrated. I-V characteristics, photospectral response, and the results of Auger profiling of structural composition for typical devices will be presented. Also presented are preliminary results on similar photovoltaic devices having Cd(0.85)Mn(0.15)Te in place of CdTe as an i layer.

  20. Growth of 2 um Crack-Free GaN on Si(111)Substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Meng; WANG Xiao-Liang; XIAO Hong-Ling; WANG Cui-Mei; PAN Xu; HOU Qi-Feng; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2011-01-01

    A 2μm high quality crack-free GaN film was successfully grown on 2-inch Si(111) substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition with a high temperature AlN/graded-AlGaN multibuffer and an AlN/GaN superlattice interlayer. It is found that the structures, as well as the thicknesses of the multibuffer and interlayer, are crucial for the growth of a crack-free GaN epilayer. The GaN(0002) XRD FWHM of the crack-free sample is 479.8 arcsec, indicating good crystal quality. An AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was grown and tested by Van der Pauw Hall measurement. The electron mobility of two-dimensional electron gas increases from 1928 cm2/V·s to 12277cm2/V·s when the test-temperature decreases from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. The electron mobility is comparable to that of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire, and the largest value is obtained for an AlGaN/GaN/Si(111) heterostructure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition.%@@ A 2pm high quality crack-free GaN film was successfully grown on 2-inch Si(111)substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition with a high temperature AIN/graded-AIGaN multibuffer and an AIN/GaN superlattice interlayer.It is found that the structures, as well as the thicknesses of the multibuffer and interlayer, are crucial for the growth of a crack-free GaN epilayer.The GaN(0002)XRD FWHM of the crack-free sample is 479.8arcsec, indicating good crystal quality.An AIGaN/GaN heterostructure was grown and tested by Van der Pauw Hall measurement.The electron mobility of two-dimensional electron gas increases from 1928 cm 2/V.S to 12277cm2/V s when the test-temperature decreases from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature.The electron mobility is comparable to that of AIGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire, and the largest value is obtained for an A]GaN/GaN/Si(111)heterostructure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

  1. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  2. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Black, M. R.; Chavez, C. A.; Maskaly, K. R.; Espinoza, M.; Boman, M.; Landstrom, L.

    2008-06-01

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited.

  3. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, J.L.; Black, M.R.; Chavez, C.A.; Maskaly, K.R.; Espinoza, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NEMISIS Team, IAT-2, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boman, M.; Landstrom, L. [Uppsala University, Inorganic Chemistry, Angstrom Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-06-15

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited. (orig.)

  4. Nanostructured Thin Film Synthesis by Aerosol Chemical Vapor Deposition for Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Tandeep S.

    Renewable energy sources offer a viable solution to the growing energy demand while mitigating concerns for greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. This has led to a tremendous momentum towards solar and wind-based energy harvesting technologies driving efficiencies higher and costs lower. However, the intermittent nature of these energy sources necessitates energy storage technologies, which remain the Achilles heel in meeting the renewable energy goals. This dissertation focusses on two approaches for addressing the needs of energy storage: first, targeting direct solar to fuel conversion via photoelectrochemical water-splitting and second, improving the performance of current rechargeable batteries by developing new electrode architectures and synthesis processes. The aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD) process has emerged as a promising single-step approach for nanostructured thin film synthesis directly on substrates. The relationship between the morphology and the operating parameters in the process is complex. In this work, a simulation based approach has been developed to understand the relationship and acquire the ability of predicting the morphology. These controlled nanostructured morphologies of TiO2 , compounded with gold nanoparticles of various shapes, are used for solar water-splitting applications. Tuning of light absorption in the visible-light range along with reduced electron-hole recombination in the composite structures has been demonstrated. The ACVD process is further extended to a novel single-step synthesis of nanostructured TiO2 electrodes directly on the current collector for applications as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, mainly for electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. The effect of morphology of the nanostructures has been investigated via experimental studies and electrochemical transport modelling. Results demonstrate the exceptional performance of the single crystal one-dimensional nanostructures over granular

  5. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  6. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  7. Laser Induced Chemical Vapor Phase Epitaxial Growth of III-V semiconductor Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-14

    temperatures for the preparation and crystal growth of semiconductors . During the first phase of this program at Southern Methodist University, the epitaxial...approach to the preparation of device-quality 4 semiconductor films of controlled electrical and stru -.tural propierties . The excitation of reaction...temperatures for the preparation and crystal growth of semiconductors . The vapors of essentially all metalorganic compounds and group V hydrides are colorless

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  9. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  10. Large-Area Growth of Uniform Single-Layer MoS2 Thin Films by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Hyun; Choi, Yura; Choi, Woong

    2015-12-01

    We report the largest-size thin films of uniform single-layer MoS2 on sapphire substrates grown by chemical vapor deposition based on the reaction of gaseous MoO3 and S evaporated from solid sources. The as-grown thin films of single-layer MoS2 were continuous and uniform in thickness for more than 4 cm without the existence of triangular-shaped MoS2 clusters. Compared to mechanically exfoliated crystals, the as-grown single-layer MoS2 thin films possessed consistent chemical valence states and crystal structure along with strong photoluminescence emission and optical absorbance at high energy. These results demonstrate that it is possible to scale up the growth of uniform single-layer MoS2 thin films, providing potentially important implications on realizing high-performance MoS2 devices.

  11. Optical and electrical characteristics of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition boron carbonitride thin films derived from N-trimethylborazine precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulyaeva, Veronica S., E-mail: veronica@niic.nsc.ru [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kosinova, Marina L.; Rumyantsev, Yurii M.; Kuznetsov, Fedor A. [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, Valerii G. [Laboratory of Physical Principles for Integrated Microelectronics, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kirienko, Viktor V. [Laboratory of Nonequilibrium Semiconductors Systems, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-02

    Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using N-trimethylborazine as a precursor. The films were deposited on Si(100) and fused silica substrates. The grown films were characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, capacitance–voltage and current–voltage measurements. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature (373–973 K) and gas phase composition were varied. Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers in the range of 300–2000 nm, the transmittance as high as 93% has been achieved. BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9 depending on the synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • N-trimethylborazine was used as a precursor. • Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers (93%). • BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9.

  12. A Comparison between Thin-Film Transistors Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition and PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of new growth techniques on the mobility and stability of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H thin film transistors (TFTs has been studied. It was suggested that the key parameter controlling the field-effect mobility and stability is the intrinsic stress in the a-Si:H layer. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD at 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Structural properties of these films were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. Electronic properties were measured by dark conductivity, σd, and photoconductivity, σph. For amorphous silicon films deposited by RF-PECVD on PET, photosensitivity's of >105 were obtained at both 100 º C and 25 ºC. For amorphous silicon films deposited by HW-CVD, a photosensitivity of > 105 was obtained at 100 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited by HW-CVD at 95% hydrogen dilution show σph~ 10-4 Ω-1cm-1, while maintaining a photosensitivity of ~102 at both 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films with a large crystalline fraction (> 50% can be deposited by HW-CVD all the way down to room temperature.

  13. Ni nanoparticles prepared by simple chemical method for the synthesis of Ni/NiO-multi-layered graphene by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Remalli, Nagarjuna; Gedela, Venkataramana; Padya, Balaji; Jain, Pawan Kumar; Al-Fatesh, Ahmed; Rana, Usman Ali; Srikanth, Vadali V. S. S.

    2017-02-01

    A new chemical method was used to obtain a high yield of nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs). The effect of solvent (distilled water, ethylene glycol, and ethanol) and surfactant (oleic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidinone) on the morphology and crystallinity of the synthesized Ni-NPs has been investigated. The experimental results revealed that among the solvents mentioned above, ethanol gives the best results in terms of complete reduction, controlled morphology and size distribution of Ni-NPs. The surfactants played an important role in impeding the agglomeration and surface oxidation of Ni-NPs. The surfactants also affected the morphology of the Ni-NPs. The synthesized Ni-NPs are found to be quite stable in air. The best of the synthesized Ni-NPs were effectively used as catalysts for the synthesis of Ni/NiO-multi-layered graphene using catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique.

  14. Diffusion with chemical reaction: An attempt to explain number density anomalies in experiments involving alkali vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual diffusion of two reacting gases is examined which takes place in a bath of inert gas atoms. Solutions are obtained between concentric spheres, each sphere acting as a source for one of the reactants. The calculational model is used to illustrate severe number density gradients observed in absorption experiments with alkali vapor. Severe gradients result when sq root k/D R is approximately 5 where k, D, and R are respectively the second order rate constant, the multicomponent diffusion constant, and the geometrical dimension of the experiment.

  15. Hybrid opto-chemical doping in Ag nanoparticle-decorated monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, R.; Haldar, S.; Majumdar, D.; Singha, A.; Ray, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    The novel opto-chemical doping effect in Ag nanoparticle-decorated monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy for the first time. We used both noble metal nanoparticles and optical excitation, in a hybrid opto-chemical route, to tune the doping level in graphene. Metal nanoparticle-induced chemical effects and laser power-induced substrate effects alter the doping nature of graphene from p- to n-type. Compared with earlier studies, the proposed method significantly lowers the laser intensity required for optical power-dependent doping, resulting in prevention of damage to the sample due to local heating. Some other interesting observations are the enhanced peak intensity in the Raman spectrum of graphene, enhancement of the D-band intensity and the introduction of G-band splitting. This novel, cheap and easily implemented hybrid optical-chemical doping strategy could be very useful for tuning graphene plasmons on the widely used Si/SiO2 substrates for various photonic device applications.

  16. Review on physical and chemical characterizations of contaminated sediments from urban stormwater infiltration basins within the framework of the French observatory for urban hydrology (SOERE URBIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mufleh, Amelène; Béchet, Béatrice; Ruban, Véronique; Legret, Michel; Clozel, Blandine; Barraud, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Delolme, Cécile

    2014-04-01

    Urban stormwater infiltration basins are designed to hold runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of sediments and associated pollutants. However concerns have been expressed about the environmental impacts that may be exerted by the trapped pollutants on groundwater, soils and ecosystems. In this context, sediment characterization represents a key issue for local authorities in terms of management strategies. During the last two decades, several studies were launched including either physical or chemical characterization of stormwater sediments but without real synthesis of data and methods used. Consequently, there is an important need for reviewing the current experimental techniques devoted to the physico-chemical characterization of sediment. The review is based on the outcomes of two experimental sites for which long term monitoring and data collection have been done: the Cheviré basin (near Nantes) and the Django Reinhardt basin (near Lyon). The authors summarize the studies dealing with bulk properties, pollutant contents, their potential mobility and speciation. This paper aims at promoting the significant progresses that were made through a multidisciplinary approach involving multi-scaled and combined experimental techniques.

  17. Analysis of the Si(111) surface prepared in chemical vapor ambient for subsequent III-V heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Steidl, M.; Paszuk, A.; Brückner, S.; Dobrich, A.; Supplie, O.; Kleinschmidt, P.; Hannappel, T.

    2017-01-01

    For well-defined heteroepitaxial growth of III-V epilayers on Si(111) substrates the atomic structure of the silicon surface is an essential element. Here, we study the preparation of the Si(111) surface in H2-based chemical vapor ambient as well as its atomic structure after contamination-free transfer to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Applying complementary UHV-based techniques, we derive a complete picture of the atomic surface structure and its chemical composition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements after high-temperature annealing confirm a Si surface free of any traces of oxygen or other impurities. The annealing in H2 ambient leads to a monohydride surface termination, as verified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning tunneling microscopy confirms a well ordered, atomically smooth surface, which is (1 × 1) reconstructed, in agreement with low energy electron diffraction patterns. Atomic force microscopy reveals a significant influence of homoepitaxy and wet-chemical pretreatment on the surface morphology. Our findings show that wet-chemical pretreatment followed by high-temperature annealing leads to contamination-free, atomically flat Si(111) surfaces, which are ideally suited for subsequent III-V heteroepitaxy.

  18. New technology for the investigation of water vapor sorption-induced crystallographic form transformations of chemical compounds: a water vapor sorption gravimetry-dispersive Raman spectroscopy coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feth, Martin Philipp; Jurascheck, Jörg; Spitzenberg, Michael; Dillenz, Jürgen; Bertele, Günter; Stark, Herbert

    2011-03-01

    In this study, a new dynamic water vapor sorption gravimetry (DWVSG)-Raman spectroscopy coupled system is presented and described for the investigation of water (de)sorption-induced solid-phase transition of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The innovative characteristic of the system is the possibility to measure up to 23 samples gravimetrically and spectroscopically in one sorption/desorption experiment. The used dispersive RXN1 Raman system with a 6-mm laser spot P(h) AT probe head is ideal for this kind of coupled technology, as the energy density at the point of measurement of the sample is low, which grants that gravimetrical data and the state of the sample (phase transformations or even degradation) are not influenced by the laser beam. The capabilities of the system were tested by the investigation of a crystalline, nonstoichiometric hydrate form (form 1) and the corresponding X-ray amorphous form of an API (SAR474832). For the crystalline hydrate form, it was possible to correlate the weight loss at low humidities to a crystallographic phase transition (form 2). Furthermore, it was possible to show that the phase transition is reversible upon water uptake (sorption cycle); however, a further intermediate crystal form (form 3) is involved in the rehydration process. By multivariate curve resolution analysis of the Raman spectra, the form distribution diagrams of the desorption/sorption cycle could be constructed. For the amorphous material, the recrystallization process was monitored by the changes in the Raman spectra. The recrystallization point was detected at high humidities (>90% relative humidity), the crystal phase formed was identified (form 1), and the time needed for the conversion into the crystalline state was determined. The form transformation processes were visualized by contour plots (time/humidity vs. wavenumber vs. Raman intensity). In summary, it was concluded that the presented water sorption gravimetry-Raman spectroscopy

  19. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m(3) and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an "Imminent Hazard" condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed.

