WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical structure sketcher

  1. The PubChem chemical structure sketcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihlenfeldt Wolf D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PubChem is an important public, Web-based information source for chemical and bioactivity information. In order to provide convenient structure search methods on compounds stored in this database, one mandatory component is a Web-based drawing tool for interactive sketching of chemical query structures. Web-enabled chemical structure sketchers are not new, being in existence for years; however, solutions available rely on complex technology like Java applets or platform-dependent plug-ins. Due to general policy and support incident rate considerations, Java-based or platform-specific sketchers cannot be deployed as a part of public NCBI Web services. Our solution: a chemical structure sketching tool based exclusively on CGI server processing, client-side JavaScript functions, and image sequence streaming. The PubChem structure editor does not require the presence of any specific runtime support libraries or browser configurations on the client. It is completely platform-independent and verified to work on all major Web browsers, including older ones without support for Web2.0 JavaScript objects.

  2. AxiSketcher: Interactive Nonlinear Axis Mapping of Visualizations through User Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bum Chul; Kim, Hannah; Wall, Emily; Choo, Jaegul; Park, Haesun; Endert, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Visual analytics techniques help users explore high-dimensional data. However, it is often challenging for users to express their domain knowledge in order to steer the underlying data model, especially when they have little attribute-level knowledge. Furthermore, users' complex, high-level domain knowledge, compared to low-level attributes, posits even greater challenges. To overcome these challenges, we introduce a technique to interpret a user's drawings with an interactive, nonlinear axis mapping approach called AxiSketcher. This technique enables users to impose their domain knowledge on a visualization by allowing interaction with data entries rather than with data attributes. The proposed interaction is performed through directly sketching lines over the visualization. Using this technique, users can draw lines over selected data points, and the system forms the axes that represent a nonlinear, weighted combination of multidimensional attributes. In this paper, we describe our techniques in three areas: 1) the design space of sketching methods for eliciting users' nonlinear domain knowledge; 2) the underlying model that translates users' input, extracts patterns behind the selected data points, and results in nonlinear axes reflecting users' complex intent; and 3) the interactive visualization for viewing, assessing, and reconstructing the newly formed, nonlinear axes.

  3. Structure validation in chemical crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Anthony L

    2009-02-01

    Automated structure validation was introduced in chemical crystallography about 12 years ago as a tool to assist practitioners with the exponential growth in crystal structure analyses. Validation has since evolved into an easy-to-use checkCIF/PLATON web-based IUCr service. The result of a crystal structure determination has to be supplied as a CIF-formatted computer-readable file. The checking software tests the data in the CIF for completeness, quality and consistency. In addition, the reported structure is checked for incomplete analysis, errors in the analysis and relevant issues to be verified. A validation report is generated in the form of a list of ALERTS on the issues to be corrected, checked or commented on. Structure validation has largely eliminated obvious problems with structure reports published in IUCr journals, such as refinement in a space group of too low symmetry. This paper reports on the current status of structure validation and possible future extensions.

  4. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  5. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  6. Diffusion phenomena in chemically stabilized multilayer structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered thin film structures are widely applied as reflective coatings for optical elements in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regime. In this thesis we investigate the structural and chemical changes that occur in Mo/Si based multilayers as a result of radiation induced thermal loads and ot

  7. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  8. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  9. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  10. The hierarchical structure of chemical engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mooson KWAUK

    2007-01-01

    Around the turn of the present century, scholars began to recognize chemical engineering as a complex system, and have been searching for a convenient point of entry for refreshing its knowledge base. From our study of the dynamic structures of dispersed particles in fluidization and the resulting multi-scale method, we have been attempting to extend our findings to structures prevailing in other multiphase systems as well as in the burgeoning industries producing functional materials. Chemical engineering itself is hierarchically structured. Besides structures based on space and time, such hierarchy could be built from ChE history scaled according to science content, or from ChE operation according to the expenditure of manpower and capital investment.

  11. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer.

  12. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  13. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. The hierarchical structure of chemical engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mooson; KWAUK

    2007-01-01

    Around the turn of the present century,scholars began to recognize chemical engineering as a com-plex system,and have been searching for a convenient point of entry for refreshing its knowledge base.From our study of the dynamic structures of dispersed particles in fluidization and the resultingmulti-scale method,we have been attempting to extend our findings to structures prevailing in othermultiphase systems as well as in the burgeoning industries producing functional materials.Chemicalengineering itself is hierarchically structured.Besides structures based on space and time,such hier-archy could be built from ChE history scaled according to science content,or from ChE operation ac-cording to the expenditure of manpower and capital investment.

  15. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  16. Trends in information theory-based chemical structure codification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Bonchev, Danail

    2014-08-01

    This report offers a chronological review of the most relevant applications of information theory in the codification of chemical structure information, through the so-called information indices. Basically, these are derived from the analysis of the statistical patterns of molecular structure representations, which include primitive global chemical formulae, chemical graphs, or matrix representations. Finally, new approaches that attempt to go "back to the roots" of information theory, in order to integrate other information-theoretic measures in chemical structure coding are discussed.

  17. Structures and Stabilization Mechanisms in Chemically Stabilized Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Boyes, Pratibha L.; Saltzberg, Michael A.; Vega, Alexander

    1993-09-01

    Structural complexities and disorder in chemically stabilized cristobalites (CSC), which are room temperature silica-based ceramics, prepared by a wet chemical route, are described. CSC displays many of the structural characteristics of the high temperature cristobalite, elucidated by HREM and X-ray diffraction. In-situ electron diffraction and NMR results suggest that the disorder is structural and is static.

  18. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  19. Mapping chemical performance on molecular structures using locally interpretable explanations

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, Leanne S; Hudson, Corey M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present an application of Locally Interpretable Machine-Agnostic Explanations to 2-D chemical structures. Using this framework we are able to provide a structural interpretation for an existing black-box model for classifying biologically produced fuel compounds with regard to Research Octane Number. This method of "painting" locally interpretable explanations onto 2-D chemical structures replicates the chemical intuition of synthetic chemists, allowing researchers in the field to directly accept, reject, inform and evaluate decisions underlying inscrutably complex quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

  20. Marine chemical ecology: chemical signals and cues structure marine populations, communities, and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Chemical cues constitute much of the language of life in the sea. Our understanding of biotic interactions and their effects on marine ecosystems will advance more rapidly if this language is studied and understood. Here, I review how chemical cues regulate critical aspects of the behavior of marine organisms from bacteria to phytoplankton to benthic invertebrates and water column fishes. These chemically mediated interactions strongly affect population structure, community organization, and ecosystem function. Chemical cues determine foraging strategies, feeding choices, commensal associations, selection of mates and habitats, competitive interactions, and transfer of energy and nutrients within and among ecosystems. In numerous cases, the indirect effects of chemical signals on behavior have as much or more effect on community structure and function as the direct effects of consumers and pathogens. Chemical cues are critical for understanding marine systems, but their omnipresence and impact are inadequately recognized.

  1. Nematic films at chemically structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, N. M.; Telo da Gama, M. M.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the morphology of a thin nematic film adsorbed at flat substrate patterned by stripes with alternating aligning properties, normal and tangential respectively. We construct a simple ‘exactly-solvable’ effective interfacial model where the liquid crystal distortions are accounted for via an effective interface potential. We find that chemically patterned substrates can strongly deform the nematic-air interface. The amplitude of this substrate-induced undulations increases with decreasing average film thickness and with increasing surface pattern pitch. We find a regime where the interfacial deformation may be described in terms of a material-independent universal scaling function. Surprisingly, the predictions of the effective interfacial model agree semi-quantitatively with the results of the numerical solution of a full model based on the Landau-de Gennes theory coupled to a square-gradient phase field free energy functional for a two phase system.

  2. Chemical isomeric effects on propanol glassy structures

    CERN Document Server

    Cuello, G J; Bermejo, F J; Cabrillo, C

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the structure of both propanol isomers in their glassy and crystalline states by neutron diffraction. The glass-transition temperatures of 1- and 2-propanol are about 98 and 115 K, respectively and, surprisingly, even larger differences are observed for the melting temperatures of the stable crystals, which are 148 and 185 K, respectively. Their supercooled liquid phases show rather different relaxation spectra, 1-propanol manifesting strong deviations from Debye behavior, whereas 2-propanol shows a far weaker effect. We discuss the spectra obtained for the static structure factor and the static pair correlation function D(r). There is a noticeable difference in the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, which clearly indicates a density change, well correlated with the period of the intermolecular oscillations shown by D(r). (orig.)

  3. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term...... content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain......Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model...

  4. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  5. Structural and Chemical Diversity of Tl-Based Cuprate Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信赢

    2003-01-01

    The Tl-based cuprate superconductor family is the largest family in crystal structure and chemical composition among all high Tc cuprate superconductors. The Tl family can be divided into two sub-families, the Tl single layer family and the Tl double layer family, based on their crystal structural characteristics. The Tl single layer family is an ideal material for investigating the evolution of crystalline formation, charge carrier density, chemical composition, transport properties, superconductivity and their relationships. The Tl family contains almostall possible crystal structures discovered in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Tl cuprate superconductors are of great importance not only in studying high-temperature superconductivity but also in commercial applications.

  6. Classification of fossil fuels according to structural-chemical characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gyul' maliev; G.S. Golovin; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    On the basis of a set of linear equations that relate the amount of major elements n{sub E} (E = C, H, O, N, S) in the organic matter of fossil fuels to structural characteristics, such as the number of cycles R, the number of atoms n{sub E}, the number of mutual chemical bonds, the degree of unsaturation of the structure {delta}, and the extent of its reduction B, a structural-chemical classification of fossil coals that is closely related to the parameters of the industrial-genetic classification (GOST 25543-88) is proposed. Structural-chemical classification diagrams are constructed for power-generating coals of Russia; coking coals; and coals designed for nonfuel purposes including the manufacture of adsorbents, synthetic liquid fuel, ion exchangers, thermal graphite, and carbon-graphite materials.

  7. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model...... Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term......, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction....

  8. Visually Guiding and Controlling the Search While Mining Chemical Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Max Pereira; Vitor Santos Costa; Rui Camacho; Fonseca, Nuno A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the work in progress on LogCHEM, an ILP based tool for discriminative interactive mining of chemical fragments. In particular, we describe the integration with a molecule visualisation software that allows the chemist to graphically control the search for interesting patterns in chemical fragments. Furthermore, we show how structured information, such as rings, functional groups like carboxyl, amine, methyl, ester, etc are integrated and exploited in LogCHEM.

  9. Mining chemical structural information from the drug literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banville, Debra L

    2006-01-01

    It is easier to find too many documents on a life science topic than to find the right information inside these documents. With the application of text data mining to biological documents, it is no surprise that researchers are starting to look at applications that mine out chemical information. The mining of chemical entities--names and structures--brings with it some unique challenges, which commercial and academic efforts are beginning to address. Ultimately, life science text data mining applications need to focus on the marriage of biological and chemical information.

  10. Improving 3D structure prediction from chemical shift data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schot, Gijs van der [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang, Zaiyong [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany); Vernon, Robert [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Vranken, Wim F. [VIB, Department of Structural Biology (Belgium); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We report advances in the calculation of protein structures from chemical shift nuclear magnetic resonance data alone. Our previously developed method, CS-Rosetta, assembles structures from a library of short protein fragments picked from a large library of protein structures using chemical shifts and sequence information. Here we demonstrate that combination of a new and improved fragment picker and the iterative sampling algorithm RASREC yield significant improvements in convergence and accuracy. Moreover, we introduce improved criteria for assessing the accuracy of the models produced by the method. The method was tested on 39 proteins in the 50-100 residue size range and yields reliable structures in 70 % of the cases. All structures that passed the reliability filter were accurate (<2 A RMSD from the reference)

  11. Powerful chemical technique. [CSIR uses new x-ray diffractometer for structural chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The CSIR's National Chemical Research Laboratory (NCRL) is now using one of the most powerful techniques available to determine the structure of molecules. It has recently acquired a Single Crystal X-ray Diffractometer. This powerful method provides the only means of determining the structure of certain compounds. NCRL scientists often carry out structure determinations to find out the relative or absolute stereochemistry of molecules. This is important when correlating physiological activity and structure, information which is necessary for synthesizing medicines with specific characteristics.

  12. The multifractal structure of chaotically advected chemical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, Z; Hernández-García, E; Tél, T; Neufeld, Zoltan; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Tel, Tamas

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the concentration field of a decaying substance produced by chemical sources and advected by a smooth incompressible two-dimensional flow is investigated. We focus our attention on the non-uniformities of the Hölder exponent of the resulting filamental chemical field. They appear most evidently in the case of open flows where irregularities of the field exhibit strong spatial intermittency as they are restricted to a fractal manifold. Non-uniformities of the Hölder exponent of the chemical field in closed flows appears as a consequence of the non-uniform stretching of the fluid elements. We study how this affects the scaling exponents of the structure functions, displaying anomalous scaling, and relate the scaling exponents to the distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents of the advection dynamics. Theoretical predictions are compared with numerical experiments.

  13. Rule-Based Classification of Chemical Structures by Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Varin, Thibault

    2011-08-01

    Databases for small organic chemical molecules usually contain millions of structures. The screening decks of pharmaceutical companies contain more than a million of structures. Nevertheless chemical substructure searching in these databases can be performed interactively in seconds. Because of this nobody has really missed structural classification of these databases for the purpose of finding data for individual chemical substructures. However, a full deck high-throughput screen produces also activity data for more than a million of substances. How can this amount of data be analyzed? Which are the active scaffolds identified by an assays? To answer such questions systematic classifications of molecules by scaffolds are needed. In this review it is described how molecules can be hierarchically classified by their scaffolds. It is explained how such classifications can be used to identify active scaffolds in an HTS data set. Once active classes are identified, they need to be visualized in the context of related scaffolds in order to understand SAR. Consequently such visualizations are another topic of this review. In addition scaffold based diversity measures are discussed and an outlook is given about the potential impact of structural classifications on a chemically aware semantic web.

  14. Structural studies of chemical constituents of Thithonia Tagetiflora Desv (Asteraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngoc Huynh, Vinh; Nguyen Thi Hoai, Thu; Phi Phung Nguyen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Tithonia tagetiflora Desv. (Asteraceae) is a widespread plant in Vietnam, and the species of Tithonia are known as plants containing many biologically active compounds. However, T. tagetiflora's chemical composition remains mostly unknown. Therefore, we now report the structural elucidation of two...

  15. Discovering More Chemical Concepts from 3D Chemical Information Searches of Crystal Structure Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    2016-01-01

    Three new examples are presented illustrating three-dimensional chemical information searches of the Cambridge structure database (CSD) from which basic core concepts in organic and inorganic chemistry emerge. These include connecting the regiochemistry of aromatic electrophilic substitution with the geometrical properties of hydrogen bonding…

  16. Global Materials Structure Search with Chemically Motivated Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosetti, Chiara; Krautgasser, Konstantin; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2015-12-01

    Identification of relevant reaction pathways in ever more complex composite materials and nanostructures poses a central challenge to computational materials discovery. Efficient global structure search, tailored to identify chemically relevant intermediates, could provide the necessary first-principles atomistic insight to enable a rational process design. In this work we modify a common feature of global geometry optimization schemes by employing automatically generated collective curvilinear coordinates. The similarity of these coordinates to molecular vibrations enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures for covalently bound systems. In the application to hydrogenated Si clusters, we concomitantly observe a significantly increased efficiency in identifying low-energy structures and exploit it for an extensive sampling of potential products of silicon-cluster soft landing on Si(001) surfaces.

  17. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  18. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.; Bent, B.E.

    1984-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table.

  19. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Gary M; Ferrence, Gregory M; Allen, Frank H

    2010-10-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal-organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout.

  20. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF STRUCTURAL ALERTS (CHEMICAL FRAGMENTS IN (ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lepailleur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  1. Computational analysis of RNA structures with chemical probing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-06-01

    RNAs play various roles, not only as the genetic codes to synthesize proteins, but also as the direct participants of biological functions determined by their underlying high-order structures. Although many computational methods have been proposed for analyzing RNA structures, their accuracy and efficiency are limited, especially when applied to the large RNAs and the genome-wide data sets. Recently, advances in parallel sequencing and high-throughput chemical probing technologies have prompted the development of numerous new algorithms, which can incorporate the auxiliary structural information obtained from those experiments. Their potential has been revealed by the secondary structure prediction of ribosomal RNAs and the genome-wide ncRNA function annotation. In this review, the existing probing-directed computational methods for RNA secondary and tertiary structure analysis are discussed.

  2. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  3. Protein secondary structure prediction using NMR chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzhong; Alipanahi, Babak; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming

    2010-10-01

    Accurate determination of protein secondary structure from the chemical shift information is a key step for NMR tertiary structure determination. Relatively few work has been done on this subject. There needs to be a systematic investigation of algorithms that are (a) robust for large datasets; (b) easily extendable to (the dynamic) new databases; and (c) approaching to the limit of accuracy. We introduce new approaches using k-nearest neighbor algorithm to do the basic prediction and use the BCJR algorithm to smooth the predictions and combine different predictions from chemical shifts and based on sequence information only. Our new system, SUCCES, improves the accuracy of all existing methods on a large dataset of 805 proteins (at 86% Q(3) accuracy and at 92.6% accuracy when the boundary residues are ignored), and it is easily extendable to any new dataset without requiring any new training. The software is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/succes.

  4. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification -- the epitranscriptome -- is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles.

  5. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R. [Argonne National Lab., Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  6. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belavic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s, mixer(s, reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and channels, and thick-film technology was used to make electrical heaters, temperature sensors and pressure sensors. The final 3D ceramic structure consists of 45 LTCC tapes. The dimensions of the structure are 75 × 41 × 9 mm3 and the weight is about 73 g.

  7. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  8. Chemical structure analysis of starch and cellulose derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischnick, Petra; Momcilovic, Dane

    2010-01-01

    Starch and cellulose are the most abundant and important representatives of renewable biomass. Since the mid-19th century their properties have been changed by chemical modification for commercial and scientific purposes, and there substituted polymers have found a wide range of applications. However, the inherent polydispersity and supramolecular organization of starch and cellulose cause the products resulting from their modification to display high complexity. Chemical composition analysis of these mixtures is therefore a challenging task. Detailed knowledge on substitution patterns is fundamental for understanding structure-property relationships in modified cellulose and starch, and thus also for the improvement of reproducibility and rational design of properties. Substitution patterns resulting from kinetically or thermodynamically controlled reactions show certain preferences for the three available hydroxyl functions in (1→4)-linked glucans. Spurlin, seventy years ago, was the first to describe this in an idealized model, and nowadays this model has been extended and related to the next hierarchical levels, namely, the substituent distribution in and over the polymer chains. This structural complexity, with its implications for data interpretation, and the analytical approaches developed for its investigation are outlined in this article. Strategies and methods for the determination of the average degree of substitution (DS), monomer composition, and substitution patterns at the polymer level are presented and discussed with respect to their limitations and interpretability. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, and modern mass spectrometry (MS), including tandem MS, are the main instrumental techniques employed, in combination with appropriate sample preparation by chemical and enzymatic methods.

  9. Chemical structure of odorants and perceptual similarity in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nick; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Fernando J

    2013-09-01

    Animals are often immersed in a chemical world consisting of mixtures of many compounds rather than of single substances, and they constantly face the challenge of extracting relevant information out of the chemical landscape. To this purpose, the ability to discriminate among different stimuli with different valence is essential, but it is also important to be able to generalise, i.e. to treat different but similar stimuli as equivalent, as natural variation does not necessarily affect stimulus valence. Animals can thus extract regularities in their environment and make predictions, for instance about distribution of food resources. We studied perceptual similarity of different plant odours by conditioning individual carpenter ants to one odour, and subsequently testing their response to another, structurally different odour. We found that asymmetry in generalisation, where ants generalise from odour A to B, but not from B to A, is dependent on both chain length and functional group. By conditioning ants to a binary mixture, and testing their reaction to the individual components of the mixture, we show that overshadowing, where parts of a mixture are learned better than others, is rare. Additionally, generalisation is dependent not only on the structural similarity of odorants, but also on their functional value, which might play a crucial role. Our results provide insight into how ants make sense of the complex chemical world around them, for example in a foraging context, and provide a basis with which to investigate the neural mechanisms behind perceptual similarity.

  10. The chemical structure and the crystalline structures of Bombyx mori silk fibroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, B; Colonna Cesari, F

    1979-01-01

    Some recent data (i.e. published in the last ten years) on the chemical and crystalline structures of B. mori silk are reviewed. The main emphasis is put on the crystallizable portion of silk fibroin, including its chemical constitution and its molecular conformation (at the crystallographic unit-cell level) in the two crystalline modifications : the beta pleated sheet and the silk I structures. The structural aspects are based on a discussion of X-ray and electron diffraction data, and on conformational energy analyses of a model (Ala-Gly)n polypeptide of silk fibroin.

  11. Linear complexions: Confined chemical and structural states at dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, M; Herbig, M; Ponge, D; Sandlöbes, S; Raabe, D

    2015-09-04

    For 5000 years, metals have been mankind's most essential materials owing to their ductility and strength. Linear defects called dislocations carry atomic shear steps, enabling their formability. We report chemical and structural states confined at dislocations. In a body-centered cubic Fe-9 atomic percent Mn alloy, we found Mn segregation at dislocation cores during heating, followed by formation of face-centered cubic regions but no further growth. The regions are in equilibrium with the matrix and remain confined to the dislocation cores with coherent interfaces. The phenomenon resembles interface-stabilized structural states called complexions. A cubic meter of strained alloy contains up to a light year of dislocation length, suggesting that linear complexions could provide opportunities to nanostructure alloys via segregation and confined structural states.

  12. Chemically Resolved Structure of the Sn/Ge(111) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien-Lin; Warren, Samantha; Cowie, Bruce C. C.; Zegenhagen, Jörg

    2006-02-01

    The structure and chemical states of the Sn/Ge(111) surface are characterized by x-ray standing waves combined with photoemission. For the room temperature 3×3 phase two chemical components, approximately 0.4 eV apart, are observed for both Sn 3d and 4d core levels. Our model-independent, x-ray standing wave analysis shows unambiguously that the two components originate from Sn adatoms located at two different heights separated vertically by 0.23 Å, in favor of a model composed of a fluctuating Sn layer. Contrary to the most accepted scenario, the stronger Sn 3d and 4d components, which appear at the lower binding-energy sides and account for 2/3 of the Sn adatoms, are identified to be associated with the higher Sn position, manifesting their filled valence state character.

  13. The double-layered chemical structure in DB white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Althaus, L G

    2004-01-01

    We study the structure and evolution of white dwarf stars with helium-rich atmospheres (DB) in a self-consistent way with the predictions of time-dependent element diffusion. Our treatment of diffusion includes gravitational settling and chemical and thermal diffusion. OPAL radiative opacities for arbitrary metallicity and carbon-and oxygen-rich compositions are employed. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the diffusion-modeled double-layered chemical structure. This structure, which is characterized by a pure helium envelope atop an intermediate remnant shell rich in helium, carbon and oxygen, is expected for pulsating DB white dwarfs, assuming that they are descendants of hydrogen-deficient PG1159 post-AGB stars. We find that, depending on the stellar mass, if DB white dwarf progenitors are formed with a helium content smaller than \\approx 10^-3 M_*, a single-layered configuration is expected to emerge during the DB pulsation instability strip. We also explore the consequences of diffusively evolving ch...

  14. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    hydrogen passivation. A joint experimental and theoretical study of the mechanism by which suspended graphene is etched by catalytically active silver nanoparticles have been studied. The experimental observation of zigzag channels is elucidated by the DFT calculations, which show that the armchair edges...... are easier to remove and therefore only zigzag edges are left. Finally, functionalized graphene has been investigated as catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels and comparisons are made with traditional transition-metal surfaces. The investigated porphyrin-like structures...

  15. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF POLYCARBONATES ON ENTANGLEMENT SPACING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ning; Wen-xiang Zhu; Bao-qing Zhang; Chun-cheng Li; Chen-yang Liu; Du-jin Wang

    2012-01-01

    The master curves of a series of aliphatic polycarbonates (APCs) with different lengths of methylene segments in the repeat unit were obtained by dynamic rheological measurements.The plateau modulus and entanglement molecular weight were determined and cross-checked by different methods.Though having distinct difference in chemical structure of repeat units,both APCs and bisphenol-A polycarbonates have the similar entanglement weight and entanglement spacing.On the other side,the plateau modulus decreases with increasing the length of the side group of atiphatic polycarbonates with different side-chain lengths in the literature.The packing length model can explain the relationship between chain structure and entanglements.

  16. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  17. Evolution of polymer photovoltaic performances from subtle chemical structure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Li, Denghua; Lu, Kun; Zhu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Yajie; Yang, Yanlian; Wei, Zhixiang

    2012-11-21

    Conjugated polymers are promising replacements for their inorganic counterparts in photovoltaics due to their low cost, ease of processing, and straightforward thin film formation. New materials have been able to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells up to 8%. However, rules for rational material design are still lacking, and subtle chemical structure variations usually result in large performance discrepancies. The present paper reports a detailed study on the crystalline structure, morphology, and in situ optoelectronic properties of blend films of polythiophene derivatives and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester by changing the alkyl side chain length and position of polythiophene. The correlation among the molecular structure, mesoscopic morphology, mesoscopic optoelectronic property and macroscopic device performance (highest efficiency above 4%) was directly established. Both solubility and intermolecular interactions should be considered in rational molecular design. Knowledge obtained from this study can aid the selection of appropriate processing conditions that improve blend film morphology, charge transport property, and overall solar cell efficiency.

  18. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate’s application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein.

  19. The Physical and Chemical Structure of Hot Molecular Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, H

    2004-01-01

    We have made self-consistent models of the density and temperature profiles of the gas and dust surrounding embedded luminous objects using a detailed radiative transfer model together with observations of the spectral energy distribution of hot molecular cores. Using these profiles we have investigated the hot core chemistry which results when grain mantles are evaporated, taking into account the different binding energies of the mantle molecules, as well a model in which we assume that all molecules are embedded in water ice and have a common binding energy. We find that most of the resulting column densities are consistent with those observed toward the hot core G34.3+0.15 at a time around 10$^4$ years after central luminous star formation. We have also investigated the dependence of the chemical structure on the density profile which suggests an observational possibility of constraining density profiles from determination of the source sizes of line emission from desorbed molecules.

  20. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism.

  1. Structural simplification of chemical reaction networks in partial steady states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madelaine, Guillaume; Lhoussaine, Cédric; Niehren, Joachim; Tonello, Elisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the structural simplification of chemical reaction networks with partial steady state semantics assuming that the concentrations of some but not all species are constant. We present a simplification rule that can eliminate intermediate species that are in partial steady state, while preserving the dynamics of all other species. Our simplification rule can be applied to general reaction networks with some but few restrictions on the possible kinetic laws. We can also simplify reaction networks subject to conservation laws. We prove that our simplification rule is correct when applied to a module of a reaction network, as long as the partial steady state is assumed with respect to the complete network. Michaelis-Menten's simplification rule for enzymatic reactions falls out as a special case. We have implemented an algorithm that applies our simplification rules repeatedly and applied it to reaction networks from systems biology.

  2. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  3. Predictive Modeling of Chemical Hazard by Integrating Numerical Descriptors of Chemical Structures and Short-term Toxicity Assay Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Sedykh, Alexander; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are widely used for in silico prediction of in vivo toxicity of drug candidates or environmental chemicals, adding value to candidate selection in drug development or in a search for less hazardous and more sustainable alternatives for chemicals in commerce. The development of traditional QSAR models is enabled by numerical descriptors representing the inherent chemical properties that can be easily defined for any number of molecules; however, traditional QSAR models often have limited predictive power due to the lack of data and complexity of in vivo endpoints. Although it has been indeed difficult to obtain experimentally derived toxicity data on a large number of chemicals in the past, the results of quantitative in vitro screening of thousands of environmental chemicals in hundreds of experimental systems are now available and continue to accumulate. In addition, publicly accessible toxicogenomics data collected on hundreds of chemicals provide another dimension of molecular information that is potentially useful for predictive toxicity modeling. These new characteristics of molecular bioactivity arising from short-term biological assays, i.e., in vitro screening and/or in vivo toxicogenomics data can now be exploited in combination with chemical structural information to generate hybrid QSAR–like quantitative models to predict human toxicity and carcinogenicity. Using several case studies, we illustrate the benefits of a hybrid modeling approach, namely improvements in the accuracy of models, enhanced interpretation of the most predictive features, and expanded applicability domain for wider chemical space coverage. PMID:22387746

  4. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  5. Chemical etching of deformation sub-structures in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, M. W.; Christie, J. M.

    1983-02-01

    Chemical etching of dislocations has been studied in natural and synthetic quartz single crystals, in deformed synthetic quartz and in naturally and experimentally deformed quartzites. The ability of different etchants to produce polished or preferentially etched surfaces on quartz is described. Dislocation etching was achieved on all crystal planes examined by using a saturated solution of ammonium bifluoride as the etchant. Appropriate etching times were determined for etching quartzites for grain size, subgrain boundaries, deformation lamellae, dislocations and twins. Growth and polished surfaces of synthetic single crystal quartz were similarly etched and dislocation etch pits, characteristic of various orientations were found. The use of ammonium bifluoride proved to be expecially advantageous for the basal plane, producing a polished surface with etch pits, suitable for dislocation etch pit counting. “Double” etch pits have been found on Dauphiné twin boundaries on the basal plane and the first order prism, using this etchant. Slip lines and deformation bands were suitably etched on deformed synthetic crystal surfaces for identification of the slip planes. Other acidic etchants have been explored and their application to the study of deformation structures in quartz crystals is discussed.

  6. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  7. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Thillai Govindaraja, S.; Jose, Sujin P.; Mohan, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The 1H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and 13C (100 MHz; CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors.

  8. Characterization of Electrochemical and Morphological Properties of Iron-Phosphate-Silicate Chemical Garden Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloboff, I. J.; Barge, L. M.; Russell, M. J.; Kanik, I.

    2012-03-01

    Examination of the growth of Fe^2^+, phosphate, and silicate chemical garden structures to understand properties of similar structures that may have formed at Hadean alkaline hydrothermal vents which may play an important role in the emergence of life.

  9. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Sadtler, Bryce F

    2010-01-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions of a nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size an...

  10. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts.

  11. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  12. Automated Structure-Activity Relationship Mining: Connecting Chemical Structure to Biological Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawer, Mathias J; Jaramillo, David E; Dančík, Vlado; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Shamji, Alykhan F; Wagner, Bridget K; Schreiber, Stuart L; Clemons, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of small molecules is important for developing probes and novel therapeutic agents in chemical biology and drug discovery. Increasingly, multiplexed small-molecule profiling assays allow simultaneous measurement of many biological response parameters for the same compound (e.g., expression levels for many genes or binding constants against many proteins). Although such methods promise to capture SARs with high granularity, few computational methods are available to support SAR analyses of high-dimensional compound activity profiles. Many of these methods are not generally applicable or reduce the activity space to scalar summary statistics before establishing SARs. In this article, we present a versatile computational method that automatically extracts interpretable SAR rules from high-dimensional profiling data. The rules connect chemical structural features of compounds to patterns in their biological activity profiles. We applied our method to data from novel cell-based gene-expression and imaging assays collected on more than 30,000 small molecules. Based on the rules identified for this data set, we prioritized groups of compounds for further study, including a novel set of putative histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  13. Structure and biological activity of chemically modified nisin A species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollema, Harry S.; Metzger, Jörg W.; Both, Paula; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Siezen, Roland J.

    1996-01-01

    Nisin, a 34-residue peptide bacteriocin, contains the less common amino acids lanthionine, β-methyllanthionine, dehydroalanine (Dha), and dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Several chemically modified nisin A species were purified by reverse-phase HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional NMR and electrospray m

  14. Branch Structure of Corona Discharge:Experimental Simulation and Chemical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹吉军; 刘昌俊

    2004-01-01

    The branch structure of corona discharge has been investigated via C2H2 corona discharge. Carbon filament with excellent branch structure is formed in the discharge. This carbon filament offers a direct mimic of the branch structure of corona discharge. It providesa very useful way to study on the average energy, physical and chemical characteristics of coronadischarge. On this basis, the chemical property of corona discharge for methane conversion is discussed.

  15. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Masataka [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honmachi, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyodai Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  16. Predicting allergic contact dermatitis: a hierarchical structure activity relationship (SAR) approach to chemical classification using topological and quantum chemical descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Subhash C.; Mills, Denise; Hawkins, Douglas M.

    2008-06-01

    A hierarchical classification study was carried out based on a set of 70 chemicals—35 which produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and 35 which do not. This approach was implemented using a regular ridge regression computer code, followed by conversion of regression output to binary data values. The hierarchical descriptor classes used in the modeling include topostructural (TS), topochemical (TC), and quantum chemical (QC), all of which are based solely on chemical structure. The concordance, sensitivity, and specificity are reported. The model based on the TC descriptors was found to be the best, while the TS model was extremely poor.

  17. Effects of chemical treatments on hemp fibre structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, M.M., E-mail: kabirm@usq.edu.au [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Wang, H. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Lau, K.T. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Cardona, F. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, hemp fibres were treated with alkali, acetyl and silane chemicals. Fibre constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents were separated from treated fibres. The chemical and thermal influences of these constituents on the treated fibres were examined by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimental results revealed that, hemicellulose was degraded faster than that of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose exhibited better thermal stability and lignin was degraded in a wide range of temperatures. The hydrophilic nature of the fibres was predominantly caused by the presence of hemicellulose and then lignin constituents. Hemicellulose and lignin were mostly removed by the alkalisation with higher concentrations of NaOH, followed by acetylation. Silane treatment could not remove the hemicellulose and lignin, rather this treatment facilitated coupling with the fibre constituents.

  18. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  19. Stochastic Generator of Chemical Structure. 3. Reaction Network Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FAULON,JEAN-LOUP; SAULT,ALLEN G.

    2000-07-15

    A new method to generate chemical reaction network is proposed. The particularity of the method is that network generation and mechanism reduction are performed simultaneously using sampling techniques. Our method is tested for hydrocarbon thermal cracking. Results and theoretical arguments demonstrate that our method scales in polynomial time while other deterministic network generator scale in exponential time. This finding offers the possibility to investigate complex reacting systems such as those studied in petroleum refining and combustion.

  20. Mining the chemical quarry with joint chemical probes: an application of latent semantic structure indexing (LaSSI) and TOPOSIM (Dice) to chemical database mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S B; Sheridan, R P; Fluder, E M; Hull, R D

    2001-05-10

    In this study we use a novel similarity search technique called latent semantic structure indexing (LaSSI) with joint chemical probes as queries to mine the MDL drug data report database. LaSSI is based on latent semantic indexing developed for searching textual databases. We use atom pair and topological torsion descriptors in our calculations. The results obtained with LaSSI are compared with another in-house similarity search technique TOPOSIM. The results from the similarity searches using joint chemical probes are significantly better than searches using single chemical probes for both LaSSI and TOPOSIM. The selected molecules are closely related in activity to their queries and are ranked among the top 300 scoring molecules of the 82 860 entries in the database. Our implementation of LaSSI is very fast and efficient in finding active compounds. The results also show that LaSSI consistently retrieves more diverse chemical structures representative of the joint chemical probes in comparison to TOPOSIM. The use of multimolecule topological probes to identify compounds complements the use of searching databases with 3D pharmacophore hypotheses.

  1. Chemical Tagging Can Work: Identification of Stellar Phase-space Structures Purely by Chemical-abundance Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, David W.; Casey, Andrew R.; Ness, Melissa; Rix, Hans-Walter; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Hasselquist, Sten; Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Martell, Sarah L.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Nidever, David L.; Shetrone, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Chemical tagging promises to use detailed abundance measurements to identify spatially separated stars that were, in fact, born together (in the same molecular cloud) long ago. This idea has not yielded much practical success, presumably because of the noise and incompleteness in chemical-abundance measurements. We have succeeded in substantially improving spectroscopic measurements with The Cannon, which has now delivered 15 individual abundances for ∼ {10}5 stars observed as part of the APOGEE spectroscopic survey, with precisions around 0.04 dex. We test the chemical-tagging hypothesis by looking at clusters in abundance space and confirming that they are clustered in phase space. We identify (by the k-means algorithm) overdensities of stars in the 15-dimensional chemical-abundance space delivered by The Cannon, and plot the associated stars in phase space. We use only abundance-space information (no positional information) to identify stellar groups. We find that clusters in abundance space are indeed clusters in phase space, and we recover some known phase-space clusters and find other interesting structures. This is the first-ever project to identify phase-space structures at the survey-scale by blind search purely in abundance space; it verifies the precision of the abundance measurements delivered by The Cannon the prospects for future data sets appear very good.

  2. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  3. Effect of Chemical Structure on Molecular Properties of Hyperbranched Polycarbosilanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Tarabukina; A.Shpyrkov; A.Amirova; E.Tarasova; N.Shumilkina; A.Filippov; A.Muzafarov

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In spite of the increased interest to the synthesis of hyperbranched polymers,there is a lack of studies of conformational properties of their macromolecules.Structural features of hyperbranched polymers are responsible for new properties that distinguish them from linear compounds and open unique possibilities for their applications.The knowledge of the "structure-properties" relationships is of fundamental value,it also can be helpful when developing new technologies and new materials. The g...

  4. Controlled modification of the structure of polymer surfaces by chemically grafting inorganic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Lambert Oréfice

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Many chemical and physical methods, such as plasma, e-beam, sputtering, CVD and others, have been used to modify the structure of polymer surfaces by depositing thin inorganic films. Most of these techniques are based upon the use of high energy sources that ultimately can damage either chemically or physically polymer surfaces. Moreover, these methods are usually not versatile enough to allow the design of structurally and chemically tailored surfaces through the control of the distribution of chemical functionalities throughout the surface. In this work, inorganic species were introduced onto polymer substrates in a controlled manner by performing a sequence of chemical reactions at the surface. Sulfonation followed by silanization reactions were used to graft alkoxysilane species at the surface of poly(aryl sulfones. The heterogeneous chemical modification of poly(aryl sulfones was monitored by FTIR-ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection - FTIR. Model compounds were used to study the chemical reactions occurring during the grafting procedure. The results showed that the developed procedure can allow a controlled introduction of inorganic species onto polymer surfaces. Furthermore, in order to prove that this procedure enables the deposition of specific chemical functionalities onto polymer surfaces that can be used to create chemically and structurally tailored surfaces, silicate films were deposited on previously silanated PAS bioactive glass composites. In vitro tests showed that the surface modified composite can enhance the rates of hydroxy-carbonate-apatite precipitation.

  5. Corrosion inhibitors: Correlation between chemical structure and efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukovits, I.; Koszto, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary). Inst. of Chemistry

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion inhibition efficiencies of heterocyclic aromatic or partially saturated aromatic compounds (pyrimidines, benzothiazole derivatives, amino-acids containing an aromatic part, pyridines and quinolines) were correlated with quan chemical indices of the respective molecules. Inhibition efficiencies measured in acidic solutions containing 0.001 and 0.01 mol/L of the inhibitor, respectively, were collected. The quantum chemical calculations were done by using the simple Hueckel method. Comparison of inhibition efficiencies and the differences between energies of the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals {Delta} indicated that if {Delta} is lower than 1.3 (in beta units) then the compound will not be active, whereas if {Delta} > 1.3 beta, the compound may be efficient in 0.001 mole/L concentration. The critical value of {Delta} may be lower in solution with 0.01 mole/L inhibitor concentration. Although {Delta} alone is not sufficient to account for the variation in the experimental inhibition efficiencies, the present result indicates that compounds which may be easily excited will be inefficient inhibitors because they maybe altered or decomposed after the excitation takes place.

  6. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  7. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  8. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE INDEXING OF TOXICITY DATA ON THE INTERNET: MOVING TOWARDS A FLAT WORLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standardized chemical structure annotation of public toxicity databases and information resources is playing an increasingly important role in the 'flattening' and integration of diverse sets of biological activity data on the Internet. This review discusses public initiatives th...

  9. A proposed chemical structure for fructans from blue agave plant (Tequilana Weber var. azul)

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Toriz; Ezequiel Delgado; Virgilio Zúñiga

    2007-01-01

    A chemical structure for agave Tequilana fructans is proposed based upon the combined results of permethylation and reductive cleavage techniques coupled to gas-liquid chromatography (GLC), as well as size exclusión chromatography /lightscattering.

  10. Surface Nano-Structuring by Adsorption and Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Nano-structuring of the surface caused by adsorption of molecules or atoms and by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species are reviewed from a chemistry viewpoint. Self-assembly of adsorbed species is markedly influenced by weak mutual interactions and the local strain of the surface induced by the adsorption. Nano-structuring taking place on the surface is well explained by the notion of a quasi-molecule provided by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species. Self-assembl...

  11. Structural Analysis Of Alfa Fibers After Chemical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Mouallif

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, natural fibers are used as reinforcement in composite materials. The Alfa fibers have undergone an alkaline treatment with sodium hydroxide NaOH at a concentration of 10%, during an immersion period of two days. After drying, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy by attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used for the analysis of the chemical properties of these fibers which were extracted from the plant Alfa of the region Al Haouz (Morocco in order to study the modifications resulting from the alkaline treatment. The results proved the presence of the cellulose, with an increase in its proportion in those fibers which have undergone an alkaline treatment with NaOH, the presence of lignin and pectin, as well as their disappearance after the alkaline extraction.

  12. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen

    In this thesis, my work involving dierent aspects of protein structure determination by computer modeling is presented. Determination of several protein's native fold were carried out with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations in the PHAISTOS protein structure simulation framework, utilizing...... to within 3 A. Furthermore, a fast quantum mechanics based chemical shift predictor was developed together with methodology for using chemical shifts in structure simulations. The developed predictor was used for renement of several protein structures and for reducing the computational cost of quantum...

  13. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  14. Impacts of chemical gradients on microbial community structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hanke, Anna; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2017-01-01

    Succession of redox processes is sometimes assumed to define a basic microbial community structure for ecosystems with oxygen gradients. In this paradigm, aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation and sulfate reduction proceed in a thermodynamically determined order, known as the 'redox ...... Journal advance online publication, 17 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.175....

  15. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  16. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  17. Structural Change of Wood Molecules and Chemorheological Behaviors during Chemical Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Manhua; Zhao Guangjie

    2004-01-01

    It is very important to clarify the relationship of changes of molecular combinations in wood cell walls and the chemical rheological behavior during various chemical reagent treatments, for it would be helpful to develop new wood modification technologies and to enrich the theory of chemical rheology of wood. Based on previous investigations on the chemorheological properties of wood by chemical treatments and the applied methods in chemical rheology of wool fibers, this paper proposes the study of various additional reagents to wood saturated in water for long periods of time in order to investigate the chemical rheology of wood, which can provide information about the character of combinations between wood molecules and the structural changes of molecules and further put forward the idea of modifying wood in a decrystallized state.

  18. Multistable Phase Patterns of Spatially Structured Chemical Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giver, Michael; Goldstein, Daniel; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments of two-dimensional microfluidic arrays of droplets containing Belousov-Zhabotinsky reactants show a rich variety of spatio-temporal patterns. Using optical techniques a variety of boundary conditions can be set within the system, including finite rings of droplets. These experiments have provided an interesting and easily reproducible system for probing the effects of nonlinearities and fluctuations in a spatially extended system. Motivated by this experimental set up, we study a simple model of chemical oscillators in the highly nonlinear excitable regime in order to gain insight into the mechanism giving rise to the observed multistable attractors. We map the attractor space of a simple two species activator-inhibitor model coupled via three different coupling mechanism: simple inhibitor diffusion, inhibitor diffusion through an inhomogenous medium where active droplets are separated by inactive holding cells, and coupling through diffusion of an inert signaling species, which arrises through a coarse graining of the inhomogenous medium. Once the attractor space of the mean-field level model has been mapped, we check the robustness of the attractors when subject to intrinsic noise.

  19. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Teixeira Magalhães

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5% were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6% and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%. Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates, Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates, Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates, Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates, Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates, Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates, Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates, Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml.

  20. Regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharide: Characterization of chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Wen; Wang, Jiancheng; Wang, Xia; Wu, Fang; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-11-20

    The biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are related to the substitution positions of functional groups. In this study, regioselective sulfation of Artemisia sphaerocephala polysaccharides (SRSASP) was prepared by using triphenylchloromethane (TrCl) as protecting precursor. FT-IR spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that SO(3-) group (S(6+), high binding energy of 168.7eV) was widely present in sulfated polysaccharides. (13)C NMR spectroscopy showed that C-2 and C-3 substitution was occurred but not fully sulfation. Meanwhile, C-6 substituted signals near 65ppm were not observed. The degree of substitution varied from 0.44 to 0.63 in SRSASP which could be attributed to the low reactivity at secondary hydroxyl. Monosaccharide composition result showed a decrease in the ratio of mannose/glucose, indicating the change of chemical composition in sulfated polysaccharides. In size-exclusion chromatograph analysis, a decrease in molecular weight and broadening of molecular weight distribution of sulfated polysaccharides was also observed. It could be attributed to the hydrolysis of polysaccharide in the sulfated reaction.

