WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical shift similarity

  1. SimShiftDB; local conformational restraints derived from chemical shift similarity searches on a large synthetic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzinger, Simon W.; Coles, Murray

    2009-01-01

    We present SimShiftDB, a new program to extract conformational data from protein chemical shifts using structural alignments. The alignments are obtained in searches of a large database containing 13,000 structures and corresponding back-calculated chemical shifts. SimShiftDB makes use of chemical shift data to provide accurate results even in the case of low sequence similarity, and with even coverage of the conformational search space. We compare SimShiftDB to HHSearch, a state-of-the-art sequence-based search tool, and to TALOS, the current standard tool for the task. We show that for a significant fraction of the predicted similarities, SimShiftDB outperforms the other two methods. Particularly, the high coverage afforded by the larger database often allows predictions to be made for residues not involved in canonical secondary structure, where TALOS predictions are both less frequent and more error prone. Thus SimShiftDB can be seen as a complement to currently available methods

  2. Chemical shift imaging: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brateman, L.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical shift is the phenomenon that is seen when an isotope possessing a nuclear magnetic dipole moment resonates at a spectrum of resonance frequencies in a given magnetic field. These resonance frequencies, or chemical shifts, depend on the chemical environments of particular nuclei. Mapping the spatial distribution of nuclei associated with a particular chemical shift (e.g., hydrogen nuclei associated with water molecules or with lipid groups) is called chemical shift imaging. Several techniques of proton chemical shift imaging that have been applied in vivo are presented, and their clinical findings are reported and summarized. Acquiring high-resolution spectra for large numbers of volume elements in two or three dimensions may be prohibitive because of time constraints, but other methods of imaging lipid of water distributions (i.e., selective excitation, selective saturation, or variations in conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences) can provide chemical shift information. These techniques require less time, but they lack spectral information. Since fat deposition seen by chemical shift imaging may not be demonstrated by conventional magnetic resonance imaging, certain applications of chemical shift imaging, such as in the determination of fatty liver disease, have greater diagnostic utility than conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, edge artifacts caused by chemical shift effects can be eliminated by certain selective methods of data acquisition employed in chemical shift imaging

  3. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G.

    2007-01-01

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles φ and ψ characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala) n -NH 2 , with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C α ICS(φ,ψ) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, α-helix, β-strand, left-handed helix (α D ), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring α-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C α - 1 H α ICS(φ,ψ) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins

  4. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2018-01-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  5. MR chemical shift imaging of human atheroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohiaddin, R.H.; Underwood, R.; Firmin, D.; Abdulla, A.K.; Rees, S.; Longmore, D.

    1988-01-01

    The lipid content of atheromatous plaques has been measured with chemical shift MR imaging by taking advantage of the different resonance frequencies of protons in lipid and water. Fifteen postmortem aortic specimens of the human descending aorta and the aortae of seven patients with documented peripheral vascular disease were studied at 0.5 T. Spin-echo images were used to localize the lesions before acquisition of the chemical shift images. The specimens were examined histologically, and the lipid distribution in the plaque showed good correlation with the chemical shift data. Validation in vivo and clinical applications remain to be established

  6. Combined chemical shift changes and amino acid specific chemical shift mapping of protein-protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Frank H.; Riepl, Hubert [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany); Maurer, Till [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Analytical Sciences Department (Germany); Gronwald, Wolfram [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany); Neidig, Klaus-Peter [Bruker BioSpin GmbH, Software Department (Germany); Kalbitzer, Hans Robert [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany)], E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de

    2007-12-15

    Protein-protein interactions are often studied by chemical shift mapping using solution NMR spectroscopy. When heteronuclear data are available the interaction interface is usually predicted by combining the chemical shift changes of different nuclei to a single quantity, the combined chemical shift perturbation {delta}{delta}{sub comb}. In this paper different procedures (published and non-published) to calculate {delta}{delta}{sub comb} are examined that include a variety of different functional forms and weighting factors for each nucleus. The predictive power of all shift mapping methods depends on the magnitude of the overlap of the chemical shift distributions of interacting and non-interacting residues and the cut-off criterion used. In general, the quality of the prediction on the basis of chemical shift changes alone is rather unsatisfactory but the combination of chemical shift changes on the basis of the Hamming or the Euclidian distance can improve the result. The corrected standard deviation to zero of the combined chemical shift changes can provide a reasonable cut-off criterion. As we show combined chemical shifts can also be applied for a more reliable quantitative evaluation of titration data.

  7. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure......In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  8. Sigmatropic proton shifts: a quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2017-09-13

    A quantum chemical study of [1,j] sigmatropic proton shifts in polyenyl anions and related conjugated systems has been performed. We found that the Woodward-Hoffmann rules can be applied to understand the stereochemical outcome of these sigmatropic rearrangements, showing that [1,j] sigmatropic proton shift occurs antarafacially when j = 4n + 2, while suprafacial proton shift is symmetry-allowed when j = 4n. The activation barriers for [1,j] proton shifts in polyenyl anions C j H j+3 - are 48.2 (j = 2), 32.8 (j = 4), 21.0 (j = 6), 40.5 (j = 8), and 49.1 (j = 10) kcal mol -1 , respectively. This trend can be explained by the trade-off between stereoelectronic requirement and ring strain in the proton shift transition structure. Among these reactions, only the [1,6] proton shift with the lowest activation barrier can occur intramolecularly under mild reaction conditions. The others are unlikely to take place in a direct manner. Consequently, proton shuttles are generally required to facilitate these sigmatropic proton shifts through a protonation/deprotonation mechanism.

  9. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Secondary chemical shift analysis is the main NMR method for detection of transiently formed secondary structure in intrinsically disordered proteins. The quality of the secondary chemical shifts is dependent on an appropriate choice of random coil chemical shifts. We report random coil chemical....... Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the (13)C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series...

  10. chemical shift tensors in helical peptides by dipolar-modulated chemical shift recoupling NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiaolan; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hong Mei

    2002-01-01

    The Cα chemical shift tensors of proteins contain information on the backbone conformation. We have determined the magnitude and orientation of the Cα chemical shift tensors of two peptides with α-helical torsion angles: the Ala residue in G*AL (φ=-65.7 deg., ψ=-40 deg.), and the Val residue in GG*V (φ=-81.5 deg., ψ=-50.7 deg.). The magnitude of the tensors was determined from quasi-static powder patterns recoupled under magic-angle spinning, while the orientation of the tensors was extracted from Cα-Hα and Cα-N dipolar modulated powder patterns. The helical Ala Cα chemical shift tensor has a span of 36 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.89. Its σ 11 axis is 116 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond while the σ 22 axis is 40 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. The Val tensor has an anisotropic span of 25 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.33, both much smaller than the values for β-sheet Val found recently (Yao and Hong, 2002). The Val σ 33 axis is tilted by 115 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond and 98 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. These represent the first completely experimentally determined Cα chemical shift tensors of helical peptides. Using an icosahedral representation, we compared the experimental chemical shift tensors with quantum chemical calculations and found overall good agreement. These solid-state chemical shift tensors confirm the observation from cross-correlated relaxation experiments that the projection of the Cα chemical shift tensor onto the Cα-Hα bond is much smaller in α-helices than in β-sheets

  11. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  12. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  13. Chemical shift of UL 3 edges in different uranium compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Energy shifts of ∼ 2–3 eV were observed for U L3 edge in the U-compounds compared to their value in elemental U. The different chemical shifts observed for the compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the ...

  14. A probabilistic approach for validating protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bowei; Wang, Yunjun; Wishart, David S.

    2010-01-01

    It has been estimated that more than 20% of the proteins in the BMRB are improperly referenced and that about 1% of all chemical shift assignments are mis-assigned. These statistics also reflect the likelihood that any newly assigned protein will have shift assignment or shift referencing errors. The relatively high frequency of these errors continues to be a concern for the biomolecular NMR community. While several programs do exist to detect and/or correct chemical shift mis-referencing or chemical shift mis-assignments, most can only do one, or the other. The one program (SHIFTCOR) that is capable of handling both chemical shift mis-referencing and mis-assignments, requires the 3D structure coordinates of the target protein. Given that chemical shift mis-assignments and chemical shift re-referencing issues should ideally be addressed prior to 3D structure determination, there is a clear need to develop a structure-independent approach. Here, we present a new structure-independent protocol, which is based on using residue-specific and secondary structure-specific chemical shift distributions calculated over small (3-6 residue) fragments to identify mis-assigned resonances. The method is also able to identify and re-reference mis-referenced chemical shift assignments. Comparisons against existing re-referencing or mis-assignment detection programs show that the method is as good or superior to existing approaches. The protocol described here has been implemented into a freely available Java program called 'Probabilistic Approach for protein Nmr Assignment Validation (PANAV)' and as a web server (http://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAVhttp://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAV) which can be used to validate and/or correct as well as re-reference assigned protein chemical shifts.

  15. Validation of archived chemical shifts through atomic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieping, Wolfgang; Vranken, Wim F

    2010-01-01

    The public archives containing protein information in the form of NMR chemical shift data at the BioMagResBank (BMRB) and of 3D structure coordinates at the Protein Data Bank are continuously expanding. The quality of the data contained in these archives, however, varies. The main issue for chemical shift values is that they are determined relative to a reference frequency. When this reference frequency is set incorrectly, all related chemical shift values are systematically offset. Such wrongly referenced chemical shift values, as well as other problems such as chemical shift values that are assigned to the wrong atom, are not easily distinguished from correct values and effectively reduce the usefulness of the archive. We describe a new method to correct and validate protein chemical shift values in relation to their 3D structure coordinates. This method classifies atoms using two parameters: the per-atom solvent accessible surface area (as calculated from the coordinates) and the secondary structure of the parent amino acid. Through the use of Gaussian statistics based on a large database of 3220 BMRB entries, we obtain per-entry chemical shift corrections as well as Z scores for the individual chemical shift values. In addition, information on the error of the correction value itself is available, and the method can retain only dependable correction values. We provide an online resource with chemical shift, atom exposure, and secondary structure information for all relevant BMRB entries (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/nmr/vasco) and hope this data will aid the development of new chemical shift-based methods in NMR. Proteins 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20602353

  16. Textual and chemical information processing: different domains but similar algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the extent to which algorithms developed for the processing of textual databases are also applicable to the processing of chemical structure databases, and vice versa. Applications discussed include: an algorithm for distribution sorting that has been applied to the design of screening systems for rapid chemical substructure searching; the use of measures of inter-molecular structural similarity for the analysis of hypertext graphs; a genetic algorithm for calculating term weights for relevance feedback searching for determining whether a molecule is likely to exhibit biological activity; and the use of data fusion to combine the results of different chemical similarity searches.

  17. Chemical Shift Imaging (CSI) by precise object displacement

    OpenAIRE

    Leclerc, Sebastien; Trausch, Gregory; Cordier, Benoit; Grandclaude, Denis; Retournard, Alain; Fraissard, Jacques; Canet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A mechanical device (NMR lift) has been built for displacing vertically an object (typically a NMR sample tube) inside the NMR probe with an accuracy of 1 Μm. A series of single pulse experiments are performed for incremented vertical positions of the sample. With a sufficiently spatially selective rf field, one obtains chemical shift information along the displacement direction (one dimensional Chemical Shift Imaging – CSI). Knowing the vertical radio-frequency (rf) f...

  18. PROSHIFT: Protein chemical shift prediction using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiler, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The importance of protein chemical shift values for the determination of three-dimensional protein structure has increased in recent years because of the large databases of protein structures with assigned chemical shift data. These databases have allowed the investigation of the quantitative relationship between chemical shift values obtained by liquid state NMR spectroscopy and the three-dimensional structure of proteins. A neural network was trained to predict the 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N of proteins using their three-dimensional structure as well as experimental conditions as input parameters. It achieves root mean square deviations of 0.3 ppm for hydrogen, 1.3 ppm for carbon, and 2.6 ppm for nitrogen chemical shifts. The model reflects important influences of the covalent structure as well as of the conformation not only for backbone atoms (as, e.g., the chemical shift index) but also for side-chain nuclei. For protein models with a RMSD smaller than 5 A a correlation of the RMSD and the r.m.s. deviation between the predicted and the experimental chemical shift is obtained. Thus the method has the potential to not only support the assignment process of proteins but also help with the validation and the refinement of three-dimensional structural proposals. It is freely available for academic users at the PROSHIFT server: www.jens-meiler.de/proshift.html

  19. Unraveling the meaning of chemical shifts in protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark V; Wishart, David S

    2017-11-01

    Chemical shifts are among the most informative parameters in protein NMR. They provide wealth of information about protein secondary and tertiary structure, protein flexibility, and protein-ligand binding. In this report, we review the progress in interpreting and utilizing protein chemical shifts that has occurred over the past 25years, with a particular focus on the large body of work arising from our group and other Canadian NMR laboratories. More specifically, this review focuses on describing, assessing, and providing some historical context for various chemical shift-based methods to: (1) determine protein secondary and super-secondary structure; (2) derive protein torsion angles; (3) assess protein flexibility; (4) predict residue accessible surface area; (5) refine 3D protein structures; (6) determine 3D protein structures and (7) characterize intrinsically disordered proteins. This review also briefly covers some of the methods that we previously developed to predict chemical shifts from 3D protein structures and/or protein sequence data. It is hoped that this review will help to increase awareness of the considerable utility of NMR chemical shifts in structural biology and facilitate more widespread adoption of chemical-shift based methods by the NMR spectroscopists, structural biologists, protein biophysicists, and biochemists worldwide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Athena E; Cort, John R

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here, we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD), and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. Slight concentration dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared with the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  2. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratholm, Lars A; Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction.

  3. Evaluating amber force fields using computed NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koes, David R; Vries, John K

    2017-10-01

    NMR chemical shifts can be computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a template matching approach and a library of conformers containing chemical shifts generated from ab initio quantum calculations. This approach has potential utility for evaluating the force fields that underlie these simulations. Imperfections in force fields generate flawed atomic coordinates. Chemical shifts obtained from flawed coordinates have errors that can be traced back to these imperfections. We use this approach to evaluate a series of AMBER force fields that have been refined over the course of two decades (ff94, ff96, ff99SB, ff14SB, ff14ipq, and ff15ipq). For each force field a series of MD simulations are carried out for eight model proteins. The calculated chemical shifts for the 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C a atoms are compared with experimental values. Initial evaluations are based on root mean squared (RMS) errors at the protein level. These results are further refined based on secondary structure and the types of atoms involved in nonbonded interactions. The best chemical shift for identifying force field differences is the shift associated with peptide protons. Examination of the model proteins on a residue by residue basis reveals that force field performance is highly dependent on residue position. Examination of the time course of nonbonded interactions at these sites provides explanations for chemical shift differences at the atomic coordinate level. Results show that the newer ff14ipq and ff15ipq force fields developed with the implicitly polarized charge method perform better than the older force fields. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Frequency response of multipoint chemical shift-based spectral decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Ethan K; Chebrolu, Venkata V; Block, Walter F; Reeder, Scott B

    2010-10-01

    To provide a framework for characterizing the frequency response of multipoint chemical shift based species separation techniques. Multipoint chemical shift based species separation techniques acquire complex images at multiple echo times and perform maximum likelihood estimation to decompose signal from different species into separate images. In general, after a nonlinear process of estimating and demodulating the field map, these decomposition methods are linear transforms from the echo-time domain to the chemical-shift-frequency domain, analogous to the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). In this work we describe a technique for finding the magnitude and phase of chemical shift decomposition for input signals over a range of frequencies using numerical and experimental modeling and examine several important cases of species separation. Simple expressions can be derived to describe the response to a wide variety of input signals. Agreement between numerical modeling and experimental results is very good. Chemical shift-based species separation is linear, and therefore can be fully described by the magnitude and phase curves of the frequency response. The periodic nature of the frequency response has important implications for the robustness of various techniques for resolving ambiguities in field inhomogeneity.

  5. Prediction of proton chemical shifts in RNA - Their use in structure refinement and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cromsigt, Jenny A.M.T.C.; Hilbers, Cees W.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2001-01-01

    An analysis is presented of experimental versus calculated chemical shifts of the non-exchangeable protons for 28 RNA structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, covering a wide range of structural building blocks. We have used existing models for ring-current and magnetic-anisotropy contributions to calculate the proton chemical shifts from the structures. Two different parameter sets were tried: (i) parameters derived by Ribas-Prado and Giessner-Prettre (GP set) [(1981) J. Mol. Struct.,76, 81-92.]; (ii) parameters derived by Case [(1995) J. Biomol. NMR, 6, 341-346]. Both sets lead to similar results. The detailed analysis was carried using the GP set. The root-mean-square-deviation between the predicted and observed chemical shifts of the complete database is 0.16 ppm with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.79. For protons in the usually well-defined A-helix environment these numbers are, 0.08 ppm and 0.96, respectively. As a result of this good correspondence, a reliable analysis could be made of the structural dependencies of the 1 H chemical shifts revealing their physical origin. For example, a down-field shift of either H2' or H3' or both indicates a high-syn/syn χ-angle. In an A-helix it is essentially the 5'-neighbor that affects the chemical shifts of H5, H6 and H8 protons. The H5, H6 and H8 resonances can therefore be assigned in an A-helix on the basis of their observed chemical shifts. In general, the chemical shifts were found to be quite sensitive to structural changes. We therefore propose that a comparison between calculated and observed 1 H chemical shifts is a good tool for validation and refinement of structures derived from NOEs and J-couplings

  6. MR imaging of osteonecrosis using frequency selective chemical shift sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, S.H.; Laniado, M.; Schick, F.

    1993-01-01

    The MR appearance of osteonecrosis was assessed on selective fat- and water images to further evaluate the nature of double-line sign. Conventional T1- and T2-weighted SE and frequency selective chemical shift images of eight patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head and three patients with bone infarcts were retrospectively reviewed. Eight of 11 patients showed a double-line sign on T2-weighted SE images. In these cases, correlation with selective water images revealed that a chemical shift artifact contributed to appearance and location of the hyperintense line. The authors conclude that chemical shift imaging improves our understanding of the nature of the double-line sign. (orig.) [de

  7. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim

    2015-01-01

    content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain......Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model......, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information...

  8. Predicting Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification of Drugs by Integrating Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zeng, Wei-Ming; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system, recommended by the World Health Organization, categories drugs into different classes according to their therapeutic and chemical characteristics. For a set of query compounds, how can we identify which ATC-class (or classes) they belong to? It is an important and challenging problem because the information thus obtained would be quite useful for drug development and utilization. By hybridizing the informations of chemical-chemical interactions and chemical-chemical similarities, a novel method was developed for such purpose. It was observed by the jackknife test on a benchmark dataset of 3,883 drug compounds that the overall success rate achieved by the prediction method was about 73% in identifying the drugs among the following 14 main ATC-classes: (1) alimentary tract and metabolism; (2) blood and blood forming organs; (3) cardiovascular system; (4) dermatologicals; (5) genitourinary system and sex hormones; (6) systemic hormonal preparations, excluding sex hormones and insulins; (7) anti-infectives for systemic use; (8) antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents; (9) musculoskeletal system; (10) nervous system; (11) antiparasitic products, insecticides and repellents; (12) respiratory system; (13) sensory organs; (14) various. Such a success rate is substantially higher than 7% by the random guess. It has not escaped our notice that the current method can be straightforwardly extended to identify the drugs for their 2nd-level, 3rd-level, 4th-level, and 5th-level ATC-classifications once the statistically significant benchmark data are available for these lower levels. PMID:22514724

  9. Ontogenetic shift in response to prey-derived chemical cues in prairie rattlesnakes Crotalus viridis viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. SAVIOLA, David CHISZAR, Stephen P. MACKESSY

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Snakes often have specialized diets that undergo a shift from one prey type to another depending on the life stage of the snake. Crotalus viridis viridis (prairie rattlesnake takes different prey at different life stages, and neonates typically prey on ectotherms, while adults feed almost entirely on small endotherms. We hypothesized that elevated rates of tongue flicking to chemical stimuli should correlate with particular prey consumed, and that this response shifts from one prey type to another as individuals age. To examine if an ontogenetic shift in response to chemical cues occurred, we recorded the rate of tongue flicking for 25 neonate, 20 subadult, and 20 adult (average SVL = 280.9, 552, 789.5 mm, respectively wild-caught C. v. viridis to chemical stimuli presented on a cotton-tipped applicator; water-soluble cues from two ectotherms (prairie lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, and house gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus, two endotherms (deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus and lab mouse, Mus musculus, and water controls were used. Neonates tongue flicked significantly more to chemical cues of their common prey, S. undulatus, than to all other chemical cues; however, the response to this lizard’s chemical cues decreased in adult rattlesnakes. Subadults tongue flicked with a higher rate of tongue flicking to both S. undulatus and P. maniculatus than to all other treatments, and adults tongue flicked significantly more to P. maniculatus than to all other chemical cues. In addition, all three sub-classes demonstrated a greater response for natural prey chemical cues over chemical stimuli of prey not encountered in the wild (M. musculus and H. frenatus. This shift in chemosensory response correlated with the previously described ontogenetic shifts in C. v. viridis diet. Because many vipers show a similar ontogenetic shift in diet and venom composition, we suggest that this shift in prey cue discrimination is likely a general phenomenon among viperid

  10. Nucleic acid helix structure determination from NMR proton chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werf, Ramon M. van der; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for de novo derivation of the three-dimensional helix structure of nucleic acids using non-exchangeable proton chemical shifts as sole source of experimental restraints. The method is called chemical shift de novo structure derivation protocol employing singular value decomposition (CHEOPS) and uses iterative singular value decomposition to optimize the structure in helix parameter space. The correct performance of CHEOPS and its range of application are established via an extensive set of structure derivations using either simulated or experimental chemical shifts as input. The simulated input data are used to assess in a defined manner the effect of errors or limitations in the input data on the derived structures. We find that the RNA helix parameters can be determined with high accuracy. We finally demonstrate via three deposited RNA structures that experimental proton chemical shifts suffice to derive RNA helix structures with high precision and accuracy. CHEOPS provides, subject to further development, new directions for high-resolution NMR structure determination of nucleic acids.

  11. 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Ring Substituted Benzonitriles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, Petr; Dransfeld, A.; Exner, Otto; Schraml, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 12 (2006), s. 1073-1080 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/0738 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Hammett correlation * chemical shifts * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2006

  12. Anisotropy of the fluorine chemical shift tensor in UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigny, P.

    1965-04-01

    An 19 F magnetic resonance study of polycrystalline UF 6 is presented. The low temperature complex line can be analyzed as the superposition of two distinct lines, which is attributed to a distortion of the UF 6 octahedron in the solid. The shape of the two components is studied. Their width is much larger than the theoretical dipolar width, and must be explained by large anisotropies of the fluorine chemical shift tensors. The resulting shape functions of the powder spectra are determined. The values of the parameters of the chemical shift tensors yield estimates of the characters of the U-F bonds, and this gives some information on the ground state electronic wave function of the UF 6 molecule in the solid. (author) [fr

  13. Temperature dependence of 1H chemical shifts in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Nicola J.; Williamson, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured by 2D NMR methods for the amide and CαH proton chemical shifts in two globular proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and hen egg-white lysozyme.The temperature-dependent changes in chemical shift are generally linear up to about 15 deg. below the global denaturation temperature, and the derived coefficients span a range of roughly -16 to +2 ppb/K for amide protons and -4 to +3 ppb/K for CαH. The temperature coefficients can be rationalized by the assumption that heating causes increases in thermal motion in the protein. Precise calculations of temperature coefficients derived from protein coordinates are not possible,since chemical shifts are sensitive to small changes in atomic coordinates.Amide temperature coefficients correlate well with the location of hydrogen bonds as determined by crystallography. It is concluded that a combined use of both temperature coefficients and exchange rates produces a far more reliable indicator of hydrogen bonding than either alone. If an amide proton exchanges slowly and has a temperature coefficient more positive than-4.5 ppb/K, it is hydrogen bonded, while if it exchanges rapidly and has a temperature coefficient more negative than -4.5 ppb/K, it is not hydrogen bonded. The previously observed unreliability of temperature coefficients as measures of hydrogen bonding in peptides may arise from losses of peptide secondary structure on heating

  14. Sequential nearest-neighbor effects on computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Jorge A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Serrano, Pedro; Wuethrich, Kurt [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States); Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To evaluate sequential nearest-neighbor effects on quantum-chemical calculations of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts, we selected the structure of the nucleic acid binding (NAB) protein from the SARS coronavirus determined by NMR in solution (PDB id 2K87). NAB is a 116-residue {alpha}/{beta} protein, which contains 9 prolines and has 50% of its residues located in loops and turns. Overall, the results presented here show that sizeable nearest-neighbor effects are seen only for residues preceding proline, where Pro introduces an overestimation, on average, of 1.73 ppm in the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. A new ensemble of 20 conformers representing the NMR structure of the NAB, which was calculated with an input containing backbone torsion angle constraints derived from the theoretical {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts as supplementary data to the NOE distance constraints, exhibits very similar topology and comparable agreement with the NOE constraints as the published NMR structure. However, the two structures differ in the patterns of differences between observed and computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts, {Delta}{sub ca,i}, for the individual residues along the sequence. This indicates that the {Delta}{sub ca,i} -values for the NAB protein are primarily a consequence of the limited sampling by the bundles of 20 conformers used, as in common practice, to represent the two NMR structures, rather than of local flaws in the structures.

  15. Solvent Effects on Oxygen-17 Chemical Shifts in Amides. Quantitative Linear Solvation Shift Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Ernesto; Fabián, Jesús San; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.; Esteban, Angel L.; Abboud, José-Luis M.; Contreras, Ruben H.; de Kowalewski, Dora G.

    1997-01-01

    A multiple-linear-regression analysis (MLRA) has been carried out using the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft (KAT) solvatochromic parameters in order to elucidate and quantify the solvent effects on the17O chemical shifts ofN-methylformamide (NMF),N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF),N-methylacetamide (NMA), andN,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA). The chemical shifts of the four molecules show the same dependence (in ppm) on the solvent polarity-polarizability, i.e., -22π*. The influence of the solvent hydrogen-bond-donor (HBD) acidities is slightly larger for the acetamides NMA and DMA, i.e., -48α, than for the formamides NMF and DMF, i.e., -42α. The influence of the solvent hydrogen-bond-acceptor (HBA) basicities is negligible for the nonprotic molecules DMF and DMA but significant for the protic molecules NMF and NMA, i.e., -9β. The effect of substituting the N-H hydrogen by a methyl group amounts to -5.9 ppm in NMF and 5.4 ppm in NMA. The effect of substituting the O=C-H hydrogen amounts to 5.5 ppm in NMF and 16.8 ppm in DMF. The model of specific hydration sites of amides by I. P. Gerothanassis and C. Vakka [J. Org. Chem.59,2341 (1994)] is settled in a more quantitative basis and the model by M. I. Burgar, T. E. St. Amour, and D. Fiat [J. Phys. Chem.85,502 (1981)] is critically evaluated.17O hydration shifts have been calculated for formamide (FOR) by the ab initio LORG method at the 6-31G* level. For a formamide surrounded by the four in-plane molecules of water in the first hydration shell, the calculated17O shift change due to the four hydrogen bonds, -83.2 ppm, is smaller than the empirical hydration shift, -100 ppm. The17O shift change from each out-of-plane water molecule hydrogen-bonded to the amide oxygen is -18.0 ppm. These LORG results support the conclusion that no more than four water molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the amide oxygen in formamide.

  16. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  17. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  18. Shift workers have a similar diet quality but higher energy intake than day workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Boer, Jolanda Ma; van der Beek, Allard J; Verschuren, Wm Monique; Sluijs, Ivonne; Vermeulen, Roel; Proper, Karin I

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Shift work is associated with adverse health outcomes, and an unhealthy diet may be a contributing factor. We compared diet quantity and quality between day and shift workers, and studied exposure-response relationships regarding frequency of night shifts and years of shift work. METHODS:

  19. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  20. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins: effects of temperature and pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming M.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary chemical shift analysis is the main NMR method for detection of transiently formed secondary structure in intrinsically disordered proteins. The quality of the secondary chemical shifts is dependent on an appropriate choice of random coil chemical shifts. We report random coil chemical shifts and sequence correction factors determined for a GGXGG peptide series following the approach of Schwarzinger et al. (J Am Chem Soc 123(13):2970–2978, 2001). The chemical shifts are determined at neutral pH in order to match the conditions of most studies of intrinsically disordered proteins. Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the 13 C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series, which allows the accurate random coil chemical shifts to be obtained at any pH. By correcting the random coil chemical shifts for the effects of temperature and pH, systematic biases of the secondary chemical shifts are minimized, which will improve the reliability of detection of transient secondary structure in disordered proteins.

  1. 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of the Triclinic and Monoclinic Crystal forms of Valinomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; McGeorge, Gary; Orendt, Anita M.; Grant, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Two different crystalline polymorphs of valinomycin, the triclinic and monoclinic forms, have been studied by high resolution, solid state 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Although the two polymorphs of the crystal are remarkably similar, there are distinct differences in the isotropic chemical shifts between the two spectra. For the triclinic form, the carbon chemical shift tensor components for the alpha carbons adjacent to oxygen in the lactic acid and hydroxyisovaleric acid residues and the ester carbonyls of the valine residue were obtained using the FIREMAT experiment. From the measured components, it was found that the behavior of the isotropic chemical shift, δ iso , for valine residue ester carbonyl carbons is predominately influenced by the intermediate component, δ 22 . Additionally it was found that the smallest shift component, δ 33 , for the L-lactic acid (L-Lac) and D-α-hydroxyisovaleric acid (D-Hyi) C α -O carbon was significantly displaced depending upon the nature of individual amino acid residues, and it is the δ 33 component that governs the behavior of δ iso in these alpha carbons

  2. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    the chemical environment of the metal ion. The change in absorption edge which could be attributed to different chemical environment of a metal ion inside a compound is generally known as the chemical shift. In the present study, the effect of chemical environ- ment on shifting of L3 X-ray absorption edge of uranium.

  3. Theoretical Modeling of 99 Tc NMR Chemical Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Gabriel B.; Andersen, Amity; Washton, Nancy M.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2016-09-06

    Technetium (Tc) displays a rich chemistry due to the wide range of oxidation states (from -I to +VII) and ability to form coordination compounds. Determination of Tc speciation in complex mixtures is a major challenge, and 99Tc NMR spec-troscopy is widely used to probe chemical environments of Tc in odd oxidation states. However interpretation of the 99Tc NMR data is hindered by the lack of reference compounds. DFT computations can help fill this gap, but to date few com-putational studies have focused on 99Tc NMR of compounds and complexes. This work systematically evaluates the inclu-sion small percentages of Hartree-Fock exchange correlation and relativistic effects in DFT computations to support in-terpretation of the 99Tc NMR spectra. Hybrid functionals are found to perform better than their pure GGA counterparts, and non-relativistic calculations have been found to generally show a lower mean absolute deviation from experiment. Overall non-relativistic PBE0 and B3PW91 calculations are found to most accurately predict 99Tc NMR chemical shifts.

  4. Effects of Napping During Shift Work on Sleepiness and Performance in Emergency Medical Services Personnel and Similar Shift Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Barger, Laura K; Moore, Charity G; Higgins, J Stephen; Teasley, Ellen M; Weiss, Patricia M; Condle, Joseph P; Flickinger, Katharyn L; Coppler, Patrick J; Sequeira, Denisse J; Divecha, Ayushi A; Matthews, Margaret E; Lang, Eddy S; Patterson, P Daniel

    2018-02-15

    Scheduled napping during work shifts may be an effective way to mitigate fatigue-related risk. This study aimed to critically review and synthesize existing literature on the impact of scheduled naps on fatigue-related outcomes for EMS personnel and similar shift worker groups. A systematic literature review was performed of the impact of a scheduled nap during shift work on EMS personnel or similar shift workers. The primary (critical) outcome of interest was EMS personnel safety. Secondary (important) outcomes were patient safety; personnel performance; acute states of fatigue, alertness, and sleepiness; indicators of sleep duration and/or quality; employee retention/turnover; indicators of long-term health; and cost to the system. Meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of napping on a measure of personnel performance (the psychomotor vigilance test [PVT]) and measures of acute fatigue. Of 4,660 unique records identified, 13 experimental studies were determined relevant and summarized. The effect of napping on reaction time measured at the end of shift was small and non-significant (SMD 0.12, 95% CI -0.13 to 0.36; p = 0.34). Napping during work did not change reaction time from the beginning to the end of the shift (SMD -0.01, 95% CI -25.0 to 0.24; p = 0.96). Naps had a moderate, significant effect on sleepiness measured at the end of shift (SMD 0.40, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.72; p = 0.01). The difference in sleepiness from the start to the end of shift was moderate and statistically significant (SMD 0.41, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.72; p = 0.01). Reviewed literature indicated that scheduled naps at work improved performance and decreased fatigue in shift workers. Further research is required to identify the optimal timing and duration of scheduled naps to maximize the beneficial outcomes.

  5. Physical basis of the effect of hemoglobin on the 31P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The marked difference between the intra- and extracellular 31 P NMR chemical shifts of various phosphoryl compounds when added to a red cell suspension may be largely understood in terms of the effects of hemoglobin on the 31 P NMR chemical shifts. The presence of [oxy- or (carbonmonoxy)-] hemoglobin inside the red cell causes the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the cell cytoplasm to be significantly less than that of the external solution. This difference is sufficient to account for the difference in the intra- and extracellular chemical shifts of the two phosphate esters trimethyl phosphate and triethyl phosphate. However, in the case of the compounds dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, and trimethylphosphine oxide as well as the hypophosphite, phenylphosphinate, and diphenylphosphinate ions, hemoglobin exerts an additional, much larger, effect, causing the 31 P NMR resonances to shift to lower frequency in a manner that cannot be accounted for in terms of magnetic susceptibility. Lysozyme is a protein structurally unrelated to hemoglobin and was shown to cause similar shifts to lower frequency of the resonances of these six compounds; this suggests that the mechanism may involve a property of proteins in general and not a specific property of hemoglobin. The effect of different solvents on the chemical shifts of the eight phosphoryl compounds provided an insight into the possible physical basis of the effect. It is proposed that, in addition to magnetic susceptibility effects, hemoglobin exerts its influence on phosphoryl chemical shifts by disrupting the hydrogen bonding of the phosphoryl group to solvent water

  6. MR chemical shift imaging and spectroscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinitski, S.; Consigny, P.M.; Shapiro, M.J.; Janes, N.; Smullens, S.N.; Rifkin, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for in vivo imaging and characterization of atherosclerotic plaque. The authors used a spin-echo technique with a short echo time (TE) of 11 msec. Lipid/water suppression was achieved by means of hybrid chemical shift imaging. Lesions were induced in three rabbits by a combination of balloon denudation of the abdominal aorta and a high-cholesterol diet. Following in vivo imaging of these rabbit aortas and human carotid arteries (1.5 T), the animals were killed or carotid endarterectomy was performed so that the plaques could be excised. The plaques were then analyzed in vitro both histologically and with high-resolution spectroscopy (8.5 T). Use of the short TE improved lesion visualization. The fat/water suppression showed only a small amount of mobile lipids in plaque. Both MR spectroscopic and histologic analysis corroborated these images. The composition of atherosclerotic plaques in both humans and rabbits was demonstrated to be heterogeneous, with predominantly nonmobile lipids. These results suggest that the combination of short TE MR imaging and fat/water suppression can identify plaque and delineate areas containing mobile lipids

  7. The PROSECCO server for chemical shift predictions in ordered and disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; De Simone, Alfonso

    2017-11-01

    The chemical shifts measured in solution-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are powerful probes of the structure and dynamics of protein molecules. The exploitation of chemical shifts requires methods to correlate these data with the protein structures and sequences. We present here an approach to calculate accurate chemical shifts in both ordered and disordered proteins using exclusively the information contained in their sequences. Our sequence-based approach, protein sequences and chemical shift correlations (PROSECCO), achieves the accuracy of the most advanced structure-based methods in the characterization of chemical shifts of folded proteins and improves the state of the art in the study of disordered proteins. Our analyses revealed fundamental insights on the structural information carried by NMR chemical shifts of structured and unstructured protein states.

  8. Evaluation of fatty replacement in the normal thymus with chemical-shift MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaoka, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Koji; Iwata, Kunihiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a fatty replacement in the normal thymus with chemical-shift MR imaging and a correlation between chemical-shift ratio and age. Between December 2001 and January 2003, 30 normal subjects (15 males and 15 females 8-25 years, mean age 15.7 years) who underwent chemical-shift MR imaging for the thymus were assessed. Signal intensities of the thymus and the paraspinal muscle were measured and thymus/muscle ratios (T/M ratios) were calculated. We calculated signal intensity alterations between in-phase and opposed-phase images (chemical-shift ratios) and evaluated a correlation between age and them. A significant correlation between chemical-shift ratios and age was identified (r=0.725, p<.001). Chemical-shift MR imaging can depict fatty replacement in the normal thymus in the adolescence and young adults. (author)

  9. Temperature dependence of1H NMR chemical shifts and its influence on estimated metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Felizitas C; Mitschke, Nico; Bock, Christian; Dreher, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependent chemical shifts of important brain metabolites measured by localised 1 H MRS were investigated to test how the use of incorrect prior knowledge on chemical shifts impairs the quantification of metabolite concentrations. Phantom measurements on solutions containing 11 metabolites were performed on a 7 T scanner between 1 and 43 °C. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences was fitted by a linear model. Spectra were simulated for different temperatures and analysed by the AQSES program (jMRUI 5.2) using model functions with chemical shift values for 37 °C. Large differences in the temperature dependence of the chemical shift differences were determined with a maximum slope of about ±7.5 × 10 -4  ppm/K. For 32-40 °C, only minor quantification errors resulted from using incorrect chemical shifts, with the exception of Cr and PCr. For 1-10 °C considerable quantification errors occurred if the temperature dependence of the chemical shifts was neglected. If 1 H MRS measurements are not performed at 37 °C, for which the published chemical shift values have been determined, the temperature dependence of chemical shifts should be considered to avoid systematic quantification errors, particularly for measurements on animal models at lower temperatures.

  10. Empirical correlation between protein backbone 15N and 13C secondary chemical shifts and its application to nitrogen chemical shift re-referencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liya; Markley, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The linear analysis of chemical shifts (LACS) has provided a robust method for identifying and correcting 13 C chemical shift referencing problems in data from protein NMR spectroscopy. Unlike other approaches, LACS does not require prior knowledge of the three-dimensional structure or inference of the secondary structure of the protein. It also does not require extensive assignment of the NMR data. We report here a way of extending the LACS approach to 15 N NMR data from proteins, so as to enable the detection and correction of inconsistencies in chemical shift referencing for this nucleus. The approach is based on our finding that the secondary 15 N chemical shift of the backbone nitrogen atom of residue i is strongly correlated with the secondary chemical shift difference (experimental minus random coil) between the alpha and beta carbons of residue i - 1. Thus once alpha and beta 13 C chemical shifts are available (their difference is referencing error-free), the 15 N referencing can be validated, and an appropriate offset correction can be derived. This approach can be implemented prior to a structure determination and can be used to analyze potential referencing problems in database data not associated with three-dimensional structure. Application of the LACS algorithm to the current BMRB protein chemical shift database, revealed that nearly 35% of the BMRB entries have δ 15 N values mis-referenced by over 0.7 ppm and over 25% of them have δ 1 H N values mis-referenced by over 0.12 ppm. One implication of the findings reported here is that a backbone 15 N chemical shift provides a better indicator of the conformation of the preceding residue than of the residue itself

  11. Shift workers have similar leisure-time physical activity levels as day workers but are more sedentary at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsegge, Gerben; Gupta, Nidhi; Holtermann, Andreas; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Proper, Karin I; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-03-01

    Objective Physical inactivity has been hypothesized as an underlying factor for the association between shift work and adverse health outcomes. We compared leisure-time and occupational physical activity and sedentary behavior between day, night, and non-night shift workers. Methods We identified 612 day workers, 139 night shift workers and 61 non-night shift workers aged 18-65 years (54% men) in two Danish studies: the New method for Objective Measurements of physical Activity in Daily living (NOMAD) and the Danish Physical ACTivity cohort with Objective measurements (DPhacto) between 2011-2013. Sedentary behavior, light, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were measured using an accelerometer. Physical activity was expressed as percentage of leisure and work time spent in each activity. Linear regression analyses were used to test differences in physical activity and sedentary behavior between day, night, and non-night shift workers. Results No differences in leisure-time sedentary behavior and physical activity were observed between day and shift workers (P>0.05). Non-night shift workers spent 7.2% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.3-12.1) more time in occupational sedentary behavior than day workers and 5.9% (95% CI -10.1- -1.7) and 1.9% (95% CI -3.7- -0.2) less time in occupational light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, respectively. Compared to day workers, night shift workers spent 4.3% (95% CI 2.4-6.1) more time at work in uninterrupted sedentary periods of ≥30 minutes. Conclusions Shift workers had similar leisure-time physical activity patterns as day workers, but were more sedentary at work. Future research should elucidate whether occupational physical inactivity and sedentary behavior contributes to shift work-related adverse health effects.

  12. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  13. Quantum chemical calculation and experimental measurement of the 13C chemical shift tensors of vanillin and 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guang; Hu, Jianzhi; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shen, Lianfang; Ye, Chaohui; Webb, Graham A.