  20. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  1. Using hot wire and initiated chemical vapor deposition for gas barrier thin film encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spee, D.A., E-mail: diederickspee@gmail.com; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-30

    Hot wire CVD (HWCVD) and initiated CVD (iCVD) are very well suited deposition techniques for the fabrication of transparent thin film gas barriers. Single inorganic or organic layers, however, face challenges, which are hard to overcome: unavoidable defects and low intrinsic barrier function. We demonstrate that by combining inorganic HWCVD films and organic iCVD films, a water vapor transmission rate a low as 5 ∗ 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day at 60 °C and 90% RH for a simple pinhole free three layer structure is obtained even with non-optimized individual layers. Given the 100 °C deposition temperature, the layer stacks can be deposited on any sensitive electronic device.

  2. Solar blind chemically vapor deposited diamond detectors for vacuum ultraviolet pulsed light-source characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Borel, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Jany, C.; Besombes, L.; Brambilla, A.; Riedel, D.; Museur, L.; Castex, M. C.; Gicquel, A.

    1998-11-01

    A major difficulty in characterizing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation produced by harmonic generation or four-wave sum frequency mixing arises in differentiating between the desired VUV signal and the remaining fundamental pump laser beam. To overcome this problem, visible and near UV blind VUV detectors, made from natural and synthetic diamond, have been developed. Such detectors have been used to characterize coherent VUV pulses (λ=125 nm, pulse duration at full width half maximum (FWHM) τFWHM~7 ns) generated by resonance-enhanced four-wave sum mixing in mercury vapor. They allow full characterization of the intensity profile of the VUV pulses, without any significant parasitic signal from simultaneous stray light irradiation at λ=313 nm. Detectors were fabricated exhibiting response times of less than 70 ps at FWHM, corresponding to the lowest response time obtainable with a 7 GHz bandwidth single-shot oscilloscope.

  3. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Woehrl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A plasma enhanced vapor deposition process is used to synthesize graphene from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture on copper samples. The graphene samples were transferred onto SiO2 substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopic mapping and atomic force microscope topographical mapping. Analysis of the Raman bands shows that the deposited graphene is clearly SLG and that the sheets are deposited on large areas of several mm2. The defect density in the graphene sheets is calculated using Raman measurements and the influence of the process pressure on the defect density is measured. Furthermore the origin of these defects is discussed with respect to the process parameters and hence the plasma environment.

  4. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  5. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: flores@quimica.ufsm.br

    2009-06-15

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L{sup - 1} KBr in 6 mol L{sup - 1} HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L{sup - 1} HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH{sub 4} solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g{sup - 1} for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  6. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  7. Metallic 1T phase source/drain electrodes for field effect transistors from chemical vapor deposited MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kappera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDs offer promise as opto-electronic materials due to their direct band gap and reasonably good mobility values. However, most metals form high resistance contacts on semiconducting TMDs such as MoS2. The large contact resistance limits the performance of devices. Unlike bulk materials, low contact resistance cannot be stably achieved in 2D materials by doping. Here we build on our previous work in which we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve low contact resistance electrodes by phase transformation. We show that similar to the previously demonstrated mechanically exfoliated samples, it is possible to decrease the contact resistance and enhance the FET performance by locally inducing and patterning the metallic 1T phase of MoS2 on chemically vapor deposited material. The device properties are substantially improved with 1T phase source/drain electrodes.

  8. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  9. Bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography on NbS2 thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, Hunyoung; Kwon, Sanghyuk; Lee, Changgu

    2016-12-01

    Niobium disulfide, one of the metallic transition metal dichalcogenides, has a high potential as an electrode material for electronic devices made of 2D materials. Here, we investigated the bias-assisted atomic force microscope nanolithography of NbS2 thin films synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. We analyzed the lithographed pattern using Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and friction force microscopy. These analyses showed that lines having various widths and thicknesses could be generated using the lithography technique by simply varying the scan speed and applied voltage. These analyses also revealed that the NbS2 film transformed from a layered crystalline structure into an amorphous structure upon being lithographed. By generating four line segments forming a square and measuring I/V curves inside and outside of the square, the electrical properties of the lithographed material were characterized. These analyses indicate that NbS2 became hydrogenated and an insulator upon being lithographed.

  10. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.B. [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, M.S. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, S.H., E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 {mu}m in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  11. Growth of selective tungsten films on self-aligned CoSi/sub 2/ by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Putte, P.; Sadana, D.K.; Broadbent, E.K.; Morgan, A.E.

    1986-12-22

    The selective deposition of tungsten films onto CoSi/sub 2/ and onto Co by low pressure chemical vapor deposition and their material properties have been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering. When using WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/, uniformly thick tungsten films can be deposited onto CoSi/sub 2/ without substrate alteration. In patterned structures, however, void formation was found at the perimeters of CoSi/sub 2/ contacts to silicon, indicating encroachment of WF/sub 6/ down the edge of the silicide-Si interface. In WF/sub 6/ and Ar, the film thickness was limited to 10 nm and some Si was locally consumed from the upper part of the CoSi/sub 2/ film. Transmission electron diffraction showed evidence of Co/sub 2/Si formation in these areas.

  12. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-24

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (∼0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  13. Formation of perfectly aligned nitrogen-vacancy-center ensembles in chemical-vapor-deposition-grown diamond (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hayato; Tahara, Kosuke; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko; Iwasaki, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    Selectively aligning a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) ensemble in diamond is an important technique for obtaining a high-sensitivity magnetic sensor. Nitrogen-doped diamonds were grown on (111) substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to perform the selective alignment of high-density NV ensembles, yielding perfectly aligned NV ensembles along the [111] direction with a density greater than 1016 cm‑3 and a spin relaxation time of 2 µs. Such alignment results in a high signal contrast with an optical magnetic resonance close to the typical value reported with an isolated NV center. These results indicate the possibility of achieving a high sensitivity through the selective alignment of NV ensembles.

  14. Remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaP with in situ generation of phosphine precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. W.; Lucovsky, G.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1993-01-01

    Thin homoepitaxial films of gallium phosphide (GaP) were grown by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing in situ generated phosphine precursors. The GaP forming reaction is kinetically controlled with an activation energy of 0.65 eV. The increase of the growth rate with increasing radio frequency (rf) power between 20 and 100 W is due to the combined effects of increasingly complete excitation and the spatial extension of the glow discharge toward the substrate, however, the saturation of the growth rate at even higher rf power indicates the saturation of the generation rate of phosphine precursors at this condition. Slight interdiffusion of P into Si and Si into GaP is indicated from GaP/Si heterostructures grown under similar conditions as the GaP homojunctions.

  15. Novel fully vertical GaN p-n diode on Si substrate grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Suguru; Urayama, Yuya; Hamada, Takeaki; Freedsman, Joseph J.; Egawa, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We report novel GaN fully vertical p-n diode on Si grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The thick strained layer superlattice is effective in controlling a doping level of 1016 cm-3 in an n--GaN drift layer. The GaN p-n diode exhibits a differential on-resistance R on of 7.4 mΩ cm2, a turn-on voltage of 3.4 V, and a breakdown voltage V B of 288 V. The corresponding Baliga’s figure of merit (FOM) V\\text{B}2/R\\text{on} is 11.2 MW/cm2. A good FOM value for the GaN-on-Si vertical p-n diode is realized for a drift layer thickness of 1.5 µm without using substrate removal technology.

  16. Highly efficient shrinkage of inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Deng, Tao; Chen, Qi; Liang, Feng; Liu, Zewen

    2016-06-01

    Solid-state nanopore-based analysis systems are currently one of the most attractive and promising platforms in sensing fields. This work presents a highly efficient method to shrink inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology by the deposition of SiN x onto the surface of the nanopore. The contraction of the inverted-pyramid silicon nanopores when subjected to the PECVD process has been modeled and carefully analyzed, and the modeling data are in good agreement with the experimental results within a specific PECVD shrinkage period (˜0-600 s). Silicon nanopores within a 50-400 nm size range contract to sub-10 nm dimensions. Additionally, the inner structure of the nanopores after the PECVD process has been analyzed by focused ion beam cutting process. The results show an inner structure morphology change from inverted-pyramid to hourglass, which may enhance the spatial resolution of sensing devices.

  17. Raman spectra investigation of the defects of chemical vapor deposited multilayer graphene and modified by oxygen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyao; Xu, Yu; Cao, Bing; Qi, Lin; He, Shunyu; Wang, Chinhua; Zhang, Jicai; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Graphene, a two dimensional material, can be modified its properties by defects engineering. Here, we present Raman spectra studies of the multilayer graphene (MLG) fabricated by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition over copper foil, and report that the defects of MLG can be controlled by adjusting methane concentration. Moreover, MLG can be changed from metallic to semiconductoring properties by using oxygen plasma treatment, and we investigate the defects evolution of the graphene after exposing to oxygen plasma by Raman spectra. Our results indicate that the amount of defects in graphene can be changed by regulating the methane concentration and oxygen plasma exposure times, but the primary type of defect in MLG is still boundary-like defect. It is valuable for understanding the physics of defects evolution through artificially generated defects, and such defect engineering will greatly open up the future application of the novel material.

  18. Purification and characterization of double-wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, P.; Okazaki, T.; Sugai, T.; Kimura, J.; Kishi, N.; Sato, K.; Ozeki, Y.; Shinohara, H.

    2006-02-01

    Double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been selectively synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of alcohol over Fe/Co loaded mesoporous silica. The as-grown carbon nanotubes are purified using a multi-step process involving heat treatment in air followed by alkali and acid treatments. The nanotubes are characterized as-grown and after each step of the purification stage by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. It is observed that most of the mesoporous silica and metal particles have been removed from the as-grown nanotubes by these treatments. The carbon content of the nanotube material obtained after the purification is found to be more than 90 wt%.

  19. Causal knowledge extraction by natural language processing in material science: a case study in chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kajikawa

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publications written in natural language still play a central role as our knowledge source. However, due to the flood of publications, the literature survey process has become a highly time-consuming and tangled process, especially for novices of the discipline. Therefore, tools supporting the literature-survey process may help the individual scientist to explore new useful domains. Natural language processing (NLP is expected as one of the promising techniques to retrieve, abstract, and extract knowledge. In this contribution, NLP is firstly applied to the literature of chemical vapor deposition (CVD, which is a sub-discipline of materials science and is a complex and interdisciplinary field of research involving chemists, physicists, engineers, and materials scientists. Causal knowledge extraction from the literature is demonstrated using NLP.

  20. Characterization of the ZnO thin film prepared by single source chemical vapor deposition under low vacuum condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Hong(邓宏); B.; GONG; A.; J.; Petrella; J.; J.; Russell; R.; N.; Lamb

    2003-01-01

    A novel technique is developed for growing high quality ZnO thin films by means of single source chemical vapor deposition (SS CVD) under low vacuum conditions with the precursor of zinc carbamate Zn4O(CO2Net2)6. SEM, AFM and XRD studies show that the resultant thin films have high density, smooth surface, uniform polycrystalline structure and excellent c-axis orientation. XPS investigation indicates that the ZnO films are free of decomposed precursor residues in the bulk. Careful quantitative XPS analysis reveals that the ZnO films are stoichiometric with O/Zn atomic ratio very close to that of ZnO single crystal.

  1. Aluminum-coated hollow glass fibers for ArF-excimer laser light fabricated by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Y; Miyagi, M

    1999-04-20

    A hollow fiber composed of a glass capillary tube and a metal thin film upon the inside of the tube is proposed for the delivery of ArF-excimer laser light. From theoretical analysis, aluminum is chosen as the metal layer. A thin aluminum film is deposited by metallorganic chemical-vapor deposition, with dimethylethylamine alane employed as the source material. Measured loss spectra in vacuum-ultraviolet and ultraviolet regions and losses for ArF-excimer laser light show the low-loss property of the aluminum-coated fiber at the 193-nm wavelength of ArF-excimer laser light. The straight loss of the 1-m long, 1-mm-bore fiber is 1.0 dB.

  2. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  3. Nonlinear optical characterization of GaN layers grown by MOCVD on sapphire[Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiginyanu, I.M.; Kravetsky, I.V.; Pavlidis, D.; Eisenbach, A.; Hildebrandt, R.; Marowsky, G.; Hartnagel, H.L.

    2000-07-01

    Optical second and third harmonic generation measurements were carried out on GaN layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. The measured d{sub 33} is 33 times the d{sub 11} of quartz. The angular dependence of second-harmonic intensity as well as the measured ratios d{sub 33}/d{sub 15} = {minus}2.02 and d{sub 33}/d{sub 31} = {minus}2.03 confirm the wurzite structure of the studied GaN layers with the optical c-axis oriented perpendicular to the sample surface. Fine oscillations were observed in the measured second and third harmonic angular dependencies. A simple model based on the interference of the fundamental beam in the sample was used to explain these oscillations.