  1. Differentiation of chemical reaction activity of various carbon nanotubes using redox potential: Classification by physical and chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Saito, Naoto; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-12-01

    The present study systematically examined the kinetics of a hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction of various carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and MWCNTs), and carbon nano peapods (AuCl3@DWCNT). The theoretical model that we recently proposed based on the redox potential of CNTs was used to analyze the experimental results. The reaction kinetics for DWCNTs and thin MWCNTs agreed well with the theoretical model and was consistent with each other. On the other hand, thin and thick MWCNTs behaved differently, which was consistent with the theory. Additionally, surface morphology of CNTs substantially influenced the reaction kinetics, while the doped particles in the center hollow parts of CNTs (AuCl3@DWCNT) shifted the redox potential in a different direction. These findings make it possible to predict the chemical and biological reactivity of CNTs based on the structural and chemical nature and their influence on the redox potential.

  2. Structural properties of produced CuO/NiO/glass thin layers Produced by chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramezani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel Oxide and Copper oxide on Nickel Oxide thin layers were produced by chemical bath deposition method. There nano structures were investigated by SEM and EDAX analysis. By producing CuO/NiO/glass sandwich layers nano structure of NiO/glass layer changed and fraction of voids decreases. In sandwich layer physical property of outer layer was dominant

  3. Computer prediction of possible toxic action from chemical structure; the DEREK system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, D M; Earnshaw, C G

    1991-07-01

    1. The development of DEREK, a computer-based expert system (derived from the LHASA chemical synthesis design program) for the qualitative prediction of possible toxic action of compounds on the basis of their chemical structure is described. 2. The system is able to perceive chemical sub-structures within molecules and relate these to a rulebase linking the sub-structures with likely types of toxicity. 3. Structures can be drawn in directly at a computer graphics terminal or retrieved automatically from a suitable in-house database. 4. The system is intended to aid the selection of compounds based on toxicological considerations, or separately to indicate specific toxicological properties to be tested for early in the evaluation of a compound, so saving time, money and some laboratory animals and resources.

  4. The relationship between chemical structure and dielectric properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hao [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States)]. E-mail: hao.jiang@wpafb.af.mil; Hong Lianggou [Materials Sci and Tech Applications, LLC, 409 Maple Springs Drive, Dayton OH 45458 (United States); Venkatasubramanian, N. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Grant, John T. [Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-0168 (United States); Eyink, Kurt [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Wiacek, Kevin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Fries-Carr, Sandra [Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, 1950 Fifth Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251 (United States); Enlow, Jesse [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States); Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, 3005 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7707 (United States)

    2007-02-26

    Polymer dielectric films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) have unique properties due to their dense crosslinked bulk structure. These spatially uniform films exhibit good adhesion to a variety of substrates, excellent chemical inertness, high thermal resistance, and are formed from an inexpensive, solvent-free, room temperature process. In this work, we studied the dielectric properties of plasma polymerized (PP) carbon-based polymer thin films prepared from two precursors, benzene and octafluorocyclobutane. Two different monomer feed locations, directly in the plasma zone or in the downstream region (DS) and two different pressures, 80 Pa (high pressure) or 6.7 Pa (low pressure), were used. The chemical structure of the PECVD films was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The dielectric constant ({epsilon} {sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) of the films were investigated over a range of frequencies up to 1 MHz and the dielectric strength (breakdown voltage) (F {sub b}) was characterized by the current-voltage method. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was performed to determine the film thickness and refractive index. Good dielectric properties were exhibited, as PP-benzene films formed in the high pressure, DS region showed a F{sub b} of 610 V/{mu}m, an {epsilon} {sub r} of 3.07, and a tan {delta} of 7.0 x 10{sup -3} at 1 kHz. The PECVD processing pressure has a significant effect on final film structure and the film's physical density has a strong impact on dielectric breakdown strength. Also noted was that the residual oxygen content in the PP-benzene films significantly affected the frequency dependences of the dielectric constant and loss.

  5. Extended Functional Groups (EFG: An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Salmina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a classification system termed “extended functional groups” (EFG, which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  6. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  7. Cuticle Structure in Relation to Chemical Composition: Re-assessing the Prevailing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Victoria; Guzmán-Delgado, Paula; Graça, José; Santos, Sara; Gil, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The surface of most aerial plant organs is covered with a cuticle that provides protection against multiple stress factors including dehydration. Interest on the nature of this external layer dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and since then, several studies facilitated a better understanding of cuticular chemical composition and structure. The prevailing undertanding of the cuticle as a lipidic, hydrophobic layer which is independent from the epidermal cell wall underneath stems from the concept developed by Brongniart and von Mohl during the first half of the 19th century. Such early investigations on plant cuticles attempted to link chemical composition and structure with the existing technologies, and have not been directly challenged for decades. Beginning with a historical overview about the development of cuticular studies, this review is aimed at critically assessing the information available on cuticle chemical composition and structure, considering studies performed with cuticles and isolated cuticular chemical components. The concept of the cuticle as a lipid layer independent from the cell wall is subsequently challenged, based on the existing literature, and on new findings pointing toward the cell wall nature of this layer, also providing examples of different leaf cuticle structures. Finally, the need for a re-assessment of the chemical and structural nature of the plant cuticle is highlighted, considering its cell wall nature and variability among organs, species, developmental stages, and biotic and abiotic factors during plant growth. PMID:27066059

  8. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to refine protein structures to this...

  9. Cuticle structure in relation to chemical composition: re-assessing the prevailing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eFernandez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface of most aerial plant organs is covered with a cuticle that provides protection against multiple stress factors including dehydration. Interest on the nature of this external layer dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and since then, several studies facilitated a better understanding of cuticular chemical composition and structure. The prevailing undertanding of the cuticle as a lipidic, hydrophobic layer which is independent from the epidermal cell wall underneath stems from the concept developed by Brongniart and von Mohl during the first half of the 19th century. Such early investigations on plant cuticles attempted to link chemical composition and structure with the existing technologies, and have not been directly challenged for decades. Beginning with a historical overview about the development of cuticular studies, this review is aimed at critically assessing the information available on cuticle chemical composition and structure, considering studies performed with cuticles and isolated cuticular chemical components. The concept of the cuticle as a lipid layer independent from the cell wall is subsequently challenged, based on the existing literature, and on new findings pointing towards the cell wall nature of this layer, also providing examples of different leaf cuticle structures. Finally, the need for a re-assessment of the chemical and structural nature of the plant cuticle is highlighted, considering its cell wall nature and variability among organs, species, developmental stages, and biotic and abiotic factors during plant growth.

  10. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W.; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D.; Kim, Kwang S.; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-01

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  11. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  12. Information Theory and Voting Based Consensus Clustering for Combining Multiple Clusterings of Chemical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Faisal; Salim, Naomie; Abdo, Ammar

    2013-07-01

    Many consensus clustering methods have been applied in different areas such as pattern recognition, machine learning, information theory and bioinformatics. However, few methods have been used for chemical compounds clustering. In this paper, an information theory and voting based algorithm (Adaptive Cumulative Voting-based Aggregation Algorithm A-CVAA) was examined for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. The effectiveness of clusterings was evaluated based on the ability of the clustering method to separate active from inactive molecules in each cluster, and the results were compared with Ward's method. The chemical dataset MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) and the Maximum Unbiased Validation (MUV) dataset were used. Experiments suggest that the adaptive cumulative voting-based consensus method can improve the effectiveness of combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures.

  13. Improved Chemical Structure-Activity Modeling Through Data Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Extending the original training data with simulated unobserved data points has proven powerful to increase both the generalization ability of predictive models and their robustness against changes in the structure of data (e.g., systematic drifts in the response variable) in diverse areas such as the analysis of spectroscopic data or the detection of conserved domains in protein sequences. In this contribution, we explore the effect of data augmentation in the predictive power of QSAR models, quantified by the RMSE values on the test set. We collected 8 diverse data sets from the literature and ChEMBL version 19 reporting compound activity as pIC50 values. The original training data were replicated (i.e., augmented) N times (N ∈ 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), and these replications were perturbed with Gaussian noise (μ = 0, σ = σnoise) on either (i) the pIC50 values, (ii) the compound descriptors, (iii) both the compound descriptors and the pIC50 values, or (iv) none of them. The effect of data augmentation was evaluated across three different algorithms (RF, GBM, and SVM radial) and two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints and physicochemical-property-based descriptors). The influence of all factor levels was analyzed with a balanced fixed-effect full-factorial experiment. Overall, data augmentation constantly led to increased predictive power on the test set by 10-15%. Injecting noise on (i) compound descriptors or on (ii) both compound descriptors and pIC50 values led to the highest drop of RMSEtest values (from 0.67-0.72 to 0.60-0.63 pIC50 units). The maximum increase in predictive power provided by data augmentation is reached when the training data is replicated one time. Therefore, extending the original training data with one perturbed repetition thereof represents a reasonable trade-off between the increased performance of the models and the computational cost of data augmentation, namely increase of (i) model complexity due to the need for optimizing

  14. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...... QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift...

  15. Influence of the chemical structure of functional monomers on their adhesive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, K L; Yoshida, Y; Hirata, I; Snauwaert, J; De Munck, J; Okazaki, M; Suzuki, K; Lambrechts, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2008-08-01

    Functional monomers in adhesive systems can improve bonding by enhancing wetting and demineralization, and by chemical bonding to calcium. This study tested the hypothesis that small changes in the chemical structure of functional monomers may improve their bonding effectiveness. Three experimental phosphonate monomers (HAEPA, EAEPA, and MAEPA), with slightly different chemical structures, and 10-MDP (control) were evaluated. Adhesive performance was determined in terms of microtensile bond strength of 4 cements that differed only for the functional monomer. Based on the Adhesion-Decalcification concept, the chemical bonding potential was assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry of the dissolution rate of the calcium salt of the functional monomers. High bond strength of the adhesive cement corresponded to low dissolution rate of the calcium salt of the respective functional monomer. The latter is according to the Adhesion-Decalcification concept, suggestive of a high chemical bonding capacity. We conclude that the adhesive performance of an adhesive material depends on the chemical structure of the functional monomer.

  16. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    2005-01-01

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain architec

  17. Surface Nano Structures Manufacture Using Batch Chemical Processing Methods for Tooling Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Calaon, Matteo; Gavillet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The patterning of large surface areas with nano structures by using chemical batch processes to avoid using highenergy intensive nano machining processes was investigated. The capability of different surface treatment methods of creating micro and nano structured adaptable mould inserts...... for subsequent polymer replication by injection moulding was analyzed. New tooling solutions to produce nano structured mould surfaces were investigated. Experiments based on three different chemical-based-batch techniques to establish surface nano (i.e. sub-μm) structures on large areas were performed. Three...... approaches were selected: (1) using Ø500 nm nano beads deposition for direct patterning of a 4” silicon wafer; (2) using Ø500 nm nano beads deposition as mask for 4” silicon wafer etching and subsequent nickel electroplating; (3) using the anodizing process to produce Ø500 nm structures on a 30x80 mm2...

  18. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  19. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in isostructural dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheimer, Benjamin D; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-04-10

    Porous crystalline dipeptides have gained recent attention for their potential as gas-storage materials. Within this large class is a group of dipeptides containing alanine, valine, and isoleucine with very similar crystal structures. We report the (13)C (carbonyl and Cα) and (15)N (amine and amide) solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shifts in a series of seven such isostructural porous dipeptides as well as shift tensor data for the carbonyl and amide sites. Using their known crystal structures and aided by ab initio quantum chemical calculations for the resonance assignments, we elucidate trends relating local structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and chemical shift. We find good correlation between the backbone dihedral angles and the Cα1 and Cα2 shifts. For the C1 shift tensor, the δ11 value shifts downfield as the hydrogen-bond distance increases, δ22 shifts upfield, and δ33 shows little variation. The C2 shift tensor shows no appreciable correlation with structural parameters. For the N2 tensor, δ11 shows little dependence on the hydrogen-bond length, whereas δ22 and δ33 both show a decrease in shielding as the hydrogen bond shortens. Our analysis teases apart some, but not all, structural contributors to the observed differences the solid-state NMR chemical shifts.

  20. Influence of Chemical Conditions on the Nanoporous Structure of Silicate Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Sinkó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica or various silicate aerogels can be characterized by highly porous, open cell, low density structures. The synthesis parameters influence the three-dimensional porous structures by modifying the kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis and condensation processes. Numerous investigations have shown that the structure of porous materials can be tailored by variations in synthesis conditions (e.g., the type of precursors, catalyst, and surfactants; the ratio of water/precursor; the concentrations; the medium pH; and the solvent. The objectives of this review are to summarize and elucidate the effects of chemical conditions on the nanoporous structure of sol-gel derived silicate aerogels.

  1. Chemical structure and physical properties of radiation-induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Akihiro E-mail: aks@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Katoh, Etsuko; Tabata, Yoneho

    2001-07-01

    The chemical structure and physical properties of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that has been crosslinked by radiation have been studied by various methods. It has been found that a Y-type crosslinking structure and a Y-type structure incorporating a double bond (modified Y-type) is formed in PTFE by radiation-crosslinking in the molten state. In addition, various types of double bond structures, excluding the crosslinking site, have been identified. The crosslinked PTFE has a good light transparency due to the loss of crystallites, whilst it retains the excellent properties of electrical insulation and heat resistance. The coefficient of abrasion and the permanent creep are also greatly improved by crosslinking.

  2. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  3. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  4. PPM-One: a static protein structure based chemical shift predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dawei; Brüschweiler, Rafael, E-mail: bruschweiler.1@osu.edu [The Ohio State University, Campus Chemical Instrument Center (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We mined the most recent editions of the BioMagResDataBank and the protein data bank to parametrize a new empirical knowledge-based chemical shift predictor of protein backbone atoms using either a linear or an artificial neural network model. The resulting chemical shift predictor PPM-One accepts a single static 3D structure as input and emulates the effect of local protein dynamics via interatomic steric contacts. Furthermore, the chemical shift prediction was extended to most side-chain protons and it is found that the prediction accuracy is at a level allowing an independent assessment of stereospecific assignments. For a previously established set of test proteins some overall improvement was achieved over current top-performing chemical shift prediction programs.

  5. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF COMONOMERS ON THE PROPERTIES OF COPOLYESTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Rongrui; GAO Jing; LI Huiping

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different kinds of comonomers with or without flexible chain on properties of copolyesters, such as transition temperature, crystallization velocity, crystallinity and size of crystallites, is studied. The experimental results indicate the obvious difference in properties between comonomers with iso- and ortho-structure of phenyl ring and comonomers with flexible chain. The influence of chemical structure of comonomers on properties of copolyesters is discussed.

  6. Ascaroside activity in Caenorhabditis elegans is highly dependent on chemical structure

    OpenAIRE

    Hollister, Kyle A.; Conner, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Xinxing; Spell, Mark; Bernard, Gary M.; Patel, Pratik; de Carvalho, Ana Carolina G.V.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Ragains, Justin R.

    2013-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides, structurally diverse derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, and uses them in chemical communication. At high population densities, specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In order to study the structure-activity relationships for the ascarosides, we synthesized a panel of ascarosides and tested them for dauer-inducing activity. This pane...

  7. Clustering and rule-based classifications of chemical structures evaluated in the biological activity space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Brown, Nathan; Ertl, Peter; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Selzer, Paul; Hamon, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Classification methods for data sets of molecules according to their chemical structure were evaluated for their biological relevance, including rule-based, scaffold-oriented classification methods and clustering based on molecular descriptors. Three data sets resulting from uniformly determined in vitro biological profiling experiments were classified according to their chemical structures, and the results were compared in a Pareto analysis with the number of classes and their average spread in the profile space as two concurrent objectives which were to be minimized. It has been found that no classification method is overall superior to all other studied methods, but there is a general trend that rule-based, scaffold-oriented methods are the better choice if classes with homogeneous biological activity are required, but a large number of clusters can be tolerated. On the other hand, clustering based on chemical fingerprints is superior if fewer and larger classes are required, and some loss of homogeneity in biological activity can be accepted.

  8. Structural analysis of some marine kerogens through a combined chemical and thermal degradation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höld, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the sedimentary organic matter in the geosphere exists in the form of kerogen, a macromolecular substance that is insoluble in water and normal organic solvents. There have been numerous attempts to elucidate the chemical structure of kerogens since kerogen is the main precursor

  9. Using NMR chemical shifts to calculate the propensity for structural order and disorder in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamiola, Kamil; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy offers the unique possibility to relate the structural propensities of disordered proteins and loop segments of folded peptides to biological function and aggregation behaviour. Backbone chemical shifts are ideally suited for this task, provided that appropriate reference data are a

  10. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  11. Structures and Chemical Equilibria of Some N-Heterocycles Containing Amide Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Abd El Moneim

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Structures and chemical equilibria of 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (1, 5,6-diphenyl-3-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazine (2, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (3 and 2-mercapto-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine hydrochloride (4 are reported. Their electronic transitions are assigned and pK values are evaluated and discussed.

  12. Chemical signals turn on guest binding through structural reconfiguration of triangular helicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne; Castilla, Ana M.; Ronson, Tanya K.;

    2013-01-01

    Be my guest: The function of a system based on self-assembled Zn(II) complexes can be controlled by external chemical stimuli. The complexes are based on a C3 -symmetric ligand that forms a unique triangular triple helicate structure 1. Upon subcomponent substitution, 1 is able to transform...

  13. Physico-Chemical and Structural Properties of DeNOx and SO2 Oxidation Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masters, Stephen Grenville; Oehlers, Cord; Nielsen, Kurt;

    1996-01-01

    Commercial catalysts for NOx removal and SO2 oxidation and their model systems have been investigated by spectroscopic, thermal, electrochemical and X-ray methods. Structural information on the vanadium complexes and compounds as well as physico-chemical properties for catalyst model systems have...... been obtained. The results are discussed in relation to proposed reaction mechanisms....

  14. Using Concept Mapping to Uncover Students' Knowledge Structures of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nikita L.; Mooring, Suazette Reid

    2015-01-01

    General chemistry is the first undergraduate course in which students further develop their understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. Many of these fundamental topics highlight the numerous conceptual interconnections present in chemistry. However, many students possess incoherent knowledge structures regarding these topics. Therefore,…

  15. Test results of chemical reactivity test (CRT) analysis of structural materials and explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.; Walters, R.R.; Haws, L.D.; Collins, L.W.

    1980-03-21

    The chemical reactivity test, CRT, is a procedure used to screen the compatibility of component structure materials with explosives. This report contains the results of CRT materials evaluations conducted at Mound Facility. Data about materials combinations are catalogued both under the name of the explosive and the nonexplosive.

  16. Nanostructured PLD-grown gadolinia doped ceria: Chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Heiroth, Sebastian;

    2011-01-01

    The morphology as well as the spatially resolved elemental and chemical characterization of 10 mol% gadolinia doped ceria (CGO10) structures prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique are investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy accompanied with electron energy loss spec...

  17. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  18. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain architecture and natural product inspired compound library design. Domains and proteins identified as being structurally similar in their ligand-sensing cores are grouped in a protein structure similarity cluster (PSSC). Natural products can be considered as evolutionary pre-validated ligands for multiple proteins and therefore natural products that are known to interact with one of the PSSC member proteins are selected as guiding structures for compound library synthesis. Application of this novel strategy for compound library design provided enhanced hit rates in small compound libraries for structurally similar proteins.

  19. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations.

  20. A script for automated 3-dimentional structure generation and conformer search from 2- dimentional chemical drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Building 3-dimensional (3D) molecules is the starting point in molecular modeling. Conformer search and identification of a global energy minimum structure are often performed computationally during spectral analysis of data from NMR, IR, and VCD or during rational drug design through ligand-based, structure-based, and QSAR approaches. I herein report a convenient script that allows for automated building of 3D structures and conformer searching from 2-dimensional (2D) drawing of chemical structures. With this Bash shell script, which runs on Mac OS X and the Linux platform, the tasks are consecutively and iteratively executed without a 3D molecule builder via the command line interface of the free (academic) software OpenBabel, Balloon, and MOPAC2012. A large number of 2D chemical drawing files can be processed simultaneously, and the script functions with stereoisomers. Semi-empirical quantum chemical calculation ensures reliable ranking of the generated conformers on the basis of energy. In addition to an energy-sorted list of file names of the conformers, their Gaussian input files are provided for ab initio and density functional theory calculations to predict rigorous electronic energies, structures, and properties. This script is freely available to all scientists.

  1. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  2. Chemical structure and pharmacokinetics of novel quinolone agents represented by avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bela; Domokos, J; Szabo, D

    2016-05-23

    Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents with a basic chemical structure of bicyclic ring. Fluorine atom at position C-6 and various substitutions on the basic quinolone structure yielded fluoroquinolones, namely norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and numerous other agents. The target molecules of quinolones and fluoroquinolones are bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. Broad-spectrum and excellent tissue penetration make fluoroquinolones potent agents but their toxic side effects and increasing number of resistant pathogens set limits on their use. This review focuses on recent advances concerning quinolones and fluoroquinolones, we will be summarising chemical structure, mode of action, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. We will be describing fluoroquinolones introduced in clinical trials, namely avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and non-fluorinated nemonoxacin. These agents have been proved to have enhanced antibacterial effect even against ciprofloxacin resistant pathogens, and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features are going to make them potential antimicrobial agents in the future.

  3. Quantitative Survey and Structural Classification of Fracking Chemicals Reported in Unconventional Gas Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Martin; Schreglmann, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    additives reported for use in hydraulic fracturing. For the years 2005-2009 it is based on the Waxman report, and for the years 2011-2013 it relies on the database FracFocus, where it makes use of the data extracted and provided by the website "SkyTruth". For the first time, we list fracking chemicals according to their chemical structure and functional groups, because these properties are important as a starting point for (i) the design of analytical methods, (ii) to assess environmental fate and (iii) to understand why a given chemical is used at a certain stage of the fracturing process and what possible alternatives exist.

  4. The chemical and magnetic structures of holmium-yttrium and holmium-lutetium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMorrow, D.F.; Jehan, D.A.; Swaddling, P.P.;

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the chemical and magnetic structures of Ho/Y and Ho/Lu superlattices, all grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By combining the results of high-resolution X-ray diffraction with detailed modelling we show that the superlattices have high crystallographic integrity......: the average structural coherence length in the growth direction is approximately 2000 angstrom, while the interfaces between the two elements are well defined, extending over approximately four lattice planes. The magnetic structures were determined using neutron scattering techniques. In the case of the Ho...

  5. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  6. A Study on the Structural Analysis of Controllability in Chemical Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.W.; Kim, Y.S.; Yoon, E.S. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    Chemical processes are highly nonlinear, multivariable systems and have complex structures. However, the controllability evaluation procedures are complicated, and the required information is very often unknown at the early design stage. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a procedure to evaluate and enhance controllability while designing processes and plants. To evaluate controllability in the design stage, it is most efficient to analyze process structure. Relative order can be used as a measure of 'physical closeness' between input and output variable. Structural controllability analysis using relative order is shown to be effective in a case study of heat exchanger network synthesis. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach. 1. Examples and the carbon metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold

    2015-02-21

    In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead to complex network systems like metabolic networks. One experimental approach to the dynamics of such systems examines their "sensitivity": each enzyme mediating a reaction in the system is increased/decreased or knocked out separately, and the responses in the concentrations of chemicals or their fluxes are observed. In this study, we present a mathematical method, named structural sensitivity analysis, to determine the sensitivity of reaction systems from information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction network depend on the structure of the network, and on the position of the perturbed reaction in the network. We establish and prove some general rules which relate the sensitivity response to the structure of the underlying network. We describe a hierarchical pattern in the flux response which is governed by branchings in the network. We apply our method to several hypothetical and real life chemical reaction networks, including the metabolic network of the Escherichia coli TCA cycle.

  8. Chemical structures of constituents from the whole plant of Bacopa monniera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tomoe; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Oda, Yoshimi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Fukaya, Masashi; Yano, Mamiko; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Two new dammarane-type triterpene oligoglycosides, bacomosaponins A and B, and three new phenylethanoid glycosides, bacomosides A, B1, and B2, were isolated from the whole plant of Bacopa monniera Wettst. The chemical structures of the new constituents were characterized on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. In the present study, bacomosaponins A and B with acyl groups were obtained from the whole plant of B. monniera. This is the first report of acylated dammarane-type triterpene oligoglycosides isolated from B. monniera. In addition, dammarane-type triterpene saponins significantly inhibited the aggregation of 42-mer amyloid β-protein.

  9. In situ chemical and structural investigations of the oxidation of Ge(001) substrates by atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Alessandro; Bhuiyan, Md. Nurul Kabir; Tallarida, Grazia; Fanciulli, Marco

    2006-08-01

    The exposure of Ge(001) substrates to atomic oxygen was studied in situ to establish the stability of the germanium oxide. After preparing chemically clean and atomically flat Ge(001) surfaces, the Ge samples were exposed to atomic oxygen in a wide temperature range from room temperature to 400°C. The chemical composition of the so-formed oxides was studied by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while the structure was observed by reflection high energy electron diffraction. At low substrate temperatures the atomic oxygen is efficiently chemisorbed and suboxides coexist with the dioxide, which in turn is remarkably promoted in the high temperature range.

  10. Chemical structure of vanadium-based contact formation on n-AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pookpanratana, S.; France, R.; Blum, M.; Bell, A.; Bar, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hofmann, T.; Fuchs, O.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J. D.; Mulcahy, S.; Moustakas, T. D.; Heske, Clemens

    2010-05-17

    We have investigated the chemical interaction between a Au/V/Al/V layer structure and n-type AlN epilayers using soft x-ray photoemission, x-ray emission spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. To understand the complex processes involved in this multicomponent system, we have studied the interface before and after a rapid thermal annealing step. We find the formation of a number of chemical phases at the interface, including VN, metallic vanadium, aluminum oxide, and metallic gold. An interaction mechanism for metal contact formation on the entire n-(Al,Ga)N system is proposed.

  11. On the Mathematical Structure of Balanced Chemical Reaction Networks Governed by Mass Action Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    van der Schaft, Arjan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the interplay between graph theory, dynamics, and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics. For reaction networks possessing a thermodynamic equilibrium we derive a compact formulation exhibiting at the same time the structure of the complex graph and the stoichiometry of the network, and which admits a direct thermodynamical interpretation. This formulation allows us to easily characterize the set of equilibria and their stability properties. Furthermore, we develop a framework for interconnection of chemical reaction networks. Finally we discuss how the established framework leads to a new approach for model reduction.

  12. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  13. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  14. Protein structure similarity clustering and natural product structure as guiding principles for chemical genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M A; Waldmann, H

    2006-01-01

    The majority of all proteins are modularly built from a limited set of approximately 1,000 structural domains. The knowledge of a common protein fold topology in the ligand-sensing cores of protein domains can be exploited for the design of small-molecule libraries in the development of inhibitors and ligands. Thus, a novel strategy of clustering protein domain cores based exclusively on structure similarity considerations (protein structure similarity clustering, PSSC) has been successfully applied to the development of small-molecule inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and the 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases based on the structure of a naturally occurring Cdc25 inhibitor. The efficiency of making use of the scaffolds of natural products as biologically prevalidated starting points for the design of compound libraries is further highlighted by the development of benzopyran-based FXR ligands.

  15. Effect of chemical substituents on the structure of glassy diphenyl polycarbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulatha, M S; Natarajan, Upendra

    2011-02-24

    Polycarbonates offer a wide variety of physical property behavior that is difficult to predict due to complexities at the molecular scale. Here, the physical structure of amorphous glassy polycarbonates having aliphatic and cycloaliphatic chemical groups is explored through atomistic simulations. The influence of chemical structure on solubility parameter, torsion distributions, radial distribution function, scattering structure factor, orientation distributions of phenylene rings and carbonate groups, and free volume distributions, leading to interchain packing effects, are shown. The effect of the cyclohexyl ring at the isopropylidene carbon as compared to the effect of the methyl groups positioned on the phenylene rings results in a larger reduction in the solubility parameter (δ). The interchain distance estimated for polycarbonates in this work is in the range of 5-5.8 Å. The o-methyl groups on the phenylene rings, as compared to a cyclohexyl ring, lead to higher interchain distances. The highest interchain distance is observed with a trimethylcyclohexylidene group at the isopropylidene carbon. Atomistic simulations reveal two different types of packing arrangement of nearest-neighbor chains in the glassy state, one type of which agrees with the NMR experimental data. The fundamental insights provided here can be utilized for design of chemical structures for tailored macroscopic properties.

  16. Chemical and Conformational Diversity of Modified Nucleosides Affects tRNA Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Y. P. Väre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are central to all gene expression through the control of protein synthesis. Four major nucleosides, adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine, compose RNAs and provide sequence variation, but are limited in contributions to structural variation as well as distinct chemical properties. The ability of RNAs to play multiple roles in cellular metabolism is made possible by extensive variation in length, conformational dynamics, and the over 100 post-transcriptional modifications. There are several reviews of the biochemical pathways leading to RNA modification, but the physicochemical nature of modified nucleosides and how they facilitate RNA function is of keen interest, particularly with regard to the contributions of modified nucleosides. Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are the most extensively modified RNAs. The diversity of modifications provide versatility to the chemical and structural environments. The added chemistry, conformation and dynamics of modified nucleosides occurring at the termini of stems in tRNA’s cloverleaf secondary structure affect the global three-dimensional conformation, produce unique recognition determinants for macromolecules to recognize tRNAs, and affect the accurate and efficient decoding ability of tRNAs. This review will discuss the impact of specific chemical moieties on the structure, stability, electrochemical properties, and function of tRNAs.

  17. Development of new materials and structures based on managed physical-chemical factors of local interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakov, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states that assigning certain physical and chemical characteristics to pills and medical drugs solutions can substitute for the development of new drugs (which is essentially equivalent to the creation of new medicines). It is established that the purposeful change of physical and chemical characteristics of the standard ("old") materials (in other words, the known substances) is fundamental for the production of solid and liquid medicines, which allows us to get "new" structures and materials. The paper shows that assigning new physical and chemical properties to "old" materials and their further usage for the production of tablets and solutions from the "old" and well-known medicines can turn even very "old" medicine into very "novel" (moreover, even very fashionable) one with unprecedented (fantastic) pharmacological activity and new mechanisms of action.

  18. Ascaroside activity in Caenorhabditis elegans is highly dependent on chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Kyle A; Conner, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Xinxing; Spell, Mark; Bernard, Gary M; Patel, Pratik; de Carvalho, Ana Carolina G V; Butcher, Rebecca A; Ragains, Justin R

    2013-09-15

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides, structurally diverse derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, and uses them in chemical communication. At high population densities, specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In order to study the structure-activity relationships for the ascarosides, we synthesized a panel of ascarosides and tested them for dauer-inducing activity. This panel includes a number of natural ascarosides that were detected in crude pheromone extract, but as yet have no assigned function, as well as many unnatural ascaroside derivatives. Most of these ascarosides, some of which have significant structural similarity to the natural dauer pheromone components, have very little dauer-inducing activity. Our results provide a primer to ascaroside structure-activity relationships and suggest that slight modifications to ascaroside structure dramatically influence binding to the relevant G protein-coupled receptors that control dauer formation.

  19. Chemical-mechanical stability of the hierarchical structure of shell nacre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hierarchical structure and mechanical property of shell nacre are experimentally investigated from the new aspects of chemical stability and chemistry-mechanics coupling. Through chemical deproteinization or demineralization methods together with characterization techniques at micro/nano scales,it is found that the nacre of abalone,haliotis discus hannai,contains a hierarchical structure stacked with irregular aragonite platelets and interplatelet organic matrix thin layers. Yet the aragonite platelet itself is a nanocomposite consisting of nanoparticles and intraplatelet organic matrix framework. The mean diameter of the nanoparticles and the distribution of framework are quite different for different platelets. Though the interplatelet and in-traplatelet organic matrix can be both decomposed by sodium hydroxide solution,the chemical stability of individual aragonite platelets is much higher than that of the microstructure stacked with them. Further,macroscopic bending test or nanoindentation experiment is performed on the micro/nanostructure of nacre after sodium hydroxide treatment. It is found that the Young’s modulus of both the stacked microstructure and nanocomposite platelet reduced. The reduction of the microstructure is more remark than that of the platelet. Therefore the chemical-mechanical stability of the nanocomposite platelet itself is much higher than that of the stacked microstructure of nacre.

  20. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  1. Comparison of the 'chemical' and 'structural' approaches to the optimization of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tatarinova

    Full Text Available Noncanonically structured DNA aptamers to thrombin were examined. Two different approaches were used to improve stability, binding affinity and biological activity of a known thrombin-binding aptamer. These approaches are chemical modification and the addition of a duplex module to the aptamer core structure. Several chemically modified aptamers and the duplex-bearing ones were all studied under the same conditions by a set of widely known and some relatively new methods. A number of the thrombin-binding aptamer analogs have demonstrated improved characteristics. Most importantly, the study allowed us to compare directly the two approaches to aptamer optimization and to analyze their relative advantages and disadvantages as well as their potential in drug design and fundamental studies.

  2. Hierarchically structured photonic crystals for integrated chemical separation and colorimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qianqian; Zhu, Biting; Ge, Jianping

    2017-02-16

    A SiO2 colloidal photonic crystal film with a hierarchical porous structure is fabricated to demonstrate an integrated separation and colorimetric detection of chemical species for the first time. This new photonic crystal based thin layer chromatography process requires no dyeing, developing and UV irradiation compared to the traditional TLC. The assembling of mesoporous SiO2 particles via a supersaturation-induced-precipitation process forms uniform and hierarchical photonic crystals with micron-scale cracks and mesopores, which accelerate the diffusion of developers and intensify the adsorption/desorption between the analytes and silica for efficient separation. Meanwhile, the chemical substances infiltrated to the voids of photonic crystals cause an increase of the refractive index and a large contrast of structural colors towards the unloaded part, so that the sample spots can be directly recognized with the naked eye before and after separation.

  3. Probing native protein structures by chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alexander; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Kahraman, Abdullah; Herzog, Franz; Rinner, Oliver; Beck, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2010-08-01

    Chemical cross-linking of reactive groups in native proteins and protein complexes in combination with the identification of cross-linked sites by mass spectrometry has been in use for more than a decade. Recent advances in instrumentation, cross-linking protocols, and analysis software have led to a renewed interest in this technique, which promises to provide important information about native protein structure and the topology of protein complexes. In this article, we discuss the critical steps of chemical cross-linking and its implications for (structural) biology: reagent design and cross-linking protocols, separation and mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked samples, dedicated software for data analysis, and the use of cross-linking data for computational modeling. Finally, the impact of protein cross-linking on various biological disciplines is highlighted.

  4. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  5. Chemical descriptors, convexity and structure of density matrices in molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bochicchio, Roberto C

    2015-01-01

    The electron energy and density matrices in molecular systems are convex in respect of the number of particles. So that, the chemical descriptors based on their derivatives present the hamper of discontinuities for isolated systems and consequently higher order derivatives are undefined. The introduction of the interaction between the physical domain with an environment induces a coherent structure for the density matrix in the grand-canonical formulation suppressing the discontinuities leading to the proper definitions of the descriptors.

  6. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited nonstoichiometric copper indium diselenide films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Bari; L A Patil; P P Patil

    2006-10-01

    Thin films of copper indium diselenide (CIS) were prepared by chemical bath deposition technique onto glass substrate at temperature, 60°C. The studies on composition, morphology, optical absorption, electrical conductivity and structure of the films were carried out and discussed. Characterization included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and absorption spectroscopy. The results are discussed and interpreted.

  7. Chemical structure of the O-polysaccharide isolated from Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI 1039.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Marszewska, Kinga; Bychowska, Anna; Dziadziuszko, Halina; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Łojkowska, Ewa; Stepnowski, Piotr; Kaczyński, Zbigniew

    2011-12-27

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI 1039 was hydrolyzed and the products were separated. A study of the obtained O-polysaccharide by means of chemical methods, GLC, GLC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy allowed us to identify a branched polymer with a pentasaccharide repeating unit of the structure shown below, in which the fucose residue was partially O-acetylated at C-2, C-3 or C-4.

  8. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels.

  9. Chemically gated electronic structure of a superconducting doped topological insulator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, L. A.; Xu, S.; Neupane, M.; Fedorov, A. V.; Hor, Y. S.; Cava, R. J.; Hasan, M. Z.

    2013-07-01

    Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy is used to observe changes in the electronic structure of bulk-doped topological insulator CuxBi2Se3 as additional copper atoms are deposited onto the cleaved crystal surface. Carrier density and surface-normal electrical field strength near the crystal surface are estimated to consider the effect of chemical surface gating on atypical superconducting properties associated with topological insulator order, such as the dynamics of theoretically predicted Majorana Fermion vortices.

  10. Analysis of the relationship between the structure and aromatic properties of chemical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debska, Barbara; Guzowska-Swider, Barbara

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the relationship between the structure and odour properties of a selection of chemical compounds. The research concerns five groups of esters, each with a different smell: almond, apricot, apple, pineapple and rose. The supposed relationship between the smell and certain selected attributes of each molecule was examined by various pattern recognition techniques using programs developed in the Department of Computer Chemistry at Rzeszów University of Technology.

  11. Relationship between the antitrichinellous effect of seven derivates of benzimidazolecarbamates and their chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldonová, R; Corba, J

    1979-01-01

    The efficacy of seven more recently developed anthelmintics of the benzimidazolecarbamate group, i. e., parbendazole, mebendazole, fenbendazole, oxibendazole, cambendazole, oxfendazole and albendazole, has been tested in a series of experiments on white mice artifically infected with Trichinella spiralis. Our results disclosed a relationship between their anthelmintic effect and their chemical structure. This finding might be of importance in a targeted synthesis of new, effective, derivates of benzimidazole, e. g., in the therapy of trichinellosis and in the choice of the most effective drug.

  12. Processing of poly(lactic acid): characterization of chemical structure, thermal stability and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Alonso, Félix Ángel; Pagès Figueras, Pere; Gamez Pérez, José; Santana Pérez, Orlando Onofre; Maspoch Rulduà, Mª Lluïsa

    2010-01-01

    The processing of poly(lactic acid) (injection and extrusion/injection) as well as annealing of processed materials were studied in order to analyze the variation of its chemical structure, thermal degradation and mechanical properties. Processing of PLA was responsible for a decrease in molecular weight, as determined by GPC, due to chain scission. The degree of crystallinity was evaluated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. It was found that mech...

  13. Survey of marine natural product structure revisions: a synergy of spectroscopy and chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Takashi L; Gerwick, William H; McPhail, Kerry L

    2011-11-15

    The structural assignment of new natural product molecules supports research in a multitude of disciplines that may lead to new therapeutic agents and or new understanding of disease biology. However, reports of numerous structural revisions, even of recently elucidated natural products, inspired the present survey of techniques used in structural misassignments and subsequent revisions in the context of constitutional or configurational errors. Given the comparatively recent development of marine natural products chemistry, coincident with modern spectroscopy, it is of interest to consider the relative roles of spectroscopy and chemical synthesis in the structure elucidation and revision of those marine natural products that were initially misassigned. Thus, a tabulated review of all marine natural product structural revisions from 2005 to 2010 is organized according to structural motif revised. Misassignments of constitution are more frequent than perhaps anticipated by reliance on HMBC and other advanced NMR experiments, especially when considering the full complement of all natural products. However, these techniques also feature prominently in structural revisions, specifically of marine natural products. Nevertheless, as is the case for revision of relative and absolute configuration, total synthesis is a proven partner for marine, as well as terrestrial, natural products structure elucidation. It also becomes apparent that considerable 'detective work' remains in structure elucidation, in spite of the spectacular advances in spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding and quantitative (for predicting mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA; all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy-methyl]-6-(phenylthiothymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1 and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis, respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  15. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  16. Improved performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell using the stack structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Qin, Bangyu; Luo, Yong; Hou, Yanping

    2012-07-01

    The microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) is a device to desalinate seawater, and produce acid and alkali. The objective of this study was to enhance the desalination and chemical-production performance of the MEDCC using two types of stack structure. Experiments were conducted with different membrane spacings, numbers of desalination chambers and applied voltages. Results showed that the stack construction in the MEDCC enhanced the desalination and chemical-production rates. The maximal desalination rate of 0.58 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which was 43% higher than that in the MEDCC, was achieved in the four-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 1.5mm. The maximal acid- and alkali-production rates of 0.079 ± 0.006 and 0.13 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which were 46% and 8% higher than that in the MEDCC, respectively, were achieved in the two-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the BPM-AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 3mm.

  17. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li4Pt3Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, S. F.; Pöttgen, R.; Al Alam, A. F.; Ouaini, N.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic structure of rhombohedral Li4Pt3Si (space group R32) is examined from ab initio with an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding relating to the presence of different Li and Pt Wyckoff sites. The structure with totally de-intercalated Li keeps the characteristics of the pristine compound with a reduction of the volume albeit with less cohesive energy. The binding energies of Li point to different bonding intensities according to their different Wyckoff sites and indicate the possibility of delithiation.

  18. Predicting physical-chemical properties of compounds from molecular structures by recursive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernazzani, Luca; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Mollica, Vincenzo; Sperduti, Alessandro; Starita, Antonina; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the potential of a recently developed neural network for structures applied to the prediction of physical chemical properties of compounds. The proposed recursive neural network (RecNN) model is able to directly take as input a structured representation of the molecule and to model a direct and adaptive relationship between the molecular structure and target property. Therefore, it combines in a learning system the flexibility and general advantages of a neural network model with the representational power of a structured domain. As a result, a completely new approach to quantitative structure-activity relationship/quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR/QSAR) analysis is obtained. An original representation of the molecular structures has been developed accounting for both the occurrence of specific atoms/groups and the topological relationships among them. Gibbs free energy of solvation in water, Delta(solv)G degrees , has been chosen as a benchmark for the model. The different approaches proposed in the literature for the prediction of this property have been reconsidered from a general perspective. The advantages of RecNN as a suitable tool for the automatization of fundamental parts of the QSPR/QSAR analysis have been highlighted. The RecNN model has been applied to the analysis of the Delta(solv)G degrees in water of 138 monofunctional acyclic organic compounds and tested on an external data set of 33 compounds. As a result of the statistical analysis, we obtained, for the predictive accuracy estimated on the test set, correlation coefficient R = 0.9985, standard deviation S = 0.68 kJ mol(-1), and mean absolute error MAE = 0.46 kJ mol(-1). The inherent ability of RecNN to abstract chemical knowledge through the adaptive learning process has been investigated by principal components analysis of the internal representations computed by the network. It has been found that the model recognizes the chemical compounds on the

  19. Damascene Array Structure of Phase Change Memory Fabricated with Chemical Mechanical Polishing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi-Bin; SONG Zhi-Tang; ZHANG Kai-Liang; WANG Liang-Yong; FENG Song-Lin; CHEN Bomy

    2006-01-01

    @@ A damascene structure of phase change memory (PCM) is fabricated successfully with the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) method, and the CMP of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) and Ti films is investigated. The polished surface of wafer is analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The measurements show that the damascene device structure of phase change memory is achieved by the CMP process.After the top electrode is deposited, dc sweeping test on PCM reveals that the phase change can be observed.The threshold current of array cells varies between 0.90mA and 1.15mA.

  20. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest.

  1. Preparation of melanin from Catharsius molossus L. and preliminary study on its chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chao; Ma, Jia-hua; Tan, Cheng-jia; Yang, Zhou; Ye, Feng; Long, Chan; Ye, Shuang; Hou, Da-bin

    2015-04-01

    A great deal of melanin was found in the waste alkali liquor produced by extraction of chitin from Catharsius molossus L. Discarding the lye could harm the environment and cause waste of resources. In this paper, melanin from C. molossus L. was recovered through acid precipitation and purified by pepsin and so on. The purity, chemical composition and structure of the prepared melanin were explored by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high resolution (13)C Cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, X ray diffraction, X ray fluorescence, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight tandem mass spectrometry, thermal analysis, and so on. The results showed that the purity of the prepared melanin was higher than the commercial standard melanin and it was a kind of nanoaggregates composed of a large quantity of 5,6-dihydroxyindole eumelanin and a small amount of phaeomelanin. In addition, the prepared melanin was irregular in shape and its structure could be divided into three levels: advanced structure maintained by polypeptides, substructure maintained by the ferric ion and microstructure. In particular, the smallest structural unit showed the graphite-like layered structure containing five layers linked by non-covalent bonds and each layer mainly consisted of 5,6-dihydroxyindole and its derivatives, which might be connected to each other through various chemical bonds.

  2. Chemical cross-linking and native mass spectrometry: A fruitful combination for structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinz, Andrea; Arlt, Christian; Chorev, Dror; Sharon, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming increasingly popular in the field of structural biology for analyzing protein three-dimensional-structures and for mapping protein-protein interactions. In this review, the specific contributions of chemical crosslinking and native MS are outlined to reveal the structural features of proteins and protein assemblies. Both strategies are illustrated based on the examples of the tetrameric tumor suppressor protein p53 and multisubunit vinculin-Arp2/3 hybrid complexes. We describe the distinct advantages and limitations of each technique and highlight synergistic effects when both techniques are combined. Integrating both methods is especially useful for characterizing large protein assemblies and for capturing transient interactions. We also point out the future directions we foresee for a combination of in vivo crosslinking and native MS for structural investigation of intact protein assemblies.