    1997-03-01

    The principal values of the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift tensors in vanillin and 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde are reported. Theoretical results of the 13C chemical shift tensors were obtained by employing the gauge included atomic orbital (GIAO) approach. The geometrical parameters were optimized by using the MNDO method. The observed chemical shifts of these two compounds were determined in powders by using the recently introduced magic angle turning (MAT) experiment. The results presented in this paper clearly demonstrate the importance of using tensor information in the study of molecular structures.

  14. Temperature-dependent chemical shift in the aqueous solution of xenon

    OpenAIRE

    Peuravaara, P. (Petri)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract At standard pressure, the chemical shift of Xe-129 in an aqueous solution of xenon exhibits a maximum as a function of temperature at 311 K, which is in contrast to the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K. In the present work, this phenomenon is studied by means of a molecular dynamics simulation, where the xenon chemical shift is computed quantum-chemically for snapshots of the simulation trajectory. Also...

  15. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan; Cowburn, David

    2015-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder

  16. Substructure elucidation and chemical shift estimation using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectral database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Yanagisawa, Masaru

    1989-01-01

    A computer system for substructure elucidation and chemical shift estimation by the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra is described. In this system, substructures in a molecule can be elucidated by specifying chemical shift values or ranges, and conversely chemical shift values can be estimated by specifying substructures for both 1 H- and 13 C-NMR data. The retrieval of data can be performed interactively between 1 H- and 13 C-NMR data. It is possible to estimate all chemical shift values for a compound by giving its chemical structure. The search file for these purposes is created for signals (or signal groups) from a large number of 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectra in our database. The information contained in the search file consists of substructures and the corresponding chemical shift values. A line notation system has been developed to plot chemical structures with spectral assignments of NMR signals and to extract substructures corresponding to particular chemical shift values. (author)

  17. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry and Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H{sup δ21} and H{sup ε21}, respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  18. Climate change and physical disturbance cause similar community shifts in biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Reed, Sasha C.; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts)—communities of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface—are fundamental components of drylands worldwide, and destruction of biocrusts dramatically alters biogeochemical processes, hydrology, surface energy balance, and vegetation cover. While there has been long-standing concern over impacts of 5 physical disturbances on biocrusts (e.g., trampling by livestock, damage from vehicles), there is also increasing concern over the potential for climate change to alter biocrust community structure. Using long-term data from the Colorado Plateau, USA, we examined the effects of 10 years of experimental warming and altered precipitation (in full-factorial design) on biocrust communities, and compared the effects of altered climate with those of long-term physical 10 disturbance (>10 years of replicated human trampling). Surprisingly, altered climate and physical disturbance treatments had similar effects on biocrust community structure. Warming, altered precipitation frequency [an increase of small (1.2 mm) summer rainfall events], and physical disturbance from trampling all promoted early successional community states marked by dramatic declines in moss cover and increased cyanobacteria cover, with more variable effects 15 on lichens. While the pace of community change varied significantly among treatments, our results suggest that multiple aspects of climate change will affect biocrusts to the same degree as physical disturbance. This is particularly disconcerting in the context of warming, as temperatures for drylands are projected to increase beyond those imposed by the climate treatments used in our study.

  19. Combined Effects of Noise and Shift Work on Workers’ Physiological Parameters in a Chemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    M. Motamedzade; S. Ghazaiee

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the combined effects of noise and shift work on physiological parameters including body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. This study was performed in a chemical industry in Tehran in 1993. The workers’ physiological parameters was recorded at the beginning and at the end of all work shifts. Groups under study included : day workers (n=115) , day workers with continuous noise exposure (n=44) , two-shift workers without...

  20. Quantitative chemical-shift MR imaging cutoff value: Benign versus malignant vertebral compression – Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Z. Zidan

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Quantitative chemical shift MR imaging could be a valuable addition to standard MR imaging techniques and represent a rapid problem solving tool in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral compression, especially in patients with known primary malignancies.

  1. PPM-One: a static protein structure based chemical shift predictor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dawei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We mined the most recent editions of the BioMagResDataBank and the protein data bank to parametrize a new empirical knowledge-based chemical shift predictor of protein backbone atoms using either a linear or an artificial neural network model. The resulting chemical shift predictor PPM-One accepts a single static 3D structure as input and emulates the effect of local protein dynamics via interatomic steric contacts. Furthermore, the chemical shift prediction was extended to most side-chain protons and it is found that the prediction accuracy is at a level allowing an independent assessment of stereospecific assignments. For a previously established set of test proteins some overall improvement was achieved over current top-performing chemical shift prediction programs

  2. Supramolecular chemical shift reagents inducing conformational transitions: NMR analysis of carbohydrate homooligomer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beeren, Sophie; Meier, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of supramolecular chemical shift reagents as a tool to improve signal resolution for the NMR analysis of homooligomers. Non-covalent interactions with the shift reagent can constrain otherwise flexible analytes inducing a conformational transition that results in signal s...

  3. Chemical fingerprints encode mother–offspring similarity, colony membership, relatedness, and genetic quality in fur seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Martin A.; Caspers, Barbara A.; Forcada, Jaume; Giannakara, Athina; Baier, Markus; Eberhart-Phillips, Luke; Müller, Caroline; Hoffman, Joseph I.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical communication underpins virtually all aspects of vertebrate social life, yet remains poorly understood because of its highly complex mechanistic basis. We therefore used chemical fingerprinting of skin swabs and genetic analysis to explore the chemical cues that may underlie mother–offspring recognition in colonially breeding Antarctic fur seals. By sampling mother–offspring pairs from two different colonies, using a variety of statistical approaches and genotyping a large panel of microsatellite loci, we show that colony membership, mother–offspring similarity, heterozygosity, and genetic relatedness are all chemically encoded. Moreover, chemical similarity between mothers and offspring reflects a combination of genetic and environmental influences, the former partly encoded by substances resembling known pheromones. Our findings reveal the diversity of information contained within chemical fingerprints and have implications for understanding mother–offspring communication, kin recognition, and mate choice. PMID:26261311

  4. Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer: substructure and similarity searching of molecules from Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Patiny, Luc; Sander, Thomas; Rufener, Christian; Zasso, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Wikipedia, the world's largest and most popular encyclopedia is an indispensable source of chemistry information. It contains among others also entries for over 15,000 chemicals including metabolites, drugs, agrochemicals and industrial chemicals. To provide an easy access to this wealth of information we decided to develop a substructure and similarity search tool for chemical structures referenced in Wikipedia. We extracted chemical structures from entries in Wikipedia and implemented a web system allowing structure and similarity searching on these data. The whole search as well as visualization system is written in JavaScript and therefore can run locally within a web page and does not require a central server. The Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer is accessible on-line at www.cheminfo.org/wikipedia and is available also as an open source project from GitHub for local installation. The web-based Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer provides a useful resource for research as well as for chemical education enabling both researchers and students easy and user friendly chemistry searching and identification of relevant information in Wikipedia. The tool can also help to improve quality of chemical entries in Wikipedia by providing potential contributors regularly updated list of entries with problematic structures. And last but not least this search system is a nice example of how the modern web technology can be applied in the field of cheminformatics. Graphical abstractWikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer allows substructure and similarity searches on molecules referenced in Wikipedia.

  5. 29Si NMR Chemical Shift Calculation for Silicate Species by Gaussian Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, S. N.; Rostami, A. A.; Godarzian, A.

    2005-05-01

    Hartree-Fock self-consistent-field (HF-SCF) theory and the Gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) methods are used in the calculation of 29Si NMR chemical shifts for ABOUT 90 units of 19 compounds of various silicate species of precursors for zeolites. Calculations have been performed at geometries optimized at the AM1 semi-empirical method. The GIAO-HF-SCF calculations were carried out with using three different basis sets: 6-31G*, 6-31+G** and 6-311+G(2d,p). To demonstrate the quality of the calculations the calculated chemical shifts, δ, were compared with the corresponding experimental values for the compounds in study. The results, especially with 6-31+g** are in excellent agreement with experimental values. The calculated chemical shifts, in practical point of view, appear to be accurate enough to aid in experimental peak assignments. The difference between the experimental and calculated 29Si chemical shift values not only depends on the Qn units but also it seems that basis set effects and the level of theory is more important. For the series of molecules studied here, the standard deviations and mean absolute errors for 29Si chemical shifts relative to TMS determined using Hartree--Fock 6-31+G** basis is nearly in all cases smaller than the errors for shifts determined using HF/6-311+G(2d,p).

  6. Chemical shift prediction for protein structure calculation and quality assessment using an optimally parameterized force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jakob T.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2011-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of chemical shifts as reporters of structural information, and the ability to measure them routinely and accurately, gives great import to formulations that elucidate the structure-chemical-shift relationship. Here we present a new and highly accurate, precise, and robust formulation for the prediction of NMR chemical shifts from protein structures. Our approach, shAIC (shift prediction guided by Akaikes Information Criterion), capitalizes on mathematical ideas and an information-theoretic principle, to represent the functional form of the relationship between structure and chemical shift as a parsimonious sum of smooth analytical potentials which optimally takes into account short-, medium-, and long-range parameters in a nuclei-specific manner to capture potential chemical shift perturbations caused by distant nuclei. shAIC outperforms the state-of-the-art methods that use analytical formulations. Moreover, for structures derived by NMR or structures with novel folds, shAIC delivers better overall results; even when it is compared to sophisticated machine learning approaches. shAIC provides for a computationally lightweight implementation that is unimpeded by molecular size, making it an ideal for use as a force field. PMID:22293396

  7. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    increases, since the metal atom transforms to a positive ion while participating in the formation of a chemical bond and this energy shift ( E) increases with an increase in the oxi- dation state or positive charge on the metal ions. Thus, as the valency ... the bond, electronegativity of the anion etc or in other words, the chemical ...

  8. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case.

  9. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen

    to within 3 A. Furthermore, a fast quantum mechanics based chemical shift predictor was developed together with methodology for using chemical shifts in structure simulations. The developed predictor was used for renement of several protein structures and for reducing the computational cost of quantum...... mechanics / molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computations of chemical shieldings. Several improvements to the predictor is ongoing, where among other things, kernel based machine learning techniques have successfully been used to improve the quantum mechanical level of theory used in the predictions....

  10. Typical parameters of the plasma chemical similarity in non-isothermal reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundermann, S.; Jacobs, H.; Miethke, F.; Rutsher, A.; Wagner, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    The substance of physical similarity principles is contained in parameters which govern the comparison of different realizations of a model device. Because similarity parameters for non-isothermal plasma chemical reactors are unknown to a great extent, an analysis of relevant equations is given together with some experimental results. Modelling of the reactor and experimental results for the ozone synthesis are presented

  11. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labudde, D.; Leitner, D.; Krueger, M.; Oschkinat, H.

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the α-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely α-helix, β-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time

  12. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  13. Prediction of Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation from sequence and chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.go [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2010-03-15

    We present a program, named Promega, to predict the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on the basis of backbone chemical shifts and the amino acid sequence. Using a chemical shift database of proteins of known structure together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of cis Xaa-Pro peptide bonds, a cis/trans probability score is calculated from the backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of the proline and its neighboring residues. For an arbitrary number of input chemical shifts, which may include Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}}, Promega calculates the statistical probability that a Xaa-Pro peptide bond is cis. Besides its potential as a validation tool, Promega is particularly useful for studies of larger proteins where Pro-{sup 13}C{sup {gamma}} assignments can be challenging, and for on-going efforts to determine protein structures exclusively on the basis of backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts.

  14. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  15. Hydrophobic clustering in nonnative states of a protein: Interpretation of chemical shifts in NMR spectra of denatured states of lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.A.; Topping, K.D.; Woolfson, D.N.; Dobson, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical shifts of resonances of specific protons in the 1H NMR spectrum of thermally denatured hen lysozyme have been determined by exchange correlation with assigned native state resonances in 2D NOESY spectra obtained under conditions where the two states are interconverting. There are subtle but widespread deviations of the measured shifts from the values which would be anticipated for a random coil; in the case of side chain protons these are virtually all net upfield shifts and it is shown that this may be the averaged effect of interactions with aromatic rings in a partially collapsed denatured state. In a very few cases, notably that of two sequential tryptophan residues, it is possible to interpret these effects in terms of specific, local interresidue interactions. Generally, however, there is no correlation with either native state shift perturbations or with sequence proximity to aromatic groups. Diminution of most of the residual shift perturbations on reduction of the disulfide cross-links confirms that they are not simply effects of residues adjacent in the sequence. Similar effects of chemical denaturants, with the disulfides intact, demonstrate that the shift perturbations reflect an enhanced tendency to side chain clustering in the thermally denatured state. The temperature dependences of the shift perturbations suggest that this clustering is noncooperative and is driven by small, favorable enthalpy changes. While the extent of conformational averaging is clearly much greater than that observed for a homologous protein, alpha-lactalbumin, in its partially folded molten globule state, the results clearly show that thermally denatured lysozyme differs substantially from a random coil, principally in that it is partially hydrophobically collapsed

  16. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... observed for Mn K edge in the Mn-compounds while a shift of 13–20 eV was observed for Cr K edge in Cr-compounds compared to values in elementalMn and Cr, respectively. The different chemical shifts observed for compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect ...

  17. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods...

  18. Theoretical Study of the NMR Chemical Shift of Xe in Supercritical Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacerda Junior, Evanildo Gomes; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2018-01-01

    In this work we investigate the level of theory necessary for reproducing the non-linear variation of the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift with the density of Xe in supercritical conditions. In detail we study how the 129Xe chemical shift depends under these conditions...... on electron correlation, relativistic and many-body effects. The latter are included using a sequential-QM/MM methodology, in which a classical MD simulation is performed first and the chemical shift is then obtained as an average of quantum calculations of 250 MD snapshots conformations carried out for Xen...... clusters (n =2-8 depending on the density). The analysis of the relativistic effects is made at the level of 4-component Hartree-Fock calculations (4c-HF) and electron correlation effects are considered using second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). To simplify the calculations...

  19. Comparative analysis of chemical similarity methods for modular natural products with a hypothetical structure enumeration algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Franczak, Brian C; McNicholas, Paul D; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2017-08-16

    Natural products represent a prominent source of pharmaceutically and industrially important agents. Calculating the chemical similarity of two molecules is a central task in cheminformatics, with applications at multiple stages of the drug discovery pipeline. Quantifying the similarity of natural products is a particularly important problem, as the biological activities of these molecules have been extensively optimized by natural selection. The large and structurally complex scaffolds of natural products distinguish their physical and chemical properties from those of synthetic compounds. However, no analysis of the performance of existing methods for molecular similarity calculation specific to natural products has been reported to date. Here, we present LEMONS, an algorithm for the enumeration of hypothetical modular natural product structures. We leverage this algorithm to conduct a comparative analysis of molecular similarity methods within the unique chemical space occupied by modular natural products using controlled synthetic data, and comprehensively investigate the impact of diverse biosynthetic parameters on similarity search. We additionally investigate a recently described algorithm for natural product retrobiosynthesis and alignment, and find that when rule-based retrobiosynthesis can be applied, this approach outperforms conventional two-dimensional fingerprints, suggesting it may represent a valuable approach for the targeted exploration of natural product chemical space and microbial genome mining. Our open-source algorithm is an extensible method of enumerating hypothetical natural product structures with diverse potential applications in bioinformatics.

  20. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    ). The differences are due to different conformational behavior of the OH and OCH3 groups; while the ortho-disubstituted OH group remains planar in polyphenols due to hydrogen bonding and conjugative stabilization, the steric congestion in ortho-disubstituted anisoles outweighs the conjugative effects and forces...... correlation between computed and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts, including agreement between computed and observed chemical shift changes caused by O-methylation. The observed regularities can aid structure elucidation of partly O-methylated polyphenols, including many natural products and drugs...

  1. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation. This me......Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation...

  2. Determination of deuterium fraction in heavy water by proton chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellomaeki, A.; Jutila, M.

    1979-01-01

    One nuclear magnetic resonance method used to determine the deuterium fraction of heavy water samples is based on the chemical shifts of dissolved fluoride ions depending on the deuterium content of the sample. This method presented indicated that the proton chemical shifts of the hydrogen form sulfonated polystyrene ion exchangers suspended in H 2 O--D 2 O mixtures are dependent on the deuterium content of the solvent. The strong polystyrene sulfuric acid ion exchangers are more practical: the concentration of the interior electrolytic solution is automatically regulated by the fairly constant swelling of the resin and the peak of the exterior water provides an internal standard in every sample. 2 figures

  3. Proton Magnetic Resonance and Human Thyroid Neoplasia III. Ex VivoChemical-Shift Microimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Allison; Künnecke, Basil; Dowd, Susan; Russell, Peter; Delbridge, Leigh; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic-resonance chemical-shift microimaging, with a spatial resolution of 40 × 40 μm, is a modality which can detect alterations to cellular chemistry and hence markers of pathological processes in human tissueex vivo.This technique was used as a chemical microscope to assess follicular thyroid neoplasms, lesions which are unsatisfactorily investigated using standard histopathological techiques or water-based magnetic-resonance imaging. The chemical-shift images at the methyl frequency (0.9 ppm) identify chemical heterogeneity in follicular tumors which are histologically homogeneous. The observed changes to cellular chemistry, detectable in foci of approximately 100 cells or less, support the existence of a preinvasive state hitherto unidentified by current pathological techniques.

  4. Derivation of 13C chemical shift surfaces for the anomeric carbons of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides using ab initio methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swalina, Chet W.; Zauhar, Randy J.; DeGrazia, Michael J.; Moyna, Guillermo [University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2001-09-15

    The dependence between the anomeric carbon chemical shift and the glycosidic bond < {phi}, {psi}> dihedral angles in oligosaccharide and glycopeptide model compounds was studied by Gauge-Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) ab initio calculations. Complete chemical shift surfaces versus {phi} and {psi} for d-Glcp-d-Glcp disaccharides with (1{sup {yields}}1), (1{sup {yields}}2), (1{sup {yields}}3), and (1{sup {yields}}4) linkages in both {alpha}- and {beta}-configurations were computed using a 3-21G basis set, and scaled to reference results from calculations at the 6-311G** level of theory. Similar surfaces were obtained for GlcNAcThr and GlcNAcSer model glycopeptides in {alpha}- and {beta}-configurations, using in this case different conformations for the peptide moiety. The results obtained for both families of model compounds are discussed. We also present the determination of empirical formulas of the form {sup 13}C{delta}=f({phi},{psi}) obtained by fitting the raw ab initio data to trigonometric series expansions suitable for use in molecular mechanics and dynamics simulations. Our investigations are consistent with experimental observations and earlier calculations performed on smaller glycosidic bond models, and show the applicability of chemical shift surfaces in the study of the conformational behavior of oligosaccharides and glycopeptides.

  5. Trends in energy intake in U.S. between 1977 and 1996: similar shifts seen across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Samara Joy; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Popkin, Barry M

    2002-05-01

    To determine the trends in locations and food sources of Americans stratified by age group for both total energy and the meal and snack subcomponents. Nationally representative data was taken from the 1977 to 1978 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey and the 1989 to 1991 and 1994 to 1996 (and 1998 for children age 2 through 9) Continuing Surveys of Food Intake by Individuals. The sample consisted of 63,380 individuals, age 2 and up. For each survey year, the percentage of total energy intake from meals and snacks was calculated separately for 2- to 18-year-olds, 19- to 39-year-olds, 40- to 59-year-olds, and those 60 years and older. The percentage of energy intake by location (at-home consumption or preparation, vending, store eaten out, restaurant/fast-food, and school) and by specific food group was computed for all age groups separately. The trends in location and food sources were almost identical for all age groups. Key dietary behavior shifts included greater away-from-home consumption; large increases in total energy from salty snacks, soft drinks, and pizza; and large decreases in energy from low- and medium-fat milk and medium- and high-fat beef and pork. Total energy intake has increased over the past 20 years, with shifts away from meals to snacks and from at-home to away-from-home consumption. The similarity of changes across all age groups furthers the assertion that broad-based environmental changes are needed to improve the diets of Americans.

  6. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues....... The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we...... in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve...

  7. Investigation of DOTA-Metal Chelation Effects on the Chemical Shift of 129 Xe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K; Slack, CC; Vassiliou, CC; Dao, P; Gomes, MD; Kennedy, DJ; Truxal, AE; Sperling, LJ; Francis, MB; Wemmer, DE; Pines, A

    2015-09-17

    Recent work has shown that xenon chemical shifts in cryptophane-cage sensors are affected when tethered chelators bind to metals. Here in this paper, we explore the xenon shifts in response to a wide range of metal ions binding to diastereomeric forms of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) linked to cryptophane-A. The shifts induced by the binding of Ca2+, Cu2+, Ce3+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cr2+, Fe3+, and Hg2+ are distinct. In addition, the different responses of the diastereomers for the same metal ion indicate that shifts are affected by partial folding with a correlation between the expected coordination number of the metal in the DOTA complex and the chemical shift of 129Xe. Lastly, these sensors may be used to detect and quantify many important metal ions, and a better understanding of the basis for the induced shifts could enhance future designs.

  8. Identification of helix capping and β-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of β-turns: I, II, I′, II′ and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and β-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7–0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  9. Enhanced measurement of residual chemical shift anisotropy for small molecule structure elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhou; Cohen, Ryan D; Gustafson, Kirk R; Martin, Gary E; Williamson, R Thomas

    2018-03-05

    A method is introduced to measure residual chemical shift anisotropies conveniently and accurately in the mesophase of poly-γ-(benzyl-l-glutamate). The alignment amplitude is substantially enhanced over common methods which greatly benefits measurements particularly on sp 3 carbons. The approach offers significant improvements in data accuracy and utility for small molecule structure determination.

  10. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Mn and Cr cations in the above compounds. Keywords. Mn K edge; Cr K edge; EXAFS; synchrotron radiation; energy shift; oxidation state; effective charge. 1. Introduction. It is well known that the X-ray absorption edge of a ...

  11. Parameter-free calculation of K alpha chemical shifts for Al, Si, and Ge oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2001-01-01

    The chemical shifts of the K alpha radiation line from Al, Si, and Ge ions between their elemental and oxide forms are calculated within the framework of density functional theory using ultrasoft pseudopotentials. It is demonstrated that this theoretical approach yields quantitatively accurate...

  12. Identification of helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of {beta}-turns: I, II, I Prime , II Prime and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7-0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  13. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static” ...

  14. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  15. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  16. Rapid chemical shift encoding with single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hahnsung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of chemical shift encoded, single-slab 3D GRASE for rapid fat-water separation within a single acquisition. The proposed method incorporates signal-to-noise-ratio-optimal chemical shift encoding into single-slab 3D GRASE with variable flip angles. Chemical shift induced phase information was encoded in succession to different positions in k-space by inserting phase encoding blips between adjacent lobes of the oscillating readout gradients. To enhance imaging efficiency, signal prescription-based variable flip angles were used in the long refocusing pulse train. After echo-independent phase correction, missing signals in k-echo space were interpolated using convolution kernels that span over all echoes. Fat-water separation in a single acquisition was performed using both multi-echo fast spin echo and GRASE as compared to conventional multiacquisition fast spin echo with echo shifts. The proposed single-slab 3D GRASE shows superior performance in accurately delineating cartilage structures compared to its counterpart, multi-echo 3D fast spin echo. Compared with multiacquisition fast spin echo with three echo shifts (63 min), the proposed method substantially speeds up imaging time (7 min), and achieves 0.6 mm isotropic resolution in knee imaging with reduced artifacts and noise. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of rapid chemical shift encoding and separation using the proposed, single-acquisition single-slab 3D GRASE for high resolution isotropic imaging within clinically acceptable time. Magn Reson Med 78:1852-1861, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Modeling NMR chemical shift: A survey of density functional theory approaches for calculating tensor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefzik, Travis H; Turco, Domenic; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Facelli, Julio C

    2005-02-17

    The NMR chemical shift, a six-parameter tensor property, is highly sensitive to the position of the atoms in a molecule. To extract structural parameters from chemical shifts, one must rely on theoretical models. Therefore, a high quality group of shift tensors that serve as benchmarks to test the validity of these models is warranted and necessary to highlight existing computational limitations. Here, a set of 102 13C chemical-shift tensors measured in single crystals, from a series of aromatic and saccharide molecules for which neutron diffraction data are available, is used to survey models based on the density functional (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) theories. The quality of the models is assessed by their least-squares linear regression parameters. It is observed that in general DFT outperforms restricted HF theory. For instance, Becke's three-parameter exchange method and mpw1pw91 generally provide the best predicted shieldings for this group of tensors. However, this performance is not universal, as none of the DFT functionals can predict the saccharide tensors better than HF theory. Both the orientations of the principal axis system and the magnitude of the shielding were compared using the chemical-shift distance to evaluate the quality of the calculated individual tensor components in units of ppm. Systematic shortcomings in the prediction of the principal components were observed, but the theory predicts the corresponding isotropic value more accurately. This is because these systematic errors cancel, thereby indicating that the theoretical assessment of shielding predictions based on the isotropic shift should be avoided.

  18. Rapid calculation of protein chemical shifts using bond polarization theory and its application to protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovkin, Igor; Klipfel, Marco; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S; Luy, Burkhard; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Although difficult to analyze, NMR chemical shifts provide detailed information on protein structure. We have adapted the semi-empirical bond polarization theory (BPT) to protein chemical shift calculation and chemical shift driven protein structure refinement. A new parameterization for BPT amide nitrogen chemical shift calculation has been derived from MP2 ab initio calculations and successfully evaluated using crystalline tripeptides. We computed the chemical shifts of the small globular protein ubiquitin, demonstrating that BPT calculations can match the results obtained at the DFT level of theory at very low computational cost. In addition to the calculation of chemical shift tensors, BPT allows the calculation of chemical shift gradients and consequently chemical shift driven geometry optimizations. We applied chemical shift driven protein structure refinement to the conformational analysis of a set of Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness) tryparedoxin peroxidase Px III structures. We found that the interaction of Px III with its reaction partner Tpx seems to be governed by conformational selection rather than by induced fit.

  19. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  20. Evaluation of the application of chemical shift for the detection of lipid in brain lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.J.; Ng, K.H.; Ramli, N.; Azman, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive detection of the presence of lipids is particularly important in staging of intracranial tumours. Presence of lipid peak in aggressive intracranial tumours has been reported widely using MR spectroscopy. However this method has limitation due to long imaging time and artefacts formed by adjacent bones. Chemical shift MR imaging (with has shorter imaging time) is an alternative method that had been used to detect presence of lipid in vivo by means of signal intensity loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift pulse sequences for detection of lipid elements in brain lesion. Ten cylindered phantoms measuring 3 x 3 cm were filled with various mixtures of lipid and water: 0-90% lipid, in 10% step by weight. The gradient echo in- and opposed-phase chemical shift sequences were performed using a 1.5 T MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens) with a head coil. In addition, we performed MRI and chemical shift studies on 32 patients with brain lesion. We then analysed the association between out of phase intensity value and classification of the lesions. For phantom containing 50% lipid, maximum signal loss on opposed-phase images was observed. There were significant differences between in- and opposed-phase lipid-water phantom images (P = 0.0054). Most of the benign lesions fall into the positive out of phase intensity value, and malignant lesions fall into negative out of phase intensity value. We conclude that chemical shift artefact can be applied in detecting and characterising lipid elements in brain lesion.

  1. Enhancement of chemical entity identification in text using semantic similarity validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Grego

    Full Text Available With the amount of chemical data being produced and reported in the literature growing at a fast pace, it is increasingly important to efficiently retrieve this information. To tackle this issue text mining tools have been applied, but despite their good performance they still provide many errors that we believe can be filtered by using semantic similarity. Thus, this paper proposes a novel method that receives the results of chemical entity identification systems, such as Whatizit, and exploits the semantic relationships in ChEBI to measure the similarity between the entities found in the text. The method assigns a single validation score to each entity based on its similarities with the other entities also identified in the text. Then, by using a given threshold, the method selects a set of validated entities and a set of outlier entities. We evaluated our method using the results of two state-of-the-art chemical entity identification tools, three semantic similarity measures and two text window sizes. The method was able to increase precision without filtering a significant number of correctly identified entities. This means that the method can effectively discriminate the correctly identified chemical entities, while discarding a significant number of identification errors. For example, selecting a validation set with 75% of all identified entities, we were able to increase the precision by 28% for one of the chemical entity identification tools (Whatizit, maintaining in that subset 97% the correctly identified entities. Our method can be directly used as an add-on by any state-of-the-art entity identification tool that provides mappings to a database, in order to improve their results. The proposed method is included in a freely accessible web tool at www.lasige.di.fc.ul.pt/webtools/ice/.

  2. Chemical similarity searches using latent semantic structural indexing (LaSSI) and comparison to TOPOSIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, R D; Fluder, E M; Singh, S B; Nachbar, R B; Kearsley, S K; Sheridan, R P

    2001-04-12

    Similarity searches based on chemical descriptors have proven extremely useful in aiding large-scale drug screening. Here we present results of similarity searching using Latent Semantic Structure Indexing (LaSSI). LaSSI uses a singular value decomposition on chemical descriptors to project molecules into a k-dimensional descriptor space, where k is the number of retained singular values. The effect of the projection is that certain descriptors are emphasized over others and some descriptors may count as partially equivalent to others. We compare LaSSI searches to searches done with TOPOSIM, our standard in-house method, which uses the Dice similarity definition. Standard descriptor-based methods such as TOPOSIM count all descriptors equally and treat all descriptors as independent. For this work we use atom pairs and topological torsions as examples of chemical descriptors. Using objective criteria to determine how effective one similarity method is versus another in selecting active compounds from a large database, we find for a series of 16 drug-like probes that LaSSI is as good as or better than TOPOSIM in selecting active compounds from the MDDR database, if the user is allowed to treat k as an adjustable parameter. Typically, LaSSI selects very different sets of actives than does TOPOSIM, so it can find classes of actives that TOPOSIM would miss.

  3. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in tautomeric systems with double proton transfer. Citronin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.; Langgard, M.; Bolvig, S.

    1998-01-01

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects on 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts are measured in citrinin, a tautomeric compound with an unusual doubly intramolecularly hydrogen bonded structure. The isotope effects are to a large extent dominated by equilibrium contributions and deuteration leads to more of the deuterated enol forms rather than the deuterated acid form. 1 H 13 C and 17 O nuclear shieldings are calculated using density functional ab initio methods. A very good correlation between calculated nuclear shieldings and experimental 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts is obtained. The tautomeric equilibrium can be analyzed based on the isotope effects on B-6 and C-8 carbons and shows an increase in the o-quinone form on lowering the temperature. Furthermore, upon deuteration the largest equilibrium shift is found for deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration is increasing at lower temperature. (author)

  4. 13C solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy analysis of the anomeric carbon in carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Chan, Sunney I; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2005-03-21

    (13)C NMR solid-state structural analysis of the anomeric center in carbohydrates was performed on six monosaccharides: glucose (Glc), mannose (Man), galactose (Gal), galactosamine hydrochloride (GalN), glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN), and N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the 1D (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectrum, the anomeric center C-1 of these carbohydrates revealed two well resolved resonances shifted by 3-5ppm, which were readily assigned to the anomeric alpha and beta forms. From this experiment, we also extracted the (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor elements of the two forms from their spinning sideband intensities, respectively. It was found out that the chemical shift tensor for the alpha anomer was more axially symmetrical than that of the beta form. A strong linear correlation was obtained when the ratio of the axial asymmetry of the (13)C chemical shift tensors of the two anomeric forms was plotted in a semilogarithmic plot against the relative population of the two anomers. Finally, we applied REDOR spectroscopy to discern whether or not there were any differences in the sugar ring conformation between the anomers. Identical two-bond distances of 2.57A (2.48A) were deduced for both the alpha and beta forms in GlcNAc (GlcN), suggesting that the two anomers have essentially identical sugar ring scaffolds in these sugars. In light of these REDOR distance measurements and the strong correlation observed between the ratio of the axial asymmetry parameters of the (13)C chemical shift tensors and the relative population between the two anomeric forms, we concluded that the anomeric effect arises principally from interaction of the electron charge clouds between the C-1-O-5 and the C-1-O-1 bonds in these monosaccharides.

  5. Effects of Napping During Shift Work on Sleepiness and Performance in Emergency Medical Services Personnel and Similar Shift Workers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-11

    Background: Scheduled napping during work shifts may be an effective way to mitigate fatigue-related risk. This study aimed to critically review and synthesize existing literature on the impact of scheduled naps on fatigue-related outcomes for EMS pe...

  6. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoebe Dreux Chappell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a three-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a three-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80% similar over a two-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response.

  7. Accuracy and precision of protein–ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, Craig J.; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-01-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein–ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K D ) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K D value of a 1:1 protein–ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125–138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of 1 H– 15 N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein–ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k off ). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k off ∼ 3,000 s −1 in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k off from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k off values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s −1 . The validity of line shape analysis for k off values approaching intermediate exchange (∼100 s −1 ), may be facilitated by more accurate K D measurements from NMR

  8. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-03

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data.

  9. Uniform fat suppression in hands and feet through the use of two-point Dixon chemical shift MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Akkerman, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the potential of two-point Dixon chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging to achieve uniform fat suppression in the distal parts of the extremities. Two-point Dixon chemical shift imaging was performed in 31 consecutive patients clinically suspected to have bone marrow disease. In some

  10. Modelling the acid/base 1H NMR chemical shift limits of metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredwell, Gregory D; Bundy, Jacob G; De Iorio, Maria; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the use of buffering agents the 1 H NMR spectra of biofluid samples in metabolic profiling investigations typically suffer from extensive peak frequency shifting between spectra. These chemical shift changes are mainly due to differences in pH and divalent metal ion concentrations between the samples. This frequency shifting results in a correspondence problem: it can be hard to register the same peak as belonging to the same molecule across multiple samples. The problem is especially acute for urine, which can have a wide range of ionic concentrations between different samples. To investigate the acid, base and metal ion dependent 1 H NMR chemical shift variations and limits of the main metabolites in a complex biological mixture. Urine samples from five different individuals were collected and pooled, and pre-treated with Chelex-100 ion exchange resin. Urine samples were either treated with either HCl or NaOH, or were supplemented with various concentrations of CaCl 2 , MgCl 2 , NaCl or KCl, and their 1 H NMR spectra were acquired. Nonlinear fitting was used to derive acid dissociation constants and acid and base chemical shift limits for peaks from 33 identified metabolites. Peak pH titration curves for a further 65 unidentified peaks were also obtained for future reference. Furthermore, the peak variations induced by the main metal ions present in urine, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ , were also measured. These data will be a valuable resource for 1 H NMR metabolite profiling experiments and for the development of automated metabolite alignment and identification algorithms for 1 H NMR spectra.

  11. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  12. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2013-01-01

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (φ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ 1 rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts

  13. Substituent Chemical Shifts of (E)-1-Aryl-3-thienylpropen-1-ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Sook Han; Jeon, Hyun Ju; Yu, Ji Sook; Lee, Chang Kiu [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Substituent chemical shifts were examined for the 2- and 3-thiophene derivatives of chalcone and compared to the thiophene series of derivatives with the phenyl series. The chemical shift values for the α-carbons of the enones showed and inverse correlation with the Hammett σ values, but the correlation coefficients were moderate (r = 0.836 - 0.878). On the other hand, the β-carbons showed a normal correlation with excellent correlation coefficients (r = 0.994). The absolute magnitude of the ρ values for the α-carbon are about half of those of the β-carbon. The observation may be the result of a through-space transition of the electronic effect of the substituents in addition to the through bond transition.

  14. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States); Yu, Wookyung [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Yonsei University, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry (Korea, Republic of); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-10-15

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  15. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  16. Assignment of protein backbone resonances using connectivity, torsion angles and 13Cα chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Laura C.; Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H.

    2004-01-01

    A program is presented which will return the most probable sequence location for a short connected set of residues in a protein given just 13 C α chemical shifts (δ( 13 C α )) and data restricting the φ and ψ backbone angles. Data taken from both the BioMagResBank and the Protein Data Bank were used to create a probability density function (PDF) using a multivariate normal distribution in δ( 13 C α ), φ, and ψ space for each amino acid residue. Extracting and combining probabilities for particular amino acid residues in a short proposed sequence yields a score indicative of the correctness of the proposed assignment. The program is illustrated using several proteins for which structure and 13 C α chemical shift data are available

  17. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  18. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu. PMID:22903636

  19. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L.

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  20. From Raw Data to Protein Backbone Chemical Shifts Using NMRFx Processing and NMRViewJ Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce A

    2018-01-01

    Assignment of the chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (HN, N, CA, CB, and C) of proteins is often a prerequisite to using NMR information in the study of proteins. These chemical shifts and their perturbations are the basis for the analysis of protein dynamics, ligand binding, and backbone conformation. They are generally assigned prior to full side-chain assignments and the determination of the complete three-dimensional molecular structure. This chapter describes the use of two software packages, NMRFx Processor and NMRViewJ, in going from raw NMR data to backbone assignments. The step-by-step procedure describes processing of the data and the use of manual and automated features of the RunAbout tool in NMRViewJ to perform the assignments.

  1. Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approva l 26 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Aoolication of...or technical information as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MDW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.] Crime Scene Investiga...tion: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Crime Scene

  2. Chemical shift assignments of polyketide cyclase_like protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunjie; Hu, Rui; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Li, Xuegang; Yang, Yunhuang; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Maili

    2017-10-01

    Protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is 155 amino acids long and 17.7 kDa, is a member of the polyketide_cyc2 family. As a potential polyketide cyclase, it may play an important role in the biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides that are the source of many bioactive molecules. Here we report the complete 1 H, 13 C and 15 N chemical shift assignments of CGL2373, which lays a foundation for further structural and functional research.

  3. 1H MR chemical shift imaging detection of phenylalanine in patients suffering from phenylketonuria (PKU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Spronsen, Francjan J. van; Leenders, Klaas L.; Valk, Harold W. de

    2004-01-01

    Short echo time single voxel methods were used in previous MR spectroscopy studies of phenylalanine (Phe) levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. In this study, apparent T 2 relaxation time of the 7.3-ppm Phe multiplet signal in the brain of PKU patients was assessed in order to establish which echo time would be optimal. 1 H chemical shift imaging (CSI) examinations of a transverse plain above the ventricles of the brain were performed in 10 PKU patients and 11 persons not suffering from PKU at 1.5 T, using four echo times (TE 20, 40, 135 and 270 ms). Phe was detectable only when the signals from all CSI voxels were summarized. In patients suffering from PKU the T 2 relaxation times of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) were similar to those previously reported for healthy volunteers (between 200 and 325 ms). The T 2 of Phe in brain tissue was 215±120 ms (standard deviation). In the PKU patients the brain tissue Phe concentrations were 141±69 μM as opposed to 58±23 μM in the persons not suffering from PKU. In the detection of Phe, MR spectroscopy performed at TE 135 or 270 ms is not inferior to that performed at TE 20 or 40 ms (all previous studies). Best results were obtained at TE=135 ms, relating to the fact that at that particular TE, the visibility of a compound with a T 2 of 215 ms still is good, while interfering signals from short-TE compounds are negligible. (orig.)

  4. {sup 1}H MR chemical shift imaging detection of phenylalanine in patients suffering from phenylketonuria (PKU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Spronsen, Francjan J. van [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Groningen (Netherlands); Leenders, Klaas L. [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands); Valk, Harold W. de [University Medical Centre of Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-10-01

    Short echo time single voxel methods were used in previous MR spectroscopy studies of phenylalanine (Phe) levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. In this study, apparent T{sub 2} relaxation time of the 7.3-ppm Phe multiplet signal in the brain of PKU patients was assessed in order to establish which echo time would be optimal. {sup 1}H chemical shift imaging (CSI) examinations of a transverse plain above the ventricles of the brain were performed in 10 PKU patients and 11 persons not suffering from PKU at 1.5 T, using four echo times (TE 20, 40, 135 and 270 ms). Phe was detectable only when the signals from all CSI voxels were summarized. In patients suffering from PKU the T{sub 2} relaxation times of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) were similar to those previously reported for healthy volunteers (between 200 and 325 ms). The T{sub 2} of Phe in brain tissue was 215{+-}120 ms (standard deviation). In the PKU patients the brain tissue Phe concentrations were 141{+-}69 {mu}M as opposed to 58{+-}23 {mu}M in the persons not suffering from PKU. In the detection of Phe, MR spectroscopy performed at TE 135 or 270 ms is not inferior to that performed at TE 20 or 40 ms (all previous studies). Best results were obtained at TE=135 ms, relating to the fact that at that particular TE, the visibility of a compound with a T{sub 2} of 215 ms still is good, while interfering signals from short-TE compounds are negligible. (orig.)

  5. Chemical composition of preen wax reflects major histocompatibility complex similarity in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J W G; Watson, M J; Kelly, T R; Gloor, G B; Bernards, M A; MacDougall-Shackleton, E A

    2016-11-16

    In jawed vertebrates, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a key role in immunity by encoding cell-surface proteins that recognize and bind non-self antigens. High variability at MHC suggests that these loci may also function in social signalling such as mate choice and kin recognition. This requires that MHC genotype covaries with some perceptible phenotypic trait. In mammals and fish, MHC is signalled chemically through volatile and non-volatile peptide odour cues, facilitating MHC-dependent mate choice and other behaviours. In birds, despite evidence for MHC-dependent mating, candidate mechanisms for MHC signalling remain largely unexplored. However, feather preen wax has recently been implicated as a potential source of odour cues. We examined whether the chemical composition of preen wax correlates with MHC class IIβ genotypes of wild song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Pairwise chemical distance reflected amino acid distance at MHC for male-female dyads, although not for same-sex dyads. Chemical diversity did not reflect MHC diversity. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to characterize preen wax compounds, and identified four wax esters that best reflect MHC similarity. Provided songbirds can detect variation in preen wax composition, this cue may allow individuals to assess MHC compatibility of potential mates. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Similarity Laws for the Lines of Ideal Free Energy and Chemical Potential in Supercritical Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, E M; Vorob'ev, V S

    2017-09-21

    We have found the curves on the density-temperature plane, along which the values of free energy and chemical potential correspond to ideal gas quantities. At first, we have applied the van der Waals equation to construct them and to derive their equations. Then we have shown that the same lines for real substances (Ar, N 2 , CH 4 , SF 6 , H 2 , H 2 O) and for the model Lennard-Jones system constructed on the basis of the measurements data and calculations are well matched with the derived equations. The validity and deviations from the obtained similarity laws are discussed.