  4. The multiscale simulation of metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth dynamics of GaInP thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As a Group III–V compound, GaInP is a high-efficiency luminous material. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology is a very efficient way to uniformly grow multi-chip, multilayer and large-area thin film. By combining the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) methods with virtual reality (VR) technology, this paper presents a multiscale simulation of fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, and molecular dynamics to study the growth process of GaInP thin film in a vertical MOCVD reactor. The results of visualization truly and intuitively not only display the distributional properties of the gas’ thermal and flow fields in a MOCVD reactor but also display the process of GaInP thin film growth in a MOCVD reactor. The simulation thus provides us with a fundamental guideline for optimizing GaInP MOCVD growth.

  5. Science Letters:Development of supported boron-doping TiO2 catalysts by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, supported nonmetal (boron) doping TiO2 coating photocatalysts were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to enhance the activity under visible light irradiation and avoid the recovering of TiO2. Boron atoms were successfully doped into the lattice of TiO2 through CVD, as evidenced from XPS analysis. B-doped TiO2 coating catalysts showed drastic and strong absorption in the visible light range with a red shift in the band gap transition. This novel B-TiO2 coating photocatalyst showed higher photocatalytic activity in methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation than that of the pure TiO2 photocatalyst.

  6. Study of High-Quality GeSn Alloys Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition towards Mid-Infrared Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kabi, Sattar; Ghetmiri, Seyed Amir; Margetis, Joe; Du, Wei; Mosleh, Aboozar; Dou, Wei; Sun, Greg; Soref, Richard A.; Tolle, John; Li, Baohua; Mortazavi, Mansour; Naseem, Hameed A.; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Germanium-tin (GeSn) films with Sn compositions from 5% to 11% were grown on Ge-buffered Si using a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system with low-cost SnCl4 and GeH4 precursors. Material characterization showed that relaxed GeSn layers with thicknesses ranging from 400 nm to 1 μm were achieved. The strong photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the low defect density indicated very high material quality. In addition, temperature-dependent 10-300 K photoluminescence spectra showed that, due to strain relaxation of the material, the emission wavelength is longer than that of strained GeSn thin film samples ( t GeSn layer and 11% Sn composition.

  7. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiO{sub x} films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.W. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiO{sub x} film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Passivated graphene transistors fabricated on a millimeter-sized single-crystal graphene film prepared with chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Yu; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we first investigate the effects of partial pressures and flow rates of precursors on the single-crystal graphene growth using chemical vapor depositions on copper foils. These factors are shown to be critical to the growth rate, seeding density and size of graphene single crystals. The prepared graphene films in millimeter sizes are then bubbling transferred to silicon-dioxide/silicon substrates for high-mobility graphene transistor fabrications. After high-temperature annealing and hexamethyldisilazane passivation, the water attachment is removed from the graphene channel. The elimination of uncontrolled doping and enhancement of carrier mobility accompanied by these procedures indicate that they are promising for fabrications of graphene transistors.

  9. An automatic modeling system of the reaction mechanisms for chemical vapor deposition processes using real-coded genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kinpara, Hiroki; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we have developed an automatic system to model reaction mechanisms in the CVD processes by analyzing the experimental results, which are cross-sectional shapes of the deposited films on substrates with micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. We designed the inference engine to model the reaction mechanism in the system by the use of real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs). We studied the dependence of the system performance on two methods using simple genetic algorithms (SGAs) and the RCGAs; the one involves the conventional GA operators and the other involves the blend crossover operator (BLX-alpha). Although we demonstrated that the systems using both the methods could successfully model the reaction mechanisms, the RCGAs showed the better performance with respect to the accuracy and the calculation cost for identifying the models.

  10. On the Origin of Light Emission in Silicon Rich Oxide Obtained by Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aceves-Mijares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon Rich Oxide (SRO has been considered as a material to overcome the drawbacks of silicon to achieve optical functions. Various techniques can be used to produce it, including Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD. In this paper, a brief description of the studies carried out and discussions of the results obtained on electro-, cathode-, and photoluminescence properties of SRO prepared by LPCVD and annealed at 1,100°C are presented. The experimental results lead us to accept that SRO emission properties are due to oxidation state nanoagglomerates rather than to nanocrystals. The emission mechanism is similar to Donor-Acceptor decay in semiconductors, and a wide emission spectrum, from 450 to 850 nm, has been observed. The results show that emission is a function of both silicon excess in the film and excitation energy. As a result different color emissions can be obtained by selecting the suitable excitation energy.

  11. Optical and structural properties of ZnO hexagonal rods prepared by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Reyhani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, ZnO nanostructure hexagonal pyramid rods with high optical and structural quality were synthesized by the simple thermal chemical vapor deposition of Zn powder without a metal catalyst. Surface morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. XRD analyses demonstrated that ZnO hexagonal pyramid rods had a wurtzite structure with the orientation of (002. Investigation of optical properties of samples by photoluminescence spectrum exhibited a sharp UV emission peak at 380nm. The quality and composition of the ZnO pyramid rods were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR at room temperature. In addition, the growth mechanism of ZnO hexagonal rods is also briefly discussed.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and capacitance spectroscopy on GaAs/Si grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond, Georges E.; Said, Hicham; Guillot, Gerard; Meddeb, Jaafar; Pitaval, M.; Draidia, Nasser; Azoulay, Rozette

    1991-03-01

    We present a complete characterization study of GaAs/Si heteroepitaxial layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at 750C using the two-step method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy secondary ion mass spectroscopy deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been performed to study the initial stage of growth misfit and threading dislocations Si diffusion and the deep levels in the GaAs layer. We describe the influence of GaAs/AlAs superlattices in the buffer layer on the decrease of dislocation density and on Si diffusion from the substrate and the existence of deep electron traps induced by the heteroepitaxy. DLTS reveals hole traps attributed to Si incorporation on the basis of PL measurements which could contribute to the reduction of the minority carrier lifetime. We also show an improvement of the layer quality by the use of selective epitaxy.

  13. Residual stress in thick low-pressure chemical-vapor deposited polycrystalline SiC coatings on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Shinavski, R. J.; Steffier, W. S.; Spearing, S. M.

    2005-04-01

    Residual stress in thick coatings of polycrystalline chemical-vapor deposited SiC on Si substrates is a key variable that must be controlled if SiC is to be used in microelectromechanical systems. Studies have been conducted to characterize the residual stress level as a function of deposition temperature, Si wafer and SiC coating thickness, and the ratios of methyltrichlorosilane to hydrogen and hydrogen chloride. Wafer curvature was used to monitor residual stress in combination with a laminated plate analysis. Compressive intrinsic (growth) stresses were measured with magnitudes in the range of 200-300MPa; however, these can be balanced with the tensile stress due to the thermal-expansion mismatch to leave near-zero stress at room temperature. The magnitude of the compressive intrinsic stress is consistent with previously reported values of surface stress in combination with the competition between grain-boundary energy and elastic strain energy.

  14. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism of (Mn,Fe Codoped ZnO Nanowires Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqin Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available (Mn,Fe codoped ZnO nanowires were synthesized on silicon substrates in situ using a chemical vapor deposition method. The structure and property of the products were investigated by X-ray, electron microscopy, Raman, photoluminescence, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The doped nanowires are of pure wurtzite phase with single crystalline, and the elements distribute homogeneously in the doped nanowires. Photoluminescence spectrum of the doped nanowires is dominated by a deep-level emission with a negligible near-band-edge emission. The magnetic hysteresis curve with a coercive field of 35 Oe is clearly observed at 300 K, resulting from room-temperature ferromagnetic ordering in the (Mn,Fe codoped ZnO nanowires, which has great potential applications for spintronics devices.

  15. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  16. Sensitivity of chemical vapor deposition diamonds to DD and DT neutrons at OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Glebov, V.; Gatu Johnson, M.; MacPhee, A.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is used routinely to measure nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition diamond. Calibration of the detectors sensitivity to neutrons and protons would allow measurement of nuclear bang times and hot spot areal density (ρR) on a single diagnostic. This study utilizes data collected at both NIF and Omega in an attempt to determine pTOF's absolute sensitivity to neutrons. At Omega pTOF's sensitivity to DT-n is found to be stable to within 8% at different bias voltages. At the NIF pTOF's sensitivity to DD-n varies by up to 59%. This variability must be decreased substantially for pTOF to function as a neutron yield detector at the NIF. Some possible causes of this variability are ruled out.

  17. Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition of WO{sub 3−x} thin films of various oxygen contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z. Silvester, E-mail: Silvester.Houweling@asml.com [Section Nanophotonics – Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, John W. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Section Nanophotonics – Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    We present the synthesis of tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3−x}) thin films consisting of layers of varying oxygen content. Configurations of layered thin films comprised of W, W/WO{sub 3−x}, WO{sub 3}/W and WO{sub 3}/W/WO{sub 3−x} are obtained in a single continuous hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process using only ambient air and hydrogen. The air oxidizes resistively heated tungsten filaments and produces the tungsten oxide species, which deposit on a substrate and are subsequently reduced by the hydrogen. The reduction of tungsten oxides to oxides of lower oxygen content (suboxides) depends on the local water vapor pressure and temperature. In this work, the substrate temperature is either below 250 °C or is kept at 750 °C. A number of films are synthesized using a combined air/hydrogen flow at various total process pressures. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry is employed to measure the number of tungsten and oxygen atoms deposited, revealing the average atomic compositions and the oxygen profiles of the films. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy is performed to measure the physical thicknesses and display the internal morphologies of the films. The chemical structure and crystallinity are investigated with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. - Highlights: • Synthesis of tungsten oxide thin films of controllable oxygen content. • Partial reduction of WO{sub 3−x} thin films during deposition. • Deposition of layered films with configurations of W, W/WO{sub 3−x}, WO{sub 3}/W/WO{sub 3−x}. • Synthesis of WO{sub 3−x} films with atomic oxygen-to-tungsten ratios between 0.3 and 3.

  18. Phase relations and chemical vapor transport of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze In{sub x}WO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Udo, E-mail: steiner@mw.htw-dresden.de

    2014-08-25

    Highlights: • Phase relations of hexagonal bronze In{sub x}WO{sub 3} with neighboring phases. • Chemical vapor transport experiments using NH{sub 4}Cl as transport agent. • Single crystals of In{sub x}WO{sub 3} up to a few mm in size were prepared. • Selective synthesis of crystals of the indium poor and indium rich phase boundary. - Abstract: Phase pure powder samples of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze In{sub x}WO{sub 3} (x = 0.25–0.35) were synthesized by solid state reaction at 1173 K. The phase relations of In{sub x}WO{sub 3} with neighboring binary and ternary phases were determined in the phase diagram In–W–O. Systematic chemical vapor transport experiments were carried out on source materials with compositions corresponding to miscellaneous two-phase and three-phase regions using NH{sub 4}X (X = Cl, Br, I) as transport agent. Crystals of hexagonal indium tungsten bronze were deposited beside In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12} with composition corresponding to the indium poor phase boundary and dimensions up to a few mm in a temperature gradient 1173 K → 1073 K starting from ternary mixtures In{sub x}WO{sub 3}/In{sub 2}W{sub 3}O{sub 12}/In{sub 0.02}WO{sub 3}. Sole deposition of In{sub x}WO{sub 3} single crystals with composition x ≈ 0.33 was observed from ternary mixtures In{sub x}WO{sub 3}/W{sub 18}O{sub 49}/WO{sub 2} with a migration rate of about 0.5 mg/h (transport agent NH{sub 4}Cl)

  19. PENGARUH TEMPERATUR DEPOSISI PADA PENUMBUHAN FILM TIPIS SILIKON KARBIDA DENGAN METODE HOMEMADE HOT-MESH CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Astuti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Film tipis silikon karbida (SiC telah ditumbuhkan di atas substrate graphene/SiO2/Si dengan metode Homemade Hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh CVD. Pengaruh dari temperature deposisi pada struktur dan morfologi film tipis SiC telah dipelajari dengan menggunakan X-Ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM dan EDX, dan spektroskopi Raman. Karakterisasi XRD menunjukkan bahwa film tipis SiC memiliki struktur polikristal tipe kubik dengan orientasi (111. Kualitas film tipis SiC, dan ukuran butir kristal dari morfologi film yang dihasilkan meningkat dengan peningkatan temperatur deposisi. Dari karakterisasi spektroskopi Raman, dapati terdapat dua puncak pergeseran Raman yang dominan pada daerah sekitar 780 - 800 cm-1 dan  950 – 980 cm-1 yang merupakan mode fonon SiC-TO dan SiC-LO. Puncak pergeseran Raman tersebut bergeser ke bilangan gelombang yang lebih pendek dengan peningkatan temperature deposisi.Silicon carbide (SiC thin film grown on graphene/SiO2/Si substrate using homemade hot mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh SVD method has been done. Effect of  deposition temperature on structure and morphology of the thin film was studied by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM and EDX, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD characteristics shows that SiC thin film has cubic polycrystalline structure with (111 orientation. Quality of the SiC thin film, and crystallite grain size from the film morphology was resulted increases with the increase of the deposition temperature. Based on the characterization of Raman spectroscopy, shows that two peak Raman shift in the range of 780 - 800 cm-1 and  950 – 980 cm-1 was attributed to SiC-TO and SiC-LO phonon mode.  The Raman shift peak was shifted toward the lower wavenumber with the increase of deposition temperature.