  3. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  4. Structuring of DLC:Ag nanocomposite thin films employing plasma chemical etching and ion sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas; Tamulevičienė, Asta; Virganavičius, Dainius; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Kopustinskas, Vitoldas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2014-12-01

    We analyze structuring effects of diamond like carbon based silver nanocomposite (DLC:Ag) thin films by CF4/O2 plasma chemical etching and Ar+ sputtering. DLC:Ag films were deposited employing unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target with Ar+ in C2H2 gas atmosphere. Films with different silver content (0.6-12.9 at.%) were analyzed. The films (as deposited and exposed to plasma chemical etching) were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDS), optical microscopy, ultraviolet-visible light (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After deposition, the films were plasma chemically etched in CF4/O2 mixture plasma for 2-6 min. It is shown that optical properties of thin films and silver nano particle size distribution can be tailored during deposition changing the magnetron current and C2H2/Ar ratio or during following plasma chemical etching. The plasma etching enabled to reveal the silver filler particle size distribution and to control silver content on the surface that was found to be dependent on Ostwald ripening process of silver nano-clusters. Employing contact lithography and 4 μm period mask in photoresist or aluminum the films were patterned employing CF4/O2 mixture plasma chemical etching, direct Ar+ sputtering or combined etching processes. It is shown that different processing recipes result in different final grating structures. Selective carbon etching in CF4/O2 gas mixture with photoresist mask revealed micrometer range lines of silver nanoparticles, while Ar+ sputtering and combined processing employing aluminum mask resulted in nanocomposite material (DLC:Ag) micropatterns.

  5. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds.

  6. Chemical engineering and structural and pharmacological characterization of the α-scorpion toxin OD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durek, Thomas; Vetter, Irina; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Motin, Leonid; Knapp, Oliver; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion α-toxins are invaluable pharmacological tools for studying voltage-gated sodium channels, but few structure-function studies have been undertaken due to their challenging synthesis. To address this deficiency, we report a chemical engineering strategy based upon native chemical ligation. The chemical synthesis of α-toxin OD1 was achieved by chemical ligation of three unprotected peptide segments. A high resolution X-ray structure (1.8 Å) of synthetic OD1 showed the typical βαββ α-toxin fold and revealed important conformational differences in the pharmacophore region when compared with other α-toxin structures. Pharmacological analysis of synthetic OD1 revealed potent α-toxin activity (inhibition of fast inactivation) at Nav1.7, as well as Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. In addition, OD1 also produced potent β-toxin activity at Nav1.4 and Nav1.6 (shift of channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction), indicating that OD1 might interact at more than one site with Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. Investigation of nine OD1 mutants revealed that three residues in the reverse turn contributed significantly to selectivity, with the triple OD1 mutant (D9K, D10P, K11H) being 40-fold more selective for Nav1.7 over Nav1.6, while OD1 K11V was 5-fold more selective for Nav1.6 than Nav1.7. This switch in selectivity highlights the importance of the reverse turn for engineering α-toxins with altered selectivity at Nav subtypes.

  7. Integrating Epistemological Perspectives on Chemistry in Chemical Education: The Cases of Concept Duality, Chemical Language, and Structural Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ebru; Erduran, Sibel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we trace the work of some philosophers of chemistry to draw some implications for the improvement of chemical education. We examine some key features of chemical knowledge, and how these features are relevant for school chemistry teaching and learning. In particular, we examine Laszlo's ("Foundations of Chemistry"…

  8. Iron Isotope Fractionation Reveals Structural Change upon Microbial and Chemical Reduction of Nontronite NAu-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Wu, L.; Shi, B.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) isotope fractionations were determined during reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1 biologically by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and chemically by dithionite. ~10% reduction was achieved in biological reactors, with similar reduction extents obtained by dithionite. We hypothesize that two stages occurred in our reactors. Firstly, reduction started from edge sites of clays and the produced Fe(II) partially remained in situ and partially was released into solution. Next aqueous Fe(II) adsorbed onto basal planes. The basal sorbed Fe(II) then undergoes electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) with octahedral Fe(III) in clays, with the most negative fractionation factor Δ56Febasal Fe(II)-structural Fe(III)of -1.7‰ when basal sorption reached a threshold value. Secondly, when the most reactive Fe(III) was exhausted, bioreduction significantly slowed down and chemical reduction was able to achieve 24% due to diffusion of small size dithionite. Importantly, no ETAE occurred between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) due to blockage of pathways by collapsed clay layers. This two-stage process in our reduction experiments is distinctive from abiotic exchange experiments by mixing aqueous Fe(II) and NAu-1, where no structural change of clay would block ETAE between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). The separation of reduction sites (clay edges) and sorption sites (basal planes) is unique to clay minerals with layered structure. In contrast, reduction and sorption occur on the same sites on the surfaces of Fe oxyhydroxides, where reduction does not induce structure change. Thus, the Fe isotope fractionations are the same for reduction and abiotic exchange experiments for Fe oxides. Our study reveals important changes in electron transfer and atom exchange pathways upon reduction of clay minerals by dissimilatory Fe reducing bacteria, which is prevalent in anoxic soils and sediments.

  9. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  10. Reactions driving conformational movements (molecular motors) in gels: conformational and structural chemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Toribio F

    2017-01-18

    In this perspective the empirical kinetics of conducting polymers exchanging anions and solvent during electrochemical reactions to get dense reactive gels is reviewed. The reaction drives conformational movements of the chains (molecular motors), exchange of ions and solvent with the electrolyte and structural (relaxation, swelling, shrinking and compaction) gel changes. Reaction-driven structural changes are identified and quantified from electrochemical responses. The empirical reaction activation energy (Ea), the reaction coefficient (k) and the reaction orders (α and β) change as a function of the conformational energy variation during the reaction. This conformational energy becomes an empirical magnitude. Ea, k, α and β include and provide quantitative conformational and structural information. The chemical kinetics becomes structural chemical kinetics (SCK) for reactions driving conformational movements of the reactants. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation model describes empirical results and some results from the literature for biochemical reactions. In parallel the development of an emerging technological world of soft, wet, multifunctional and biomimetic tools and anthropomorphic robots driven by reactions of the constitutive material, as in biological organs, can be now envisaged being theoretically supported by the kinetic model.

  11. The influence of condensed tannin structure on rate of microbial mineralization and reactivity to chemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte E; Preston, Caroline M; Hogg, Karen E; Titus, Brian D

    2011-03-01

    We examined how tannin structure influences reactivity in tannin assays and carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Condensed tannins from the foliage of ten tree and shrub species and from pecan shells (Carya illinoensis) had different proportions of: (a) epicatechin (cis) and catechin (trans) isomers, (b) procyanidin (PC) and prodelphinidin (PD) monomers, and (c) different chain lengths. The response of each tannin to several widely used tannin assays was determined. Although there was some variation in response to proanthocyanidin (butanol/HCl) and Folin Ciocalteu assays, we did not deduce any predictable relationship between tannin structure and response to either assay. There was little variation in protein precipitation among the different tannins. To assess biological activity, six of the tannins were incubated with forest humus for 22 days. We determined that, while PC-based tannins remained at least partly extractable for the duration of the incubation, tannins with a high proportion of PD subunits rapidly became unextractable from soil. There was a positive correlation between net nitrogen mineralization and cis chemical structure. Carbon mineralization was enhanced initially by the addition of tannins to humus, but after 22 days, a negative correlation between the proportion of cis subunits and respiration was determined. Overall, we were not able to demonstrate consistent effects of structure on either microbial mineralization or reactivity to chemical assays; such relationships remain elusive.

  12. Advances in Chemical and Structural Characterization of Concretion with Implications for Modeling Marine Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2014-05-01

    The Weins number model and concretion equivalent corrosion rate methodology were developed as potential minimum-impact, cost-effective techniques to determine corrosion damage on submerged steel structures. To apply the full potential of these technologies, a detailed chemical and structural characterization of the concretion (hard biofouling) that transforms into iron bearing minerals is required. The fractions of existing compounds and the quantitative chemistries are difficult to determine from x-ray diffraction. Environmental scanning electron microscopy was used to present chemical compositions by means of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). EDS demonstrates the chemical data in mapping format or in point or selected area chemistries. Selected-area EDS data collection at precise locations is presented in terms of atomic percent. The mechanism of formation and distribution of the iron-bearing mineral species at specific locations will be presented. Based on water retention measurements, porosity in terms of void volume varies from 15 v/o to 30 v/o (vol.%). The void path displayed by scanning electron microscopy imaging illustrates the tortuous path by which oxygen migrates in the water phase within the concretion from seaside to metalside.

  13. Heterogeneity of Physico-Chemical Properties in Structured Soils and Its Consequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. JASINSKA; H. WETZEL; T. BAUMGARTL; R. HORN

    2006-01-01

    Structured soils are characterized by the presence of inter- and intra-aggregate pore systems and aggregates, which show varying chemical, physical, and biological properties depending on the aggregate type and land use system. How far these aspects also affect the ion exchange processes and to what extent the interaction between the carbon distribution and kind of organic substances affect the internal soil strength as well as hydraulic properties like wettability are still under discussion. Thus, the objective of this research was to clarify the effect of soil aggregation on physical and chemical properties of structured soils at two scales: homogenized material and single aggregates. Data obtained by sequentially peeling off soil aggregates layers revealed gradients in the chemical composition from the aggregate surface to the aggregatecore. In aggregates from long term untreated forest soils we found lower amounts of carbon in the external layer, while in arable soils the differentiation was not pronounced. However, soil aggregates originating from these sites exhibited a higher concentration of microbial activity in the outer aggregate layer and declined towards the interior. Furthermore,soil depth and the vegetation type affected the wettability. Aggregate strength depended on water suction and differences in tillage treatments.

  14. Effects of age and sex on the structural, chemical and technological characteristics of mule duck meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, E; Salichon, M R; Marche, G; Wacrenier, N; Dominguez, B; Culioli, J

    2000-07-01

    1. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of age and sex on the chemical, structural and technological characteristics of mule duck meat. 2. Ten males and 10 females were weighed and slaughtered at 8, 10, 11, 12 and 13 weeks of age. Weight, pH value, colour, tenderness and juice loss of breast muscle were determined. 3. The activities of 3 enzymes (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase) which indicate muscular metabolic activity were assayed. 4. Chemical composition (moisture, lipids, proteins, minerals, lipid and phospholipid classes, fatty acid composition) of breast muscle was analysed. 5. Fibre type, fibre type percentage and cross-sectional areas were determined using histochemistry and an image analysis system. 6. For growth performance and muscular structure, the ideal slaughter age of mule ducks is 10 weeks of age. Chemical and technological analysis indicated that muscular maturity in Pectoralis major was reached at 11 weeks of age, but, at this age, breast lipid content is high. Moreover, after 10 weeks of age, food costs rapidly increased. 7. Lastly, sexual dimorphism for body weight is minor. In this study, at any given age, no significant differences between males and females were shown. Thus, it is possible to rear both sexes together and to slaughter them at the same age.

  15. Network structural analysis using directed graph for chemical reaction analysis in weakly-ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuto, Kyosuke; Mizui, Yasutaka; Miyagi, Shigeyuki; Sakai, Osamu; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-09-01

    We visualize complicated chemical reaction systems in weakly-ionized plasmas by analysing network structure for chemical processes, and calculate some indexes by assuming interspecies relationships to be a network to clarify them. With the current social evolution, the mean size of general data which we can use in computers grows huge, and significance of the data analysis increases. The methods of the network analysis which we focus on in this study do not depend on a specific analysis target, but the field where it has been already applied is still limited. In this study, we analyse chemical reaction systems in plasmas for configuring the network structure. We visualize them by expressing a reaction system in a specific plasma by a directed graph and examine the indexes and the relations with the characteristic of the species in the reaction system. For example, in the methane plasma network, the centrality index reveals importance of CH3 in an influential position of species in the reaction. In addition, silane and atmospheric pressure plasmas can be also visualized in reaction networks, suggesting other characteristics in the centrality indexes.

  16. A large scale analysis of information-theoretic network complexity measures using chemical structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Dehmer

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate information-theoretic network complexity measures which have already been intensely used in mathematical- and medicinal chemistry including drug design. Numerous such measures have been developed so far but many of them lack a meaningful interpretation, e.g., we want to examine which kind of structural information they detect. Therefore, our main contribution is to shed light on the relatedness between some selected information measures for graphs by performing a large scale analysis using chemical networks. Starting from several sets containing real and synthetic chemical structures represented by graphs, we study the relatedness between a classical (partition-based complexity measure called the topological information content of a graph and some others inferred by a different paradigm leading to partition-independent measures. Moreover, we evaluate the uniqueness of network complexity measures numerically. Generally, a high uniqueness is an important and desirable property when designing novel topological descriptors having the potential to be applied to large chemical databases.

  17. Structural properties of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles prepared by chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgul, Guvenc, E-mail: guvencakgul@gmail.com [Bor Vocational School, Nigde University, 51700 Nigde (Turkey); Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Akgul, Funda Aksoy [Physics Department, Nigde University, 51240 Nigde (Turkey); Attenkofer, Klaus [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Winterer, Markus [Nanoparticle Process Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, and Center for NanoIntegration Duisburg-Essen, CeNIDE, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2013-03-25

    Highlights: ► Local structure determination of ZnO and TiO{sub 2} nanostructures by XANES and EXAFS. ► Zn K and Ti K absorption edge XANES investigations of nanopowder samples. ► Investigation of pre-edge peak features of TiO{sub 2} nanosamples. ► Obtaining of local structure parameters of nano ZnO and TiO{sub 2} using EXAFS. ► Good agreement of EXAFS results and crystal structure datas. -- Abstract: Transition metal (TM) oxides provide a wide range of functional materials especially when nanostructured. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and wurtzite type zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructured materials were fabricated by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). Crystal and local structures of the prepared nanosamples were ascertained using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. Based on the XRD data, a second phase(s) was not found in both samples. A single wurtzite and anatase type structures were observed in ZnO and TiO{sub 2} nanosamples, respectively. Ti K pre-edge features of XANES spectrum indicated the presence of sixfold coordinated Ti in TiO{sub 2} nanosamples. The results showed that CVS is quite useful method to produce high crystalline nanoparticles.

  18. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  19. Study of the chemical structure of petroleum asphaltenes by spectral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posadov, I.A.; Pokonova, Yu.V.; Khusidman, M.B.; Gitlin, I.G.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1977-03-01

    Results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet (UV), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy studies of the chemical and supermolecular structure of asphaltene concentrates isolated from petroleum residues are reported. Considerable intensity of a characteristic series of absorption bands at 750, 810, 870, 1560, 1600, and 3030 cm/sup -1/ is interpreted as indicative of aromatic structures; while the bands at 870 and 810 cm/sup -1/ are taken as evidence of the predominant presence of highly substituted aromatic rings which are apparently included in alicyclic structures but do not form polynuclear condensed aromatic systems. The bathochromic shift of the electronic absorption spectrum in the region of 250-600 nm and the weak inflection at 300-310 nm are attributed to the partial condensation of the aromatic rings with predominance of fragments of the bi- and tricyclic types. The percentage content of various organic groups, the degree of polycondensation, the degree of potential for substitution, and the elementary composition are reported.

  20. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyleva, S., E-mail: motyleva-svetlana@mail.ru; Mertvishcheva, M. [All-Russian Horticular Institute for Breeding, Agrotechnology and Nursery Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Moskow (Russian Federation); Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V. [Yelets state university named after I. A. Bunin, Yelets (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-22

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75)

  1. On the Comparability of Chemical Structure and Roughness of Nanochannels in Altering Fluid Slippage

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Chinmay Anand

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial hydrodynamic slippage of water depends on both on surface chemistry and roughness. This study tries to connect the effect of chemical property and the physical structure of the surface on the interfacial slippage of water. By performing molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) of Couette flow of water molecules over a reduced Lennard-Jones (LJ) surface, the velocity profile is obtained and extrapolated to get the slip lengths. The slip lengths are measured for various surface-fluid interactions. These interactions are varied by changing the wettability of the surface (characterized by the static contact angle) and its roughness. The slip length variation with the static contact angle as $(1+cos\\theta)^{-2}$ is observed. However, it is also observed that the presence of surface roughness always reduces the slip length and it is proposed that the slip length varies with non-dimensionalized average surface roughness as $(1+\\alpha^*)^{-2}$ . Thus a relation between the chemical wettability and the physica...

  2. Structural, chemical and magnetic properties of secondary phases in Co-doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ney, A; Ney, V; Ye, S; Ollefs, K; Kammermeier, T [Fakultaet fuer Physik and CeNIDE, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); Kovacs, A; Dunin-Borkowski, R E [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Wilhelm, F; Rogalev, A, E-mail: andreas.ney@uni-due.de [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    We have utilized a comprehensive set of experimental techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and the respective x-ray linear dichroism and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism to characterize the correlation of structural, chemical and magnetic properties of Co-doped ZnO samples. It can be established on a quantitative basis that the superparamagnetic (SPM) behavior observed by integral superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry is not an intrinsic property of the material but stems from precipitations of metallic Co. Their presence is revealed by TEM as well as XAS. Annealing procedures for these SPM samples were also studied, and the observed changes in the magnetic properties found to be due to a chemical reduction or oxidation of the metallic Co species. (paper)

  3. Structural, Mechanical and Optical Properties of Plasma-chemical Si-C-N Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Kozak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An influence of the substrate temperature in the range of 40-400 °C on the properties of the Si-C-N films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD technique using hexamethyldisilazane is analyzed. Study of the structure, chemical bonding, surface morphology, mechanical properties and energy gap of the obtained films was carried out using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical measurements and nanoindentation. It was established that all the films were X-ray amorphous and had low surface roughness. Intensive hydrogen effusion from the films takes place, when substrate temperature increases up to 400 °C, which promotes a decrease of roughness and an increase in hardness and Young modules more than twice.

  4. Targeting acetylcholinesterase: identification of chemical leads by high throughput screening, structure determination and molecular modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Berg

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is an essential enzyme that terminates cholinergic transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Compounds inhibiting this enzyme can be used (inter alia to treat cholinergic deficiencies (e.g. in Alzheimer's disease, but may also act as dangerous toxins (e.g. nerve agents such as sarin. Treatment of nerve agent poisoning involves use of antidotes, small molecules capable of reactivating AChE. We have screened a collection of organic molecules to assess their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of AChE, aiming to find lead compounds for further optimization leading to drugs with increased efficacy and/or decreased side effects. 124 inhibitors were discovered, with considerable chemical diversity regarding size, polarity, flexibility and charge distribution. An extensive structure determination campaign resulted in a set of crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. Overall, the ligands have substantial interactions with the peripheral anionic site of AChE, and the majority form additional interactions with the catalytic site (CAS. Reproduction of the bioactive conformation of six of the ligands using molecular docking simulations required modification of the default parameter settings of the docking software. The results show that docking-assisted structure-based design of AChE inhibitors is challenging and requires crystallographic support to obtain reliable results, at least with currently available software. The complex formed between C5685 and Mus musculus AChE (C5685•mAChE is a representative structure for the general binding mode of the determined structures. The CAS binding part of C5685 could not be structurally determined due to a disordered electron density map and the developed docking protocol was used to predict the binding modes of this part of the molecule. We believe that chemical modifications of our discovered inhibitors, biochemical and biophysical

  5. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  6. Innovative Strategies to Develop Chemical Categories Using a Combination of Structural and Toxicological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Batke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 1.AbstractInterest is increasing in the development of non-animal methods for toxicological evaluations. These methods are however, particularly challenging for complex toxicological endpoints such as repeated dose toxicity. European Legislation, e.g. the European Union´s Cosmetic Directive and REACH, demands the use of alternative methods. Frameworks, such as the Read-across Assessment Framework or the Adverse Outcome Pathway Knowledge Base, support the development of these methods. The aim of the project presented in this publication was to develop substance categories for a read-across with complex endpoints of toxicity based on existing databases. The basic conceptual approach was to combine structural similarity with shared mechanisms of action. Substances with similar chemical structure and toxicological profile form candidate categories suitable for read-across. We combined two databases on repeated dose toxicity, RepDose database and ELINCS database to form a common database for the identification of categories. The resulting database contained physicochemical, structural and toxicological data, which were refined and curated for cluster analyses. We applied the Predictive Clustering Tree (PCT approach for clustering chemicals based on structural and on toxicological information to detect groups of chemicals with similar toxic profiles and pathways/mechanisms of toxicity. As many of the experimental toxicity values were not available, this data was imputed by predicting them with a multi-label classification method, prior to clustering. The clustering results were evaluated by assessing chemical and toxicological similarities with the aim of identifying clusters with a concordance between structural information and toxicity profiles/mechanisms. From these chosen clusters, seven were selected for a quantitative read-across, based on a small ratio of NOAEL of the members with the highest and the lowest NOAEL in the cluster (<5. We discuss

  7. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds.

  8. Chemical tagging can work: Identification of stellar phase-space structures purely by chemical-abundance similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, David W; Ness, Melissa; Rix, Hans-Walter; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Chemical tagging promises to use detailed abundance measurements to identify spatially separated stars that were in fact born together (in the same molecular cloud), long ago. This idea has not previously yielded scientific successes, probably because of the noise and incompleteness in chemical-abundance measurements. However, we have succeeded in substantially improving spectroscopic measurements with The Cannon, which has delivered 15 individual abundances for 100,000 stars observed as part of the APOGEE spectroscopic survey, with precisions around 0.04 dex. We test the chemical-tagging hypothesis by looking at clusters in abundance space and confirming that they are clustered in phase space. We identify (by the k-means algorithm) overdensities of stars in the 15-dimensional chemical-abundance space delivered by The Cannon, and plot the associated stars in phase space. We use only abundance-space information (no positional information) to identify stellar groups. We find that clusters in abundance space are...

  9. STUDIES ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURES OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS BY SOLID STATE NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FURuowen; HuangWenqiang; 等

    1999-01-01

    The solid state C13-NMR spectra of different ACFs from various precursor fibers were recorded in this paper,The effects of activation conditions on chemical structures of ACFs,as well as the changes of chemical structures during carbonization and redox reaction were inverstigated by NMR technique,At same time,the soild state P31-NMR spectra of ACFS are studied.The C13-NMR spectra of ACFs can be divided into six bands that are assigned to methyl and methylene groups,hydroxyl and ether groups.acetal (or methylenedioxy) carbon,graphite-like aromatic carbon structure,phenol,and quinone groups,respectively.Only phosphorous pentoxide exists on ACFs and CFs.Moreover,most of them are stuck over the crystal face but not at the edge of graphite-like micro-crystal.The carbonization and activation conditions affect the C13-NMR spectra of ACFs.The experimental rsults indicate that the redox reaction of ACFs with oxidants greatly consumes C-H group.

  10. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically derived nickel substituted zinc ferrite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, S. [Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713 104 (India); Pal, M., E-mail: palm@cgcri.res.in [CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Dutta, A., E-mail: adutta@phys.buruniv.ac.in [Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713 104 (India)

    2015-03-01

    Single phase spinel Ni substituted nanocrystalline Zn ferrites have been synthesized using a soft chemical route. Effect of Ni substitution on structure, electrical and optical properties has been investigated. X-ray diffraction study confirms the growth of single phase nanocrystalline Ni substituted Zn ferrites. FTIR and UV–Visible studies delineate the change in structure and optical band gap due to inclusion of Ni ions. Substitution of Ni ion has been manifested on lattice parameter which systematically decreases from 8.448 Å to 8.280 Å. An initial increase followed by subsequent decrease in optical band gap with the increase in Ni content is observed. In addition, both ac and dc electrical studies shows anomalous behavior in conductivity and dielectric properties for the samples having Ni content in the range 0.2–0.6 mol fraction which can be attributed to the normal to inverse spinel structural changes. - Highlights: • Pure single phase nanocrystalline Zn/Ni ferrites by facile soft chemical route. • Changes in microstructural parameters of Zn ferrite is observed due to Ni inclusion. • Optical band gap shows a maximum while the concentration of Ni increases. • Inverse to spinal ferrite change is observed in ac and dc electrical properties.

  11. Optimization of chemical structure of Schottky-type selection diode for crossbar resistive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Jeon, Woojin; Song, Seul Ji; Seok, Jun Yeong; Yoon, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Park, Tae Joo; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2012-10-24

    The electrical performances of Pt/TiO(2)/Ti/Pt stacked Schottky-type diode (SD) was systematically examined, and this performance is dependent on the chemical structures of the each layer and their interfaces. The Ti layers containing a tolerable amount of oxygen showed metallic electrical conduction characteristics, which was confirmed by sheet resistance measurement with elevating the temperature, transmission line measurement (TLM), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis. However, the chemical structure of SD stack and resulting electrical properties were crucially affected by the dissolved oxygen concentration in the Ti layers. The lower oxidation potential of the Ti layer with initially higher oxygen concentration suppressed the oxygen deficiency of the overlying TiO(2) layer induced by consumption of the oxygen from TiO(2) layer. This structure results in the lower reverse current of SDs without significant degradation of forward-state current. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis showed the current conduction through the local conduction paths in the presented SDs, which guarantees a sufficient forward-current density as a selection device for highly integrated crossbar array resistive memory.

  12. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  13. On the structure and topography of free-standing chemically modified graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, N R; Pandey, P A; Beanland, R; Lupo, U; Rowlands, G; Roemer, R A [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rourke, J P, E-mail: Neil.Wilson@Warwick.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanical, electrical and chemical properties of chemically modified graphene (CMG) are intrinsically linked to its structure. Here, we report on our study of the topographic structure of free-standing CMG using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron diffraction. We find that, unlike graphene, suspended sheets of CMG are corrugated and distorted on nanometre length scales. AFM reveals not only long-range (100 nm) distortions induced by the support, as previously observed for graphene, but also short-range corrugations with length scales down to the resolution limit of 10 nm. These corrugations are static not dynamic, and are significantly diminished on CMG supported on atomically smooth substrates. Evidence for even shorter-range distortions, down to a few nanometres or less, is found by electron diffraction of suspended CMG. Comparison of the experimental data with simulations reveals that the mean atomic displacement from the nominal lattice position is of order 10% of the carbon-carbon bond length. Taken together, these results suggest a complex structure for CMG where heterogeneous functionalization creates local strain and distortion.

  14. On the structure and topography of free-standing chemically modified graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N. R.; Pandey, P. A.; Beanland, R.; Rourke, J. P.; Lupo, U.; Rowlands, G.; Römer, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The mechanical, electrical and chemical properties of chemically modified graphene (CMG) are intrinsically linked to its structure. Here, we report on our study of the topographic structure of free-standing CMG using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron diffraction. We find that, unlike graphene, suspended sheets of CMG are corrugated and distorted on nanometre length scales. AFM reveals not only long-range (100 nm) distortions induced by the support, as previously observed for graphene, but also short-range corrugations with length scales down to the resolution limit of 10 nm. These corrugations are static not dynamic, and are significantly diminished on CMG supported on atomically smooth substrates. Evidence for even shorter-range distortions, down to a few nanometres or less, is found by electron diffraction of suspended CMG. Comparison of the experimental data with simulations reveals that the mean atomic displacement from the nominal lattice position is of order 10% of the carbon-carbon bond length. Taken together, these results suggest a complex structure for CMG where heterogeneous functionalization creates local strain and distortion.

  15. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Aguilera, N. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica Medica, Instituto Estatal de Cancerologia ' Dr. Arturo Beltran Ortega' , Acapulco, Guerrero (Mexico); Torres-Garcia, E., E-mail: etorresg@uaemex.m [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR ({sup 137}Cs) and HDR ({sup 192}Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 192}Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2x2x3 mm{sup 3}. Four materials were considered in the VP-air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of {sup 192}Ir is more irregular than that of {sup 137}Cs but spatially better defined.

  16. Voting-based consensus clustering for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Faisal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although many consensus clustering methods have been successfully used for combining multiple classifiers in many areas such as machine learning, applied statistics, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, few consensus clustering methods have been applied for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. It is known that any individual clustering method will not always give the best results for all types of applications. So, in this paper, three voting and graph-based consensus clusterings were used for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures to enhance the ability of separating biologically active molecules from inactive ones in each cluster. Results The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA, cluster-based similarity partitioning algorithm (CSPA and hyper-graph partitioning algorithm (HGPA were examined. The F-measure and Quality Partition Index method (QPI were used to evaluate the clusterings and the results were compared to the Ward’s clustering method. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR dataset was used for experiments and was represented by two 2D fingerprints, ALOGP and ECFP_4. The performance of voting-based consensus clustering method outperformed the Ward’s method using F-measure and QPI method for both ALOGP and ECFP_4 fingerprints, while the graph-based consensus clustering methods outperformed the Ward’s method only for ALOGP using QPI. The Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures were the methods of choice to generate the ensembles, which give the highest values for both criteria. Conclusions The results of the experiments show that consensus clustering methods can improve the effectiveness of chemical structures clusterings. The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA was the method of choice among consensus clustering methods.

  17. The designability of protein switches by chemical rescue of structure: mechanisms of inactivation and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; DiPrimio, Nina; Keppel, Theodore R.; Vo, Binh; Fraser, Keith; Battaile, Kevin P.; Egan, Chet; Bystroff, Christopher; Lovell, Scott; Weis, David D.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Karanicolas, John

    2014-01-01

    The ability to selectively activate function of particular proteins via pharmacological agents is a longstanding goal in chemical biology. Recently, we reported an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. However, rationally identifying analogous de novo binding sites in other enzymes represents a key challenge for extending this approach to introduce allosteric control into other enzymes. Here we show that mutation sites leading to protein inactivation via tryptophan-to-glycine substitution and allowing (partial) reactivation by the subsequent addition of indole are remarkably frequent. Through a suite of methods including a cell-based reporter assay, computational structure prediction and energetic analysis, fluorescence studies, enzymology, pulse proteolysis, x-ray crystallography and hydrogen-deuterium mass spectrometry we find that these switchable proteins are most commonly modulated indirectly, through control of protein stability. Addition of indole in these cases rescues activity not by reverting a discrete conformational change, as we had observed in the sole previously reported example, but rather rescues activity by restoring protein stability. This important finding will dramatically impact the design of future switches and sensors built by this approach, since evaluating stability differences associated with cavity-forming mutations is a far more tractable task than predicting allosteric conformational changes. By analogy to natural signaling systems, the insights from this study further raise the exciting prospect of modulating stability to design optimal recognition properties into future de novo switches and sensors built through chemical rescue of structure. PMID:24313858

  18. Quantum chemical prediction of vibrational spectra of large molecular systems with radical or metallic electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio; Irle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum chemical simulation of infrared (IR) and Raman spectra for molecules with open-shell, radical, or multiradical electronic structure represents a major challenge. We report analytic second-order geometrical derivatives of the Mermin free energy for the second-order self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (DFTB2) method with fractional occupation numbers (FONs). This new method is applied to the evaluation of Nsbnd O radical stretching modes in various open-shell molecules and to the prediction of the evolution of IR and Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with increasing molecular size.

  19. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  20. Measuring the Effect of Fuel Chemical Structure on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions using Isotope Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Upatnicks, A; Dibble, R W; Cheng, S

    2003-09-11

    Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique initially developed for radiocarbon dating and recently applied to internal combustion engines, carbon atoms within specific fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in particulate or gaseous emissions. In addition to examining the effect of fuel chemical structure on emissions, the specific source of carbon for PM can be identified if an isotope label exists in the appropriate fuel source. Existing work has focused on diesel engines, but the samples (soot collected on quartz filters or combustion gases captured in bombs or bags) are readily collected from large industrial combustors as well.

  1. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited copper selenide films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R H Bari; V Ganesan; S Potadar; L A Patil

    2009-02-01

    Stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric thin films of copper selenide have been prepared by chemical bath deposition technique at temperature below 60°C on glass substrate. The effect of nonstoichiometry on the optical, electrical and structural properties of the film was studied. The bandgap energy was observed to increase with the increase in at % of copper in composition. The grain size was also observed to increase with the decrease of at % of copper in composition. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), absorption spectroscopy, and AFM. The results are discussed and interpreted.

  2. Chemical Structure of Carbon Nitride Films Prepared by MW-ECR Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUJun,GAOPeng; DINGWan-yu; LIXin; DENGXin-lu; DONGChuang

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were prepared by plasma-enhanced DC magnetron sputtering using twinned microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Chemical structure of deposited films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transtorm infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the deposition rate is strongly affected by direct current bias, and the films are mainly composed of a single amorphous carbon nitride phase with N/C ratio close to C3N4, and the bonding is predominantly of C-N type.

  3. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  4. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    A study analyzed the occupational structure and qualifications associated with the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the United Kingdom. The analysis included nine case studies based on interviews with firms in the chemicals and metals sectors. Information was gathered within an analytical framework that…

  5. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  6. Structure activity studies of an analgesic drug tapentadol hydrochloride by spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Tapentadol is a novel opioid pain reliever drug with a dual mechanism of action, having potency between morphine and tramadol. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for tapentadol hydrochloride (TAP.Cl) to determine the properties. The geometry is optimised and the structural properties of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the solid phase in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Frontier molecular orbital energies, LUMO-HOMO energy gap, ionisation potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness and chemical potential are also calculated. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalisation has been analysed using NBO analysis. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule are analysed.

  7. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  8. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemically Synthesized ZnS Nanoparticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. PAWAR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Different samples of ZnS nanoparticals were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method at room temperature using zincsulphate as zinc source and sodium sulphide as sulphur source. Structural properties of synthesized ZnS nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD while optical properties were examined by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. XRD pattern showed the as synthesized ZnS nanoparticles have cubic zinc blended structure with 2.0-2.87 nm average crystallite size and lattice constant a=5.829 Ao. UV-Visible absorption spectrum showed the band gap energy of the ZnS nanoparticals corresponding to absorption edge are found in the range of 2.63eV-3.87eV, which shows increase in band gap with the decrease of crystallite size of the nanoparticles.

  9. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...... synthesized and used to accommodate GAOX. SBA-15-ROD is rod-shaped particles with periodically ordered nanopores (9.5 nm), while MCF has a mesocellular foam-like structure with randomly distributed pores (23 nm) interconnected by smaller windows (8.8 nm). GAOX is non-covalently confined in SBA-15- ROD, while...... constant (KM) of the enzyme is largely unchanged upon immobilization, while the turnover number (kcat) is slightly reduced. The overall catalytic efficiency, represented by the ratio of kcat/KM, is retained around 70% and 60% for SBA-15 and MCF immobilization, respectively. The thermal resistance...

  10. Main-Group Halide Semiconductors Derived from Perovskite: Distinguishing Chemical, Structural, and Electronic Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabini, Douglas H; Labram, John G; Lehner, Anna J; Bechtel, Jonathon S; Evans, Hayden A; Van der Ven, Anton; Wudl, Fred; Chabinyc, Michael L; Seshadri, Ram

    2017-01-03

    Main-group halide perovskites have generated much excitement of late because of their remarkable optoelectronic properties, ease of preparation, and abundant constituent elements, but these curious and promising materials differ in important respects from traditional semiconductors. The distinguishing chemical, structural, and electronic features of these materials present the key to understanding the origins of the optoelectronic performance of the well-studied hybrid organic-inorganic lead halides and provide a starting point for the design and preparation of new functional materials. Here we review and discuss these distinguishing features, among them a defect-tolerant electronic structure, proximal lattice instabilities, labile defect migration, and, in the case of hybrid perovskites, disordered molecular cations. Additionally, we discuss the preparation and characterization of some alternatives to the lead halide perovskites, including lead-free bismuth halides and hybrid materials with optically and electronically active organic constituents.

  11. Physical and chemical structure of planet-forming disks probed by millimeter observations and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Dutrey, Anne; Chapillon, Edwige; Gorti, Uma; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Hersant, Franck; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Hughes, Meredith; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Nomura, Hideko; Piétu, Vincent; Qi, Chunhua; Wakelam, Valentine

    2014-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks composed of dust and gas are ubiquitous around young stars and are commonly recognized as nurseries of planetary systems. Their lifetime, appearance, and structure are determined by an interplay between stellar radiation, gravity, thermal pressure, magnetic field, gas viscosity, turbulence, and rotation. Molecules and dust serve as major heating and cooling agents in disks. Dust grains dominate the disk opacities, reprocess most of the stellar radiation, and shield molecules from ionizing UV/X-ray photons. Disks also dynamically evolve by building up planetary systems which drastically change their gas and dust density structures. Over the past decade significant progress has been achieved in our understanding of disk chemical composition thanks to the upgrade or advent of new millimeter/Infrared facilities (SMA, PdBI, CARMA, Herschel, e-VLA, ALMA). Some major breakthroughs in our comprehension of the disk physics and chemistry have been done since PPV. This review will present and discus...

  12. Determination of the Chemical Structures of Tandyukisins B–D, Isolated from a Marine Sponge-Derived Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yamada

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tandyukisins B–D (1–3, novel decalin derivatives, have been isolated from a strain of Trichoderma harzianum OUPS-111D-4 originally derived from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai, and their structures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. In addition, their chemical structures were established by chemical transformation. They exhibited weak cytotoxicity, but selective growth inhibition on panel screening using 39 human cancer cell lines.

  13. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  14. Structure and stability of pyrophyllite edge surfaces: Effect of temperature and water chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Newton, Aric G.

    2016-10-01

    The surfaces of clay minerals, which are abundant in atmospheric mineral dust, serve as an important medium to catalyze ice nucleation. The lateral edge surface of 2:1 clay minerals is postulated to be a potential site for ice nucleation. However, experimental investigations of the edge surface structure itself have been limited compared to the basal planes of clay minerals. Density functional theory (DFT) computational studies have provided insights into the pyrophyllite edge surface. Pyrophyllite is an ideal surrogate mineral for the edge surfaces of 2:1 clay minerals as it possesses no or little structural charge. Of the two most-common hydrated edge surfaces, the AC edge, (1 1 0) surface in the monoclinic polytype notation, is predicted to be more stable than the B edge, (0 1 0) surface. These stabilities, however, were determined based on the total energies calculated at 0 K and did not consider environmental effects such as temperature and humidity. In this study, atomistic thermodynamics based on periodic DFT electronic calculations was applied to examine the effects of environmental variables on the structure and thermodynamic stability of the common edge surfaces in equilibrium with bulk pyrophyllite and water vapor. We demonstrate that the temperature-dependent vibrational energy of sorbed water molecules at the edge surface is a significant component of the surface free energy and cannot be neglected when determining the surface stability of pyrophyllite. The surface free energies were calculated as a function of temperature from 240 to 600 K and water chemical potential corresponding to conditions from ultrahigh vacuum to the saturation vapor pressure of water. We show that at lower water chemical potentials (dry conditions), the AC and B edge surfaces possessed similar stabilities; at higher chemical potentials (humid conditions) the AC edge surface was more stable than the B edge surface. At high temperatures, both surfaces showed similar stabilities

  15. Chemical Reasoning Based on an Invariance Property: Bond and Lone Pair Pictures in Quantum Structural Formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Alia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemists use one set of orbitals when comparing to a structural formula, hybridized AOs or NBOs for example, and another for reasoning in terms of frontier orbitals, MOs usually. Chemical arguments can frequently be made in terms of energy and/or electron density without the consideration of orbitals at all. All orbital representations, orthogonal or not, within a given function space are related by linear transformation. Chemical arguments based on orbitals are really energy or electron density arguments; orbitals are linked to these observables through the use of operators. The Valency Interaction Formula, VIF, offers a system of chemical reasoning based on the invariance of observables from one orbital representation to another. VIF pictures have been defined as one-electron density and Hamiltonian operators. These pictures are classified in a chemically meaningful way by use of linear transformations applied to them in the form of two pictorial rules and the invariance of the number of doubly, singly, and unoccupied orbitals or bonding, nonbonding, and antibonding orbitals under these transformations. The compatibility of the VIF method with the bond pair – lone pair language of Lewis is demonstrated. Different electron lone pair representations are related by the pictorial rules and have stability understood in terms of Walsh’s rules. Symmetries of conjugated ring systems are related to their electronic state by simple mathematical formulas. Description of lone pairs in conjugated systems is based on the strength and sign of orbital interactions around the ring. Simple models for bonding in copper clusters are tested, and the bonding of O2 to Fe(II in hemoglobin is described. Arguments made are supported by HF, B3LYP, and MP2 computations.

  16. Ranking chemical structures for drug discovery: a new machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shivani; Dugar, Deepak; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-05-24

    With chemical libraries increasingly containing millions of compounds or more, there is a fast-growing need for computational methods that can rank or prioritize compounds for screening. Machine learning methods have shown considerable promise for this task; indeed, classification methods such as support vector machines (SVMs), together with their variants, have been used in virtual screening to distinguish active compounds from inactive ones, while regression methods such as partial least-squares (PLS) and support vector regression (SVR) have been used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for predicting biological activities of compounds. Recently, a new class of machine learning methods - namely, ranking methods, which are designed to directly optimize ranking performance - have been developed for ranking tasks such as web search that arise in information retrieval (IR) and other applications. Here we report the application of these new ranking methods in machine learning to the task of ranking chemical structures. Our experiments show that the new ranking methods give better ranking performance than both classification based methods in virtual screening and regression methods in QSAR analysis. We also make some interesting connections between ranking performance measures used in cheminformatics and those used in IR studies.

  17. Structure, chemical ordering and thermal stability of Pt-Ni alloy nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daojian; Yuan, Shuai; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2013-09-01

    Equilibrium structures, chemical ordering and thermal properties of Pt-Ni nanoalloys are investigated by using basin hopping-based global optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods, based on the second-moment approximation of the tight-binding potentials (TB-SMA). The TB-SMA potential parameters for Pt-Ni nanoalloys are fitted to reproduce the results of density functional theory calculations for small clusters. The chemical ordering in cuboctahedral (CO) Pt-Ni nanoalloys with 561 and 923 atoms is obtained from the so called semi-grand-canonical ensemble MC simulation at 100 K. Two ordered phases of L12 (PtNi3) and L10 (PtNi) are found for the CO561 and CO923 Pt-Ni nanoalloys, which is in good agreement with the experimental phase diagram of the Pt-Ni bulk alloy. In addition, the order-disorder transition and thermal properties of these nanoalloys are studied by using MC and MD methods, respectively. It is shown that the typical perfect L10 PtNi structure is relatively stable, showing high order-disorder transition temperature and melting point among these CO561 and CO923 Pt-Ni nanoalloys.

  18. Effects of structural and chemical disorders on the visible/UV spectra of carbonaceous interstellar grains

    CERN Document Server

    Papoular, R J; Roldan, R; Katsnelson, M I; Papoular, R

    2013-01-01

    The recent spectacular progress in the experimental and theoretical understanding of graphene, the basic constituent of graphite, is applied here to compute, from first principles, the UV extinction of nano-particles made of stacks of graphene layers. The theory also covers cases where graphene is affected by structural, chemical or orientation disorder, each disorder type being quantitatively defined by a single parameter. The extinction bumps carried by such model materials are found to have positions and widths falling in the same range as the known astronomical 2175 \\AA features: as the disorder parameter increases, the bump width increases from 0.85 to 2.5 $\\mu$m$^{-1}$, while its peak position shifts from 4.65 to 4.75 $\\mu$m$^{-1}$. Moderate degrees of disorder are enough to cover the range of widths of the vast majority of observed bumps (0.75 to 1.3 $\\mu$m$^{-1}$). Higher degrees account for outliers, also observed in the sky. The introduction of structural or chemical disorder amounts to changing the...

  19. Structural interpretation of chemically synthesized ZnO nanorod and its application in lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Samapti; Sain, Sumanta [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research and Education Centre, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Kar, Tanusree [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032, West Bengal (India); Gunawardhana, Nanda, E-mail: nandagunawardhana@pdn.ac.lk [International Research Centre, Senate Building, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400 (Sri Lanka); Pradhan, Swapan Kumar, E-mail: skpradhan@phys.buruniv.ac.in [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ZnO nanorods are synthesized at room temperature via a simple chemical route. • Growth direction of ZnO nanorods has been determined along 〈0 0 2〉. • ZnO nanorods constructed anode shows a high discharge capacity in first cycle. • It retains good reversible capacity compared to other ZnO morphologies. - Abstract: ZnO nanorods are synthesized at room temperature via a simple chemical route without using any template or capping agent and its importance is evaluated as a suitable candidate for anode material in lithium ion battery. Structural and microstructure characterizations of these nanorods are made by analyzing the X-ray diffraction data employing the Rietveld method of powder structure refinement. It reveals that the ZnO nanorods are grown up with a preferred orientation and elongated along 〈0 0 2〉. FESEM images reveal that these uniform cylindrical shaped nanorods are of different lengths and diameters. These synthesized ZnO nanorods are tested as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The nano grain size of the ZnO rods results in less volume expansion and/or contraction during the alloying/de-alloying process and causes in good cyclability. In addition, synthesized ZnO nanorods deliver high charge/discharge capacities compared to other reported ZnO materials.

  20. Optical and structural properties of PbI2 thin film produced via chemical dipping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariper, İ. A.