  7. Chemical similarity among domesticated and wild genotypes of peanut based on n-alkanes profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Janaína Carvalho de Souza

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the epicuticular n-alkane profile of domesticated and wild peanut genotypes. Foliar epicuticular n-alkanes of four Arachis hypogaea genotypes and two wild species - A. monticola and A. stenosperma - were analyzed by gas chromatography. Chemical relationships between them were evaluated using the Dice coefficient and UPGMA method. Two clusters were formed: one with four A. hypogaea genotypes and the other with the two wild species. There is more similarity between the BR1 and LIGO-PE06 genotypes and between the BRS 151 L-7 and BRS Havana genotypes.

  8. Similarity-based prediction for Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification of drugs by integrating multiple data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; Gu, Jiangyong; Wang, Yong; Li, Yang; Wang, Dan; Lu, Liang; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2015-06-01

    Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system, widely applied in almost all drug utilization studies, is currently the most widely recognized classification system for drugs. Currently, new drug entries are added into the system only on users' requests, which leads to seriously incomplete drug coverage of the system, and bioinformatics prediction is helpful during this process. Here we propose a novel prediction model of drug-ATC code associations, using logistic regression to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources including chemical structures, target proteins, gene expression, side-effects and chemical-chemical associations. The model obtains good performance for the prediction not only on ATC codes of unclassified drugs but also on new ATC codes of classified drugs assessed by cross-validation and independent test sets, and its efficacy exceeds previous methods. Further to facilitate the use, the model is developed into a user-friendly web service SPACE ( S: imilarity-based P: redictor of A: TC C: od E: ), which for each submitted compound, will give candidate ATC codes (ranked according to the decreasing probability_score predicted by the model) together with corresponding supporting evidence. This work not only contributes to knowing drugs' therapeutic, pharmacological and chemical properties, but also provides clues for drug repositioning and side-effect discovery. In addition, the construction of the prediction model also provides a general framework for similarity-based data integration which is suitable for other drug-related studies such as target, side-effect prediction etc. The web service SPACE is available at http://www.bprc.ac.cn/space. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. More insight into the chemical composition of Greek propolis; differences and similarities with Turkish propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celemli, Omür G; Hatjina, Fani; Charistos, Leonidas; Schiesser, Aygün; Ozkirim, Asli

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to determine the differences and similarities between Greek and Turkish propolis with respect to their chemical composition given that the two countries have many similarities in floral biodiversity. We observed that: a) Greek propolis is different from the European-type propolis, having a high terpene content; therefore we can definitely characterize it as a Mediterranean type; b) the Turkish propolis collected along the coast line of the Aegean Sea is similiar to the examined Greek propolis; c) the remaining Turkish samples, originating from the European part of Turkey, were found to be similiar to the European-type propolis, having a high flavonoid content. Finally, especially two compounds, beta-elemene and totarol, were found in Greek samples in quite high amounts that are thought to have important biological properties.

  10. Analysis of seven-membered lactones by computational NMR methods: proton NMR chemical shift data are more discriminating than carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marell, Daniel J; Emond, Susanna J; Kulshrestha, Aman; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-01-17

    We report an NMR chemical shift study of conformationally challenging seven-membered lactones (1-11); computed and experimental data sets are compared. The computations involved full conformational analysis of each lactone, Boltzmann-weighted averaging of the chemical shifts across all conformers, and linear correction of the computed chemical shifts. DFT geometry optimizations [M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)] and GIAO NMR chemical shift calculations [B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)] provided the computed chemical shifts. The corrected mean absolute error (CMAE), the average of the differences between the computed and experimental chemical shifts for each of the 11 lactones, is encouragingly small (0.02-0.08 ppm for (1)H or 0.8-2.2 ppm for (13)C). Three pairs of cis versus trans diastereomeric lactones were used to assess the ability of the method to distinguish between stereoisomers. The experimental shifts were compared with the computed shifts for each of the two possible isomers. We introduce the use of a "match ratio"--the ratio of the larger CMAE (worse fit) to the smaller CMAE (better fit). A greater match ratio value indicates better distinguishing ability. The match ratios are larger for proton data [2.4-4.0 (av = 3.2)] than for carbon [1.1-2.3 (av = 1.6)], indicating that the former provide a better basis for discriminating these diastereomers.

  11. Characterization of the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of RNase A using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Robustelli, Paul; De Simone, Alfonso; Cavalli, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-07

    Following the recognition that NMR chemical shifts can be used for protein structure determination, rapid advances have recently been made in methods for extending this strategy for proteins and protein complexes of increasing size and complexity. A remaining major challenge is to develop approaches to exploit the information contained in the chemical shifts about conformational fluctuations in native states of proteins. In this work we show that it is possible to determine an ensemble of conformations representing the free energy surface of RNase A using chemical shifts as replica-averaged restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of this surface indicates that chemical shifts can be used to characterize the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of this protein. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Molecular basis sets - a general similarity-based approach for representing chemical spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Akshay S; Maggiora, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    A new method, based on generalized Fourier analysis, is described that utilizes the concept of "molecular basis sets" to represent chemical space within an abstract vector space. The basis vectors in this space are abstract molecular vectors. Inner products among the basis vectors are determined using an ansatz that associates molecular similarities between pairs of molecules with their corresponding inner products. Moreover, the fact that similarities between pairs of molecules are, in essentially all cases, nonzero implies that the abstract molecular basis vectors are nonorthogonal, but since the similarity of a molecule with itself is unity, the molecular vectors are normalized to unity. A symmetric orthogonalization procedure, which optimally preserves the character of the original set of molecular basis vectors, is used to construct appropriate orthonormal basis sets. Molecules can then be represented, in general, by sets of orthonormal "molecule-like" basis vectors within a proper Euclidean vector space. However, the dimension of the space can become quite large. Thus, the work presented here assesses the effect of basis set size on a number of properties including the average squared error and average norm of molecular vectors represented in the space-the results clearly show the expected reduction in average squared error and increase in average norm as the basis set size is increased. Several distance-based statistics are also considered. These include the distribution of distances and their differences with respect to basis sets of differing size and several comparative distance measures such as Spearman rank correlation and Kruscal stress. All of the measures show that, even though the dimension can be high, the chemical spaces they represent, nonetheless, behave in a well-controlled and reasonable manner. Other abstract vector spaces analogous to that described here can also be constructed providing that the appropriate inner products can be directly

  13. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsching, Keith J.; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ( 13 C– 13 C, 15 N– 13 C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 13 C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ∼94 % of the 13 C NMR data and almost all 15 N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the 13 C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a

  14. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsching, Keith J., E-mail: kfritzsc@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Hong, Mei [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus, E-mail: srohr@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ({sup 13}C–{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 {sup 13}C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ∼94 % of the {sup 13}C NMR data and almost all {sup 15}N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the {sup 13}C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra

  15. Elucidation of the substitution pattern of 9,10-anthraquinones through the chemical shifts of peri-hydroxyl protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schripsema, Jan; Danigno, Denise

    1996-01-01

    In 9,10-anthraquinones the chemical shift of a peri-hydroxyl proton is affected by the substituents in the other benzenoid ring. These effects are additive. They are useful for the determination of substitution patterns and have been used to revise the structures of six previously reported...... anthraquinones containing methoxyl, hydroxyl, methylenedioxy and beta-methyl substituents. Because the chemical shifts of the other protons are hardly affected by substitutions in the other ring, the characteristic chemical shifts for a wide variety of substitution patterns could be derived....

  16. Low-carbon Scenarios Development for Modal Shift in the Chemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocicka Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain managers have to deal with the performance requirement to significantly reduce CO2 emissions in searching for excellence in green business processes management. The purpose of this article is to examine the perspectives on low-carbon scenarios development for modal shift in the chemical industry. The author outlines main research findings from the Interreg Central Europe ChemMultimodal project realised by 14 partners from 7 countries, among others by Department of Logistics at Warsaw School of Economics in Poland. The project idea is focused on analysing the potential and growth opportunities for multimodal transport usage in chemical supply chain management. Firstly, the objectives, current status and methodology of the project are explained. Then, the results of the research carried out among chemical and logistics companies operating in Poland are discussed. Furthermore, there is recognised that transport modal shift decisions determine changes in supply chain configurations that might be supported by planning and management tools. Consequently, the elements of the ChemMultimodal toolbox are outlined and its potential significance for low-carbon scenarios development is highlighted. As a result, both theoretical and practical implications of the research findings are indicated.

  17. SPARTA+: a modest improvement in empirical NMR chemical shift prediction by means of an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    NMR chemical shifts provide important local structural information for proteins and are key in recently described protein structure generation protocols. We describe a new chemical shift prediction program, SPARTA+, which is based on artificial neural networking. The neural network is trained on a large carefully pruned database, containing 580 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray structures and nearly complete backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts are available. The neural network is trained to establish quantitative relations between chemical shifts and protein structures, including backbone and side-chain conformation, H-bonding, electric fields and ring-current effects. The trained neural network yields rapid chemical shift prediction for backbone and 13 C β atoms, with standard deviations of 2.45, 1.09, 0.94, 1.14, 0.25 and 0.49 ppm for δ 15 N, δ 13 C', δ 13 C α , δ 13 C β , δ 1 H α and δ 1 H N , respectively, between the SPARTA+ predicted and experimental shifts for a set of eleven validation proteins. These results represent a modest but consistent improvement (2-10%) over the best programs available to date, and appear to be approaching the limit at which empirical approaches can predict chemical shifts.

  18. Thymic hyperplasia and thymus gland tumors: differentiation with chemical shift MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Koji; Mineta, Masayuki; Yamada, Tomonori; Shuke, Noriyuki; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Nagasawa, Kenichi; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Aburano, Tamio

    2007-06-01

    To prospectively evaluate chemical shift magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for differentiating thymic hyperplasia from tumors of the thymus gland. The institutional review board approved this study; informed consent was obtained and patient confidentiality was protected. The authors assessed 41 patients (17 male, 24 female; age range, 16-78 years) in whom thymic lesions were seen at chest computed tomography. Patients were assigned to a hyperplasia group (n=23) (18 patients with hyperplastic thymus associated with Graves disease and five with rebound thymic hyperplasia) and a tumor group (n=18) (seven patients with thymomas, four with invasive thymomas, five with thymic cancers, and two with malignant lymphomas). T2-weighted fast spin-echo and T1-weighted in-phase and opposed-phase MR images were obtained in all patients and visually assessed. A chemical shift ratio (CSR), determined by comparing the signal intensity of the thymus gland with that of the paraspinal muscle, was calculated for quantitative analysis. Mean CSRs for the patient groups and subgroups were analyzed by using Welch t and Newman-Keuls tests. Pthymus gland had homogeneous signal intensity in all 23 patients in the hyperplasia group and in 12 of the 18 patients in the tumor group. The mean CSR (+/- standard deviation) was 0.614 +/- 0.130 in the hyperplasia group and 1.026 +/- 0.039 in the tumor group. Mean CSRs in the patients with a hyperplastic thymus and Graves disease, rebound thymic hyperplasia, thymoma, invasive thymoma, thymic cancer, and malignant lymphoma were 0.594 +/- 0.120, 0.688 +/- 0.154, 1.033 +/- 0.043, 1.036 +/- 0.040, 1.020 +/- 0.044, and 0.997 +/- 0.010, respectively. The difference in CSR between the hyperplasia and tumor groups was significant (Pthymus gland signal intensity at chemical shift MR imaging; no tumor group patients had a decrease in thymus gland signal intensity. Chemical shift MR imaging can be used to differentiate thymic hyperplasia from thymic tumors. (c) RSNA

  19. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  20. Simulations of Xe-129 NMR chemical shift of atomic xenon dissolved in liquid benzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, P.; Marek, R.; Horníček, Jan; Bouř, Petr; Straka, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 129, 3/5 (2011), s. 677-684 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/2037; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200550902; European Reintegration Grant(XE) 230955; European Community(XE) 205872 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Xe-129 NMR chemical shift * dynamical averaging * density functional theory * Breit-Pauli perturbation theory * relativistic effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.162, year: 2011

  1. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Görling

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored.

  2. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance Chemical shifts are the most fundamental parameters measured in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Since these parameters are exquisitely sensitive to the local atomic environment, they can provide detailed information about the three-dimensional structures of proteins. It has...... recently been shown that using such information directly as input in molecular simulations based on the molecular fragment replacement strategy can help the process of protein structure determination. Here, we show how to implement this strategy to determine not only the structures of proteins but also...

  3. Relativistic heavy atom effect on13C NMR chemical shifts initiated by adjacent multiple chalcogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, Yu Yu; Rusakova, I L

    2018-02-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the cumulative peculiarity of the "heavy atom on light atom" effect on the 13 C NMR chemical shifts, initiated by the adjacent chalcogens. For this purpose, the most accurate hybrid computational scheme for the calculation of chemical shifts of carbon nuclei, directly bonded with several heavy chalcogens, is introduced and attested on the representative series of molecules. The best hybrid scheme combines the nonrelativistic coupled cluster-based approach with the different types of corrections, including vibrational, solvent, and relativistic. The dependences of the total relativistic corrections to carbon shielding constants in 2 series of model compounds, namely, X═ 13 C═Y (X, Y = O, S, Se, Te) and C(XH) m (YH) n (ZH) p (QH) s H 1-m H 1-n H 1-p H 1-s (X, Y, Z, Q = S, Se, Te and m, n, p, s = 0, 1), on the total atomic number of the adjacent chalcogens have been obtained. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Chemical shift assignments of CHU_1110: an AHSA1-like protein from Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunjie; He, Ting; Li, Tao; Yang, Yunhuang; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Maili

    2018-04-01

    AHSA1 protein family is one of the four largest families in the Bet v1-like protein superfamily. The functions and structures of proteins in AHSA1 family are still largely unknown. CHU_1110 with 167 amino acids and a molecular weight of 19.2 kDa is a member of the AHSA1 family from Cytophaga hutchinsonii, a soil bacterium known for its ability to digest crystalline cellulose. Here we report the complete 1 H, 13 C and 15 N chemical shift assignments of CHU_1110. The secondary structural elements of CGL2373 are consistent with the canonical AHSA1 structure. However the sequence identity of CHU_1110 with other members of AHSA1 family with functional and structural reports, such as RHE_CH02687 from Rhizobium etli, Aha1 from Homo sapiens and Yndb from Bacillus subtilis, are very low, which may suggest a different function of CHU_1110. Our chemical shift assignments of CHU_1110 are essential for the following structural and functional research of CHU_1110.

  5. Chemical constituents of Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. from Amazon forest: 1H and 13C chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facundo, Valdir A.; Morais, Selene M.; Braz Filho, Raimundo

    2004-01-01

    In an ethanolic extract of leaves of Ottonia corcovadensis (Piperaceae) were identified sixteen terpenoids of essential oil and the three flavonoids 3',4',5,5',7-penta methoxyflavone (1), 3',4',5,7-tetra methoxyflavone (2) and 5-hydroxy-3',4',5',7-tetra methoxyflavone (3) and cafeic acid (4). Two amides (5 and 6) were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the roots. The structures were established by spectral analysis, meanly NMR (1D and 2D) and mass spectra. Extensive NMR analysis was also used to complete 1 H and 13 C chemical shift assignments of the flavonoids and amides. The components of the essential oil were identified by computer library search, retention indices and visual interpretation of mass spectra. (author)

  6. Windowless dipolar recoupling: the detection of weak dipolar couplings between spin 1/2 nuclei with large chemical shift anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D. M.; Mitchell, D. J.; Stringer, J. A.; Kiihne, S.; Shiels, J. C.; Callahan, J.; Mehta, M. A.; Drobny, G. P.

    1995-12-01

    A new homonuclear dipolar recoupling technique is described which uses a sequence of phase-shifted, windowless irradiations applied synchronously with sample spinning. Experiments performed on a series of doubly labeled dicarboxylic acids, alanine-1,3- 13C 2, and 2'-deoxythymidine-4,6- 13C 2 demonstrate that this new windowless dipolar recoupling pulse sequence can accurately determine internuclear distances from polycrystalline solids in cases where the coupled spins have large chemical shift anisotropies and large differences in isotropic chemical shift.

  7. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamura, Naoka, E-mail: NAGAMURA.Naoka@nims.go.jp; Kitada, Yuta; Honma, Itaru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Horiba, Koji [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Oshima, Masaharu [Synchrotron Radiation Research Organization, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-06-22

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO{sub 2} (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying −30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  8. Chemical potential shift in organic field-effect transistors identified by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamura, Naoka; Kitada, Yuta; Tsurumi, Junto; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Horiba, Koji; Honma, Itaru; Takeya, Jun; Oshima, Masaharu

    2015-06-01

    A chemical potential shift in an organic field effect transistor (OFET) during operation has been revealed by soft X-ray operando nano-spectroscopy analysis performed using a three-dimensional nanoscale electron-spectroscopy chemical analysis system. OFETs were fabricated using ultrathin (3 ML or 12 nm) single-crystalline C10-DNBDT-NW films on SiO2 (200 nm)/Si substrates with a backgate electrode and top source/drain Au electrodes, and C 1s line profiles under biasing at the backgate and drain electrodes were measured. When applying -30 V to the backgate, there is C 1s core level shift of 0.1 eV; this shift can be attributed to a chemical potential shift corresponding to band bending by the field effect, resulting in p-type doping.

  9. Using multiple criteria for fingerprinting unknown oil samples having very similar chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Fingas, M.F.; Sigouin, L.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in which 3 mystery oil samples from Quebec were fingerprinted using a multi-criterion approach. The three objectives of the study were to determine the nature and the type of product, to obtain the detailed hydrocarbon composition of the samples, and to determine if the samples came from the same source. The product type was first determined by identifying the hydrocarbon distribution patterns. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) profiles were then compared and then the conclusions were verified by quantifying biomarkers and by determining several diagnostic ratios of source-specific marker compounds. Additives in the oil were also identified. The samples were analyzed using gas chromatography combined with flame ionization detection (GC-FID), and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It was determined that the 3 oils were probably hydraulic-fluid type oil. They were very pure, and composed mostly of saturated hydrocarbons with the total aromatics being 4 to 10 per cent of the total petroleum hydrocarbon. Although it was determined that the oils were mixtures of 2 different hydraulic fluids, there was no clear indication if they had been weathered. The PAH concentration was very low, while the biomarker concentration was very high. Three unknown compounds (antioxidants) were positively identified. Two of the samples came from the same source. One of the samples had similar group hydrocarbon composition but it was not identical in chemical composition and did not come from the same source. 34 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  10. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  11. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  12. Chemical shift assignments of the partially deuterated Fyn SH2-SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieken, Fabien; Loth, Karine; van Nuland, Nico; Tompa, Peter; Lenaerts, Tom

    2018-04-01

    Src Homology 2 and 3 (SH2 and SH3) are two key protein interaction modules involved in regulating the activity of many proteins such as tyrosine kinases and phosphatases by respective recognition of phosphotyrosine and proline-rich regions. In the Src family kinases, the inactive state of the protein is the direct result of the interaction of the SH2 and the SH3 domain with intra-molecular regions, leading to a closed structure incompetent with substrate modification. Here, we report the 1 H, 15 N and 13 C backbone- and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the partially deuterated Fyn SH3-SH2 domain and structural differences between tandem and single domains. The BMRB accession number is 27165.

  13. Improvement of chemical shift selective saturation (CHESS) pulse for MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Sashie, Hiroyuki; Hiraga, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We improved the fat suppression technique based on chemical shift selective saturation (CHESS). To do this, we shortened the duration of the CHESS pulse to achieve a short repetition time (TR) for MR angiography (MRA). A short-duration CHESS pulse causes broad frequency band saturation, creating extensive offset from the resonance frequency of water. In our phantom experiment, the best parameters of the short-duration CHESS pulse were 3.84 ms in duration, -650 Hz in offset frequency from water resonance, and had a 130-degree flip angle. With this technique, MRA will be able to be carried out without a significant increase in TR. Thus, better vessel contrast will be maintained in time-of-flight (TOF) MRA or contrast-enhanced MRA when using the maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. (author)

  14. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Clinical application of 1H-chemical-shift imaging (CSI) to brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Furuya, Seiichi; Ide, Mariko

    1992-01-01

    An H-1 chemical shift imaging (CSI) was developed as part of the clinical MRI system, by which magnetic resonance spectra (MRS) can be obtained from multiple small voxels and metabolite distribution in the brain can be visualized. The present study was to determine the feasibility and clinical potential of using an H-1 CSI. The device used was a Magnetom H 15 apparatus. The study population was comprised of 25 healthy subjects, 20 patients with brain tumor, 4 with ischemic disease, and 6 with miscellaneous degenerative disease. The H-1 CSI was obtained by the 3-dimensional Fourier transformation. After suppressing the lipid signal by the inversion-recovery method and the water signal by the chemical-shift selective pulse with a following dephasing gradient, 2-directional 16 x 16 phase encodings were applied to the 16 x 16∼18 x 18 cm field of view, in which a 8 x 8 x 2∼10 x 10 x 2 cm area was selected by the stimulated echo or spin-echo method. The metabolite mapping and its contour mapping were created by using the curve-fitted area, with interpolation to the 256 x 256 matrix. In the healthy group, high resolution spectra for N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, choline (Cho), and glutamine/glutamate were obtained from each voxel; and metabolite mapping and contour mapping also clearly showed metabolite distribution in the brain. In the group of brain tumor, an increased Cho and lactate and loss of NAA were observed, along with heterogeneity within the tumor and changes in the surrounding tissue; and there was a good correlation between lactate peak and tumor malignancy. The group of ischemic and degenerative disease had a decreased NAA and increased lactate on both spectra and metabolite mapping, depending on disease stage. These findings indicated that H-1 CSI is helpful for detecting spectra over the whole brain, as well as for determining metabolite distribution. (N.K.)

  16. Chemical shifts as a novel measure of interactions between two binding sites of symmetric dialkyldimethylammonium bromides to {alpha}-cyclodextrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funasaki, Noriaki [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 21st Century COE Program, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan)]. E-mail: funasaki@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp; Ishikawa, Seiji [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 21st Century COE Program, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Hirota, Shun [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 21st Century COE Program, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2006-01-12

    Complex formation of {alpha}-cyclodextrin ({alpha}-CD) with decyltrimethylammonium (DeTAB), N,N-dioctyldimethylammonium (DOAB), and N,N-didecyldimethylammonium bromides (DDeAB) was investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of chemical shifts yielded macroscopic 1:1 and 1:2 binding constants (K {sub 1} and K {sub 2}) and chemical shift differences ({delta}{delta} {sub SD} and {delta}{delta} {sub SD2}) for the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of DeTAB, DOAB, and DDeAB with {alpha}-CD. The K {sub 1} and K {sub 2} values of DDeAB were quantitatively explained on the basis of the assumption that the microscopic 1:1 binding constant of DDeAB is identical to the observed K {sub 1} value of DeTAB. The K {sub 2} value of DDeAB was also explained in terms of its observed K {sub 1} value and the independent binding of two alkyl chains. Furthermore, the {delta}{delta} {sub SD} and {delta}{delta} {sub SD2} values for protons of DDeAB and {alpha}-CD were quantitatively explained on the basis of the assumption that the geometry of the decyl group of DDeAB in an {alpha}-CD cavity is identical to that of DeTAB. The {delta}{delta} {sub SD} value was also explicable on the basis of the same geometric assumption and the observed {delta}{delta} {sub SD2} value for this system. Similar results were obtained for the 1:1 and 1:2 DOAB-{alpha}-CD complexes.

  17. Spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Xiaoyan; Tian, Fang; Huang, Yuqing; Chen, Zhong; Fu, Riqiang

    2018-02-01

    The feasibility of using the spin-echo based diagonal peak suppression method in solid-state MAS NMR homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments is demonstrated. A complete phase cycling is designed in such a way that in the indirect dimension only the spin diffused signals are evolved, while all signals not involved in polarization transfer are refocused for cancellation. A data processing procedure is further introduced to reconstruct this acquired spectrum into a conventional two-dimensional homonuclear chemical shift correlation spectrum. A uniformly 13C, 15N labeled Fmoc-valine sample and the transmembrane domain of a human protein, LR11 (sorLA), in native Escherichia coli membranes have been used to illustrate the capability of the proposed method in comparison with standard 13C-13C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  18. Quantum-Chemical Approach to NMR Chemical Shifts in Paramagnetic Solids Applied to LiFePO4and LiCoPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Arobendo; Kaupp, Martin

    2018-03-09

    A novel protocol to compute and analyze NMR chemical shifts for extended paramagnetic solids, accounting comprehensively for Fermi-contact (FC), pseudocontact (PC), and orbital shifts, is reported and applied to the important lithium ion battery cathode materials LiFePO 4 and LiCoPO 4 . Using an EPR-parameter-based ansatz, the approach combines periodic (hybrid) DFT computation of hyperfine and orbital-shielding tensors with an incremental cluster model for g- and zero-field-splitting (ZFS) D-tensors. The cluster model allows the use of advanced multireference wave function methods (such as CASSCF or NEVPT2). Application of this protocol shows that the 7 Li shifts in the high-voltage cathode material LiCoPO 4 are dominated by spin-orbit-induced PC contributions, in contrast with previous assumptions, fundamentally changing interpretations of the shifts in terms of covalency. PC contributions are smaller for the 7 Li shifts of the related LiFePO 4 , where FC and orbital shifts dominate. The 31 P shifts of both materials finally are almost pure FC shifts. Nevertheless, large ZFS contributions can give rise to non-Curie temperature dependences for both 7 Li and 31 P shifts.

  19. Shifts in Plant Chemical Defenses of Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. Due to Domestication in Mesoamerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose de Jesus Luna-Ruiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose that comparisons of wild and domesticated Capsicum species can serve as a model system for elucidating how crop domestication influences biotic and abiotic interactions mediated by plant chemical defenses. Perhaps no set of secondary metabolites (SMs used for plant defenses and human health have been better studied in the wild and in milpa agro-habitats than those found in Capsicum species. However, very few scientific studies on SM variation have been conducted in both the domesticated landraces of chile peppers and in their wild relatives in the Neotropics. In particular, capsaicinoids in Capsicum fruits and on their seeds differ in the specificity of their ecological effects from broad-spectrum toxins in other members of the Solanaceae. They do so in a manner that mediates specific ecological interactions with a variety of sympatric Neotropical vertebrates, invertebrates, nurse plants and microbes. Specifically, capsaicin is a secondary metabolite (SM in the placental tissues of the chile fruit that mediates interactions with seed dispersers such as birds, and with seed predators, ranging from fungi to insects and rodents. As with other Solanaceae, a wide range of SMs in Capsicum spp. function to ecologically mediate the effects of a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses on wild chile peppers in certain tropical and subtropical habitats. However, species in the genus Capsicum are the only ones found within any solanaceous genus that utilize capsaicinoids as their primary means of chemical defense. We demonstrate how exploring in tandem the evolutionary ecology and the ethnobotany of human-chile interactions can generate and test novel hypotheses with regard to how the domestication process shifts plant chemical defense strategies in a variety of tropical crops. To do so, we draw upon recent advances regarding the chemical ecology of a number of wild Capsicum species found in the Neotropics. We articulate three hypotheses regarding

  20. Contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the 31P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single 31 P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular 31 P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied) it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference is the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved

  1. Distance phenomena in high-dimensional chemical descriptor spaces: consequences for similarity-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Matthias; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-11-15

    Measuring the (dis)similarity of molecules is important for many cheminformatics applications like compound ranking, clustering, and property prediction. In this work, we focus on real-valued vector representations of molecules (as opposed to the binary spaces of fingerprints). We demonstrate the influence which the choice of (dis)similarity measure can have on results, and provide recommendations for such choices. We review the mathematical concepts used to measure (dis)similarity in vector spaces, namely norms, metrics, inner products, and, similarity coefficients, as well as the relationships between them, employing (dis)similarity measures commonly used in cheminformatics as examples. We present several phenomena (empty space phenomenon, sphere volume related phenomena, distance concentration) in high-dimensional descriptor spaces which are not encountered in two and three dimensions. These phenomena are theoretically characterized and illustrated on both artificial and real (bioactivity) data. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Similarity between the mechanisms of soft-laser radiation and chemical adaptogen action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pavlova, Rimma N.; Murzin, Alexander G.; Boiko, Vladimir A.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Soms, Leonid N.

    1993-07-01

    The comparative studies of SLR effects vs chemical adaptogens effects on animals poisoned by industrial poisons and SLR as compared to traditional radio-protectors effects on gamma- irradiated animals were carried out. Obtained results show the stressed adaptogenous effect of SLR.

  3. Towards predictive resistance models for agrochemicals by combining chemical and protein similarity via proteochemometric modelling

    OpenAIRE

    van Westen, Gerard J. P.; Bender, Andreas; Overington, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem in agriculture. Despite practices such as phased use and cycling of ‘orthogonally resistant’ agents, resistance remains a major risk to national and global food security. To combat this problem, there is a need for both new approaches for pesticide design, as well as for novel chemical entities themselves. As summarized in this opinion article, a technique termed ‘proteochemometric modelling’ (PCM), from the field of chemoinformatics, could ai...

  4. Shifts in controls on the temporal coherence of throughfall chemical flux in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Webster, Katherine E.; Loftin, Cynthia S.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Major ion and mercury (Hg) inputs to terrestrial ecosystems include both wet and dry deposition (total deposition). Estimating total deposition to sensitive receptor sites is hampered by limited information regarding its spatial heterogeneity and seasonality. We used measurements of throughfall flux, which includes atmospheric inputs to forests and the net effects of canopy leaching or uptake, for ten major ions and Hg collected during 35 time periods in 1999–2005 at over 70 sites within Acadia National Park, Maine to (1) quantify coherence in temporal dynamics of seasonal throughfall deposition and (2) examine controls on these patterns at multiple scales. We quantified temporal coherence as the correlation between all possible site pairs for each solute on a seasonal basis. In the summer growing season and autumn, coherence among pairs of sites with similar vegetation was stronger than for site-pairs that differed in vegetation suggesting that interaction with the canopy and leaching of solutes differed in coniferous, deciduous, mixed, and shrub or open canopy sites. The spatial pattern in throughfall hydrologic inputs across Acadia National Park was more variable during the winter snow season, suggesting that snow re-distribution affects net hydrologic input, which consequently affects chemical flux. Sea-salt corrected calcium concentrations identified a shift in air mass sources from maritime in winter to the continental industrial corridor in summer. Our results suggest that the spatial pattern of throughfall hydrologic flux, dominant seasonal air mass source, and relationship with vegetation in winter differ from the spatial pattern of throughfall flux in these solutes in summer and autumn. The coherence approach applied here made clear the strong influence of spatial heterogeneity in throughfall hydrologic inputs and a maritime air mass source on winter patterns of throughfall flux. By contrast, vegetation type was the most important influence on

  5. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  6. Changes of brain metabolite concentrations during maturation in different brain regions measured by chemical shift imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueltmann, Eva; Lanfermann, Heinrich [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Naegele, Thomas [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Radiological University Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Klose, Uwe [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental MR of the CNS, Department of Neuroradiology, Radiological University Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    We examined the effect of maturation on the regional distribution of brain metabolite concentrations using multivoxel chemical shift imaging. From our pool of pediatric MRI examinations, we retrospectively selected patients showing a normal cerebral MRI scan or no pathologic signal abnormalities at the level of the two-dimensional 1H MRS-CSI sequence and an age-appropriate global neurological development, except for focal neurological deficits. Seventy-one patients (4.5 months-20 years) were identified. Using LC Model, spectra were evaluated from voxels in the white matter, caudate head, and corpus callosum. The concentration of total N-acetylaspartate increased in all regions during infancy and childhood except in the right caudate head where it remained constant. The concentration of total creatine decreased in the caudate nucleus and splenium and minimally in the frontal white matter and genu. It remained largely constant in the parietal white matter. The concentration of choline-containing compounds had the tendency to decrease in all regions except in the parietal white matter where it remained constant. The concentration of myoinositol decreased slightly in the splenium and right frontal white matter, remained constant on the left side and in the caudate nucleus, and rose slightly in the parietal white matter and genu. CSI determined metabolite concentrations in multiple cerebral regions during routine MRI. The obtained data will be helpful in future pediatric CSI measurements deciding whether the ratios of the main metabolites are within the range of normal values or have to be considered as probably pathologic. (orig.)

  7. Changes of brain metabolite concentrations during maturation in different brain regions measured by chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueltmann, Eva; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Naegele, Thomas; Klose, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of maturation on the regional distribution of brain metabolite concentrations using multivoxel chemical shift imaging. From our pool of pediatric MRI examinations, we retrospectively selected patients showing a normal cerebral MRI scan or no pathologic signal abnormalities at the level of the two-dimensional 1H MRS-CSI sequence and an age-appropriate global neurological development, except for focal neurological deficits. Seventy-one patients (4.5 months-20 years) were identified. Using LC Model, spectra were evaluated from voxels in the white matter, caudate head, and corpus callosum. The concentration of total N-acetylaspartate increased in all regions during infancy and childhood except in the right caudate head where it remained constant. The concentration of total creatine decreased in the caudate nucleus and splenium and minimally in the frontal white matter and genu. It remained largely constant in the parietal white matter. The concentration of choline-containing compounds had the tendency to decrease in all regions except in the parietal white matter where it remained constant. The concentration of myoinositol decreased slightly in the splenium and right frontal white matter, remained constant on the left side and in the caudate nucleus, and rose slightly in the parietal white matter and genu. CSI determined metabolite concentrations in multiple cerebral regions during routine MRI. The obtained data will be helpful in future pediatric CSI measurements deciding whether the ratios of the main metabolites are within the range of normal values or have to be considered as probably pathologic. (orig.)

  8. Utilization of chemical shift MRI in the diagnosis of disorders affecting pediatric bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfeld, Matthew; Ahlawat, Shivani; Safdar, Nabile

    2016-01-01

    MRI signal intensity of pediatric bone marrow can be difficult to interpret using conventional methods. Chemical shift imaging (CSI), which can quantitatively assess relative fat content, may improve the ability to accurately diagnose bone marrow abnormalities in children. Consecutive pelvis and extremity MRI at a children's hospital over three months were retrospectively reviewed for inclusion of CSI. Medical records were reviewed for final pathological and/or clinical diagnosis. Cases were classified as normal or abnormal, and if abnormal, subclassified as marrow-replacing or non-marrow-replacing entities. Regions of interest (ROI) were then drawn on corresponding in and out-of-phase sequences over the marrow abnormality or over a metaphysis and epiphysis in normal studies. Relative signal intensity ratio for each case was then calculated to determine the degree of fat content in the ROI. In all, 241 MRI were reviewed and 105 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 61 had normal marrow, 37 had non-marrow-replacing entities (osteomyelitis without abscess n = 17, trauma n = 9, bone infarction n = 8, inflammatory arthropathy n = 3), and 7 had marrow-replacing entities (malignant neoplasm n = 4, bone cyst n = 1, fibrous dysplasia n = 1, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis n = 1). RSIR averages were: normal metaphyseal marrow 0.442 (0.352-0.533), normal epiphyseal marrow 0.632 (0.566-698), non-marrow-replacing diagnoses 0.715 (0.630-0.799), and marrow-replacing diagnoses 1.06 (0.867-1.26). RSIR for marrow-replacing entities proved significantly different from all other groups (p < 0.05). ROC analysis demonstrated an AUC of 0.89 for RSIR in distinguishing marrow-replacing entities. CSI techniques can help to differentiate pathologic processes that replace marrow in children from those that do not. (orig.)

  9. Towards predictive resistance models for agrochemicals by combining chemical and protein similarity via proteochemometric modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westen, Gerard J P; Bender, Andreas; Overington, John P

    2014-10-01

    Resistance to pesticides is an increasing problem in agriculture. Despite practices such as phased use and cycling of 'orthogonally resistant' agents, resistance remains a major risk to national and global food security. To combat this problem, there is a need for both new approaches for pesticide design, as well as for novel chemical entities themselves. As summarized in this opinion article, a technique termed 'proteochemometric modelling' (PCM), from the field of chemoinformatics, could aid in the quantification and prediction of resistance that acts via point mutations in the target proteins of an agent. The technique combines information from both the chemical and biological domain to generate bioactivity models across large numbers of ligands as well as protein targets. PCM has previously been validated in prospective, experimental work in the medicinal chemistry area, and it draws on the growing amount of bioactivity information available in the public domain. Here, two potential applications of proteochemometric modelling to agrochemical data are described, based on previously published examples from the medicinal chemistry literature.

  10. Two chemically similar stellar overdensities on opposite sides of the plane of the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Maria; Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Serenelli, Aldo M.; Sheffield, Allyson; Li, Ting S.; Casagrande, Luca; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Laporte, Chervin F. P.; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Schönrich, Ralph; Gould, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Our Galaxy is thought to have an active evolutionary history, dominated over the past ten billion years or so by star formation, the accretion of cold gas and, in particular, the merging of clumps of baryonic and dark matter. The stellar halo—the faint, roughly spherical component of the Galaxy—reveals rich ‘fossil’ evidence of these interactions, in the form of stellar streams, substructures and chemically distinct stellar components. The effects of interactions with dwarf galaxies on the content and morphology of the Galactic disk are still being explored. Recent studies have identified kinematically distinct stellar substructures and moving groups of stars in our Galaxy, which may have extragalactic origins. There is also mounting evidence that stellar overdensities (regions with greater-than-average stellar density) at the interface between the outer disk and the halo could have been caused by the interaction of a dwarf galaxy with the disk. Here we report a spectroscopic analysis of 14 stars from two stellar overdensities, each lying about five kiloparsecs above or below the Galactic plane—locations suggestive of an association with the stellar halo. We find that the chemical compositions of these two groups of stars are almost identical, both within and between these overdensities, and closely match the abundance patterns of stars in the Galactic disk. We conclude that these stars came from the disk, and that the overdensities that they are part of were created by tidal interactions of the disk with passing or merging dwarf galaxies.

  11. New chemical determinations of zinc in basalts, and rocks of similar composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, L.F.; Swadley, W.C.; Huffman, C.; Lipp, H.H.

    1963-01-01

    New determinations of zinc in 124 basalts by the chemical method described (Huff-Man et al. 1963) are reported. Average zinc values, in per cent, for basalts from diverse regions are as follows: Idaho, 28 samples, 0.013; Hawaii, 33 samples, 0.010; Connecticut, 27 samples, 0.0090; Oregon, 17 samples, 0.0081; California, 8 samples, 0.0071; and New Mexico, 11 samples, 0.0086; average, all samples, 0.0099 per cent zinc. A plot of differentiation indicator ratios calculated from the conventional rock analyses, CaO/(Na2O + K2O) as the ordinate and SiO2/MgO as the abscissa, was used to select, from different localities, samples essentially the same in chemical composition that were to be used for comparisons of zinc and other minor elements. Zinc correlates with MnO and with total iron as FeO. An inverse relationship found for zinc and manganese is related to the total iron content of the basalts. Thus for a given iron concentration as zinc increases, manganese decreases and vice versa. Ratios of zinc, the common denominator, to 11 other minor elements determined spectro-graphically show correlations with cobalt, gallium, scandium, yttrium, and zirconium. ?? 1963.

  12. Two chemically similar stellar overdensities on opposite sides of the plane of the Galactic disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Maria; Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G; Serenelli, Aldo M; Sheffield, Allyson; Li, Ting S; Casagrande, Luca; Johnston, Kathryn V; Laporte, Chervin F P; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Schönrich, Ralph; Gould, Andrew

    2018-02-26

    Our Galaxy is thought to have an active evolutionary history, dominated over the past ten billion years or so by star formation, the accretion of cold gas and, in particular, the merging of clumps of baryonic and dark matter. The stellar halo-the faint, roughly spherical component of the Galaxy-reveals rich 'fossil' evidence of these interactions, in the form of stellar streams, substructures and chemically distinct stellar components. The effects of interactions with dwarf galaxies on the content and morphology of the Galactic disk are still being explored. Recent studies have identified kinematically distinct stellar substructures and moving groups of stars in our Galaxy, which may have extragalactic origins. There is also mounting evidence that stellar overdensities (regions with greater-than-average stellar density) at the interface between the outer disk and the halo could have been caused by the interaction of a dwarf galaxy with the disk. Here we report a spectroscopic analysis of 14 stars from two stellar overdensities, each lying about five kiloparsecs above or below the Galactic plane-locations suggestive of an association with the stellar halo. We find that the chemical compositions of these two groups of stars are almost identical, both within and between these overdensities, and closely match the abundance patterns of stars in the Galactic disk. We conclude that these stars came from the disk, and that the overdensities that they are part of were created by tidal interactions of the disk with passing or merging dwarf galaxies.