  20. Enhanced performance of sulfur-infiltrated bimodal mesoporous carbon foam by chemical solution deposition as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae-Gyung; Chun, Jinyong; Cho, Byung-Won; Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-02-01

    The porous carbon matrix is widely recognized to be a promising sulfur reservoir to improve the cycle life by suppressing the polysulfide dissolution in lithium sulfur batteries (LSB). Herein, we synthesized mesocellular carbon foam (MSUF-C) with bimodal mesopore (4 and 30 nm) and large pore volume (1.72 cm2/g) using MSUF silica as a template and employed it as both the sulfur reservoir and the conductive agent in the sulfur cathode. Sulfur was uniformly infiltrated into MSUF-C pores by a chemical solution deposition method (MSUF-C/S CSD) and the amount of sulfur loading was achieved as high as 73% thanks to the large pore volume with the CSD approach. MSUF-C/S CSD showed a high capacity (889 mAh/g after 100 cycles at 0.2 C), an improved rate capability (879 mAh/g at 1C and 420 mAh/g at 2C), and a good capacity retention with a fade rate of 0.16% per cycle over 100 cycles.

  1. Enhanced performance of sulfur-infiltrated bimodal mesoporous carbon foam by chemical solution deposition as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Tae-Gyung; Chun, Jinyong; Cho, Byung-Won; Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-01-01

    The porous carbon matrix is widely recognized to be a promising sulfur reservoir to improve the cycle life by suppressing the polysulfide dissolution in lithium sulfur batteries (LSB). Herein, we synthesized mesocellular carbon foam (MSUF-C) with bimodal mesopore (4 and 30 nm) and large pore volume (1.72 cm2/g) using MSUF silica as a template and employed it as both the sulfur reservoir and the conductive agent in the sulfur cathode. Sulfur was uniformly infiltrated into MSUF-C pores by a chemical solution deposition method (MSUF-C/S CSD) and the amount of sulfur loading was achieved as high as 73% thanks to the large pore volume with the CSD approach. MSUF-C/S CSD showed a high capacity (889 mAh/g after 100 cycles at 0.2 C), an improved rate capability (879 mAh/g at 1C and 420 mAh/g at 2C), and a good capacity retention with a fade rate of 0.16% per cycle over 100 cycles. PMID:28165041

  2. Effects of chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N ratios on pollutants removal in the subsurface wastewater infiltration systems with/without intermittent aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Siyu; Pan, Jing; Wu, Shiwei; Guo, Yijing; Yu, Jingxiao; Shan, Qingchi

    2016-01-01

    The matrix oxidation reduction potential level, organic pollutants and nitrogen removal performances of eight subsurface wastewater infiltration systems (SWISs) (four with intermittent aeration, four without intermittent aeration) fed with influent chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N ratio of 3, 6, 12 and 18 were investigated. Nitrification of non-aerated SWISs was poor due to oxygen deficiency while higher COD/N ratios further led to lower COD and nitrogen removal rate. Intermittent aeration achieved almost complete nitrification, which successfully created aerobic conditions in the depth of 50 cm and did not change anoxic or anaerobic conditions in the depth of 80 and 110 cm. The sufficient carbon source in high COD/N ratio influent greatly promoted denitrification in SWISs with intermittent aeration. High average removal rates of COD (95.68%), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) (99.32%) and total nitrogen (TN) (89.65%) were obtained with influent COD/N ratio of 12 in aerated SWISs. The results suggest that intermittent aeration was a reliable option to achieve high nitrogen removal in SWISs, especially with high COD/N ratio wastewater.

  3. Chemical alteration by tooth bleaching of human salivary proteins that infiltrated subsurface enamel lesions: experimental study with bovine lesion model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iizuka, J.; Mukai, Y.; Taniguchi, M.; ten Cate, J.M.; Mikuni-Takagaki, Y.; Teranaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    Salivary macromolecules infiltrate white and brown spot enamel lesions and adsorb onto hydroxyapatite. Calcium-binding salivary proteins such as statherin hinder remineralization of these lesions. We assessed whether bleaching agents can remove salivary components that have infiltrated and bound to

  4. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  5. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  6. Undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn epitaxial growth on Ge by atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, B.; Gencarelli, F.; Bender, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we propose an atmospheric pressure-chemical vapor deposition technique to grow metastable GeSn epitaxial layers on Ge. We report the growth of defect free fully strained undoped and in-situ B doped GeSn layers on Ge substrates with Sit contents up to 8%. Those metastable layers stay...

  7. Growth of ZnO Single Crystal by Chemical Vapor Transport Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    ZnO crystals were grown by CVT method in closed quartz tube under seeded condition. Carbon was used as a transport agent to enhance the chemical transport of ZnO in the growth process. ZnO single crystals were grown by using GaN/sapphire and GaN/Si wafer as seeds. The property and crystal quality of the ZnO single crystals was studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction technique.

  8. Vaporous Decontamination Methods: Potential Uses and Research Priorities for Chemical and Biological Contamination Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    resistant to commonly used disinfectants and require the use of chemical sterilants† to effectively decontaminate exposed areas. Since anthrax...all micro-organisms present, including B agents. † Sterilants and disinfectants differ only in their potency; disinfectants have relatively low...of H2O2 [10]. Currently there is no reported data on the use of O3-VHP against B or C agents. DSTO-GD-0465 6 The U.K. based BIOQUELL

  9. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  10. Thin film solar cells with Si nanocrystallites embedded in amorphous intrinsic layers by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungil; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the thin film growths of hydrogenated silicon by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with different flow rates of SiH4 and H2 mixture ambient and fabricated thin film solar cells by implementing the intrinsic layers to SiC/Si heterojunction p-i-n structures. The film samples showed the different infrared absorption spectra of 2,000 and 2,100 cm(-1), which are corresponding to the chemical bonds of SiH and SiH2, respectively. The a-Si:H sample with the relatively high silane concentration provides the absorption peak of SiH bond, but the microc-Si:H sample with the relatively low silane concentration provides the absorption peak of SiH2 bond as well as SiH bond. Furthermore, the microc-Si:H sample showed the Raman spectral shift of 520 cm(-1) for crystalline phase Si bonds as well as the 480 cm(-1) for the amorphous phase Si bonds. These bonding structures are very consistent with the further analysis of the long-wavelength photoconduction tail and the formation of nanocrystalline Si structures. The microc-Si:H thin film solar cell has the photovoltaic behavior of open circuit voltage similar to crystalline silicon thin film solar cell, indicating that microc-Si:H thin film with the mixed phase of amorphous and nanocrystalline structures show the carrier transportation through the channel of nanocrystallites.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of graphene layers prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition using triphenylphosphine as precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrapa, G.C.; Maia da Costa, M.E.H. Maia [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Larrude, D.G., E-mail: dunigl@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brazilian Center for Physical Research, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    The synthesis of a single-layer graphene using a low-pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system with triphenylphosphine as precursor is reported. The amount of triphenylphosphine used as precursor was in the range of 10–40 mg. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze samples prepared with 10 mg of the precursor, and these spectra were found typical of graphene. The Raman measurements indicate that the progressive degradation of graphene occurs as the amount of triphenylphosphine increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the different chemical environments involving carbon and phosphorous atoms. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also employed and the results reveal the formation of dispersed nanostructures on top of the graphene layer, In addition, the number of these nanostructures is directly related to the amount of precursor used for sample growth. - Highlights: • We grow graphene using the solid precursor triphenylphosphine. • Raman analysis confirms the presence of monolayer graphene. • SEM images show the presence of small dark areas dispersed on the graphene surface. • Raman I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio increases in the dark region of the graphene surface.

  12. Stress Control in GaN Grown on 6H-SiC by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yao; JIANG Yang; XU Pei-Qiang; MA Zi-Guang; WANG Xiao-Li; WANG Lu; JIA Hai-Qiang; CHEN Hong

    2011-01-01

    The strain in GaN epitaxial layers grown on 6H-SiC substrates with an AIN buffer by metalorganic chemical wpor deposition is investigated.It is found that the insertion of a graded AlGaN layer between the GaN layer and the AIN buffer can change the signs of strain.A compressive strain in an overgrown thick (2 μm) GaN layer is obtained.High-resolution x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements are used to determine the strain state in the GaN layers.The mechanism of stress control by inserting graded AlGaN in subsequent GaN layers is discussed briefly.%@@ The strain in GaN epitaxial layers grown on 611-SiC substrates with an AIN buffer by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is investigated.It is found that the insertion of a graded AlGaN layer between the GaN layer and the AIN buffer can change the signs of strain.A compressive strain in an overgrown thick(2μm)GaN layer is obtained.High-resolution x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements are used to determine the strain state in the GaN layers.The mechanism of stress control by inserting graded AlGaN in subsequent GaN layers is discussed briefly.

  13. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of ortho-carborane: structural insights and interaction with Cu overlayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robinson; Pasquale, Frank L; Kelber, Jeffry A

    2013-09-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) are used to investigate the chemical and electronic structure of boron carbide films deposited from ortho-carborane precursors using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the reactivity of PECVD films toward sputter-deposited Cu overlayers. The XPS data provide clear evidence of enhanced ortho-carborane reactivity with the substrate, and of extra-icosahedral boron and carbon species; these results differ from results for films formed by condensation and electron beam induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane (EBIC films). The UPS data show that the valence band maximum for PECVD films is ∼1.5 eV closer to the Fermi level than for EBIC films. The XPS data also indicate that PECVD films are resistant to thermally-stimulated diffusion of Cu at temperatures up to 1000 K in UHV, in direct contrast to recently reported results, but important for applications in neutron detection and in microelectronics.

  14. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low- loss as-grown germanosilicate layers for optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Feridun; Agan, Sedat; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-08-01

    We report on systematic growth and characterization of low-loss germanosilicate layers for use in optical waveguides. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique was used to grow the films using silane, germane and nitrous oxide as precursor gases. Chemical composition was monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. N-H bond concentration of the films decreased from 0.43x1022 cm-3 down to below 0.06x1022 cm-3, by a factor of seven as the GeH4 flow rate increased from 0 to 70 sccm. A simultaneous decrease of O-H related bonds was also observed by a factor of 10 in the same germane flow range. The measured TE rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=632.8 nm were found to increase from are 0.20 +/- 0.02 to 6.46 +/- 0.04 dB/cm as the germane flow rate increased from 5 to 50 sccm, respectively. In contrast, the propagation loss values for TE polarization at λ=1550 nm were found to decrease from 0.32 +/- 0.03 down to 0.14 +/- 0.06 dB/cm for the same samples leading to the lowest values reported so far in the literature, eliminating the need for high temperature annealing as is usually done for these materials to be used in waveguide devices.

  16. Growth and photoluminescence of Si-SiOx nanowires by catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yue [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Luo, Ruiying, E-mail: ryluo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723000 (China); Shang, Haidong [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Si-SiOx NWs were successfully synthesized via a one-step catalyst-free CVD method using TEOS as the precursor. • The Si-SiOx NWs had a core–shell structure with Si as the inner crystalline cores and SiOx as the outer amorphous layer. • The formation of Si-SiOx NWs was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. • The Si-SiOx NWs spontaneously self-assembled from the building block of charged nanoparticles. • The Si-SiOx NWs showed their potential applications in UV emission and visible light emission devices. - Abstract: We developed a one-step catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition process to synthesize Si-SiOx nanowires using tetraethoxysilane as the precursor. Observations using scanning electron microscopy showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires were 20–50 nm in diameter and tens of microns in length. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the nanowires consisted of crystal silicon and amorphous SiOx. The Si and O with an atomic ratio of the Si-SiOx NWs were 1:1.2 according to the energy dispersion X-ray spectroscope. A systematic study on the effect of the growth conditions, such as reaction temperature, the reaction time, and the TEOS vapor flow rate was performed. The formation of Si-SiOx nanowires was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. The charged nanoparticles acting as building blocks self-assembled into nanowires. The photoluminescence measurements were carried out and showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires emitted stable ultraviolet and green luminescence excited by ultraviolet light.

  17. The Infiltration Process and Texture Transition of 2D C/C Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hejun Li; Guozhong Xu; Kezhi Li; Chuang Wang; Wei Li; Miaoling Li

    2009-01-01

    2D needle-punched fiber felt was infiltrated by a kind of rapid isothermal chemical vapor infiltration technique. The infiltration process and texture transition of the infiltrated C/C composites were investigated. The porosity and the variations of the cumulative pore volume were determined by mercury porosimetry. The texture of matrix carbon was studied under a polarized light microscope. The results show that the relative mass gain of the sample increases directly as the infiltration time at the initial stage until 20 h, and subsequently the increasing rate of the relative mass gain decreases gradually with the prolonging of infiltration time. Three layers of pyrocarbon were formed around fibers. Low-textured pyrocarbon was obtained at the initial stage. With the densification going on, high-textured pyrocarbon was formed on the surface of low-textured pyrocarbon. Then, low-textured pyrocarbon was produced again during the final stage of densification. The texture transition is ascribed to the variation of the ratio of cumulative inner surface area to volume of pores and the gas partial pressure in pores.

  18. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  19. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of iron disulfide and its use for solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaoui, Ahmed; Fiechter, Sebastian; Vogel, Ralf; Giersig, M.; Weller, Horst; Tributsch, Helmut

    1992-12-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of iron disulfide have been grown on different substrates by chemical vapour deposition. The films were characterized using optical absorption and TEM. RBS and EDAX analysis has been used to explore the chemical stoichiometry. XRD and FTIR allowed the identification of both FeS2 phases pyrite and marcasite. A novel method for sensitization of highly porous Ti02 elecrodes with ultra thin (10-20 nm) polycrystalline films of FeS2 (pyrite) is presented. Photoelectrochemical solar cell using the above electrode generated high photovoltage of up to 600mV compared with single crystalline electrode (200 mV). In this device the semiconductor with a small band gap and high absorption coefficient (FeS2 pyrite; EG = 0.9 eV; a = 6 x 105 cm-1) absorbs the light and injects electrons into the conduction band the wide band gap semiconductor (Ti02 anatase; EG = 3.2 eV). Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from redox system in the electrolyte.