    2016-06-01

    PbI2 thin films were deposited on glass substrates via chemical bath deposition. The characteristics of PbI2 thin films were examined through their structural and optical properties. X-ray diffraction spectra showed the presence of rhombohedral structure and atom planes were subject to change with the pH of the bath. Scanning electron microscope indicated uniform distribution of grains. Optical properties were examined via UV-VIS; optical spectrum of the thin films was measured at the range of 200-1100 nm wavelength. Optimum pH levels for producing thin films were found to be pH 4-5. It has been observed that transmission and optical band gap ( E g) increased with the pH of the bath, which varied between 66-95 and 2.24-2.50 %, respectively; on the other hand film thickness of PbI2 thin films was decreased with the pH of the bath. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were in accordance with theoretical value of PbI2 at pH = 4 and 5. Refractive index was negatively correlated with pH of the chemical bath; it has been calculated as 1.97, 1.40, 1.29 and 1.24 for the films produced at pH 2, 3, 4 and 5. The results of the study were compared with similar studies in the literature.

  1. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  2. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    CERN Document Server

    Woitke, Peter; Thi, Wing-Fai

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new disk code, called ProDiMo, to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling balance with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include FeII and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant for the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape probability treatment. The models are characterized by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5AU to 500AU, the models are featured by a puffed-up inner rim and show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r<0.1, Tg~Td) is surrounded by a layer of hot (5000K) and thin (10^7 to 10^8 cm^-3) atomic ga...

  3. The influence of chemical composition on the properties and structure Al-Si-Cu(Mg alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaczorowski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of different chemical composition AlSiCuMg type cast alloys after precipitation hardening are presented. The aim of the study was to find out how much the changes in chemistry of aluminum cast alloys permissible by EN-PN standards may influence the mechanical properties of these alloys. Eight AlSi5Cu3(Mg type cast alloys of different content alloying elements were selected for the study. The specimens cut form test castings were subjected to precipitation hardening heat treatment. The age hardened specimens were evaluated using tensile test, hardness measurements and impact test. Moreover, the structure investigation were carried out using either conventional light Metallography and scanning (SEM and transmission (TEM electron microscopy. The two last methods were used for fractography observations and precipitation process observations respectively. It was concluded that the changes in chemical composition which can reach even 2,5wt.% cause essential differences of the structure and mechanical properties of the alloys. As followed from quantitative evaluation and as could be predicted theoretically, copper and silicon mostly influenced the mechanical properties of AlSi5Cu3(Mg type cast alloys. Moreover it was showed that the total concentration of alloying elements accelerated and intensifies the process of decomposition of supersaturated solid solution. The increase of Cu and Mg concentration increased the density of precipitates. It increases of strength properties of the alloys which are accompanied with decreasing in ductility.

  4. Biomimetic hydrophobic surface fabricated by chemical etching method from hierarchically structured magnesium alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jijia [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China); Wang, Yaming [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Zhiwu, E-mail: zwhan@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China); Ren, Luquan [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-09-01

    As one of the lightest metal materials, magnesium alloy plays an important role in industry such as automobile, airplane and electronic product. However, magnesium alloy is hindered due to its high chemical activity and easily corroded. Here, inspired by typical plant surfaces such as lotus leaves and petals of red rose with super-hydrophobic character, the new hydrophobic surface is fabricated on magnesium alloy to improve anti-corrosion by two-step methodology. The procedure is that the samples are processed by laser first and then immersed and etched in the aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution concentrations of 0.1 mol/L, 0.3 mol/L and 0.5 mol/L for different times of 15 s, 40 s and 60 s, respectively, finally modified by DTS (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}Si(OCH{sub 3}){sub 3}). The microstructure, chemical composition, wettability and anti-corrosion are characterized by means of SEM, XPS, water contact angle measurement and electrochemical method. The hydrophobic surfaces with microscale crater-like and nanoscale flower-like binary structure are obtained. The low-energy material is contained in surface after DTS treatment. The contact angles could reach up to 138.4 ± 2°, which hydrophobic property is both related to the micro–nano binary structure and chemical composition. The results of electrochemical measurements show that anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy is improved. Furthermore, our research is expected to create some ideas from natural enlightenment to improve anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy while this method can be easily extended to other metal materials.

  5. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Chemical Structure-Related Drug-Like Criteria of Global Approved Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fei; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jing; Ji, Min; Li, Jian

    2016-01-12

    The chemical structure of a drug determines its physicochemical properties, further determines its ADME/Tox properties, and ultimately affects its pharmacological activity. Medicinal chemists can regulate the pharmacological activity of drug molecules by modifying their structure. Ring systems and functional groups are important components of a drug. The proportion of non-hydrocarbon atoms among non-hydrogen atoms reflects the heavy atoms proportion of a drug. The three factors have considerable potential for the assessment of the drug-like properties of organic molecules. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies to systematically analyze the simultaneous effects of the number of aromatic and non-aromatic rings, the number of some special functional groups and the proportion of heavy atoms on the drug-like properties of an organic molecule. To this end, the numbers of aromatic and non-aromatic rings, the numbers of some special functional groups and the heavy atoms proportion of 6891 global approved small drugs have been comprehensively analyzed. We first uncovered three important structure-related criteria closely related to drug-likeness, namely: (1) the best numbers of aromatic and non-aromatic rings are 2 and 1, respectively; (2) the best functional groups of candidate drugs are usually -OH, -COOR and -COOH in turn, but not -CONHOH, -SH, -CHO and -SO3H. In addition, the -F functional group is beneficial to CNS drugs, and -NH2 functional group is beneficial to anti-infective drugs and anti-cancer drugs; (3) the best R value intervals of candidate drugs are in the range of 0.05-0.50 (preferably 0.10-0.35), and R value of the candidate CNS drugs should be as small as possible in this interval. We envision that the three chemical structure-related criteria may be applicable in a prospective manner for the identification of novel candidate drugs and will provide a theoretical foundation for designing new chemical entities with good drug

  7. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PYROLYSIS RESPONSE OF BETA-O-4 LIGNIN MODEL POLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Yan Liu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyphenyl (H-type and guaiacyl (G-type lignin model polymers composed of the β–O–4 structure without gamma–hydroxymethyl groups were synthesized. The chemical structures of the H- and G-type lignin models were characterized by 1H- and 13C-NMR, as well as MALDI-TOF/MS. The pyrolysis response was analyzed by means of TG-DTG, Py-GC/MS, and a tube furnace technique. 1H-, 13C-NMR, and MALDI-TOF/MS showed that the lignin models were linear polymers. The polymers included the β–O–4 linkage, as in natural lignin. Pyrolytic products from H-type lignin model only possessed p-hydroxyphenyl structure without methoxyl groups, and the pyrolytic products from G-type lignin model only possessed guaiacyl structure with methoxyl groups. Pyrolysis products from H- and G- type lignin models were classified into char, gas, and liquid (bio-oil, and the gaseous products of two model compounds mainly consisted of H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and C2H4.

  8. Boundary layer chemical vapour synthesis of self-organised ferromagnetically filled radial-carbon-nanotube structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S; Wilson, Rory M; Mountjoy, Gavin; Ibrar, Muhammad; Baxendale, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Boundary layer chemical vapour synthesis is a new technique that exploits random fluctuations in the viscous boundary layer between a laminar flow of pyrolysed metallocene vapour and a rough substrate to yield ferromagnetically filled radial-carbon-nanotube structures departing from a core agglomeration of spherical nanocrystals individually encapsulated by graphitic shells. The fluctuations create the thermodynamic conditions for the formation of the central agglomeration in the vapour which subsequently defines the spherically symmetric diffusion gradient that initiates the radial growth. The radial growth is driven by the supply of vapour feedstock by local diffusion gradients created by endothermic graphitic-carbon formation at the vapour-facing tips of the individual nanotubes and is halted by contact with the isothermal substrate. The radial structures are the dominant product and the reaction conditions are self-sustaining. Ferrocene pyrolysis yields three common components in the nanowire encapsulated by multiwall carbon nanotubes, Fe3C, α-Fe, and γ-Fe. Magnetic tuning in this system can be achieved through the magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies of the encapsulated nanowire. Here we demonstrate proof that alloying of the encapsulated nanowire is an additional approach to tuning of the magnetic properties of these structures by synthesis of radial-carbon-nanotube structures with γ-FeNi encapsulated nanowires.

  9. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Martínez-Santiago

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms. It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  10. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  11. Screening of 397 chemicals and development of a quantitative structure-activity relationship model for androgen receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Annemarie; Niemelä, Jay Russell; Wedebye, Eva Bay;

    2008-01-01

    We have screened 397 chemicals for human androgen receptor (AR) antagonism by a sensitive reporter gene assay to generate data for the development of a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. A total of 523 chemicals comprising data on 292 chemicals from our laboratory and data...... by the synthetic androgen R1881. The MultiCASE expert system was used to construct a QSAR model for AR antagonizing potential. A "5 Times, 2-Fold 50% Cross Validation" of the model showed a sensitivity of 64%, a specificity of 84%, and a concordance of 76%. Data for 102 chemicals were generated for an external...... validation of the model resulting in a sensitivity of 57%, a specificity of 98%, and a concordance of 92% of the model. The model was run on a set of 176103 chemicals, and 47% were within the domain of the model. Approximately 8% of chemicals was predicted active for AR antagonism. We conclude...

  12. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M. [CIEMAT. FNL (edificio 2), Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: maria.gonzalez@ciemat.es; Roman, R.; Maffiotte, C. [CIEMAT. FNL (edificio 2), Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Casablanca, J. [CAI-URJC, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles (Spain); Perez, R. [PNT-PCB, Edifici Modular, C/Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hole, D. [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Pevensey 2 Bdlg., University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 x 10{sup 17} and 5 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 deg. C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  13. Gas separation performance of 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Wulin

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the gas separation performance of several 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures, to correlate chemical structure with gas transport properties with a special focus on CO2 and CH 4 transport and plasticization stability of the polyimides membranes relevant to natural gas purification. The consideration of the other gases (He, O2 and N2) provided additional insights regarding effects of backbone structure on detailed penetrant properties. The polyimides studied include 6FDA-DAM, 6FDA-mPDA, 6FDA-DABA, 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2), 6FDA-DAM:mPDA (3:2) and 6FDA-mPDA:DABA (3:2). Both pure and binary gas permeation were investigated. The packing density, which is tunable by adjusting monomer type and composition of the various samples, correlated with transport permeability and selectivity. The separation performance of the polyimides for various gas pairs were also plotted for comparison to the upper bound curves, and it was found that this family of materials shows attractive performance. The CO 2 plasticization responses for the un-cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance to CO2/CH4 mixed gas with 10% CO2; however, only the cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance under aggressive gas feed conditions (CO 2/CH4 mixed gas with 50% CO2 or pure CO 2). For future work, asymmetric hollow fibers and carbon molecular sieve membranes based on the most attractive members of the family will be considered. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  15. Structural features of the pore formed by Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin inferred from chemical modification and primary structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menestrina, G; Belmonte, G; Parisi, V; Morante, S

    1992-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin makes cells and model membranes permeable to ions and uncharged molecules by opening oligomeric pores of uniform size. Its primary sequence reveals peculiar features which give some hints on the structure of the pore. A flexible region separating the toxin into two halves, several amphiphilic beta-strands and two amphiphilic alpha-helices long enough to span the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer are predicted. In analogy to bacterial porins, we propose that the inner walls of the pore are, at least in part, built by an amphiphilic beta-barrel. The model is consistent with circular dichroism data and with the electrophysiological properties of the pore. Functional information on this toxin were obtained by chemical modification of its four histidine residues. Specific carbethoxylation suggested they have different roles: one is required for specific receptor binding, one for oligomerisation and two for unspecific lipid binding. A tentative assignment of each histidine to its specific role is done on the basis of the structural predictions. A functionally related hemolysin, Aeromonas hydrophyla aerolysin, reveals remarkably similar features including the presence and location of histidines involved in receptor binding and oligomerisation.

  16. Structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces and thin film structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Robert J.

    1999-12-14

    This project focused on three different aspects of oxide thin film systems: (1) Model metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interface studies were carried out by depositing ultra-thin metal (Al, K, Mg) and oxide (MgO, AlO{sub x}) films on TiO{sub 2}, NiO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal oxide substrates. (2) Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen plasma deposition was used to fabricate AlO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates, and film growth mechanisms and structural characteristics were investigated. (3) The friction and wear characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates in unlubricated sliding contact were studied and correlated with film microstructure. In these studies, thin film and interfacial regions were characterized using diffraction (RHEED, LEED, XRD), electron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS, AES), microscopy (AFM) and tribology instruments (pin-on-disk, friction microprobe, and scratch tester). By precise control of thin film microstructure, an increased understanding of the structural and chemical stability of interface regions and tribological performance of ultra-thin oxide films was achieved in these important ceramic systems.

  17. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  18. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kumpf, Christian, E-mail: c.kumpf@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  19. Filamentary structure in chemical tracer distributions near the subtropical jet following a wave breaking event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of observations and analyses of trace gas cross sections in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. The spatially highly resolved (≈0.5 km vertically and 12.5 km horizontally cross sections of ozone (O3, nitric acid (HNO3, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, retrieved from the measurements of the CRISTA-NF infrared limb sounder flown on the Russian M55-Geophysica, revealed intricate layer structures in the region of the subtropical tropopause break. The chemical structure in this region shows an intertwined stratosphere and troposphere. The observed filaments in all discussed trace gases are of a spatial scale of less than 0.8 km vertically and about 200 km horizontally across the jet stream. Backward trajectory calculations confirm that the observed filaments are the result of a breaking Rossby wave in the preceding days. An analysis of the trace gas relationships between PAN and O3 identifies four distinct groups of air mass: polluted subtropical tropospheric air, clean tropical upper-tropospheric air, the lowermost stratospheric air, and air from the deep stratosphere. The tracer relationships further allow the identification of tropospheric, stratospheric, and the transitional air mass made of a mixture of UT and LS air. Mapping of these air mass types onto the geo-spatial location in the cross sections reveals a highly structured extratropical transition layer (ExTL. Finally, the ratio between the measured reactive nitrogen species (HNO3 + PAN + ClONO2 and O3 is analysed to estimate the influence of tropospheric pollution on the extratropical UTLS. In combination, these diagnostics provide the first example of a multi-species two-dimensional picture of the inhomogeneous distribution of chemical species within the UTLS region. Since Rossby wave breaking occurs frequently in the region of the tropopause break, these observed fine-scale filaments are likely ubiquitous in the region. The

  20. Filamentary structure in chemical tracer distributions near the subtropical jet following a wave breaking event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of observations and analyses of trace gas cross-sections in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. The spatially highly-resolved (≈0.5 km vertically and 12.5 km horizontally cross-sections of ozone (O3, nitric acid (HNO3, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, retrieved from the measurements of the CRISTA-NF infrared limb sounder flown on the Russian M55-Geophysica, revealed intricate layer structures in the region of the subtropical tropopause break. The chemical structure in this region shows an intertwined stratosphere and troposphere. The observed filaments in all discussed trace gases are of a spatial scale of less than 0.8 km vertically and about 200 km horizontally across the jet-stream. Backward trajectory calculations confirm that the observed filaments are the result of a breaking Rossby wave in the preceding days. An analysis of the trace gas relationships between PAN and O3 identifies four distinct groups of air mass: polluted subtropical tropospheric air, clean tropical upper-tropospheric air, the lowermost stratospheric air, and air from the deep stratosphere. The tracer relationships further allow the identification of tropospheric, stratospheric, and the transitional air mass made of a mixture of UT and LS air. Mapping of these air mass types onto the geo-spatial location in the cross-sections reveals a highly structured extratropical transition layer (ExTL. Finally, the ratio between the measured reactive nitrogen species (HNO3 + PAN + ClONO2 and O3 is analysed to estimate the influence of tropospheric pollution on the extratropical UTLS.

    In combination, these diagnostics provide the first example of a multi-species two-dimensional picture of a chemically inhomogeneous UTLS region. Since Rossby wave breaking occurs frequently in the region of the tropopause break, these observed fine scale filaments are

  1. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  2. CLiDE Pro: the latest generation of CLiDE, a tool for optical chemical structure recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Aniko T; Johnson, A Peter

    2009-04-01

    We present CLiDE Pro, the latest version of the output of the long-term CLiDE project for the development of tools for automatic extraction of chemical information from the literature. CLiDE Pro is concerned with the extraction of chemical structure and generic structure information from electronic images of chemical molecules available online as well as pages of scanned chemical documents. The information is extracted in three phases, first the image is segmented into text and graphical regions, then graphical regions are analyzed and where possible the connection tables are reconstructed, and finally any generic structures are interpreted by matching R-groups found in structure diagrams with the ones located in the text. The program has been tested on a large set of images of chemical structures originating from various sources. The results demonstrate good performance in the reconstruction of connection tables with few errors in the interpretation of the individual drawing features found in the structure diagrams. This full test set is presented for use in the validation of other similar systems.

  3. X-rays in protoplanetary disks: their impact on the thermal and chemical structure, a grid of models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W. F.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    X-rays impact protoplanetary disks hydrostatic, thermal and chemical structure. The range of efficiency of X-rays is explored using a grid modelling approach: different parameters affects the structure of the disk, this determines different contribution of the X-ray radiation to the chemistry and th

  4. X-rays in protoplanetary disks : Their impact on the thermal and chemical structure, a grid of models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W. F.; Spaans, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    X-rays impact protoplanetary disks hydrostatic, thermal and chemical structure. The range of efficiency of X-rays is explored using a grid modelling approach: different parameters affects the structure of the disk, this determines different contribution of the X-ray radiation to the chemistry and th

  5. Magnetization distribution at the surface of Co-Cr films:magneto-optical, chemical and structural characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Wilhelmus Johannes Maria Arnoldu

    1992-01-01

    In magnetic high density recording media, the Wonnation is stared in the domain structure at the surface of thin films. Chemical, structural and magnetic properties at the surface plar an important role in the reading and writing process. In this thesis the results of an investigation on sputtered C

  6. An ab initio quantum chemical investigation of the structure and stability of ozone-water complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pradeep [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Sathyamurthy, N., E-mail: nsath@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, Sector 81, SAS Nagar, Manauli 140306 (India)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Eclipse geometry most stable for the 1:1 ozone-water complex. ► Cyclic structure most stable for the 1:2 complex. ► Shift in the vertical electronic excitation energy of ozone due to hydration. - Abstract: Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been carried out to investigate the structure and stability of 1:1 and 1:2 ozone-water complexes. All the geometries have been optimized at the CCSD level of theory using aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. The importance of correlation-consistent basis sets in deciding the nature of critical points on these complexes is emphasized. An analysis based on the dipole moment of the complexes and the charge distribution on atoms follows. The effect of ozone molecule on the structure and properties of water dimer is also investigated. Values of the vertical electronic excitation energy and the corresponding transition dipole moment have been calculated for the ozone-water complexes using the multi-reference-configuration-interaction method and the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The calculated shift in vibrational frequencies due to complex formation is compared with the earlier reported experimental and theoretical values.

  7. Manipulation of Optoelectronic Properties and Band Structure Engineering of Ultrathin Te Nanowires by Chemical Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ahin; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Tripathi, Shalini; Biswas, Sangram; Singh, Abhishek K; Bid, Aveek; Ravishankar, N

    2017-01-13

    Band structure engineering is a powerful technique both for the design of new semiconductor materials and for imparting new functionalities to existing ones. In this article, we present a novel and versatile technique to achieve this by surface adsorption on low dimensional systems. As a specific example, we demonstrate, through detailed experiments and ab initio simulations, the controlled modification of band structure in ultrathin Te nanowires due to NO2 adsorption. Measurements of the temperature dependence of resistivity of single ultrathin Te nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) devices exposed to increasing amounts of NO2 reveal a gradual transition from a semiconducting to a metallic state. Gradual quenching of vibrational Raman modes of Te with increasing concentration of NO2 supports the appearance of a metallic state in NO2 adsorbed Te. Ab initio simulations attribute these observations to the appearance of midgap states in NO2 adsorbed Te nanowires. Our results provide fundamental insights into the effects of ambient on the electronic structures of low-dimensional materials and can be exploited for designing novel chemical sensors.

  8. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Deposited By Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Bansilal Ahirrao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cuprous oxide (Cu2O is an interesting p-type semiconductor material used in solar cell applications.  The Modified Chemical Bath Deposition (M-CBD method is suitable for growing thin multilayer structure due to low deposition temperature. This method does not require any sophisticated instrument and substrate need not to be conductive. The nanocrystalline Cu2O thin films were deposited on glass substrates by M-CBD method. The deposited films were characterized by different characterization techniques to study structural, surface morphological, optical and electrical properties. The structural studies show that, the formation of Cu2O thin films with an average crystallite size of 14 nm. Optical studies show a direct band gap 2.48 eV. The room temperature electrical resistivity is of the order of 1.3 kW-cm and activation energy 0.33 eV. The films exhibit p-type electrical conductivity as seen by thermo-emf measurements.

  9. Co3O4(100) films grown on Ag(100): Structure and chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Mohammad A.; Merte, Lindsay R.; Lundgren, Edvin; Knudsen, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Spinel type Co3O4(100) is successfully grown on Ag(100) at ultrahigh vacuum conditions and its structure, electronic and chemical properties are compared with those of Co3O4(111) grown on Ir(100). We find that the Co3O4(100) is unreconstructed. In contrast to the defect free Co3O4(111) surface the Co3O4(100) surface contains a high concentration of defects that we assign to subsurface cation vacancies analogous to those observed for Fe3O4(100). Our photoemission and absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal a very similar electronic structure of the Co3O4(111) and Co3O4(100) surfaces. The similar electronic structure of the two surfaces is reflected in the CO adsorption properties at low temperatures, as we observe adsorption of molecular CO as well as the formation of carbonate (CO3) species on both surfaces upon CO exposure at 85 K.

  10. EDCs DataBank: 3D-Structure database of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a group of compounds that affect the endocrine system, frequently found in everyday products and epidemiologically associated with several diseases. The purpose of this work was to develop EDCs DataBank, the only database of EDCs with three-dimensional structures. This database was built on MySQL using the EU list of potential endocrine disruptors and TEDX list. It contains the three-dimensional structures available on PubChem, as well as a wide variety of information from different databases and text mining tools, useful for almost any kind of research regarding EDCs. The web platform was developed employing HTML, CSS and PHP languages, with dynamic contents in a graphic environment, facilitating information analysis. Currently EDCs DataBank has 615 molecules, including pesticides, natural and industrial products, cosmetics, drugs and food additives, among other low molecular weight xenobiotics. Therefore, this database can be used to study the toxicological effects of these molecules, or to develop pharmaceuticals targeting hormone receptors, through docking studies, high-throughput virtual screening and ligand-protein interaction analysis. EDCs DataBank is totally user-friendly and the 3D-structures of the molecules can be downloaded in several formats. This database is freely available at http://edcs.unicartagena.edu.co.

  11. X-ray chemical imaging and the electronic structure of a single nanoplatelet Ni/graphene composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Wang, Jian; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2014-03-01

    Chemical imaging and quantitative analysis of a single graphene nanoplatelet grown with Ni nanoparticles (Ni/graphene) has been performed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Local electronic and chemical structure of Ni/graphene has been investigated by spatially resolved C, O K-edges and Ni L-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, revealing the covalent anchoring of Ni(0) on graphene. This study facilitates the understanding of the structure modification of host materials for hydrogen storage and offers a better understanding of interaction between Ni particles and graphene.

  12. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savilov, Serguei V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Desyatov, Andrey V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (Russian Federation); Hui, Xia [Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China); Aldoshin, Serguei M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  13. NMR Crystallography of a Carbanionic Intermediate in Tryptophan Synthase: Chemical Structure, Tautomerization, and Reaction Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Carbanionic intermediates play a central role in the catalytic transformations of amino acids performed by pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Here, we make use of NMR crystallography—the synergistic combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and computational chemistry—to interrogate a carbanionic/quinonoid intermediate analogue in the β-subunit active site of the PLP-requiring enzyme tryptophan synthase. The solid-state NMR chemical shifts of the PLP pyridine ring nitrogen and additional sites, coupled with first-principles computational models, allow a detailed model of protonation states for ionizable groups on the cofactor, substrates, and nearby catalytic residues to be established. Most significantly, we find that a deprotonated pyridine nitrogen on PLP precludes formation of a true quinonoid species and that there is an equilibrium between the phenolic and protonated Schiff base tautomeric forms of this intermediate. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the latter builds up negative charge at the substrate Cα and positive charge at C4′ of the cofactor, consistent with its role as the catalytic tautomer. These findings support the hypothesis that the specificity for β-elimination/replacement versus transamination is dictated in part by the protonation states of ionizable groups on PLP and the reacting substrates and underscore the essential role that NMR crystallography can play in characterizing both chemical structure and dynamics within functioning enzyme active sites. PMID:27779384

  14. The Influence of the Chemical Structures of Chitosan and Acid Dye on the Adsorption Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayet Ben Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the study of the influence of the chemical structures of adsorbent and adsorbate on the adsorption process. By using of crab shell chitosan (CC and deep-pink shrimp chitosan (CP for removal of acid 183 and AR114 from aqueous solutions, it is shown that CP, which corresponds to the highest molecular weight, is the most efficient adsorbent material. In addition, the best extent of decolorization is obtained for AR 183 that is the smallest molecule. Langmuir model represents the best fit of the experimental data, indicating monolayer coverage of chitosan outer surface. Pseudo-second order kinetic model describes accurately the adsorption processes, suggesting chemical rate limiting steps. The positive values of the enthalpy changes indicated endothermic attachment of dyes to the biomaterials. CP/AR183 system corresponds to the most energetically favorable phenomenon. Besides, desorption of AR from chitosan was found to be very low in acidic aqueous medium for all couples.

  15. Molecular structure, vibrational, electronic and thermal properties of 4-vinylcyclohexene by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabalasubramanian, P B; Periandy, S; Karabacak, Mehmet; Govindarajan, M

    2015-06-15

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-vinylcyclohexene (abbreviated as 4-VCH) have been recorded in the region 4000-100cm(-1). The optimized molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the fundamental modes of 4-VCH have been precisely assigned and analyzed with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method at 6-311++G(d,p) level basis set. The theoretical frequencies were properly scaled and compared with experimentally obtained FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. Also, the effect due the substitution of vinyl group on the ring vibrational frequencies was analyzed and a detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated total energy distribution (TED). The time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method was employed to predict its electronic properties, such as electronic transitions by UV-Visible analysis, HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and various global reactivity and selectivity descriptors (chemical hardness, chemical potential, softness, electrophilicity index). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Atomic charges obtained by Mulliken population analysis and NBO analysis are compared. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures are also calculated.

  16. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Janaína G M S; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade; Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes; Santos, Carlos Alberto Dos; Vilela, Antônio Cezar Faria; Cunha, João Batista Marimon da

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), MgFe(2)O(4), FeCr(2)O (4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4), MgO, Mn(3)O(4), SiO(2) and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe(2)O(4), Fe(3)O(4), Ca(0.15)Fe(2.85)O(4) and FeCr(2)O(4). Magnesium ferrite (MgFe(2)O(4)), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  17. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  18. Antibacterial, Structural and Optical Characterization of Mechano-Chemically Prepared ZnO Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Manzoor

    Full Text Available Structural investigations, optical properties and antibacterial performance of the pure Zinc Oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs synthesized by mechano-chemical method are presented. The morphology, dimensions and crystallinity of the ZnO NPs were controlled by tweaking the mechanical agitation of the mixture and subsequent thermal treatment. ZnO nanoparticles in small (< 20 nm dimensions with spherical morphology and narrow size distribution were successfully obtained after treating the mechano-chemically prepared samples at 250°C. However, higher temperature treatments produced larger particles. TEM, XRD and UV-Vis spectroscopy results suggested crystalline and phase pure ZnO. The NPs demonstrated promising antibacterial activity against Gram negative foodborne and waterborne bacterial pathogens i.e. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, Campylobacter jejuni and Vibrio cholerae as well as Gram positive methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, thus potential for medical applications. Scanning electron microscopy and survival assay indicated that most probably ZnO nanoparticles cause changes in cellular morphology which eventually causes bacterial cell death.

  19. Structuring Chemical Space: Similarity-Based Characterization of the PubChem Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincilla, Giovanni; Thormann, Michael; Pons, Miquel

    2010-01-12

    The ensemble of conceivable molecules is referred to as the Chemical Space. In this article we describe a hierarchical version of the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering algorithm and apply it to analyze the LINGO-based similarity matrix of a 500 000-molecule subset of the PubChem database, which contains more than 19 million compounds. The combination of two highly efficient methods, namely the AP clustering algorithm and LINGO-based molecular similarity calculations, allows the unbiased analysis of large databases. Hierarchical clustering generates a numerical diagonalization of the similarity matrix. The target-independent, intrinsic structure of the database , derived without any previous information on the physical or biological properties of the compounds, maps together molecules experimentally shown to bind the same biological target or to have similar physical properties.

  20. Enhancing Chemical Stability of Electroplated Cu Films by Engineering Electrolyte Chemistry and Twinning Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Jie; Huang, Chun-Lung; Liao, Chien-Neng

    2015-07-01

    The effects of an electrolyte additive and twinning structure on the corrosion characteristics of electroplated Cu films have been investigated. Four different Cu films were individually deposited with and without benzotriazole (BTA) in the electrolyte using the direct-current (DC) and pulsed-current (PC) plating techniques. The Cu films plated with BTA additive showed improved corrosion resistance according to electrochemical polarization testing and postetching morphological inspection. Moreover, the PC-plated films that had dense nanoscale twin boundaries appeared to have higher chemical stability than the DC-plated ones. It is proposed that the presence of twin-modified grain boundary segments suppresses corrosion along the grain boundary network and improves the corrosion resistance of electroplated Cu films.

  1. Tree and Hashing Data Structures to Speed up Chemical Searches: Analysis and Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Ramzi; Kristensen, Thomas; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    In many large chemoinformatics database systems, molecules are represented by long binary fingerprint vectors whose components record the presence or absence of particular functional groups or combinatorial features. For a given query molecule, one is interested in retrieving all the molecules in the database with a similarity to the query above a certain threshold. Here we describe a method for speeding up chemical searches in these large databases of small molecules by combining previously developed tree and hashing data structures to prune the search space without any false negatives. More importantly, we provide a mathematical analysis that allows one to predict the level of pruning, and validate the quality of the predictions of the method through simulation experiments.

  2. Electronic structure and chemical reaction of Ca deposition on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; GUO YuXian; FENG XueFei; ZHANG Liang; ZHANG WenHua; ZHU JunFa

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT), films were prepared by spin-coating the rr-P3HT chloroform solution onto clean silicon wafer surfaces. The chemical re-action and electronic structure of Ca deposition on rr-P3HT surfaces were in situ investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission spectros-copy (XPS). Upon Ca deposition, Ca-induced band bending of rr-P3HT is observed. In addition, Ca atoms preferentially react with S atoms of rr-P3HT. No obvious reaction between Ca and C atoms can be found. Through the investigation of the evolution of valence band spectra and secondary electron cut-off of rr-P3HT during the process of Ca deposition, an energy level alignment diagram at the Ca/rr-P3HT interface is derived.

  3. Corrosion resistance, composition and structure of RE chemical conversion coating on magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Golden yellow rare earths chemical conversion coating was obtained on the surface of magnesium alloy by immersing in cerium sulfate solution.The corrosion resistance of RE conversion coating was evaluated using immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 3.5%NaCl solution.The morphologies of samples before corrosion and after corrosion were observed by SEM.The structures and compositions of the RE conversion coating were studied by means of XPS.XRD and IR.The results show that,the conversion coating consists of mainly two kinds of element Ce and O,the valences of cerium are+3 and+4.and OH exists in the coating.The anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy is increased obviously by rare earths conversion coating,Its self-corrosion current density decreases and the coating has self-repairing capability in the corrosion process in 3.5%NaCl solution.

  4. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  5. Structure and magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles synthesized by chemical vapor condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. H.; Jang, T. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, B. K.

    2004-06-01

    Iron nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) without the aid of LN2 chiller. The powder synthesized at 400 °C was a mixture of amorphous and crystalline -Fe. Fully crystallized iron particles were then obtained at and above 600 °C. When the reactor temperature was 1000 °C, however, nonmagnetic -Fe was stabilized together with -Fe. The synthesized particles, mostly possessing the core-shell type structure, were all nearly spherical, but the average particle size rapidly increased as the temperature increased. The surface layer that enclosed the iron core and became thicker in smaller particles was Fe3O4 or Fe3O4-related amorphous. Except for the one synthesized at 1000 °C, the iron nanoparticles were not fully saturated. The iron nanoparticles (20 nm) synthesized at 600 °C exhibited iHc 1.0 kOe and Ms 170 emu/g.

  6. The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory for Structured Chemical Product Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Kalakul, Sawitree;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present new methods for design of chemicals based formulated products and their implementation in the software, the Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory. The new products are tailor-made blended liquid products and emulsion-based products. The new software...... employs a template approach, where each template follows the same common steps in the workflow for design of formulated products, but has the option to employ different product specific property models, data and calculation routines, when necessary. With the new additions, the software is able to support...... the design and analysis of a wide range of homogeneous formulated products: tailor-made blends, single phase liquid formulations and emulsion-based products. The decision making process is supported by dedicated property models and structured databases, specifically developed for each design problem scenario...

  7. Electronic Structures and Chemical Bonds of Cobaltite and Ni-Doped

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; XING Xueling; ZHU Lei

    2005-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and thermoelectric property of Ca3 Co2 O6 and Ni-doped was studied by density function theory and discrete variation method(DFT-DVM). The results indicate that the highest valence band (HVB) and the lowest conduction band(LCB) are mainly attributed to Co3 d, Ni3 d and O2 p atomic orbitals. The property of a semiconductor is shown from the gap between HVB and LCB. The gap of Ni-doped one is less than that of Ca3 Co2 O6. The non-metal bond or ceramic characteristic of Ni-doped one is weaker than that of Ca3 Co2 O6, but the metal characteristics of Ni-doped one are stronger than those of Ca3 Co2O6. The thermoelectric property should be improved by adding Ni element into the system of Ca3 Co2 O6.

  8. Structural, Chemical and Biological Aspects of Antioxidants for Strategies Against Metal and Metalloid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J. S. Flora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties.

  9. Structural analysis of CdS thin films obtained by multiple dips of oscillating chemical bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Lazos, C.D. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosendo, E., E-mail: erosendo@siu.buap.m [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Ortega, M. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Oliva, A.I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Tapia, O.; Diaz, T.; Juarez, H.; Garcia, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Rubin, M. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Computacion, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-11-25

    Highly oriented CdS thin films with thicknesses greater than 1 mum were deposited by multiple dips, using oscillating chemical bath deposition (OCBD) at the bath temperature of 75 deg. C, and deposition time ranging from 15 to 75 min for a single dip. Samples with different thickness were prepared by repeating the deposition process for two and three times. The films deposited by a single dip have the alpha-greenockite structure showing the (0 0 2) as preferred orientation, as indicated by the X-ray diffraction measurements. This notable characteristic is preserved in the samples obtained from two or three dips. The crystallite size for the samples deposited by a single dip depends on the deposition time, because it varied from 23 to 37 nm as the deposition time increased. Nevertheless for samples deposited by two and three dips, the grain size shows no noticeable change, being about 22 nm.

  10. Geometrical and substituent effects in conical intersections: Linking chemical structure and photoreactivity in polyenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenov, Artur; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de [Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univerisitaet, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-21

    The knowledge of the intersection space topography of electronic states is essential for deciphering and predicting photoinduced reactions. Michl and Bonacic-Koutecky developed a two-electron two-orbital model that allowed first systematic studies of the chemical origin of conical intersections in strongly polar systems. We generalize this approach to arbitrary functionalized and unfunctionalized polyene systems. For the extended model, a set of mathematical conditions for the formation of conical intersections are derived. These conditions are translated into geometrical motions and electronic effects, which help to explain and predict the structure and energetics of conical intersections. A three-step strategy for the conceptual search of conical intersections is outlined. Its universal validity is demonstrated using the textbook example cyclohexadiene and its functionalized derivative trifluoromethyl-indolylfulgide, a chromophore studied for possible application as a molecular switch.

  11. Geometrical and substituent effects in conical intersections: Linking chemical structure and photoreactivity in polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenov, Artur; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-07-01

    The knowledge of the intersection space topography of electronic states is essential for deciphering and predicting photoinduced reactions. Michl and Bonac̆ić-Koutecký developed a two-electron two-orbital model that allowed first systematic studies of the chemical origin of conical intersections in strongly polar systems. We generalize this approach to arbitrary functionalized and unfunctionalized polyene systems. For the extended model, a set of mathematical conditions for the formation of conical intersections are derived. These conditions are translated into geometrical motions and electronic effects, which help to explain and predict the structure and energetics of conical intersections. A three-step strategy for the conceptual search of conical intersections is outlined. Its universal validity is demonstrated using the textbook example cyclohexadiene and its functionalized derivative trifluoromethyl-indolylfulgide, a chromophore studied for possible application as a molecular switch.

  12. Review of selective accumudation of photosensitizers with different chemical structure in tumor tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Machinskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of available theories explaining mechanisms of photosensitizer selective accumulation in tumor tissue is represented in the article. Variants associated with both targeted delivery of compounds with different chemical structure to tumor and low elimination rate of photosensitizers in the tumor are described. Details of tumor cell up-take of photosensitizer bounded with lipoproteins due to increased expression of low solidity lipoproteins receptors comparing with normal cells; mechanisms of photosensitizer accumulation in tumor tissue due to phagocytosis by macrophages localized in this area; mechanisms of binding of porphyrin-based photosensitizer by collagen fibers, production of which is increased in tumor cells, and other mechanisms are reviewed. Perspectives of practical application of knowledge about mechanisms of selective accumulation for induced increase in selectiveness of photosensitizer accumulation in tumor through targeted delivery of agent to pathological tissues are shown. Analysis of world trends in the search of transport systems for photosensitizers is performed. 

  13. Chemical structures and hepatoprotective effects of constituents from Cassia auriculata leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Seikou; Xu, Fengming; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Nakashima, Souichi; Oda, Yoshimi; Morikawa, Toshio; Muraoka, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    An 80% aqueous acetone extract of Cassia auriculata leaves was found to show a protective effect on D-galactosamine-induced cytotoxicity in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes. From the 80% aqueous acetone extract, we isolated a new benzocoumarin glycoside, avaraoside I (1), and a new flavanol dimer, avaraol I (2), together with 29 known constituents. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. In addition, three isolated compounds, pseudosemiglabrin (15, 0.0011%), (2S)-7,4'-dihydroxyflavan(4β→8)-catechin (22, 0.00075%), and (2S)-7,4'-dihydroxyflavan(4β→8)-gallocatechin (23, 0.092%), displayed hepatoprotective effects equivalent to that of the hepatoprotective agent, silybin.

  14. Raman imaging to study structural and chemical features of the dentin enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebrahim, M. Anwar; Krafft, C.; Popp, J.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and chemical features of the human dentin enamel junction (DEJ) were characterized using Raman spectroscopic imaging. Slices were prepared from 10 German, and 10 Turkish teeth. Raman images were collected at 785 nm excitation and the average Raman spectra were calculated for analysis. Univariate and multivariate spectral analysis were applied for investigation. Raman images were obtained based on the intensity ratios of CH at 1450 cm-1 (matrix) to phosphate at 960 cm-1 (mineral), and carbonate to phosphate (1070/960) ratios. Different algorithms (HCA, K-means cluster and VCA) also used to study the DEJ. The obtained results showed that the width of DEJ is about 5 pm related to univariate method while it varies from 6 to 12 μm based on multivariate spectral technique. Both spectral analyses showed increasing in carbonate content inside the DEJ compared to the dentin, and the amide I (collagen) peak in dentin spectra is higher than DEJ spectra peak.

  15. Structural and Optical Properties of CdS Thin Film Grown by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajpal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report synthesis and optical characterization of CdS thin films coated on glass substrate. The films were deposited using chemical bath deposition method. Scanning Electron microscopy shows a uniform film of CdS film at particular concentration and dipping time. The Energy Dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of Cd and S in the CdS film. X-Ray diffraction confirms the cubic structure of CdS deposited on glass and amorphous nature of glass. Optical and photoluminescence studies were done using UV-Visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy respectively. We have determined bandgap by analyzing UV-Visible spectra results. Wettability studies were done using Optical Contact Angle, which confirms the hydrophobic nature of the CdS films.

  16. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of iron doped thin dioxide films, their structure and photowetting effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobczyk-Guzenda, A., E-mail: anna.sobczyk-guzenda@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Owczarek, S.; Szymanowski, H. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Wypych-Puszkarz, A. [Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Volesky, L. [Technical University of Liberec, Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Studentska 1402/2, 461 17 Liberec 1 (Czech Republic); Gazicki-Lipman, M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lodz University of Technology, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2015-08-31

    Radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) technique was applied for the purpose of deposition of iron doped titanium dioxide coatings from a gaseous mixture of oxygen with titanium (IV) chloride and iron (0) pentacarbonyl. Glass slides and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The coatings morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental and chemical composition was studied with the help of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively, while their phase composition was analyzed with the Raman spectroscopy. For the determination of the film optical properties, ultraviolet (UV–Vis) spectroscopy techniques were used. Iron content in the range of 0.07 to 11.5 at.% was found in the coatings. FTIR studies showed that iron was built-in in the structure of TiO{sub 2} matrix. Surface roughness, assessed with the SEM and AFM techniques, increases with an increasing content of this element. Trace amounts of iron resulted in a lowering of an absorption threshold of the films and their optical gap, but the tendency was reversed for high concentrations of that element. The effect of iron doping on UV photowettability of the films was also studied and, for coatings containing up to 5% of iron, it was stronger than that exhibited by pure TiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Iron doped TiO{sub 2} films were deposited with the PECVD method. • Differences of surface morphology of the films with different iron content were shown. • Depending on the iron content, the film structure is either amorphous or crystalline. • A parabolic character of the optical gap dependence on the concentration of iron was observed. • Up to a concentration of 5% of iron, doped TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a super-hydrophilic effect.

  17. Dependence of SERS enhancement on the chemical composition and structure of Ag/Au hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Elise; O'Connor, Ryan T; Barr, James; Huang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yongmei

    2016-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) such as silver (Ag) and gold (Au) have unique plasmonic properties that give rise to surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Generally, Ag NPs have much stronger plasmonic properties and, hence, provide stronger SERS signals than Au NPs. However, Ag NPs lack the chemical stability and biocompatibility of comparable Au NPs and typically exhibit the most intense plasmonic resonance at wavelengths much shorter than the optimal spectral region for many biomedical applications. To overcome these issues, various experimental efforts have been devoted to the synthesis of Ag/Au hybrid NPs for the purpose of SERS detections. However, a complete understanding on how the SERS enhancement depends on the chemical composition and structure of these nanoparticles has not been achieved. In this study, Mie theory and the discrete dipole approximation have been used to calculate the plasmonic spectra and near-field electromagnetic enhancements of Ag/Au hybrid NPs. In particular, we discuss how the electromagnetic enhancement depends on the mole fraction of Au in Ag/Au alloy NPs and how one may use extinction spectra to distinguish between Ag/Au alloyed NPs and Ag-Au core-shell NPs. We also show that for incident laser wavelengths between ∼410 nm and 520 nm, Ag/Au alloyed NPs provide better electromagnetic enhancement than pure Ag, pure Au, or Ag-Au core-shell structured NPs. Finally, we show that silica-core Ag/Au alloy shelled NPs provide even better performance than pure Ag/Au alloy or pure solid Ag and pure solid Au NPs. The theoretical results presented will be beneficial to the experimental efforts in optimizing the design of Ag/Au hybrid NPs for SERS-based detection methods.

  18. Determination of contact maps in proteins: A combination of structural and chemical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: mc@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gómez-Sicilia, Àngel [Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Av. Doctor Arce, 37, 28002 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), C/Faraday 9, 28049 Cantoblanco (Madrid) (Spain)

    2015-12-28

    Contact map selection is a crucial step in structure-based molecular dynamics modelling of proteins. The map can be determined in many different ways. We focus on the methods in which residues are represented as clusters of effective spheres. One contact map, denoted as overlap (OV), is based on the overlap of such spheres. Another contact map, named Contacts of Structural Units (CSU), involves the geometry in a different way and, in addition, brings chemical considerations into account. We develop a variant of the CSU approach in which we also incorporate Coulombic effects such as formation of the ionic bridges and destabilization of possible links through repulsion. In this way, the most essential and well defined contacts are identified. The resulting residue-residue contact map, dubbed repulsive CSU (rCSU), is more sound in its physico-chemical justification than CSU. It also provides a clear prescription for validity of an inter-residual contact: the number of attractive atomic contacts should be larger than the number of repulsive ones — a feature that is not present in CSU. However, both of these maps do not correlate well with the experimental data on protein stretching. Thus, we propose to use rCSU together with the OV map. We find that the combined map, denoted as OV+rCSU, performs better than OV. In most situations, OV and OV+rCSU yield comparable folding properties but for some proteins rCSU provides contacts which improve folding in a substantial way. We discuss the likely residue-specificity of the rCSU contacts. Finally, we make comparisons to the recently proposed shadow contact map, which is derived from different principles.