  13. Relativistic Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom NMR Chemical Shifts: General Trends Across the Periodic Table Explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vícha, Jan; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2018-04-20

    The importance of relativistic effects on the NMR parameters in heavy-atom (HA) compounds, particularly the SO-HALA (Spin-Orbit Heavy Atom on the Light Atom) effect on NMR chemical shifts, has been known for about 40 years. Yet, a general correlation between the electronic-structure and SO-HALA effect have been missing. By analyzing 1H NMR chemical shifts of the 6th-period hydrides (Cs-At) we discovered general electronic-structure principles and mechanisms that dictate the size and sign of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts. In brief, partially occupied HA valence shells induce relativistic shielding at the light atom (LA) nuclei, while empty HA valence shells induce relativistic deshielding. In particular, the LA nucleus is relativistically shielded in 5d2-5d8 and 6p4 HA hydrides and deshielded in 4f0, 5d0, 6s0, 6p0 HA hydrides. This general and intuitive concept explains periodic trends in the 1H NMR chemical shifts along the 6th-period hydrides (Cs-At) studied in this work. We present substantial evidence that the introduced principles have a general validity across the periodic table and can be extended to non-hydride LAs. The decades-old question why compounds with occupied frontier π molecular orbitals (MOs) cause SO-HALA shielding at the LA nuclei, while the frontier σ MOs cause deshielding is answered. We further derive connection between the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts and Spin-Orbit-induced Electron Deformation Density (SO-EDD), a property, which can be obtained easily from differential electron densities and can be represented graphically. SO-EDD provides an intuitive understanding of the SO-HALA effect in terms of the depletion/concentration of the electron density at LA nuclei caused by spin-orbit coupling due to HA in the presence of magnetic field. Using an analogy between SO-EDD concept and arguments from classic NMR theory, the complex question of the SO-HALA NMR chemical shifts becomes easily understandable for a wide chemical audience.

  14. Pressure dependence of side chain 13C chemical shifts in model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck Erlach, Markus; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Munte, Claudia E; Kainosho, Masatsune; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2017-10-01

    For evaluating the pressure responses of folded as well as intrinsically unfolded proteins detectable by NMR spectroscopy the availability of data from well-defined model systems is indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of 13 C chemical shifts of the side chain atoms in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH 2 (Xxx, one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of a number of nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The size of the polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 is dependent on the type of atom and amino acid studied. For H N , N and C α the first order pressure coefficient B 1 is also correlated to the chemical shift at atmospheric pressure. The first and second order pressure coefficients of a given type of carbon atom show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure also are weakly correlated. The downfield shifts of the methyl resonances suggest that gauche conformers of the side chains are not preferred with pressure. The valine and leucine methyl groups in the model peptides were assigned using stereospecifically 13 C enriched amino acids with the pro-R carbons downfield shifted relative to the pro-S carbons.

  15. Vanadium NMR Chemical Shifts of (Imido)vanadium(V) Dichloride Complexes with Imidazolin-2-iminato and Imidazolidin-2-iminato Ligands: Cooperation with Quantum-Chemical Calculations and Multiple Linear Regression Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Yang, Wenhong; Sun, Wen-Hua; Nomura, Kotohiro; Hada, Masahiko

    2017-11-30

    The NMR chemical shifts of vanadium ( 51 V) in (imido)vanadium(V) dichloride complexes with imidazolin-2-iminato and imidazolidin-2-iminato ligands were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method with GIAO. The calculated 51 V NMR chemical shifts were analyzed by the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis (MLRA) method with a series of calculated molecular properties. Some of calculated NMR chemical shifts were incorrect using the optimized molecular geometries of the X-ray structures. After the global minimum geometries of all of the molecules were determined, the trend of the observed chemical shifts was well reproduced by the present DFT method. The MLRA method was performed to investigate the correlation between the 51 V NMR chemical shift and the natural charge, band energy gap, and Wiberg bond index of the V═N bond. The 51 V NMR chemical shifts obtained with the present MLR model were well reproduced with a correlation coefficient of 0.97.

  16. A Systems Biology Approach for Identifying Hepatotoxicant Groups Based on Similarity in Mechanisms of Action and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebels, Dennie G A J; Rasche, Axel; Herwig, Ralf; van Westen, Gerard J P; Jennen, Danyel G J; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2016-01-01

    When evaluating compound similarity, addressing multiple sources of information to reach conclusions about common pharmaceutical and/or toxicological mechanisms of action is a crucial strategy. In this chapter, we describe a systems biology approach that incorporates analyses of hepatotoxicant data for 33 compounds from three different sources: a chemical structure similarity analysis based on the 3D Tanimoto coefficient, a chemical structure-based protein target prediction analysis, and a cross-study/cross-platform meta-analysis of in vitro and in vivo human and rat transcriptomics data derived from public resources (i.e., the diXa data warehouse). Hierarchical clustering of the outcome scores of the separate analyses did not result in a satisfactory grouping of compounds considering their known toxic mechanism as described in literature. However, a combined analysis of multiple data types may hypothetically compensate for missing or unreliable information in any of the single data types. We therefore performed an integrated clustering analysis of all three data sets using the R-based tool iClusterPlus. This indeed improved the grouping results. The compound clusters that were formed by means of iClusterPlus represent groups that show similar gene expression while simultaneously integrating a similarity in structure and protein targets, which corresponds much better with the known mechanism of action of these toxicants. Using an integrative systems biology approach may thus overcome the limitations of the separate analyses when grouping liver toxicants sharing a similar mechanism of toxicity.

  17. Proton Chemical Shift Imaging of the Brain in Pediatric and Adult Developmental Stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Joseph; Dong, Zhengchao; Bansal, Ravi; Ivanov, Iliyan; Hao, Xuejun; Desai, Jay; Pozzi, Elena; Peterson, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition of incompletely understood brain origin. Our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study indicates a possible partial basis of stuttering in circuits enacting self-regulation of motor activity, attention, and emotion. To further characterize the neurophysiology of stuttering through in vivo assay of neurometabolites in suspect brain regions. Proton chemical shift imaging of the brain was performed in a case-control study of children and adults with and without stuttering. Recruitment, assessment, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed in an academic research setting. Ratios of N-acetyl-aspartate plus N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAA) to creatine (Cr) and choline compounds (Cho) to Cr in widespread cerebral cortical, white matter, and subcortical regions were analyzed using region of interest and data-driven voxel-based approaches. Forty-seven children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years (22 with stuttering and 25 without) and 47 adults aged 21 to 51 years (20 with stuttering and 27 without) were recruited between June 2008 and March 2013. The mean (SD) ages of those in the stuttering and control groups were 12.2 (4.2) years and 13.4 (3.2) years, respectively, for the pediatric cohort and 31.4 (7.5) years and 30.5 (9.9) years, respectively, for the adult cohort. Region of interest-based findings included lower group mean NAA:Cr ratio in stuttering than nonstuttering participants in the right inferior frontal cortex (-7.3%; P = .02), inferior frontal white matter (-11.4%; P stuttering sample included higher NAA:Cr and Cho:Cr ratios (regression coefficient, 197.4-275; P stuttering severity (r = 0.40-0.52; P = .001-.02). This spectroscopy study of stuttering demonstrates brainwide neurometabolite alterations, including several regions implicated by other neuroimaging modalities. Prior ascription of a role in stuttering to inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, caudate, and other

  18. Evaluation of vertebral bone marrow fat content by chemical-shift MRI in osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Mutlu, Fatma Senturk; Yazici, Zeynep; Yildirim, Nalan [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    To quantitatively evaluate vertebral bone marrow fat content and investigate its association with osteoporosis with chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI). Fifty-six female patients (age range 50-65 years) with varying bone mineral densities as documented with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were prospectively included in the study. According to the DXA results, the patients were grouped as normal bone density, osteopenic, or osteoporotic. In order to calculate fat content, the lumbar region was visualized in the sagittal plane by CS-MRI sequence. ''Region of interest'' (ROI)s were placed within L3 vertebral bodies and air (our reference point) at different time points by different radiologists. Fat content was calculated through ''signal intensity (SI) suppression rate'' and ''SI Index''. The quantitative values were compared statistically with those obtained from DXA examinations. Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for comparisons between groups. The reliability of the measurements performed by two radiologists was evaluated with the ''intraclass correlation coefficient''. This study was approved by an institutional review board and all participants provided informed consent to participate in the study. Eighteen subjects with normal bone density (mean T score, 0.39 {+-} 1.3 [standard deviation]), 20 subjects with osteopenia (mean T score, -1.79 {+-} 0.38), and 18 subjects with osteoporosis (mean T score, -3 {+-} 0.5) were determined according to DXA results. The median age was 55.9 (age range 50-64 years) in the normal group, 55.5 (age range 50-64 years) in the osteopenic group, and 55.1 (age range 50-65 years) in the osteoporotic group (p = 0.872). In the CS-MRI examination, the values of ''SI suppression ratio'' and ''SI Index'' (median [min:max]) were calculated by the first and second reader, independently. There

  19. Calculation of the NMR chemical shift for a 4d1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry with a threefold axis of quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Woon; Oh, Se Woung; Ro, Seung Woo

    1986-01-01

    The NMR chemical shift arising from 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron angular momentum and 4d electron spin dipolar-nuclear spin angular momentum interactions for a 4d 1 system in a strong crystal field environment of trigonal symmetry, where the threefold axis is chosen to be the axis of quantization axis, has been examined. A general expression using the nonmultipole expansion method (exact method) is derived for the NMR chemical shift. From this expression all the multipolar terms are determined. we observe that along the (100), (010), (110), and (111) axes the NMR chemical shifts are positive while along the (001) axis, it is negative. We observe that the dipolar term (1/R 3 ) is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift except for along the (111) axis. A comparison of the multipolar terms with the exact values shows also that the multipolar results are exactly in agreement with the exact values around R≥0.2 nm. The temperature dependence analysis on the NMR chemical shifts may imply that along the (111) axis the contribution to the NMR chemical shift is dominantly pseudo contact interaction. Separation of the contributions of the Fermi and the pseudo contact interactions would correctly imply that the dipolar interaction is the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shifts along the (100), (010), (001), and (110) axes, but along the (111) axis the Fermi contact interaction is incorrectly the dominant contribution to the NMR chemical shift. (Author)

  20. Backbone chemical shifts assignments, secondary structure, and ligand binding of a family GH-19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Shoko; Nagata, Takuya; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Taira, Toki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2012-10-01

    Family GH19 chitinases have been recognized as important in the plant defense against fungal pathogens. However, their substrate-recognition mechanism is still unknown. We report here the first resonance assignment of NMR spectrum of a GH19 chitinase from moss, Bryum coronatum (BcChi-A). The backbone signals were nearly completely assigned, and the secondary structure was estimated based on the chemical shift values. The addition of the chitin dimer to the enzyme solution perturbed the chemical shifts of HSQC resonances of the amino acid residues forming the putative substrate-binding cleft. Further NMR analysis of the ligand binding to BcChi-A will improve understanding of the substrate-recognition mechanism of GH-19 enzymes.

  1. Studies of 17 0 NMR chemical shift effects of the structural relationships of charge distributions on substituted ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, Katia Z.; Malvestiti, Ivani; Battiste, Merle A.

    1995-01-01

    Oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy data, at natural abundance, in acetonitirle were obtained for a series of methyl alkyl ketones and alkyl-carboxylic acids in order to study substituent induced electronic effects on the carbonyl group. The trend in chemical shifts for the relatively unhindered ketones is a general increase shielding with increasing size of the alkyl group; however an steric chrownding becomes significant marked deshielding is observed and attributed to sterically induced depolarization of the C-O bond. Ionization potentials and net atomic charges for the methyl ketones and carboxylic acids are estimated using the MOPAC program and compared with those for substituted cyclohexanones, bicyclo-[2,2,2]-2-octanones. The 17 O - chemical shifts for some strined bridgehead methyl ketones are estimated from a correlation with 13 C - N.M.R. values for the carbonyl carbon. (author)

  2. New fat suppression method with no pre-saturation pulse. WCHASE (water chemical-shift selective excitation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yu; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Machida, Yoshio; Takai, Hiroshi; Kojima, Fumitoshi

    1998-01-01

    A new fat suppression method with no pre-saturation pulse, water chemical-shift selective excitation (WCHASE), was developed. The characteristic feature of WCHASE is as follows. First, narrowing the frequency bandwidth of the 90deg RF pulse to chemical shift between water and fat signals, about 230 Hz in 1.5 T. Next, the ratio of slice gradient amplitudes for 90deg and 180deg. RF pulses are optimized in order to eliminate fat components from all slices. Prior to the experiment, a brief phase map shimming was performed to adjust B 0 field inhomogeneity using first order gradients. The WCHASE technique was compared with CHESS and conventional spin echo without fat suppression on the brain of healthy volunteers. The experimental results showed better fat suppression effect with WCHASE compared to CHESS. (author)

  3. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Harano, Yoko; Tochio, Naoya; Nakatani, Eiichi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Mading, Steve; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-08-01

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001-2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies.

  4. Development of 19F-NMR chemical shift detection of DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19F-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Yang, H; Hirata, C; Kersaudy, F; Fujimoto, K

    2017-06-28

    Various DNA conformational changes are in correlation with biological events. In particular, DNA B-Z equilibrium showed a high correlation with translation and transcription. In this study, we developed a DNA probe containing 5-trifluoromethylcytidine or 5-trifluoromethylthymidine to detect DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19 F-NMR. Its probe enabled the quantitative detection of B-, Z-, and ss-DNA based on 19 F-NMR chemical shift change.

  5. Towards the versatile DFT and MP2 computational schemes for 31P NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of organophosphorous compounds are examined at the density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. At the DFT level, the best functionals for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts are those of Keal and Tozer, KT2 and KT3. Both at the DFT and MP2 levels, the most reliable basis sets are those of Jensen, pcS-2 or larger, and those of Pople, 6-311G(d,p) or larger. The reliable basis sets of Dunning's family are those of at least penta-zeta quality that precludes their practical consideration. An encouraging finding is that basically, the locally dense basis set approach resulting in a dramatic decrease in computational cost is justified in the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts within the 1-2-ppm error. Relativistic corrections to (31)P NMR absolute shielding constants are of major importance reaching about 20-30 ppm (ca 7%) improving (not worsening!) the agreement of calculation with experiment. Further better agreement with the experiment by 1-2 ppm can be obtained by taking into account solvent effects within the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model solvation scheme. We recommend the GIAO-DFT-KT2/pcS-3//pcS-2 scheme with relativistic corrections and solvent effects taken into account as the most versatile computational scheme for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts characterized by a mean absolute error of ca 9 ppm in the range of 550 ppm. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The observed and calculated 1H and 13C chemical shifts of tertiary amines and their N-oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pohl, Radek; Dračínský, Martin; Slavětínská, Lenka; Buděšínský, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 6 (2011), s. 320-327 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1919 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR * 1H * 13C * in situ oxidation of tertiary amines * calculated chemical shifts * HF * MP2 * DFT Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.437, year: 2011

  7. High SNR Acquisitions Improve the Repeatability of Liver Fat Quantification Using Confounder-corrected Chemical Shift-encoded MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Hernando, Diego; Wiens, Curtis; Bannas, Peter; Reeder, Scott B

    2017-10-10

    To determine whether high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) acquisitions improve the repeatability of liver proton density fat fraction (PDFF) measurements using confounder-corrected chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (CSE-MRI). Eleven fat-water phantoms were scanned with 8 different protocols with varying SNR. After repositioning the phantoms, the same scans were repeated to evaluate the test-retest repeatability. Next, an in vivo study was performed with 20 volunteers and 28 patients scheduled for liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two CSE-MRI protocols with standard- and high-SNR were repeated to assess test-retest repeatability. MR spectroscopy (MRS)-based PDFF was acquired as a standard of reference. The standard deviation (SD) of the difference (Δ) of PDFF measured in the two repeated scans was defined to ascertain repeatability. The correlation between PDFF of CSE-MRI and MRS was calculated to assess accuracy. The SD of Δ and correlation coefficients of the two protocols (standard- and high-SNR) were compared using F-test and t-test, respectively. Two reconstruction algorithms (complex-based and magnitude-based) were used for both the phantom and in vivo experiments. The phantom study demonstrated that higher SNR improved the repeatability for both complex- and magnitude-based reconstruction. Similarly, the in vivo study demonstrated that the repeatability of the high-SNR protocol (SD of Δ = 0.53 for complex- and = 0.85 for magnitude-based fit) was significantly higher than using the standard-SNR protocol (0.77 for complex, P < 0.001; and 0.94 for magnitude-based fit, P = 0.003). No significant difference was observed in the accuracy between standard- and high-SNR protocols. Higher SNR improves the repeatability of fat quantification using confounder-corrected CSE-MRI.

  8. Assessment of whole spine vertebral bone marrow fat using chemical shift-encoding based water-fat MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Thomas; Yap, Samuel P; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Ruschke, Stefan; Eggers, Holger; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J; Bauer, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of bone marrow composition has recently gained significant attention due to its association with bone loss pathophysiology and cancer therapy-induced bone marrow damage. The purpose of our study was to investigate the anatomical variation of the vertebral bone marrow fat using chemical shift-encoding based water-fat MRI and to assess the repeatability of these measurements. Chemical shift-encoding based water-fat MRI of the whole spine was performed in 28 young, healthy subjects (17 males, 11 females, 26 ± 4 years). Six subjects were scanned three times with repositioning to assess the repeatability of these measurements. Proton density fat fraction (PDFF) maps were computed and manually segmented to obtain PDFF of C3-L5. Mean PDFF of all subjects significantly increased from C3 to L5 (P vertebral bone marrow fat could be reproducibly assessed by using chemical shift-encoding based water-fat MRI and showed anatomical variations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  10. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Paradigm Shift: Supply Chain Collaboration and Competition in and between Europe’s Chemical Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N. van Wassenhove (Luk); B. Lebreton (Baptiste); P. Letizia (Paolo)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWith the attention of the chemical industry focused on exploiting the low cost feedstocks in the Middle East and the growth markets of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South East Asia, this report provides a timely reminder to policy makers, chemical companies and logistics service

  12. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Mn and Cr cations in the above compounds.

  13. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  14. Bidirectional shifts of TRPM8 channel gating by temperature and chemical agents modulate the cold sensitivity of mammalian thermoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mälkiä, Annika; Madrid, Rodolfo; Meseguer, Victor; de la Peña, Elvira; Valero, María; Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix

    2007-05-15

    TRPM8, a member of the melastatin subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels, is activated by voltage, low temperatures and cooling compounds. These properties and its restricted expression to small sensory neurons have made it the ion channel with the most advocated role in cold transduction. Recent work suggests that activation of TRPM8 by cold and menthol takes place through shifts in its voltage-activation curve, which cause the channel to open at physiological membrane potentials. By contrast, little is known about the actions of inhibitors on the function of TRPM8. We investigated the chemical and thermal modulation of TRPM8 in transfected HEK293 cells and in cold-sensitive primary sensory neurons. We show that cold-evoked TRPM8 responses are effectively suppressed by inhibitor compounds SKF96365, 4-(3-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (4-tert-butyl-phenyl)-amide (BCTC) and 1,10-phenanthroline. These antagonists exert their effect by shifting the voltage dependence of TRPM8 activation towards more positive potentials. An opposite shift towards more negative potentials is achieved by the agonist menthol. Functionally, the bidirectional shift in channel gating translates into a change in the apparent temperature threshold of TRPM8-expressing cells. Accordingly, in the presence of the antagonist compounds, the apparent response-threshold temperature of TRPM8 is displaced towards colder temperatures, whereas menthol sensitizes the response, shifting the threshold in the opposite direction. Co-application of agonists and antagonists produces predictable cancellation of these effects, suggesting the convergence on a common molecular process. The potential for half maximal activation of TRPM8 activation by cold was approximately 140 mV more negative in native channels compared to recombinant channels, with a much higher open probability at negative membrane potentials in the former. In functional terms, this difference translates

  15. Chemical Shift Artifact on Steady-State MRI Sequences for Detection of Vesical Wall Invasion in Placenta Percreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ishan; Verma, Ashish; Jain, Shivi; Jain, Madhu; Shukla, R C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of the invasiveness of a placenta percreta helps in planning the surgical approach, reducing blood loss and morbidity. Doppler sonography is the mainstay diagnostic modality with a sensitivity of 80-95 %. With the advent of high magnetic field MRI techniques, there has been recent interest in evaluation of placenta by MRI. On an extensive PUBMED search, we could not find any citations describing imaging, ultrasound, or MRI features to evaluate vesical wall invasion by placenta percreta. We attempt to evaluate transmyometrial vesical wall invasion by placenta percreta using chemical shift artifact as a marker of intact bladder-myometrial interface on steady-state MRI sequences. This is a prospective observational study, conducted at a university hospital. We have compiled clinico-radiological criteria for diagnosis of invasive placentae based on the existing body of evidences, in four patients. We further go on to analyze a specific proposed sign on a newly introduced MR imaging sequence i.e., loss of chemical shift artifact (India ink line) on steady-state GRE sequence (TrueFISP), to diagnose transmyometrial vesical invasion in placenta percreta. Though the sample size is small, the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive value of the proposed sign for the purpose was 100 %. Loss of chemical shift artifact (India ink line) on steady-state GRE sequences at the vesico-myometrial junction in case of invasive placentae confirms vesical wall invasion, a prospective diagnoses of which can help in planning the surgical protocol and preventing potentially fatal blood loss.

  16. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A

    2000-01-01

    compared to single voxel methods. In the present study, the optimal voxel size is calculated from segmented human brain data and accompanying field maps. The optimal voxel size is found to be approximately 8 cc, but a wide range of values, 4-64 cc, can be chosen with little increase in estimated......Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations...

  17. Development of a novel fingerprint for chemical reactions and its application to large-scale reaction classification and similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Lowe, Daniel M; Sayle, Roger A; Landrum, Gregory A

    2015-01-26

    Fingerprint methods applied to molecules have proven to be useful for similarity determination and as inputs to machine-learning models. Here, we present the development of a new fingerprint for chemical reactions and validate its usefulness in building machine-learning models and in similarity assessment. Our final fingerprint is constructed as the difference of the atom-pair fingerprints of products and reactants and includes agents via calculated physicochemical properties. We validated the fingerprints on a large data set of reactions text-mined from granted United States patents from the last 40 years that have been classified using a substructure-based expert system. We applied machine learning to build a 50-class predictive model for reaction-type classification that correctly predicts 97% of the reactions in an external test set. Impressive accuracies were also observed when applying the classifier to reactions from an in-house electronic laboratory notebook. The performance of the novel fingerprint for assessing reaction similarity was evaluated by a cluster analysis that recovered 48 out of 50 of the reaction classes with a median F-score of 0.63 for the clusters. The data sets used for training and primary validation as well as all python scripts required to reproduce the analysis are provided in the Supporting Information.

  18. Inhibition of thermolysin by phosphonamidate transition-state analogues: measurement of 31P-15N bond lengths and chemical shifts in two enzyme-inhibitor complexes by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copié, V; Kolbert, A C; Drewry, D H; Bartlett, P A; Oas, T G; Griffin, R G

    1990-10-02

    31P and 15N chemical shifts and 31P-15N bond lengths have been measured with solid-state NMR techniques in two inhibitors of thermolysin, carbobenzoxy-Glyp-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZGpLA) and carbobenzoxy-L-Phep-L-Leu-L-Ala (ZFpLA), both as free lithium salts and when bound to the enzyme. Binding of both inhibitors to thermolysin results in large changes in the 31P chemical shifts. These changes are more dramatic for the tighter binding inhibitor ZFpLA, where a approximately 20 ppm downfield movement of the 31P isotropic chemical shift (sigma iso) is observed. This shift is due to changes in the shift tensor elements sigma 11 and sigma 22, while sigma 33 remains essentially constant. We observed a similar pattern for ZGpLA, but only a approximately 5 ppm change occurs in sigma iso. The changes in the 15N chemical shifts for both inhibitors are small upon binding, amounting to downfield shifts of 2 and 4 ppm for ZGpLA and ZFpLA, respectively. This indicates that there are no changes in the protonation state of the 15N in either the ZFpLA- or the ZGpLA-thermolysin complex. NMR distance measurements yield a P-N bond length rP-N = 1.68 +/- 0.03 A for the tight binding inhibitor ZFpLA both in its free lithium salt form and in its thermolysin-ZFpLA complex, a distance that is much shorter than the 1.90-A distance reported by X-ray crystallography studies [Holden et al. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8542-8553].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Folding of small proteins by Monte Carlo simulations with chemical shift restraints without the use of molecular fragment replacement or structural homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robustelli, Paul; Cavalli, Andrea; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele; Salvatella, Xavier

    2009-06-04

    It has recently been shown that protein structures can be determined from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts using a molecular fragment replacement strategy. In these approaches, structural motifs are selected from existing protein structures on the basis of chemical shift and sequence homology and assembled to generate new structures. Here, we demonstrate that it is also possible to determine structures of proteins by directly incorporating experimental NMR chemical shifts as structural restraints in conformational searches, without the use of structural homology and molecular fragment replacement. In this approach, a protein is folded from an extended conformation to its native state using a simulated annealing procedure that minimizes an energy function that combines a standard force field with a term that penalizes the differences between experimental and calculated chemical shifts. We provide an initial demonstration of this procedure by determining the structure of two small proteins, with alpha and beta folds, respectively.

  20. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    same oxidation state of the metal ion, its X-ray absorption edge may appear at different energies in different materi- als, depending on the nature of ligands attached to the metal ion, coordination number, covalent character of the bond, electronegativity of the anion or in other words the chemical environment of the metal ion.

  1. Chemical shift of neutron resonances and some ideas on neutron resonances and scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatovich, V.K.; )

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of positions of neutron resonances in nuclei in condensed matter on chemical environment is considered. A possibility of theoretical description of neutron resonances, different from R-matrix theory is investigated. Some contradictions of standard scattering theory are discussed and a new approach without these contradictions is formulated [ru

  2. NMR chemical shift and J coupling parameterization and quantum mechanical reference spectrum simulation for selected nerve agent degradation products in aqueous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Harri; Anđelković, Boban

    2017-10-01

    The spectral parameters of selected nerve agent degradation products relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention, namely, ethyl methylphosphonate, isopropyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate and methylphosphonic acid, were studied in wide range of pH conditions and selected temperatures. The pH and temperature dependence of chemical shifts and J couplings was parameterized using Henderson-Hasselbalch-based functions. The obtained parameters allowed calculation of precise chemical shifts and J coupling constants in arbitrary pH conditions and typical measurement temperatures, thus facilitating quantum mechanical simulation of reference spectra in the chosen magnetic field strength for chemical verification. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Velocity encoding with the slice select refocusing gradient for faster imaging and reduced chemical shift-induced phase errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middione, Matthew J; Thompson, Richard B; Ennis, Daniel B

    2014-06-01

    To investigate a novel phase-contrast MRI velocity-encoding technique for faster imaging and reduced chemical shift-induced phase errors. Velocity encoding with the slice select refocusing gradient achieves the target gradient moment by time shifting the refocusing gradient, which enables the use of the minimum in-phase echo time (TE) for faster imaging and reduced chemical shift-induced phase errors. Net forward flow was compared in 10 healthy subjects (N = 10) within the ascending aorta (aAo), main pulmonary artery (PA), and right/left pulmonary arteries (RPA/LPA) using conventional flow compensated and flow encoded (401 Hz/px and TE = 3.08 ms) and slice select refocused gradient velocity encoding (814 Hz/px and TE = 2.46 ms) at 3 T. Improved net forward flow agreement was measured across all vessels for slice select refocused gradient compared to flow compensated and flow encoded: aAo vs. PA (1.7% ± 1.9% vs. 5.8% ± 2.8%, P = 0.002), aAo vs. RPA + LPA (2.1% ± 1.7% vs. 6.0% ± 4.3%, P = 0.03), and PA vs. RPA + LPA (2.9% ± 2.1% vs. 6.1% ± 6.3%, P = 0.04), while increasing temporal resolution (35%) and signal-to-noise ratio (33%). Slice select refocused gradient phase-contrast MRI with a high receiver bandwidth and minimum in-phase TE provides more accurate and less variable flow measurements through the reduction of chemical shift-induced phase errors and a reduced TE/repetition time, which can be used to increase the temporal/spatial resolution and/or reduce breath hold durations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. SHIFTING WEED COMPOSITIONS AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION IN SWEET CORN FIELD TREATED WITH ORGANIC COMPOSTS AND CHEMICAL WEED CONTROLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marulak Simarmata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to study the shift of weed compositions in sweet corn field treated with organic compost and chemical weed controls and to compare the effect of treatment combinations on weed growth, weed biomass and sweet corn biomass. The research was conducted in Bengkulu, Indonesia, from April to July 2014. Results showed that the number of weed species decreased after the trials from 14 to 13. There was a shift in weed compositions because 5 species of weeds did not emerge after the trials, but 4 new species were found. Chemical weed control used a herbiside mixture of atrazine and mesotrione applied during postemergence was the most effective method to control weeds, which was observed on decreased weed emergence and weed biomass down to 22.33 and 25.00 percent of control, respectively. Subsequently, biomass production of sweet corn increased up to 195.64 percent at the same trials. Biomass of weeds and sweet corn were also affected by the organic composts. Weed biomass was inhibited by treatment of composted empty fruith bunches of oil palm, whereas significantly increased of sweet corn biomass were observed in the plots of organic manure.

  5. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  6. NMR Chemical Shift of a Helium Atom as a Probe for Electronic Structure of FH, F-, (FHF)-, and FH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupikina, E Yu; Efimova, A A; Denisov, G S; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-12-21

    In this work, we present the first results of outer electronic shell visualization by using a 3 He atom as a probe particle. As model objects we have chosen F - , FH, and FH 2 + species, as well as the hydrogen-bonded complex FH···F - at various H···F - distances (3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 Å and equilibrium at ca. 1.14 Å). The interaction energy of investigated objects with helium atom (CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ) and helium atom chemical shift (B3LYP/pcS-2) surfaces were calculated, and their topological analysis was performed. For comparison, the results of standard quantum mechanical approaches to electronic shell visualization were presented (ESP, ELF, ED, ∇ 2 ED). We show that the Laplacian of helium chemical shift, ∇ 2 δ He , is sensitive to fluorine atom lone pair localization regions, and it can be used for the visualization of the outer electronic shell, which could be used to evaluate the proton accepting ability. The sensitivity of ∇ 2 δ He to lone pairs is preserved at distances as large as 2.0-2.5 Å from the fluorine nucleus (in comparison with the distance to ESP minima, located at 1.0-1.5 Å or maxima of ELF, which are as close as 0.6 Å to the fluorine nucleus).

  7. Localized in vivo 1H spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging of the bone marrow in leukemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, H.; Schick, F.; Skalej, M.; Jung, W.I.; Einsele, H.

    1992-01-01

    Six healthy volunteers, ten patients with acute leukemia, one patient with hypersplenia and two with bone marrow carcinosis were studied. Nine patients with leukemia were restudied during chemotherapy. A double spin echo localization method, implemented on a 1.5 T whole body unit was used for 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A cubic (13 mm) 3 voxel was chosen in a midlumbar vertebra. For chemical shift imaging (CSI) the SENEX sequence was used. We recorded fat and water images in a representative midsagittal plane. Patients with acute leukemia and hypercellular bone marrow showed a severe reduction or loss of the bone marrow fat signal and an increased water signal. Water T1 increased during therapy in three patients. The bone marrow fat reappeared in the spectra and chemical shift images within 2 or 3 weeks in responders and remained unchanged or reappeared later in non-responders. A normal fat signal could be detected in leukemic patients without hypercellular bone marrow. Specificity was missing for 1 H MRS and CSI; marrow carcinosis and benign stimulation (hypersplenia) could not be separated from leukemia. In clinical routine, CSI may have advantages over 1 H MRS, because a large anatomic field can be examined. Inhomogeneous fat signal distributions can be detected and were seen in several cases during therapy. 1 H MRS and CSI allow non-invasive therapy monitoring of leukemic patients and might be of prognostic value. (orig.)

  8. Calculation of fluorine chemical shift tensors for the interpretation of oriented (19)F-NMR spectra of gramicidin A in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Klipfel, Marco; Grage, Stephan L; Witter, Raiker; Ulrich, Anne S

    2009-08-28

    A semi-empirical method for the prediction of chemical shifts, based on bond polarization theory, has recently been introduced for (13)C. Here, we extended this approach to calculate the (19)F chemical shift tensors of fluorine bound to aromatic rings and in aliphatic CF(3) groups. For the necessary parametrization, ab initio chemical shift calculations were performed at the MP2 level for a set of fluorinated molecules including tryptophan. The bond polarization parameters obtained were used to calculate the (19)F chemical shift tensors for several crystalline molecules, and to reference the calculated values on a chemical shift scale relative to CFCl(3). As a first biophysical application, we examined the distribution of conformations of a (19)F-labeled tryptophan side chain in the membrane-bound ion channel peptide, gramicidin A. The fluorine chemical shift tensors were calculated from snapshots of a molecular dynamics simulation employing the (19)F-parametrized bond polarization theory. In this MD simulation, published (2)H quadrupolar and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of the indole ring were used as orientational constraints to determine the conformational distribution of the 5F-Trp(13) side chain. These conformations were then used to interpret the spectra of (19)F-labeled gramicidin A in fluid and gel phase lipid bilayers.

  9. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous (19)F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R

    2015-11-11

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of (19)F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in (19)F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F isomer results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of (19)F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra.

  10. Demystifying fluorine chemical shifts: Electronic structure calculations address origins of seemingly anomalous 19F-NMR spectra of fluorohistidine isomers and analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Bann, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying biomolecular structure, dynamics, and ligand binding, yet the origins of 19F chemical shifts are not well understood. Herein, we use electronic structure calculations to describe the changes in 19F chemical shifts of 2F- and 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon acid titration. While the protonation of the 2F species results in a deshielded chemical shift, protonation of the 4F results in an opposite, shielded chemical shift. The deshielding of 2F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole upon protonation can be rationalized by concomitant decreases in charge density on fluorine and a reduced dipole moment. These correlations do not hold for 4F-histidine/(5-methyl)-imidazole, however. Molecular orbital calculations reveal that for the 4F species, there are no lone pair electrons on the fluorine until protonation. Analysis of a series of 4F-imidazole analogues, all with delocalized fluorine electron density, indicates that the deshielding of 19F chemical shifts through substituent effects correlates with increased C-F bond polarity. In summary, the delocalization of fluorine electrons in the neutral 4F species, with gain of a lone pair upon protonation may help explain the difficulty in developing a predictive framework for fluorine chemical shifts. Ideas debated by chemists over 40 years ago, regarding fluorine's complex electronic effects, are shown to have relevance for understanding and predicting fluorine NMR spectra. PMID:26524669

  11. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  12. Chemical Shifts of the Carbohydrate Binding Domain of Galectin-3 from Magic Angle Spinning NMR and Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jodi; Gupta, Rupal; Yehl, Jenna; Lu, Manman; Case, David A; Gronenborn, Angela M; Akke, Mikael; Polenova, Tatyana

    2018-03-22

    Magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to probe the structure and dynamics of insoluble proteins and protein assemblies at atomic resolution, with NMR chemical shifts containing rich information about biomolecular structure. Access to this information, however, is problematic, since accurate quantum mechanical calculation of chemical shifts in proteins remains challenging, particularly for 15 N H . Here we report on isotropic chemical shift predictions for the carbohydrate recognition domain of microcrystalline galectin-3, obtained from using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, implemented using an automated fragmentation approach, and using very high resolution (0.86 Å lactose-bound and 1.25 Å apo form) X-ray crystal structures. The resolution of the X-ray crystal structure used as an input into the AF-NMR program did not affect the accuracy of the chemical shift calculations to any significant extent. Excellent agreement between experimental and computed shifts is obtained for 13 C α , while larger scatter is observed for 15 N H chemical shifts, which are influenced to a greater extent by electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation.

  13. Similarities and differences in PM 10 chemical source profiles for geological dust from the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Ashbaugh, Lowell L.; Magliano, Karen L.

    A systematic sampling and analysis approach was followed to acquire chemical source profiles for six types of geological dust in California's San Joaquin Valley. Forty-seven samples from 37 locations included: (1) urban and rural paved roads, (2) residential and agricultural unpaved roads and parking areas, (3) almond, cotton, grape, safflower, and tomato fields, (4) dairy and feedlot surfaces, (5) salt-laden lake and irrigation canal drainage deposits, and (6) building and roadway construction/earthmoving soil. These samples were dried, sieved, resuspended, sampled through a PM 10 inlet onto filters, and chemically analyzed to construct PM 10 source profiles (fractional mass abundances and uncertainties) for 40 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, and U), 7 ions (Cl -, NO 3-, PO 42-, SO 42-, Na +, K +, and NH 4+), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), 8 carbon fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, OP, EC1, EC2, and EC3), and carbonate carbon. Individual source profiles with analytical precisions were averaged and compared to quantify differences in chemical abundances for: (1) duplicate laboratory resuspension sampling, (2) multiple sampling within the same agricultural field, (3) sampling at different locations for the same land-use activity, (4) sampling of different activities regardless of location, and (5) grouping of different activities into generalized emission inventory source categories. Distinguishing features were found among composite source profiles of six source types. Elemental carbon and Pb marked paved road dust; Na +, Na, S, and SO 42- marked salt deposits; OC, PO 42-, P, K +, K, and Ca characterized animal husbandry; and several metals (Ti, V, Mn) marked construction soil, with abundances 2-10 times higher than those of other profiles. High-sensitivity X-ray fluorescence analysis resulted in detectable alkali and rare earth

  14. Structural analysis of flavonoids in solution through DFT 1H NMR chemical shift calculations: Epigallocatechin, Kaempferol and Quercetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Leonardo A.; Tavares, Wagner M. G.; Lopes, Ana Paula M.; Soeiro, Malucia M.; De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we showed that comparison between experimental and theoretical 1H NMR chemical shift patterns, calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT), can be used for the prediction of molecular structure of flavonoids in solution, what is experimentally accessible for gas phase (electron diffraction methods) and solid samples (X-ray diffraction). The best match between B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)-PCM 1H NMR calculations for B ring rotated structures and experimental spectra can provide information on the conformation adopted by polyphenols in solution (usually DMSO-d6, acetone-d6 as solvents), which may differ from solid state and gas phase observed structures, and also DFT optimized geometry in the vacuum.

  15. Chemical shift assignments of RHE_RS02845, a NTF2-like domain-containing protein from Rhizobium etli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Shuangli; Liang, Chunjie; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Maili; Yang, Yunhuang

    2018-03-23

    The nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF2) like superfamily includes members of the NTF2 family, delta-5-3-ketosteroid isomerases, and the beta subunit of ring hydroxygenases. This family plays important roles in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, and is taken as a classic example of divergent evolution because proteins in this family exhibit diverse biological functions, although share common structural features. We cloned the gene RHE_RS02845 encoding a predicted NTF2-like domain-containing protein in Rhizobium etli, and prepared U- 13 C/ 15 N-labeled protein samples for its three-dimensional NMR structural determination. Here, chemical shift assignments for both backbone and side-chain atoms are reported, which is prerequisite for further structural calculation and functional research using NMR spectroscopy.