  20. Surface chemical/binding reaction of coated Li layer by lithium vapor injectors in LIGHT-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikawa, Naoko, E-mail: ashikawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Chung, K.-S.; Masuzaki, Suguru; Nagayama, Yoshio [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The Lithium Injection Gettering of Hydrogen and its Transport (LIGHT-1) experiment has begun at the NIFS. To study the material probes installed in the cylindrical vacuum chamber, the chemical characteristics for lithium are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characteristics of chemical binding between lithium and other impurities are shown to be oxide bindings. In addition, the influence of the vacuum vent effect due to exposure to air was determined in both solid lithium and lithium-coated probes in LIGHT-1. Using the peak positions of Li{sub 2}O and pure lithium, the thickness of the coated lithium is estimated. For the SS316 target, the coated lithium shows two different peaks, Li1s and Fe3p, located at a similar binding energy region. Thus, the real lithium intensities can be measured by the separation of the peaks. After this analysis, the coated thickness of lithium is estimated to be from 8 to 20 nm, and it is not uniform in the Z-axis direction, probably due to erosion by glow discharge.

  1. Low-temperature synthesis of diamond films by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, Mayuri, E-mail: kawata@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Ojiro, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka 181-8585 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD), a process in which photoelectrons emitted from a substrate irradiated with ultraviolet light are utilized as a trigger for DC discharge, was investigated in this study; specifically, the DC discharge characteristics of PA-PECVD were examined for an Si substrate deposited in advance through hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a nitrogen-doped diamond layer of thickness ∼1 μm. Using a commercially available Xe excimer lamp (hν = 7.2 eV) to illuminate the diamond surface with and without hydrogen termination, the photocurrents were found to be 3.17 × 10{sup 12} and 2.11 × 10{sup 11} electrons/cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The 15-fold increase in photocurrent was ascribed to negative electron affinity (NEA) caused by hydrogen termination on the diamond surfaces. The DC discharge characteristics revealed that a transition bias voltage from a Townsend-to-glow discharge was considerably decreased because of NEA (from 490 to 373 V for H{sub 2} gas and from 330 to 200 V for Ar gas), enabling a reduction in electric power consumption needed to synthesize diamond films through PA-PECVD. In fact, the authors have succeeded in growing high-quality diamond films of area 2.0 cm{sup 2} at 540 °C with a discharge power of only 1.8 W, plasma voltage of 156.4 V, and discharge current of 11.7 mA under the glow discharge of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gases. In addition to having only negligible amounts of graphite and amorphous carbon, the diamond films exhibit a relatively high diamond growth rate of 0.5 μm/h at temperatures as low as 540 °C, which is attributed to Ar{sup +} ions impinging on the diamond surface, and causing the removal of hydrogen atoms from the surface through sputtering. This process leads to enhanced CH{sub x} radical adsorption, because the sample was applied with a negative potential to accelerate photoelectrons in PA-PECVD.

  2. CVD钨沉积层组织控制%Control the Microstructure of Tungsten Layer Fabricated by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马捷; 张永志; 魏建忠; 蒙丽娟

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure of tungsten layer fabricated by chemical vapor deposition was changed by supplying the reactive gas WF6 and H2 discontinuously. The effect of the technics principle of chemical vapor deposition on the tungsten layer's microstructure and properties had been analyzed. And the condition of stress on the surface and crack on the fracture surface had been discussed. The results show that the microstructure of Tungsten layer is changed from layered columnar grains to equiaxed grains with the decreasing of cyclical deposition time. And the surface appearances are spherical grains, which are no longer tending to grow in a single direction, meanwhile the deposits are of high purity and high density. The stress on the surface is reduced and the direction of the propagating cracks has been changed. The expansion of the crack can be effectively blocked.%以WF6和H2为反应气体,采用间断供应反应气体方法改变CVD钨沉积层显微组织形貌.研究了间断沉积工艺参数对沉积层显微组织及性能的影响,讨论了间断沉积层的表面应力状态及断口裂纹扩展情况.结果表明:采用间断化学气相沉积法钨层的显微组织随周期沉积时间的缩短,柱状晶晶粒长度尺寸变小,形态逐渐接近等轴晶;沉积层表面形貌呈圆球状,沉积层生长界面不再趋向于单一方向;钨层保持了连续CVD钨的高纯度、高密度特性.且采用间断供应反应气体沉积方法显著降低了钨制品表面的残余应力,使裂纹扩展方向发生改变,有效阻碍了裂纹的深入扩展.

  3. Large-scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Method and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Morinobu

    2005-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes consisting of rolled graphene layer built from sp2-units have attracted the imagination of scientists as one-dimensional macromolecules. Their unusual physical and chemical properties make them useful in the fabrication of nanocomposite, nanoelectronic device and sensor etc. In this study, the recent hot topics "highly pure and crystalline double walled carbon nanotubes" will be described because it is expected that these tubes are thermally and structurally stable, and also contain small-sized tubes (below 2 nm). Among the recent applications of carbon nanotubes, micro-catheter fabricated from high purity carbon nanotubes as filler and nylon as matrix exhibited quite low blood coagulation and also reduced thrombogenity. It is envisaged that carbon nanotubes will play an important role in the development of nano-technology in the near-future.

  4. Data for First Responder Use of Photoionization Detectors for Vapor Chemical Constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith A. Daum; Matthew G. Watrous; M. Dean Neptune; Daniel I. Michael; Kevin J. Hull; Joseph D. Evans

    2006-11-01

    First responders need appropriate measurement technologies for evaluating incident scenes. This report provides information about photoionization detectors (PIDs), obtained from manufacturers and independent laboratory tests, and the use of PIDs by first responders, obtained from incident commanders in the United States and Canada. PIDs are valued for their relatively low cost, light weight, rapid detection response, and ease of use. However, it is clear that further efforts are needed to provide suitable instruments and decision tools to incident commanders and first responders for assessing potential hazardous chemical releases. Information provided in this report indicates that PIDs should always be part of a decision-making context in which other qualitative and more definitive tests and instruments are used to confirm a finding. Possible amelioratory actions ranging from quick and relatively easy fixes to those requiring significant additional effort are outlined in the report.

  5. The growth and in situ characterization of chemical vapor deposited SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R.; Chang, R. R.; Lile, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the results of studies of the kinetics of remote (indirect) plasma enhanced low pressure CVD growth of SiO2 on Si and InP and of the in situ characterization of the electrical surface properties of InP during CVD processing. In the latter case photoluminescence was employed as a convenient and sensitive noninvasive method for characterizing surface trap densities. It was determined that, provided certain precautions are taken, the growth of SiO2 occurs in a reproducible and systematic fashion that can be expressed in an analytic form useful for growth rate prediction. Moreover, the in situ photoluminescence studies have yielded information on sample degradation resulting from heating and chemical exposure during the CVD growth.

  6. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  7. Effect of treatment temperature on surface wettability of methylcyclosiloxane layer formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sasagawa, Keisuke; Furukawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Sou; Yamamoto, Erina; Chiba, Satoshi; Kamiyama, Naosumi; Kiguchi, Takayoshi

    2016-08-01

    The surface wettability of the native Si oxide surfaces were tuned by chemical adsorption of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) molecules through thermal CVD method at different temperature. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the water contact angles of the TMCTS-modified Si oxide surfaces at the temperature of 333-373 K were found to be in the range of 92 ± 2-102 ± 2°. The advancing and receding water contact angle of the surface prepared at 333 K were found to be 97 ± 2/92 ± 2°, showing low contact angle hysteresis surface. The water contact angles of the surfaces prepared at the temperature of 373-413 K increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. When the treatment temperature was more than 423 K, the water contact angles of TMCTS-modified surfaces were found to become more than 150°, showing superhydrophobic surface. AFM study revealed that the surface roughness of the TMCTS-modified surface increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. This geometric morphology enhanced the surface hydrophobicity. The surface roughness could be fabricated due to the hydrolysis/condensation reactions in the gas phase during CVD process. The effect of the treatment temperature on the reactivity of the TMCTS molecules were also investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of polysilanes polymer based thin films and their applications in compound semiconductors and silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulachgar, El Hassane

    As the semiconductors industry is moving toward nanodevices, there is growing need to develop new materials and thin films deposition processes which could enable strict control of the atomic composition and structure of thin film materials in order to achieve precise control on their electrical and optical properties. The accurate control of thin film characteristics will become increasingly important as the miniaturization of semiconductor devices continue. There is no doubt that chemical synthesis of new materials and their self assembly will play a major role in the design and fabrication of next generation semiconductor devices. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of thin film using a polymeric precursor as a source material. This process offers many advantages including low deposition cost, hazard free working environment, and most importantly the ability to customize the polymer source material through polymer synthesis and polymer functionalization. The combination between polymer synthesis and CVD process will enable the design of new generation of complex thin film materials with a wide range of improved chemical, mechanical, electrical and optical properties which cannot be easily achieved through conventional CVD processes based on gases and small molecule precursors. In this thesis we mainly focused on polysilanes polymers and more specifically poly(dimethylsilanes). The interest in these polymers is motivated by their distinctive electronic and photonic properties which are attributed to the delocalization of the sigma-electron along the Si-Si backbone chain. These characteristics make polysilane polymers very promising in a broad range of applications as a dielectric, a semiconductor and a conductor. The polymer-based CVD process could be eventually extended to other polymer source materials such as polygermanes, as well as and a variety of other inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers

  9. Growth mechanism of single-crystalline NiO thin films grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffi, Teuku Muhammad; Nozaki, Shinji; Uchida, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) thin films were grown by atmospheric-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (APMOCVD). Growth was carried out using various growth parameters, including the growth temperature, the input precursor (O2/Ni) ratio, and the type of substrate material. Effects of the growth parameters on the structural and electrical properties of the films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal structure and quality were strongly affected by the growth temperature and the type of substrate material. At an optimized growth temperature, single-crystalline NiO films were grown on MgO(100) and MgO(111) substrates in a cube-on-cube orientation relationship, while on an Al2O3(001) substrate, the film was grown in the NiO[111] direction. The use of MgO substrates successfully suppressed the formation of twin defects, which have been frequently reported in the growth of NiO. The difference in the formation of the twin defects on MgO and Al2O3 substrates was discussed. It was observed that the resistivity dependence on crystal quality was affected by the choice of substrate material. The effects of the precursor ratio on the transmittance and resistivity of the films were also investigated. Improved transparency in the visible wavelength region and higher conductivity were found in films grown with higher O2/Ni ratios.

  10. MgB2UltrathinFilms Fabricated by Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition and Subsequent Ion Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthaeus; Tan, Teng; Cunnane, Daniel; Karasik, Boris; Xi, Xiaoxing

    Hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers are a great tool for measuring high-resolution spectroscopy at Terahertz frequencies. MgB2offers a higher critical temperature (39 K) compared to commonly used Nb and NbN and boasts a shorter intrinsic electron-phonon relaxation time, giving rise to a broader intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth. We have fabricated high quality ultrathin MgB2films using hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) and employing ion milling to achieve thickness down to 2 nm. The thinnest achieved films show high Tc of 28 K with residual resistivity below 28 µ Ωcm and high critical current Jcof 1x106 A/cm2at 20 K. As a result of the employed low angle ion milling process, the films remain well connected even after being thinned down since the initial thick films offer a better connectivity than as-grown thin films. The established process offers a way to realize MgB2 based HEB mixers of extremely low thickness and therefore small local oscillator power requirements and increased IF bandwidth.

  11. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition of tungsten oxide films and nanorods from oxo tungsten(VI) fluoroalkoxide precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hankook; Bonsu, Richard O; O'Donohue, Christopher; Korotkov, Roman Y; McElwee-White, Lisa; Anderson, Timothy J

    2015-02-04

    Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of WOx was demonstrated using the oxo tungsten(VI) fluoroalkoxide single-source precursors, WO[OCCH3(CF3)2]4 and WO[OC(CH3)2CF3]4. Substoichiometric amorphous tungsten oxide thin films were grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates in nitrogen at low deposition temperature (100-250 °C). At growth temperatures above 300 °C, the W18O49 monoclinic crystalline phase was observed. The surface morphology and roughness, visible light transmittance, electrical conductivity, and work function of the tungsten oxide materials are reported. The solvent and carrier gas minimally affected surface morphology and composition at low deposition temperature; however, material crystallinity varied with solvent choice at higher temperatures. The work function of the tungsten oxide thin films grown between 150 and 250 °C was determined to be in the range 5.0 to 5.7 eV, according to ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS).