  19. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  20. Electronic structure and chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis of dicaesiumtetrachlorodioxoplutonate (Cs2PuO2Cl4 single crystal was done in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV on the basis of binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the PuO2Cl4 (D4h. This cluster reflects Pu close environment in Cs2PuO2Cl4 containing the plutonyl group PuO2. The many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine were shown to contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV binding energy spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV- ~35 eV binding energy one. The filled Pu 5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally con- firmed to present in the valence band of Cs2PuO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the Pu 5f electrons in the chemical bond. The Pu 6p atomic orbitals were shown to participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands, while the filled Pu 6p and O 2s, Cl 3s electronic shells were found to take the largest part in formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. The composition of molecular orbitals and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in Cs2PuO2Cl4 were established. The quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for Cs2PuO2Cl4 in the binding energy range 0-~15 eV was built on the basis of the experimental and theoretical data. It is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2PuO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the PuO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the contribution of the outer valence molecular orbitals -66 %, the contribution of the inner valence molecular orbitals -34 %.

  1. Pure magnetic hard fct FePt nanoparticles: Chemical synthesis, structural and magnetic properties correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suber, L., E-mail: lorenza.suber@ism.cnr.it [ISM-CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, RM (Italy); Marchegiani, G. [ISM-CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, RM (Italy); Olivetti, E.S.; Celegato, F.; Coïsson, M.; Tiberto, P. [INRIM, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Allia, P. [DISAT Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Barrera, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pilloni, L. [UTTMAT-CHI, Via Anguillarese 10, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy); Barba, L. [IC-CNR, Area Science Park, SS 14 Km 163.5 Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Padella, F. [UTTMAT-CHI, Via Anguillarese 10, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy); Cossari, P. [IGAG-CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, RM (Italy); Chiolerio, A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Center for Space Human Robotics, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    FePt nanoparticles, containing a near-equal atomic percentage of Fe and Pt, with a face centered tetragonal structure (fct), are challenging for potential applications in high performance permanent magnets and high density data storage. In this study, we report on the chemical synthesis, carried out both solvothermally and hydrothermally in autoclave reacting iron (III) acetylacetonate and platinum (II) acetylacetonate with tri- or tetra-ethylene glycol, these employed as solvents, reducers and particle surface protecting agents as well. In both methods, a subsequent thermal treatment at high temperatures is necessary to transform the magnetic soft face centered cubic (fcc) phase to the hard fct one. Organic low-weight molecules, generally used to protect the nanoparticle surface and avoid particle aggregation, are decomposed by the thermal treatment resulting in particle aggregation and coalescence phenomena; on the contrary, in this case, a polymer matrix is formed as particle protecting agent and, by thermally treating the hydrothermally prepared nanoparticles up to 750 °C for 1 h, the pure magnetic hard fct phase is obtained while preserving the nanostructure. A detailed study is carried out on FePt nanoparticle structure (fcc and fct phases) and correlated to the magnetic properties of the system. - Highlights: • fct FePt nanoparticles for hard magnetic nanotechnology applications. • Influence of synthesis parameters on the precursor fcc FePt nanoparticle structure. • Easy hydrothermal method for preparing pure fct FePt nanoparticles. • Monitoring the role of temperature and time on the FePt fcc–fct phase transformation. • Correlation between FePt nanoparticle structural and magnetic properties.

  2. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of flower-like ZnO nanostructures prepared by a facile wet chemical method

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Flower-like ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile wet chemical method. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of these nanostructures have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. SEM and TEM studies revealed flower-like structures consisting of nanosheets, formed due to oriented attachment of ZnO nanoparticles. Flower-like ZnO structures ...

  3. Biosynthesis, chemical structure and structure-activity relationship of orfamide lipopeptides produced by Pseudomonas protegens and related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwang eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orfamide-type cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs are biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas and involved in lysis of oomycete zoospores, biocontrol of Rhizoctonia and insecticidal activity against aphids. In this study we compared the biosynthesis, structural diversity, in vitro and in planta activities of orfamides produced by rhizosphere-derived Pseudomonas protegens and related Pseudomonas species. Genetic characterization together with chemical identification revealed that the main orfamide compound produced by the P. protegens group is orfamide A, while the related strains Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c and CMR12a produce orfamide B. Comparison of orfamide fingerprints led to the discovery of two new orfamide homologues (orfamide F and orfamide G in Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c. The structures of these two CLPs were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and mass spectrometry (MS analysis. Mutagenesis and complementation showed that orfamides determine the swarming motility of parental Pseudomonas sp. strain CMR5c and their production was regulated by luxR type regulators. Orfamide A and orfamide B differ only in the identity of a single amino acid, while orfamide B and orfamide G share the same amino acid sequence but differ in length of the fatty acid part. The biological activities of orfamide A, orfamide B and orfamide G were compared in further bioassays. The three compounds were equally active against Magnaporthe oryzae on rice, against Rhizoctonia solani AG 4-HGI in in vitro assays, and caused zoospore lysis of Phytophthora and Pythium. Furthermore we could show that orfamides decrease blast severity in rice plants by blocking appressorium formation in M. oryzae. Taken all together, our study shows that orfamides produced by P. protegens and related species have potential in biological control of a broad spectrum of fungal plant pathogens.

  4. Quantum chemical investigation on structures and energetics of Tungsten Fluoride (WF$_{n}^{f}$) species ( = 0, ±1; < 6)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ambrish Kumar Srivastava; Anoop Kumar Pandey; Neeraj Misra

    2015-10-01

    The present work deals with a systematic study on WF species using ab initio density functional method. The geometrical features related to the equilibrium structures of WF species up to = 5 are highlighted and the effect of addition as well as removal of an electron is discussed. The chemical stability of these species is discussed by calculating their HOMO-LUMO energy gap and binding energy per atom. The frontier molecular orbital surfaces are also analyzed. The energy based electronic properties such as ionization potential, electron affinity, absolute electronegativity and chemical hardness are also evaluated which provide insights into chemical reactivity of these species.

  5. Biodegradation of PAHs in soil: Influence of chemical structure, concentration and multiple amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couling, Natalie R.; Towell, Marcie G. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.u [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    The influence of PAH chemical structure and concentration, added in either single (75 or 300 mg kg{sup -1}) or multiple (2 x 75, 2 x 150 or 4 x 75 mg kg{sup -1}) applications as single- or multiple-contaminant systems, on the development of PAH biodegradation in a pristine soil was investigated. Development in microbial catabolic ability was assessed at 0, 28, 56 and 84 d by monitoring {sup 14}C-naphthalene, {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-pyrene mineralisation over 14 d in respirometric assays. The presence of other contaminants influenced the ability of the indigenous microflora to mineralise structurally different contaminants over time. {sup 14}C-Naphthalene mineralisation was inhibited by the presence of other contaminants; whereas the presence of naphthalene significantly enhanced rates of mineralisation in multiple-contaminant systems containing {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-pyrene. Generally, increasing the number of contaminant applications has implications for catabolic activity of soil microbes. It is suggested the toxic nature of PAHs retarded mineralisation at increased contaminant concentrations. - The simultaneous effects of PAH concentration, contaminant mixture and repeated application on the development of catabolic activity in soil.

  6. Relativistic Multireference Quantum Chemical Study of the Electronic Structure of Actinide Trioxide Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Attila

    2017-03-17

    Actinide trioxide (AnO3, An = U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm) molecules have been investigated by relativistic multireference quantum chemical calculations with the goal to elucidate their electronic structures. The molecular geometries of the ground and selected excited electronic states have been optimized at the spin-orbit-free complete active space second-order perturbation theory (SF-CASPT2) level. The low-lying vertical excitation states have been computed and characterized by CASPT2 calculations taking into account spin-orbit coupling. The reason for the considerable lengthening of the equatorial An-O bond in AmO3 and CmO3 with respect to the other trioxides has been analyzed on the basis of valence molecular orbitals of the SF ground electronic states. For the bond in question a singly occupied π orbital has been identified, this orbital is doubly occupied in the other (An = U, Np, Pu) trioxides. The clarified electronic structures of the investigated AnO3 molecules confirmed the pentavalent character of Am and Cm in their trioxides in contrast to the hexavalent character of U, Np, and Pu.

  7. Quantum chemical and experimental studies on the structure and vibrational spectra of an alkaloid-Corlumine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rashmi; Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The study concentrates on an important natural product, phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid Corlumine (COR) [(6R)-6-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-methylisoquinolin-1-yl] furo [3,4-e]-1,3-benzodioxol-8(6H)-one] well known to exhibit spasmolytic and GABA antagonist activity. It was fully characterized by a variety of experimental methods including vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman), thermal analysis (DSC), UV and SEM. For a better interpretation and analysis of the results quantum chemical calculations employing DFT were also performed. TD-DFT was employed to elucidate electronic properties for both gaseous and solvent environment using IEF-PCM model. Graphical representation of HOMO and LUMO would provide a valuable insight into the nature of reactivity and some of the structural and physical properties of the title molecule. The structure-activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug-receptor interactions. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalisation has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Computation of thermodynamical properties would help to have a deep insight into the molecule for further applications.

  8. Effect of Chemical Structure on Pyrolysis Behavior of Alcell Mild Acidolysis Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two purified mild acidolysis lignins (MAL extracted from triploid poplar, i.e., Alcell MAL and Alkali MAL, were compared. Some properties, including elemental contents, higher heating value (HHV, functional hydroxyl group compositions, and molecular weights, were tested to characterize the structure of these two MALs. The releasing laws of gases and the distribution of products were also investigated through the use of thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared (TG-FTIR and pyrolysis-gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The results showed that both MALs had pyrolytic advantages, largely because of their unique chemical structures. However, although the species of volatiles from Alkali MAL were similar to those from Alcell MAL, the releasing temperature range for Alcell MAL was relatively narrow and the volatiles from it were concentrated. Among the fast pyrolytic products, phenols were the most abundant. The yield of 2,6-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenylphenol, which was the dominant product, was 25.66% for Alcell MAL and 20.77% for Alkali MAL, respectively. Overall, pyrolytic products from Alcell MAL were more enriched.

  9. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  10. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.; (UWASH); (UTSMC)

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  11. [The study on chemical composition and crystalline structure of hypoplastic primary dental enamel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S; Deng, H; Gao, X

    1997-11-01

    The present study, firstly, analyzed chemical composition of hypoplastic primary teeth by electron probe analyzer and compared the hypoplastic part with the normal part in the same tooth; secondly, by X-ray diffraction analyzer, studied the hypoplastic dental enamel and the normal dental enamel, and compared the crystalline structure between different dental enamel and with that of the hydroxyapatite. The aim was to find out any change of crystalline structure. Two exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth were used for the electron probe study. The normal part of each tooth served as control. Determinations of weight percentage (wt%) were made for P, Al, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Sr, Na, K and F. Four exfoliated hypoplastic deciduous anterior teeth and eight exfoliated normal deciduous anterior teeth were used for the X-ray diffraction study. We found by X-ray diffraction that the length of the alpha-axis of enamel crystallite and the distance of lattice plane (corresponding 300) were increased in defective enamel and could be associated with the increased content of magnesium detected by electron probe. Thus, the present study demonstrated that there were both quantity and quality changes in the enamel hypoplasia lesion, which may increase the susceptibility of the defective teeth to caries.

  12. Structural and vibrational properties of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the chemical precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Anshuman; Goswami, Navendu

    2014-04-01

    In this article we study the structural and vibrational properties of ZnO nanoparticles. The details of process and mechanism responsible for the synthesis of nanoparticles by a high yield yet facile chemical precipitation method are explained. The prepared nanomaterial was subjected to various characterizations. Elemental composition of ~30 nm average size nanoparticles was evident through transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Identification of hexagonal wurtzite phase and determination of lattice parameters, crystallite size, strain, crystallinity index, Znsbnd O bond length, Young's modulus, specific surface area, and dislocation density of prepared ZnO nanocrystallites were revealed through extensive X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Vibrational properties of prepared nanoparticles are determined through micro-Raman (μR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. The FTIR and micro-Raman investigations of Infrared and Raman active vibrational modes of ZnO nanoparticles are not only mutually supportive but more significantly, the vibrational properties thus determined are highly correlated with the structural properties determined through TEM, EDS and XRD investigations.

  13. The structural, chemical, and electrical properties of He-implantation-induced nanocavities in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Stein, H.J.; Wampler, W.R.

    1993-11-01

    Si implanted with He to doses of about 2 {times} 10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} and greater and annealed at high temperatures develops a layer of internal nanocavities near the end of the He range. Above an annealing temperature of 700 C, all the implanted He escapes from these implanted samples, and the resultant internal cavity surfaces can be shown to possess a high density of chemically reactive Si dangling orbitals. These structures, in addition to possessing a variety of interesting electronic properties, have recently been shown to hold great promise as getters for removing undesirable impurities from the silicon matrix. Here the authors describe some of the structural features of these nanocavities and studies which have been used to accurately determine the binding energy of H and Cu to Si atoms at the cavity walls. Recently, they have also demonstrated that these nanocavities capture large densities of majority carriers in n- and p-type silicon. These electrical measurements have demonstrated that the nanocavity electronic states possess both acceptor and donor levels in the Si forbidden gap. The approximate location of these levels has been determined by a variety of different types of capacitance transient spectroscopy.

  14. Phytocenotic structure and physico-chemical properties of a small water body in agricultural landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Sender

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Small water bodies, until recently considered as wasteland, are an essential element of the so-called small water retention. Their main use can vary significantly, but they always play a positive role by increasing water resources and enhancing the natural values of the landscape. Moreover, by increasing bio- diversity thanks to plants forming habitats for many species of flora and fauna, small water bodies act as a biofilter, improving water quality. But these small reservoirs belong to the groups of waters that are most exposed to damage, especially within the catchment area. Because of the invaluable role of small farmland water bodies, a study was undertaken to investigate their phytocenotic structure. In addition, an attempt was made to assess the level of threats and to indicate their role in the development of habitat conditions. The investigated reservoir was created in 2007. Before that time, it functioned as a part of the Zemborzycki reservoir, as they were close to each other. Almost the entire surrounding of this small reservoir consisted of farmland. In 2011 a revitalization project was carried out in the reservoir. Plants typical for wetland habitats were mainly introduced, while synanthropic vegetation was removed. Based on chemical and physical analyses, it can be concluded that the investigated reservoir serves as a natural biofilter thanks to the qualitative and quantitative changes in the structure of macrophytes. After the revitalization project, the investigated pond gained new aesthetic and ecological qualities.

  15. Influence of chemical structure on skin reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs--the role of the aromatic ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Au, Ran; Chen, Fu-Shun; Wang, Fang; Lang, Sen-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Here we assessed whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can explain skin reaction. We found that 164 cases of skin reactions associated with the use of AEDs were reported. Aromatic AEDs were suspected in 88.41% (145/164) of patients with skin reactions versus 59.80% (2316/3873) of patients without skin reactions. The presence of an aromatic ring in the chemical structure was associated with a significant increased risk of skin reactions (adjusted ROR 3.50; 95% CI 2.29, 5.35). Among the aromatic AEDs, skin reactions were significantly associated with carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and oxarbazepine. These results confirm that the presence of an aromatic ring as a common feature in chemical structures of AEDs partly explains AED-skin reactions. Skin reactions were reported triple as frequently with aromatic AEDs than with non-aromatic AEDs.

  16. Chemical composition and structural characterization of contrasting colors of soybean seed coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos André Bahry

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed coats provide protection to seeds and present differential traits between soybean genotypes. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition and analyze the internal coat structure of soybean genotypes with contrasting seed coat color, as well as to evaluate the rate of water absorption by seeds. Four genotypes were tested: two genotypes with black seed coat (IAC and TP lines and two genotypes with yellow seed coat (BMX Potência RR and CD 202 cultivars.The seeds of the four genotypes were grown during the 2012/0213 crop season, in a greenhouse at the Embrapa Clima Temperado - Estação Experimental Terras Baixas. After the harvest, the seeds were stored in controlled conditions for five months. After this period, concentration of phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential, anthocyanins, carotenoids, and lignin in seed coats were determined at the Universidade Federal de Pelotas. Internal coat structure was examined on anatomical slides and documented with image capturing software using a microscope at the Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Universidade de São Paulo. Finally, water absorption of contrasting seeds was evaluated at 42 hours of imbibition. Experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey’s test, at 5% probability level. Coat structure was characterized by the image analysis. Imbibition data were subjected to regression analysis. The concentration of phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential, anthocyanins, carotenoids, and lignin are higher in black coated genotypes. Their palisade layer and hourglass cells are thicker and the former are more lignified in black seed coats compared to yellow seed coats. The water gain by the seeds is dependent on the conditions in which the seeds were formed and varied between genotypes, independent of coat coloration and lignin concentration.

  17. Structure, surface reactivity and physico-chemical degradation of fluoride containing phospho-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Santos, Luis F.; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2011-03-28

    We report on the structure, apatite-forming ability and physicochemical degradation of glasses along fluorapatite [FA; Ca5(PO4)3F] - diopside (Di; CaMgSi2O6) join. A series of glasses with varying FA/Di ratio have been synthesised by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous glasses could be obtained only for compositions up to 40 wt.% of FA. The detailed structural analysis of glasses has been made by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR). Silicon was predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species while phosphorus was found in orthophosphate type environment in all the investigated glasses. The apatite forming ability of glasses was investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h – 28 days. An extensive precipitation of calcite (CaCO3) after immersion in SBF was found in all the glasses which considerably masked the formation of hydroxyapatite [HA; Ca5(PO4)3OH] as depicted by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR. The possible mechanism favouring formation of calcite instead of HA has been explained on the basis of experimental results obtained for structure of glasses, leaching profile of glass powders in SBF solution and pH variation in SBF solution. Further, physico-chemical degradation of glasses has been studied in accordance with ISO 10993-14 “Biological evaluation of medical devices – Part 14: Identification and quantification of degradation products from ceramics” in Tris HCl and citric acid buffer. All the FA containing glasses exhibited a weight gain (instead of weight loss) after immersion in citric acid buffer due to the formation of different crystalline products.

  18. Molecular structure of gaseous isatin as studied by electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Alexander V.; Nikolaenko, Kirill O.; Davidovich, Pavel B.; Ivanov, Anatolii D.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2017-03-01

    The molecular structure of isatin, indole-2,3-dione, was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum chemical calculations (M062X and MP2 methods with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set). The best fit of the experimental scattering intensities (R-factor = 4.4%) was obtained for a molecular model of Cs symmetry. The structure of the benzene ring deviates from a regular hexagon due to the adjacent pyrrole heterocycle. The small differences between similar geometric parameters were constrained at the values calculated at the M062X level. The experimental structural parameters agree well with the results of theoretical calculations. The bonds in the benzene moiety are in agreement with their standard values. The (Odbnd)Csbnd C(dbnd O) carbon-carbon bond of the pyrrole moiety (1.573(7) Å) is remarkably lengthened in comparison with standard C(sp2)sbnd C(sp2) value, 1.425(11) Å for N-methylpyrrole. According to NBO analysis of isatin, glyoxal and pyrrole-2,3-dione molecules this lengthening cannot be attributed to the steric interactions of Cdbnd O bonds alone and is, mainly, due to the electrostatic repulsion and hyperconjugation that is delocalization of oxygen lone pairs of π-type into the corresponding carbon-carbon antibonding orbital, nπ(O) → σ∗(Csbnd C). Deletion of σ∗(Csbnd C) orbital followed by subsequent geometry optimization led to shortening of the corresponding Csbnd C bond by 0.06 Å. According to different aromaticity descriptors, aromaticity of benzene moiety of isatin is smaller in comparison with benzene molecule. External magnetic field induces diatropic ring current in benzene moiety of isatin.

  19. Mashed potatoes enriched with soy protein isolate and inulin: chemical, rheological and structural basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M D; Olivares, M D; Blanch, M; Canet, W

    2013-10-01

    Soy protein isolate is typical vegetable protein with health-enhancing activities. Inulin, a prebiotic no digestible carbohydrate, has functional properties. A mashed potato serving of 200 g with added soy protein isolate and/or inulin concentrations of 15-60 g/kg provides from 3 to 12 g of soy protein isolate and/or inulin, respectively. Currently, no information is available about the possible texture-modifying effect of this non-ionizable polar carbohydrate in different soy-based food systems. In this study, the effect of the addition of soy protein isolate and inulin blends at different soy protein isolate: inulin ratios on the degree of inulin polymerization and the rheological and structural properties of fresh mashed and frozen/thawed mashed potatoes were evaluated. The inulin chemical structure remained intact throughout the various treatments, and soy protein isolate did not affect inulin composition being a protein compatible with this fructan. Small-strain rheology showed that both ingredients behaved like soft fillers. In the frozen/thawed mashed potatoes samples, addition of 30 : 30 and 15 : 60 blend ratios significantly increased elasticity (G' value) compared with 0 : 0 control, consequently reducing the freeze/thaw stability conferred by the cryoprotectants. Inulin crystallites caused a significant strengthening effect on soy protein isolate gel. Micrographs revealed that soy protein isolate supports the inulin structure by building up a second fine-stranded network. Thereby, possibility of using soy protein isolate and inulin in combination with mashed potatoes to provide a highly nutritious and healthy product is promising.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPLEX CHEMICAL ADDITIVE CONTAINING THE STRUCTURED CARBON NANOMATERIAL ON PROPERTIES OF CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Sheyda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on influence of domestic complex chemical additive containing structured carbon nanomaterial and characterized by a combination effect (curing acceleration and plasticizing on cement and cement stone properties. The purpose of the investigations, on the one hand, has been to confirm efficacy of УКД-1additive from the perspective for increasing the rate of gain, strength growth of cement concrete and additive influence on setting time with the purpose to preserve molding properties of concrete mixes in time, and on the other hand, that is to assess “mechanism” of the УКД-1 additive action in the cement concrete. The research results have revealed regularities in changes due to the additive of water requirements and time period of the cement setting. The reqularities are considered as a pre-requisite for relevant changes in molding properties of the concrete mixes. The paper also experimentally substantiates the possibility to decrease temperature of cement concrete heating with the УДК-1 additive. It has been done with the purpose to save energy resources under production conditions. In addition to this the paper proves the efficiency of the additive which is expressed in strength increase of cement stone up to 20–40 % in the rated age (28 days that is considered as a basis for strength growth of cement concrete. The paper confirms a hypothesis on physical nature of this phenomenon because the X-ray phase analysis method has shown that there are no changes in morphology of portland cement hydration products under the action of the additive agent containing a structured carbon nanomaterial. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations on УКД-1 additive efficiency have been proved by industrial approbation while fabricating precast concrete products and construction of monolithic structures under plant industrial conditions (Minsk, SS “Stroyprogress” JSC MAPID and on

  1. Quantitative structure-property relationships for chemical functional use and weight fractions in consumer articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical functional use -- the functional role a chemical plays in processes or products -- may be a useful heuristic for predicting human exposure potential in that it comprises information about the compound's likely physical properties and the product formulations or articles ...

  2. Chemical, electrochemical, and structural stability of low-density self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, David K; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-09-25

    The stability of low-density self-assembled monolayers of mercaptohexadecanoic acid on gold is studied under a variety of storage conditions--air at room temperature, argon at room temperature and 4 degrees C, and ethanol at room temperature. The structural monotony of the low-density monolayers was assessed by monitoring the alkyl chains of LDSAMs by grazing-angle Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a function of time. Independently of the storage conditions, both symmetric and asymmetric methylene stretches at 2923 and 2852 cm-1 decreased after 4 weeks to 2919 and 2849 cm-1, respectively. These data suggest an increased ordering of the alkyl chains that is distinctly different from that of conventional high-density monolayers of mercaptohexadecanoic acid included as a reference in this study. As a further extension of this observation, the electrochemical barrier properties of the low-density monolayers were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and did not change significantly for any of the storage conditions over a period of 4 weeks. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to assess the chemical changes in the low-density monolayers over time. The chemical composition was essentially unaltered for all storage conditions. Specifically, oxidation of the sulfur headgroup, a common cause of monolayer degradation, was excluded for all test conditions on the basis of XPS analysis. This study confirms excellent storage stability for low-density monolayers under commonly used storage conditions and bridges an important technological gap between these systems and conventional high-density systems.

  3. Structure and vibrational spectrum of 2-methylallyl radical. Nonempirical quantum chemical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, V.G.; Volkova, V.V.; Gusel' nikov, L.E.; Ziegler, U.; Zimmermann, G.; Ondurshka, B.; Nametkin, N.S.

    1987-04-01

    In the study of the role of allyl type radicals in the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons it is of interest to investigate the conditions of formation, structure, and reactivity of 2-methylallyl radical (C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./). The authors performed theoretical assignment of the bands, which were observed in the lattice spectra of the pyrolysis products, to the vibrations of the C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ radical by means of calculation of the frequencies and shapes of the normal vibrations. Since the necessary geometrical parameters and force coefficients of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ are not known, they determined them by means of nonempirical quantum chemical calculation. The quantum chemical calculation of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ was performed by means of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock method using STO-4G (geometry optimization taking into account the characteristics of calculation of radicals in minimal bases and calculation of the force coefficients by means of numerical differentiation) and 4-31G bases (electron density distribution) by means of GAUSSIAN-70 program. For comparison of the energy and electron density distribution they performed calculations also for the 2-methylallyl cation C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./. From the calculation of the difference of the total energies of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ and C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ in the 4-31G basis was 7.4 eV, which is comparable to the ionization energy of the 2-methylallyl radical, 7.95 eV.

  4. Chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the electric arc furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Janaina G.M.S. [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: jana@ct.ufrgs.br; Brehm, Feliciane Andrade [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Moraes, Carlos Alberto Mendes [Nucleo de Caracterizacao de Materiais/NucMat, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, UNISINOS, Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil); Santos, Carlos Alberto dos [Nucleo de Educacao a Distancia, Universidade Estadual do Rio Grande do Sul, UERGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vilela, Antonio Cezar Faria [Laboratorio de Siderurgia/LASID, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS/PPGEM Centro de Tecnologia, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500 CEP, 91501-970 Caixa postal 15021, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cunha, Joao Batista Marimon da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Campus do Vale, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2006-08-25

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) is a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Important elements to the industry such as, Fe and Zn are the main ones in EAFD. Due to their presence, it becomes very important to know how these elements are combined before studying new technologies for its processing. The aim of this work was to carry out a chemical, physical, structural and morphological characterization of the EAFD. The investigation was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy via SEM (EDS), X-ray mapping analysis via SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. By XRD the following phases were detected: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, FeCr{sub 2}O {sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4}, MgO, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} and ZnO. On the other hand, the phases detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy were: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Ca{sub 0.15}Fe{sub 2.85}O{sub 4} and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnesium ferrite (MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}), observed in the XRD pattern as overlapped peaks, was not identified in the Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis.

  5. Optical and structural properties of chemically deposited CdS thin films on polyethylene naphthalate substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Paz, M.G., E-mail: myrnasandoval@udec.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Ramirez-Bon, R. [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Queretaro, Apdo. Postal 1-798, 76001 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-11-30

    CdS thin films were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate substrates by means of the chemical bath deposition technique in an ammonia-free cadmium-sodium citrate system. Three sets of CdS films were grown in precursor solutions with different contents of Cd and thiourea maintaining constant the concentration ratios [Cd]/[thiourea] and [Cd]/[sodium citrate] at 0.2 and 0.1 M/M, respectively. The concentrations of cadmium in the reaction solutions were 0.01, 7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M, respectively. The three sets of CdS films were homogeneous, hard, specularly reflecting, yellowish and adhered very well to the plastic substrates, quite similar to those deposited on glass substrates. The structural and optical properties of the CdS films were determined from X-ray diffraction, optical transmission and reflection spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. We found that the properties of the films depend on both the amount of Cd in the growth solutions and on the deposition time. The increasing of Cd concentration in the reaction solution yield to thicker CdS films with smaller grain size, shorter lattice constant, and higher energy band gap. The energy band gap of the CdS films varied in the range 2.42-2.54 eV depending on the precursor solution. The properties of the films were analyzed in terms of the growth mechanisms during the chemical deposition of CdS layers.

  6. Structure-based chemical modification strategy for enzyme replacement treatment of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Gamez, Alejandra; Sarkissian, Christineh N; Straub, Mary; Patch, Marianne G; Han, Gye Won; Striepeke, Steve; Fitzpatrick, Paul; Scriver, Charles R; Stevens, Raymond C

    2005-01-01

    Structure-based protein engineering coupled with chemical modifications (e.g., pegylation) is a powerful combination to significantly improve the development of proteins as therapeutic agents. As a test case, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) was selected for enzyme replacement therapy in phenylketonuria [C.R. Scriver, S. Kaufman, Hyperphenylalaninemia:phenylalanine Hydroxylase Deficiency. The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2001, Chapter 77], an inherited metabolic disorder (OMIM 261600) causing mental retardation due to deficiency of the enzyme l-phenylalanine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.1). Previous in vivo studies of recombinant PAL demonstrated a lowering of blood l-phenylalanine levels; yet, the metabolic effect was not sustained due to protein degradation and immunogenicity [C.N. Sarkissian, Z. Shao, F. Blain, R. Peevers, H. Su, R. Heft, T.M. Chang, C.R. Scriver, A different approach to treatment of phenylketonuria:phenylalanine degradation with recombinant phenylalanine ammonia lyase, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1999) 2339; J.A. Hoskins, G. Jack, H.E. Wade, R.J. Peiris, E.C. Wright, D.J. Starr, J. Stern, Enzymatic control of phenylalanine intake in phenylketonuria, Lancet 1 (1980) 392; C.M. Ambrus, S. Anthone, C. Horvath, K. Kalghatgi, A.S. Lele, G. Eapen, J.L. Ambrus, A.J. Ryan, P. Li, Extracorporeal enzyme reactors for depletion of phenylalanine in phenylketonuria, Ann. Intern. Med. 106 (1987) 531]. Here, we report the 1.6A three-dimensional structure of Rhodosporidium toruloides PAL, structure-based molecular engineering, pegylation of PAL, as well as in vitro and in vivo PKU mouse model studies on pegylated PAL formulations. Our results show that pegylation of R. toruloides PAL leads to promising therapeutic efficacy after subcutaneous injection by enhancing the in vivo activity, lowering plasma phenylalanine, and leading to reduced immunogenicity. The three-dimensional structure of PAL provides a

  7. The potential of computer-based quantitative structure activity approaches for predicting acute toxicity of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvinavashe, E.

    2008-01-01

    Within the EU, the management of the risks of chemicals currently falls under a new legislation called Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH). Within the next 10 years, existing (eco)toxicological data gaps for the more than 100 000 chemicals on the European Inventory of E

  8. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  9. Understanding Boron through Size-Selected Clusters: Structure, Chemical Bonding, and Fluxionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeeva, Alina P.; Popov, Ivan A.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2014-04-15

    Conspectus Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center–two-electron (2c–2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter–two-electron (nc–2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron’s electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13+ and B19–. A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B–, formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B

  10. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  11. Quantum chemical calculations to reveal the relationship between the chemical structure and the fluorescence characteristics of phenylquinolinylethynes and phenylisoquinolinylethynes derivatives, and to predict their relative fluorescence intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Siavash; Beheshti, Abolghasem; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the relationship between the chemical structure and fluorescence characteristics of 30 phenylquinolinylethyne (PhQE), and phenylisoquinolinylethyne (PhIE) derivatives compounds employing ab initio calculations have been elucidated. Quantum chemical calculations (6-31G) were carried out to obtain: the optimized geometry, energy levels, charges and dipole moments of these compounds, in the singlet (steady and excited states) and triplet states. The relationship between quantum chemical descriptors, and wavelength of maximum excitation and emission indicated that these two parameters have the most correlation with quantum chemical hardness (eta). Also, stokes shift has the most correlation with the square of difference between the maximum of positive charges in the singlet steady and singlet excited states. The quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) of PhQE and PhIE was studied for relative fluorescence intensity (RFI). The genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to select the variables that resulted in the best-fit models. After the variable selection, multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector machine (SVM) were both utilized to construct linear and non-linear QSPR models, respectively. The SVM model demonstrated a better performance than that of the MLR model. The route mean square error (RMSE) in the training and the test sets for the SVM model was 0.195 and 0.324, and the correlation coefficients were 0.965 and 0.960, respectively, thus revealing the reliability of this model. The resulting data indicated that SVM could be used as a powerful modeling tool for QSPR studies. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on QSPR studies to predict RFI for a series of PhQE and PhIE derivative compounds using SVM.

  12. Effect of chemical permeation enhancers on stratum corneum barrier lipid organizational structure and interferon alpha permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Shadi H; Saliaj, Evi; Wettig, Shawn D; Dong, Chilbert; Ivanova, Marina V; Huzil, J Torin; Foldvari, Marianna

    2013-06-01

    The outermost layer of the skin, known as the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of dead corneocytes embedded in an intercellular lipid matrix consisting of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. The high level of organization within this matrix protects the body by limiting the permeation of most compounds through the skin. While essential for its protective functions, the SC poses a significant barrier for the delivery of topically applied pharmaceutical agents. Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) can increase delivery of small drug compounds into the skin by interacting with the intercellular lipids through physical processes including extraction, fluidization, increased disorder, and phase separation. However, it is not clear whether these same mechanisms are involved in delivery of biotherapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins. Here we describe the effect of three categories of CPEs {solvents [ethanol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (transcutol), oleic acid], terpenes [menthol, nerol, camphor, methyl salicylate], and surfactants [Tween 80, SDS, benzalkonium chloride, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (Cremophor RH40), didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), didecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)]} on the lipid organizational structure of human SC as determined by X-ray scattering studies. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies were conducted to correlate the degree of structural changes and hydrocarbon chain packing in SC lipids caused by these various classes of CPEs to the extent of permeation of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα), a 19 kDa protein drug, into human skin. With the exception of solvents, propylene glycol and ethanol, all classes of CPEs caused increased disordering of lamellar and lateral packing of lipids. We observed that the highest degree of SC lipid disordering was caused by surfactants (especially SDS, DDAB, and DTAB) followed by terpenes, such as nerol. Interestingly, in vitro skin permeation studies

  13. Electronic and physico-chemical properties of nanometric boron delta-doped diamond structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicot, G., E-mail: gauthier.chicot@neel.cnrs.fr; Fiori, A.; Tran Thi, T. N.; Bousquet, J.; Delahaye, J.; Grenet, T.; Eon, D.; Omnès, F.; Bustarret, E. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, 38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, 38042 Grenoble (France); Volpe, P. N.; Tranchant, N.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Arnault, J. C. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gerbedoen, J. C.; Soltani, A.; De Jaeger, J. C. [IEMN, UMR-CNRS 8520, Avenue Poincaré, Université de Lille 1, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Araújo, D. [Dpto Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cádiz) (Spain); Jomard, F. [Groupe d' Étude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), UMR 8635 du CNRS, UVSQ, 45 Avenue des États-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); and others

    2014-08-28

    Heavily boron doped diamond epilayers with thicknesses ranging from 40 to less than 2 nm and buried between nominally undoped thicker layers have been grown in two different reactors. Two types of [100]-oriented single crystal diamond substrates were used after being characterized by X-ray white beam topography. The chemical composition and thickness of these so-called delta-doped structures have been studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Temperature-dependent Hall effect and four probe resistivity measurements have been performed on mesa-patterned Hall bars. The temperature dependence of the hole sheet carrier density and mobility has been investigated over a broad temperature range (6 K < T < 450 K). Depending on the sample, metallic or non-metallic behavior was observed. A hopping conduction mechanism with an anomalous hopping exponent was detected in the non-metallic samples. All metallic delta-doped layers exhibited the same mobility value, around 3.6 ± 0.8 cm{sup 2}/Vs, independently of the layer thickness and the substrate type. Comparison with previously published data and theoretical calculations showed that scattering by ionized impurities explained only partially this low common value. None of the delta-layers showed any sign of confinement-induced mobility enhancement, even for thicknesses lower than 2 nm.

  14. Quantum-chemical investigation of zirconium phthalocyanine (PcZr) electronic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, S.G.; Bannikov, V.S.; Brattsev, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    Using LCAO MO SCF quantum-chemical method zirconium phthalocyanine (PcZr) electronic structure was investigated. Zirconium valence state is characterized by 4dsup(3.03)5ssup(0.46)5psup(0.57) configuration, practically zero-order formal charge, the presence of full-symmetrical orbital of unshared electron pair, consisting mainly of 4dsub(Zsup(2))-AO with 5s-AO small admixture. The conjugation of ..pi..-electron system of octaazamacrocycle with zirconium is characterized by 0.56 a. u. electron density delocalization on ..pi..-orbital of the latter and Vsub(..pi..Zr)=1.0 valence index. ZrN bonds are characterized by 0.66 Wiberg indexes, CN bonds - by 1.24 and 1.39 indexes. The energy of asub(1u) ..-->.. esub(g)* (1.8 eV) long-wave transition, calculated in one-configurational approximation coincides with the experimental one. The second band of the electron absorption spectrum is located on the boundary of the visible and ultraviolet spectrum regions and corresponds to asub(2u) ..-->.. esub(g)* one-electron excitation. Both electron transitions are polarized in molecule plane.

  15. Influences of ultrasonic irradiation on the morphology and structure of nanoporous Co nanoparticles during chemical dealloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Co-61.8 wt% Al nanoparticles of 45 nm were prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction (HPMR method. The nanoparticles display core shell structure with Al13Co4 and CoAl core and aluminum oxide shell (about 2 nm. Under ultrasonic irradiation, nanoporous fcc-Co nanoparticles were produced successfully by chemically dealloying the Co-Al nanoparticles at room temperature, whereas, without ultrasonic irradiation CoAl phase could hardly react with sodium hydroxide solution. At 323 K the Co-Al nanoparticles could be dealloyed to fcc-Co and hcp-Co phases even without ultrasonic irradiation. The surface area of the dealloyed nanoparticles under ultrasonic irradiation was larger than that of the dealloyed sample without ultrasonic irradiation at the same temperature. It is believed that the microjet and shock-wave induced by ultrasonic irradiation give rise to particles size reduction, interparticle collision and surface cleaning, and accelerate the dealloying process and the phase transformation.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  17. Quantum chemical density functional theory studies on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P P; Gunasekaran, S; Swaminathan, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-02-25

    A collective experimental and theoretical study was conducted on the molecular structure and vibrational spectra of mannitol. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of mannitol were recorded in the solid phase. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic functions and atomic charges of mannitol in the ground state have been calculated by using the ab initio HF (Hartree-Fock) and density functional methods (B3LYP) invoking cc-pVDZ basis set. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of Total Energy Distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes. The UV absorption spectra of the title compound dissolved in water. Natural bond orbital analysis has been carried out to explain the charge transfer or delocalization of charge due to the intra-molecular interactions. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by GIAO methods. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of this novel molecular system and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of mannitol are calculated using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ and HF/cc-pVDZ methods on the finite-field approach. By using TD-DFT calculation, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted and a good agreement with experimental one is established. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) have been investigated using theoretical calculations, the calculated HOMO and LUMO energies shows that the charge transfer within the molecule.

  18. ChemEngine: harvesting 3D chemical structures of supplementary data from PDF files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Vyas, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Digital access to chemical journals resulted in a vast array of molecular information that is now available in the supplementary material files in PDF format. However, extracting this molecular information, generally from a PDF document format is a daunting task. Here we present an approach to harvest 3D molecular data from the supporting information of scientific research articles that are normally available from publisher's resources. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of extracting truly computable molecules from PDF file formats in a fast and efficient manner, we have developed a Java based application, namely ChemEngine. This program recognizes textual patterns from the supplementary data and generates standard molecular structure data (bond matrix, atomic coordinates) that can be subjected to a multitude of computational processes automatically. The methodology has been demonstrated via several case studies on different formats of coordinates data stored in supplementary information files, wherein ChemEngine selectively harvested the atomic coordinates and interpreted them as molecules with high accuracy. The reusability of extracted molecular coordinate data was demonstrated by computing Single Point Energies that were in close agreement with the original computed data provided with the articles. It is envisaged that the methodology will enable large scale conversion of molecular information from supplementary files available in the PDF format into a collection of ready- to- compute molecular data to create an automated workflow for advanced computational processes. Software along with source codes and instructions available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/chemengine/files/?source=navbar.Graphical abstract.

  19. Different patterns of developmental toxicity in the rat following prenatal administration of structurally diverse chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, D.L.; Valentine, D.M.; Bradshaw, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    Differences in the profiles of developmental toxicity for four structurally diverse chemical compounds have been defined following prenatal exposure in the rat. Diethylstilbestrol (DES), 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (4CB), zeranol, and cadmium were administered by gavage to Sprague-Dawley rats daily from d 6 through d 18 of gestation. Dams were sacrificed at four prenatal endpoints and the numbers of live and dead fetuses and resorbed embryos were counted. Additional dams were allowed to bring their litters to term, and their offspring were monitored until they reached adulthood. DES induced prenatal death primarily in early embryonic life, and also during parturition. 4CB increased mortality from late in gestation up to 24 h after birth, and altered the sex ratio of survivors by selectively acting against males in utero. Exposure to zeranol resulted in embryolethality only. Cadmium was not lethal to the conceptus at any dose below the dose that caused maternal mortality. Only 4CB had an obvious teratogenic effect, causing intestinal hemorrhage. All compounds produced transient perinatal decreases in the weight of the offspring. 30 references, 6 tables.

  20. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  1. A comparative chemical-structural study of fossil humic acids and those extracted from urban wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, C.; Hernandez, T.; Costa, F.; Ceccanti, B.; Polo, A. (Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Segura, Murcia (Spain))

    1992-05-01

    Chemical-structural features of commercial humic acids (HAs) from leonardite or lignite were studied and the data obtained were compared with those of humic acids extracted from composted urban wastes. The greatest differences showed by the elemental analysis between the three HAs were in N and H contents, both of which diminished with the oxidation degree of the starting materials. FTIR spectra did not show differences between HAs from evolved materials such as leonardite or lignite. However, differences were found between these HAs and those extracted from composts of urban wastes, which showed a greater aliphatic character and a more pronounced peak in the absorption band attributed to secondary amides and in that of carbohydrates. The {sup 13}C-NMR spectra were similar for both HAs from leonardite regardless of their oxidation degree. The percentage of aromaticity of these HAs was 45%. The spectra of compost HAs showed a low aromaticity degree for these HAs as a consequence of the pronounced peak appearing at 73 ppm corresponding to carbon of carbohydrates and/or polyalcohols and aminoacids. Py-GC revealed a high content of benzene and toluene in all the commercial HAs. The values of these fragments as well as those of the ratios between pyrolitic fragments, used as humification index for soils, were the highest in the HA extracted from the more oxidized leonardite. 17 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. Effects of chemical contaminants on growth, age-structure, and reproduction of Mytilus edulis complex from Puget sound, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagley, Anna N; Kardong, Kyle E; Snider, Robert G; Casillas, Edmundo

    2014-07-01

    Bivalves are used as sentinel species to detect chemical contaminants in the marine environment, but biological effects on indigenous populations that result from chemical exposure are largely unknown. We assessed age-weight, length-weight relationships, age structure, and reproductive status (i.e. fecundity, egg size) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis complex from six sites in central Puget Sound, Washington, and one site in the relatively pristine area of northern Puget Sound. Results of this study suggest that mussels from urban areas of Puget Sound exhibit a lower growth rate, altered population age-structure, and potential reproductive impairment as a result of exposure to chemical contaminants. These findings support the use of mussels as sentinel species to assess the biological effects of contaminants on invertebrate populations.

  3. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs: the role of the aromatic ring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Puijenbroek, E.P. van; Bijl, A.H.; Hermens, W.A.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  4. Influence of chemical structure on hypersensitivity reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs : the role of the aromatic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, Kim B; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P; Bijl, Annemarie H; Hermens, Walter A J J; Zwart-van Rijkom, Jeannette E F; Hekster, Yechiel A; Egberts, Toine C G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can cause various 'idiosyncratic' hypersensitivity reactions, i.e. the mechanism by which AEDs induce hypersensitivity is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can ex

  5. Combining QSAR modeling and text-mining techniques to link chemical structures and carcinogenic modes of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Papamokos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. QSAR, a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  6. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  7. [New biological active derivatives of indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid. Synthesis, physico-chemical characterisation and structure validation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Catalina; Stefanache, Alina; Dumitrache, M

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that niflumic acid glycinamide has a good antiinflammatory action useful in gum inflammatory diseases. The objective of this study was to obtain new glycinamides of acetylsalicylic acid and indomethacin, which could have a better antiinflammatory action than niflumic acid glycinamide. The study presents the synthesis, physico-chemical characterisation and structure validation of these glycinamides.

  8. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzani, Claudio

    This report provides an initial analysis of the occupational and qualification structures in the field of environmental protection in the Italian metal and chemical industries. The first two chapters review the legislative background, situation in industry, and provision of environmental education and training. The third chapter presents results…

  9. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the

  10. Chemical bonding and electronic-structure in MAX phases as viewed by X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Martin; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is a critical review of MAX-phase carbides and nitrides from an electronic-structure and chemical bonding perspective. This large group of nanolaminated materials is of great scientific and technological interest and exhibit a combination of metallic and ceramic features. These properties are related to the special crystal structure and bonding characteristics with alternating strong M-C bonds in high-density MC slabs, and relatively weak M-A bonds between the slabs. Here, we review the trend and relationship between the chemical bonding, conductivity, elastic and magnetic properties of the MAX phases in comparison to the parent binary MX compounds with the underlying electronic structure probed by polarized X-ray spectroscopy. Spectroscopic studies constitute important tests of the results of state-of-the-art electronic structure density functional theory that is extensively discussed and are generally consistent. By replacing the elements on the M, A, or X-sites in the crystal structure, the corresponding changes in the conductivity, elasticity, magnetism and other materials properties makes it possible to tailor the characteristics of this class of materials by controlling the strengths of their chemical bonds.