  16. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... shifts of all substructures from the proposed models. A full reconstruction makes sure that all carbons are accounted for and enables on the negative side to discuss structural elements identified from recorded spectra of humic substances that cannot be observed in the simulated spectrum. On the positive...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  17. Chemical dynamics between wells across a time-dependent barrier: Self-similarity in the Lagrangian descriptor and reactive basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Andrej; Duvenbeck, Lennart; Feldmaier, Matthias; Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-01

    In chemical or physical reaction dynamics, it is essential to distinguish precisely between reactants and products for all times. This task is especially demanding in time-dependent or driven systems because therein the dividing surface (DS) between these states often exhibits a nontrivial time-dependence. The so-called transition state (TS) trajectory has been seen to define a DS which is free of recrossings in a large number of one-dimensional reactions across time-dependent barriers and thus, allows one to determine exact reaction rates. A fundamental challenge to applying this method is the construction of the TS trajectory itself. The minimization of Lagrangian descriptors (LDs) provides a general and powerful scheme to obtain that trajectory even when perturbation theory fails. Both approaches encounter possible breakdowns when the overall potential is bounded, admitting the possibility of returns to the barrier long after the trajectories have reached the product or reactant wells. Such global dynamics cannot be captured by perturbation theory. Meanwhile, in the LD-DS approach, it leads to the emergence of additional local minima which make it difficult to extract the optimal branch associated with the desired TS trajectory. In this work, we illustrate this behavior for a time-dependent double-well potential revealing a self-similar structure of the LD, and we demonstrate how the reflections and side-minima can be addressed by an appropriate modification of the LD associated with the direct rate across the barrier.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of vertebral marrow adipose tissue in postmenopausal female using MRI chemical shift-based water–fat separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.-W.; Xu, Z.; Chen, Q.-W.; Tian, Y.-N.; Wang, X.-Y.; Zhou, L.; Chang, S.-X.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility of assessing vertebral marrow adipose tissue using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) chemical shift-based water–fat separation technique at 3 T. Material and methods: A modified Dixon technique was performed to obtain the vertebral marrow fat fraction (FF) in a study of 58 postmenopausal females (age range 49.2–77.4 years), including 24 normal bone density, 19 osteopaenia, and 15 osteoporosis as documented with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The reliability of FF measurements performed by two radiologists independently was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Ten participants were scanned twice to assess the reproducibility of FF measurements. FF values were compared between each vertebral level and between groups. Results: The mean coefficient of variation of FF measurements was 2.1%. According to the ICC, the measurements were reliable (ICC = 0.900 for normal bone density, ICC = 0.937 for osteopaenia and ICC = 0.909 for osteoporosis, p < 0.001 for all). There was an inverse association between mean FF at L1–L4 vertebrae and lumbar spine BMD (r = −0.459, p = 0.006), which remained significant even after controlling for confounders (age, height, and body weight). FF values at different vertebral levels were significantly correlated to each other (r = 0.703–0.921, p < 0.05 for all). There was a general trend toward increased marrow adiposity for more inferior vertebral bodies. Patients with osteopaenia and osteoporosis had a higher marrow fat content compared with normal bone mass after adjusting for confounders, although no significant differences in each vertebral level and average marrow fat content were found between the osteopaenia and osteoporosis groups. Conclusion: Chemical shift-based water–fat separation enables the quantitation of vertebral marrow adiposity with excellent reproducibility, which appears to be a useful method to provide complementary information to osteoporosis

  19. Utility of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of hyperattenuating adrenal lesions at 3.0T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jiqing; Zhang, Chengqi; Liu, Qingwei; Yu, Taifei; Jiang, Xuemei; Xia, Qinghua; Zhang, Yinan; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the value of chemical shift imaging (CSI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) at 3.0 T MRI in adrenal hyperattenuating lesions. Methods: Fifty-one hyperattenuating adrenal lesions in 40 patients were evaluated. Signal intensity index (SII), adrenal to spleen ratio (ASR) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were used as quantitative analysis parameters. Results: The mean SII, ASR and ADC values were: benign pheochromocytomas (n = 22), 7.04%; 0.96, 1.15 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s; lipid-poor adenomas (n = 18), 33.77%, 0.71, 1.07 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s; malignant tumors (n = 7), 11.24%; 1.00; 0.92 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s. There were significant differences between the lipid-poor adenomas and nonadenomas for SII and ASR, and there were significant differences between the benign and the malignant tumor ADC values. The optimal diagnostic threshold point of SII and ASR for lipid-poor adenomas was 11.96%, 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.9%, 97.5% and 97%, 83.3%. The optimal diagnostic threshold point of ADC value for benign lesions and malignant tumors was 1.04 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s, the sensitivity and specificity were 61.4% and 85.7%. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of chemical shift MRI and DWI can help to characterize the hyperattenuating adrenal lesions, especially in differentiatiation between the lipid-poor adenomas, the benign pheochromocytomas, and the malignant tumors

  20. 31P NMR Chemical Shifts of Phosphorus Probes as Reliable and Practical Acidity Scales for Solid and Liquid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2017-10-11

    Acid-base catalytic reaction, either in heterogeneous or homogeneous systems, is one of the most important chemical reactions that has provoked a wide variety of industrial catalytic processes for production of chemicals and petrochemicals over the past few decades. In view of the fact that the catalytic performances (e.g., activity, selectivity, and reaction mechanism) of acid-catalyzed reactions over acidic catalysts are mostly dictated by detailed acidic features, viz. type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount (concentration), strength, and local environments (location) of acid sites, information on and manipulation of their structure-activity correlation are crucial for optimization of catalytic performances as well as innovative design of novel effective catalysts. This review aims to summarize recent developments on acidity characterization of solid and liquid catalysts by means of experimental 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using phosphorus probe molecules such as trialkylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R 3 PO). In particular, correlations between the observed 31 P chemical shifts (δ 31 P) of phosphorus (P)-containing probes and acidic strengths have been established in conjuction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, rendering practical and reliable acidity scales for Brønsted and Lewis acidities at the atomic level. As illustrated for a variety of different solid and liquid acid systems, such as microporous zeolites, mesoporous molecular sieves, and metal oxides, the 31 P NMR probe approaches were shown to provide important acid features of various catalysts, surpassing most conventional methods such as titration, pH measurement, Hammett acidity function, and some other commonly used physicochemical techniques, such as calorimetry, temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 -TPD), Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), and 1 H NMR spectroscopies.

  1. Graphic representation of 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of oxygen-containing organosulfur compounds and its application to the structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Soei; Nagata, Chikakiyo; Tanaka, Shigeyuki.

    1985-01-01

    A new method for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing organosulfur compounds was examined by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. The 13 C-NMR spectra were measured for organosulfur compounds of various types such as sulfoxides, sulfones, sulfinic acids, sulfonyl chlorides, sulfonic acids and their salts, sulfuric acid ester compounds and sultam derivatives containing alkyl, alkenyl, alkinyl and aromatic ring groups. The spectra collected from literatures were also used. The 13 C-chemical shifts of α-carbon adjacent to sulfur atom in organosulfur compounds were classified according to the structural types of the compounds and classes of carbon atoms of alkane(CH 3 , CH 2 , > CH-, etc.), alkene, aromatic ring types. The graphic representation for these data was carried out in view of the structural analysis of these compounds. The chemical shifts for α-carbon of oxygen-containing organosulfur compounds were observed at lower-field range than that of sulfide and disulfide compounds. The chemical shifts of α-carbon are gradually shifted to lower-field in order of methyl, methylene, methyne and quaternary carbons. The chemical shifts of α-carbons were also affected by the adjacent groups and their structural types. Detailed graphic representations including adjacent groups were made for a series of compounds which have many kinds of β-groups. This method was succesfully applied to the structural analysis of a textile and polymer additive. (J.P.N.)

  2. Unusually large chemical potential shift in a degenerate semiconductor: Angle-resolved photoemission study of SnSe and Na-doped SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.; Arita, M.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Tan, G.; Zhao, L. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of SnSe and Na-doped SnSe by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The valence-band top reaches the Fermi level by the Na doping, indicating that Na-doped SnSe can be viewed as a degenerate semiconductor. However, in the Na-doped system, the chemical potential shift with temperature is unexpectedly large and is apparently inconsistent with the degenerate semiconductor picture. The large chemical potential shift and anomalous spectral shape are key ingredients for an understanding of the novel metallic state with the large thermoelectric performance in Na-doped SnSe.

  3. The interplay between transient a-helix formation and side chain rotamer distributions in disordered proteins probed by methyl chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-01-01

    and retinoid receptors (ACTR). We find that small differences in the methyl carbon chemical shifts due to the ¿-gauche effect may provide information about the side chain rotamer distributions. However, the effects of neighboring residues on the methyl group chemical shifts obscure the direct observation...... a quantitative analysis of the ensemble of ¿(2)-angles of especially leucine residues in disordered proteins. The changes in the rotamer distributions upon denaturation correlate to the changes upon helix induction by the co-solvent trifluoroethanol, suggesting that the side chain conformers are directly...

  4. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: Implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Zhicheng; Nguyen, Bao D.; La Mar, Gerd N.

    2000-01-01

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift, which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein

  5. 1H and 13C NMR Data on Hydroxy/methoxy Flavonoids and the Effects of Substituents on Chemical Shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Eom, Sung Lock; Hyun, Ji Ye; Jo, Geun Hyeong; Hwang, Do Seok; Lee, Sun Hee; Yong, Yeon Joong; Lee, Young Han; Lim, Yoong Ho; Park, Jun Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols have recently been examined for such applications, and they are classified based on their carbon skeletons: phenolic acids with C6-C1 skeleton, hydrocinammates with C6-C 3 skeleton, stilbenes with C6-C2-C6 skeleton, and flavonoids with C6-C 3 -C6 skeleton.2 Of these compounds, flavonoids are ubiquitously found in most plants. Since flavonoids belong to polyphenols, they have many hydroxy groups. From a bioavailability point of view, hydroxy groups prevent cell membrane transport, and hydroxyflavonoids can be metabolized by O-methyltransferases. However, methoxylated flavonoids may not have these problems. Hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids are found from natural sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to identify different compounds including hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids. Because the position and the number of substituted hydroxy or/and methoxy groups will change the 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts, it is important to understand these changes so that the structures of newly isolated hydroxy/methoxy-flavonoids can be easily identified

  6. Influence of the chemical shift artifact on measurements of compact bone thickness in equine distal limb MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimock, Abigail N; Spriet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the chemical shift artifact, resulting from misregistration or phase cancellation at the interface between compact and trabecular bone, on apparent bone thickness was quantified in six isolated equine limbs. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo (SE) and in-phase three-dimensional spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images were acquired twice with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) unit, switching the frequency encoding direction between acquisitions. Out-of-phase SPGR images were also obtained. MR images with different frequency encoding directions were compared with each other and to radiographs made from corresponding 3-mm-bone sections. Compact bone thickness was significantly different when comparing images acquired with different frequency encoding directions for both SE and SPGR sequences. Significant differences were identified in the frequency but not the phase encoding direction when measurements of compact bone in MR images were compared with measurements obtained from thin section radiographs for the majority of surfaces studied (P 0.05). Measurements of compact bone from out-of-phase SPGR sequences were significantly different than from in-phase sequences (P echo sequences.

  7. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D.

    2017-01-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  8. Noninvasive measurements of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites in dilated cardiomyopathy by using 31P spectroscopic chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, A.; Rzanny, R.; Heyne, J.-P.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Kaiser, W.A.; Leder, U.

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is accompanied by an impaired cardiac energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic ratios in patients with DCM compared to controls by using spectroscopic two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI). Twenty volunteers and 15 patients with severe symptoms (left ventricular ejection fraction, LVEF 30%) of DCM were investigated. Cardiac 31 P MR 2D-CSI measurements (voxel size: 40 x 40 x 100 mm 3 ) were performed with a 1.5 T whole-body scanner. Measurement time ranged from 15 min to 30 min. Peak areas and ratios of different metabolites were evaluated, including high-energy phosphates (PCr, ATP), 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters (PDE). In addition, we evaluated how PCr/ATP ratios correlate with LVEF as an established prognostic factor of heart failure. The PCr/γ-ATP ratio was significantly decreased in patients with moderate and severe DCM and showed a linear correlation with reduced LVEFs. PDE/ATP ratios were significantly increased only in patients with severe DCM as compared to volunteers. Applying 31 P MRS with commonly-available 2D-CSI sequences is a valuable technique to evaluate DCM by determining PCr/ATP ratios noninvasively. In addition to reduced PCr/ATP ratios observed in patients suffering from DCM, significantly-increased PDE/ATP ratios were found in patients with severe DCM. (orig.)

  9. Synthesis, three-dimensional structure, conformation and correct chemical shift assignment determination of pharmaceutical molecules by NMR and molecular modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeredo, Sirlene O.F. de; Sales, Edijane M.; Figueroa-Villar, José D., E-mail: jdfv2009@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear e Química Medicinal

    2017-07-01

    This work includes the synthesis of phenanthrenequinone guanylhydrazone and phenanthro[9,10-e][1,2,4]triazin-3-amine to be tested as intercalate with DNA for treatment of cancer. The other synthesized product, 2-[(4-chlorophenylamino)methylene]malononitrile, was designed for future determination of its activity against leishmaniasis. A common problem about some articles on the literature is that some previously published compounds display error of their molecular structures. In this article it is shown the application of several procedures of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the complete molecular structure and the non questionable chemical shift assignment of the synthesized compounds, and also their analysis by molecular modeling to confirm the NMR results. To determine the capacity of pharmacological compounds to interact with biological targets is determined by docking. This work is to motivate the application of NMR and molecular modeling on organic synthesis, being a process that is very important for the study of the prepared compounds as interactions with biological targets by NMR. (author)

  10. A complete set of NMR chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants for L-Alanyl-L-Alanine zwitterion and analysis of its conformational behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouř, Petr; Buděšínský, Miloš; Špirko, Vladimír; Kapitán, Josef; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 127, - (2005), 17079-17089 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055104; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : NMR * chemical shifts * coupling constants Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.419, year: 2005

  11. Differentiation of osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral fractures by chemical shift {l_brace}in-phase and out-of phase{r_brace} MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragab, Yasser [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Radiology Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: yragab61@hotmail.com; Emad, Yasser [Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: yasseremad68@yahoo.com; Gheita, Tamer [Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: gheitamer@yahoo.com; Mansour, Maged [Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Oncology Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: magedmansour@yahoo.com; Abou-Zeid, A. [Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: alaabouzeid@yahoo.com; Ferrari, Serge [Division of Bone Diseases, Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, and WHO, Collaborating Center for Osteoporosis Prevention, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland)], E-mail: serge.ferrari@medecine.unige.ch; Rasker, Johannes J. [Rheumatologist University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.j.rasker@utwente.nl

    2009-10-15

    Objective: The objective of this study was to establish the cut-off value of the signal intensity drop on chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with appropriate sensitivity and specificity to differentiate osteoporotic from neoplastic wedging of the spine. Patients and methods: All patients with wedging of vertebral bodies were included consecutively between February 2006 and January 2007. A chemical shift MRI was performed and signal intensity after (in-phase and out-phase) images were obtained. A DXA was performed in all. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 20 with osteoporotic wedging (group 1) and 20 neoplastic (group 2). They were 21 males and 19 females. Acute vertebral collapse was observed in 15 patients in group 1 and subacute collapse in another 5 patients, while in group 2, 11 patients showed acute collapse and 9 patients (45%) showed subacute vertebral collapse. On the chemical shift MRI a substantial reduction in signal intensity was found in all lesions in both groups. The proportional changes observed in signal intensity of bone marrow lesions on in-phase compared with out-of-phase images showed significant differences in both groups (P < 0.05). At a cut-off value of 35%, the observed sensitivity of out-of-phase images was 95%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 95.2%. Conclusion: A chemical shift MRI is useful in order to differentiate patients with vertebral collapse due to underlying osteoporosis or neoplastic process.

  12. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    that are comparable with experiment. The introduction of a probabilistic linear regression model allows us to substantially reduce the number of snapshots that are needed to make comparisons with experiment. This approach is further improved by augmenting snapshot selection with chemical shift predictions by which we...

  13. High-Frequency H-1 NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn-II and Pb-II Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb-II Hydrides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 20 (2016), s. 10302-10309 ISSN 0020-1669 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrides of TlI and PbII * high-frequency 1H chemical shifts * relativistic effects Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  14. High-Frequency C-13 and Si-29 NMR Chemical Shifts in Diamagnetic Low-Valence Compounds of TII and Pb-II: Decisive Role of Relativistic Effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Straka, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2016), s. 1770-1781 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : high-frequency NMR chemical shifts * HALA effect * relativistic DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  15. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain

  16. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  17. Modern MRI tools for the characterization of acute demyelinating lesions: value of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueker, W.; Mehnert, F.; Mader, I.; Naegele, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Tuebingen Medical School, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Ruff, J. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Gaertner, S. [Department of Neurology, University of Tuebingen Medical School, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Acute demyelinating lesions occur in various inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Apart from multiple sclerosis, most cases can be attributed to an overshooting immunological response to infectious agents called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). ADEM, which is mostly characterized by a monophasic course, has a multiphasic variant (MDEM). The early application of corticosteroids has been shown to be beneficial for the outcome; thus, an early diagnosis is highly desirable. Furthermore, the differential diagnosis ruling out neoplastic disorders may be difficult using conventional MRI alone. The potential diagnostic value of advanced MR techniques such as chemical shift imaging (CSI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was investigated in a patient with MDEM, who had a new lesion in continuity with the initial disease manifestation. CSI was performed at 1.5 T with a long echo time of 135 ms for the evaluation of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) and with short TE of 30 ms for macromolecules (mm) and myo-Inositol (mI). DWI was performed using a single-shot isotropic EPI sequence. Whereas acute and chronic areas of demyelination were neither distinguishable on T2- nor on contrast-enhanced T1-weigted images, CSI and DWI revealed different metabolite concentrations and diffusion characteristics within the composite lesion, clearly separating acute from chronic areas of demyelination. In conclusion, the addition of CSI and DWI may add to the diagnostic power of MRI in the setting of demyelinating disorders by identifying areas of acute and chronic demyelination, even in the absence of contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  18. Using chemical-shift MR imaging to quantify fatty degeneration within supraspinatus muscle due to supraspinatus tendon injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Yildirim, Nalan; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Ercan, Ilker [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Biostatistics, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    The objective of this study was to prospectively quantify the fatty degeneration of supraspinatus (SSP) muscle due to SSP tendon injuries by using chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI). Forty-one patients with suspected rotator cuff tear or impingement examined with MR arthrography were included in the study. The following images were obtained after injection of diluted gadolinium chelate into glenohumeral joint: fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo in the coronal, axial, and sagittal-oblique plane; fat-saturated T2-weighted and intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo in the coronal-oblique plane; and T1-weighted spin echo in the sagittal-oblique plane. CS-MRI was performed in the coronal plane using a double-echo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. SSP tendon changes were classified as normal, tendinosis, and partial and complete tear according to MR arthrography findings. Fatty degeneration was quantified after measurement of signal intensity values within the region of interest (ROI) placed over SSP muscle. Signal intensity (SI) suppression ratio and SI index were calculated with the values obtained. Degrees of fatty degeneration depicted in normal subjects and subjects with rotator cuff injuries were compared. Median (min:max) was used as descriptive values. SI suppression ratio was -3.5% (-15.5:3.03) in normal subjects, whereas it was -13.5% (-28.55:-6.60), -30.7% (-41.5:-20.35), and -43.75% (-62:-24.90) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. SI index was 0.75% (-6:11.5) in normal subjects. It was 10% (4.50:27), 26.5% (19.15:35.5), and 41% (23.9:57) in tendinosis, partial and complete tears, respectively. The increase in degree of fatty degeneration parallels the seriousness of tendon pathology. CS-MRI is a useful method for grading fat accumulation within SSP muscle. (orig.)

  19. Modern MRI tools for the characterization of acute demyelinating lesions: value of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueker, W.; Mehnert, F.; Mader, I.; Naegele, T.; Ruff, J.; Gaertner, S.

    2004-01-01

    Acute demyelinating lesions occur in various inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Apart from multiple sclerosis, most cases can be attributed to an overshooting immunological response to infectious agents called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). ADEM, which is mostly characterized by a monophasic course, has a multiphasic variant (MDEM). The early application of corticosteroids has been shown to be beneficial for the outcome; thus, an early diagnosis is highly desirable. Furthermore, the differential diagnosis ruling out neoplastic disorders may be difficult using conventional MRI alone. The potential diagnostic value of advanced MR techniques such as chemical shift imaging (CSI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was investigated in a patient with MDEM, who had a new lesion in continuity with the initial disease manifestation. CSI was performed at 1.5 T with a long echo time of 135 ms for the evaluation of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) and with short TE of 30 ms for macromolecules (mm) and myo-Inositol (mI). DWI was performed using a single-shot isotropic EPI sequence. Whereas acute and chronic areas of demyelination were neither distinguishable on T2- nor on contrast-enhanced T1-weigted images, CSI and DWI revealed different metabolite concentrations and diffusion characteristics within the composite lesion, clearly separating acute from chronic areas of demyelination. In conclusion, the addition of CSI and DWI may add to the diagnostic power of MRI in the setting of demyelinating disorders by identifying areas of acute and chronic demyelination, even in the absence of contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  20. A chemically stable analogue, 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin, with similar effects to epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) in man.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Grady, J; Hedges, A; Whittle, B J; Al-Sinawi, L A; Mekki, Q A; Burke, C; Moody, S G; Moti, M J; Hassan, S

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin, a chemically stable analogue of epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) were studied, in comparison with epoprostenol, both in vitro and in vivo in man. In vitro 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin and epoprostenol inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, the endoperoxide analogue U46619 and arachidonic acid. The potency of 9 beta-methyl carbacyclin relative to epoprostenol was comparable in ADP and collagen-aggregated platelet rich plasma (PRP), 9 be...

  1. Designing novel Sn-Bi, Si-C and Ge-C nanostructures, using simple theoretical chemical similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdetsis Aristides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A framework of simple, transparent and powerful concepts is presented which is based on isoelectronic (or isovalent principles, analogies, regularities and similarities. These analogies could be considered as conceptual extensions of the periodical table of the elements, assuming that two atoms or molecules having the same number of valence electrons would be expected to have similar or homologous properties. In addition, such similar moieties should be able, in principle, to replace each other in more complex structures and nanocomposites. This is only partly true and only occurs under certain conditions which are investigated and reviewed here. When successful, these concepts are very powerful and transparent, leading to a large variety of nanomaterials based on Si and other group 14 elements, similar to well known and well studied analogous materials based on boron and carbon. Such nanomaterias designed in silico include, among many others, Si-C, Sn-Bi, Si-C and Ge-C clusters, rings, nanowheels, nanorodes, nanocages and multidecker sandwiches, as well as silicon planar rings and fullerenes similar to the analogous sp2 bonding carbon structures. It is shown that this pedagogically simple and transparent framework can lead to an endless variety of novel and functional nanomaterials with important potential applications in nanotechnology, nanomedicine and nanobiology. Some of the so called predicted structures have been already synthesized, not necessarily with the same rational and motivation. Finally, it is anticipated that such powerful and transparent rules and analogies, in addition to their predictive power, could also lead to far-reaching interpretations and a deeper understanding of already known results and information.

  2. A retrospective cohort study of shift work and risk of cancer-specific mortality in German male chemical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Mei; Nasterlack, Michael; Messerer, Peter; Oberlinner, Christoph; Lang, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    Human evidence of carcinogenicity concerning shift work is inconsistent. In a previous study, we observed no elevated risk of total mortality in shift workers followed up until the end of 2006. The present study aimed to investigate cancer-specific mortality, relative to shift work. The cohort consisted of male production workers (14,038 shift work and 17,105 day work), employed at BASF Ludwigshafen for at least 1 year between 1995 and 2005. Vital status was followed from 2000 to 2009. Cause-specific mortality was obtained from death certificates. Exposure to shift work was measured both as a dichotomous and continuous variable. While lifetime job history was not available, job duration in the company was derived from personal data, which was then categorized at the quartiles. Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for potential confounders, in which job duration was treated as a time-dependent covariate. Between 2000 and 2009, there were 513 and 549 deaths among rotating shift and day work employees, respectively. Risks of total and cancer-specific mortalities were marginally lower among shift workers when taking age at entry and job level into consideration and were statistically significantly lower when cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, job duration, and chronic disease prevalence at entry to follow-up were included as explanatory factors. With respect to mortality risks in relation to exposure duration, no increased risks were found in any of the exposure groups after full adjustment and there was no apparent trend suggesting an exposure-response relation with duration of shift work. The present analysis extends and confirms our previous finding of no excess risk of mortality associated with work in the shift system employed at BASF Ludwigshafen. More specifically, there is also no indication of an increased risk of mortality due to cancer.

  3. A pinning puzzle: two similar, non-superconducting chemical deposits in YBCO-one pins, the other does not

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Gandini, Alberto; Skorpenske, Harley; Parks, Drew, E-mail: Weinstein@uh.ed [Beam Particle Dynamics Laboratories, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5002 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    The pinning effects of two kinds of U-rich deposits in YBCO (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}) are compared. One is a five-element compound, (U{sub 0.6}Pt{sub 0.4})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6}, which is a paramagnetic double perovskite which forms as profuse stable nanosize deposits, and pins very well. The other is a four-element compound, (U{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3}, which is a ferromagnetic single perovskite which forms as profuse stable nanosize deposits and pins very weakly or not at all. The pinning comparison is done with nearly equal deposit sizes and number of deposits per unit volume for the two compounds. Evidence for the pinning capability, chemical makeup, x-ray diffraction signature, and magnetic properties of the two compounds is reported.

  4. Solvent-induced chemical shifts of methoxyl nuclear resonance signals in chalcones by benzene and trifluoroacetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Shashi K.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Parmar, Virinder S.

    The 1H NMR spectra of eight different methoxylated chalcones have separately been recorded, (1) in deuterated chloroform; (2) in a mixture (1:1) of deuterated chloroform and benzene; and (3) in a mixture of deuterated chloroform, benzene and trifluoroacetic acid (2:2:1) and the benzene induced and TFA induced shift values have been assigned to different methoxyl groups. These shift values can serve as a guide in determining the structures of natural or new chalcones. The steric, electronic and conformational factors are discussed to explain the shift values.

  5. Chemical shifts of K-X-ray absorption edges on copper in different compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D.; Basu, S.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-03-01

    Cu K X-ray absorption edges were measured in compounds such as CuO, Cu(CH3CO2)2, Cu(CO3)2, and CuSO4 where Cu is present in oxidation state of 2+, using the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ˜4-7 eV were observed for Cu K X-ray absorption edge in the above compounds compared to its value in elemental copper. The difference in the Cu K edge energy shifts in the different compounds having same oxidation state of Cu shows the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cation in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Cu cations in the above compounds.

  6. NMR spectroscopic studies of a TAT-derived model peptide in imidazolium-based ILs: influence on chemical shifts and the cis/trans equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Bordusa, Frank

    2017-09-13

    NMR spectroscopy was used to study systematically the impact of imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) solutions on a TAT-derived model peptide containing Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. The selected IL anions cover a wide range of the Hofmeister series of ions. Based on highly resolved one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra individual 1 H and 13 C peptide chemical shift differences were analysed and a classification of IL anions according to the Hofmeister series was derived. The observed chemical shift changes indicate significant interactions between the peptide and the ILs. In addition, we examined the impact of different ILs towards the cis/trans equilibrium state of the Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. In this context, the IL cations appear to be of exceptional importance for inducing an alteration of the native cis/trans equilibrium state of Xaa-Pro bonds in favour of the trans-isomers.

  7. Structure, solvent, and relativistic effects on the NMR chemical shifts in square-planar transition-metal complexes: assessment of DFT approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vícha, J.; Novotný, J.; Straka, Michal; Repisky, M.; Ruud, K.; Komorovsky, S.; Marek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 38 (2015), s. 24944-24955 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR chemical shifts * transition metal complexes * relativistic effects * method calibration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04214c

  8. Terrestrial Fe-oxide Concretions and Mars Blueberries: Comparisons of Similar Advective and Diffusive Chemical Infiltration Reaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A. J.; Chan, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    Abundant iron oxide concretions occurring in Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah and those discovered at Meridiani Planum, Mars share many common observable physical traits such as their spheriodal shapes, occurrence, and distribution patterns in sediments. Terrestrial concretions are products of interaction between oxygen-rich aquifer water and basin-derived reducing (iron-rich) water. Water-rock interaction simulations show that diffusion of oxygen and iron supplied by slow-moving water is a reasonable mechanism for producing observed concretion patterns. In short, southern Utah iron oxide concretions are results of Liesegang-type diffusive infiltration reactions in sediments. We propose that the formation of blueberry hematite concretions in Mars sediments followed a similar diagenetic mechanism where iron was derived from the alteration of volcanic substrate and oxygen was provided by the early Martian atmosphere. Although the terrestrial analog differs in the original host rock composition, both the terrestrial and Mars iron-oxide precipitation mechanisms utilize iron and oxygen interactions in sedimentary host rock with diffusive infiltration of solutes from two opposite sources. For the terrestrial model, slow advection of iron-rich water is an important factor that allowed pervasive and in places massive precipitation of iron-oxide concretions. In Mars, evaporative flux of water at the top of the sediment column may have produced a slow advective mass-transfer mechanism that provided a steady source and the right quantity of iron. The similarities of the terrestrial and Martian systems are demonstrated using a water-rock interaction simulator Sym.8, initially in one-dimensional systems. Boundary conditions such as oxygen content of water, partial pressure of oxygen, and supply rate of iron were varied. The results demonstrate the importance of slow advection of water and diffusive processes for producing diagenetic iron oxide concretions.

  9. Understanding the Polar Character Trend in a Series of Diels-Alder Reactions Using Molecular Quantum Similarity and Chemical Reactivity Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Morales-Bayuelo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In molecular similarity there is a premise “similar molecules tend to behave similarly”; however in the actual quantum similarity field there is no clear methodology to describe the similarity in chemical reactivity, and with this end an analysis of charge-transfer (CT processes in a series of Diels-Alder (DA reactions between cyclopentadiene (Cp and cyano substitutions on ethylene has been studied. The CT analysis is performed in the reagent assuming a grand canonical ensemble and the considerations for an electrophilic system using B3LYP/6-31G(d and M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p methods. An analysis for CT was performed in agreement with the experimental results with a good statistical correlation (R2=0.9118 relating the polar character to the bond force constants in DA reactions. The quantum distortion analysis on the transition states (TS was performed using molecular quantum similarity indexes of overlap and coulomb showing good correlation (R2=0.8330 between the rate constants and quantum similarity indexes. In this sense, an electronic reorganization based on molecular polarization in terms of CT is proposed; therefore, new interpretations on the electronic systematization of the DA reactions are presented, taking into account that today such electronic systematization is an open problem in organic physical chemistry. Additionally, one way to quantify the similarity in chemical reactivity was shown, taking into account the dependence of the molecular alignment on properties when their position changes; in this sense a possible way to quantify the similarity of the CT in systematic form on these DA cycloadditions was shown.

  10. Nonsuppressing normal thymus on chemical-shift MR imaging and anterior mediastinal lymphoma: differentiation with diffusion-weighted MR imaging by using the apparent diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Gned, Dario; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Veltri, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    To prospectively evaluate usefulness of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in differentiating anterior mediastinal lymphoma from nonsuppressing normal thymus on chemical-shift MR, and to look at the relationship between patient age and ADC. Seventy-three young subjects (25 men, 48 women; age range, 9-29 years), who underwent chemical-shift MR and diffusion-weighted MR were divided into a normal thymus group (group A, 40 subjects), and a lymphoma group (group B, 33 patients). For group A, all subjects had normal thymus with no suppression on opposed-phase chemical-shift MR. Two readers measured the signal intensity index (SII) and ADC. Differences in SII and ADC between groups were tested using t-test. ADC was correlated with age using Pearson correlation coefficient. Mean SII±standard deviation was 2.7±1.8% for group A and 2.2±2.4% for group B, with no significant difference between groups (P=.270). Mean ADC was 2.48±0.38x10 -3 mm 2 /s for group A and 1.24±0.23x10 -3 mm 2 /s for group B. A significant difference between groups was found (Pnormal thymus at visual assessment • ADC is useful for distinguishing nonsuppressing normal thymus from mediastinal lymphoma • ADC is more accurate than transverse-diameter and surface-area in this discrimination • ADC of normal thymus is age dependent and increases with increasing age.

  11. Molecular and Silica-Supported Molybdenum Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts: Influence of Electronics and Dynamics on Activity Revealed by Kinetics, Solid-State NMR, and Chemical Shift Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Deven P; Gordon, Christopher P; Fedorov, Alexey; Liao, Wei-Chih; Ehrhorn, Henrike; Bittner, Celine; Zier, Manuel Luca; Bockfeld, Dirk; Chan, Ka Wing; Eisenstein, Odile; Raynaud, Christophe; Tamm, Matthias; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-12-06

    Molybdenum-based molecular alkylidyne complexes of the type [MesC≡Mo{OC(CH 3 ) 3-x (CF 3 ) x } 3 ] (MoF 0 , x = 0; MoF 3 , x = 1; MoF 6 , x = 2; MoF 9 , x = 3; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and their silica-supported analogues are prepared and characterized at the molecular level, in particular by solid-state NMR, and their alkyne metathesis catalytic activity is evaluated. The 13 C NMR chemical shift of the alkylidyne carbon increases with increasing number of fluorine atoms on the alkoxide ligands for both molecular and supported catalysts but with more shielded values for the supported complexes. The activity of these catalysts increases in the order MoF 0 catalysts coupled with DFT/ZORA calculations rationalize the NMR spectroscopic signatures and discernible activity trends at the frontier orbital level: (1) increasing the number of fluorine atoms lowers the energy of the π*(M≡C) orbital, explaining the more deshielded chemical shift values; it also leads to an increased electrophilicity and higher reactivity for catalysts up to MoF 6 , prior to a sharp decrease in reactivity for MoF 9 due to the formation of stable metallacyclobutadiene intermediates; (2) the silica-supported catalysts are less active than their molecular analogues because they are less electrophilic and dynamic, as revealed by their 13 C NMR chemical shift tensors.

  12. MR imaging of osteonecrosis using frequency selective chemical shift sequences; Neue Aspekte in der MR-Diagnostik der Osteonekrose: Selektive Fett/Wasser-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duda, S.H. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Laniado, M. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Schick, F. [Inst. fuer Physik, Tuebingen Univ. (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    The MR appearance of osteonecrosis was assessed on selective fat- and water images to further evaluate the nature of double-line sign. Conventional T1- and T2-weighted SE and frequency selective chemical shift images of eight patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head and three patients with bone infarcts were retrospectively reviewed. Eight of 11 patients showed a double-line sign on T2-weighted SE images. In these cases, correlation with selective water images revealed that a chemical shift artifact contributed to appearance and location of the hyperintense line. The authors conclude that chemical shift imaging improves our understanding of the nature of the double-line sign. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das MR-tomographische Erscheinungsbild der Osteonekrose auf selektiven Fett- und Wasserbildern wurde analysiert, um das in der Literatur beschriebene Doppellinienzeichen naeher zu untersuchen. Hierfuer wurden sowohl die herkoemmlichen T1- und T2-gewichteten Spin-Echo-Sequenzen herangezogen, als auch frequenzselektive Bilder, die aufgrund chemischer Verschiebung gewonnen wurden (1,5 T). Es wurden die Untersuchungen von acht Patienten mit avaskulaerer Hueftkopfnekrose und von drei Patienten mit Knocheninfarkten retrospektiv ausgewertet. Acht von 11 Patienten zeigten ein Doppellinienzeichen auf den T2-gewichteten Bildern. Die Korrelation mit den selektiven Wasserbildern ergab, dass durch chemische Verschiebung bedingte Artefakte das Erscheinungsbild und den Ort der hyperintensen Linie beeinflussten. Die Bildgebung mit Hilfe der chemischen Verschiebung verbessert unser Verstaendnis der MRT-Charakteristika der Osteonekrose. (orig.)

  13. Indoor-biofilter growth and exposure to airborne chemicals drive similar changes in plant root bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jacob A; Hu, Yi; Chau, Linh; Pauliushchyk, Margarita; Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Anandan, Shivanthi; Waring, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Due to the long durations spent inside by many humans, indoor air quality has become a growing concern. Biofiltration has emerged as a potential mechanism to clean indoor air of harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are typically found at concentrations higher indoors than outdoors. Root-associated microbes are thought to drive the functioning of plant-based biofilters, or biowalls, converting VOCs into biomass, energy, and carbon dioxide, but little is known about the root microbial communities of such artificially grown plants, how or whether they differ from those of plants grown in soil, and whether any changes in composition are driven by VOCs. In this study, we investigated how bacterial communities on biofilter plant roots change over time and in response to VOC exposure. Through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we compared root bacterial communities from soil-grown plants with those from two biowalls, while also comparing communities from roots exposed to clean versus VOC-laden air in a laboratory biofiltration system. The results showed differences in bacterial communities between soil-grown and biowall-grown plants and between bacterial communities from plant roots exposed to clean air and those from VOC-exposed plant roots. Both biowall-grown and VOC-exposed roots harbored enriched levels of bacteria from the genus Hyphomicrobium. Given their known capacities to break down aromatic and halogenated compounds, we hypothesize that these bacteria are important VOC degraders. While different strains of Hyphomicrobium proliferated in the two studied biowalls and our lab experiment, strains were shared across plant species, suggesting that a wide range of ornamental houseplants harbor similar microbes of potential use in living biofilters. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Reproducibility and influencing factors of 31P MR spectroscopy in rabbit liver with two-dimensional chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Risheng; Sun Jianzhong; Ding Wenhong; Xu Xiufang; Wang Zhikang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the reproducibility and influencing factors of relative quantification of phosphorus metabolites with two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D CSI) in rabbit liver. Methods: Using 2D CSI MRS, 500 ml phosphate (NaH 2 PO 4 ) solution phantom with 0.05 mol/L concentration and one healthy rabbit were scanned 30 times respectively in one day and rescanned 30 times in the next day, and the stability of MR scanner and reproducibility of within-run and between-days in the same individual were analyzed. Each of thirty rabbits was scanned and rescanned one time respectively in different days, and the reproducibility of between-days in one group was analyzed. The data were statistically analyzed with t tests. Results: (1) Phosphate solution phantom had a good reproducibility of within-run with the coefficient variation (CV) of 4.92% and 5.12% respectively in different two days. No significant change of phosphorus metabolites was detected in between-days, which was 16.68±0.82 and 16.56± 0.85 respectively (t=0.665, P>0.05). (2) The CV of metabolites in one healthy rabbit ranged from 8.04% to 34.13%. Among the metabolites, β-ATP had the best reproducibility with the CV less than 10%. PME was 0.88±0.28 and 0.88±0.30, PDE was 4.35±0.66 and 4.35±0.66, Pi was 0.95±0.30 and 0.97±0.28, α-ATP was 5.58±0.60 and 5.61±0.61, β-ATP was 2.70±0.22 and 2.71± 0.22, γ-ATP was 2.20±0.63 and 2.18±0.44 respectively, no significant changes of metabolites were detected in between-days (P>0.05). (3) The CV of metabolites in 30 healthy rabbits ranged from 8.48% to 36.21%. Among the metabolites, β-ATP had the best reproducibility with CV less than 10%. PME was 0.84±0.30 and 0.79±0.28, PDE was 4.29±0.72 and 3.94±0.84, Pi was 0.91±0.28 and 0.92± 0.31, α-ATP was 5.65±0.66 and 5.36±0.60, β-ATP was 2.71±0.23 and 2.66±0.25, γ-ATP was 2.07±0.29 and 1.99±0.37 respectively, no significant changes of metabolites were detected in between-days (P>0

  15. Integrated ecological and chemical food web accumulation modeling explains PAH temporal trends during regime shifts in a shallow lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangzhen; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; Liu, Wenxiu; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chen; Xu, Fuliu; Mooij, Wolf M; Koelmans, Albert A

    2017-08-01

    Shallow lakes can switch suddenly from a turbid situation with high concentrations of phytoplankton and other suspended solids to a vegetated state with clear water, and vice versa. These alternative stable states may have a substantial impact on the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). Models that are fit to simulate impacts from these complex interactions are scarce. We developed a contaminant fate model which is linked to an ecosystem model (PCLake) for shallow lakes. This integrated model was successful in simulating long-term dynamics (1953-2012) of representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the main biotic and abiotic components in a large shallow lake (Chaohu in China), which has undergone regime shifts in this period. Historical records from sediment cores were used to evaluate the model. The model revealed that regime shifts in shallow lakes had a strong impact on the fate of less hydrophobic compounds due to the large storage capacity of macrophytes, which accumulated up to 55.6% of phenanthrene in the clear state. The abrupt disappearance of macrophytes after the regime shift resulted in a sudden change in phenanthrene distribution, as the sediment became the major sink. For more hydrophobic compounds such as benzo(a)pyrene, the modeled impact of the regime shift was negligible for the whole environment, yet large for biotic compartments. This study is the first to provide a full mechanistic analysis of the impact of regime shifts on the fate of PAHs in a real lake ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  17. Hydrogen Atomic Positions of O-H···O Hydrogen Bonds in Solution and in the Solid State: The Synergy of Quantum Chemical Calculations with ¹H-NMR Chemical Shifts and X-ray Diffraction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskos, Michael G; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2017-03-07

    The exact knowledge of hydrogen atomic positions of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in solution and in the solid state has been a major challenge in structural and physical organic chemistry. The objective of this review article is to summarize recent developments in the refinement of labile hydrogen positions with the use of: (i) density functional theory (DFT) calculations after a structure has been determined by X-ray from single crystals or from powders; (ii) ¹H-NMR chemical shifts as constraints in DFT calculations, and (iii) use of root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated ¹H-NMR chemical shifts considering the great sensitivity of ¹H-NMR shielding to hydrogen bonding properties.