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of monolayer WS2 nano- sheets on Au foils toward direct application in hydrogen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanshuo Zhang[1; Jianping Shi[1; Gaofeng Han[3; Minjie Li[2; Qingqing Ji[2; Donglin Ma[2; Yu Zhang[1,2; Cong Li[1,2; Xingyou Lang[3; Yanfeng Zhang[1,2; Zhongfan Liu[2

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2), a typical member of the semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide family has drawn considerable interest because of its unique properties. Intriguingly the edge of WS2 exhibits an ideal hydrogen binding energy which makes WS2 a potential alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Here, we demonstrate for the first time the successful synthesis of uniform monolayer WS2 nanosheets on centimeter- scale Au foils using a facile, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method. The edge lengths of the universally observed triangular WS2 nanosheets are tunable from -100 to N1,000 nm. The WS2 nanosheets on Au foils featuring abundant edges were then discovered to be efficient catalysts for the HER, exhibiting a rather high exchange current density of -30.20 μA/cm2 and a small onset potential of Nl10 mV. The effects of coverage and domain size (which correlate closely with the active edge density of WS2) on the electrocatalytic activity were investigated. This work not only provides a novel route toward the batch-production of monolayer WS2 via the introduction of metal foil substrates but also opens up its direct application for facile HER.

  13. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on Germanium Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on germanium substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Effects of growth temperature and InAs coverage on the size, density, and height of quantum dots were investigated. Growth temperature was varied from 400 to 450 °C and InAs coverage was varied between 1.40 and 2.35 monolayers (MLs. The surface morphology and structural characteristics of the quantum dots analyzed by atomic force microscope revealed that the density of the InAs quantum dots first increased and then decreased with the amount of InAs coverage; whereas density decreased with increase in growth temperature. It was observed that the size and height of InAs quantum dots increased with increase in both temperature and InAs coverage. The density of QDs was effectively controlled by growth temperature and InAs coverage on GaAs buffer layer.

  14. Initial stages of growth and the influence of temperature during chemical vapor deposition of sp{sup 2}-BN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, Mikhail; Pedersen, Henrik; Högberg, Hans; Henry, Anne, E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Czigány, Zsolt [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Energy Research of Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege Miklós út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    Knowledge of the structural evolution of thin films, starting by the initial stages of growth, is important to control the quality and properties of the film. The authors present a study on the initial stages of growth and the temperature influence on the structural evolution of sp{sup 2} hybridized boron nitride (BN) thin films during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with triethyl boron and ammonia as precursors. Nucleation of hexagonal BN (h-BN) occurs at 1200 °C on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an AlN buffer layer (AlN/α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). At 1500 °C, h-BN grows with a layer-by-layer growth mode on AlN/α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} up to ∼4 nm after which the film structure changes to rhombohedral BN (r-BN). Then, r-BN growth proceeds with a mixed layer-by-layer and island growth mode. h-BN does not grow on 6H-SiC substrates; instead, r-BN nucleates and grows directly with a mixed layer-by-layer and island growth mode. These differences may be caused by differences in substrate surface temperature due to different thermal conductivities of the substrate materials. These results add to the understanding of the growth process of sp{sup 2}-BN employing CVD.

  15. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: limits and opportunities of protecting the tungsten catalyzer from silicide with a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, P.A. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain); Nos, O., E-mail: oriol_nos@ub.ed [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain); Ecotecnia (ALSTOM Group) (Spain); Bengoechea, S.; Frevert, C.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain)

    2009-04-30

    Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) is one of the most promising techniques for depositing the intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layer for the production of micro-morph solar cells. However, the silicide formation at the colder ends of the tungsten wire drastically reduces the lifetime of the catalyzer, thus limiting its industrial exploitation. A simple but interesting strategy to decrease the silicide formation is to hide the electrical contacts of the catalyzer in a long narrow cavity which reduces the probability of the silane molecules to reach the colder ends of the wire. In this paper, the working mechanism of the cavity is elucidated. Measurements of the thickness profile of the silicon deposited in the internal walls of the cavity have been compared with those predicted using a simple diffusion model based on the assumption of Knudsen flow. A lifetime study of the protected and unprotected wires has been carried out. The different mechanisms which determine the deterioration of the catalyzer have been identified and discussed.

  16. Tungsten Doped TiO2 with Enhanced Photocatalytic and Optoelectrical Properties via Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathasivam, Sanjayan; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Lu, Yao; Chadwick, Nicholas; Althabaiti, Shaeel A.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.; Basahel, Sulaiman N.; Carmalt, Claire J.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2015-06-01

    Tungsten doped titanium dioxide films with both transparent conducting oxide (TCO) and photocatalytic properties were produced via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition of titanium ethoxide and dopant concentrations of tungsten ethoxide at 500 °C from a toluene solution. The films were anatase TiO2, with good n-type electrical conductivities as determined via Hall effect measurements. The film doped with 2.25 at.% W showed the lowest resistivity at 0.034 Ω.cm and respectable charge carrier mobility (14.9 cm3/V.s) and concentration (×1019 cm-3). XPS indicated the presence of both W6+ and W4+ in the TiO2 matrix, with the substitutional doping of W4+ inducing an expansion of the anatase unit cell as determined by XRD. The films also showed good photocatalytic activity under UV-light illumination, with degradation of resazurin redox dye at a higher rate than with undoped TiO2.

  17. Improvement of the Crystallinity of Silicon Films Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition with Negative Substrate Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Shen, Honglie; You, Jiayi

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of negative substrate bias on microcrystalline silicon films deposited on glass and stainless steel by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to gain insight into the effect of negative substrate bias on crystallization. Structural characterization of the silicon films was performed by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the crystallinity of the films is obviously improved by applying the substrate bias, especially for films on stainless steel. At hot-wire temperature of 1800°C and negative substrate bias of -800 V, grain size as large as 200 nm was obtained on stainless-steel substrate with crystalline fraction 9% higher than that of films deposited on glass and 15% higher than that of films deposited without substrate bias. It is deduced that the improvement of the crystallinity is mainly related to the accelerated electrons emitted from the hot wires. The differences in this improvement between different substrates are caused by the different electrical potential of the substrates. A solar cell fabricated by HWCVD with -800 V substrate bias is demonstrated, showing an obviously higher conversion efficiency than that without substrate bias.

  18. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrutis, Adulfas, E-mail: adulfas.abrutis@chf.vu.lt; Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-03-15

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2 cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 0–10 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 6–10 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ≈10–20 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400 °C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ≈150 nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9 A exhibited a resistivity of ≈2 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  19. Nanostructured Hydrogenated Silicon Films by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition: the Influence of Substrate Temperature on Material Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Waman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon are prepared at reasonably higher deposition rates (9-13 Å/s by indigenously fabricated hot-wire chemical vapor deposition system at various substrate temperatures (Ts. In this paper we report extensively studied structural, optical and electrical properties of these films by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction (low angle XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The low angle XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis indicate amorphous-to-nanocrystalline transition occurred at Ts = 300 °C. It is observed that volume fraction of crystallites and its size increases with increase in Ts. The low angle XRD study also shows nc-Si:H films with well-identified lattice planes of (111 orientation. In addition, it is observed from the FTIR spectroscopy that the hydrogen is incorporated in the film mainly in Si-H2 and (Si-H2n complexes. The nc-Si:H films with low hydrogen content (< 4 at. % and wide band gap (1.83-1.89 eV and low refractive index (< 3 is useful for various device applications.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhari, Pradip, E-mail: pradipcha@gmail.com [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India); Singh, Arvind, E-mail: arvindsingh1884@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita.topkar@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Dusane, Rajiv, E-mail: rodusane@iitb.ac.in [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India)

    2015-04-11

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and {sup 10}B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  1. Effect of hydrogen on low temperature epitaxial growth of polycrystalline silicon by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Cao; Hailong, Zhang; Fengzhen, Liu; Meifang, Zhu; Gangqiang, Dong

    2015-02-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films were prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) at a low substrate temperature of 525 °C. The influence of hydrogen on the epitaxial growth of ploy-Si films was investigated. Raman spectra show that the poly-Si films are fully crystallized at 525 °C with a different hydrogen dilution ratio (50%-91.7%). X-ray diffraction, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and SEM images show that the poly-Si thin films present (100) preferred orientation on (100) c-Si substrate in the high hydrogen dilution condition. The P-type poly-Si film prepared with a hydrogen dilution ratio of 91.7% shows a hall mobility of 8.78 cm2/(V·s) with a carrier concentration of 1.3 × 1020 cm-3, which indicates that the epitaxial poly-Si film prepared by HWCVD has the possibility to be used in photovoltaic and TFT devices.

  2. Field-Emission Study of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown On Si Substrate by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CNTs are synthesized by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD method at 600 °C. The Si substrate is coated with Fe, used as a catalyst, by RF- sputtering. The thickness of the catalyst film is measured to be approximately 15 nm. Three precursor gases Acetylene (C2H2, Ammonia (NH3 and Hydrogen (H2 with flow rates 15 sccm, 100 sccm and 100 sccm respectively are allowed to flow through the tube reactor for 20 minutes. The as grown CNTs sample was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. SEM images show that the diameter of as grown CNTs is in the range of 20-50 nm. Field emission properties of as grown sample have also been studied. The CNTs film shows good field emission with turn on field Eα = 2.10 V/μm at the current density of 4.59 mA/cm2 with enhancement factor β = 1.37 × 102.

  3. Hetero- and homogeneous three-dimensional hierarchical tungsten oxide nanostructures by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houweling, Z.S., E-mail: Silvester.Houweling@asml.com [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Harks, P.-P.R.M.L.; Kuang, Y.; Werf, C.H.M. van der [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Geus, J.W. [Utrecht University, Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics—Physics of Devices, Princetonlaan 4, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-30

    We present the synthesis of three-dimensional tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3−x}) nanostructures, called nanocacti, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. The growth of the nanocacti is controlled through a succession of oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes. By using only a resistively heated W filament, a flow of ambient air and hydrogen at subatmospheric pressure, and a substrate heated to about 700 °C, branched nanostructures are deposited. We report three varieties of simple synthesis approaches to obtain hierarchical homo- and heterogeneous nanocacti. Furthermore, by using catalyst nanoparticles site-selection for the growth is demonstrated. The atomic, morphological and crystallographic compositions of the nanocacti are determined using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. - Highlights: • Continuous upscalable hot-wire CVD of 3D hierarchical nanocacti • Controllable deposition of homo- and heterogeneous WO{sub 3−x}/WO{sub 3−y} nanocacti • Introduction of three synthesis routes comprising oxidation, reduction and re-oxidation processes • Growth of periodic arrays of hetero- and homogeneous hierarchical 3D nanocacti.

  4. Crystal Engineering for Low Defect Density and High Efficiency Hybrid Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Annie; Ren, Zhiwei; Shen, Qian; Cheung, Sin Hang; Gokkaya, Huseyin Cem; So, Shu Kong; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Wan, Yangyang; Wu, Xiaojun; Surya, Charles

    2016-12-07

    Synthesis of high quality perovskite absorber is a key factor in determining the performance of the solar cells. We demonstrate that hybrid chemical vapor deposition (HCVD) growth technique can provide high level of versatility and repeatability to ensure the optimal conditions for the growth of the perovskite films as well as potential for batch processing. It is found that the growth ambient and degree of crystallization of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPI) have strong impact on the defect density of MAPI. We demonstrate that HCVD process with slow postdeposition cooling rate can significantly reduce the density of shallow and deep traps in the MAPI due to enhanced material crystallization, while a mixed O2/N2 carrier gas is effective in passivating both shallow and deep traps. By careful control of the perovskite growth process, a champion device with power conversion efficiency of 17.6% is achieved. Our work complements the existing theoretical studies on different types of trap states in MAPI and fills the gap on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between deep levels and oxygen. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  5. High Temperature Nanocomposites For Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and In-Space Fabrication by Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Webb, N. D.; Espinoza, M.; Cook, S.; Houts, M.; Kim, T.

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is an indispensable technology for the manned exploration of the solar system. By using Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (HP-LCVD), the authors propose to design and build a promising next-generation fuel element composed of uranium carbide UC embedded in a latticed matrix of highly refractory Ta4HfC5 for an NTP rocket capable of sustaining temperatures up to 4000 K, enabling an Isp of up to 1250 s. Furthermore, HP-LCVD technology can also be harnessed to enable 3D rapid prototyping of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics and composites, opening up the possibility of in-space fabrication of components, replacement parts, difficult-to-launch solar sails and panels and a variety of other space structures. Additionally, rapid prototyping with HP-LCVD makes a feasible "live off the land" strategy of interplanetary and interstellar exploration ­ the precursors commonly used in the technology are found, often in abundance, on other solar system bodies either as readily harvestable gas (e.g. methane) or as a raw material that could be converted into a suitable precursor (e.g. iron oxide into ferrocene on Mars).

  6. A new perspective on structural and morphological properties of carbon nanotubes synthesized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salar Elahi, A.; Agah, K. Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M.

    CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs.

  7. High-angle tilt boundary graphene domain recrystallized from mobile hot-wire-assisted chemical vapor deposition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinsup; Baek, Jinwook; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Mi Jin; Oh, Seran; Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Seok-Hee; Cho, Byung Jin; Lee, Zonghoon; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2014-08-13

    Crystallization of materials has attracted research interest for a long time, and its mechanisms in three-dimensional materials have been well studied. However, crystallization of two-dimensional (2D) materials is yet to be challenged. Clarifying the dynamics underlying growth of 2D materials will provide the insight for the potential route to synthesize large and highly crystallized 2D domains with low defects. Here, we present the growth dynamics and recrystallization of 2D material graphene under a mobile hot-wire assisted chemical vapor deposition (MHW-CVD) system. Under local but sequential heating by MHW-CVD system, the initial nucleation of nanocrystalline graphenes, which was not extended into the growth stage due to the insufficient thermal energy, took a recrystallization and converted into a grand single crystal domain. During this process, the stitching-like healing of graphene was also observed. The local but sequential endowing thermal energy to nanocrystalline graphenes enabled us to simultaneously reveal the recrystallization and healing dynamics in graphene growth, which suggests an alternative route to synthesize a highly crystalline and large domain size graphene. Also, this recrystallization and healing of 2D nanocrystalline graphenes offers an interesting insight on the growth mechanism of 2D materials.