  11. Neurodevelopmental toxicity of prenatal polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs by chemical structure and activity: a birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hye-Youn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are ubiquitous environmental toxins. Although there is growing evidence to support an association between PCBs and deficits of neurodevelopment, the specific mechanisms are not well understood. The potentially different roles of specific PCB groups defined by chemical structures or hormonal activities e.g., dioxin-like, non-dioxin like, or anti-estrogenic PCBs, remain unclear. Our objective was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to defined subsets of PCBs and neurodevelopment in a cohort of infants in eastern Slovakia enrolled at birth in 2002-2004. Methods Maternal and cord serum samples were collected at delivery, and analyzed for PCBs using high-resolution gas chromatography. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development -II (BSID were administered at 16 months of age to over 750 children who also had prenatal PCB measurements. Results Based on final multivariate-adjusted linear regression model, maternal mono-ortho-substituted PCBs were significantly associated with lower scores on both the psychomotor (PDI and mental development indices (MDI. Also a significant association between cord mono-ortho-substituted PCBs and reduced PDI was observed, but the association with MDI was marginal (p = 0.05. Anti-estrogenic and di-ortho-substituted PCBs did not show any statistically significant association with cognitive scores, but a suggestive association between di-ortho-substituted PCBs measured in cord serum and poorer PDI was observed. Conclusion Children with higher prenatal mono-ortho-substituted PCB exposures performed more poorly on the Bayley Scales. Evidence from this and other studies suggests that prenatal dioxin-like PCB exposure, including mono-ortho congeners, may interfere with brain development in utero. Non-dioxin-like di-ortho-substituted PCBs require further investigation.

  12. Chemical-Structural Changes of Organic Matter in a Semi-Arid Soil After Organic Amendment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.NICOL(A)S; G.MASCIANDARO; T.HERN(A)NDEZ; C.GARCIA

    2012-01-01

    A 9-month incubation experiment using composted and non-composted amendments derived from vine pruning waste and sewage sludge was carried out to study the effects of the nature and stability of organic amendments on the structural composition of organic matter (OM) in a semi-arid soil. The changes of soil OM,both in the whole soil and in the extractable carbon with pyrophosphate,were evaluated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography and chemical analyses.By the end of the experiment,the soils amended with pruning waste exhibited less organic carbon loss than those receiving sewage sludge.The non-composted residues increased the aliphatic-pyrolytic products of the OM,both in the whole soil and also in the pyrophosphate extract,with the products derived from peptides and proteins being significantly higher.After 9 months,in the soils amended with pruning waste the relative abundance of phenolic-pyrolytic products derived from phenolic compounds,lignin and proteins in the whole soil tended to increase more than those in the soils amended with sewage sludge.However,the extractable OM with pyrophosphate in the soils amended with composted residues tended to have higher contents of these phenolic-pyrolytic products than that in non-composted ones.Thus,despite the stability of pruning waste,the composting of this material promoted the incorporation of phenolic compounds to the soil OM.The pyrolytic indices (furfural/pyrrole and aliphatic/aromatic ratios) showed the diminution of aliphatic compounds and the increase of aromatic compounds,indicating the stabilization of the OM in the amended soils after 9 months.In conclusion,the changes of soil OM depend on the nature and stability of the organic amendments,with composted vine pruning waste favouring humification.

  13. Structure and Chemical Bond of Thermoelectric Ce-Co-Sb Skutterudites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The correlations among composition,structure,chemical bond and thermoelectric property of skutterudites CoSb3 and CeCo5Fe3Sb12 have been studied by using density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method.Three models for this study were proposed and calculated by which the "rattling" pattern was described.Model 1 is with Ce in the center,model 2 is with Ce away the center and near to Sb,and model 3 is also with Ce away the center but near to Fe.The calculated results show that in model 3,the ionic bond is the strongest,but the covalent bond is the weakest.Due to the different changes between ionic and covalent bond,there is less difference in the stability among the models 1,2 and 3.Therefore,these different models can exist at the same time,or can translate from one to another more easily.In other words,the "rattling" pattern has taken place.Unfilled model of CoSb3,without Ce and Fe,is called model 4.The covalent bond of Co-Sb or Fe-Sb in models 1,2 and 3 is weaker than that of Co-Sb in model 4,as some electrical cloud of Sb takes part in the covalent bond of Ce-Sb in the filled models.The result is consistent with the experimental result that the thermal conductivity of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is lower than that of CoSb3,and the thermoelectric property of CeCo5Fe3Sb12 is superior to that of CoSb3.

  14. Complex, dynamic combination of physical, chemical and nutritional variables controls spatio-temporal variation of sandy beach community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Cisneros, Kelly; Smit, Albertus J; Laudien, Jürgen; Schoeman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Sandy beach ecological theory states that physical features of the beach control macrobenthic community structure on all but the most dissipative beaches. However, few studies have simultaneously evaluated the relative importance of physical, chemical and biological factors as potential explanatory variables for meso-scale spatio-temporal patterns of intertidal community structure in these systems. Here, we investigate macroinfaunal community structure of a micro-tidal sandy beach that is located on an oligotrophic subtropical coast and is influenced by seasonal estuarine input. We repeatedly sampled biological and environmental variables at a series of beach transects arranged at increasing distances from the estuary mouth. Sampling took place over a period of five months, corresponding with the transition between the dry and wet season. This allowed assessment of biological-physical relationships across chemical and nutritional gradients associated with a range of estuarine inputs. Physical, chemical, and biological response variables, as well as measures of community structure, showed significant spatio-temporal patterns. In general, bivariate relationships between biological and environmental variables were rare and weak. However, multivariate correlation approaches identified a variety of environmental variables (i.e., sampling session, the C∶N ratio of particulate organic matter, dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, various size fractions of photopigment concentrations, salinity and, to a lesser extent, beach width and sediment kurtosis) that either alone or combined provided significant explanatory power for spatio-temporal patterns of macroinfaunal community structure. Overall, these results showed that the macrobenthic community on Mtunzini Beach was not structured primarily by physical factors, but instead by a complex and dynamic blend of nutritional, chemical and physical drivers. This emphasises the need to recognise ocean-exposed sandy

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose)--a unique natural polymer structural features, biological role and approaches to the chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a natural polymer, taking part in numerous important cellular processes. Several enzymes are involved in biosynthesis and degradation of PAR. One of them, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is considered to be a perspective target for the design of new drugs, affecting PAR metabolism. The structure of PAR was established by enzymatic hydrolysis and further analysis of the products, but total chemical synthesis of PAR hasn't been described yet. Several approaches have been developed on the way to chemical synthesis of this unique biopolymer.

  16. ToxAlerts: a Web server of structural alerts for toxic chemicals and compounds with potential adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushko, Iurii; Salmina, Elena; Potemkin, Vladimir A; Poda, Gennadiy; Tetko, Igor V

    2012-08-27

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  17. At the brink of supercoloniality: genetic, behavioral and chemical assessments of population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eSaar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting habits of ants play an important role in structuring ant populations. They vary from monodomy, a colony occupies a single nest, via polydomy, a colony occupies multiple adjacent nests, to supercoloniality, a colony spans over large territories comprising dozen to thousands nests without having any boundaries. The population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger, previously considered to form supercolonies, was studied using genetic, chemical and behavioral tools in plots of 50x50 meters at two distinct populations. At the Palmahim site, the plot comprised 15 nests that according to the genetic analysis constituted three colonies. Likewise at the Rishon Leziyyon site 14 nests constituted 5 genetic colonies. In both sites, both chemical analysis and the behavioral (aggression tests confirmed the colony genetic architecture. The behavioral tests also revealed that aggression between colonies within a population was higher than that exhibited between colonies of different populations, suggesting the occurrence of the nasty neighbor phenomenon. In contrast to supercolony structure previously reported in another population of this species, the presently studied populations were composed of polydomous colonies. However, both the genetic and chemical data revealed that the inter-colonial differences between sites were larger than those within site, suggesting some within-site population viscosity. Thus, C. niger exhibits flexible nesting characteristics, from polydomy to supercoloniality, and can be considered at the brink of supercoloniality. We attribute the differences in population structure among sites to the intensity of intraspecific competition.

  18. Chemical sensing by band modulation of a black phosphorus/molybdenum diselenide van der Waals hetero-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhihong; Chen, Buyun; Qian, Shuangbei; Xu, Linyan; Feng, Liefeng; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Jiancui; Li, Qianqian; Li, Quanning; Sun, Chongling; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jing; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-09-01

    We report on a new chemical sensor based on black phosphorus/molybdenum diselenide van der Waals hetero-junctions. Due to the atomically thin nature of two-dimensional (2D) materials, surface adsorption of gas molecules can effectively modulate the band alignment at the junction interface, making the device a highly sensitive detector for chemical adsorptions. Compared to sensors made of homogeneous nanomaterials, the hetero-junction demonstrates considerably lower detection limit and higher sensitivity toward nitrogen dioxide. Kelvin probe force microscopy and finite element simulations have provided experimental and theoretical explanations for the enhanced performance, proving that chemical adsorption can induce significant changes in band alignment and carrier transport behaviors. The study demonstrates the potential of van der Waals hetero-junction as a new platform for sensing applications, and provides more insights into the interaction between gaseous molecules and 2D hetero-structures.

  19. Influence of the pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on the adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yanping

    2014-01-15

    Reactivation and chemical modification were used to obtain modified activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties. The samples were characterized by nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the Bothem method. Using mercury chloride as the target pollutant, the Hg(2+) adsorption ability of samples was investigated. The results show that the Hg(2+) adsorption capacity of samples increased significantly with increases in micropores and acidic functional groups and that the adsorption process was exothermic. Different models and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to establish the mechanisms. It was concluded that the adsorption occurred through a monolayer mechanism by a two-speed process involving both rapid adsorption and slow adsorption. The adsorption rate was determined by chemical reaction.

  20. Growth of a Novel Periodic Structure of SiC/AlN Multilayers by Low Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong-Mei; SUN Guo-Sheng; LI Jia-Ye; LIU Xing-Fang; WANG Lei; ZHAO Wan-Shun; LI Jin-Min

    2007-01-01

    A novel 10-period SiC/AlN multilayered structure with a SiC cap layer is prepared by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD). The structure with total Sim thickness of about 1.45μm is deposited on a Si (111) substrate and shows good surface morphology with a smaller rms surface roughness of 5.3 nm. According to the secondary ion mass spectroscopy results, good interface of the 10 period SiC/AlN structure and periodic changes of depth profiles of C, Si, Al, N components are obtained by controlling the growth procedure. The structure exhibits the peak reflectivity close to 30% near the wavelength of 322 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of growth of the SiC/AlN periodic structure using the home-made LPCVD system.

  1. Chemical and Electronic Structure Studies of Refractory and Dielectric Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneille, Jason Stephen

    This study presents the synthesis and characterization of oxide and refractory thin films under varying conditions. The deposition of the thin films is performed under vacuum conditions. The characterization of the growth, as well as the chemical and electronic properties of the thin films was accomplished using a broad array of surface analytical techniques. These model studies describe the relationship between the preparative processes and the stoichiometry, structure and electronic properties of the film products. From these efforts, the optimal deposition conditions for the production of high quality films have been established. The thin film oxides synthesized and studied here include magnesium oxide, silicon oxide and iron oxide. These oxides were synthesized on a refractory substrate using both post oxidation of thin films as well as reactive vapor deposition of the metals in the presence of an oxygen background. Comparisons and contrasts are presented for the various systems. Metallic magnesium films were grown and characterized as a preliminary study to the synthesis of magnesium oxide. Magnesium oxide (MgO(100)) was synthesized on Mo(100) by evaporating magnesium at a rate of one monolayer per minute in an oxygen background pressure of 1 times 10 ^{-6} Torr at room temperature. The resulting film was found to exhibit spectroscopic characteristics quite similar to those observed for bulk MgO. The acid/base characteristics of the films were studied using carbon monoxide, water and methanol as probe molecules. The film was found to exhibit essentially the same chemical properties as found in analogous powdered catalysts. Silicon dioxide was synthesized by evaporating silicon onto Mo(100) in an oxygen ambient. It is shown that the silicon oxide prepared at room temperature with a silicon deposition rate of {~ }{1.2}A/min and an oxygen pressure of 2 times 10^{ -8} Torr, consisted of predominantly silicon dioxide with a small fraction of suboxides. Annealing to

  2. Segmentation algorithm of chemical molecular structure images%化学分子结构图分割算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管燕; 李存华; 仲兆满; 孙兰兰

    2012-01-01

    为了将化学分子结构图中化学键与杂原子、基团分割开,提出了基于区域尺寸和弯曲度的化学分子结构图分割算法。首先,根据连通区域尺寸大小,将化学分子结构图分割成两部分:一部分是由化学键组成的所有大尺寸连通区域的组合,另一部分是杂原子、基团和单化学键等小尺寸区域的组合。然后,根据弯曲度将小尺寸组合图中的表示化学键的单线段和类线段“I”、“1”、“-”提取出。最后根据位置等信息将“I”、“1”、“-”和单线段进行区分,将单线段的化学键和大尺寸连通区组合,实现了化学键与杂原子、基团的分离。实验结果表明,该图像分割算法准确率高达98.3%,与人类视觉感知具有一致性。这为后续的化学分子结构图像信息的自动提取奠定了基础。%The segmentation algorithm of chemical molecular structure based on area size and bending degree was proposed to segment chemical bonds, heteroatoms and perssad. First, chemical molecular structure images were segmented into two parts according to connection area size. One was the combination of all big size connection areas containing chemical bonds, and the other was the combination of heteroatoms, perssad and single chemical bonds. Second, single lines were extracted based on bending degree, which represents small size combination images, and like-lines such as "I" ,"l" and " - ". Finally, "I" ,"l", " - " and single lines were distinguished, chemical bonds of single lines and big size connection areas were combined, and the segmentation of chemical bonds, heteroatoms and perssad was realized. The accuracy by the proposed algorithm reached to 98. 3%, and the segmentation effect was consistent with human visual perception. This is the foundation for automatically extracting chemical molecular structure images.

  3. Toward epitaxially grown two-dimensional crystal hetero-structures: Single and double MoS2/graphene hetero-structures by chemical vapor depositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Yu; Chang, Chung-En; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Su, Chen-Fung; Chen, Chi; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2014-08-01

    Uniform large-size MoS2/graphene hetero-structures fabricated directly on sapphire substrates are demonstrated with layer-number controllability by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images provide the direct evidences of layer numbers of MoS2/graphene hetero-structures. Photo-excited electron induced Fermi level shift of the graphene channel are observed on the single MoS2/graphene hetero-structure transistors. Furthermore, double hetero-structures of graphene/MoS2/graphene are achieved by CVD fabrication of graphene layers on top of the MoS2, as confirmed by the cross-sectional HRTEM. These results have paved the possibility of epitaxially grown multi-hetero-structures for practical applications.

  4. Effect of anatomical and chemical structure in the permeability of "Amapá" wood

    OpenAIRE

    Edy Eime Pereira Baraúna; José Tarcísio Lima; Renato da Silva Vieira; José Reinaldo Moreira da Silva; Thiago Campos Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to study the permeability to air and liquid, in the longitudinal direction of "amapá" wood (Brosimum parinarioides Ducke), originating from the Amazon Forest. Furthermore, the influence of anatomical and chemical characteristics in the permeability of the wood was investigated. For this study, samples were collected from three trees, in the state of Pará, Brazil, and submitted to permeability test, anatomical characterization, and chemical analyses. The permeability to the ai...

  5. Structural, chemical surface and transport modifications of regenerated cellulose dense membranes due to low-dose {gamma}-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.I. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Heredia-Guerrero, J.A., E-mail: jose.alejandro@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Americo Vespuccio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Galan, P. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Benitez, J.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Avda, Americo Vespuccio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Benavente, J. [Grupo de Caracterizacion Electrocinetica en Membranas e Interfases, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Low dose {gamma}-radiation causes slight structural, chemical and morphological changes on regenerated cellulose films. {yields} Induced structural changes increase the fragility of irradiated films. {yields} Structural modifications reduce ion permeability of films. - Abstract: Modifications caused in commercial dense regenerated cellulose (RC) flat membranes by low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (average photons energy of 1.23 MeV) are studied. Slight structural, chemical and morphological surface changes due to irradiation in three films with different RC content were determined by ATR-FTIR, XRD, XPS and AFM. Also, the alteration of their mechanical elasticity has been studied. Modification of membrane performance was determined from solute diffusion coefficient and effective membrane fixed charge concentration obtained from NaCl diffusion measurements. Induced structural changes defining new and effective fracture propagation directions are considered to be responsible for the increase of fragility of irradiated RC membranes. The same structural changes are proposed to explain the reduction of the membrane ion permeability through a mechanism involving either ion pathways elongation and/or blocking.

  6. NMR structure calculation for all small molecule ligands and non-standard residues from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Emel Maden; Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    An algorithm, CYLIB, is presented for converting molecular topology descriptions from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary into CYANA residue library entries. The CYANA structure calculation algorithm uses torsion angle molecular dynamics for the efficient computation of three-dimensional structures from NMR-derived restraints. For this, the molecules have to be represented in torsion angle space with rotations around covalent single bonds as the only degrees of freedom. The molecule must be given a tree structure of torsion angles connecting rigid units composed of one or several atoms with fixed relative positions. Setting up CYANA residue library entries therefore involves, besides straightforward format conversion, the non-trivial step of defining a suitable tree structure of torsion angles, and to re-order the atoms in a way that is compatible with this tree structure. This can be done manually for small numbers of ligands but the process is time-consuming and error-prone. An automated method is necessary in order to handle the large number of different potential ligand molecules to be studied in drug design projects. Here, we present an algorithm for this purpose, and show that CYANA structure calculations can be performed with almost all small molecule ligands and non-standard amino acid residues in the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  8. What a difference a bond makes: the structural, chemical, and physical properties of methyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Keith T; Lewis, Nathan S

    2014-10-21

    The chemical, electronic, and structural properties of surfaces are affected by the chemical termination of the surface. Two-step halogenation/alkylation of silicon provides a scalable, wet-chemical method for grafting molecules onto the silicon surface. Unlike other commonly studied wet-chemical methods of surface modification, such as self-assembly of monolayers on metals or hydrosilylation on silicon, the two-step method enables attachment of small alkyl chains, even methyl groups, to a silicon surface with high surface coverage and homogeneity. The methyl-terminated Si(111) surface, by comparison to hydrogen-terminated Si(111), offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of the first surface bond connecting the overlayer to the surface. This Account describes studies of methyl-terminated Si(111), which have shown that the H-Si(111) and CH3-Si(111) surfaces are structurally nearly identical, yet impart significantly different chemical and electronic properties to the resulting Si surface. The structure of methyl-terminated Si(111) formed by a two-step halogenation/methylation process has been studied by a variety of spectroscopic methods. A covalent Si-C bond is oriented normal to the surface, with the methyl group situated directly atop a surface Si atom. Multiple spectroscopic methods have shown that methyl groups achieve essentially complete coverage of the surface atoms while maintaining the atomically flat, terraced structure of the original H-Si(111) surface. Thus, the H-Si(111) and CH3-Si(111) surface share essentially identical structures aside from the replacement of a Si-H bond with a Si-C bond. Despite their structural similarity, hydrogen and methyl termination exhibit markedly different chemical passivation. Specifically, CH3-Si(111) exhibits significantly greater oxidation resistance than H-Si(111) in air and in aqueous electrolyte under photoanodic current flow. Both surfaces exhibit similar thermal stability in vacuum, and the Si-H and Si

  9. Surface-treated commercially pure titanium for biomedical applications: Electrochemical, structural, mechanical and chemical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Erika S.; Matos, Adaias O.; Beline, Thamara [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av Limeira, 901, Piracicaba, São Paulo 13414-903 (Brazil); IBTN/Br—Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine—Brazilian Branch (Brazil); Marques, Isabella S.V. [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av Limeira, 901, Piracicaba, São Paulo 13414-903 (Brazil); Sukotjo, Cortino [Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, 801 S Paulina, Chicago, IL, USA, 60612 (United States); IBTN—Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine (United States); Mathew, Mathew T. [IBTN—Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois, College of Medicine at Rockford, 1601 Parkview Avenue, Rockford, IL, USA, 61107 (United States); Rangel, Elidiane C.; Cruz, Nilson C. [IBTN/Br—Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine—Brazilian Branch (Brazil); Laboratory of Technological Plasmas, Engineering College, Univ Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av Três de Março, 511, Sorocaba, São Paulo 18087-180 (Brazil); Mesquita, Marcelo F.; Consani, Rafael X. [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Av Limeira, 901, Piracicaba, São Paulo 13414-903 (Brazil); and others

    2016-08-01

    Modified surfaces have improved the biological performance and biomechanical fixation of dental implants compared to machined (polished) surfaces. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the surface properties of titanium (Ti) as a function of different surface treatment. This study investigated the role of surface treatments on the electrochemical, structural, mechanical and chemical properties of commercial pure titanium (cp-Ti) under different electrolytes. Cp-Ti discs were divided into 6 groups (n = 5): machined (M—control); etched with HCl + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Cl), H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (S); sandblasted with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Sb), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by HCl + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (SbCl), and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (SbS). Electrochemical tests were conducted in artificial saliva (pHs 3; 6.5 and 9) and simulated body fluid (SBF—pH 7.4). All surfaces were characterized before and after corrosion tests using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface roughness, Vickers microhardness and surface free energy. The results indicated that Cl group exhibited the highest polarization resistance (R{sub p}) and the lowest capacitance (Q) and corrosion current density (I{sub corr}) values. Reduced corrosion stability was noted for the sandblasted groups. Acidic artificial saliva decreased the R{sub p} values of cp-Ti surfaces and produced the highest I{sub corr} values. Also, the surface treatment and corrosion process influenced the surface roughness, Vickers microhardness and surface free energy. Based on these results, it can be concluded that acid-etching treatment improved the electrochemical stability of cp-Ti and all treated surfaces behaved negatively in acidic artificial saliva. - Highlights: • Characterization of surface treatment for biomedical implants was investigated. • Sandblasting reduced the corrosion stability of cp

  10. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny;

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open...... state to a closed active state to facilitate nucleotide addition upon the binding of the cognate substrate to the Pol II active site. However, a comprehensive understanding of the specific chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures that are essential to this TL conformational change...... II. This study reveals novel insights into understanding the molecular basis of TL conformational transition upon substrate binding during Pol II transcription. This synthetic chemical biology approach may be extended to understand the mechanisms of other RNA polymerases as well as other nucleic acid...

  11. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Structural, morphology and optical properties of chemically deposited Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraoui-Meherzi, H., E-mail: hajer.maghraoui@laposte.ne [Laboratoire de chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Ben Nasr, T.; Kamoun, N. [Laboratoire de physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Dachraoui, M. [Laboratoire de chimie Analytique et Electrochimie, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus universitaire 2092 Tunis El Manar (Tunisia)

    2010-08-01

    Metal chalcogenide thin films prepared by chemical methods are currently attracting considerable attention, as they are relatively inexpensive, simple and convenient for large area deposition. Antimony sulphide (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) films were deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition from solution containing SbCl{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization of the films was carried out with X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Using these techniques, we have specified the effect of temperature and time deposition on the crystallinity structure of antimony sulphide films. Homogeneous films were found to be crystallized on orthorhombic structure, and indicate a direct band gap of 2.24 eV.

  13. Chemical composition and molecular structure of polysaccharide-protein biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed: extraction and purification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amid Bahareh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological functions of natural biopolymers from plant sources depend on their chemical composition and molecular structure. In addition, the extraction and further processing conditions significantly influence the chemical and molecular structure of the plant biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to characterize the chemical and molecular structure of a natural biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed. A size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi angle laser light-scattering (SEC-MALS was applied to analyze the molecular weight (Mw, number average molecular weight (Mn, and polydispersity index (Mw/Mn. Results The most abundant monosaccharide in the carbohydrate composition of durian seed gum were galactose (48.6-59.9%, glucose (37.1-45.1%, arabinose (0.58-3.41%, and xylose (0.3-3.21%. The predominant fatty acid of the lipid fraction from the durian seed gum were palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1, linoleic acid (C18:2, and linolenic acid (C18:2. The most abundant amino acids of durian seed gum were: leucine (30.9-37.3%, lysine (6.04-8.36%, aspartic acid (6.10-7.19%, glycine (6.07-7.42%, alanine (5.24-6.14%, glutamic acid (5.57-7.09%, valine (4.5-5.50%, proline (3.87-4.81%, serine (4.39-5.18%, threonine (3.44-6.50%, isoleucine (3.30-4.07%, and phenylalanine (3.11-9.04%. Conclusion The presence of essential amino acids in the chemical structure of durian seed gum reinforces its nutritional value.

  14. Delayed stage-structured predator-prey model with impulsive perturbations on predator and chemical control on prey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We consider a delayed stage-structured pest management predator-prey system with impulsive transmitting on predator and chemical control on prey. Sufficient conditions of the global attractiveness of the pest-extinction boundary periodic solution and permanence of the system are obtained. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide reliable tactical basis for practical pest management.

  15. Perspective: On the relevance of slower-than-femtosecond time scales in chemical structural-dynamics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Coppens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of examples illustrate structural-dynamics studies of picosecond and slower photo-induced processes. They include molecular rearrangements and excitations. The information that can be obtained from such studies is discussed. The results are complementary to the information obtained from femtosecond studies. The point is made that all pertinent time scales should be covered to obtain comprehensive insight in dynamic processes of chemical and biological importance.

  16. Correlation between magnetic spin structure and the three-dimensional geometry in chemically synthesized nanoscale magnetite rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Klaui, M.; Rudiger, U;

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between magnetic spin structure and geometry in nanoscale chemically synthesized Fe3O4 rings has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. We find primarily the flux closure vortex states but in rings with thickness variations, an effective stray field occurs. Using....... The interaction between exchange coupled rings leads to antiparallel vortex states and extended onion states. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Ab initio quantum mechanical investigation of structural and chemical-physical properties of selected minerals for minero-petrological, structural ceramic and biomaterial applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ulian, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is the atomic-scale simulation of the crystal-chemical and physical (phonon, energetic) properties of some strategically important minerals for structural ceramics, biomedical and petrological applications. These properties affect the thermodynamic stability and rule the mineral-environment interface phenomena, with important economical, (bio)technological, petrological and environmental implications. The minerals of interest belong to the family of phyllosilicates ...

  18. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  19. Chemical and structural analysis of Eucalyptus globulus and E. camaldulensis leaf cuticles: a lipidized cell wall region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eGuzmán

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The plant cuticle has traditionally been conceived as an independent hydrophobic layer that covers the external epidermal cell wall. Due to its complexity, the existing relationship between cuticle chemical composition and ultra-structure remains unclear to date. This study aimed to examine the link between chemical composition and structure of isolated, adaxial leaf cuticles of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus by the gradual extraction and identification of lipid constituents (cutin and soluble lipids, coupled to spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. The soluble compounds and cutin monomers identified could not be assigned to a concrete internal cuticle ultra-structure. After cutin depolymerization, a cellulose network resembling the cell wall was observed, with different structural patterns in the regions ascribed to the cuticle proper and cuticular layer, respectively. Our results suggest that the current cuticle model should be revised, stressing the presence and major role of cell wall polysaccharides. It is concluded that the cuticle may be interpreted as a modified cell wall region which contains additional lipids. The major heterogeneity of the plant cuticle makes it difficult to establish a direct link between cuticle chemistry and structure with the existing methodologies.

  20. Chemical and structural analysis of Eucalyptus globulus and E. camaldulensis leaf cuticles: a lipidized cell wall region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; Graça, José; Cabral, Vanessa; Kayali, Nour; Khayet, Mohamed; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The plant cuticle has traditionally been conceived as an independent hydrophobic layer that covers the external epidermal cell wall. Due to its complexity, the existing relationship between cuticle chemical composition and ultra-structure remains unclear to date. This study aimed to examine the link between chemical composition and structure of isolated, adaxial leaf cuticles of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus by the gradual extraction and identification of lipid constituents (cutin and soluble lipids), coupled to spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. The soluble compounds and cutin monomers identified could not be assigned to a concrete internal cuticle ultra-structure. After cutin depolymerization, a cellulose network resembling the cell wall was observed, with different structural patterns in the regions ascribed to the cuticle proper and cuticular layer, respectively. Our results suggest that the current cuticle model should be revised, stressing the presence and major role of cell wall polysaccharides. It is concluded that the cuticle may be interpreted as a modified cell wall region which contains additional lipids. The major heterogeneity of the plant cuticle makes it difficult to establish a direct link between cuticle chemistry and structure with the existing methodologies.

  1. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid......; L, long-chain fatty acid). Collision-induced dissociation of deprotonated parent TAG with argon was used to produce daughter ion spectra with appropriate fragmentation patterns for structure determination. Fatty acids constituting the TAG molecule were identified according to [RCO2](-) ions...... in the daughter ion spectra. With the standard curve for ratios of [M - H - RCO2H - 100](-) ions corresponding to each [RCO2](-) ion, determined with known mixtures of sn-1/3 and sn-2 regioisomers of structured TAG, it was possible to determine the proportions of different regioisomers in unknown samples...

  2. Electronic structure, chemical bond and thermal stability of hydrogen absorber Li2MgN2H2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; CHEN YunGui; WU ChaoLing; TAO MingDa; GAI JingGang

    2009-01-01

    The lowest total energy crystal structure of Li2MgN2H2 was identified by the first principle calculation with RPBE exchange-correlation function. Furthermore, the fine structure parameters of this crystal structure were calculated with PBE and PW91 exchange-correlation function. In a further step, the density of states, electron density, charge density difference on (0 0 1) plane and heat of formation of Li2MgN2H2 hydrogenation were computed with PW91 exchange-correlation function. Consequently, the electronic structures and chemical bonds in this compound were analyzed and discussed, and then the thermodynamic character of Li2MgN2H2 for hydrogen storage was evacuated.

  3. Structure of the chondrules and the chemical composition of olivine in meteorite Jesenice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Ambrožič

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mineralogical analysis of various chondrule types and chemical analysis of olivine indifferent parts of meteorite Jesenice. Quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy with a scanning electronmicroscope was used in the analyses. The results showed that the chemical composition of the olivine was homogeneousthroughout the meteorite with an average olivine composition of Fa 26.4 ± 0.6. The results of this study werein agreement with previous study of the meteorite, which showed that the meteorite Jesenice was an equilibratedL chondrite.

  4. Structural, chemical and magnetic properties of secondary phases in Co-doped ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ney, A; Kovács, András; Ney, V;

    2011-01-01

    , chemical and magnetic properties of Co-doped ZnO samples. It can be established on a quantitative basis that the superparamagnetic (SPM) behavior observed by integral superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry is not an intrinsic property of the material but stems from precipitations...... of metallic Co. Their presence is revealed by TEM as well as XAS. Annealing procedures for these SPM samples were also studied, and the observed changes in the magnetic properties found to be due to a chemical reduction or oxidation of the metallic Co species....

  5. Morphology tailoring of nano/micro-structured conductive polymers, composites and their applications in chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingfa; Gao, Mingjun; He, Xiaochun; Li, Guang

    2010-11-01

    Conductive polymer is one of the important multi-functional materials. It has many applications in light-emitting diodes, chemical sensors, biosensors, et al. This paper provides a relatively comprehensive review on the progress of conductive polymer and composite as sensitive film for sensors to chemical vapors including patents, papers and our preliminary research results. Especially, the feature of conjugated polymers, the processing technology, doping characteristics and some factors affecting gas responses are discussed. Otherwise, the developments of nanostructured conductive polymer and organic-inorganic hybrid film sensor with high sensitivity and rapid response to vapors are also described, and some suggestions are proposed.

  6. Modeling the reactivities of hydroxyl radical and ozone towards atmospheric organic chemicals using quantitative structure-reactivity relationship approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Mohan, Dinesh; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-07-01

    The persistence and the removal of organic chemicals from the atmosphere are largely determined by their reactions with the OH radical and O3. Experimental determinations of the kinetic rate constants of OH and O3 with a large number of chemicals are tedious and resource intensive and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. Recently, ensemble machine learning (EML) methods have emerged as unbiased tools to establish relationship between independent and dependent variables having a nonlinear dependence. In this study, EML-based, temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models have been developed for predicting the kinetic rate constants for OH (kOH) and O3 (kO3) reactions with diverse chemicals. Structural diversity of chemicals was evaluated using a Tanimoto similarity index. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation performed employing statistical checks. In test data, the EML QSRR models yielded correlation (R (2)) of ≥0.91 between the measured and the predicted reactivities. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined using methods based on descriptors range, Euclidean distance, leverage, and standardization approaches. The prediction accuracies for the higher reactivity compounds were relatively better than those of the low reactivity compounds. Proposed EML QSRR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. The proposed QSRR models can make predictions of rate constants at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards OH radical and O3 in the atmosphere.

  7. Exploiting Chemical Libraries, Structure, and Genomics in the Search for Kinase Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Wodicka, Lisa; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Norman, Thea C.; Kwon, Soojin; Espinoza, F. Hernan; Morgan, David O.; Barnes, Georjana; LeClerc, Sophie; Meijer, Laurent; Kim, Sung-Hou; Lockhart, David J.; Schultz, Peter G.

    1998-01-01

    Selective protein kinase inhibitors were developed on the basis of the unexpected binding mode of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purines to the adenosine triphosphate-binding site of the human cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). By iterating chemical library synthesis and biological screening, potent inhibitors

  8. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitke, P.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. -F.

    2009-01-01

    Context. Emission lines from protoplanetary disks originate mainly in the irradiated surface layers, where the gas is generally warmer than the dust. Therefore, interpreting emission lines requires detailed thermo-chemical models, which are essential to converting line observations into understandin

  9. Heterogeneity in physical, chemical and plankton-community structures in Lake Tanganyika

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, V.T.; Tumba, J.M.; Tshibangu, K.; Lukwesa, C.; Chitamwebwa, D.; Bwebwa, D.; Makasa, L.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2008-01-01

    From 28 August to 6 September 1995, we monitored the lake-wide physical, chemical and biological properties of the pelagic waters in Lake Tanganyika. The aim of this study was to examine the spatial environmental variability and its relation to fluctuations in plankton abundance and community assemb

  10. Structural characterization and chemical classification of some bryophytes found in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, Viktorija; Klavina, Laura; Bikovens, Oskars; Zicmanis, Andris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-07-01

    Bryophytes are the second largest taxonomic group in the plant kingdom; yet, studies conducted to better understand their chemical composition are rare. The aim of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of bryophytes common in Northern Europe by using elemental, spectral, and non-destructive analytical methods, such as Fourier transform IR spectrometry (FT-IR), solid-phase (13) C-NMR spectrometry, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), for the purpose of investigating their chemotaxonomic relationships on the basis of chemical-composition data. The results of all these analyses showed that bryophytes consist mainly of carbohydrates. Judging by FT-IR spectra, the OH groups in combination of CO groups were the most abundant groups. The (13) C-NMR spectra provided information on the presence of such compounds as phenolics and lipids. It was found that the amount of phenolic compounds in bryophytes is relatively small. This finding definitely confirmed the absence of lignin in the studied bryophytes. Cluster analysis was used to better understand differences in the chemical composition of bryophyte samples and to evaluate possible usage of these methods in the chemotaxonomy of bryophytes.

  11. Structural, chemical and optical evaluation of Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by an aqueous solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iribarren, A., E-mail: augusto@imre.oc.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, Vedado, Plaza, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Hernández-Rodríguez, E. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, Vedado, Plaza, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Maqueira, L. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, Vedado, Plaza, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, Vedado, Plaza, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles obtained by chemical synthesis. • Substitutional or interstitial Cu into ZnO lead specific structural, chemical, and optical changes. • Incorporation efficiency of Cu atoms in ZnO as a function of the Cu concentration in the precursor dissolution. - Abstract: In this work a study of ZnO and Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles obtained by chemical synthesis in aqueous media was carried out. Structural analysis gave the dominant presence of wurtzite ZnO phase forming a solid solution Zn{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}O. For high Cu doping CuO phase is also present. For low Cu concentration the lattice shrinks due to Cu atoms substitute Zn atoms. For high Cu concentration the lattice enlarges due to predominance of interstitial Cu. From elemental analysis we determined and analyzed the incorporation efficiency of Cu atoms in Zn{sub 1−x}Cu{sub x}O as a function of the Cu concentration in the precursor dissolution. Combining structural and chemical results we described the Cu/Zn precursor concentrations r{sub w} in which the solid solution of Cu in ZnO is predominant. In the region located at r{sub w} ≈ 0.2–0.3 it is no longer valid. For Cu/Zn precursor concentration r{sub w} > 0.3 interstitial Cu dominates, and some amount of copper oxide appears. As the Cu concentration increases, the effective size of nanoparticles decreases. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements of the Cu-doped ZnO nanoparticles were carried out and analyzed.

  12. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  13. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  14. Relationship between chemical structure of soil organic matter and intra-aggregate pore structure: evidence from X-ray computed micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alexandra; Grandy, Stuart A.

    2014-05-01

    Understanding chemical structure of soil organic matter (SOM) and factors that affect it are vital for gaining understanding of mechanisms of C sequestration by soil. Physical protection of C by adsorption to mineral particles and physical disconnection between C sources and microbial decomposers is now regarded as the key component of soil C sequestration. Both of the processes are greatly influenced by micro-scale structure and distribution of soil pores. However, because SOM chemical structure is typically studied in disturbed (ground and sieved) soil samples the experimental evidence of the relationships between soil pore structure and chemical structure of SOM are still scarce. Our study takes advantage of the X-ray computed micro-tomography (µ-CT) tools that enable non-destructive analysis of pore structure in intact soil samples. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between SOM chemical structure and pore-characteristics in intact soil macro-aggregates from two contrasting long-term land uses. The two studied land use treatments are a conventionally tilled corn-soybean-wheat rotation treatment and a native succession vegetation treatment removed from agricultural use >20 years ago. The study is located in southwest Michigan, USA, on sandy-loam Typic Hapludalfs. For this study we used soil macro-aggregates 4-6 mm in size collected at 0-15 cm depth. The aggregate size was selected so as both to enable high resolution of µ-CT and to provide sufficient amount of soil for C measurements. X-ray µ-CT scanning was conducted at APS Argonne at a scanning resolution of 14 µm. Two scanned aggregates (1 per treatment) were used in this preliminary study. Each aggregate was cut into 7 "geo-referenced" sections. Analyses of pore characteristics in each section were conducted using 3DMA and ImageJ image analysis tools. SOM chemistry was analyzed using pyrolysis/gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the relationships

  15. Structure evolution upon chemical and physical pressure in (Sr1-xBax)2FeSbO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiittanen, T.; Karppinen, M.

    2017-02-01

    Here we demonstrate the gradual structural transformation from the monoclinic I2/m to tetragonal I4/m, cubic Fm-3m and hexagonal P63/mmc structure upon the isovalent larger-for-smaller A-site cation substitution in the B-site ordered double-perovskite system (Sr1-xBax)2FeSbO6. This is the same transformation sequence previously observed up to Fm-3m upon heating the parent Sr2FeSbO6 phase to high temperatures. High-pressure treatment, on the other hand, transforms the hexagonal P63/mmc structure of the other end member Ba2FeSbO6 back to the cubic Fm-3m structure. Hence we may conclude that chemical pressure, physical pressure and decreasing temperature all work towards the same direction in the (Sr1-xBax)2FeSbO6 system. Also shown is that with increasing Ba-for-Sr substitution level, i.e. with decreasing chemical pressure effect, the degree-of-order among the B-site cations, Fe and Sb, decreases.

  16. Effects of chemical and biological pesticides on plant growth parameters and rhizospheric bacterial community structure in Vigna radiata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sunil; Gupta, Rashi; Sharma, Shilpi, E-mail: shilpi@dbeb.iitd.ac.in

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Non-target effects of pesticides employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. • Qualitative shifts in resident and active bacterial community structure. • Abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts were reduced significantly. • Effects of biological pesticide similar to chemical pesticides on rhizospheric bacteria. - Abstract: With increasing application of pesticides in agriculture, their non-target effects on soil microbial communities are critical to soil health maintenance. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of chemical pesticides (chlorpyrifos and cypermethrin) and a biological pesticide (azadirachtin) on growth parameters and the rhizospheric bacterial community of Vigna radiata. Qualitative and quantitative analysis by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and q-PCR, respectively, of the 16S rRNA gene and transcript were performed to study the impact of these pesticides on the resident and active rhizospheric bacterial community. While plant parameters were not affected significantly by the pesticides, a shift in the bacterial community structure was observed with an adverse effect on the abundance of 16S rRNA gene and transcripts. Chlorpyrifos showed almost complete degradation toward the end of the experiment. These non-target impacts on soil ecosystems and the fact that the effects of the biopesticide mimic those of chemical pesticides raise serious concerns regarding their application in agriculture.

  17. Morphological, physical and chemical evaluation of the Vascugraft arterial prosthesis: comparison of a novel polyurethane device with other microporous structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; King, M W; Guidoin, R; Therrien, M; Pezolet, M; Adnot, A; Ukpabi, P; Vantal, M H

    1994-06-01

    In this study the morphology, physical properties, surface chemical characteristics and microstructure of the Vascugraft arterial prosthesis have been investigated. This is a novel microporous polyurethane device, recently developed by the company Braun-Melsungen AG in Germany for use as a small calibre arterial substitute. This comparative study included two other synthetic grafts: the Mitrathane prosthesis, a hydrophilic prototype polyetherurethane urea graft with closed internal pores, and the commercially successful expanded polytetrafluoroethylene reinforced Goretex prosthesis with an open microporous structure. The Vascugraft prosthesis contains a network of fused microfibres of varying thickness and orientation which provide open and communicating pores similar in size to those in the Goretex material. In addition, they extend from one side of the graft wall to the other. As well as having superior longitudinal and radial compliance to the reinforced Goretex device, the Vascugraft prosthesis has more than adequate bursting and suture retention strengths. Through the use of contact angle measurements, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and molecular weight analysis by size exclusion chromatography, the surface of the Vascugraft prosthesis has been shown to be uniquely hydrophobic, as well as containing carbonate groups within an aliphatic polyesterurethane polymer. In addition, variations in micro-phase separation structure of hard and soft segment domains between different sizes and batches of product are marginal. Because of the interesting physical and chemical properties, it is recommended that in vitro biocompatibility and biostability studies be undertaken prior to using the prosthesis in animal or clinical trials.

  18. Structural and biological trait responses of diatom assemblages to organic chemicals in outdoor flow-through mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona, Yannick; Roucaute, Marc; Cailleaud, Kevin; Lagadic, Laurent; Bassères, Anne; Caquet, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The sensitivity of diatom taxonomy and trait-based endpoints to chemicals has been poorly used so far in Environmental Risk Assessment. In this study, diatom assemblages in outdoor flow-through mesocosms were exposed to thiram (35 and 170 μg/L), and a hydrocarbon emulsion (HE; 0.01, 0.4, 2 and 20 mg/L). The effects of exposure were assessed for 12 weeks, including 9 weeks post-treatment, using taxonomic structure and diversity, bioindication indices, biological traits, functional diversity indices, indicator classes and ecological guilds. For both chemicals, diversity increased after the treatment period, and responses of ecological traits were roughly identical with an abundance increase of motile taxa tolerant to organic pollution and decrease of low profile taxa. Bioindication indices were not affected. Traits provided a complementary approach to biomass measurements and taxonomic descriptors, leading to a more comprehensive overview of ecological changes due to organic chemicals, including short- and long-term effects on biofilm structure and functioning.

  19. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  20. Electro-chemical methods of corrosion monitoring for marine concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, C.L.; Cunningham, P.J. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    1988-12-31

    Corrosion potential mapping and concrete resistivity measurements have been used for several years for the assessment of reinforced concrete structures. These techniques have also been used to characterise the corrosion state of reinforcing steel used in marine concrete structures. The object of the research was to examine the effectiveness of these electrochemical methods of corrosion monitoring and to assess their reliability, reproducibility and sensitivity when applied to marine concrete structures. (author)

  1. Quantum Chemical Study on Structure-activity Relationship of Several Kinds of Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; CHENG Xin-Lu; ZHANG Rui-Zhou; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2005-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship of several drugs with similar structure has been investigated by using ab initio method.The relation between the dipole moments and biological activities of these drugs was judged after comparing their geometric structures, dipole moments and inhibitory concentrations.In principle, new drug molecule could be reasonably designed by altering the place of groups and ultimately, the potential drug could be screened by comparing the dipole moments of obtained molecules.