  18. 31P MAS refocused INADEQUATE spin-echo (REINE) NMR spectroscopy: revealing J coupling and chemical shift two-dimensional correlations in disordered solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerry, Paul; Smith, Mark E; Brown, Steven P

    2009-08-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) variations in (2)J(P(1),P(1)), (2)J(P(1),P(2)), and (2)J(P(2),P(2)) are obtained--using the REINE (REfocused INADEQUATE spin-Echo) pulse sequence presented by Cadars et al. (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2007, 9, 92-103)--from pixel-by-pixel fittings of the spin-echo modulation for the 2D correlation peaks due to linked phosphate tetrahedra (P(1)-P(1), P(1)-P(2), P(2)-P(1), and P(2)-P(2)) in a (31)P refocused INADEQUATE solid-state MAS NMR spectrum of a cadmium phosphate glass, 0.575CdO-0.425P(2)O(5). In particular, separate variations for each 2D (31)P REINE peak are obtained which reveal correlations between the J couplings and the (31)P chemical shifts of the coupled nuclei that are much clearer than those evident in previously presented 2D z-filtered (31)P spin-echo spectra. Notably, such correlations between the J couplings and the (31)P chemical shifts are observed even though the conditional probability distributions extracted using the protocol of Cadars et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 4466-4476) indicate that there is no marked correlation between the (31)P chemical shifts of neighboring phosphate tetrahedra. For 2D peaks at the P(2) (31)P chemical shift in the direct dimension, there can be contributions from chains of three units (P(1)-P(2)-P(1)), chains of four units (P(1)-P(2)-P(2)-P(1)), or longer chains or rings (-P(2)-P(2)-P(2)-): for the representative glass considered here, best fits are obtained assuming a glass comprised predominantly of chains of four units. The following variations are found: (2)J(P(1),P(1)) = 13.4 +/- 0.3 to 14.8 +/- 0.5 Hz, (2)J(P(1),P(2)) = 15.0 +/- 0.3 to 18.2 +/- 0.3 Hz, and (2)J(P(2),P(2)) = 5.9 +/- 0.6 to 9.1 +/- 0.9 Hz from the fits to the P(1)-P(1), P(1)-P(2), and P(2)-P(2) peaks, respectively. The correlation of a particular J coupling with the (31)P chemical shifts of the considered nucleus and the coupled nucleus is quantified by the coefficients C(F(2)) and C(F(1)) that correspond to the

  19. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  1. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas; Carvalho, Mario G. de, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais

    2012-07-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  2. Refinement of labile hydrogen positions based on DFT calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts: comparison with X-ray and neutron diffraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskos, Michael G; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2017-05-31

    Numerous gas phase electron diffraction, ultra-fast electron diffraction, X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments on β-dicarbonyl compounds exhibiting enol-enol tautomeric equilibrium, with emphasis on acetylacetone and dibenzoylmethane, have so far been reported with conflicting results on the structural details of the O-HO intramolecular hydrogen bond and resulted in alternative hypotheses on the intramolecular hydrogen bond potential function either a double minimum potential corresponding to two tautomeric forms in equilibrium or a single symmetrical one. We demonstrate herein, firstly, that the DFT calculated OH 1 H NMR chemical shifts of acetylacetone and dibenzoylmethane exhibit a strong linear dependence on the computed OO hydrogen bond length of ∼-50 ppm Å -1 and as a function of the O-HO bond angle of ∼1 ppm per degree, upon the transfer of the hydrogen atom from the ground state toward the transition state. Secondly, the refinement of labile hydrogen atomic positions in intramolecular hydrogen bonds based on the root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated 1 H NMR chemical shifts in solution can provide high resolution structures of O-H and O(H)O bond lengths and O-HO bond angles with an accuracy of ∼10 -2 Å and ∼0.5°, respectively. Thirdly, the calculated 1 H NMR chemical shifts in solution of the two ground state tautomers in equilibrium of acetylacetone and dibenzoylmethane are in excellent agreement with the experimental value, even for moderate basis sets for energy minimization. In contrast, the single symmetrical structure in a strongly delocalized system is a transition state with calculated 1 H NMR chemical shifts which strongly deviate from the experimental value. Fourth, the DFT calculated ground state O-H bond lengths of acetylacetone and dibenzoylmethane are in quantitative agreement with the literature data which take into account the effect of quantum nuclear motion. The DFT structural

  3. Hydrogen exchange rate of tyrosine hydroxyl groups in proteins as studied by the deuterium isotope effect on C(zeta) chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, Jungoo; Ono, Akira Mei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2009-12-30

    We describe a new NMR method for monitoring the individual hydrogen exchange rates of the hydroxyl groups of tyrosine (Tyr) residues in proteins. The method utilizes (2S,3R)-[beta(2),epsilon(1,2)-(2)H(3);0,alpha,beta,zeta-(13)C(4);(15)N]-Tyr, zeta-SAIL Tyr, to detect and assign the (13)C(zeta) signals of Tyr rings efficiently, either by indirect (1)H-detection through 7-8 Hz (1)H(delta)-(13)C(zeta) spin couplings or by direct (13)C(zeta) observation. A comparison of the (13)C(zeta) chemical shifts of three Tyr residues of an 18.2 kDa protein, EPPIb, dissolved in H(2)O and D(2)O, revealed that all three (13)C(zeta) signals in D(2)O appeared at approximately 0.13 ppm ( approximately 20 Hz at 150.9 MHz) higher than those in H(2)O. In a H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) mixture, however, one of the three signals for (13)C(zeta) appeared as a single peak at the averaged chemical shifts, and the other two appeared as double peaks at exactly the same chemical shifts in H(2)O and D(2)O, in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.6) at 40 degrees C. These three peaks were assigned to Tyr-36, Tyr-120, and Tyr-30, from the lower to higher chemical shifts, respectively. The results indicate that the hydroxyl proton of Tyr-120 exchanges faster than a few milliseconds, whereas those of Tyr-30 and Tyr-36 exchange more slowly. The exchange rate of the Tyr-30 hydroxyl proton, k(ex), under these conditions was determined by (13)C NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) to be 9.2 +/- 1.1 s(-1). The Tyr-36 hydroxyl proton, however, exchanges too slowly to be determined by EXSY. These profound differences among the hydroxyl proton exchange rates are closely related to their relative solvent accessibility and the hydrogen bonds associated with the Tyr hydroxyl groups in proteins.

  4. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory and their 13C NMR isotropic nuclear shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H-, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives......). The decreasing electronegativity of the halogen substituent (F, Cl, Br and I) was reflected in both nonrelativistic and relativistic NMR results as decreased values of chemical shifts of carbon atoms attached to halogen (C3 and C6) leading to a strong sensitivity to halogen atom type at 3 and 6 positions...

  5. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment.

  6. Solid-state NMR chemical-shift perturbations indicate domain reorientation of the DnaG primase in the primosome of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiennet, Carole [Université de Lorraine, CNRS, CRM2, UMR 7036 (France); Wiegand, Thomas [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Bazin, Alexandre [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Cadalbert, Riccardo [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Kunert, Britta; Lacabanne, Denis [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Gutsche, Irina [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS), CNRS, IBS, CEA, IBS (France); Terradot, Laurent, E-mail: l.terradot@ibcp.fr [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [Université de Lyon 1, Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France)

    2016-03-15

    We here investigate the interactions between the DnaB helicase and the C-terminal domain of the corresponding DnaG primase of Helicobacter pylori using solid-state NMR. The difficult crystallization of this 387 kDa complex, where the two proteins interact in a six to three ratio, is circumvented by simple co-sedimentation of the two proteins directly into the MAS-NMR rotor. While the amount of information that can be extracted from such a large protein is still limited, we can assign a number of amino-acid residues experiencing significant chemical-shift perturbations upon helicase-primase complex formation. The location of these residues is used as a guide to model the interaction interface between the two proteins in the complex. Chemical-shift perturbations also reveal changes at the interaction interfaces of the hexameric HpDnaB assembly on HpDnaG binding. A structural model of the complex that explains the experimental findings is obtained.

  7. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  8. Differential Responses of Two Ecologically Similar Case-Bearing Caddisfly Species to a Fish Chemical Cue: Implications for a Coexistence Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Jun-Ichi; Tayasu, Ichiro; Nakano, Shin-Ichi; Okuda, Noboru

    2017-12-01

    The mechanisms for the coexistence of multiple species occupying the same ecological niche are often puzzling. Predator effects on competitively superior species is one possible mechanism. In this study, we tested whether the presence of size-selective predators (fishes) acts as a mechanism for the coexistence of two species of case-bearing caddisfly larvae, Perissoneura paradoxa and Psilotreta kisoensis (Odontoceridae, Trichoptera). The larvae of these two species have similar ecological and life history traits except their body size, and they have been found to coexist only in habitats shared with predatory fishes. Experiments on intra and interspecific competition revealed that the larger Pe. paradoxa always outcompeted the smaller Ps. kisoensis in the absence of predatory fishes, suggesting that Pe. paradoxa performed intra-guild predation on Ps. kisoensis. We also conducted experiments to examine how strongly each of these species responded in terms of case repair with/without a predator chemical cue after their cases were partly dismantled. Perissoneura paradoxa exhibited a stronger case repair response in the presence of a predator chemical cue than that exhibited by Ps. kisoensis, suggesting that Pe. paradoxa is more vulnerable to fish predation, probably because their body size is in the preferred prey range of fishes. We suggest that the presence of predators works in the favor of smaller, subordinate species through size-selective predator effects, enabling these two competitive species to coexist in the same habitat.

  9. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Correlations of the chemical shift on fasly rotating biological solids by means of NMR spectroscopy; Korrelationen der chemischen Verschiebung an schnell rotierenden biologischen Festkoerpern mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Christian

    2010-04-27

    The basic aim of the thesis was the development and improvement of homo- and heteronuclear feedback sequences for the generation of correlation spectra of the chemical shift. In a first step the possibility of the acquisition of {sup 13}C-{sup 13} correlation spectra of the chemical shift by means of inversion pulses with low RF power factor was studied. Furthermore it was shown that broad-band phase-modulated inversion and universal rotational pulses can be constructed by means of global optimization procedures like the genetic algorithms under regardment of the available RF field strength. By inversion, universal rotational, and 360 pulses as starting values of the optimization efficient homonuclear CN{sub n}{sup {nu}} and RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} mixing sequences as well as heteronuclear RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} feedback sequences were generated. The satisfactory power of the numerically optimized sequences was shown by means of the simulation as well by means of correlation experiments of the chemical shift of L-histidine, L-arginine, and the (CUG){sub 97}-RNA. This thesis deals furthermore with the possibility to acquire simultaneously different signals with several receivers. By means of numerically optimized RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} pulse sequences both {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation spectra were simultaneously generated. Furthermore it could be shown that the simultaneous acquisition of 3D-{sup 15}N-{sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N-({sup 1}H)-{sup 1}H correlation spectra is possible. By this in only one measurement process resonance assignments can be met and studies of the global folding performed. A further application of several receivers is the simultaneous acquisition of CHHC, NHHN, NHHC, as well as CHHN spectra. By such experiments it is possible to characterize the hydrogen-bonding pattern and the glycosidic torsion angle {sup {chi}} in RNA. This was demonstrated by means of the (CUG){sub 97

  11. Comparison of CT and chemical-shift MRI for differentiating thymoma from non-thymomatous conditions in myasthenia gravis: value of qualitative and quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priola, A.M.; Priola, S.M.; Gned, D.; Giraudo, M.T.; Fornari, A.; Veltri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) and chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) for differentiating thymoma (THY) from thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and normal thymus (NT), and to determine which technique is more accurate. Materials and methods: Eighty-three patients with generalised MG who underwent surgery were divided into the TLH/NT group (A; 65 patients) and THY group (B; 24 patients). Differences in qualitative characteristics and quantitative data (CT: radiodensity in Hounsfield units; MRI: signal intensity index [SII]) between groups were tested using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. Logistic regression models were estimated for both qualitative and quantitative analyses. At quantitative analysis, discrimination abilities were determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUROC) with computation of optimal cut-off points. The diagnostic accuracies of CT and MRI were compared using McNemar's test. Results: At qualitative assessment, MRI had higher accuracy than CT (96.4%, 80/83 and 86.7%, 72/83, respectively). At quantitative analysis, both the radiodensity and SII were significantly different between groups (p<0.0001). For CT, at quantitative assessment, the AUROC of the radiodensity in discriminating between groups was 0.904 (optimal cut-off point, 20 HU) with an accuracy of 77.1% (64/83). For MRI, the AUROC of the SII was 0.989 (optimal cut-off point, 7.766%) with an accuracy of 96.4% (80/83), which was significantly higher than CT (p<0.0001). By using optimal cut-off points for cases with an erroneous diagnosis at qualitative assessment, accuracy improved both for CT (89.2%, 74/83) and MRI (97.6%, 81/83). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis is useful in evaluating patients with MG and improves the diagnostic accuracy of CT and MRI based on qualitative assessment. Chemical-shift MRI is more reliable than CT in

  12. The Nature of the Chemical Process. 1. Symmetry Evolution – Revised Information Theory, Similarity Principle and Ugly Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symmetry is a measure of indistinguishability. Similarity is a continuous measure of imperfect symmetry. Lewis' remark that “gain of entropy means loss of information” defines the relationship of entropy and information. Three laws of information theory have been proposed. Labeling by introducing nonsymmetry and formatting by introducing symmetry are defined. The function L ( L=lnw, w is the number of microstates, or the sum of entropy and information, L=S+I of the universe is a constant (the first law of information theory. The entropy S of the universe tends toward a maximum (the second law law of information theory. For a perfect symmetric static structure, the information is zero and the static entropy is the maximum (the third law law of information theory. Based on the Gibbs inequality and the second law of the revised information theory we have proved the similarity principle (a continuous higher similarity−higher entropy relation after the rejection of the Gibbs paradox and proved the Curie-Rosen symmetry principle (a higher symmetry−higher stability relation as a special case of the similarity principle. The principles of information minimization and potential energy minimization are compared. Entropy is the degree of symmetry and information is the degree of nonsymmetry. There are two kinds of symmetries: dynamic and static symmetries. Any kind of symmetry will define an entropy and, corresponding to the dynamic and static symmetries, there are static entropy and dynamic entropy. Entropy in thermodynamics is a special kind of dynamic entropy. Any spontaneous process will evolve towards the highest possible symmetry, either dynamic or static or both. Therefore the revised information theory can be applied to characterizing all kinds of structural stability and process spontaneity. Some examples in chemical physics have been given. Spontaneous processes of all kinds of molecular

  13. Bonding and XPS chemical shifts in ZrSiO4 versus SiO2 and ZrO2: Charge transfer and electrostatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guittet, M.J.; Gautier-Soyer, M.; Crocombette, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The degree of ionic/covalent character in oxides has a great influence on the electronic structure and the material's properties. A simple phenomenological rule is currently used to predict the evolution of covalence/ionicity in mixed oxides compared to the parent ones, and is also widely used to interpret the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding-energy shifts of the cations in terms of charge transfer. We test the validity of this simple rule and its application to XPS of mixed oxides with a prototypical system: zircon ZrSiO 4 and parent oxides ZrO 2 and SiO 2 . The ionic charges on Si, Zr, and O were extracted from the density functional theory in the local density approximation calculations in the plane-wave formalism. In agreement with the predictions of the phenomenological rule, the most ionic cation (Zr) becomes more ionic in ZrSiO 4 than in ZrO 2 , while the more covalent one (Si) experiences a corresponding increase in covalence with respect to SiO 2 . The XPS chemical shifts of the O 1s, Si 2p, and Zr 3d 5/2 photoelectron lines in the three oxides were measured and the respective contributions of charge transfer and electrostatic effects (initial state), as well as extra-atomic relaxation effects (final state) evaluated. The validity of the phenomenological rule of mixed oxides used in x-ray electron spectroscopy as well as the opportunity to use the O1s binding-energy shifts to derive a scale of covalence in silicates is discussed

  14. Evaluation of the Aromaticity of a Non-Planar Carbon Nano-Structure by Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shift Criterion: Aromaticity of the Nitrogen- Doped Corannulene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reisi-Vanani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Substitution of two or four carbon atoms by nitrogen in the corannulene molecule as a carbon nanostructure was done and the obtained structures were optimized at MP2/6-31G(d level of theory. Calculations of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS were performed to analyze the aromaticity of the corannulene rings and its derivatives upon doping with N at B3LYP/6-31G(d level of theory. Results showed NICS values in six-membered and five-membered rings of two and four N atoms doped corannulene are different and very dependent to number and position of the N atoms. The values of the mean NICS of all N-doped structures are more positive than intact corannulene that show insertion of N atom to the structures causes to decreasing aromaticity of them.

  15. 31P-MR spectroscopy of all regions of the human heart at 1.5 T with acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koestler, H.; Beer, M.; Buchner, S.; Sandstede, J.; Pabst, T.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this study was to show whether or not acquisition-weighted chemical shift imaging (AW-CSI) allows the determination of PCr and ATP in the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart at 1.5 T. Methods: 12 healthy volunteers were examined using a conventional chemical shift imaging (CSI) and an AW-CSI. The sequences differed only in the number of repetitions for each point in k space. A hanning function was used as filter function leading to 7 repetitions in the center of the k space and 0 in the corners. Thus, AW-CSI had the same resolution as the CSI sequence. The results for both sequences were analyzed using identically positioned voxels in the septal, anterior, lateral and posterior wall. Results: The determined averaged AW-CSI signal to noise ratios were higher for PCr by a factor of 1.3 and for ATP by 1.4 than those of CSI. The PCr/ATP ratios were higher by a factor of 1.2 - 1.3 and showed a smaller standard deviation in all locations for AW-CSI. The mean PCr/ATP ratios determined by AW-CSI of septal, lateral and posterior wall were almost identical (1.72 - 1.76), while it was higher in the anterior wall (1.9). Conclusions: The reduced contamination in AW-CSI improves the signal to noise ratio and the determination of the PCr/ATP ratio in cardiac 31 P spectroscopy compared to CSI with the same resolution. The results in volunteers indicate that AW-CSI renders 31 P spectroscopy of the lateral and posterior wall of the human heart feasible for patient studies at 1.5 T. (orig.) [de

  16. Comparison of CT and chemical-shift MRI for differentiating thymoma from non-thymomatous conditions in myasthenia gravis: value of qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, A M; Priola, S M; Gned, D; Giraudo, M T; Fornari, A; Veltri, A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) and chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) for differentiating thymoma (THY) from thymic lymphoid hyperplasia (TLH) and normal thymus (NT), and to determine which technique is more accurate. Eighty-three patients with generalised MG who underwent surgery were divided into the TLH/NT group (A; 65 patients) and THY group (B; 24 patients). Differences in qualitative characteristics and quantitative data (CT: radiodensity in Hounsfield units; MRI: signal intensity index [SII]) between groups were tested using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. Logistic regression models were estimated for both qualitative and quantitative analyses. At quantitative analysis, discrimination abilities were determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUROC) with computation of optimal cut-off points. The diagnostic accuracies of CT and MRI were compared using McNemar's test. At qualitative assessment, MRI had higher accuracy than CT (96.4%, 80/83 and 86.7%, 72/83, respectively). At quantitative analysis, both the radiodensity and SII were significantly different between groups (pquantitative assessment, the AUROC of the radiodensity in discriminating between groups was 0.904 (optimal cut-off point, 20 HU) with an accuracy of 77.1% (64/83). For MRI, the AUROC of the SII was 0.989 (optimal cut-off point, 7.766%) with an accuracy of 96.4% (80/83), which was significantly higher than CT (pqualitative assessment, accuracy improved both for CT (89.2%, 74/83) and MRI (97.6%, 81/83). Quantitative analysis is useful in evaluating patients with MG and improves the diagnostic accuracy of CT and MRI based on qualitative assessment. Chemical-shift MRI is more reliable than CT in differentiating THYs from non-thymomatous conditions. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic structure and (1)H NMR chemical shifts in host-guest complexes of cucurbit[6]uril and sym-tetramethyl cucurbit[6]uril with imidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Priyanka H; Pinjari, Rahul V; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2010-10-14

    Binding patterns and (1)H NMR chemical shifts in the complexes of protonated N-(4-hydroxylphenyl)imidazole (g1), N-(4-aminophenyl)imidazole (g2), 2-phenylimidazole (g3) guests with cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]), and sym-substituted tetramethyl cucurbit[6]uril (TMeCB[6]) in the gas phase as well as in water have been investigated using the density functional theory. It has been shown that the inclusion complexes of g1 and g2 with CB[6] or TMeCB[6] exhibit selective encapsulation of the phenyl moiety with its substituents binding to portal oxygens on the lower rim of the host and imidazole protons facilitate C-H···O interactions externally with upper rim ureido oxygens. On the other hand, the lowest-energy g3 complex encapsulates the imidazole ring within the host, engendering N-H···O interactions with portal oxygens on the upper rim of the host with the phenyl ring residing outside the cavity owing to an absence of para-substituent and show qualitatively different host-guest binding patterns. Calculated (1)H NMR spectra of the complexes in water reveal shielding of phenyl ring protons within the host cavity which exhibit signals at 0.2-0.5 ppm, whereas the protons of the imidazole ring participating in hydrogen bonded interactions exhibit deshielding, and the corresponding (1)H NMR signals are downshifted by 1.1-1.5 ppm in the spectra compared to those in the unbound guest. (1)H NMR chemical shifts of inclusion complexes thus obtained are in consonant with δ(H) patterns observed in experiments reported in the literature.

  18. Leveraging 3D chemical similarity, target and phenotypic data in the identification of drug-protein and drug-adverse effect associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target identification is crucial to discover novel applications for existing drugs and provide more insights about mechanisms of biological actions, such as adverse drug effects (ADEs). Computational methods along with the integration of current big data sources provide a useful framework for drug-target and drug-adverse effect discovery. In this article, we propose a method based on the integration of 3D chemical similarity, target and adverse effect data to generate a drug-target-adverse effect predictor along with a simple leveraging system to improve identification of drug-targets and drug-adverse effects. In the first step, we generated a system for multiple drug-target identification based on the application of 3D drug similarity into a large target dataset extracted from the ChEMBL. Next, we developed a target-adverse effect predictor combining targets from ChEMBL with phenotypic information provided by SIDER data source. Both modules were linked to generate a final predictor that establishes hypothesis about new drug-target-adverse effect candidates. Additionally, we showed that leveraging drug-target candidates with phenotypic data is very useful to improve the identification of drug-targets. The integration of phenotypic data into drug-target candidates yielded up to twofold precision improvement. In the opposite direction, leveraging drug-phenotype candidates with target data also yielded a significant enhancement in the performance. The modeling described in the current study is simple and efficient and has applications at large scale in drug repurposing and drug safety through the identification of mechanism of action of biological effects.

  19. A data-oriented self-calibration and robust chemical-shift encoding by using clusterization (OSCAR): Theory, optimization and clinical validation in neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, G; La Corte, A; Gaeta, M; Finocchio, G

    2018-01-01

    Multi-echo Chemical Shift-Encoded (CSE) methods for Fat-Water quantification are growing in clinical use due to their ability to estimate and correct some confounding effects. State of the art CSE water/fat separation approaches rely on a multi-peak fat spectrum with peak frequencies and relative amplitudes kept constant over the entire MRI dataset. However, the latter approximation introduces a systematic error in fat percentage quantification in patients where the differences in lipid chemical composition are significant (such as for neuromuscular disorders) because of the spatial dependence of the peak amplitudes. The present work aims to overcome this limitation by taking advantage of an unsupervised clusterization-based approach offering a reliable criterion to carry out a data-driven segmentation of the input MRI dataset into multiple regions. Results established that the presented algorithm is able to identify at least 4 different partitions from MRI dataset under which to perform independent self-calibration routines and was found robust in NMD imaging studies (as evaluated on a cohort of 24 subjects) against latest CSE techniques with either calibrated or non-calibrated approaches. Particularly, the PDFF of the thigh was more reproducible for the quantitative estimation of pathological muscular fat infiltrations, which may be promising to evaluate disease progression in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Shifting Sugars and Shifting Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face. PMID:25688600

  1. Shifting sugars and shifting paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L Siegal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face.

  2. A lanthanide complex with dual biosensing properties: CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts) with europium DOTA-tetraglycinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; Kiefer, Garry E; Rothman, Douglas L; Sherry, A Dean; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2011-12-01

    Responsive contrast agents (RCAs) composed of lanthanide(III) ion (Ln3R) complexes with a variety of1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTA4S) derivatives have shown great potential as molecular imaging agents for MR. A variety of LnDOTA–tetraamide complexes have been demonstrated as RCAs for molecular imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). The CEST method detects proton exchange between bulk water and any exchangeable sites on the ligand itself or an inner sphere of bound water that is shifted by a paramagnetic Ln3R ion bound in the core of the macrocycle. It has also been shown that molecular imaging is possible when the RCA itself is observed (i.e. not its effect on bulk water) using a method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS). The BIRDS method utilizes redundant information stored in the nonexchangeable proton resonances emanating from the paramagnetic RCA for ambient factors such as temperature and/or pH.Thus, CEST and BIRDS rely on exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons, respectively, for biosensing. We posited that it would be feasible to combine these two biosensing features into the same RCA (i.e. dual CEST and BIRDS properties). A complex between europium(III) ion (Eu3R) and DOTA–tetraglycinate [DOTA–(gly)S4] was used to demonstrate that its CEST characteristics are preserved, while its BIRDS properties are also detectable. The in vitro temperature sensitivity of EuDOTA–(gly)S4 was used to show that qualitative MR contrast with CEST can be calibrated using quantitative MR mapping with BIRDS, thereby enabling quantitative molecular imaging at high spatial resolution.

  3. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative evaluation of diffusion-weighted MRI and chemical-shift imaging in the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral body fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Schmidt, Gerwin; Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf; Dürr, Hans Roland; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of qualitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), quantitative DWI, and chemical-shift imaging in a single prospective cohort of patients with acute osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. The study group was composed of patients with 26 osteoporotic vertebral fractures (18 women, eight men; mean age, 69 years; age range, 31 years 6 months to 86 years 2 months) and 20 malignant vertebral fractures (nine women, 11 men; mean age, 63.4 years; age range, 24 years 8 months to 86 years 4 months). T1-weighted, STIR, and T2-weighted sequences were acquired at 1.5 T. A DW reverse fast imaging with steady-state free precession (PSIF) sequence at different delta values was evaluated qualitatively. A DW echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence and a DW single-shot turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence at different b values were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using the apparent diffusion coefficient. Opposed-phase sequences were used to assess signal intensity qualitatively. The signal loss between in- and opposed-phase images was determined quantitatively. Two-tailed Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed. Sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were determined. Qualitative DW-PSIF imaging (delta = 3 ms) showed the best performance for distinguishing between benign and malignant fractures (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 88.5%; accuracy, 93.5%). Qualitative DW-EPI (b = 50 s/mm(2) [p = 1.00]; b = 250 s/mm(2) [p = 0.50]) and DW single-shot TSE imaging (b = 100 s/mm(2) [p = 1.00]; b = 250 s/mm(2) [p = 0.18]; b = 400 s/mm(2) [p = 0.18]; b = 600 s/mm(2) [p = 0.39]) did not indicate significant differences between benign and malignant fractures. DW-EPI using a b value of 500 s/mm(2) (p = 0.01) indicated significant differences between benign and malignant vertebral fractures. Quantitative DW-EPI (p = 0.09) and qualitative opposed-phase imaging (p = 0

  4. Chemical shift effect predicting lymph node status in rectal cancer using high-resolution MR imaging with node-for-node matched histopathological validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Chongda; Ye, Feng; Liu, Yuan; Zhou, Chunwu [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, ChaoYang District, Beijing (China); Zheng, Zhaoxu [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Colorectal Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, ChaoYang District, Beijing (China); Zou, Shuangmei [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, ChaoYang District, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the value of the chemical shift effect (CSE) as well as other criteria for the prediction of lymph node status. Twenty-nine patients who underwent radical surgery of rectal cancers were studied with pre- and postoperative specimen MRI. Lymph nodes were harvested from transverse whole-mount specimens and compared with in vivo and ex vivo images to obtain a precise slice-for-section match. Preoperative MR characteristics including CSE, as well as other predictors, were evaluated by two readers independently between benign and metastatic nodes. A total of 255 benign and 35 metastatic nodes were obtained; 71.4% and 69.4% of benign nodes were detected with regular CSE for two readers, whereas 80.0% and 74.3% of metastatic nodes with absence of CSE. The CSE rendered areas under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.879 and 0.845 for predicting nodal status for two readers. The criteria of nodal location, border, signal intensity and minimum distance to the rectal wall were also useful but with AUCs (0.629-0.743) lower than those of CSE. CSE is a reliable predictor for differentiating benign from metastatic nodes. Additional criteria should be taken into account when it is difficult to determine the nodal status by using only a single predictor. (orig.)

  5. Scan time reduction in ²³Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence: Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingärtner, Sebastian; Wetterling, Friedrich; Konstandin, Simon; Fatar, Marc; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Schad, Lothar R

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in (23)Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI (23)Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered (1)H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. 2D relayed anisotropy correlation NMR: Characterization of the 13C' chemical shift tensor orientation in the peptide plane of the dipeptide AibAib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Bert; Leppert, Joerg; Wenschuh, Holger; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2001-01-01

    An approach to the determination of the orientation of the carbonyl chemical shift (CS) tensor in a 13 C'- 15 N- 1 H dipolar coupled spin network is proposed. The method involves the measurement of the Euler angles of the 13 C'- 15 N and 15 N- 1 H dipolar vectors in the 13 C' CS tensor principal axes system, respectively, via a 13 C- 15 N REDOR experiment and by a 2D relayed anisotropy correlation of the 13 C' CSA (ω 2 ) and 15 N- 1 H dipolar interaction (ω 1 ). Via numerical simulations the sensitivity of the ω 1 cross sections of the 2D spectrum to the Euler angles of the 15 N- 1 H bond vector in the 13 C' CSA frame is shown. Employing the procedure outlined in this work, we have determined the orientation of the 13 C' CS tensor in the peptide plane of the dipeptide AibAib-NH 2 (Aib = α-aminoisobutyric acid). The Euler angles are found to be (χ CN , ψ CN ) = (34 deg. ± 2 deg., 88 deg. ± 2 deg.) and (χ NH , ψ NH ) = (90 deg. ± 10 deg., 80 deg. ± 10 deg.). From the measured Euler angles it is seen that the σ 33 and σ 22 components of the 13 C' CS tensor approximately lie in the peptide plane

  7. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  8. Hepatic steatosis assessment with 1H-spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging at 3.0 T before hepatic surgery: Reliable enough for making clinical decisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Krššák, Martin; Maresch, Judith; Wrba, Fritz; Kaczirek, Klaus; Gruenberger, Thomas; Tamandl, Dietmar; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Weber, Michael; Schima, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of liver fat quantification using chemical shift imaging (CSI) and H1 MR-spectroscopy (MRS) at 3.0 T in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods: Totally 35 patients were included in this prospective IRB approved study. The histopathologically assessed liver fat was compared to the hepatic fat fractions calculated with CSI (with and without spleen correction) and MRS. Spearman's rank correlation and Fisher z-test were used for correlation analysis. Sensitivity and specificity regarding the detection of marked steatosis were calculated for the different modalities and compared using the McNemar test. Results: MRS (r = .85) and CSI with spleen correction (r = .85) showed a significantly better correlation (p = .03) with histology compared to CSI without spleen correction (r = .67). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of marked steatosis was 100% (12/12) and 87% (20/23) for MRS and 92% (11/12) and 83% (19/23) for CSI with spleen correction (p > .12). Conclusion: For the assessment of hepatic steatosis both CSI with spleen correction and MRS at 3.0 T, show a good correlation with histology. CSI without spleen correction should not be used. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of marked steatosis are high with both modalities. However, results that are scattered around the cut-off values are not reliable enough for clinical decisions.

  9. Comparison of diffusion-weighted images using short inversion time inversion recovery or chemical shift selective pulse as fat suppression in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Toshiki; Nasu, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nawano, Shigeru; Ito, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Fat suppression is essential for diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the body. However, the chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse often fails to suppress fat signals in the breast. The purpose of this study was to compare DWI using CHESS and DWI using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) in terms of fat suppression and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value. DWI using STIR, DWI using CHESS, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained in 32 patients with breast carcinoma. Uniformity of fat suppression, ADC, signal intensity, and visualization of the breast tumors were evaluated. In 44% (14/32) of patients there was insufficient fat suppression in the breasts on DWI using CHESS, whereas 0% was observed on DWI using STIR (P<0.0001). The ADCs obtained for DWI using STIR were 4.3% lower than those obtained for DWI using CHESS (P<0.02); there was a strong correlation of the ADC measurement (r=0.93, P<0.001). DWI using STIR may be excellent for fat suppression; and the ADC obtained in this sequence was well correlated with that obtained with DWI using CHESS. DWI using STIR may be useful when the fat suppression technique in DWI using CHESS does not work well. (author)

  10. Proton resonance frequency chemical shift thermometry: experimental design and validation toward high-resolution noninvasive temperature monitoring and in vivo experience in a nonhuman primate model of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, S; Mao, H; Howell, L; Zhang, X; Pate, K S; Magrath, P R; Tong, F; Wei, L; Qiu, D; Fleischer, C; Oshinski, J N

    2015-06-01

    Applications for noninvasive biologic temperature monitoring are widespread in biomedicine and of particular interest in the context of brain temperature regulation, where traditionally costly and invasive monitoring schemes limit their applicability in many settings. Brain thermal regulation, therefore, remains controversial, motivating the development of noninvasive approaches such as temperature-sensitive nuclear MR phenomena. The purpose of this work was to compare the utility of competing approaches to MR thermometry by using proton resonance frequency chemical shift. We tested 3 methodologies, hypothesizing the feasibility of a fast and accurate approach to chemical shift thermometry, in a phantom study at 3T. A conventional, paired approach (difference [DIFF]-1), an accelerated single-scan approach (DIFF-2), and a new, further accelerated strategy (DIFF-3) were tested. Phantom temperatures were modulated during real-time fiber optic temperature monitoring, with MR thermometry derived simultaneously from temperature-sensitive changes in the water proton chemical shift (∼0.01 ppm/°C). MR thermometry was subsequently performed in a series of in vivo nonhuman primate experiments under physiologic and ischemic conditions, testing its reproducibility and overall performance. Chemical shift thermometry demonstrated excellent agreement with phantom temperatures for all 3 approaches (DIFF-1: linear regression R(2) = 0.994; P thermometry and present in vivo applications under physiologic and ischemic conditions in a primate stroke model. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Determination of accurate 1H positions of an alanine tripeptide with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures by high resolution 1H solid state NMR and GIPAW chemical shift calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Koji; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ohata, Takuya; Aoki, Akihiro; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori; Shimizu, Tadashi; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2012-11-25

    The accurate (1)H positions of alanine tripeptide, A(3), with anti-parallel and parallel β-sheet structures could be determined by highly resolved (1)H DQMAS solid-state NMR spectra and (1)H chemical shift calculation with gauge-including projector augmented wave calculations.

  12. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  13. Anatomical Variation of Age-Related Changes in Vertebral Bone Marrow Composition Using Chemical Shift Encoding-Based Water–Fat Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baum

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of vertebral bone marrow composition has been proposed as imaging biomarker for osteoporosis, hematopoietic, and metabolic disorders. We investigated the anatomical variation of age-related changes of vertebral proton density fat fraction (PDFF using chemical shift encoding-based water–fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. 156 healthy subjects were recruited (age range 20–29 years: 12/30 males/females; 30–39: 15/9; 40–49: 4/14; 50–59: 9/27; 60–69: 5/19; 70–79: 4/8. An eight-echo 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence at 3T MRI was used for chemical shift-encoding based water–fat separation at the lumbar spine. Vertebral bodies of L1–L4 were manually segmented to extract PDFF values at each vertebral level. PDFF averaged over L1–L4 was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in males than females in the twenties (32.0 ± 8.0 vs. 27.2 ± 6.0% and thirties (35.3 ± 6.7 vs. 27.3 ± 6.2%. With increasing age, females showed an accelerated fatty conversion of the bone marrow compared to men with no significant (p > 0.05 mean PDFF differences in the forties (32.4 ± 8.4 vs. 34.5 ± 6.8% and fifties (42.0 ± 6.1 vs. 40.5 ± 9.7%. The accelerated conversion process continued resulting in greater mean PDFF values in females than males in the sixties (40.2 ± 6.9 vs. 48.8 ± 7.7%; p = 0.033 and seventies (43.9 ± 7.6 vs. 50.5 ± 8.2%; p = 0.208, though the latter did not reach statistical significance. Relative age-related PDFF change from the twenties to the seventies increased from 16.7% (L1 to 51.4% (L4 in males and 76.8% (L1 to 85.7% (L4 in females. An accelerated fatty conversion of bone marrow was observed in females with increasing age particularly evident after menopause. Relative age-related PDFF changes showed an anatomical variation with most pronounced changes at lower lumbar vertebral levels in both sexes.

  14. Comparison of modified two-point dixon and chemical shift encoded MRI water-fat separation methods for fetal fat quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Stephanie A; Miller, Michael R; Parthasarathy, Prasiddha; de Vrijer, Barbra; McKenzie, Charles A

    2018-01-10

    Fetal fat is indicative of the energy balance within the fetus, which may be disrupted in pregnancy complications such as fetal growth restriction, macrosomia, and gestational diabetes. Water-fat separated MRI is a technique sensitive to tissue lipid content, measured as fat fraction (FF), and can be used to accurately measure fat volumes. Modified two-point Dixon and chemical shift encoded MRI (CSE-MRI) are water-fat separated MRI techniques that could be applied to imaging of fetal fat. Modified two-point Dixon has biases present that are corrected in CSE-MRI which may contribute to differences in the fat measurements. To compare the measurement of fetal fat volume and FF by modified two-point Dixon and CSE-MRI. Cross-sectional study for comparison of two MRI pulse sequences. Twenty-one pregnant women with singleton pregnancies. 1.5T, modified two-point Dixon and CSE-MRI. Manual segmentation of total fetal fat volume and mean FF from modified 2-point Dixon and CSE-MRI FF images. Reliability was assessed by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement was assessed using a one-sample t-test on the fat measurements difference values (modified two-point Dixon - CSE-MRI). The difference scores were tested against a value of 0, which would indicate that the measurements were identical. The fat volume and FF measured by modified two-point Dixon and CSE-MRI had excellent reliability, demonstrated by ICCs of 0.93 (P Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Grey and white matter differences in brain energy metabolism in first episode schizophrenia: 31P-MRS chemical shift imaging at 4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Eric; Miller, Jodi; Williamson, Peter C; Neufeld, Richard W J; Menon, Ravi S; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Schaefer, Betsy; Densmore, Maria; Drost, Dick J

    2006-03-31

    Altered high energy and membrane metabolism, measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS), has been inconsistently reported in schizophrenic patients in several anatomical brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of this illness, with little attention to the effects of brain tissue type on the results. Tissue regression analysis correlates brain tissue type to measured metabolite levels, allowing for the extraction of "pure" estimated grey and white matter compartment metabolite levels. We use this tissue analysis technique on a clinical dataset of first episode schizophrenic patients and matched controls to investigate the effect of brain tissue specificity on altered energy and membrane metabolism. In vivo brain spectra from two regions, (a) the fronto-temporal-striatal region and (b) the frontal-lobes, were analyzed from 12 first episode schizophrenic patients and 11 matched controls from a (31)P chemical shift imaging (CSI) study at 4 Tesla (T) field strength. Tissue regression analyses using voxels from each region were performed relating metabolite levels to tissue content, examining phosphorus metabolite levels in grey and white matter compartments. Compared with controls, the first episode schizophrenic patient group showed significantly increased adenosine triphosphate levels (B-ATP) in white matter and decreased B-ATP levels in grey matter in the fronto-temporal-striatal region. No significant metabolite level differences were found in grey or white matter compartments in the frontal cortex. Tissue regression analysis reveals grey and white matter specific aberrations in high-energy phosphates in first episode schizophrenia. Although past studies report inconsistent regional differences in high-energy phosphate levels in schizophrenia, the present analysis suggests more widespread differences that seem to be strongly related to tissue type. Our data suggest that differences in grey and white matter tissue content between past

  16. Origin of the chemical shift in X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the Mn K-Edge in manganese oxide compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, AH; Hozoi, L.; Broer, R.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption edge in Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of manganese oxide compounds shows a shift of several electronvolts in going from MnO through LaMnO3 to CaMnO3. On the other hand, in X-ray photoelectron spectra much smaller shifts are observed. To identify the mechanisms that cause the

  17. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  18. Lanthanide shift reagents, binding, shift mechanisms and exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.W.M. de

    1977-01-01

    Paramagnetic lanthanide shift reagents, when added to a solution of a substrate, induce shifts in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the substrate molecules. The induced shifts contain information about the structure of the shift reagent substrate complex. The structural information, however, may be difficult to extract because of the following effects: (1) different complexes between shift reagent and substrate may be present in solution, e.g. 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, and the shift observed is a weighed average of the shifts of the substrate nuclei in the different complexes; (2) the Fermi contact interaction, arising from the spin density at the nucleus, contributes to the induced shift; (3) chemical exchange effects may complicate the NMR spectrum. In this thesis, the results of an investigation into the influence of these effects on the NMR spectra of solutions containing a substrate and LSR are presented. The equations describing the pseudo contact and the Fermi contact shift are derived. In addition, it is shown how the modified Bloch equations describing the effect of the chemical exchange processes occurring in the systems studied can be reduced to the familiar equations for a two-site exchange case. The binding of mono- and bifunctional ethers to the shift reagent are reported. An analysis of the induced shifts is given. Finally, the results of the experiments performed to study the exchange behavior of dimethoxyethane and heptafluorodimethyloctanedionato ligands are presented

  19. Overall structure and sugar dynamics of a DNA dodecamer from homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings and {sup 31}P chemical shift anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Zhengrong; Delaglio, Frank [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States); Tjandra, Nico [National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry (United States); Zhurkin, Victor B. [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Experimental and Computational Biology (United States); Bax, Ad [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2003-08-15

    The solution structure of d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} has been determined on the basis of an exceptionally large set of residual dipolar couplings. In addition to the heteronuclear {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H and qualitative homonuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings, previously measured in bicelle medium, more than 300 quantitative {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and 22 {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H dipolar restraints were obtained in liquid crystalline Pf1 medium, and 22 {sup 31}P chemical shift anisotropy restraints. High quality DNA structures can be obtained solely on the basis of these new restraints, and these structures are in close agreement with those calculated previously on the basis of {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings. In the newly calculated structures, {sup 31}P-{sup 1}H dipolar and {sup 3}JsubH3{sup '}Psub couplings and {sup 31}P CSA data restrain the phosphodiester backbone torsion angles. The final structure represents a quite regular B-form helix with a modest bending of {approx}10 deg., which is essentially independent of whether or not electrostatic terms are used in the calculation. Combined, the number of homo- and heteronuclear dipolar couplings significantly exceeds the number of degrees of freedom in the system. Results indicate that the dipolar coupling data cannot be fit by a single structure, but are compatible with the presence of rapid equilibria between C2{sup '}-endo and C3{sup '}-endo deoxyribose puckers (sugar switching). The C2{sup '}-H2{sup '}/H2{sup ''} dipolar couplings in B-form DNA are particularly sensitive to sugar pucker and yield the largest discrepancies when fit to a single structure. To resolve these discrepancies, we suggest a simplified dipolar coupling analysis that yields N/S equilibria for the ribose sugar puckers, which are in good agreement with previous analyses of NMR J{sub HH} couplings, with a population of the minor C3{sup '}-endo form higher for

  20. Determination of pKa values of tenoxicam from 1H NMR chemical shifts and of oxicams from electrophoretic mobilities (CZE) with the aid of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barrientos, Damaris; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa

    2009-12-15

    In this work it is explained, by the first time, the application of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR to refine equilibrium constant values through the fit of electrophoretic mobilities determined by capillary zone electrophoresis experiments, due to the mathematical isomorphism of UV-vis absorptivity coefficients, NMR chemical shifts and electrophoretic mobilities as a function of pH. Then, the pK(a) values of tenoxicam in H(2)O/DMSO 1:4 (v/v) have been obtained from (1)H NMR chemical shifts, as well as of oxicams in aqueous solution from electrophoretic mobilities determined by CZE, at 25 degrees C. These values are in very good agreement with those reported by spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements.