  8. Role of oxygen and nitrogen in n-type microcrystalline silicon carbide grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaska, Manuel; Mock, Jan; Köhler, Florian; Zastrow, Uwe; Perani, Martina; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Cavalcoli, Daniela; Carius, Reinhard; Finger, Friedhelm; Ding, Kaining

    2016-12-01

    N-type microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H(n)) deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition provides advantageous opto-electronic properties for window layer material in silicon-based thin-film solar cells and silicon heterojunction solar cells. So far, it is known that the dark conductivity (σd) increases with the increase in the crystallinity of μc-SiC:H(n)films. However, due to the fact that no active doping source is used, the mechanism of electrical transport in these films is still under debate. It is suggested that unintentional doping by atmospheric oxygen (O) or nitrogen (N) contamination plays an important role in the electrical transport. To investigate the impact of O and N, we incorporated O and N in μc-SiC:H(n) films and compared the influence on the microstructural, electronic, and optical properties. We discovered that, in addition to increasing the crystallinity, it is also possible to increase the σd by several orders of magnitude by increasing the O-concentration or the N-concentration in the films. Combining a high concentration of O and N, along with a high crystallinity in the film, we optimized the σd to a maximum of 5 S/cm.

  9. Fabrication of Al2O3-Cu Nanocomposites Using Rotary Chemical Vapor Deposition and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-step rotary chemical vapor deposition technique was developed to uniformly mix Cu nanoparticles with the γAl2O3 powders, and then the as-obtained powders were consolidated to Al2O3-Cu nanocomposites by spark plasma sintering. In the RCVD process, the metal-organic precursor of copper dipivaloylmethanate (Cu(DPM2 reacted with O2 and then was reduced by H2 in order to erase the contamination of carbon. At 1473 K, the relative density of Al2O3-Cu increased with increasing CCu and the maximum value was 97.7% at CCu = 5.2 mass%. The maximum fracture toughness of Al2O3-Cu was 4.1 MPa m1/2 at CCu = 3.8 mass%, and 1 MPa m1/2 higher than that of monolithic Al2O3, validating the beneficial effects of Cu nanoparticles.

  10. Superconducting properties of very high quality NbN thin films grown by high temperature chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, D.; Tsavdaris, N.; Jebari, S.; Grimm, A.; Blanchet, F.; Mercier, F.; Blanquet, E.; Chapelier, C.; Hofheinz, M.

    2016-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) is widely used in high-frequency superconducting electronics circuits because it has one of the highest superconducting transition temperatures ({T}{{c}}˜ 16.5 {{K}}) and largest gap among conventional superconductors. In its thin-film form, the T c of NbN is very sensitive to growth conditions and it still remains a challenge to grow NbN thin films (below 50 nm) with high T c. Here, we report on the superconducting properties of NbN thin films grown by high-temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD). Transport measurements reveal significantly lower disorder than previously reported, characterized by a Ioffe-Regel parameter ({k}{{F}}{\\ell }) ˜ 12. Accordingly we observe {T}{{c}}˜ 17.06 {{K}} (point of 50% of normal state resistance), the highest value reported so far for films of thickness 50 nm or less, indicating that HTCVD could be particularly useful for growing high quality NbN thin films.

  11. Layer-Controlled Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of MoS2 Vertical Heterostructures via van der Waals Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Leith; Bladow, Sage M; Ding, Qi; Zhuo, Junqiao; Jacobberger, Robert M; Arnold, Michael S; Jin, Song

    2016-07-26

    The fascinating semiconducting and optical properties of monolayer and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, as exemplified by MoS2, have made them promising candidates for optoelectronic applications. Controllable growth of heterostructures based on these layered materials is critical for their successful device applications. Here, we report a direct low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of MoS2 monolayer/multilayer vertical heterostructures with layer-controlled growth on a variety of layered materials (SnS2, TaS2, and graphene) via van der Waals epitaxy. Through precise control of the partial pressures of the MoCl5 and elemental sulfur precursors, reaction temperatures, and careful tracking of the ambient humidity, we have successfully and reproducibly grown MoS2 vertical heterostructures from 1 to 6 layers over a large area. The monolayer MoS2 heterostructure was verified using cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) while Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed the layer-controlled MoS2 growth and heterostructure electronic interactions. Raman, photoluminescence, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mappings verified the uniform coverage of the MoS2 layers. This reaction provides an ideal method for the scalable layer-controlled growth of transition metal dichalcogenide heterostructures via van der Waals epitaxy for a variety of optoelectronic applications.

  12. Preparation of a-Si and a-Si-Alloy Films Using an Ion-Gun Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haku, Hisao; Sayama, Katsunobu; Matsuoka, Tsugufumi; Tsuda, Shinya; Nakano, Shoichi; Ohnishi, Michitoshi; Kuwano, Yukinori

    1991-07-01

    As a new amorphous-silicon (a-Si) fabrication technique, an ion-gun chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in which ions add energy to surface reactions, has been developed. The ion source employed in this gun is of the hot cathode type with a multicapillary anode which creates a collimated gas flow. A-Si:H and a-Ge:H films, fabricated at the substrate temperature of 130°C, show low dihydride bond density and high photosensitivity (4.0× 105 at Eopt˜1.95 eV and 5.1 at Eopt˜1.03 eV, respectively). In addition, a double ion-gun CVD method, for which the energy of two kinds of ion species can be independently controlled, has been developed for fabricating high-quality a-Si-alloy films. Highly photoconductive a-SiGe:H films with low optical gaps (<1.3 eV) were obtained using this fabrication method.

  13. High-temperature stability of chemically vapor-deposited tungsten-silicon couples rapid thermal annealed in ammonia and argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, E.K.; Morgan, A.E.; Flanner, J.M.; Coulman, B.; Sadana, D.K.; Burrow, B.J.; Ellwanger, R.C.

    1988-12-15

    A rapid thermal anneal (RTA) in an NH/sub 3/ ambient has been found to increase the thermal stability of W films chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Si. W films deposited onto single-crystal Si by low-pressure CVD were rapid thermal annealed at temperatures between 500 and 1100 /sup 0/C in NH/sub 3/ and Ar ambients. The reactions were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and four-point resistivity probe. High-temperature (greater than or equal to1000 /sup 0/C) RTA in Ar completely converted W into the low resistivity (31 ..mu cap omega.. cm) tetragonal WSi/sub 2/ phase. In contrast, after a prior 900 /sup 0/C RTA in NH/sub 3/, N inclusion within the W film and at the W/Si interface almost completely suppressed the W-Si reaction. Detailed examination, however, revealed some patches of WSi/sub 2/ formed at the interface accompanied by long tunnels extending into the substrate, and some crystalline precipitates in the substrate close to the interface. The associated interfacial contact resistance was only slightly altered by the 900 /sup 0/C NH/sub 3/ anneal. The NH/sub 3/-treated W film acted as a diffusion barrier in an Al/W/Si contact metallurgy up to at least 550 /sup 0/C, at which point some increase in contact resistance was measured.

  14. Highly Uniform Wafer-scale Synthesis of α-MoOsub>3sub> by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeongU; Son, Juhyun; Kulkarni, Atul; Ahn, Chisung; Kim, Ki Seok; Shin, Dongjoo; Yeom, Geun; Kim, Taesung

    2017-03-20

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOsub>3sub>) has gained immense attention because of its high electron mobility, wide band gap, and excellent optical and catalytic properties. However, the synthesis of uniform and large-area MoOsub>3sub> is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of wafer-scale α-MoO3 by plasma oxidation of Mo-deposited on Si/SiOsub>2sub>. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at 150 °C. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a PECVD system at 150 °C. It was found that the synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> had a highly uniform crystalline structure. For the as-synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> sensor, we observed a current change when the relative humidity was increased from 11% to 95%. The sensor was exposed to different humidity levels with fast recovery time of about 8 s. Hence this feasibility study shows that MoOsub>3sub> synthesized at low temperature can be utilized for the gas sensing applications by adopting flexible device technology.

  15. Direct Growth of a-Plane GaN on r-Plane Sapphire by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Chiu; Su, Yan-Kuin; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Wang, Yu-Jen; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chou, Ming-Chieh

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we had demonstrated the direct growth of nonpolar a-plane GaN on an r-plane sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) without any buffer layer. First, in this experiment, we had determined the optimum temperature for two-step growth, including obtaining three-dimensional (3D) GaN islands in the nucleation layer and coalescing with a further two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. The result shows that the nucleation layer grown under high temperature (1150 °C) leads to large islands with few grain boundaries. Under the same temperature, the effect of the V/III ratio on the growth of the overlaying GaN layer to obtain a flat and void free a-plane GaN layer is also studied. The result indicates one can directly grow a smooth epitaxial layer on an r-plane sapphire by changing the V/III ratio. The rms roughness decreases from 13.61 to 2.02 nm. The GaN crystal quality is verified using a mixed acid to etch the film surface. The etch pit density (EPD) is 3.16 ×107 cm-2.

  16. Synthesis and nanorod growth of n-type phthalocyanine on ultrathin metal films by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Yasuko; Nishimoto, Mihoko; Misawa, Asuka; Misaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    The thermal behavior of 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene (TCNB), the synthesis of metal-2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octacyanophthalocyanine-metal [MPc(CN)8-M] (M = Cu, Fe, Ni) complexes by the tetramerization of TCNB, and the growth of MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were investigated. By chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in vacuum, MPc(CN)8 molecules were synthesized and MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were formed on all substrates. Among them, CuPc(CN)8 molecules were synthesized in high yield, and CuPc(CN)8-Cu nanorods were deposited uniformly and in high density, with diameters and lengths of 70-110 and 200-700 nm, respectively. The differences in the growth of MPc(CN)8-M nanorods were mainly attributed to the stability of the MPc(CN)8-M complex, the oxidation of ultrathin metal films, and the diffusion of metal atoms. Additionally, the tetramerization of TCNB by CVD at atmospheric pressure was performed on ultrathin Cu films, and the synthesis of CuPc(CN)8 molecules was observed by in situ UV-vis spectroscopy. CVD under atmospheric pressure is also useful for the synthesis of CuPc(CN)8 molecules.

  17. Physical and electrochemical properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes [CNTs] on a metal substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, Yong Hwan; Ha, Jong Keun; Cho, Kwon Koo; Kim, Hye Sung

    2012-01-05

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized on a Ni/Au/Ti substrate using a thermal chemical vapor deposition process. A Ni layer was used as a catalyst, and an Au layer was applied as a barrier in order to prevent diffusion between Ni and Ti within the substrate during the growth of carbon nanotubes. The results showed that vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes could be uniformly grown on the Ti substrate (i.e., metal substrate), thus indicating that the Au buffer layer effectively prevented interdiffusion of the catalyst and metal substrate. Synthesized carbon nanotubes on the Ti substrate have the diameter of about 80 to 120 nm and the length of about 5 to 10 μm. The Ti substrate, with carbon nanotubes, was prepared as an electrode for a lithium rechargeable battery, and its electrochemical properties were investigated. In a Li/CNT cell with carbon nanotubes on a 60-nm Au buffer layer, the first discharge capacity and discharge capacity after the 50th cycle were 210 and 80 μAh/cm2, respectively.

  18. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methane to Carbon Nanotubes: Copper Promoted Effect of Ni/MgO Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts were prepared by sol-gel method and used as the catalysts for synthesis of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The effect of Cu on the carbon yield and structure was investigated, and the effects of calcination temperature and reaction temperature were also investigated. The catalysts and synthesized carbon materials were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the addition of Cu promoted the reduction of nickel species, subsequently improving the growth and yield of CNTs. Meanwhile, CNTs were synthesized by the Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts with various calcination temperatures and reaction temperatures, and results suggested that the obtained CNTs on Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst with the calcination temperature of 500°C and the reaction temperature of 650°C were of the greatest yield and quantity of 927%.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition and analysis of thermally insulating ZrO{sub 2} layers on injection molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atakan, Burak; Khlopyanova, Victoria; Mausberg, Simon; Kandzia, Adrian; Pflitsch, Christian [Thermodynamik (IVG) and Cenide, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Mumme, Frank [Kunststoff-Institut Luedenscheid, Karolinenstrasse 8, 58507 Luedenscheid (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    High quality injection molding requires a precise control of cooling rates. Thermal barrier coating (TBC) of zirconia with a thickness of 20-40 μm on polished stainless steel molds could provide the necessary insulating effect. This paper presents results of zirconia deposition on stainless steel substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) aiming to provide the process parameters for the deposition of uniform zirconia films with such a thickness. The deposition was performed with zirconium (IV) acetylacetonate (Zr(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 4}) as precursor and synthetic air as co-reactant, which allows deposition at temperatures below 600 C. The experiments were carried out in a hot-wall reactor at pressures between 7.5 mbar and 500 mbar and in a temperature range from 450 C to 600 C. Important growth parameters were characterized and growth rates between 1 and 2.5 μm/h were achieved. Thick and well adhering zirconia layers of 38 μm could be produced on steel within 40 h. The transient heat transfer rate upon contact with a hot surface was also evaluated experimentally with the thickest coatings. These exhibit a good TBC performance. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Probing electronic lifetimes and phonon anharmonicities in high-quality chemical vapor deposited graphene by magneto-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Christoph, E-mail: cneumann@physik.rwth-aachen.de; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Halpaap, Donatus; Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Beschoten, Bernd [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Reichardt, Sven [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Physics and Materials Science Research Unit, Université du Luxembourg, 1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    We present a magneto-Raman study on high-quality single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) that is fully encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride by a dry transfer technique. By analyzing the Raman D, G, and 2D peaks, we find that the structural quality of the samples is comparable with state-of-the-art exfoliated graphene flakes. From B-field dependent Raman measurements, we extract the broadening and associated lifetime of the G peak due to anharmonic effects. Furthermore, we determine the decay width and lifetime of Landau level (LL) transitions from magneto-phonon resonances as a function of laser power. At low laser power, we find a minimal decay width of 140 cm{sup −1} highlighting the high electronic quality of the CVD-grown graphene. At higher laser power, we observe an increase of the LL decay width leading to a saturation, with the corresponding lifetime saturating at a minimal value of 18 fs.