  2. Effect of anatomical and chemical structure in the permeability of "Amapá" wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Eime Pereira Baraúna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to study the permeability to air and liquid, in the longitudinal direction of "amapá" wood (Brosimum parinarioides Ducke, originating from the Amazon Forest. Furthermore, the influence of anatomical and chemical characteristics in the permeability of the wood was investigated. For this study, samples were collected from three trees, in the state of Pará, Brazil, and submitted to permeability test, anatomical characterization, and chemical analyses. The permeability to the air of the "amapá" wood was estimated at 63.7.10-9 m3.[m.(N.m-2.s]-1 and to the liquid was 2.07.10-9 m3.[m.(N.m-2.s]-1. There were low correlations between air and liquid permeability and the anatomical features.

  3. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....... shifts of all substructures from the proposed models. A full reconstruction makes sure that all carbons are accounted for and enables on the negative side to discuss structural elements identified from recorded spectra of humic substances that cannot be observed in the simulated spectrum. On the positive...

  4. Role of vermicompost chemical composition, microbial functional diversity, and fungal community structure in their microbial respiratory response to three pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gómez, Manuel J; Nogales, Rogelio; Insam, Heribert; Romero, Esperanza; Goberna, Marta

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between vermicompost chemical features, enzyme activities, community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs), fungal community structures, and its microbial respiratory response to pesticides were investigated. Fungal community structure of vermicomposts produced from damaged tomato fruits (DT), winery wastes (WW), olive-mill waste and biosolids (OB), and cattle manure (CM) were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rDNA. MicroResp™ was used for assessing vermicompost CLPPs and testing the microbial response to metalaxyl, imidacloprid, and diuron. Vermicompost enzyme activities and CLPPs indicated that WW, OB, and DT had higher microbial functional diversity than CM. The microbiota of the former tolerated all three pesticides whereas microbial respiration in CM was negatively affected by metalaxyl and imidacloprid. The response of vermicompost microbiota to the fungicide metalaxyl was correlated to its fungal community structure. The results suggest that vermicomposts with higher microbial functional diversity can be useful for the management of pesticide pollution in agriculture.

  5. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of flower-like ZnO nanostructures prepared by a facile wet chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kuriakose

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flower-like ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile wet chemical method. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of these nanostructures have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, photoluminescence (PL and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. SEM and TEM studies revealed flower-like structures consisting of nanosheets, formed due to oriented attachment of ZnO nanoparticles. Flower-like ZnO structures showed enhanced photocatalytic activity towards sun-light driven photodegradation of methylene blue dye (MB as compared to ZnO nanoparticles. XRD, UV–vis absorption, PL, FTIR and TEM studies revealed the formation of Zn(OH2 surface layer on ZnO nanostructures upon ageing. We demonstrate that the formation of a passivating Zn(OH2 surface layer on the ZnO nanostructures upon ageing deteriorates their efficiency to photocatalytically degrade of MB.

  6. Structure and physico-chemical properties in mixed aqueoussolution of sodium alkylcarboxylate-alkyltrimethylammoniumbromide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG, Jian-Bin(黄建滨); ZHAO, Guo-Xi(赵国玺); HE, Xu(何煦); ZHU, Bu-Yao(朱步瑶); FU, Hong-Lan(付宏兰)

    2000-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of organized assemblies (micelle or vesicle) from sodium alkylcarboxylate-alkyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide mixture have been investigated systematically. In different mixed cationic-anionic surfactant systems, micelles and vesicles can coexist or be transformed into each other on different conditions. The experimental results are explained prelimilarily from the viewpoint of molecular packing geometry. The solubilization of organic compound in the mixed surfactant system was also studied in detail.

  7. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE VARIATIONS IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE DURING THE CASSINI MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bampasidis, Georgios; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Spatiales et d' Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lavvas, P. [GSMA, Universite Reims Champagne-Ardenne, F-51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Carlson, R. C.; Romani, P. N.; Guandique, E. A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Moussas, X.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Stamogiorgos, S., E-mail: gbabasid@phys.uoa.gr [Faculty of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, GR 15783 Zographos, Athens (Greece)

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a line-by-line Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Titan code that includes the most recent laboratory spectroscopic data and haze descriptions relative to Titan's stratosphere. We use this code to model Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer data taken during the numerous Titan flybys from 2006 to 2012 at surface-intercepting geometry in the 600-1500 cm{sup -1} range for latitudes from 50 Degree-Sign S to 50 Degree-Sign N. We report variations in temperature and chemical composition in the stratosphere during the Cassini mission, before and after the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE). We find indication for a weakening of the temperature gradient with warming of the stratosphere and cooling of the lower mesosphere. In addition, we infer precise concentrations for the trace gases and their main isotopologues and find that the chemical composition in Titan's stratosphere varies significantly with latitude during the 6 years investigated here, with increased mixing ratios toward the northern latitudes. In particular, we monitor and quantify the amplitude of a maximum enhancement of several gases observed at northern latitudes up to 50 Degree-Sign N around mid-2009, at the time of the NSE. We find that this rise is followed by a rapid decrease in chemical inventory in 2010 probably due to a weakening north polar vortex with reduced lateral mixing across the vortex boundary.

  8. Infrared Chemical Nano-Imaging: Accessing Structure, Coupling, and Dynamics on Molecular Length Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Eric A.; Pollard, Benjamin; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2015-04-02

    This Perspective highlights recent advances in infrared vibrational chemical nano-imaging. In its implementations of scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and photothermal-induced resonance (PTIR), IR nanospectroscopy provides few-nanometer spatial resolution for the investigation of polymer, biomaterial, and related soft-matter surfaces and nanostructures. Broad-band IR s-SNOM with coherent laser and synchrotron sources allows for chemical recognition with small-ensemble sensitivity and the potential for sensitivity reaching the single-molecule limit. Probing selected vibrational marker resonances, it gives access to nanoscale chemical imaging of composition, domain morphologies, order/disorder, molecular orientation, or crystallographic phases. Local intra- and intermolecular coupling can be measured through frequency shifts of a vibrational marker in heterogeneous environments and associated inhomogeneities in vibrational dephasing. In combination with ultrafast spectroscopy, the vibrational coherent evolution of homogeneous sub-ensembles coupled to their environment can be observed. Outstanding challenges are discussed in terms of extensions to coherent and multidimensional spectroscopies, implementation in liquid and in situ environments, general sample limitations, and engineering s-SNOM scanning probes to better control the nano-localized optical excitation and to increase sensitivity.

  9. The atomic structure and chemical composition of HfOx (x < 2) films prepared by ion-beam sputtering deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, V. S.; Gerasimova, A. K.; Kruchinin, V. N.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Badmaeva, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Non-stoichiometric HfOx films of different chemical composition (x partial pressure in a chamber. An effect of chemical composition on the atomic structure of the films was studied by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy methods. The films were found to be amorphous, consisting only of three components: Hf-metal clusters, Hf4O7 suboxide and stoichiometric HfO2. The relative concentration of these components varies with changing x. The surface of the films contains the increased oxygen content compared to the bulk. It was found that the Hf4O7 suboxide concentration is maximal at x = 1.8. The concept of hafnium oxide film growth by the IBSD method is proposed to explain the lack of suboxides variety in the films and the instability of HfO2, when annealed at high temperature.

  10. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Ramachandra, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Soot formation in oxidation of allene, 1,3-butadiene, vinylacetylene and chlorobenzene and in pyrolysis of ethylene, vinylacetylene, 1-butene, chlorobenzene, acetylen-hydrogen, benzene-acetylene, benzene-butadiene and chlorobenzene-acetylene argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves. The results are rationalized within the framework of the conceptual models. It is shown that vinylacetylene is much less sooty than allene, which indicates that conjugation by itself is not a sufficient factor for determining the sooting tendency of a molecule. Structural reactivity in the context of the chemical kinetics is the dominant factor in soot formation. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of soot formation in pyrolysis of acetylene is reported. The main mass growth was found to proceed through a single dominant route composed of conventional radical reactions. The practically irreversible formation reactions of the fused polycyclic aromatics and the overshoot by hydrogen atom over its equilibrium concentration are the g-driving kinetic forces for soot formation.

  11. Structural and optical studies on hot wire chemical vapour deposited hydrogenated silicon films at low substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, Assam (India)

    2009-02-15

    Thin films of hydrogenated silicon are deposited by hot wire chemical vapour deposition technique, as an alternative of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. By varying the hydrogen and silane flow rate, we deposited the films ranging from pure amorphous to nanocrystallite-embedded amorphous in nature. In this paper we report extensively studied structural and optical properties of these films. It is observed that the rms bond angle deviation decreases with increase in hydrogen flow rate, which is an indication of improved order in the films. We discuss this under the light of breaking of weak Si-Si bonds and subsequent formation of strong Si-Si bonds and coverage of the growing surface by atomic hydrogen. (author)

  12. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  13. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, E G; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Bruze, M

    2000-01-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships...... test on the pre-sensitized patient. The chemical composition of the fractions giving a positive patch-test response and repeated open application test reactions was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the compounds identified, those that contained a "structural alert...... mix. The combination of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships seems to be a valuable tool for the investigation of contact allergy to fragrance materials....

  14. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics Lecture: Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy for Chemical Kinetics, Molecular Structure, and Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Advances in high-speed digital electronics have enabled a new generation of molecular rotational spectroscopy techniques that provide instantaneous broadband spectral coverage. These techniques use a chirped excitation pulse to coherently excite the molecular sample over a spectral bandwidth of 10 GHz or larger through rapid passage. The subsequent time-domain emission is recorded using high-speed digitizers (up to 100 Gigasample/s) and the frequency domain spectrum is produced by fast Fourier transformation. The chirped-pulse Fourier transform (CP-FT) method has been implemented in the microwave frequency range (2-40 GHz) for studies of cold samples in pulsed jet sources and in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) frequency range for studies of samples at room-temperature. The method has opened new applications for molecular rotational spectroscopy in the area of chemical kinetics where dynamic rotational spectroscopy is used to measure the rates of unimolecular isomerization reactions in highly excited molecules prepared by pulsed infrared laser excitation. In these applications, the isomerization rate is obtained from an analysis of the overall line shapes which are modified by chemical exchange leading to coalescence behavior similar to the effect in NMR spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the method and the ability to extend it to low frequency (2-8 GHz) have significantly increased the size range of molecules and molecular clusters for structure determination using isotopic substitution to build up the 3D molecular structures atom-by-atom. Application to the structure of water clusters with up to 15 water molecules will be presented. When coupled with advances in solid-state mm-wave/THz devices, this method provides a direct digital technique for analytical chemistry of room-temperature gases based on molecular rotational spectroscopy. These high-throughput methods can analyze complex sample mixtures with unmatched chemical selectivity and short analysis times. Work

  15. Structural and Functional Difference of Pheromone Binding Proteins in Discriminating Chemicals in the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria Dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxue Yu, Fei Ma, Yixia Cao, Junhua Zhang, Yongan Zhang, Shengnan Duan, Yadong Wei, Shuifang Zhu, Naizhong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L., play an important role in olfaction. Here structures of PBPs were first built by Homology Modeling, and each model of PBPs had seven α-helices and a large hydrophobic cavity including 25 residues for PBP1 and 30 residues for PBP2. Three potential semiochemicals were first screened by CDOCKER program based on the PBP models and chemical database. These chemicals were Palmitic acid n-butyl ester (Pal, Bis(3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl adipate (Bis, L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-isoleucyl-proline methyl ester propylamide (CA-074. The analysis of chemicals docking the proteins showed one hydrogen bond was established between the residues Lys94 and (+-Disparlure ((+-D, and л-л interactions were present between Phe36 of PBP1 and (+-D. The Lys94 of PBP1 formed two and three hydrogen bonds with Bis and CA-074, respectively. There was no residue of PBP2 interacting with these four chemicals except Bis forming one hydrogen bond with Lys121. After simulating the conformational changes of LdisPBPs at pH7.3 and 5.5 by constant pH molecular dynamics simulation in implicit solvent, the N-terminal sequences of PBPs was unfolded, only having five α-helices, and PBP2 had larger binding pocket at 7.3 than PBP1. To investigate the changes of α-helices at different pH, far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism showed PBPs consist of α-helices, and the tertiary structures of PBP1 and PBP2 were influenced at pH7.3 and 5.5. The fluorescence binding assay indicated that PBP1 and PBP2 have similarly binding affinity to (+-D at pH 5.5 and 7.3, respectively. At pH 5.5, the dissociation constant of the complex between PBP1 and 2-decyl-1-oxaspiro [2.2] pentane (OXP1 was 0.68±0.01μM, for (+-D was 5.32±0.11μM, while PBP2 with OXP1 and (+-D were 1.88±0.02μM and 5.54±0.04μM, respectively. Three chemicals screened had higher affinity to PBP1 than (+-D except Pal at pH5.5, and had lower affinity than (+-D at p

  16. Structural characterization and photoluminescence properties of zinc oxide nano particles synthesized by chemical route method

    OpenAIRE

    P.B. Taunk; Das, R.; D.P. Bisen; Raunak kumar Tamrakar

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures, crystalline Zinc oxide powder were synthesized by mixing Zinc chloride (0.04M) and sodium hydroxide (0.08M) using chemical route method. 0.001M molar concentrations of TEA (Tri ethanolamine) in aqueous solution used to the growing reaction solution. The powder samples are annealed at 190 °C. The experimental results indicate a successful growth of Zinc oxide in solid form which is not observed ever before. XRD, SEM, TEM and PL were performed to characterize the morphology, gro...

  17. Structural and light-emission modification in chemically-etched porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Urrios, D.; Oton, C.J. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, University of La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Fco. Sanchez, La Laguna (Spain); INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, Povo, Trento (Italy); Perez-Padron, C.; Lorenzo, E.; Capuj, N.E. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, University of La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Fco. Sanchez, La Laguna (Spain); Gaburro, Z.; Pavesi, L. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    After electrochemical etching, we have made a study of the effects generated on p{sup +}-type porous silicon layers when they are left in presence of the electrolyte for different post-etching times. Using an interferometric technique, we have monitored the change of its porosity during the post-etch process due to a chemical dissolution mechanism. These data are complemented with a study of photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy measurements for different post-etching times. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Structural and chemical analysis of gadolinium halides encapsulated within WS2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumol, E. A.; Enyashin, Andrey N.; Batra, Nitin M.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2016-06-01

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.The hollow cavities of nanotubes serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of WS2 nanotubes by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is non-trivial due to the

  19. Visible photoluminescence of MWCNT/CdS nanohybrid structure synthesized by a simple chemical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Rima; Kumbhakar, P. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India); Mitra, A.K., E-mail: akmrecdgp@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur 713209, West Bengal (India)

    2010-03-15

    The authors report a simple wet chemical technique to prepare hybrid nanostructures of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles. In a solution containing cadmium acetate and sodium sulphide, purified MWCNTs are added. Cadmium sulphide nanocrystals of average size 5 nm are synthesized and they decorate the walls of the MWCNTs. The hybrid material is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Interesting optical properties of the composite are revealed through UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy.

  20. Structure-property relationships in cubic cuprous iodide: A novel view on stability, chemical bonding, and electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishtshev, A; Karazhanov, S Zh

    2017-02-14

    Based on the combination of density functional theory and theory-group methods, we performed systematic modeling of γ-CuI structural design at the atomistic level. Being started from the metallic copper lattice, we treated a crystal assembly as a stepwise iodination process characterized in terms of a sequence of intermediate lattice geometries. These geometries were selected and validated via screening of possible structural transformations. The genesis of chemical bonding was studied for three structural transformations by analyzing the relevant changes in the topology of valence electron densities. We determined structural trends driven by metal-ligand coupling. This allowed us to suggest the improved scenario of chemical bonding in γ-CuI. In particular, the unconventional effect of spatial separation of metallic and covalent interactions was found to be very important with respect to the preferred arrangements of valence electrons in the iodination process. We rigorously showed that useful electronic and optical properties of γ-CuI originate from the combination of two separated bonding patterns-strong covalency established in I-Cu tetrahedral connections and noncovalent interactions of copper cores is caused by the 3d(10) closed-shell electron configurations. The other finding of ours is that the self-consistency of the GW calculations is crucial for correctly determining the dynamic electronic correlations in γ-CuI. Detail reinvestigation of the quasi-particle energy structure by means of the self-consistent GW approach allowed us to explain how p-type electrical conductivity can be engineered in the material.

  1. Structure-property relationships in cubic cuprous iodide: A novel view on stability, chemical bonding, and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishtshev, A.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.

    2017-02-01

    Based on the combination of density functional theory and theory-group methods, we performed systematic modeling of γ-CuI structural design at the atomistic level. Being started from the metallic copper lattice, we treated a crystal assembly as a stepwise iodination process characterized in terms of a sequence of intermediate lattice geometries. These geometries were selected and validated via screening of possible structural transformations. The genesis of chemical bonding was studied for three structural transformations by analyzing the relevant changes in the topology of valence electron densities. We determined structural trends driven by metal-ligand coupling. This allowed us to suggest the improved scenario of chemical bonding in γ-CuI. In particular, the unconventional effect of spatial separation of metallic and covalent interactions was found to be very important with respect to the preferred arrangements of valence electrons in the iodination process. We rigorously showed that useful electronic and optical properties of γ-CuI originate from the combination of two separated bonding patterns—strong covalency established in I-Cu tetrahedral connections and noncovalent interactions of copper cores is caused by the 3d10 closed-shell electron configurations. The other finding of ours is that the self-consistency of the GW calculations is crucial for correctly determining the dynamic electronic correlations in γ-CuI. Detail reinvestigation of the quasi-particle energy structure by means of the self-consistent GW approach allowed us to explain how p-type electrical conductivity can be engineered in the material.

  2. Internal rotation potential and structure of six fluorine substituted nitrobenzenes studied by microwave spectroscopy supported by quantum chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Wessel; Nielsen, Ole Vesterlund

    2014-01-01

    Microwave spectra of the vibrational ground state and several torsionally excited states were used to investigate the internal rotation potential and the structure of six fluorine substituted nitrobenzenes: 3-fluoro- and 4-fluoronitrobenzene were planar molecules just as nitrobenzene whereas 2....... For the planar molecules and for 2,4,6-trifluoronitrobenzene V 2 and V4 were determined using assumptions about V 6 based on the quantum chemical calculations. For all non-planar molecules tunnelling through the lower of the two barriers was observed as a splitting of the torsional energy levels. © 2014 Elsevier...

  3. Influence of the chemical composition and the surface structure imperfection of metal substrates on the zeolite film formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtchev, V.; Mintova, S. [Institute of Applied Mineralogy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-01

    There are several attractive features of zeolites that make-them useful in designing molecular thin films, coatings and membranes. Metal supports axe especially convenient for zeolite containing composite materials due to their high thermal stability, acid resistance and the possibility to form micropore modules of an arbitrary shape. There axe, however, no systematic studies on the effect of the substrate chemical composition and surface structure imperfections on the zeolite film formation. This study is concerned with: (1) the effect of the metal substrate and surface imperfections on the process of film formation; (2) the effect of the surface pretreatment.

  4. 1H NMR study of the solvent THF concerning their structural and dynamical properties in chemically Li-intercalated SWNT

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2011-09-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the THF solvent in single-walled carbon nanotubes intercalated with lithium are investigated by NMR. 1H NMR experiments reveal the existence of two types of inequivalent THF solvent molecules with different chemical environments and dynamical behavior. At low temperatures THF molecules perpendicularly arranged in between adjacent SWNT presumably exhibit a restricted rotation around their dipolar axis. At higher temperatures THF molecules are isotropically rotating and diffusing along the interstitial channels of the SWNT bundles. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mimicking/extracting structure and functions of natural products: synthetic approaches that address unexplored needs in chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Go

    2015-04-01

    Natural products are often attractive and challenging targets for synthetic chemists, and many have interesting biological activities. However, synthetic chemists need to be more than simply suppliers of compounds to biologists. Therefore, we have been seeking ways to actively apply organic synthetic methods to chemical biology studies of natural products and their activities. In this personal review, I would like to introduce our work on the development of new biologically active compounds inspired by, or extracted from, the structures of natural products, focusing on enhancement of functional activity and specificity and overcoming various drawbacks of the parent natural products.

  6. Impact of the physical and chemical environment on the molecular structure of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houborg, Karen; Harris, Pernille; Petersen, Jens; Rowland, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Schneider, Palle; Vind, Jesper; Larsen, Sine

    2003-06-01

    The structure of the peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus (CiP) has been determined in three different space groups and crystalline environments. Two of these are of the recombinant glycosylated form (rCiP), which crystallized in space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1) and C2. The third crystal form was obtained from a variant of CiP in which the glycosylation sites have been removed (rCiPON). It crystallizes in space group P2(1) with beta approximately 90 degrees; the structure was determined from room-temperature data and low-temperature data obtained from twinned crystals. Two independent molecules of CiP related by non-crystallographic symmetry are contained in the three crystal forms. The packing in the two structures of the glycosylated form of rCiP is closely related, but differs from the packing in the unglycosylated rCiPON. A database search based on small-molecule porphinato iron (III) complexes has been performed and related to observations of the spin states and coordination numbers of the iron ion. The room-temperature structures of CiP and one structure of the almost identical peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus (ARP) have been used to identify 66 conserved water molecules and to assign a structural role to most of them.

  7. Chemical and structural characterization of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Nakatani, Mariana Kyosen; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Estrela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are restorative materials, which clinical use has increased significantly during the last decade. The aim of the present study was to analyze the chemical constitution and surface morphology of four glass ionomer cements: Maxxion R, VitroFill, Vidrion R and Vitremer. Twelve polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 3 and 3 mm in length were prepared, filled and then transferred to a chamber with 95% relative humidity and a temperature of 37°C. The surface morphology of the tested materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and main components were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). Scanning electron microscopy revealed irregular and rough external surface. Cracking was not observed. The main constituents were found to be aluminum, silicon, calcium, sodium and fluoride. Phosphorus, sulfur and barium were only observed in Vidrion R, while chlorine were only observed in Maxxion R. Elemental mapping of the outer surface revealed high concentration of aluminum and silicon. Significant irregularities on the surface of the tested materials were observed. The chemical constitution of all GIC was similar.

  8. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). III. Chemical structure of the protostellar envelope

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmierczak-Barthel, Maja; van der Tak, Floris; Chavarría, Luis; van der Wiel, Matthijs

    2014-01-01

    We aim to understand the rich chemical composition of AFGL 2591, a prototypical isolated high-mass star-forming region. Based on HIFI and JCMT data, the molecular abundances of species found in the protostellar envelope of AFGL 2591 were derived with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RATRAN, assuming either constant values or 1D stepwise radial profiles as abundance distributions. The reconstructed 1D abundances were compared with the results of time-dependent gas-grain chemical modeling, considering ages of 10,000 to 50,000 years, cosmic-ray ionization rates of 0.5 to 50 times 10^-16 s^-1, uniformly-sized 0.1-1 micron dust grains, a dust/gas ratio of 1%, and several sets of initial molecular abundances with C/O 1. Constant abundance models give good fits to the data for CO, CN, CS, HCO+, H2CO, N2H+, C2H, NO, OCS, OH, H2CS, O, C, C+, and CH. Models with an abundance jump at 100 K give good fits to the data for NH3, SO, SO2, H2S, H2O, HCl, and CH3OH. For HCN and HNC, the best models have an abundance jum...

  9. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A

    2016-05-18

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  10. On the Development and Use of Large Chemical Similarity Networks, Informatics Best Practices and Novel Chemical Descriptors Towards Materials Quantitative Structure Property Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Michael

    ZINC data set, a qHTS PubChem bioassay, as well as the protein binding sites from the PDB. The characteristics of these networks are compared and contrasted with those of the bioassay Structure Activity Landscape Index (SALI) subnetwork, which maps discontinuities or cliffs in the structure activity landscape. Mapping this newly generated information over underlying chemistry space networks generated using different descriptors demonstrates local modeling capacity and can guide the choice of better local representations of chemistry space. Chapter 2 introduces and demonstrates this novel concept, which also enables future work in visualization and interpretation of chemical spaces. Initially, it was discovered that there were no community-available tools to leverage best-practice ideas to comprehensively build, compare, and interpret QSPRs. The Yet Another Modeling System (YAMS) tool performs a series of balanced, rational decisions in dataset preprocessing and parameter/feature selection over a choice of modeling methods. To date, YAMS is the only community-available informatics tool that performs such decisions consistently between methods while also providing multiple model performance comparisons and detailed descriptor importance information. The focus of the tool is thus to convey rich information about model quality and predictions that help to "close the loop" between modeling and experimental efforts, for example, in tailoring nanocomposite properties. Polymer nanocomposites (PNC) are complex material systems encompassing many potential structures, chemistries, and self assembled morphologies that could significantly impact commercial and military applications. There is a strong desire to characterize and understand the tradespace of nanocomposites, to identify the important factors relating nanostructure to materials properties and determine an effective way to control materials properties at the manufacturing scale. Due to the complexity of the systems

  11. Crystal Structures of Peptide Deformylase from Rice Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in Complex with Substrate Peptides, Actinonin, and Fragment Chemical Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Ho, Thien-Hoang; Lee, Inho; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Sur, Bookyo; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2016-10-05

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight on rice; this species is one of the most destructive pathogenic bacteria in rice cultivation worldwide. Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of the N-formyl group from the N-terminus of newly synthesized polypeptides in bacterial cells and is an important target to develop antibacterial agents. We determined crystal structures of Xoo PDF (XoPDF) at up to 1.9 Å resolution, which include apo, two substrate-bound (methionine-alanine or methionine-alanine-serine), an inhibitor-bound (actinonin), and six fragment chemical-bound structures. Six fragment chemical compounds were bound in the substrate-binding pocket. The fragment chemical-bound structures were compared to the natural PDF inhibitor actinonin-bound structure. The fragment chemical molecules will be useful to design an inhibitor specific to XoPDF and a potential pesticide against Xoo.

  12. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  13. The structural properties of CdS deposited by chemical bath deposition and pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bass, K.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films were deposited by two different processes, chemical bath deposition (CBD), and pulsed DC magnetron sputtering (PDCMS) on fluorine doped-tin oxide coated glass to assess the potential advantages of the pulsed DC magnetron sputtering process. The structural, optical and morphological properties of films obtained by CBD and PDCMS were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The as-grown films were studied and comparisons were drawn between their morphology, uniformity, crystallinity, and the deposition rate of the process. The highest crystallinity is observed for sputtered CdS thin films. The absorption in the visible wavelength increased for PDCMS CdS thin films, due to the higher density of the films. The band gap measured for the as-grown CBD-CdS is 2.38 eV compared to 2.34 eV for PDCMS-CdS, confirming the higher density of the sputtered thin film. The higher deposition rate for PDCMS is a significant advantage of this technique which has potential use for high rate and low cost manufacturing. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering (PDCMS) of CdS films • Chemical bath deposition of CdS films • Comparison between CdS thin films deposited by chemical bath and PDCMS techniques • High deposition rate deposition for PDCMS deposition • Uniform, pinhole free CdS thin films.

  14. Molecular structure, IR spectra, and chemical reactivity of cisplatin and transplatin: DFT studies, basis set effect and solvent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Qingzhu; Qiu, Ling; Wang, Tengfei; Yuan, Haoliang; Lin, Jianguo; Luo, Shineng

    2015-01-01

    Three different density functional theory (DFT) methods were employed to study the molecular structures of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (TDDP). The basis set effect on the structure was also investigated. By comparing the optimized structures with the experimental data, a relatively more accurate method was chosen for further study of the IR spectra and other properties as well as the solvent effect. Nineteen characteristic vibrational bands of the title compounds were assigned and compared with available experimental data. The number of characteristic peaks for the asymmetric stretching and deformation vibrations of N-H can serve as a judgment for the isomer between CDDP and TDDP. Significant solvent effect was observed on the molecular structures and IR spectra. The reduced density gradient analysis was performed to study the intramolecular interactions of CDDP and TDDP, and the nature of changes in the structures caused by the solvent was illustrated. Several descriptors determined from the energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) were applied to describe the chemical reactivity of the title compounds. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) surfaces showed that the amino groups were the most favorable sites that nucleophilic reagents tend to attack, and CDDP was easier to be attacked by nucleophilic reagents than TDDP.

  15. Magnetism, structure and chemical order in small CoPd clusters: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb, E-mail: Junais.Mokkath@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-01-15

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small Co{sub m}Pd{sub n}(N=m+n=8,m=0−N) nanoalloy clusters are studied in the framework of a generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. The optimized cluster structures have a clear tendency to maximize the number of nearest-neighbor CoCo pairs. The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like (FM) for all the ground-state structures. Antiferromagnetic-like spin arrangements were found in some low-lying isomers. The average magnetic moment per atom μ{sup ¯}{sub N} increases approximately linearly with Co content. A remarkable enhancement of the local Co moments is observed as a result of Pd doping. This is a consequence of the increase in the number of Co d holes, due to CoPd charge transfer, combined with the reduced local coordination. The influence of spin–orbit interactions on the cluster properties is also discussed. - Highlights: • This work analyses the structural and magnetic properties of CoPd nanoclusters. • The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like for all the ground-state structures. • The average magnetic moment per atom increases approximately linearly with Co content. • The influence of spin–orbit interactions on the cluster properties is discussed.

  16. Chemical structure-optical property understanding in bisphenyls and substituted polycarbonates by molecular simulations: Role of polarizabilities and conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Upendra; Sulatha, M. S.

    2005-03-01

    We present calculations of polarizability tensors, optical anisotropy of organic molecules, repeating units and polymer chains of several bisphenyls, bisphenol carbonates and polycarbonates with a variety of chemical substitutions.^1,2 Theoretical calculations of polarizabilities and optical birefringence of several newer structures having specific side-group substitutions which render low birefringence, not previously reported, is also shown here. Our method combines VOSRIS scheme^3, molecular geometry and conformations from force-field simulations and accurate anisotropic polarizability tensors. Aliphatic, aliphatic aromatic and cycloaliphatic substitutions reduce optical anisotropy in relation to bisphenol A polycarbonate. Calculated /x of these structurally modified polycarbonates^2 follows linear behavior with respect to experimentally observed melt stress-optical coefficient (Cm). *J. Phys. Chem. A, 107, 97 (2003) *Macromolecules, 36, 2944 (2003) *P.J. Flory, Statistical Mechanics of Chain Molecules, Wiley Interscience, New York (1969)

  17. Optical and structural properties of ZnO hexagonal rods prepared by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Reyhani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, ZnO nanostructure hexagonal pyramid rods with high optical and structural quality were synthesized by the simple thermal chemical vapor deposition of Zn powder without a metal catalyst. Surface morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. XRD analyses demonstrated that ZnO hexagonal pyramid rods had a wurtzite structure with the orientation of (002. Investigation of optical properties of samples by photoluminescence spectrum exhibited a sharp UV emission peak at 380nm. The quality and composition of the ZnO pyramid rods were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR at room temperature. In addition, the growth mechanism of ZnO hexagonal rods is also briefly discussed.

  18. Structural and chemical modifications of typical South African biomasses during torrefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, Lihle D; Neomagus, Hein W J P; Everson, Raymond C; Carrier, Marion; Strydom, Christien A; Bunt, John R

    2016-02-01

    Torrefaction experiments were carried out for three typical South African biomass samples (softwood chips, hardwood chips and sweet sorghum bagasse) to a weight loss of 30 wt.%. During torrefaction, moisture, non-structural carbohydrates and hemicelluloses were reduced, resulting in a structurally modified torrefaction product. There was a reduction in the average crystalline diameter (La) (XRD), an increase in the aromatic fraction and a reduction in aliphatics (substituted and unsubstituted) (CPMAS (13)C NMR). The decrease in the aliphatic components of the lignocellulosic material under the torrefaction conditions also resulted in a slight ordering of the carbon lattice. The degradation of hemicelluloses and non-structural carbohydrates increased the inclusive surface area of sweet sorghum bagasse, while it did not change significantly for the woody biomasses.

  19. Structure and Electrical Study of New Chemically Modified Poly(vinyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ammari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the structural and electrical properties of a new polymer obtained by functionalization of a commercial poly(vinyl chloride (PVC (Mw = 48000 by grafting aminoalkyl and aminoaryl groups. Modified poly(vinyl chloride was prepared in two steps. The structural properties of the polymer were systematically investigated by varieties of techniques as differential scanning calorimetric (DSC, thermogravimetry analysis (TG, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. The electrical properties of the polymer were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS.

  20. Photoluminescence changes of III-Nitride lateral polarity structures after chemical functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Nora G.; Franke, Alexander; Kirste, Ronny; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-12-01

    The photoluminescence changes of a III-Nitride semiconductor with various surface topographies were studied after chemical functionalization. Al x Ga1‑x N with a composition of 70% aluminum was used and the surfaces were functionalized with a fluorophore dye-terminated peptide using a linker molecule. The stability of the wafers in water was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry prior to modifying the material. The leaching data demonstrated that the AlGaN material in highly stable in biological conditions over 7 d. The attachment of the dye to the wafer was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The PL spectrum showed a clear signature of the dye with a pronounced emission peak at approximately 260 nm, indicating a successful attachment to the surface.

  1. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and properties of ceramic insulators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arman Sedghi; Nastaran Riahi-Noori; Naser Hamidnezhad; Mohammad Reza Salmani

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, six electrical porcelain compositions with different amount of alumina and silica have been prepared and fired in an industrial furnace at 1300°C. Density, porosity, bending strength and electrical strength were measured in the samples. In order to find a relationship between properties and sample microstructures, samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results showed that, with chemical composition of 53.5 wt.% SiO2 and 37.5 wt.% alumina, highest electrical strength of 21.97 kV/mm was achieved in fabricated electrical porcelains. Increasing amount of alumina up to 30 wt.% decreases quartz and cristobalite phases, but increases corundum phase 3 to 5 times. SEM observation revealed that dense particles and uniform distribution of long and thin needle shaped mullite are predominant in sample microstructures with highest electrical strength.

  2. Isolated and synergistic effects of chemical and structural defenses of two species of Tethya (Porifera: Demospongiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Suzi Meneses; Cassiano, Keila Mara; Cavalcanti, Diana Negrão; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Pereira, Renato Crespo

    2012-02-01

    Sponges are an important source of many interesting secondary metabolites with multiple ecological roles. Sponges can also use their spicules as a means of deterring consumers. The present study investigated the importance of chemicals and spicules as defensive strategies against predation for two congeneric sponge species from the Brazilian coast, Tethya rubra and Tethya maza. Crude extract and spicules differed somewhat in their effectiveness between these sponge species, with T. maza better defended than T. rubra against predation by the hermit crab Calcinus tibicen and synergistic effects stronger in T. rubra. These results show that defensive strategies may be similar between sponge species possessing monophyletic origin, and reveal the importance of research on congeneric species to understand the ecology and evolution of defensive strategies.

  3. Chemical substitution of Cd ions by Hg in CdSe nanorods and nanodots: Spectroscopic and structural examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudnikau, Anatol [Institute for Physico-Chemical Problems, Belarussian State University, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Artemyev, Mikhail, E-mail: m_artemyev@yahoo.com [Institute for Physico-Chemical Problems, Belarussian State University, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Laboratory of Nano-Bioengineering, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe sh., 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51100 Reims (France); Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor [Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51100 Reims (France); Laboratory of Nano-Bioengineering, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, 31 Kashirskoe sh., 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranov, Alexandr V.; Cherevkov, Sergey A.; Fedorov, Anatoly V. [Saint-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St.-Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied cadmium-by-mercury chemical substitution in CdSe nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc blende CdSe quantum dots can be easily converted to isostructural Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wurtzite CdSe QDs require longer time to convert to a zinc blende Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wurtzite CdSe nanorods transform to nanoheterogeneous luminescent Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se rods. - Abstract: The chemical substitution of cadmium by mercury in colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanorods has been examined by absorption, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline structure of original CdSe QDs used for Cd/Hg substitution (zinc blende versus wurtzite) shows a strong impact on the optical and structural properties of resultant Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se nanocrystals. Substitution of Cd by Hg in isostructural zinc blende CdSe QDs converts them to ternary Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se zinc blende nanocrystals with significant NIR emission. Whereas, the wurtzite CdSe QDs transformed first to ternary nanocrystals with almost no emission followed by slow structural reorganization to a NIR-emitting zinc blende Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se QDs. CdSe nanorods with intrinsic wurtzite structure show unexpectedly intense NIR emission even at early Cd/Hg substitution stage with PL active zinc blende Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se regions.

  4. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81

  5. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Doerfler

    Full Text Available The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012

  6. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhu, Hao [The Rutgers Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia [NovaMechanics Ltd., Nicosia (Cyprus); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function.

  7. Development of standards for chemical and biological decontamination of buildings and structures affected by terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, T.C.; Volchek, K.; Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch; Hay, A.W.M. [Leeds Univ., Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are no suitable standards for determining levels of safety when reoccupying a building that has been recommissioned following a biological or chemical attack. For that reason, this study focused on developing clean-up standards for decontaminating buildings and construction materials after acts of terrorism. Several parameters must be assessed when determining the course of action to decontaminate toxic agents and to rehabilitate facilities. First, the hazardous substance must be positively identified along with the degree of contamination and information on likely receptors. Potential exposure route is also a key consideration in the risk assessment process. A key objective of the study was to develop specific guidelines for ascertaining and defining clean. In particular, standards for chemical and biological agents that pose a real or potential risk for use as agents of terrorism will be developed. The selected agents for standards development were ammonia, fentanyl, malathion, mustard gas, potassium cyanide, ricin, sarin, hepatitis A virus, and bacillus anthracis. The standards will be developed by establishing the relationship between the amount of exposure and expected health effects; assessing real and potential risks by identifying individuals at risk and consideration of all exposure routes; and, characterizing the risk to determine the potential for toxicity or infectivity. For non-carcinogens, this was done through the analysis of other known guidelines. Cancer-slope factors will be considered for carcinogens. The standards will be assessed in the laboratory using animal models. The guidelines and standards are intended for first-responders and are scheduled for development by the end of 2006. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-05

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current.

  9. Coal Liquefaction characteristics and chemical structure of product oil; Sekitan ekika hanno tokusei to seiseibutsu no kagaku kozo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, H.; Sato, M.; Chiba, T.; Hattori, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology; Sasaki, M. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Through the hydrogenolysis of Wandoan coal and Tanito Harum coal which are used for the NEDOL process, differences of liquefaction characteristics between them were found. The purpose of this study is to grasp these differences as differences of chemical structures of oil fractions. The compound type analysis was conducted for oil fractions obtained at varied reaction temperature for varied reaction time. Coal liquefaction characteristics of these coals were discussed by relating oil yields and chemical structures. For Tanito Harum coal, yields of gas and oil were considered to be lower than those for Wandoan coal, which reflected that the contents of partially hydrogenated hydroaromatics in oil fraction from the former were lower than those from the latter, and that the remarkable change of composition did not occur with the progress of the reaction. For both the coals, the remarkable changes in the average molecular weight of oil fraction were not observed with the progress of the reaction. While, the content of methane gradually increased with the progress of the reaction, which suggested that oil was gradually dealkylated. 5 figs.

  10. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  11. Chemical Structure, Property and Potential Applications of Biosurfactants Produced by Bacillus subtilis in Petroleum Recovery and Spill Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Feng Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptides produced by microorganisms are one of the five major classes of biosurfactants known and they have received much attention from scientific and industrial communities due to their powerful interfacial and biological activities as well as environmentally friendly characteristics. Microbially produced lipopeptides are a series of chemical structural analogues of different families and, among them, 26 families covering about 90 lipopeptide compounds have been reported in the last two decades. This paper reviews the chemical structural characteristics and molecular behaviors of surfactin, one of the representative lipopeptides of the 26 families. In particular, two novel surfactin molecules isolated from cell-free cultures of Bacillus subtilis HSO121 are presented. Surfactins exhibit strong self-assembly ability to form sphere-like micelles and larger aggregates at very low concentrations. The amphipathic and surface properties of surfactins are related to the existence of the minor polar and major hydrophobic domains in the three 3-D conformations. In addition, the application potential of surfactin in bioremediation of oil spills and oil contaminants, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are discussed.

  12. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-03-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (-)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (-)-borneol, α-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2-5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ≥ esters ≥ alcohols > oxides > hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol-water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation.

  13. Robust, functionalizable, nanometer-thick poly(acrylic acid) films spontaneously assembled on oxidized aluminum substrates: structures and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Eunhae; Yoon, Sungho; Atre, Sundar V; Allara, David L

    2011-04-05

    Immersion of oxidized aluminum substrates in ethanol solutions of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), followed by extensive solvent immersion, results in tenaciously chemisorbed, nanometer scale, controllable thickness films for a wide range of solution concentrations and molecular weights. Atomic force microscope images reveal isolated polymer globules from adsorption in low-concentration solutions with crossover to conformal, highly uniform, nanometer-thickness films at higher concentrations, an indication that the chemisorbing chains start to overlap and trap underlying segments to form planar chemisorbed films only two or three chains in thickness. Quantitative IR reflection spectroscopy in combination with chemical derivitization on a standard set of 1.0(±0.2) nm thick films reveals a film structure with 5.5(±1) chemisorbed -CO(-)(2) groups/nm(2) and 6.3 unattached -CO(2)H groups/nm(2), with up to ∼3.6/nm(2) available for chemical derivitization, a comparable number to typical self-assembled monolayer coverages of ∼4-5 molecules/nm(2). Thermal treatment of the ∼1 nm chemisorbed films, at even extreme temperatures of ∼150 °C, results in almost no anhydride formation via adjacent -CO(2)H condensation, in strong contrast to bulk PAA, a clear indication that the films have a frozen glass structure with effectively no segment and side group mobility. Overall, these results demonstrate that these limiting thickness nanometer films provide a model surface for understanding the behavior of strongly bound polymer chains at substrates and show potential as a path to creating highly stable, chemically functionalized inorganic substrates with highly variable surface properties.

  14. Origami: A Versatile Modeling System for Visualising Chemical Structure and Exploring Molecular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James; Leslie, Ray; Billington, Susan; Slater, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of "Origami" is presented as an accessible and transferable modeling system through which to convey the intricacies of molecular shape and highlight structure-function relationships. The implementation of origami has been found to be a versatile alternative to conventional ball-and-stick models, possessing the key advantages of being both…

  15. The Effect of Chemical Composition and Structure on XPS Binding Energies in Zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Mens, A.J.M.; Lenthe, J.H. van; Mortier, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of zeolite composition and structure on XPS core level binding energies has been studied for a large class of zeolites (FAU, MFI, MOR, LTA) differing in their counterions (Na, K, Rb, Ca, Mg, Ba) and Si:Al ratio (1 to 160). Whereas absolute binding energies cannot be determined to any reas

  16. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of the high-temperature phase of AgN3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carsten L; Dinnebier, Robert; Wedig, Ulrich; Jansen, Martin

    2007-02-05

    The crystal structure of silver azide (AgN3) in its high-temperature (HT) modification was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data, recorded at T = 170 degrees C and was further refined by the Rietveld method. The structure is monoclinic (P21/c (No. 14), a = 6.0756(2) A, b = 6.1663(2) A, c = 6.5729(2) A, beta = 114.19(0) degrees, V = 224.62(14) A3, Z = 4) and consists of two-dimensional Ag and N containing layers in which the silver atoms are coordinated by four nitrogen atoms exhibiting a distorted square coordination environment. These sheets are linked together by weaker perpendicular Ag-N contacts, thus forming a 4 + 2 coordination geometry around the silver atoms. The phase transition has been characterized by DTA, DSC, and measurement of the density, as well as of the ionic conductivity. Both, the room-temperature and the HT phase are electrically insulating. This fact is getting support by DFT band structure calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, using the PBE functional. On the basis of the DFT band structure, the bonding characteristics of both phases are essentially the same. Finally, the implication of the existence of a low-symmetry HT-phase in a crystalline explosive concerning decomposition mechanisms is discussed.

  17. Crystal Structure and Chemical Bonding of the High-Temperature Phase of AgN3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt,C.; Dinnebier, R.; Wedig, U.; Jansen, M.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of silver azide (AgN{sub 3}) in its high-temperature (HT) modification was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data, recorded at T = 170 {sup o}C and was further refined by the Rietveld method. The structure is monoclinic (P2{sub 1}lc (No. 14), a = 6.0756(2) {angstrom}, b = 6.1663(2) {angstrom}, c = 6.5729(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 114.19(0){sup o}, V = 224.62(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4) and consists of two-dimensional Ag and N containing layers in which the silver atoms are coordinated by four nitrogen atoms exhibiting a distorted square coordination environment. These sheets are linked together by weaker perpendicular Ag-N contacts, thus forming a 4 + 2 coordination geometry around the silver atoms. The phase transition has been characterized by DTA, DSC, and measurement of the density, as well as of the ionic conductivity. Both, the room-temperature and the HT phase are electrically insulating. This fact is getting support by DFT band structure calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, using the PBE functional. On the basis of the DFT band structure, the bonding characteristics of both phases are essentially the same. Finally, the implication of the existence of a low-symmetry HT-phase in a crystalline explosive concerning decomposition mechanisms is discussed.