  1. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    , in the solution state the 2-bond and 3-bond J(1H–13C) coupling constants have been used to confirm the equilibrium positions. The isotope effects due to deuteriation at the OH position are shown to be superior to chemical shift in determination of equilibrium positions of these almost symmetrical -pyridoyl......-benzoyl methanes. The assignments of the NMR spectra are supported by calculations of the chemical shifts at the DFT level. The equilibrium positions are shown to be different in the liquid and the solid state. In the liquid state the 4-pyridoyl derivative is at the B-form (C-1 is OH), whereas the 2-and 3-pyridoyl...... derivatives are in the A-form. In the solid state all three compounds are on the B-form. The 4-pyridoyl derivative shows unusual deuterium isotope effects in the solid, which are ascribed to a change of the crystal structure of the deuteriated compound...

  2. E-2-Benzylidenebenzocycloalkanones. IV. Studies on transmission of substituent effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts of E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones, and -benzosuberones. Comparison with the 13C NMR data of chalcones and E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-indanones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perjési, Pál; Linnanto, Juha; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Ősz, Erzsébet; Virtanen, Elina

    2005-04-01

    Single substituent parameter (SSP) and dual substituent parameter (DSP) analyses were applied to study the transmission of substituent effects on selected 13C NMR chemical shifts of the cyclic chalcone analogues, E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones ( 2) and E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-benzosuberones ( 3). In order to study how the geometry of the cyclic chalcone analogues affects the transmission of substituent effects similar investigations with the respective chalcones ( 4) were also performed. The results obtained earlier with the five-membered analogue E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-indanones ( 1) were also involved in the comparisons. Geometry optimization of the unsubstituted 1a, 2a, 3a and 4a as well as the substituted 2 and 3 was performed by ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Both SSP and DSP analyses reflected that resonance effects contribute more to the chemical shift of C-α (C2), while inductive effects primarily affect that of C-β (C10) of the enone moiety of all the four series. This latter effect, however, is far not as pronounced as that of the former one. It was found that DSP analysis data ( ρF and ρR values) of transmission of substituent effects on the δC2 data can serve as a measure of choice to study the conformation (planarity) of the investigated enones in the four series.

  3. Lanthanide ion (III) complexes of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate for dual biosensing of pH with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Ali, Meser M; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Relaxivity-based magnetic resonance of phosphonated ligands chelated with gadolinium (Gd(3+)) shows promise for pH imaging. However instead of monitoring the paramagnetic effect of lanthanide complexes on the relaxivity of water protons, biosensor (or molecular) imaging with magnetic resonance is also possible by detecting either the nonexchangeable or the exchangeable protons on the lanthanide complexes themselves. The nonexchangeable protons (e.g. -CHx, where 3 ≥ x ≥ 1) are detected using a three-dimensional chemical shift imaging method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS), whereas the exchangeable protons (e.g. -OH or -NHy , where 2 ≥ y ≥ 1) are measured with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast. Here we tested the feasibility of BIRDS and CEST for pH imaging of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate (DOTA-4AmP(8-)) chelated with thulium (Tm(3+) ) and ytterbium (Yb(3+)). BIRDS and CEST experiments show that both complexes are responsive to pH and temperature changes. Higher pH and temperature sensitivities are obtained with BIRDS for either complex when using the chemical shift difference between two proton resonances vs using the chemical shift of a single proton resonance, thereby eliminating the need to use water resonance as reference. While CEST contrast for both agents is linearly dependent on pH within a relatively large range (i.e. 6.3-7.9), much stronger CEST contrast is obtained with YbDOTA-4AmP(5-) than with TmDOTA-4AmP(5-). In addition, we demonstrate the prospect of using BIRDS to calibrate CEST as new platform for quantitative pH imaging. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Proton Resonance Frequency Chemical Shift Thermometry: Experimental Design and Validation Towards High-Resolution Non-Invasive Temperature Monitoring, and in vivo Experience in a Non-human Primate Model of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, Seena; Mao, Hui; Howell, Leonard; Zhang, Xiaodong; Pate, K S; Magrath, P R; Tong, Frank; Wei, L; Qiu, D; Fleischer, C; Oshinski, J N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Applications for non-invasive biological temperature monitoring are widespread in biomedicine, and of particular interest in the context of brain temperature regulation, where traditionally costly and invasive monitoring schemes limit their applicability in many settings. Brain thermal regulation therefore remains controversial, motivating the development of non-invasive approaches such as temperature-sensitive NMR phenomena. The purpose of this work was to compare the utility of competing approaches to MR thermometry (MRT) employing proton resonance frequency chemical shift. Three methodologies were tested, hypothesizing the feasibility of a fast and accurate approach to chemical shift thermometry, in a phantom study at 3.0 Tesla. MATERIALS AND METHODS A conventional, paired approach (DIFF-1), an accelerated single-scan approach (DIFF-2), and a new, further accelerated strategy (DIFF-3) were tested. Phantom temperatures were modulated during real-time fiber optic temperature monitoring, with MRT derived simultaneously from temperature-sensitive changes in the water proton chemical shift (~0.01 ppm/°C). MRT was subsequently performed in a series of in vivo non-human primate experiments under physiologic and ischemic conditions testing its reproducibility and overall performance. RESULTS Chemical shift thermometry demonstrated excellent agreement with phantom temperatures for all three approaches (DIFF-1 linear regression R2=0.994, p<0.001, acquisition time 4 min 40 s; DIFF-2 R2=0.996, p<0.001, acquisition time 4 min; DIFF-3 R2=0.998, p<0.001, acquisition time 40 s). CONCLUSION These findings confirm the comparability in performance of three competing approaches MRT, and present in vivo applications under physiologic and ischemic conditions in a primate stroke model. PMID:25655874

  5. Comparative analysis of volatiles difference of Yunnan sun-dried Pu-erh green tea from different tea mountains: Jingmai and Wuliang mountain by chemical fingerprint similarity combined with principal component analysis and cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanshuang; Lv, Shidong; Wang, Chen; Gao, Xuemei; Li, Jiangbing; Meng, Qingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Modern instrumental analysis technology can provide various chemical data and information on tea samples. Unfortunately, it remains difficult to extract the useful information. We describe the use of chemical fingerprint similarities, combined with principal component and cluster analyses, to distinguish and recognize Pu-erh green teas, which from two tea mountains, Wuliang and Jingmai, in the Pu-erh district of Yunnan province. The volatile components of all 20 Pu-erh green teas (10 Wuliang and 10 Jingmai teas) were extracted and identified by headspace solid-phase micro extraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sixty-three volatiles (including alcohols, hydrocarbons, ketones, and aldehydes) were identified in the 20 Pu-erh green teas, and differences in compound compositions between them were also observed. Through fingerprint similarity, combined with principal component and cluster analyses, the 20 Pu-erh green teas were differentiated successfully based on their volatile characteristics. This study demonstrates that the GC-MS combined with chemical fingerprint and unsupervised pattern recognition method is suitable for the investigation of the volatile profiling and evaluating the quality and authenticity of teas related to the different origins.Graphical abstractDifferentiate Pu-erh green teas from different tea mountains by using chemical fingerprint similarity and multivariate statistical methods.

  6. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    people to change their behavior at home. Leveraging prior research on encouraging reductions in residential energy use through game play, we introduce ShareBuddy: a casual mobile game intended to encourage players not only to reduce, but also to shift their electricity use. We conducted two field studies...... real-world resource use into a game....

  7. Oxygen levels versus chemical pollutants: do they have similar influence on macrofaunal assemblages? A case study in a harbour with two opposing entrances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra-Garcia, J.M.; Garcia-Gomez, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Generally, harbours are polluted zones characterised by low values of hydrodynamism and oxygen in the water column and high concentrations of pollutants in sediments. The harbour of Ceuta, North Africa, has an unusual structure; it is located between two bays connected by a channel, which increases the water movement and exchange in the harbour, maintaining moderate oxygen levels in the water-sediment interface. Nevertheless, high concentration of organic matter, nutrients and heavy metals were measured in sediments from this harbour. Under these unusual conditions (high levels of pollution but total saturation of oxygen in the water column) we studied the responses of soft-bottom macrobenthic communities using uni and multivariate analyses. The number of species was similar inside and outside the harbour but the species composition differed between internal and external stations; oxygen levels seem to control the 'quantity' of species whereas pollutants control the 'quality' of them. - A high diversity of benthic animals was found in a polluted harbour where high oxygen levels occurred

  8. Oxygen levels versus chemical pollutants: do they have similar influence on macrofaunal assemblages? A case study in a harbour with two opposing entrances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra-Garcia, J.M. [Laboratorio de Biologia Marina, Departamento de Fisiologia y Zoologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: jmguerra@us.es; Garcia-Gomez, J.C. [Laboratorio de Biologia Marina, Departamento de Fisiologia y Zoologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda Reina Mercedes 6, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    Generally, harbours are polluted zones characterised by low values of hydrodynamism and oxygen in the water column and high concentrations of pollutants in sediments. The harbour of Ceuta, North Africa, has an unusual structure; it is located between two bays connected by a channel, which increases the water movement and exchange in the harbour, maintaining moderate oxygen levels in the water-sediment interface. Nevertheless, high concentration of organic matter, nutrients and heavy metals were measured in sediments from this harbour. Under these unusual conditions (high levels of pollution but total saturation of oxygen in the water column) we studied the responses of soft-bottom macrobenthic communities using uni and multivariate analyses. The number of species was similar inside and outside the harbour but the species composition differed between internal and external stations; oxygen levels seem to control the 'quantity' of species whereas pollutants control the 'quality' of them. - A high diversity of benthic animals was found in a polluted harbour where high oxygen levels occurred.

  9. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  10. Shifting Blame?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garofalo, Orsola; Rott, Christina

    2017-01-01

    either the decision maker or a spokesperson communicates the decided allocation to recipients, who then determine whether to punish either of them. We find that receivers punish both the decision maker and the spokesperson more often, and more heavily, for unfair allocations communicated...... by the spokesperson if there is room for shifting blame. The increased punishment results from the messenger’s style of delivery: spokespersons are more likely than decision makers to express emotional regret instead of rational need. Receivers seem to punish the former style of communication because they view...

  11. IsoCleft Finder – a web-based tool for the detection and analysis of protein binding-site geometric and chemical similarities [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/13y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Kurbatova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available IsoCleft Finder is a web-based tool for the detection of local geometric and chemical similarities between potential small-molecule binding cavities and a non-redundant dataset of ligand-bound known small-molecule binding-sites. The non-redundant dataset developed as part of this study is composed of 7339 entries representing unique Pfam/PDB-ligand (hetero group code combinations with known levels of cognate ligand similarity. The query cavity can be uploaded by the user or detected automatically by the system using existing PDB entries as well as user-provided structures in PDB format. In all cases, the user can refine the definition of the cavity interactively via a browser-based Jmol 3D molecular visualization interface. Furthermore, users can restrict the search to a subset of the dataset using a cognate-similarity threshold. Local structural similarities are detected using the IsoCleft software and ranked according to two criteria (number of atoms in common and Tanimoto score of local structural similarity and the associated Z-score and p-value measures of statistical significance. The results, including predicted ligands, target proteins, similarity scores, number of atoms in common, etc., are shown in a powerful interactive graphical interface. This interface permits the visualization of target ligands superimposed on the query cavity and additionally provides a table of pairwise ligand topological similarities. Similarities between top scoring ligands serve as an additional tool to judge the quality of the results obtained. We present several examples where IsoCleft Finder provides useful functional information. IsoCleft Finder results are complementary to existing approaches for the prediction of protein function from structure, rational drug design and x-ray crystallography. IsoCleft Finder can be found at: http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca/isocleftfinder.

  12. Backbone and side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments for the apo-form of the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase NcLPMO9C

    OpenAIRE

    Courtade, Gaston; Wimmer, Reinhard; Dimarogona, Maria; Sandgren, Mats; Eijsink, Vincent; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund

    2016-01-01

    The apo-form of the 23.3 kDa catalytic domain of the AA9 family lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa has been isotopically labeled and recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris. In this paper, we report the 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of this LPMO. © Springer Verlag. The final publication is available at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12104-016-9683-x. This is the authors' accepted and refereed manuscript to the article.

  13. Chemical shift assignments for the apo-form of the catalytic domain, the linker region, and the carbohydrate-binding domain of the cellulose-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtade, Gaston; Forsberg, Zarah; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Aachmann, Finn L

    2017-10-01

    The apo-form of the 21.4 kDa catalytic domain and the 10.7 kDa carbohydrate binding domain of the AA10 family lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C from Streptomyces coelicolor have been isotopically labeled and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we report the 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N chemical shift assignments of each individual domain as well as an ensemble of the assignment for the full-length protein, including its approximately 30-amino acid long linker.

  14. Age and personal values: Similar value circles with shifting priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Ingwer; Hertel, Guido; Hermann, Dieter

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the relationship of personal values to age using data from two representative surveys. We hypothesized that individuals organize personal values, regardless of their age, as a circle with the same order of values on this circle but that older persons are closer to conservation and more remote from openness to change and closer to self-transcendence and more distant from self-enhancement. The structural stability of the value circle over age was largely confirmed across and within individuals. Different age groups exhibited a tendency to more strongly cluster those values that they rated as relatively important. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Plakilactones G and H from a marine sponge. Stereochemical determination of highly flexible systems by quantitative NMR-derived interproton distances combined with quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Micco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stereostructural investigation of two new oxygenated polyketides, plakilactones G and H, isolated from the marine sponge Plakinastrella mamillaris collected at Fiji Islands, is reported. The stereostructural studies began on plakilactone H by applying an integrated approach of the NOE-based protocol and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts. In particular, plakilactone H was used as a template to extend the application of NMR-derived interproton distances to a highly flexible molecular system with simultaneous assignment of four non-contiguous stereocenters. Chemical derivatization and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C on plakilactone G along with a plausible biogenetic interconversion between plakilactone G and plakilactone H allowed us to determine the absolute configuration in this two new oxygenated polyketides.

  16. Is there substituent cross-interaction effect in all the conjugated systems containing Cdbnd N polar bond? The substituent effects on the NMR chemical shifts of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Chun-Ni; Li, Meng-Yang

    2018-03-01

    The substituent cross-interaction effect in the substituted benzylidene anilines (p-Xsbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd C6H4sbnd Y-p) has been observed and widely investigated. In order to investigate whether the substituent cross-interaction effect exist in all the conjugated systems containing Cdbnd N polar bond, this paper employed 2-X-5-Y pyrimidines as the model compounds for study. The influences of substituents X and Y on the 1H NMR and 13C NMR chemical shifts of 2, 5-disubsitituted pyrimidines have been systematically investigated. Quantitative structure-chemical shifts relationship models have been built for δ(H4,6), δ(C2), δ(C4,6) and δ(C5) with four to six molecular descriptors. These models were confirmed of good stability and predictive performances by leave-one-out cross validation. This study indicates that the substituent effects of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines are much more complex than that of the substituted benzylidene anilines. More structural factors besides of Hammett parameter should be taken into consideration. Different from the substituted benzylidene anilines, the cross-interaction effect (Δσ2) of substituents X and Y has little contribution to δ(H4,6), δ(C2), δ(C5) and δ(C4,6) of 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines.

  17. Novel application of chemical shift gradient echo in- and opposed-phase sequences in 3 T MRI for the detection of H-MRS visible lipids and grading of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Norlisah; Khairy, Azua Mohd; Seow, Pohchoo; Tan, Li Kuo; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Ganesan, Dharmendra; Rahmat, Kartini

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using chemical shift gradient-echo (GE) in- and opposed-phase (IOP) imaging to grade glioma. A phantom study was performed to investigate the correlation of (1)H MRS-visible lipids with the signal loss ratio (SLR) obtained using IOP imaging. A cross-sectional study approved by the institutional review board was carried out in 22 patients with different glioma grades. The patients underwent scanning using IOP imaging and single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) using 3T MRI. The brain spectra acquisitions from solid and cystic components were obtained and correlated with the SLR for different grades. The phantom study showed a positive linear correlation between lipid quantification at 0.9 parts per million (ppm) and 1.3 ppm with SLR (r = 0.79-0.99, p classification probabilities for grade II (SII = 1), grade III (SIII = 0.50) and grade IV (SIV = 0.89). The results underscore the lipid quantification differences in grades of glioma and provide a more comprehensive characterization by using SLR in chemical shift GE IOP imaging. SLR in IOP sequence demonstrates good performance in glioma grading. • Strong correlation was seen between lipid concentration and SLR obtained using IOP • IOP sequence demonstrates significant differences in signal loss within the glioma grades • SLR at solid tumour portions was the best measure for differentiation • This sequence is applicable in a research capacity for glioma staging armamentarium.

  18. Determination of the configuration in six-membered saturated heterocycles (N, P, S, Se) and their oxidation products using experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buděšínský, Miloš; Vaněk, Václav; Dračínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Pícha, Jan; Císařová, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 25 (2014), s. 3871-3886 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1919; GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : six-membered saturated heterocycles (N, P, S, Se) * oxidation products * configuration * NMR * quantum chemical calculations * X- ray structures Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2014

  19. Synthesis, structural characterization and study of blue shift in optical properties of zinc oxide nano particles prepared by chemical route method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunk, P. B.; Das, R.; Bisen, D. P.; Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis and optical properties of ZnO nano particle using TEA (Tri Ethanol Amine) and without TEA by chemical route method. By decreasing the concentration of TEA, reaction rate is decreases and inter planner spacing d is increases, band gap is increased from 4.1 to 4.8 eV. In case of without TEA band gap is obtained 3.4 eV. Morphology, growth and the nature of crystalline of the powder samples were performed by X- ray Diffraction (XRD); UV spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Photoluminescence (PL). Luminescence properties are discussed by probing the photoluminescence properties of ZnO nano particles with TEA at different molar concentrations.

  20. Solid-state (185/187)Re NMR and GIPAW DFT study of perrhenates and Re2(CO)10: chemical shift anisotropy, NMR crystallography, and a metal-metal bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Cory M; Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2015-04-21

    Advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) methods, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), intricate pulse sequences, and increased applied magnetic fields, allow for the study of systems which even very recently would be impractical. However, SSNMR methods using certain quadrupolar probe nuclei (i.e., I > 1/2), such as (185/187)Re remain far from fully developed due to the exceedingly strong interaction between the quadrupole moment of these nuclei and local electric field gradients (EFGs). We present a detailed high-field (B0 = 21.1 T) experimental SSNMR study on several perrhenates (KReO4, AgReO4, Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O), as well as ReO3 and Re2(CO)10. We propose solid ReO3 as a new rhenium SSNMR chemical shift standard due to its reproducible and sharp (185/187)Re NMR resonances. We show that for KReO4, previously poorly understood high-order quadrupole-induced effects (HOQIE) on the satellite transitions can be used to measure the EFG tensor asymmetry (i.e., ηQ) to nearly an order-of-magnitude greater precision than competing SSNMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) approaches. Samples of AgReO4 and Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O enable us to comment on the effects of counter-ions and hydration upon Re(vii) chemical shifts. Calcium-43 and (185/187)Re NMR tensor parameters allow us to conclude that two proposed crystal structures for Ca(ReO4)2·2H2O, which would be considered as distinct, are in fact the same structure. Study of Re2(CO)10 provides insights into the effects of Re-Re bonding on the rhenium NMR tensor parameters and rhenium oxidation state on the Re chemical shift value. As overtone NQR experiments allowed us to precisely measure the (185/187)Re EFG tensor of Re2(CO)10, we were able to measure rhenium chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) for the first time in a powdered sample. Experimental observations are supported by gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with NMR tensor calculations also

  1. ¹H, ¹³C, and ¹⁵N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignment of the toxin Doc in the unbound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gieter, Steven; Loris, Remy; van Nuland, Nico A J; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2014-04-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules in bacteria are involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic stress response, persister formation and programmed cell death. The toxin Doc, from the phd/doc module, blocks protein synthesis by targeting the translation machinery. Despite a large wealth of biophysical and biochemical data on the regulatory aspects of the operon transcription and role of Doc co-activator and co-repressor, little is still know on the molecular basis of Doc toxicity. Structural information about this toxin is only available for its inhibited state bound to the antitoxin Phd. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of the toxin Doc from of bacteriophage P1 (the model protein from this family of TA modules) in its free state. The BMRB accession number is 18899.

  2. Iboga alkaloids from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments: antioxidant activity; Alcaloides iboga de Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - atribuicao inequivoca dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono: atividade antioxidante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allana Kellen L.; Magalhaes, Ticiane S.; Monte, Francisco Jose Q.; Mattos, Marcos Carlos de; Oliveira, Maria Conceicao F. de; Almeida, Maria Mozarina B.; Lemos, Telma L.G.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica], e-mail: tlemos@dqoi.ufc.br

    2009-07-01

    Six known alkaloids iboga type and the triterpene {alpha}- and {beta}-amyrin acetate were isolated from the roots and stems of Peschiera affinis. Their structures were characterized on the basis of spectral data mainly NMR and mass spectra. 1D and 2D NMR spectra were also used to unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of alkaloids. The ethanolic extract of roots, alkaloidic and no-alkaloidic fractions and iso-voacristine hydroxyindolenine and voacangine were evaluated for their antioxidative properties using an autographic assay based on {beta}-carotene bleaching on TLC plates, and also spectrophotometric detection by reduction of the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical. (author)

  3. Structure-based predictions of 13C-NMR chemical shifts for a series of 2-functionalized 5-(methylsulfonyl)-1-phenyl-1H-indoles derivatives using GA-based MLR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Raouf; Sadeghi, Faridoon; Rasouli, Zolikha; Djannati, Farhad

    2012-12-01

    Experimental values for the 13C NMR chemical shifts (ppm, TMS = 0) at 300 K ranging from 96.28 ppm (C4' of indole derivative 17) to 159.93 ppm (C4' of indole derivative 23) relative to deuteride chloroform (CDCl3, 77.0 ppm) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, 39.50 ppm) as internal reference in CDCl3 or DMSO-d6 solutions have been collected from literature for thirty 2-functionalized 5-(methylsulfonyl)-1-phenyl-1H-indole derivatives containing different substituted groups. An effective quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were built using hybrid method combining genetic algorithm (GA) based on stepwise selection multiple linear regression (SWS-MLR) as feature-selection tools and correlation models between each carbon atom of indole derivative and calculated descriptors. Each compound was depicted by molecular structural descriptors that encode constitutional, topological, geometrical, electrostatic, and quantum chemical features. The accuracy of all developed models were confirmed using different types of internal and external procedures and various statistical tests. Furthermore, the domain of applicability for each model which indicates the area of reliable predictions was defined.

  4. Does the ARFIMA really shift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monache, Davide Delle; Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    Short memory models contaminated by level shifts have long-memory features similar to those associated to processes generated under fractional integration. In this paper, we propose a robust testing procedure, based on an encompassing parametric specification, that allows to disentangle the level...

  5. Investigating the organic and conventional production type of olive oil with target and suspect screening by LC-QTOF-MS, a novel semi-quantification method using chemical similarity and advanced chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogiouri, Natasa P; Aalizadeh, Reza; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2017-09-01

    The discrimination of organic and conventional production has been a critical topic of public discussion and constitutes a scientific issue. It remains a challenge to establish a correlation between the agronomical practices and their effects on the composition of olive oils, especially the phenolic composition, since it defines their organoleptic and nutritional value. Thus, a liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometric method was developed, using target and suspect screening workflows, coupled with advanced chemometrics for the identification of phenolic compounds and the discrimination between organic and conventional extra virgin olive oils. The method was optimized by one-factor design and response surface methodology to derive the optimal conditions of extraction (methanol/water (80:20, v/v), pure methanol, or acetonitrile) and to select the most appropriate internal standard (caffeic acid or syringaldehyde). The results revealed that extraction with methanol/water (80:20, v/v) was the optimum solvent system and syringaldehyde 1.30 mg L -1 was the appropriate internal standard. The proposed method demonstrated low limits of detection in the range of 0.002 (luteolin) to 0.028 (tyrosol) mg kg -1 . Then, it was successfully applied in 52 olive oils of Kolovi variety. In total, 13 target and 24 suspect phenolic compounds were identified. Target compounds were quantified with commercially available standards. A novel semi-quantitation strategy, based on chemical similarity, was introduced for the semi-quantification of the identified suspects. Finally, ant colony optimization-random forest model selected luteolin as the only marker responsible for the discrimination, during a 2-year study. Graphical abstract Investigation of the organic and conventional production type of olive oil by LC-QTOF-MS.

  6. Difference in the structures of alanine tri- and tetra-peptides with antiparallel β-sheet assessed by X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR and chemical shift calculations by GIPAW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Yazawa, Koji; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Alanine oligomers provide a key structure for silk fibers from spider and wild silkworms.We report on structural analysis of L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine (Ala)4 with anti-parallel (AP) β-structures using X-ray and solid-state NMR. All of the Ala residues in the (Ala)4 are in equivalent positions, whereas for alanine trimer (Ala)3 there are two alternative locations in a unit cell as reported previously (Fawcett and Camerman, Acta Cryst., 1975, 31, 658-665). (Ala)4 with AP β-structure is more stable than AP-(Ala)3 due to formation of the stronger hydrogen bonds. The intermolecular structure of (Ala)4 is also different from polyalanine fiber structure, indicating that the interchain arrangement of AP β-structure changes with increasing alanine sequencelength. Furthermore the precise (1)H positions, which are usually inaccesible by X-ray diffraction method, are determined by high resolution (1)H solid state NMR combined with the chemical shift calculations by the gauge-including projector augmented wave method. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparison of clinical semi-quantitative assessment of muscle fat infiltration with quantitative assessment using chemical shift-based water/fat separation in MR studies of the calf of post-menopausal women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizai, Hamza; Nardo, Lorenzo; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Yap, Samuel P.; Baum, Thomas; Krug, Roland; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The goal of this study was to compare the semi-quantitative Goutallier classification for fat infiltration with quantitative fat-fraction derived from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) chemical shift-based water/fat separation technique. Sixty-two women (age 61 {+-} 6 years), 27 of whom had diabetes, underwent MRI of the calf using a T1-weighted fast spin-echo sequence and a six-echo spoiled gradient-echo sequence at 3 T. Water/fat images and fat fraction maps were reconstructed using the IDEAL algorithm with T2* correction and a multi-peak model for the fat spectrum. Two radiologists scored fat infiltration on the T1-weighted images using the Goutallier classification in six muscle compartments. Spearman correlations between the Goutallier grades and the fat fraction were calculated; in addition, intra-observer and inter-observer agreement were calculated. A significant correlation between the clinical grading and the fat fraction values was found for all muscle compartments (P < 0.0001, R values ranging from 0.79 to 0.88). Goutallier grades 0-4 had a fat fraction ranging from 3.5 to 19%. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement values of 0.83 and 0.81 were calculated for the semi-quantitative grading. Semi-quantitative grading of intramuscular fat and quantitative fat fraction were significantly correlated and both techniques had excellent reproducibility. However, the clinical grading was found to overestimate muscle fat. (orig.)

  8. Influence of substituents on chemical shift of {delta}({sup 13}C) in the series of 5-methyl-5H-indole [2,3-b]quinoline derivatives; Wplyw podstawnikow na przesuniecie chemiczne {sigma}({sup 13}C) w serii pochodnych 5-metylo-5H-indolo-[2,3-b]chinoliny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamienska-Trela, K.; Kania, L.; Kaczmarek, L. [Inst. Chemii Organicznej, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    {sup 13}C NMR spectra of series of 5-methyl-5H-indole quinoline substituted with different groups and their number have been measured. The influence of steric and electronic properties of substituents on observed chemical shifts of {sup 13}C nuclei have been discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  10. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  11. Constituintes químicos de Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. da floresta Amazônica: atribuição dos deslocamentos químicos dos átomos de hidrogênio e carbono Chemical constituents of Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. from Amazon forest: ¹h and 13c chemical shift assignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir A. Facundo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In an ethanolic extract of leaves of Ottonia corcovadensis (Piperaceae were identified sixteen terpenoids of essential oil and the three flavonoids 3',4',5,5',7-pentamethoxyflavone (1, 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone (2 and 5-hydroxy-3',4',5',7-tetramethoxyflavone (3 and cafeic acid (4. Two amides (5 and 6 were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the roots. The structures were established by spectral analysis, meanly NMR (1D and 2D and mass spectra. Extensive NMR analysis was also used to complete ¹H and 13C chemical shift assignments of the flavonoids and amides. The components of the essential oil were identified by computer library search, retention indices and visual interpretation of mass spectra.

  12. Similarity Measure of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Labriji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of identifying the similarity of graphs was considered as highly recommended research field in the Web semantic, artificial intelligence, the shape recognition and information research. One of the fundamental problems of graph databases is finding similar graphs to a graph query. Existing approaches dealing with this problem are usually based on the nodes and arcs of the two graphs, regardless of parental semantic links. For instance, a common connection is not identified as being part of the similarity of two graphs in cases like two graphs without common concepts, the measure of similarity based on the union of two graphs, or the one based on the notion of maximum common sub-graph (SCM, or the distance of edition of graphs. This leads to an inadequate situation in the context of information research. To overcome this problem, we suggest a new measure of similarity between graphs, based on the similarity measure of Wu and Palmer. We have shown that this new measure satisfies the properties of a measure of similarities and we applied this new measure on examples. The results show that our measure provides a run time with a gain of time compared to existing approaches. In addition, we compared the relevance of the similarity values obtained, it appears that this new graphs measure is advantageous and  offers a contribution to solving the problem mentioned above.

  13. New Similarity Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdani, Hossein; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel; Kwasnicka, Halina

    2016-01-01

    In data science, there are important parameters that affect the accuracy of the algorithms used. Some of these parameters are: the type of data objects, the membership assignments, and distance or similarity functions. This paper discusses similarity functions as fundamental elements in membership...

  14. Similarity after Goodman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decock, L.B.; Douven, I.

    2011-01-01

    In a famous critique, Goodman dismissed similarity as a slippery and both philosophically and scientifically useless notion. We revisit his critique in the light of important recent work on similarity in psychology and cognitive science. Specifically, we use Tversky's influential set-theoretic

  15. Judgments of brand similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, THA; Wedel, M; Pieters, RGM; DeSarbo, WS

    This paper provides empirical insight into the way consumers make pairwise similarity judgments between brands, and how familiarity with the brands, serial position of the pair in a sequence, and the presentation format affect these judgments. Within the similarity judgment process both the

  16. The influence of like-charge attraction on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids: NMR chemical shifts, quadrupole coupling constants, rotational correlation times and failure of Stokes-Einstein-Debye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Anne; Overbeck, Viviane; Lehde, Viktoria; Neumann, Jan; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Niemann, Thomas; Paschek, Dietmar; Michalik, Dirk; Ludwig, Ralf

    2018-02-21

    Ion pairing is one of the most fundamental atomic interactions in chemistry and biology. In contrast, pairing between like-charged ions remains an elusive concept. So far, this phenomenon was observed only for large-scaled structures, assemblies, stabilizing frameworks, or in aqueous solution wherein like-charge attraction is supported by mediating water molecules. Recently, we reported the formation of cationic clusters in pure ionic liquids (ILs) which all include hydroxyl groups (OH) for possible hydrogen bonding. In such structures like-charge repulsion is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonds. The vibrational bands in the OH-stretch region of the infrared spectra can be clearly assigned to H-bonded ion pairs (c-a) or to H-bonded cationic clusters (c-c). The equilibrium between both types of ionic clusters can be controlled by using the same cation but differently strong interacting anions. In the present work, we study the influence of the cationic cluster formation on structural and dynamical NMR properties of ionic liquids, where we know that they form cationic clusters to different extent. First, we measure proton chemical shifts, δ 1 H, and determine deuteron quadrupole coupling constants, χ D , from a calculated relation between both NMR properties. Reliable χ D values for the liquid phase are a prerequisite for calculating reorientational correlation times, τ OH , from measured deuteron relaxation times, T 1 . It is shown that the correlation times are significantly influenced by the amount of cationic clusters present in the IL. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is valid for the ILs wherein H-bonded ion pairs (c-a) are the dominant species. With increasing cationic cluster (c-c) formation of e.g. cyclic tetramers, SED breaks down because of the structural heterogeneities.

  17. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  18. The semantic similarity ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ballatore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational measures of semantic similarity between geographic terms provide valuable support across geographic information retrieval, data mining, and information integration. To date, a wide variety of approaches to geo-semantic similarity have been devised. A judgment of similarity is not intrinsically right or wrong, but obtains a certain degree of cognitive plausibility, depending on how closely it mimics human behavior. Thus selecting the most appropriate measure for a specific task is a significant challenge. To address this issue, we make an analogy between computational similarity measures and soliciting domain expert opinions, which incorporate a subjective set of beliefs, perceptions, hypotheses, and epistemic biases. Following this analogy, we define the semantic similarity ensemble (SSE as a composition of different similarity measures, acting as a panel of experts having to reach a decision on the semantic similarity of a set of geographic terms. The approach is evaluated in comparison to human judgments, and results indicate that an SSE performs better than the average of its parts. Although the best member tends to outperform the ensemble, all ensembles outperform the average performance of each ensemble's member. Hence, in contexts where the best measure is unknown, the ensemble provides a more cognitively plausible approach.

  19. Similarity or difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Anders Ryom

    2013-01-01

    While the organizational structures and strategies of public organizations have attracted substantial research attention among public management scholars, little research has explored how these organizational core dimensions are interconnected and influenced by pressures for similarity. In this p......While the organizational structures and strategies of public organizations have attracted substantial research attention among public management scholars, little research has explored how these organizational core dimensions are interconnected and influenced by pressures for similarity....... In this paper I address this topic by exploring the relation between expenditure strategy isomorphism and structure isomorphism in Danish municipalities. Different literatures suggest that organizations exist in concurrent pressures for being similar to and different from other organizations in their field...... of action. It is theorized that to meet this challenge organizations may substitute increased similarity on one core dimension for increased idiosyncrasy on another, but only after a certain level of isomorphism is reached. Results of quantitative analyses support this theory and show that an inverse U...

  20. Molecular Similarity Concepts for Informatics Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorath, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of small molecule similarity is a central task in chemoinformatics and medicinal chemistry. A variety of molecular representations and metrics are applied to computationally evaluate and quantify molecular similarity. A critically important aspect of molecular similarity analysis in chemoinformatics and pharmaceutical research is that one is typically not interested in quantifying the degree of structural or chemical similarity between compounds per se, but rather in extrapolating from molecular similarity to property similarity. In other words, one assumes that there is a correlation between calculated similarity and specific properties of small molecules including, first and foremost, biological activities. Although similarity is a priori a subjective concept, and difficult to quantify, it must computationally be assessed in a formally consistent manner. Otherwise, there is little utility of similarity calculations. Consistent treatment requires approximations to be made and the consideration of alternative computational similarity concepts, as discussed herein.

  1. Paradigm Shifts in Ophthalmic Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, J; Sadun, Alfredo A; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    , successful implementation of these paradigm shifts in ophthalmology may provide useful guidance for similar developments in all of healthcare.

  2. Incremental Similarity and Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Hedevang, Emil; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    This paper discusses the mathematical representation of an empirically observed phenomenon, referred to as Incremental Similarity. We discuss this feature from the viewpoint of stochastic processes and present a variety of non-trivial examples, including those that are of relevance for turbulence...

  3. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  4. Third ventricle midline shift on computed tomography as an alternative to septum pellucidum shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Carlos Francis A.; Oropilla, Jean Quint L; Alvarez, Victor M.

    2000-01-01

    The cerebral midline shift is measured using the displacement from midline of the third ventricle. It is an easily determined criterion from which CT scans of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hematoma may be investigated. Midline shift is a significant criteria in which to gauge the neurological status of patients. In a retrospective study of 32 patients with spontaneous unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage, a midline third ventricle shift correlated well with septum pellucidum shift. A greater than 7 mm midline third ventricle shift was associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score compared a shift less than 7mm. For the septum pellucidum, a greater than 10 mm shift was similarly associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score. (Author)

  5. Similarity and denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitányi, Paul M B

    2013-02-13

    We can discover the effective similarity among pairs of finite objects and denoise a finite object using the Kolmogorov complexity of these objects. The drawback is that the Kolmogorov complexity is not computable. If we approximate it, using a good real-world compressor, then it turns out that on natural data the processes give adequate results in practice. The methodology is parameter-free, alignment-free and works on individual data. We illustrate both methods with examples.

  6. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Homogeneous bilateral block shifts. ADAM KORÁNYI. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York,. New York, NY 10016, USA. E-mail: Adam.Koranyi@lehman.cuny.edu. MS received 18 January 2013. Abstract. A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described.

  7. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new 3-parameter family of homogeneous 2-by-2 block shifts is described. These are the first examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1. Author Affiliations. Adam Korányi1. Department of Mathematics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA ...

  8. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  9. Shifting employment revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Gramuglia, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The CLR-network examined in 2006 the phenomenon of undeclared labour, with specific regard to the construction sector. The resulting study, Shifting Employment: undeclared labour in construction (Shifting-study hereafter), gave evidence that this is an area particularly affected by undeclared

  10. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  11. More Similar Than Different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Jin

    2018-01-01

    What role do employee features play into the success of different personnel management practices for serving high performance? Using data from a randomized survey experiment among 5,982 individuals of all ages, this article examines how gender conditions the compliance effects of different...... incentive treatments—each relating to the basic content of distinct types of personnel management practices. The findings show that males and females are more similar than different in terms of the incentive treatments’ effects: Significant average effects are found for three out of five incentive...

  12. A chemical–biological similarity-based grouping of complex substances as a prototype approach for evaluating chemical alternatives† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6gc01147k Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Fabian A.; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Chappell, Grace A.; Wright, Fred A.; Reif, David M.; Braisted, John; Gerhold, David L.; Yeakley, Joanne M.; Shepard, Peter; Seligmann, Bruce; Roy, Tim; Boogaard, Peter J.; Ketelslegers, Hans B.; Rohde, Arlean M.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative assessment of potential human health impacts is a critical step in evaluating both chemical alternatives and existing products on the market. Most alternatives assessments are conducted on a chemical-by-chemical basis and it is seldom acknowledged that humans are exposed to complex products, not individual substances. Indeed, substances of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, and Biological materials (UVCBs) are ubiquitous in commerce yet they present a major challenge for registration and health assessments. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and computational approach to categorize UVCBs according to global similarities in their bioactivity using a suite of in vitro models. We used petroleum substances, an important group of UVCBs which are grouped for regulatory approval and read-across primarily on physico-chemical properties and the manufacturing process, and only partially based on toxicity data, as a case study. We exposed induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes to DMSO-soluble extracts of 21 petroleum substances from five product groups. Concentration-response data from high-content imaging in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, as well as targeted high-throughput transcriptomic analysis of the hepatocytes, revealed distinct groups of petroleum substances. Data integration showed that bioactivity profiling affords clustering of petroleum substances in a manner similar to the manufacturing process-based categories. Moreover, we observed a high degree of correlation between bioactivity profiles and physico-chemical properties, as well as improved groupings when chemical and biological data were combined. Altogether, we demonstrate how novel in vitro screening approaches can be effectively utilized in combination with physico-chemical characteristics to group complex substances and enable read-across. This approach allows for rapid and scientifically-informed evaluation of health impacts of

  13. Binary similarity measures for fingerprint analysis of qualitative metabolomic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Anita; Andrić, Filip; Bajusz, Dávid; Héberger, Károly

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary metabolomic fingerprinting is based on multiple spectrometric and chromatographic signals, used either alone or combined with structural and chemical information of metabolic markers at the qualitative and semiquantitative level. However, signal shifting, convolution, and matrix effects may compromise metabolomic patterns. Recent increase in the use of qualitative metabolomic data, described by the presence (1) or absence (0) of particular metabolites, demonstrates great potential in the field of metabolomic profiling and fingerprint analysis. The aim of this study is a comprehensive evaluation of binary similarity measures for the elucidation of patterns among samples of different botanical origin and various metabolomic profiles. Nine qualitative metabolomic data sets covering a wide range of natural products and metabolomic profiles were applied to assess 44 binary similarity measures for the fingerprinting of plant extracts and natural products. The measures were analyzed by the novel sum of ranking differences method (SRD), searching for the most promising candidates. Baroni-Urbani-Buser (BUB) and Hawkins-Dotson (HD) similarity coefficients were selected as the best measures by SRD and analysis of variance (ANOVA), while Dice (Di1), Yule, Russel-Rao, and Consonni-Todeschini 3 ranked the worst. ANOVA revealed that concordantly and intermediately symmetric similarity coefficients are better candidates for metabolomic fingerprinting than the asymmetric and correlation based ones. The fingerprint analysis based on the BUB and HD coefficients and qualitative metabolomic data performed equally well as the quantitative metabolomic profile analysis. Fingerprint analysis based on the qualitative metabolomic profiles and binary similarity measures proved to be a reliable way in finding the same/similar patterns in metabolomic data as that extracted from quantitative data.