  1. Intermolecular interaction between rare earth and manganese precursors in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of perovskite manganite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro [Department of Engineering Science, Osaka Electro-Communication University, 18-8 Hatsu-cho, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8530 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism was investigated in liquid delivery metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of praseodymium and lanthanum manganite films. We studied the gas-phase behavior of praseodymium, lanthanum, and manganese precursors under actual CVD conditions by in situ infrared absorption spectroscopy. The rate of the decrease of the infrared absorbance due to Pr(DPM){sub 3} was almost constant even if Mn(DPM){sub 3} was added, indicating that the intermolecular interaction between Pr and Mn precursors in the gas phase is relatively weak in MOCVD of praseodymium manganite films. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of the infrared absorption indicates that the thermal decomposition of La(DPM){sub 3} was promoted in the presence of Mn(DPM){sub 3}. The significant intermolecular interaction occurs between La and Mn precursors in the gas phase in MOCVD of lanthanum manganite films. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. High-yield chemical vapor deposition growth of high-quality large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-09-25

    Bernal-stacked (AB-stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electric field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB-stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB- and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H(2)/CH(4) ratio in a low-pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high-temperature and low-pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90%) and high coverage (up to 99%). The electrical transport studies demonstrate that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB-stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4000 cm(2)/V · s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  4. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  5. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-08-08

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  6. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde, E-mail: gozdeince@sabanciuniv.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Matin, Asif, E-mail: amatin@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Zafarullah, E-mail: zukhan@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Zaidi, S.M. Javaid, E-mail: zaidismj@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkgleasn@mit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-31

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling.

  7. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Xiong, X.; Huang, B. Y.; Li, G. D.; Zhang, H. B.; Xiao, P.; Chen, Z. K.; Zheng, X. L.

    2009-05-01

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl 4-C 3H 6-H 2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl 4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm 3 by Archimedes' principle.

  8. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of low-loss SiON optical waveguides at 15-microm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, F; Guidice, M D; Recca, R; Testa, F

    1991-11-01

    Good optical-quality SiON layers deposited upon a SiO(2) buffer layer placed upon silicon wafers have been obtained by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from SiH(4), NH(3), and N(2)O. Optical planar waveguides with a thickness of 5 microm and a refractive index of 1.470 have been deposited and investigated in the wavelength region of 1.3-1.6 microm. Three absorption bands at 1.40, 1.48, and 1.54 microm have been detected and interpreted as Si-OH, N-H, and Si-H vibrational modes, respectively. Absorption losses of 3.8 dB/cm at 1.4 microm and 3.2 dB/cm at 1.51 microm have been measured. A mild annealing at approximately 800 degrees C completely removes the band at 1.40 microm, whereas strong reduction of absorption at 1.51 microm requires 3 h of annealing at 1100 degrees C. As a result, propagation losses of 0.36 to 0.54 dB/cm have been measured at 1.54-microm wavelength.

  9. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  10. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  11. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Seop; Choi, Changrok; Kim, Soo Heon; Choi, Kun oh [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Min [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sanghak [R and D Center, ELBIO Incorporation, 426-5 Gasan-dong Geumchun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH{sub 3}) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH{sub 3}) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  12. Preparation and characteristics of C/C composite brake disc by multi-cylindrical chemical vapor deposition processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yi-dong; ZHANG Fu-kuan; ZHOU Wan-cheng

    2005-01-01

    The C/C composite brake discs were prepared by tri-cylindrical chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The optimum processing parameters were as follows: deposition temperature was 830-930 ℃, the gas-flow rates of N2 and propylene were 4.8-5.2 m3/h and 5.8-6.2 m3/h, respectively, the furnace pressure was 4.5-5.5 kPa and the deposition time was 200 h.The effects of processing parameters on the densified rates, thermal-physical property and mechanical performance of C/C composite brake discs were studied. The results show that density, heat conductivity, bend strength and abrasion ratio of the multi-cylindrica brake discs are 1.02-1.78 g/cm3, 31 W/(m·K), 114 MPa and 7 μm/s, respectively, which are approximately similar to those of the single-cylindrical ones. The gas flow rate has no relation to the number of the cylinder and furnace loading. The utilization ratio of carbon can be improved by multi-cylinder CVD process without changing the characteristics of brake disc.

  13. Temperature varying photoconductivity of GeSn alloys grown by chemical vapor deposition with Sn concentrations from 4% to 11%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John; Adam, Thomas; Kim, Yihwan; Huang, Yi-Chiau; Reznicek, Alexander; Hazbun, Ramsey; Gupta, Jay; Kolodzey, James

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomorphic GeSn layers with Sn atomic percentages between 4.5% and 11.3% were grown by chemical vapor deposition using digermane and SnCl4 precursors on Ge virtual substrates grown on Si. The layers were characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking curves and reciprocal space maps. Photoconductive devices were fabricated, and the dark current was found to increase with Sn concentration. The responsivity of the photoconductors was measured at a wavelength of 1.55 μm using calibrated laser illumination at room temperature and a maximum value of 2.7 mA/W was measured for a 4.5% Sn device. Moreover, the responsivity for higher Sn concentration was found to increase with decreasing temperature. Spectral photoconductivity was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photoconductive absorption edge continually increased in wavelength with increasing tin percentage, out to approximately 2.4 μm for an 11.3% Sn device. The direct band gap was extracted using Tauc plots and was fit to a bandgap model accounting for layer strain and Sn concentration. This direct bandgap was attributed to absorption from the heavy-hole band to the conduction band. Higher energy absorption was also observed, which was thought to be likely from absorption in the light-hole band. The band gaps for these alloys were plotted as a function of temperature. These experiments show the promise of GeSn alloys for CMOS compatible short wave infrared detectors.

  14. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  15. Growth of magnesium diboride films on 2 inch diameter copper discs by hybrid physical–chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withanage, Wenura K.; Xi, X. X.; Nassiri, Alireza; Lee, Namhoon; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Tan, Teng; Welander, Paul B.; Franzi, Matthew; Tantawi, Sami; Kustom, Robert L.

    2017-04-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) coating is a potential candidate to replace bulk niobium (Nb) for superconducting radio frequency cavities due to the appealing superconducting properties of MgB2. MgB2 coating on copper may allow cavity operation near 20–25 K as a result of the high transition temperature (T c) of MgB2 and excellent thermal conductivity of Cu. We have grown MgB2 films on 2 inch diameter Cu discs by hybrid physical–chemical vapor deposition for radio frequency characterization. Structural and elemental analyses showed a uniform MgB2 coating on top of a Mg–Cu alloy layer with occasional intrusion of Mg–Cu alloy regions. High T c values of around 37 K and high critical current density (J c) on the order of 107 A cm‑2 at zero field were observed. Radio frequency measurements at 11.4 GHz confirmed a high T c and showed a quality factor (Q 0) much higher than for Cu and close to that of Nb.

  16. Tantalum coating on porous Ti6Al4V scaffold using chemical vapor deposition and preliminary biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Lin; Yu, Xiaoming; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Chengtao; Yang, Ke; Su, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Porous tantalum (Ta), produced via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of commercially pure Ta onto a vitreous carbon, is currently available for use in orthopedic applications. However, the relatively high manufacturing cost and the incapability to produce customized implant using medical image data have limited its application to gain widespread acceptance. In this study, Ta film was deposited on porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds using CVD technique. Digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the Ta coating evenly covered the entire scaffold structure. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the coating consisted of α and β phases of Ta. Goat mesenchymal stem cells were seeded and cultured on the Ti6Al4V scaffolds with and without coating. The tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay exhibited better cell adhesion and proliferation on Ta-coated scaffolds compared with uncoated scaffolds. The porous scaffolds were subsequently implanted in goats for 12weeks. Histological analysis revealed similar bone formation around the periphery of the coated and uncoated implants, but bone ingrowth is better within the Ta-coated scaffolds. To demonstrate the ability of producing custom implant for clinical applications via this technology, we designed and fabricated a porous Ti6Al4V scaffold with segmental mandibular shape derived from patient computerized tomography data.

  17. Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using CoMnMgO catalysts through catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Feng, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Cheng-Fa; Chu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The CoMgO and CoMnMgO catalysts are prepared by a co-precipitation method and used as the catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The effects of Mn addition on the carbon yield and structure are investigated. The catalysts are characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, and the synthesized carbon materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG). TEM measurement indicates that the catalyst CoMgO enclosed completely in the produced graphite layer results in the deactivation of the catalyst. TG results suggest that the CoMnMgO catalyst has a higher selectivity for CNTs than CoMgO. Meanwhile, different diameters of CNTs are synthesized by CoMnMgO catalysts with various amounts of Co content, and the results show that the addition of Mn avoids forming the enclosed catalyst, prevents the formation of amorphous carbon, subsequently promotes the growth of CNTs, and the catalyst with decreased Co content is favorable for the synthesis of CNTs with a narrow diameter distribution. The CoMnMgO catalyst with 40% Co content has superior catalytic activity for the growth of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Structural, optical and electrical study of undoped GaN layers obtained by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio, E-mail: tapio.rangel@gmail.co [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Aguilar, Cesia Guarneros [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, C.P. 07360, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico); Sanchez-Resendiz, Victor, E-mail: victors@sees.cinvestav.m [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, A.P. 14740, C.P. 07360, Mexico, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2011-01-31

    We investigate optical, structural and electrical properties of undoped GaN grown on sapphire. The layers were prepared in a horizontal reactor by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition at temperatures of 900 {sup o}C and 950 {sup o}C on a low temperature grown (520 {sup o}C) GaN buffer layer on (0001) sapphire substrate. The growth pressure was kept at 10,132 Pa. The photoluminescence study of such layers revealed a band-to-band emission around 366 nm and a yellow band around 550 nm. The yellow band intensity decreases with increasing deposition temperature. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy studies show the formation of hexagonal GaN layers with a thickness of around 1 {mu}m. The electrical study was performed using temperature dependent Hall measurements between 35 and 373 K. Two activation energies are obtained from the temperature dependent conductivity, one smaller than 1 meV and the other one around 20 meV. For the samples grown at 900 {sup o}C the mobilities are constant around 10 and 20 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, while for the sample grown at 950 {sup o}C the mobility shows a thermally activated behavior with an activation energy of 2.15 meV.

  19. Radiation induced changes in electrical conductivity of chemical vapor deposited silicon carbides under fast neutron and gamma-ray irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Bun, E-mail: btsuchiya@meijo-u.ac.jp [Department of General Education, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501, Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Shikama, Tatsuo; Nagata, Shinji; Saito, Kesami [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamamoto, Syunya [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233, Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ohnishi, Seiki [Tokai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nozawa, Takashi [Aomori Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166, Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The radiation-induced changes in the volume electrical conductivities of chemical vapor deposited silicon carbides (CVD-SiCs) were in-site investigated by performing irradiation using 1.17 and 1.33-MeV gamma-ray and 14-MeV fast neutron beams in air and vacuum. Under gamma-ray irradiation at ionization dose rates of 3.6 and 5.9 Gy/s and irradiation temperature of approximately 300 K, the initial rapid increase in electrical conductivity; this is indicative of radiation-induced conductivity (RIC), occurred due to electronic excitation, and a more gradual increase followed up to a dose of approximately 10-50 kGy corresponding to the results in base conductivity without radiation; this is indicative of radiation-induced electrical degradation (RIED). However, the radiation-induced phenomena were not observed at irradiation temperatures above 373 K. Under neutron irradiation at a further low dose rate below approximately 2.1 Gy/s, a fast neutron flux of 9.2 x 10{sup 14} n/m{sup 2} s, and 300 K, the RIED-like behavior according to radiation-induced modification of the electrical property occurred with essentially no displacement damage, but ionizing effects (radiolysis).

  20. An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer by fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin; Chang, Jiaxing; Shao, Youlin; Liu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle has been successful in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), but an improved design is required for future development. In this paper, the coating layers are reconsidered, and an improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer is proposed. Three methods of preparing the porous SiC layer, called high methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentration method, high Ar concentration method and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) method, are experimentally studied. It is indicated that porous SiC layer can be successfully prepared and the density of SiC layer can be adjusted by tuning the preparation parameters. Microstructure and characterization of the improved TRISO coated particle are given based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. It can be found that the improved TRISO coated particle with porous SiC layer can be mass produced successfully. The formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer are also discussed based on the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition principle.