  18. The quaternary structure of the recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein is modulated by chemical denaturants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Stepanenko

    Full Text Available A large group of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs has attracted great scientific interest as promising building blocks in constructing optical biosensors for dangerous substances, such as toxic and explosive molecules. Native tissue-extracted bovine OBP (bOBP has a unique dimer folding pattern that involves crossing the α-helical domain in each monomer over the other monomer's β-barrel. In contrast, recombinant bOBP maintaining the high level of stability inherent to native tissue bOBP is produced in a stable native-like state with a decreased tendency for dimerization and is a mixture of monomers and dimers in a buffered solution. This work is focused on the study of the quaternary structure and the folding-unfolding processes of the recombinant bOBP in the absence and in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl. Our results show that the recombinant bOBP native dimer is only formed at elevated GdnHCl concentrations (1.5 M. This process requires re-organizing the protein structure by progressing through the formation of an intermediate state. The bOBP dimerization process appears to be irreversible and it occurs before the protein unfolds. Though the observed structural changes for recombinant bOBP at pre-denaturing GdnHCl concentrations show a local character and the overall protein structure is maintained, such changes should be considered where the protein is used as a sensitive element in a biosensor system.

  19. Isolation and structural elucidation of chemical constituents from the fruits of Morinda citrifolia Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Bina S; Sattar, Fouzia A; Ahmad, Fayaz; Begum, Sabira

    2007-08-01

    The fruits of Morinda citrifolia, Linn. afforded a new constituent, morinaphthalenone (1), and three known constituents, scopoletin (2), 1, 3-dimethoxy-anthraquinone (3) and 1, 2-dihydroxy-anthraquinone (4). The structures of these isolated compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods, including 1D- and 2D-NMR (COSY-45, HMQC, HMBC) techniques, as well as by comparison with published values.

  20. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, E G; Andersen, K E; Bruze, M; Frosch, P J; Johansen, J D; Menné, T; Rastogi, S C; White, I R; Lepoittevin, J P

    2000-12-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships (SARs). The basis for the investigation was a 45-year-old woman allergic to her own perfume. She had a negative patch test to the fragrance mix and agreed to participate in the study. Chemical fractionation of the perfume concentrate was used for repeated patch testing and/or repeated open application test on the pre-sensitized patient. The chemical composition of the fractions giving a positive patch-test response and repeated open application test reactions was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the compounds identified, those that contained a "structural alert" in their chemical structure, indicating an ability to modify skin proteins and thus behave as a skin sensitizer, were tested on the patient. The patient reacted positively to the synthetic fragrance p-t-butyl-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic aldehyde (Lilial), a widely used fragrance compound not present in the fragrance mix. The combination of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships seems to be a valuable tool for the investigation of contact allergy to fragrance materials.

  1. Chemical Structure of TiO2 Nanotube Photocatalysts Promoted by Copper and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs promoted by copper (5% (Cu-TNT and iron (5% (Fe-TNT were prepared for visible-light photocatalysis. By X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy, it is found that the enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB on Cu-TNT and Fe-TNT is associated with the predominant surface photoactive sites A2 ((Ti=OO4. By extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy, the dispersed copper and iron also cause increases in the Ti–O and Ti–(O–Ti bond distances by 0.01-0.02 and 0.04-0.05 Å, respectively. The decreased Ti–O bonding energy may lead to an increase of photoexcited electron transport. The copper- or-iron promoted TNT can thus enhance photocatalytic degradation of MB under the visible-light radiation.

  2. Prediction of bioactive compound pathways using chemical interaction and structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shiwen; Zhu, Changming; Chu, Chen; Huang, Tao; Kong, Xiangyin; Zhu, Liu Cun

    2016-01-01

    The functional screening of compounds is an important topic in chemistry and biomedicine that can uncover the essential properties of compounds and provide information concerning their correct use. In this study, we investigated the bioactive compounds reported in Selleckchem, which were assigned to 22 pathways. A computational method was proposed to identify the pathways of the bioactive compounds. Unlike most existing methods that only consider compound structural information, the proposed method adopted both the structural and interaction information from the compounds. The total accuracy achieved by our method was 61.79% based on jackknife analysis of a dataset of 1,832 bioactive compounds. Its performance was quite good compared with that of other machine learning algorithms (with total accuracies less than 46%). Finally, some of the false positives obtained by the method were analyzed to investigate the likelihood of compounds being annotated to new pathways.

  3. The influence of electron beam irradiation on the chemical and structural properties of medical grade Polyurethane

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Sukyoung

    2015-01-01

    Thermo plastic polyurethane (TPU) provides excellent bio-compatibility, flexibility and good irradiation resistance; however, extremely high irradiation doses can alter the structure and function of macromolecules, resulting in oxidation, chain scission and cross-linking. In this study, the effects of e-beam irradiation on the medical grade thermo plastic polyurethane were studied. The changes in the chain length and their distribution as well as the changes in molecular structure were studied. The GPC (Gel Permeation Chromatography) results show that the oxidative decomposition is followed by a decrease in molecular mass together with an increase in polydispersity. This indicates a very inhomogeneous degradation, which is a consequence of the specific course and of the intensity of oxidative degradation. This was confirmed by means of mechanical property measurements. Overall, this study demonstrated that the medical grade TPU was affected by radiation exposure, particularly at high irradiation doses.

  4. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach 3. Regular multimolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic mathematical analysis of the qualitative steady-state response to rate perturbations in large classes of reaction networks. This includes multimolecular reactions and allows for catalysis, enzymatic reactions, multiple reaction products, nonmonotone rate functions, and non-closed autonomous systems. Our structural sensitivity analysis is based on the stoichiometry of the reaction network, only. It does not require numerical data on reaction rates. Instead, we impose mild and generic nondegeneracy conditions of algebraic type. From the structural data, only, we derive which steady-state concentrations are sensitive to, and hence influenced by, changes of any particular reaction rate - and which are not. We also establish transitivity properties for influences involving rate perturbations. This allows us to derive an influence graph which globally summarizes the influence pattern of the given network. The influence graph allows the computational, but meaningful, automatic identification ...

  5. Goadsporin, a chemical substance which promotes secondary metabolism and Morphogenesis in streptomycetes. II. Structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Y; Kan, Y; Fujii, K; Fujita, T; Harada, K; Naoki, H; Tabata, H; Onaka, H; Furumai, T

    2001-12-01

    The structure of goadsporin was determined by using spectroscopic techniques. NMR analysis revealed that goadsporin consists of 19 amino acids, two of which are dehydroalanines (Deala), and six of which are cyclized to oxazoles (Oxz) and thiazoles (Thz) by dehydrative cyclization and dehydrogenation from serine, threonine and cysteine. NMR analysis established seven partial structures, and their sequence was determined by CID-MS/MS. Negative mode FAB-MS/MS gave product ions arising from charge-remote fragmentation that allowed determination of the sequence of the amino acid components as AcNH-Ala-MeOxz-Val-Deala-MeOxz-Ile-Leu-Thz-Ser-Gly-Gly-MeOxz-Leu-Deala-Oxz-Ala-Gly-Thz-Val-OH. The chiral amino acids were determined by the advanced Marfey's method to have L-configurations.

  6. Organic chemistry as a language and the implications of chemical linguistics for structural and retrosynthetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, Andrea; Wylie, Elizabeth K; Jurczak, Janusz; Wampler-Doty, Matthew; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2014-07-28

    Methods of computational linguistics are used to demonstrate that a natural language such as English and organic chemistry have the same structure in terms of the frequency of, respectively, text fragments and molecular fragments. This quantitative correspondence suggests that it is possible to extend the methods of computational corpus linguistics to the analysis of organic molecules. It is shown that within organic molecules bonds that have highest information content are the ones that 1) define repeat/symmetry subunits and 2) in asymmetric molecules, define the loci of potential retrosynthetic disconnections. Linguistics-based analysis appears well-suited to the analysis of complex structural and reactivity patterns within organic molecules.

  7. Magnetism, structure and chemical order in small CoPd clusters: A first-principles study

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-01-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small ComPdn (N=m+n=8,m=0-N) nanoalloy clusters are studied in the framework of a generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. The optimized cluster structures have a clear tendency to maximize the number of nearest-neighbor CoCo pairs. The magnetic order is found to be ferromagnetic-like (FM) for all the ground-state structures. Antiferromagnetic-like spin arrangements were found in some low-lying isomers. The average magnetic moment per atom μ̄N increases approximately linearly with Co content. A remarkable enhancement of the local Co moments is observed as a result of Pd doping. This is a consequence of the increase in the number of Co d holes, due to CoPd charge transfer, combined with the reduced local coordination. The influence of spin-orbit interactions on the cluster properties is also discussed. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Cement clinker structure during plasma-chemical synthesis and its influence on cement properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, N.; Skripnikova, N.; Lucenko, A.; Novikova, L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree of influence of cement clinker cooling modes, synthesized in a low-temperature plasma, its structure and physico-mechanical properties. The raw mixture consisting of marble, sand, ash from thermal power plants and py- rite cinders were used, which are characterized by saturation factor (1,045); silicate (2,35) and alumina (1,22) modules. It was found that the use of different cooling rates of fused cement clinker entails changes associated with the mineralogical composition (increase of alite of 8.719,2 %), morphology (variation of the mineral alite aspect ratio of 6,7-17,5), density of the structure (change in distance between the minerals from 1 to 7,5 microns), grindability, specific surface area (2600-3650 cm2/g) and, in consequence, the activity of cement (56,973,2 MPa). Disorientation of alite mineral blocks against each other, a significant amount of microcracks, affect the increase in cement specific surface area of 14,3-21,6 %, which leads to activity growth of the system. Along with this, with the rapid cooling of the samples, alite 54CaO- 16SiO2-Al2O3 MgO is formed, with single units of the structure, more deformed relatively to C3S, which has a positive effect on the hydraulic cement activity.

  9. Chemical and structural indicators for large redox potentials in Fe-based positive electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melot, Brent C; Scanlon, David O; Reynaud, Marine; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Henry, Marc; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2014-07-23

    Li-ion batteries have enabled a revolution in the way portable consumer-electronics are powered and will play an important role as large-scale electrochemical storage applications like electric vehicles and grid-storage are developed. The ability to identify and design promising new positive insertion electrodes will be vital in continuing to push Li-ion technology to its fullest potential. Utilizing a combination of computational tools and structural analysis, we report new indicators which will facilitate the recognition of phases with the desired redox potential. Most importantly of these, we find there is a strong correlation between the presence of Li ions sitting in close-proximity to the redox center of polyanionic phases and the open circuit voltage in Fe-based cathodes. This common structural feature suggests that the bonding associated with Li may have a secondary inductive effect which increases the ionic character of Fe bonds beyond what is typically expected based purely on arguments of electronegativity associated with the polyanionic group. This correlation is supported by ab initio calculations which show the Bader charge increases (reflecting an increased ionicity) in a nearly linear fashion with the experimental cell potentials. These features are demonstrated to be consistent across a wide variety of compositions and structures and should help to facilitate the design of new, high-potential, and environmentally sustainable insertion electrodes.

  10. SUBSTITUENT CHEMICAL SHIFT (SCS) AND THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF ETHYLENE-VINYL ALCOHOL COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zinan; TIAN Wenjing; WU Shengrong; DAI Yingkun; FENG Zhiliu; SHEN Lianfang; YUAN Hanzhen

    1992-01-01

    Three ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were studied by means of the substituent chemical shift(SCS) method. The SCS parameters of hydroxy (-OH)in two different solvents were obtained: in deuterium oxide/phenol (20/80 W/W ) the parameters are S1 = 42.77 ± 0.08ppm, S2 = 7.15 ±0.06 ppm,S3(s )=-4.08±0.02ppm, S3(t)=-3.09±0.20ppm,S4=0.48±0.03ppm, S5 =0.26±0.05ppm. In o-dichlorobenzen-d4 S1(s)=44.79±0.61ppm, S2=7.40±0.00ppm, S3 (s)=-4.51±0.17ppm, S3 (t)= -3.13± 0.00 ppm, S4 =0 . 63±0.04ppm, S5=0.36±0.00ppm. Simultaneously the 13CNMR spectra of EVA copolymers were assigned by using the SCS parameters obtained.

  11. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noheda, Beatriz

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new paradigms for materials synthesis that allow controlling their functionality down to the smallest scales. Here we report a novel two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase that is synthesized at the domain walls (DWs) of the antiferromagnetic insulator TbMnO3 when grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain. This Mn oxide phase presents an atomic arrangement that does not exist in bulk and cannot be synthesized by standard chemical routes. The number of 2D ferromagnetic sheets can be controlled by tuning the thickness of the thin films, giving rise to volume fractions that go up to 25% of the total film volume. Such novel phases are driven by a unique environment induced by the symmetry breaking and large stresses present at domain walls, which function as nanoreactors. This new class of nanoscale materials may find innovative applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics. The work is published as S. Farokhipoor, C. Magén, S. Venkatesan, J. Íñiguez, C. J. M. Daumont, D. Rubi, E. Snoeck, M. Mostovoy, C. de Graaf, A. Müller, M. Döblinger, C. Scheu, B. Noheda, Nature 515, 379 (2014)

  12. Physico-chemical and structural characterization of mucilage isolated from seeds of Diospyros melonoxylon Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucilage was isolated from the seeds of Diospyros melonoxylonRoxb., a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. Various physico-chemical methods like particle analysis, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry analysis, molecular weight by gel permeation chromatography, rheometry, elemental analysis, x-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1D(1H and 13C (NMR have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle analyses suggest that mucilage had particle size in nanometer. SEM analysis suggested that the mucilage had irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum observed was 78 °C and 74 °C by DSC and DTA respectively. The Thermogravimetry analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability with two stage decomposition. The molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 8760, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The XRD pattern of the mucilage indicated a complete amorphous nature. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed specific contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441 cm-1 (-OH, 1632 cm-1 (-COO-, 1414 cm-1 (-COO- and 1219 cm-1 (-CH3CO. Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR indicated the presence of sugars.

  13. Quantum chemical calculations of bond dissociation energies for COOH scission and electronic structure in some acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Hui; Zhao Jun; Xiao Xun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations are performed to investigate the equilibrium C-COOH bond distances and the bond dissociation energies (BDEs) for 15 acids.These compounds are studied by utilizing the hybrid density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP,B3PW91,B3P86,PBE1PBE) and the complete basis set (CBS-Q) method in conjunction with the 6-31 lG** basis as DFT methods have been found to have low basis sets sensitivity for small and medium molecules in our previous work.Comparisons between the computational results and the experimental values reveal that CBS-Q method,which can produce reasonable BDEs for some systems in our previous work,seems unable to predict accurate BDEs here.However,the B3P86 calculated results accord very well with the experimental values,within an average absolute error of 2.3 kcal/mol.Thus,B3P86 method is suitable for computing the reliable BDEs of C-COOH bond for carboxylic acid compounds.In addition,the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of studied compounds are estimated,based on which the relative thermal stabilities of the studied acids are also discussed.

  14. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  15. Structure-property evaluation of thermally and chemically gelling injectable hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenseair, Adam K; Boere, Kristel W M; Tzouanas, Stephanie N; Vo, Tiffany N; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2012-09-10

    The impact of synthesis and solution formulation parameters on the swelling and mechanical properties of a novel class of thermally and chemically gelling hydrogels combining poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based thermogelling macromers containing pendant epoxy rings with polyamidoamine-based hydrophilic and degradable diamine cross-linking macromers was evaluated. Through variation of network hydrophilicity and capacity for chain rearrangement, the often problematic tendency of thermogelling hydrogels to undergo significant syneresis was addressed. The demonstrated ability to tune postformation dimensional stability easily at both the synthesis and formulation stages represents a significant novel contribution toward efforts to utilize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based polymers as injectable biomaterials. Furthermore, the cytocompatibility of the hydrogel system under relevant conditions was established while demonstrating time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity at high solution osmolality. Such injectable in situ forming degradable hydrogels with tunable water content are promising candidates for many tissue-engineering applications, particularly for cell delivery to promote rapid tissue regeneration in non-load-bearing defects.

  16. Structural and electronic characterization of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joucken, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.joucken@unamur.be; Colomer, Jean-François; Sporken, Robert; Reckinger, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • CVD graphene is transferred onto sapphire. • Transport measurements reveal relatively low charge carriers mobility. • Scanning probe microscopy experiments reveal the presence of robust contaminant layers between the graphene and the sapphire, responsible for the low carriers mobility. - Abstract: We present a combination of magnetotransport and local probe measurements on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil and subsequently transferred onto a sapphire substrate. A rather strong p-doping is observed (∼9 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) together with quite low carrier mobility (∼1350 cm{sup 2}/V s). Atomic force and tunneling imaging performed on the transport devices reveals the presence of contaminants between sapphire and graphene, explaining the limited performance of our devices. The transferred graphene displays ridges similar to those observed whilst graphene is still on the copper foil. We show that, on sapphire, these ridges are made of different thicknesses of the contamination layer and that, contrary to what was reported for hBN or certain transition metal dichalcogenides, no self-cleansing process of the sapphire substrate is observed.

  17. Chemical structure and antioxidant activity of a new exopolysaccharide produced from Micrococcus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mohamed Selim Asker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An exopolysaccharide (EPS reaching a maximum of 13 g/L was isolated from Micrococcus luteus by ethanol precipitation. The crude EPS was purified by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-200, affording a polysaccharide active fraction (AEP with a molecular weight of ∼137 kDa. AEP was investigated by a combination of chemical and chromatographic methods including FTIR, HPLC, periodate oxidation, methylation and GC–MS. Data obtained indicated that AEP was composed of mannose, arabinose, glucose and glucuronic acid in a molar ratio of 3.6:2.7:2.1:1.0, respectively. The main backbone consists of mannose units linked with (1→6-glycosidic bonds and arabinose units linked with (1→5-glycosidic bonds. There is a side chain consisting of mannose units linked with (1→6-glycosidic bonds at C3, when all glucose and most of glucuronic acid are found in the side chain. The in vitro antioxidant assay showed that AEP possesses DPPH radical-scavenging activity, with an EC50 value of 180 μg/mL.

  18. Impact of lignin and carbohydrate chemical structures on degradation reactions during hardwood kraft pulping processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B. Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies aimed at determining rates of hardwood delignification and carbohydrate degradation have focused on understanding the behavior of a single wood species. Such studies tend to determine either the delignification rate or the rate of carbohydrate degradation without examining the potential interactions resulting from related variables. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation on both lignin and carbohydrate degradation during kraft pulping of multiple hardwood species. The kraft delignification rates of E. urograndis, E. nitens, E. globulus, sweet gum, maple, red oak, red alder, cottonwood, and acacia were obtained. Furthermore, the kinetics of glucan, xylan, and total carbohydrate dissolution during the bulk phase of the kraft pulping process for the above species were also investigated. The wide ranges of delignification and carbohydrate degradation rates were correlated to wood chemical characteristics. It appears that the S/G ratio and lignin-carbohydrate-complexes (LCCs are the main characteristics responsible for the differences in kraft pulping performance among the hardwoods studied.

  19. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  20. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao-Song [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Xi, Bei-Dou, E-mail: hexs82@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui, Dong-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Yong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agro-Environmental Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1} and 57.1– 346.07 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1}, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting.

  1. Chemical construction and structural permutation of potent cytotoxin polytheonamide B: discovery of artificial peptides with distinct functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masayuki

    2013-07-16

    Polytheonamide B (1), isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei, is a posttranslationally modified ribosomal peptide (MW 5030 Da) that displays extraordinary cytotoxicity. Among its 48 amino acid residues, this peptide includes a variety D- and L-amino acids that do not occur in proteins, and the chiralities of these amino acids alternate in sequence. These structural features induce the formation of a stable β6.3-helix, giving rise to a tubular structure of over 4 nm in length. In the biological setting, this fold is believed to transport cations across the lipid bilayer through a pore, thereby acting as an ion channel. In this Account, we discuss the construction and structural permutations of this potent cytotoxin. First we describe the 161-step chemical construction of this unusual peptide 1. By developing a synthetic route to 1, we established the chemical basis for subsequent SAR studies to pinpoint the proteinogenic and nonproteinogenic building blocks within the molecule that confer its toxicity and channel function. Using fully synthetic 1, we generated seven analogues with point mutations, and studies of their activity revealed the importance of the N-terminal moiety. Next, we simplified the structure of 1 by substituting six amino acid residues of 1 to design a more synthetically accessible analogue 9. This dansylated polytheonamide mimic 9 was synthesized in 127 total steps, and we evaluated its function to show that it can emulate the toxic and ion channel activities of 1 despite its multiple structural modifications. Finally, we applied a highly automated synthetic route to 48-mer 9 to generate 13 substructures of 27-39-mers. The 37-mer 12 exhibited nanomolar level toxicity through a potentially distinct mode of action from 1 and 9. The SAR studies of polytheonamide B and the 21 artificial analogues have deepened our understanding of the precise structural requirements for the biological functions of 1. They have also led to the discovery of

  2. Quantitative determination of anti-structured defects applied to alloys of a wide chemical range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yongxin; Lu, Yanli

    2016-11-01

    Anti-structured defects bridge atom migration among heterogeneous sublattices facilitating diffusion but could also result in the collapse of ordered structure. Component distribution Ni75Al x V25-x alloys are investigated using a microscopic phase field model to illuminate relations between anti-structured defects and composition, precipitate order, precipitate type, and phase stability. The Ni75Al x V25-x alloys undergo single Ni3V (stage I), dual Ni3Al and Ni3V (stage II with Ni3V prior; and stage III with Ni3Al prior), and single Ni3Al (stage IV) with enhanced aluminum level. For Ni3V phase, anti-structured defects (VNi1, NiV, except VNi2) and substitution defects (AlNi1, AlNi2, AlV) exhibit a positive correlation to aluminum in stage I, the positive trend becomes to negative correlation or smooth during stage II. For Ni3Al phase, anti-structured defects (AlNi, NiAl) and substitution defects (VNi, VAl) have a positive correlation to aluminum in stage II, but NiAl goes down since stage III and lasts to stage IV. VNi and VAl fluctuate when Ni3Al precipitates prior, but go down drastically in stage IV. Precipitate type conversion of single Ni3V/dual (Ni3V+Ni3Al) affects Ni3V defects, while dual (Ni3V+Ni3Al)/single Ni3Al has little effect on Ni3Al defects. Precipitate order swap occurred in the dual phase region affects on Ni3Al defects but not on Ni3V. Project supported by the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JQ5014), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3102014JCQ01024), the Research Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing (NWPU), China (Grant No. 114-QP-2014), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20136102120021), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51474716 and 51475378).

  3. Microscopic structures of ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in water probed by the relative chemical shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The relative chemical shifts (△δ) △δwere put forward to investigate the microscopic structure of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EmimBF4) during the dilution process with water.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H,△δ(C2)H-(C5)H and △δ(C4)H-(C5)H were analyzed.The results reveal that the variations of the microscopic structures of three aromatic protons are inconsistent.The strength of the H-bond between water and three aromatic protons follows the order:(C2)H···O > (C4)H···O > (C5)H···O.The concentration-dependent △δ(C6)H-(C7)H and △δ(C6)H-(C8)H indicate the formation of the H-bonds of (Calkyl)H···O is impossible,and more water is located around (C6)H than around (C7)H or (C8)H.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H both increase rapidly when xwater > 0.9 or so,suggesting the ionic pairs of EmimBF4 are dissociated rapidly.The turning points of concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H indicate that some physical properties of the EmimBF4/water mixtures also change at the corresponding concentration point.The microscopic structures of EmimBF4 in water could be clearly detected by the relative chemical shifts.

  4. Microwave-Assisted Extraction, Chemical Structures, and Chain Conformation of Polysaccharides from a Novel Cordyceps Sinensis Fungus UM01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Kit-Leong; Wang, Lan-Ying; Wu, Ding-Tao; Hu, De-Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Shao-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Cordyceps sinensis is a well-known tonic food with broad medicinal properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the optimization of microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and characterize chemical structures and chain conformation of polysaccharides from a novel C. sinensis fungus UM01. Ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography were used to purify the polysaccharides. The chemical structure of purified polysaccharide was determined through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Moreover, high performance size exclusion chromatography combined with refractive index detector and multiangle laser light scattering were conducted to analyze the molecular weight (Mw ) and chain conformation of purified polysaccharide. Based on the orthogonal design L9 , optimal MAE conditions could be obtained through 1300 W of microwave power, with a 5-min irradiation time at a solid to water ratio of 1:60, generating the highest extraction yield of 6.20%. Subsequently, the polysaccharide UM01-S1 was purified. The UM01-S1 is a glucan-type polysaccharide with a (1→4)-β-d-glucosyl backbone and branching points located at O-3 of Glcp with a terminal-d-Glcp. The Mw , radius of gyration (Rg ) and hydrodynamic radius (Rh ) of UM01-S1 were determined as 5.442 × 10(6)  Da, 21.8 and 20.2 nm, respectively. Using the polymer solution theory, the exponent (ν) value of the power law function was calculated as 0.38, and the shape factor (ρ = Rg /Rh ) was 1.079, indicating that UM01-S1 has a sphere-like conformation with a branched structure in an aqueous solution. These results provide fundamental information for the future application of polysaccharides from cultured C. sinensis in health and functional food area.

  5. Chemical, Physical, and Biological Factors Shape Littoral Invertebrate Community Structure in Coal-Mining End-Pit Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luek, Andreas; Rasmussen, Joseph B.

    2017-04-01

    Aquatic invertebrates form the base of the consumer food web in lakes. In coal-mining end-pit lakes, invertebrates are exposed to an environment with potentially challenging physical and chemical features. We hypothesized that the physical and chemical features of end-pit lakes reduce critical littoral habitat and thus reduce invertebrate diversity, thereby limiting the potential for these lakes to be naturalized. We used a multivariate approach using principle component analysis and redundancy analysis to study relationships between invertebrate community structure, habitat features, and water quality in five end-pit lakes and five natural lakes in the Rocky Mountain foothills of west-central Alberta, Canada. Results show a significantly different invertebrate community structure was present in end-pit lakes as compared with reference lakes in the same region, which could be accounted for by water hardness, conductivity, slope of the littoral zone, and phosphorus concentrations. Habitat diversity in end-pit lakes was also limited, cover provided by macrophytes was scarce, and basin slopes were significantly steeper in pit lakes. Although water chemistry is currently the strongest influencing factor on the invertebrate community, physical challenges of habitat homogeneity and steep slopes in the littoral zones were identified as major drivers of invertebrate community structure. The addition of floating wetlands to the littoral zone of existing pit lakes can add habitat complexity without the need for large-scale alterations to basing morphology, while impermeable capping of waste-rock and the inclusion of littoral habitat in the planning process of new pit lakes can improve the success of integrating new pit lakes into the landscape.

  6. Chemical composition and structural phase changes of Pd sample and properties of novel synthesized structure at dense deuterium gas under irradiation by γ-quanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.

    2012-12-01

    Studies have been carried out into the element composition of Pd and brass with associated materials and synthesized novel structure, placed in dense deuterium gas in a deuterium high-pressure chamber (DHPC) under the pressure 3 kbar and irradiated with γ-quanta of energy up to 8.8 MeV. Using the methods of scanning electron microscopy, microelement chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction, it was determined that in the absence in the chamber volume and walls of all HPC-forming materials the synthesized structure is largely composed of alumosilicates and Al and Si oxides with high content of Ti compounds as rutile TiO2. Pd1.5D2. Considerable anomalies in the chemical composition were found both in the surface and at large depth in a Pd specimen. The entire Pd surface turned into a structure comprised of Pd clusters, Cu and Zn compounds, with a notable content of Mg, Al, S, Si, K, Ca, Ti and Fe compounds. Results of evaluative calculations, including computation of the Q-value, are presented for nuclear reactions produced in a saturated with deuterium Pd specimen and dense deuterium gas under the action of γ-quanta, neutrons and protons of energies up to E n + E p ≈ E γ - E D MeV generated by deuteron fission. The obtained results can be explained by "collective effects" as chain reactions caused by deuteron fission induced by protons ( E p > 3.39 MeV) and neutrons ( E n > 2.25 MeV), as well as by thermonuclear synthesis of deuterium atoms elastically scattered by protons of energies up to E P < E γ - E D MeV.

  7. Chemical Components of Helicia nilagirica Beed. I. Structure of Three New Flavonol Glycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Three new flavonol glycosides were isolated from the leaves of Helicia nilagirica Beed.. The structures were elucidated as kaempferol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glyco- pyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glycopy- ranosyl-(1→2)-[-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→4)]-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, and quercetin-3-O-β-D- xylopyranosyl-(1→6)-α-D-glycopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, named as Helicianeoside A、B and C, respectively.

  8. Surface magnetism Correlation of structural, electronic and chemical properties with magnetic behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Getzlaff, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    This volume reviews on selected aspects related to surface magnetism, a field of extraordinary interest during the last decade. The special emphasis is set to the correlation of structural, electronic and magnetic properties in rare earth metal systems and ferromagnetic transition metals. This is made possible by the combination of electron emission techniques (spin polarized photoelectron spectroscopy, magnetic dichroism in photoemission and spin polarized metastable deexcitation spectroscopy) and local probes with high lateral resolution down to the atomic scale (spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy / spectroscopy).

  9. Rates and Mechanisms of Oil Shale Pyrolysis: A Chemical Structure Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Three pristine Utah Green River oil shale samples were obtained and used for analysis by the combined research groups at the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Oil shale samples were first demineralized and the separated kerogen and extracted bitumen samples were then studied by a host of techniques including high resolution liquid-state carbon-13 NMR, solid-state magic angle sample spinning 13C NMR, GC/MS, FTIR, and pyrolysis. Bitumen was extracted from the shale using methanol/dichloromethane and analyzed using high resolution 13C NMR liquid state spectroscopy, showing carbon aromaticities of 7 to 11%. The three parent shales and the demineralized kerogens were each analyzed with solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Carbon aromaticity of the kerogen was 23-24%, with 10-12 aromatic carbons per cluster. Crushed samples of Green River oil shale and its kerogen extract were pyrolyzed at heating rates from 1 to 10 K/min at pressures of 1 and 40 bar and temperatures up to 1000°C. The transient pyrolysis data were fit with a first-order model and a Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM). The demineralized kerogen was pyrolyzed at 10 K/min in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure at temperatures up to 525°C, and the pyrolysis products (light gas, tar, and char) were analyzed using 13C NMR, GC/MS, and FTIR. Details of the kerogen pyrolysis have been modeled by a modified version of the chemical percolation devolatilization (CPD) model that has been widely used to model coal combustion/pyrolysis. This refined CPD model has been successful in predicting the char, tar, and gas yields of the three shale samples during pyrolysis. This set of experiments and associated modeling represents the most sophisticated and complete analysis available for a given set of oil shale samples.

  10. The Molecular Structure of Phenetole Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferres, Lynn; Stahl, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam

    2016-06-01

    A pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating in the frequency range 2 - 26.5 GHz was used to measure the spectrum of phenetole (ethyl phenyl ether or ethoxybenzene, C6H5OC2H5). The conformational landscape is completely determined by the orientations of the phenyl ring and the ethyl group. A two-dimensional potential energy surface was calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Two conformers were found: The trans conformer has a Cs symmetry, and the gauche conformer has the ethyl group tilted out of the phenyl plane by about 70°. Totally 186 rotational transitions were assigned to the more stable planar trans conformer, and fitted using a semi-rigid rotor model to measurement accuracy of 2 kHz. Highly accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. Several method and basis set combinations were applied to check for convergence and to compare with the experimentally deduced molecular parameters. The inertial defect of the observed conformer Δc = (Ic - Ia - Ib) = -6.718 uÅ2 confirms that the heavy atom skeleton is planar with two pairs of hydrogen atoms out of plane. All lines in the spectrum could be assigned to the trans conformer, which confirms that the gauche conformer cannot be observed under our measurement conditions. In agreement with the rather high torsional barrier of the methyl group (V3 = 1168 wn) calculated by quantum chemical methods, all assigned lines appeared sharp and no signs of splittings were observed for the methyl internal rotation.

  11. Sequential application of ligand and structure based modeling approaches to index chemicals for their hH4R antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pappalardo

    Full Text Available The human histamine H4 receptor (hH4R, a member of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR family, is an increasingly attractive drug target. It plays a key role in many cell pathways and many hH4R ligands are studied for the treatment of several inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune disorders, as well as for analgesic activity. Due to the challenging difficulties in the experimental elucidation of hH4R structure, virtual screening campaigns are normally run on homology based models. However, a wealth of information about the chemical properties of GPCR ligands has also accumulated over the last few years and an appropriate combination of these ligand-based knowledge with structure-based molecular modeling studies emerges as a promising strategy for computer-assisted drug design. Here, two chemoinformatics techniques, the Intelligent Learning Engine (ILE and Iterative Stochastic Elimination (ISE approach, were used to index chemicals for their hH4R bioactivity. An application of the prediction model on external test set composed of more than 160 hH4R antagonists picked from the chEMBL database gave enrichment factor of 16.4. A virtual high throughput screening on ZINC database was carried out, picking ∼ 4000 chemicals highly indexed as H4R antagonists' candidates. Next, a series of 3D models of hH4R were generated by molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations performed in fully atomistic lipid membranes. The efficacy of the hH4R 3D models in discrimination between actives and non-actives were checked and the 3D model with the best performance was chosen for further docking studies performed on the focused library. The output of these docking studies was a consensus library of 11 highly active scored drug candidates. Our findings suggest that a sequential combination of ligand-based chemoinformatics approaches with structure-based ones has the potential to improve the success rate in discovering new biologically active GPCR drugs and

  12. Interfacial structure of tungsten layers formed by selective low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacy, W.T.; Broadbent, E.K.; Norcott, M.H.

    1985-02-01

    We have analyzed the interfacial structure of selectively deposited LPCVD tungsten on monocrystalline silicon, polycrystalline silicon, and polycrystalline aluminum substrates. Cross-sectional specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the amount of substrate consumed by the selective deposition process and to assess the degree of lateral encroachment under masking SiO/sub 2/ layers for different conditions of deposition and surface preparation. The tungsten-silicon interfacial structure was found to depend strongly on the initia surface preparation. Immersion in a dilute HF solution resulted in a smooth interface, while a glow-discharge treatment (CF/sub 4/ + O/sub 2/) led to highly irregular interfaces, which, in extreme cases, contained tunnels extending 1 ..mu..m or more into the silicon substrate. Layers formed in WF/sub 6/ plus H/sub 2/ were found to consist of two layers, of which the lower layer i formed by the substrate reduction of WF/sub 6/.

  13. Glucuronoarabinoxylan from coconut palm gum exudate: chemical structure and gastroprotective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; Barraza, Ruth R; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Baggio, Cristiane H; Wagner, Ricardo; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Carbonero, Elaine R; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Gorin, Philip A J

    2014-07-17

    A glucuronoarabinoxylan (CNAL) was extracted with 1% aq. KOH (25°C) from Cocos nucifera gum exudate. It had a homogeneous profile on HPSEC-MALLS-RI (Mw 4.6 × 10(4)g/mol) and was composed of Fuc, Ara, Xyl, GlcpA (and 4-O-GlcpA) in a 7:28:62:3 molar ratio. Methylation data showed a branched structure with 39% of non-reducing end units, 3-O-substituted Araf (8%), 3,4-di-O- (15%), 2,4-di-O- (5%) and 2,3,4-tri-O-substituted Xylp units (17%). The anomeric region of CNAL (13)C NMR spectrum contained 9 signals, indicating a complex structure. The main chain of CNAL was characterized by analysis of a Smith-degraded polysaccharide. Its (13)C NMR spectrum showed 5 main signals at δ 101.6, δ 75.5, δ 73.9, δ 72.5, and δ 63.1 that were attributed to C-1, C-4, C-3, C-2 and C-5 of (1→4)-linked β-Xylp-main chain units, respectively. CNAL exhibited gastroprotective effect, by reducing gastric hemorrhagic lesions, when orally administered (1 and 3mg/kg) to rats prior to ethanol administration.

  14. Luminescence and tenebrescence of natural sodalites: a chemical and structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoransky, Teresa; Friis, Henrik; Marks, Michael A. W.

    2016-07-01

    Sodalite (Na8Al6Si6O24Cl2) shows a wide range of colours and may exhibit a variety of optical properties including cathodoluminescence, photoluminescence and tenebrescence. These optical peculiarities are not yet fully understood but are of key interest for industry. We provide a detailed study on the photochromic properties of natural sodalite, and we show that S is crucially influencing luminescence of sodalites. A reduced intensity in cathodoluminescence was observed at high S contents for some samples, showing that S can act as cathodoluminescence quencher. Photoluminescent sodalites are generally enriched in S compared to non-photoluminescent samples, although few samples being very low in S still show photoluminescence. Additionally, S was found to enlarge the unit cell in natural sodalites which might have a crucial impact on their photochromic properties. The most efficient tenebrescent samples were found to be low in Fe, Mn and S. They showed the smallest unit-cell dimensions, and a strong link between the atomic structure and the formation of F-centres is proposed. Tenebrescence in natural sodalites appears to be enhanced (1) by S but saturated at too high S concentrations and (2) by a stoichiometry and structure close to the ideal sodalite composition. In contrast to the term self-quenching for luminescence, we propose a saturation of F-centres to explain tenebrescence at different S contents.

  15. Impact of annealing on the chemical structure and morphology of the thin-film CdTe/ZnO interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, K., E-mail: horsley5@unlv.nevada.edu; Hanks, D. A.; Weir, M. G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Beal, R. J. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Wilks, R. G. [Solar Energy Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), 14109 Berlin (Germany); Blum, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Häming, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hofmann, T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Bundeswehr Research Institute for Materials, Fuels and Lubricants (WIWeB), Institutsweg 1, 85435 Erding (Germany); Weinhardt, L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States); Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); and others

    2014-07-14

    To enable an understanding and optimization of the optoelectronic behavior of CdTe-ZnO nanocomposites, the morphological and chemical properties of annealed CdTe/ZnO interface structures were studied. For that purpose, CdTe layers of varying thickness (4–24 nm) were sputter-deposited on 100 nm-thick ZnO films on surface-oxidized Si(100) substrates. The morphological and chemical effects of annealing at 525 °C were investigated using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray-excited Auger electron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We find a decrease of the Cd and Te surface concentration after annealing, parallel to an increase in Zn and O signals. While the as-deposited film surfaces show small grains (100 nm diameter) of CdTe on the ZnO surface, annealing induces a significant growth of these grains and separation into islands (with diameters as large as 1 μm). The compositional change at the surface is more pronounced for Cd than for Te, as evidenced using component peak fitting of the Cd and Te 3d XPS peaks. The modified Auger parameters of Cd and Te are also calculated to further elucidate the local chemical environment before and after annealing. Together, these results suggest the formation of tellurium and cadmium oxide species at the CdTe/ZnO interface upon annealing, which can create a barrier for charge carrier transport, and might allow for a deliberate modification of interface properties with suitably chosen thermal treatment parameters.

  16. Changes in bacterial community structure of agricultural land due to long-term organic and chemical amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Vasvi; Rehman, Ateequr; Mishra, Aradhana; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2012-08-01

    Community level physiological profiling and pyrosequencing-based analysis of the V1-V2 16S rRNA gene region were used to characterize and compare microbial community structure, diversity, and bacterial phylogeny from soils of chemically cultivated land (CCL), organically cultivated land (OCL), and fallow grass land (FGL) for 16 years and were under three different land use types. The entire dataset comprised of 16,608 good-quality sequences (CCL, 6,379; OCL, 4,835; FGL, 5,394); among them 12,606 sequences could be classified in 15 known phylum. The most abundant phylum were Proteobacteria (29.8%), Acidobacteria (22.6%), Actinobacteria (11.1%), and Bacteroidetes (4.7%), while 24.3% of the sequences were from bacterial domain but could not be further classified to any known phylum. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Gemmatimonadetes were found to be significantly abundant in OCL soil. On the contrary, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria were significantly abundant in CCL and FGL, respectively. Our findings supported the view that organic compost amendment (OCL) activates diverse group of microorganisms as compared with conventionally used synthetic chemical fertilizers. Functional diversity and evenness based on carbon source utilization pattern was significantly higher in OCL as compared to CCL and FGL, suggesting an improvement in soil quality. This abundance of microbes possibly leads to the enhanced level of soil organic carbon, soil organic nitrogen, and microbial biomass in OCL and FGL soils as collated with CCL. This work increases our current understanding on the effect of long-term organic and chemical amendment applications on abundance, diversity, and composition of bacterial community inhabiting the soil for the prospects of agricultural yield and quantity of soil.

  17. Shell structure of natural rubber particles: evidence of chemical stratification by electrokinetics and cryo-TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Christophe N; Crassous, Jérôme J; Drechsler, Markus; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Eloy, Marie; de Gaudemaris, Benoît; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2013-11-26

    The interfacial structure of natural rubber (NR) colloids is investigated by means of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and electrokinetics over a broad range of KNO3 electrolyte concentrations (4-300 mM) and pH values (1-8). The asymptotic plateau value reached by NR electrophoretic mobility (μ) in the thin double layer limit supports the presence of a soft (ion- and water-permeable) polyelectrolytic type of layer located at the periphery of the NR particles. This property is confirmed by the analysis of the electron density profile obtained from cryo-TEM that evidences a ∼2-4 nm thick corona surrounding the NR polyisoprene core. The dependence of μ on pH and salt concentration is further marked by a dramatic decrease of the point of zero electrophoretic mobility (PZM) from 3.6 to 0.8 with increasing electrolyte concentration in the range 4-300 mM. Using a recent theory for electrohydrodynamics of soft multilayered particles, this "anomalous" dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration is shown to be consistent with a radial organization of anionic and cationic groups across the peripheral NR structure. The NR electrokinetic response in the pH range 1-8 is indeed found to be equivalent to that of particles surrounded by a positively charged ∼3.5 nm thick layer (mean dissociation pK ∼ 4.2) supporting a thin and negatively charged outermost layer (0.6 nm in thickness, pK ∼ 0.7). Altogether, the strong dependence of the PZM on electrolyte concentration suggests that the electrostatic properties of the outer peripheral region of the NR shell are mediated by lipidic residues protruding from a shell containing a significant amount of protein-like charges. This proposed NR shell interfacial structure questions previously reported NR representations according to which the shell consists of either a fully mixed lipid-protein layer, or a layer of phospholipids residing exclusively beneath an outer proteic film.

  18. Syntheses, structural elucidation, thermal properties, theoretical quantum chemical studies (DFT and biological studies of barbituric–hydrazone complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina A. Soayed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Condensation of barbituric acid with hydrazine hydrate yielded barbiturichydrazone (L which was characterized using IR, 1H NMR and mass spectra. The Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes derived from this ligand have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopic methods (IR, UV–Vis and ESR and thermal analyses (TGA, DTG and DTA and the structures were further elucidated using quantum chemical density functional theory. Complexes of L were found to have the ML.nH2O stoichiometry with either tetrahedral or octahedral geometry. The ESR data showed the Cu(II complex to be in a tetragonal geometry. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of metal complexes at the TD-DFT/B3LYP level of theory has been carried out and discussed. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and a good agreement between observed and scaled calculated wavenumbers was achieved. Thermal studies were performed to deduce the stabilities of the ligand and complexes. Thermodynamic parameters, such as the order of reactions (n, activation energy ΔE∗, enthalpy of reaction ΔH∗ and entropy ΔS∗ were calculated from DTA curves using Horowitz–Metzger method. The ligand L and its complexes have been screened for their antifungal and antibacterial activities and were found to possess better biological activities compared to those of unsubstituted barbituric acid complexes.

  19. Estimation and Prediction of Bioconcentration Factors of Nonionic Organic Chemicals in Fish by Electrotopological State Indices and Structural Parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Chang-Jun; YANG Wei-Hua; MU Lai-Long

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of atom types, Hall's electrotopological state indices (En) are calculated for 165 nonionic organic compounds. On the basis of the characteristics of substituent and conjugated matrix, a novel molecular structure parameter (G) is defined and calcu- lated for 165 molecules in this paper. En and G show good structural selectivity for organic molecules. G, a satisfactory relationship between bioconcentration factor (BCF) and En, is expressed as: lgBCF = -0.283 + 1.246G + 0.079E42 + 0.351E9 - 0.063E17 (n' = 122, R = 0.967, F = 425.636, s = 0.394), which could provide estimation and prediction for the lgBCF of nonionic organic chemicals. Furthermore, the model is examined to validate overall robustness with Jackknife tests, and the independent variables in model do not exist cross correlation with VIF. All these regression results show that the new parameter G and electrotopological state index have good rationality and efficiency. It is concluded that the En and G will be used widely in quantitative structure-property/activity relationship (QSPR/QSAR) research.

  20. Structural and functional diversity of microbial communities from a lake sediment contaminated with trenbolone, an endocrine-disrupting chemical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radl, Viviane [GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, PO Box 1129, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: barbosa@gsf.de; Pritsch, Karin [GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, PO Box 1129, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Munch, Jean Charles [GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, PO Box 1129, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany); Schloter, Michael [GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, PO Box 1129, D-85764, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2005-09-15

    Effects of trenbolone (TBOH), a hormone used in cattle production, on the structure and function of microbial communities in a fresh water sediment from a lake in Southern Germany were studied in a microcosm experiment. The microbial community structure and the total gene pool of the sediment, assessed by 16S rRNA/rDNA and RAPD fingerprint analysis, respectively, were not significantly affe