  14. Modeling nuclear field shift isotope fractionation in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this study nuclear field shift fractionations in solids (and chemically similar liquids) are estimated using calibrated density functional theory calculations. The nuclear field shift effect is a potential driver of mass independent isotope fractionation(1,2), especially for elements with high atomic number such as Hg, Tl and U. This effect is caused by the different shapes and volumes of isotopic nuclei, and their interactions with electronic structures and energies. Nuclear field shift isotope fractionations can be estimated with first principles methods, but the calculations are computationally difficult, limiting most theoretical studies so far to small gas-phase molecules and molecular clusters. Many natural materials of interest are more complex, and it is important to develop ways to estimate field shift effects that can be applied to minerals, solutions, in biomolecules, and at mineral-solution interfaces. Plane-wave density functional theory, in combination with the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), is much more readily adapted to complex materials than the relativistic all-electron calculations that have been the focus of most previous studies. DFT-PAW is a particularly effective tool for studying crystals with periodic boundary conditions, and may also be incorporated into molecular dynamics simulations of solutions and other disordered phases. Initial calibrations of DFT-PAW calculations against high-level all-electron models of field shift fractionation suggest that there may be broad applicability of this method to a variety of elements and types of materials. In addition, the close relationship between the isomer shift of Mössbauer spectroscopy and the nuclear field shift isotope effect makes it possible, at least in principle, to estimate the volume component of field shift fractionations in some species that are too complex even for DFT-PAW models, so long as there is a Mössbauer isotope for the element of interest. Initial results

  15. Transition-Metal-Free C-Vinylation of Ketones with Acetylenes: A Quantum-Chemical Rationalization of Similarities and Differences in Catalysis by Superbases MOH/DMSO and tBuOM/DMSO (M = Na, K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Vladimir B; Vitkovskaya, Nadezhda M; Kobychev, Vladimir B; Trofimov, Boris A

    2018-04-06

    Transition-metal-free C-vinylation of acetone with phenylacetylene catalyzed by superbases MOH/DMSO and tBuOM/DMSO (M = Na, K) has been theoretically evaluated in the B3LYP/6-311++G**//B3LYP/6-31+G* approach to rationalize similarities and differences in activity of the above catalytic systems. The close solvate surroundings of sodium and potassium tert-butoxides have been studied. Formation of tBuOM· nDMSO complexes and their structure and thermodynamic stability are discussed in comparison with similar complexes of alkali-metal hydroxides MOH· nDMSO. Activation barriers of the title reaction in the presence of tBuOM· nDMSO complexes are found to be less than those with MOH· nDMSO complexes participating.

  16. Similar Task Features Shape Judgment and Categorization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Janina A.; von Helversen, Bettina; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The distinction between similarity-based and rule-based strategies has instigated a large body of research in categorization and judgment. Within both domains, the task characteristics guiding strategy shifts are increasingly well documented. Across domains, past research has observed shifts from rule-based strategies in judgment to…

  17. Nurses' shift reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Hoeck, Bente; Hamilton, Bridget Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    practices were described as highly conventionalised and locally situated, but with occasional opportunities for improvisation and negotiation between nurses. Finally, shift reports were described as multifunctional meetings, with individual and social effects for nurses and teams. CONCLUSION: Innovations...... of nurses' shift reports. BACKGROUND: Nurses' shift reports are routine occurrences in healthcare organisations that are viewed as crucial for patient outcomes, patient safety and continuity of care. Studies of communication between nurses attend primarily to 1:1 communication and analyse the adequacy...... and negotiate care....

  18. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  19. Anthropogenic and impact spherules: Morphological similarity and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 6. Anthropogenic and impact spherules: Morphological similarity and chemical distinction – A case study from India and its implications. Ambalika Niyogi Jayanta K Pati Suresh C Patel Dipak Panda Shiv K Patil. Volume 120 Issue 6 December 2011 pp ...

  20. Similarity Measure for Molecular Structure: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, S. A.; Muda, A. K.; Choo, Y. H.; Muda, N. A.; Pratama, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Similarity or distance measures have been used widely to calculate the similarity or dissimilarity between two samples of dataset. Cheminformatics is known as the domain that dealing with chemical information and both similarity and distance coefficient have been an important role for matching, searching and classification of chemical information. There are various types of similarity/distance coefficient used in molecular structure similarity searching. Generally, the calculation using similarity/distance coefficient is focusing more on 2-dimensional (2D) rather than 3-dimensional (3D) structure. In this paper, the popular similarity/distance coefficients for molecular structure will be reviewed together with the review on 3D molecular structure.

  1. Sobre uma degenerescência acidental nos deslocamentos químicos de RMN de 31P{¹H} em complexos difosfínicos de rutênio On an accidental degeneracy in the 31P{¹H} NMR chemical shifts in ruthenium diphosphine complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maira Agostini Valle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The [RuCl(bipy(dppb(4-pic]PF6 complex was prepared and fully characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of this complex was determined in order to make an unambiguous distinction between the two possible positions of the 4-methylpyridine ligand (4-pic in the compound: trans to phosphorus atom or trans to nitrogen atom. The [RuCl(bipy(dppb(4-pic]PF6 complex exhibits an unusual temperature-dependent accidental degeneracy of the 31P chemical shifts in its solution NMR spectrum.

  2. Blue and red shifted temperature dependence of implicit phonon shifts in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Jindal, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    We have calculated the implicit shift for various modes of frequency in a pure graphene sheet. Thermal expansion and Grüneisen parameter which are required for implicit shift calculation have already been studied and reported. For this calculation, phonon frequencies are obtained using force constants derived from dynamical matrix calculated using VASP code where the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) is used in interface with phonopy software. The implicit phonon shift shows an unusual behavior as compared to the bulk materials. The frequency shift is large negative (red shift) for ZA and ZO modes and the value of negative shift increases with increase in temperature. On the other hand, blue shift arises for all other longitudinal and transverse modes with a similar trend of increase with increase in temperature. The q dependence of phonon shifts has also been studied. Such simultaneous red and blue shifts in transverse or out plane modes and surface modes, respectively leads to speculation of surface softening in out of plane direction in preference to surface melting.

  3. Shifting Up a Gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Shift workers are often excluded from educational opportunities on and off the job. General education and leisure learning needs are addressed less than job-specific training needs. Providers should consider open/distance learning, creative marketing, targeted funding, and consortia of employer-developed programs. (SK)

  4. Understanding regime shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heymann, Matthias; Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    ”. Danish wind power development is all the more surprising, as the innovation process in wind technology was carried to a large extent by non-academic craftsmen and political activists. Many features of this innovation story have been investigated and that research makes it possible to summarize...... the current understanding of the regime shift....

  5. Shifting employment revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, J.; Gramuglia, A.

    2014-01-01

    The CLR-network examined in 2006 the phenomenon of undeclared labour, with specific regard to the construction sector. The resulting study, Shifting Employment: undeclared labour in construction, gave evidence that this is an area particularly affected by undeclared activities with one of the

  6. Paradigm Shifts into Giftedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckstroth, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    The process of recognizing qualities of giftedness in a child evokes a range of responses in families, affecting the roles and relationships of an entire family system as the whole family constellation shifts to accommodate a child's giftedness, and each family member's reactions differ because of their own particular temperament, personality,…

  7. A New Paradigm for Chemical Engineering?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    businesses has been observed. There is an increasing trend within the chemical industry to focus on products and the sustainable processes that can make them. Do these changes point to a paradigm shift in chemical engineering as a discipline? Historically, two previous paradigm shifts in chemical engineering...... corresponded to major shifts in chemical engineering as a discipline, which affected not only the education of chemical engineers, but also the development of chemical engineering as a discipline. Has the time come for a new paradigm shift that will prepare the current and future chemical engineering graduates...... to tackle the complex problems facing the chemicals based industries and serve the modern society more efficiently? The lecture will review the current status of chemical engineering as a discipline, the proposals for the third paradigm, the need for such a paradigm shift and related educational issues....

  8. The Interpretation of Object Shift and Optimality Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2001-01-01

    argues that Optimality Theory has certain advantages over e.g. Minimalism in accounting for such data. This is because the interpretational differences only hold of object shift constructions: In a construction where object shift is possible, a non-object-shifted object only has one interpretation......, but also whether it "could have moved" (i.e. it depends on how well those competing candidates are doing which contain object-shifted objects). In Optimality Theory, such a situation can be accounted for in terms of violable constraints, and the difference between object shift and scrambling can be derived......Diesing (1996, 1997) observes that the interpretations of object-shifted objects and non-object-shifted objects in Icelandic object shift constructions differ along lines very similar to the interpretation differences between scrambled and non-scrambled objects in e.g. German. The present paper...

  9. Unmixing of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  10. Understanding and controlling chromaticity shift in LED devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Perkins, Curtis; Bobashev, Georgiy; Young, Joseph; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina

    2017-05-30

    Chromaticity shift in light-emitting diode (LED) devices arises from multiple mechanisms, and at least five different chromaticity shift modes (CSMs) have been identified to date. This paper focuses on the impacts of irreversible phosphor degradation as a cause of chromaticity shifts in LED devices. The nitride phosphors used to produce warm white LEDs are especially vulnerable to degradation due to thermal and chemical effects such as reactions with oxygen and water. As a result, LED devices utilizing these phosphors were found to undergo either a green shift or, less commonly, a red shift depending on the phosphor mix in the LED devices. These types of chromaticity shifts are classified as CSM-2 (green shift) and CSM-5 (red shift). This paper provides an overview of the kinetic processes responsible for green and red chromaticity shifts along with examples from accelerated stress testing of 6” downlights. Both CSMs appear to proceed through analogous mechanisms that are initiated at the surface of the phosphor. A green shift is produced by the surface oxidation of the nitride phosphor that changes the emission profile to lower wavelengths. As the surface oxidation reaction proceeds, reactant limitations slow the rate and bulk oxidation processes become more prevalent. We found that a red chromaticity shift arises from quenching of the green phosphor, also possibly due to surface reactions of oxygen, which shift the emission chromaticity in the red direction. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings on projecting chromaticity.

  11. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  12. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    variabilis (A.v. PCu) (Ma, L.; Hass, M. A. S.; Vierick, N.; Kristensen, S. M.; Ulstrup, J.; Led, J. J. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 320-330). The R-1 and R-2 relaxation rates of the backbone N-15 nuclei were measured at a series of pH and temperatures on an 15N labeled sample of A.v. PCu, and the 15 N chemical...

  13. Dictyostelium Cells Migrate Similarly on Surfaces of Varying Chemical Composition

    OpenAIRE

    McCann, Colin P.; Rericha, Erin C.; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A.

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction ...

  14. Measuring proton shift tensors with ultrafast MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Habeeba K; Bennett, David A; Iuga, Dinu; Titman, Jeremy J

    2013-10-01

    A new proton anisotropic-isotropic shift correlation experiment is described which operates with ultrafast MAS, resulting in good resolution of isotropic proton shifts in the detection dimension. The new experiment makes use of a recoupling sequence designed using symmetry principles which reintroduces the proton chemical shift anisotropy in the indirect dimension. The experiment has been used to measure the proton shift tensor parameters for the OH hydrogen-bonded protons in tyrosine·HCl and citric acid at Larmor frequencies of up to 850 MHz. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lamb shift of Unruh detector levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrecht, Bjoern [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITF) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-06-07

    We argue that the energy levels of an Unruh detector experience an effect similar to the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics. As a consequence, the spectrum of energy levels in a curved background is different from that in flat space. As examples, we consider a detector in an expanding universe and in Rindler space, and for the latter case we suggest a new expression for the local virtual energy density seen by an accelerated observer. In the ultraviolet domain, that is when the space between the energy levels is larger than the Hubble rate or the acceleration of the detector, the Lamb shift quantitatively dominates over the thermal response rate.

  16. Tropical Colonial Ports: Shifting concepts, 1500s-1800s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Based on a study of the history of exploration and settlement in North Australia in the 18th and 19th centuries, I became particularly interested in the concept of a 'good port' in the tropics and how in time this concept shifted. The threat of fevers played a significant part in these shifts. In this overview, I examine how similar shifts in the concept of a good port occurred in the maritime silk and spice routes of South and Shout East Asia.

  17. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformatio...

  18. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformations...

  19. Shift rostering using decomposition: assign weekend shifts first

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Post, Gerhard F.; Veltman, Bart

    This paper introduces a shift rostering problem that surprisingly has not been studied in literature: the weekend shift rostering problem. It is motivated by our experience that employees’ shift preferences predominantly focus on the weekends, since many social activities happen during weekends. The

  20. Quantum-chemical insights from deep tensor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Kristof T.; Arbabzadah, Farhad; Chmiela, Stefan; Müller, Klaus R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Learning from data has led to paradigm shifts in a multitude of disciplines, including web, text and image search, speech recognition, as well as bioinformatics. Can machine learning enable similar breakthroughs in understanding quantum many-body systems? Here we develop an efficient deep learning approach that enables spatially and chemically resolved insights into quantum-mechanical observables of molecular systems. We unify concepts from many-body Hamiltonians with purpose-designed deep tensor neural networks, which leads to size-extensive and uniformly accurate (1 kcal mol-1) predictions in compositional and configurational chemical space for molecules of intermediate size. As an example of chemical relevance, the model reveals a classification of aromatic rings with respect to their stability. Further applications of our model for predicting atomic energies and local chemical potentials in molecules, reliable isomer energies, and molecules with peculiar electronic structure demonstrate the potential of machine learning for revealing insights into complex quantum-chemical systems.

  1. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  2. The shift in windpower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    1992-01-01

    Despite new production records, the near-term market for new windpower projects in the US remains bleak. Congressional incentives and project proposals in the mid-1990s offer promise, but for now most development has shifted to Europe. During 1992 and 1993 the largest wind projects developed by US companies will not be in the US, but in the United Kingdom and Spain. Indeed, most of the US's windpower industry is going abroad, establishing offices overseas. This move toward Europe comes as little surprise. New project development for US firms has faltered at home while the European market has burgeoned. The topics of the article include the move to Europe, a reduction in California's share of producing wind power plants, a rise in Europe's share of producing wind power plants, the future market for wind power in the US, and reawakening California's market

  3. Renewing the Respect for Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon eEdelman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemmingfrom its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problemat hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, bysurveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preservingassociative lookup and dimensionality reduction — critical components of many cognitive functions, aswell as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing familyof algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, andon the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-basedideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included inthe core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience.

  4. Semantic Similarity in Biomedical Ontologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pesquita, Catia; Faria, Daniel; Falc?o, Andr? O.; Lord, Phillip; Couto, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies hav...

  5. Shift work in a security environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhouser, G.A. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Human beings are diurnal species, normally active by day and asleep by night. Yet over thirty million Americans struggle with work schedules that include an off-normal work effort. The railroads, law enforcement, health services, Department of Defense, factory workers, chemical plants and public services, communications and utility workers must provide some form of around-the-clock effort. Shift work has been around since the advent of recorded history. There has always been a need for some type of off-normal service and assistance. The impact of shift work is replete with tales and factual evidence of an increased personnel error rate; disorders, both personal and family, and of course, increased accident events. In recent memory, the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant incident, Union Carbide's explosion in Bhopal, and the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant catastrophe all occurred during off-normal working hours. Yet management overall has done little to correct the production-driven twelve hour, seven day week shift mentality of the nineteenth century. Most schedules in use today are nothing more than cosmetic variations of the old production schedules. This could be driven by a management consideration of the worker's response to change coupled with a reluctant buy-in of responsibility for the effects of change. Florida Power Corporation has developed for its nuclear security force, a unique work schedule which attempts to employ the sound principles of circadian rhythms coupled with a comprehensive training program to counter the problems associated with shift work. The results over the last four years have seen a marked reduction in the generic problems of personnel errors, absenteeism, unscheduled overtime and turnover rates. Utilization and understanding of this scheduling process for rotational shift work needs to be assessed to determine if the benefits are site specific or provide an expected response to the problems of shift work

  6. Similarity Learning of Manifold Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-Bao; Ding, Chris H Q; Luo, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Without constructing adjacency graph for neighborhood, we propose a method to learn similarity among sample points of manifold in Laplacian embedding (LE) based on adding constraints of linear reconstruction and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator type minimization. Two algorithms and corresponding analyses are presented to learn similarity for mix-signed and nonnegative data respectively. The similarity learning method is further extended to kernel spaces. The experiments on both synthetic and real world benchmark data sets demonstrate that the proposed LE with new similarity has better visualization and achieves higher accuracy in classification.

  7. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with 15N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.

    2015-11-01

    The 15N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated 15N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of 15N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved 1H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental 15N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than 13C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  8. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  9. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  10. Towards personalized medicine: leveraging patient similarity and drug similarity analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance.

  11. Semantic similarity in biomedical ontologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Pesquita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies have been published in the last few years describing and evaluating diverse approaches. Semantic similarity has become a valuable tool for validating the results drawn from biomedical studies such as gene clustering, gene expression data analysis, prediction and validation of molecular interactions, and disease gene prioritization. We review semantic similarity measures applied to biomedical ontologies and propose their classification according to the strategies they employ: node-based versus edge-based and pairwise versus groupwise. We also present comparative assessment studies and discuss the implications of their results. We survey the existing implementations of semantic similarity measures, and we describe examples of applications to biomedical research. This will clarify how biomedical researchers can benefit from semantic similarity measures and help them choose the approach most suitable for their studies.Biomedical ontologies are evolving toward increased coverage, formality, and integration, and their use for annotation is increasingly becoming a focus of both effort by biomedical experts and application of automated annotation procedures to create corpora of higher quality and completeness than are currently available. Given that semantic similarity measures are directly dependent on these evolutions, we can expect to see them gaining more relevance and even becoming as essential as sequence similarity is today in biomedical research.

  12. Semantic similarity in biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesquita, Catia; Faria, Daniel; Falcão, André O; Lord, Phillip; Couto, Francisco M

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies have been published in the last few years describing and evaluating diverse approaches. Semantic similarity has become a valuable tool for validating the results drawn from biomedical studies such as gene clustering, gene expression data analysis, prediction and validation of molecular interactions, and disease gene prioritization. We review semantic similarity measures applied to biomedical ontologies and propose their classification according to the strategies they employ: node-based versus edge-based and pairwise versus groupwise. We also present comparative assessment studies and discuss the implications of their results. We survey the existing implementations of semantic similarity measures, and we describe examples of applications to biomedical research. This will clarify how biomedical researchers can benefit from semantic similarity measures and help them choose the approach most suitable for their studies.Biomedical ontologies are evolving toward increased coverage, formality, and integration, and their use for annotation is increasingly becoming a focus of both effort by biomedical experts and application of automated annotation procedures to create corpora of higher quality and completeness than are currently available. Given that semantic similarity measures are directly dependent on these evolutions, we can expect to see them gaining more relevance and even becoming as essential as sequence similarity is today in biomedical research.

  13. Perceived shift. South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coovadia, H

    1998-01-01

    This speech challenges the global community to commit to reducing HIV/AIDS in Durban, South Africa, where 1 in 4 adults is infected with the virus. A commitment of resources and energy would show good faith in fairness, generate unstoppable momentum in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS, provide a genuine renewal in the war against this disease, and set an example for other low income, resource poor, and HIV-epidemic countries. In 2000, the 13th Annual International AIDS Conference will be suitably located in Durban in a region with the highest rates of HIV/AIDS. The 1998 UNAIDS report states that 70% of those infected with HIV (21 million) are in Africa. A shift in program effort and political will would mark a turning point in the war against AIDS. There are four "P's" behind prevention and control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic: politicians, people, private sector, and programs. It is suggested that next year's conference should include political will that will become unshakable. Budgets need to be realistic. People should have unquestionable tolerance, acceptance, and generosity. Community organizations should be strengthened. Discrimination should be stopped. Science needs to be advanced. The private sector's involvement should be meaningful and supportive. Programs should be appropriate, affordable, and accessible. Many gaps need to be bridged and many people need to enlist their aid. The author urges that conference participants remember the afflicted poor and plan for a rebirth and renewal of hope.

  14. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal \\'energy recycling\\', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F 1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N chemical shift assignments of Na-FAR-1, a helix-rich fatty acid and retinol binding protein of the parasitic nematode Necator americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Ibañez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2014-04-01

    The fatty acid and retinol-binding (FAR) proteins are a family of unusual helix-rich lipid binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes, and are secreted by a range of parasites of humans, animals and plants. Na-FAR-1 is from the parasitic nematode Necator americanus, an intestinal blood-feeding parasite of humans. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments have been obtained for the recombinant 170 amino acid protein, using three-dimensional triple-resonance heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments. Backbone assignments have been obtained for 99.3% of the non-proline HN/N pairs (146 out of 147). The amide resonance of T45 was not observed, probably due to rapid exchange with solvent water. A total of 96.9% of backbone resonances were identified, while 97.7% assignment of amino acid sidechain protons is complete. All Hα(166), Hβ(250) and Hγ(160) and 98.4% of the Hδ (126 out of 128) atoms were assigned. In addition, 99.4% Cα (154 out of 155) and 99.3% Cβ (143 out of 144) resonances have been assigned. No resonances were observed for the NH(n) groups of R93 NεHε, arginine, N(η1)H2, N(η2)H2, histidine N(δ1)H(δ1), N(ε1)H(ε1) and lysine N(ζ3)H3. Na-FAR-1 has a similar overall arrangement of α-helices to Ce-FAR-7 of the free-living Caeorhabditis elegans, but with an extra C-terminal helix.

  16. Rapid Hydrogen Shift Reactions in Acyl Peroxy Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knap, Hasse C; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2017-02-23

    We have used quantum mechanical chemical calculations (CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ) to investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in acyl peroxy and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals. We have focused on the H-shift reactions from a hydroperoxy group (OOH) (1,X-OOH H-shift with X = 6, 7, 8, or 9) in the hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals, this H-shift is a reversible reaction and it scrambles between two peroxides, hydroperoxy acyl peroxy and peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. The forward reaction rate constants of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions are estimated to be above 10 3 s -1 with transition state theory corrected with Eckart quantum tunnelling correction. The ratio between the forward and reverse reaction rate constant of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions is around ∼10 5 . Therefore, the equilibrium is pushed toward the production of peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. These very fast 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions are much faster than the reactions with NO and HO 2 under most atmospheric conditions and must be included in the atmospheric models when hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals are oxidized. Finally, we have observed that H-shift reactions in a pentane acyl peroxy radical (C5-AOO) is fast (>1 s -1 ); this can have a significant influence on the possible formation of large acyl peroxy nitrate molecules.

  17. Method of similarity for cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espanet, L.; Tekatlian, A.; Barbier, D. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gouin, H. [Aix-Marseille-3 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France). Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique et Thermodynamique

    1998-07-01

    The knowledge of possible cavitation in subassembly nozzles of the fast reactor core implies the realization of a fluid dynamic model test. We propose a method of similarity based on the non-dimensionalization of the equation of motion for viscous capillarity fluid issued from the Cahn and Hilliard model. Taking into account the dissolved gas effect, a condition of compatibility is determined. This condition must be respected by the fluid in experiment, along with the scaling between the two similar flows. (author)

  18. Method of similarity for cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espanet, L.; Tekatlian, A.; Barbier, D.; Gouin, H.

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge of possible cavitation in subassembly nozzles of the fast reactor core implies the realization of a fluid dynamic model test. We propose a method of similarity based on the non-dimensionalization of the equation of motion for viscous capillarity fluid issued from the Cahn and Hilliard model. Taking into account the dissolved gas effect, a condition of compatibility is determined. This condition must be respected by the fluid in experiment, along with the scaling between the two similar flows. (author)

  19. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  20. Visualizing multiple word similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kievit-Kylar, Brent; Jones, Michael N

    2012-09-01

    Although many recent advances have taken place in corpus-based tools, the techniques used to guide exploration and evaluation of these systems have advanced little. Typically, the plausibility of a semantic space is explored by sampling the nearest neighbors to a target word and evaluating the neighborhood on the basis of the modeler's intuition. Tools for visualization of these large-scale similarity spaces are nearly nonexistent. We present a new open-source tool to plot and visualize semantic spaces, thereby allowing researchers to rapidly explore patterns in visual data that describe the statistical relations between words. Words are visualized as nodes, and word similarities are shown as directed edges of varying strengths. The "Word-2-Word" visualization environment allows for easy manipulation of graph data to test word similarity measures on their own or in comparisons between multiple similarity metrics. The system contains a large library of statistical relationship models, along with an interface to teach them from various language sources. The modularity of the visualization environment allows for quick insertion of new similarity measures so as to compare new corpus-based metrics against the current state of the art. The software is available at www.indiana.edu/~semantic/word2word/.

  1. Similarities and Differences in Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Yan; Liang, Jie; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Similar symptomatology manifestations and high co-morbidity in substance and non-substance addictions suggest that there may be a common pathogenesis between them. Associated with impulse control and emotional processing, the monoamine neurotransmitter system genes are suggested to be related to both substance and non-substance addictions, such as dopamine (DA) system, 5-hydroxytryptamine/serotonin (5-HT) system, the endogenous opioid system and so on. Here we reviewed the similarities and differences in genetics between classic substance addiction and common types of non-substance addiction, e.g. pathological gambling, Internet addiction, binge-eating disorder etc. It is necessary to systematically compare genetic mechanisms of non-substance addiction and substance addiction, which could reveal similarities and differences of substance addiction and non-addictive substances essentially, enhance our understanding of addiction theory and improve clinical practice with research results.

  2. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  3. TIPS (trigger an IIF paradigm shift)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcup, P.E. Glen; Hickox, Dick; Reynaga, Adolfo

    2007-01-01

    5 had no severe (recordable) injuries -Biggest total injury type was ergonomic -Biggest recordable injury type (58%) was cuts/lacerations -Chemical exposure and inhalations resulted in no recordables - Biggest root cause category was behavioral -Biggest behavioral root cause was 'Failure to Evaluate Hazards' - Biggest administrative controls root cause was 'Inadequate Procedures' - Biggest engineering controls root cause was 'Unrecognized Workplace Hazard' - Majority of injuries occurred in Spring/Summer which accounted for 86% of recordables -Response was inadequate or poor for 25% of injuries - Number of injuries by workgroup were about equal -Work area injuries were mostly in the CUB and Subfab but CUB injuries favored cuts/lacerations while Subfab favored ergonomic injuries These learnings and gaps were used to develop our New Mexico Site Safety Action Plan for 2005. It has also been used by individual managers and supervisors in their day-to-day business meetings, activities, and communications, for a more focused IIF message and effort. Results: Conclusions/Recommendations: Challenges are different amongst shifts. Shift culture may be stronger than workgroup culture. Work areas pose different challenges that all should be aware of and prepared for. We should prepare ourselves for challenges posed by the Spring and Summer seasons as well. We should be aware of and prepare for the different challenges and cultures characteristic of each shift. Supervisors need to spend more time in the field with their people to help them address safety issues and help make IIF a more consistent component of daily workgroup culture. Each site should analyze their data and look for their unique safety challenges. This will allow customized, focused action plans that meet the unique needs of each site

  4. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  5. Glove boxes and similar containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    According to the present invention a glove box or similar containment is provided with an exhaust system including a vortex amplifier venting into the system, the vortex amplifier also having its main inlet in fluid flow connection with the containment and a control inlet in fluid flow connection with the atmosphere outside the containment. (U.S.)

  6. Revisiting Inter-Genre Similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Gouyon, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the idea of ``inter-genre similarity'' (IGS) for machine learning in general, and music genre recognition in particular. We show analytically that the probability of error for IGS is higher than naive Bayes classification with zero-one loss (NB). We show empirically that IGS does...

  7. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  8. Active browsing using similarity pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jau-Yuen; Bouman, Charles A.; Dalton, John C.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases, which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure, which hierarchically organizes the database, so that it can be efficiently browsed. At coarse levels, the similarity pyramid allows users to view the database as large clusters of similar images. Alternatively, users can 'zoom into' finer levels to view individual images. We discuss relevance feedback for the browsing process, and argue that it is fundamentally different from relevance feedback for more traditional search-by-query tasks. We propose two fundamental operations for active browsing: pruning and reorganization. Both of these operations depend on a user-defined relevance set, which represents the image or set of images desired by the user. We present statistical methods for accurately pruning the database, and we propose a new 'worm hole' distance metric for reorganizing the database, so that members of the relevance set are grouped together.

  9. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bradley T.; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein–ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state (“lig1”) of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  10. Similar genetic mechanisms underlie the parallel evolution of floral phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenheng Zhang

    Full Text Available The repeated origin of similar phenotypes is invaluable for studying the underlying genetics of adaptive traits; molecular evidence, however, is lacking for most examples of such similarity. The floral morphology of neotropical Malpighiaceae is distinctive and highly conserved, especially with regard to symmetry, and is thought to result from specialization on oil-bee pollinators. We recently demonstrated that CYCLOIDEA2-like genes (CYC2A and CYC2B are associated with the development of the stereotypical floral zygomorphy that is critical to this plant-pollinator mutualism. Here, we build on this developmental framework to characterize floral symmetry in three clades of Malpighiaceae that have independently lost their oil bee association and experienced parallel shifts in their floral morphology, especially in regard to symmetry. We show that in each case these species exhibit a loss of CYC2B function, and a strikingly similar shift in the expression of CYC2A that is coincident with their shift in floral symmetry. These results indicate that similar floral phenotypes in this large angiosperm clade have evolved via parallel genetic changes from an otherwise highly conserved developmental program.

  11. Regime shifts, resilience and recovery of a cod stock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin; Diekmann, Rabea; Möllmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the North and Baltic seas Atlantic cod Gadus morhua stocks collapsed as part or one of the major factors inducing large-scale ecosystem regime shifts. Determining the relative contribution of overfishing and climate variability in causing these shifts has proven difficult. While facing similar...... of the local cod stock to environmental change. The recovery and healthy condition of the Sound cod stock illustrate the need for adaptive marine management strategies that maximize ecosystem resilience....

  12. Blackbody radiation shift of the Ga+ clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yongjun; Mitroy, J

    2013-01-01

    The blackbody radiation shift of the Ga + clock transition is computed to be −0.0140 ± 0.0062 Hz at 300 K. The small shift is consistent with the blackbody radiation shifts of the clock transitions of other group III ions which are of a similar size. The polarizabilities of the Ga + states were computed using the configuration interaction method with an underlying semi-empirical core potential. Quadrupole and non-adiabatic dipole polarizabilities were also computed. A byproduct of the analysis involved calculations of the low-lying spectrum and oscillator strengths, including polarizabilities, of the Ga 2+ ion. (paper)

  13. Piezoelectric Ceramics of the (1 − x)Bi0.50Na0.50TiO3–xBa0.90Ca0.10TiO3 Lead-Free Solid Solution: Chemical Shift of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary, a Case Study for x = 0.06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivar-Ocampo, Rodrigo; Pardo, Lorena; Ávila, David; Morán, Emilio; González, Amador M.; Bucio, Lauro; Villafuerte-Castrejón, María-Elena

    2017-01-01

    Research and development of lead-free piezoelectric materials are still the hottest topics in the field of piezoelectricity. One of the most promising lead-free family of compounds to replace lead zirconate–titanate for actuators is that of Bi0.50Na0.50TiO3 (BNT) based solid solutions. The pseudo-binary (1 − x)Bi0.50Na0.50TiO3–xBa1 − yCayTiO3 system has been proposed for high temperature capacitors and not yet fully explored as piezoelectric material. In this work, the solid solution with x = 0.06 and y = 0.10 was obtained by two different synthesis routes: solid state and Pechini, aiming at using reduced temperatures, both in synthesis (<800 °C) and sintering (<1150 °C), while maintaining appropriated piezoelectric performance. Crystal structure, ceramic grain size, and morphology depend on the synthesis route and were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, together with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of processing and ceramic microstructure on the structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties were discussed in terms of a shift of the Morphotropic Phase Boundary, chemically induced by the synthesis route. PMID:28773096

  14. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The global financial and economic crisis has prompted some scholars to suggest that a fundamental regulatory shift away from neoliberalism will take place – both in general and in the field of EU competition regulation. This paper shows that so far no radical break with the neoliberal type...... of competition regulation is heaving into sight. It sets out to explain this from the vantage point of a critical political economy perspective, which identifies the circumstances under which a crisis can result in a regulatory paradigm shift. Contrasting the current situation with the shift in EC/EU competition...... regulation after the crisis in the 1970s, the paper argues that the preconditions for a fundamental shift in this issue area are not present this time around. Several reasons account for this: the current crisis has been construed by economic and political elites as a crisis within and not of neoliberal...

  15. Methods for Similarity-based Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Greve Kristensen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing new medical drugs is expensive. Among the first steps is a screening process, in which molecules in existing chemical libraries are tested for activity against a given target. This requires a lot of resources and manpower. Therefore it has become common to perform a virtual screening, where computers are used for predicting the activity of very large libraries of molecules, to identify the most promising leads for further laboratory experiments. Since computer simulations generally require fewer resources than physical experimentation this can lower the cost of medical and biological research significantly. In this paper we review practically fast algorithms for screening databases of molecules in order to find molecules that are sufficiently similar to a query molecule.

  16. METHODS FOR SIMILARITY-BASED VIRTUAL SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Kristensen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing new medical drugs is expensive. Among the first steps is a screening process, in which molecules in existing chemical libraries are tested for activity against a given target. This requires a lot of resources and manpower. Therefore it has become common to perform a virtual screening, where computers are used for predicting the activity of very large libraries of molecules, to identify the most promising leads for further laboratory experiments. Since computer simulations generally require fewer resources than physical experimentation this can lower the cost of medical and biological research significantly. In this paper we review practically fast algorithms for screening databases of molecules in order to find molecules that are sufficiently similar to a query molecule.

  17. A criticism of big bang cosmological models based on interpretation of the red shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kierein, J.W. (Ball Aerospace Systems Div., Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-08-01

    The interaction of light with the intergalactic plasma produces the Hubble red shift versus distance relationship. This interaction also produces an isotopic long wavelength background radiation from the plasma. Intrinsic red shifts in quasars and other objects are similarly explained, showing why they are exceptions to Hubble's law. Because the red shift is not doppler-shifted, big bang cosmological models should be replaced with static models. (author).

  18. Seniority bosons from similarity transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, H.B.

    1986-01-01

    The requirement of associating in the boson space seniority with twice the number of non-s bosons defines a similarity transformation which re-expresses the Dyson pair boson images in terms of seniority bosons. In particular the fermion S-pair creation operator is mapped onto an operator which, unlike the pair boson image, does not change the number of non-s bosons. The original results of Otsuka, Arima and Iachello are recovered by this procedure while at the same time they are generalized to include g-bosons or even bosons with J>4 as well as any higher order boson terms. Furthermore the seniority boson images are valid for an arbitrary number of d- or g-bosons - a result which is not readily obtainable within the framework of the usual Marumori- or OAI-method

  19. Rapid Hydrogen Shift Reactions in Acyl Peroxy Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2017-01-01

    -shift with X = 6, 7, 8, or 9) in the hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals, this H-shift is a reversible reaction and it scrambles between two peroxides, hydroperoxy acyl peroxy and peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. The forward reaction rate constants of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions are estimated to be above 103 s–1...... with transition state theory corrected with Eckart quantum tunnelling correction. The ratio between the forward and reverse reaction rate constant of the 1,X-OOH H-shift reactions is around ∼105. Therefore, the equilibrium is pushed toward the production of peroxy peroxoic acid radicals. These very fast 1,X-OOH H......We have used quantum mechanical chemical calculations (CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ) to investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in acyl peroxy and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals. We have focused on the H-shift reactions from a hydroperoxy group (OOH) (1,X-OOH H...

  20. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  1. Ontogenetic shifts of heart position in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Lillywhite, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Heart position relative to total body length (TL) varies among snakes, with anterior hearts in arboreal species and more centrally located hearts in aquatic or ground-dwelling species. Anterior hearts decrease the cardiac work associated with cranial blood flow and minimize drops in cranial pressure and flow during head-up climbing. Here, we investigate whether heart position shifts intraspecifically during ontogenetic increases in TL. Insular Florida cottonmouth snakes, Agkistrodon conanti, are entirely ground-dwelling and have a mean heart position that is 33.32% TL from the head. In contrast, arboreal rat snakes, Pantherophis obsoleta, of similar lengths have a mean heart position that is 17.35% TL from the head. In both species, relative heart position shifts craniad during ontogeny, with negative slopes = -.035 and -.021% TL/cm TL in Agkistrodon and Pantherophis, respectively. Using a large morphometric data set available for Agkistrodon (N = 192 individuals, 23-140 cm TL), we demonstrate there is an anterior ontogenetic shift of the heart position within the trunk (= 4.56% trunk length from base of head to cloacal vent), independent of head and tail allometry which are both negative. However, in longer snakes > 100 cm, the heart position reverses and shifts caudally in longer Agkistrodon but continues toward the head in longer individuals of Pantherophis. Examination of data sets for two independent lineages of fully marine snakes (Acrochordus granulatus and Hydrophis platurus), which do not naturally experience postural gravity stress, demonstrate both ontogenetic patterns for heart position that are seen in the terrestrial snakes. The anterior migration of the heart is greater in the terrestrial species, even if TL is standardized to that of the longer P. obsoleta, and compensates for about 5 mmHg gravitational pressure head if they are fully upright. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Rotating night shift work, sleep, and colorectal adenoma in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, Elizabeth E; Massa, Jennifer; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Schernhammer, Eva S; Wu, Kana; Zhang, Xuehong; Willett, Walter C; Fuchs, Charles S; Chan, Andrew T; Ogino, Shuji; Giovannucci, Edward; Wei, Esther K

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the associations of rotating night shift work history and sleep duration with risk of colorectal adenoma. We evaluated 56,275 cancer-free participants of the Nurses' Health Study II, who had their first colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy between 1991 and 2011; rotating night shift work and sleep duration were reported by mailed questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) of colorectal adenoma, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), across categories of rotating night shift work history (none, 1-4, 5-9, and ≥10 years) and sleep duration (≤5, 6, 7, 8, and ≥9 h/day). We found no association between duration of rotating night shift work and occurrence of colorectal adenoma (p-trend across shift work categories = 0.5). Women with the longest durations of rotating night shift work (≥10 years) had a similar risk of adenoma compared to women without a history of rotating night shift work (multivariable-adjusted RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.83-1.11). Similarly, there were no associations of shorter or longer sleep durations with adenoma risk (p-trend = 0.2 across sleep durations of ≤5 through 7 h/day and p-trend = 0.5 across sleep durations of 7 through ≥9 h/day). Results were similar when we examined associations according to adenoma location and subtype. Our results do not support an association between rotating night shift work or sleep duration and risk of colorectal adenoma in women.

  3. Pharmacophore-based similarity scoring for DOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingling; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-01-22

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein-ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK.

  4. SAT in shift manager training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, F.

    1995-01-01

    EDF has improved the organization of the operation shift teams with the replacement of shift supervisor in shift manager function. The shift manager is not only responsible for tasks associated to plant operation (production), but he is also responsible for safety of these tasks and for management of shift team members. A job analysis of this new job position has been performed in order to design the training programme. It resulted in a 10-month training programme that includes 8 weeks in safety-related topics and 12 weeks in soft-skills related topics. The safety related training courses are mandatory, the other courses are optional courses depending on individual trainee needs. The training also includes the development of management competencies. During the 10 month period, each trainee develops an individual project that is evaluated by NPP manager. As well, as group project is undertaken by the trainees and overseen by a steering committee. The steering committee participates in the evaluation process and provides operational experience feedback to the trainee groups and to the overall programme

  5. A New Look at Corporate Diversity Training and Management: From Affirming Diversity to Affirming DiversSimilarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori-Dankwa, Joseph; Bonner, Ralph

    1998-01-01

    Discusses organizations shifting from affirming diversity to affirming similarity in workforce training. The DiverSimilarity principles include creativity and adversity in diversity, conformity and compatibility in similarity, diversity within diversity, similarity across diversity, and managing diversity by managing diverSimilarity. (MMU)

  6. Conformational distributions of denatured and unstructured proteins are similar to those of 20 × 20 blocked dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Jung, Young-Sang; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Cho, Minhaeng

    2012-01-01

    Understanding intrinsic conformational preferences of amino-acids in unfolded proteins is important for elucidating the underlying principles of their stability and re-folding on biological timescales. Here, to investigate the neighbor interaction effects on the conformational propensities of amino-acids, we carried out 1 H NMR experiments for a comprehensive set of blocked dipeptides and measured the scalar coupling constants between alpha protons and amide protons as well as their chemical shifts. Detailed inspection of these NMR properties shows that, irrespective of amino-acid side-chain properties, the distributions of the measured coupling constants and chemical shifts of the dipeptides are comparatively narrow, indicating small variances of their conformation distributions. They are further compared with those of blocked amino-acids (Ac–X–NHMe), oligopeptides (Ac–GGXGG–NH 2 ), and native (lysozyme), denatured (lysozyme and outer membrane protein X from Escherichia coli), unstructured (Domain 2 of the protein 5A of Hepatitis C virus), and intrinsically disordered (hNlg3cyt: intracellular domain of human NL3) proteins. These comparative investigations suggest that the conformational preferences and local solvation environments of the blocked dipeptides are quite similar to not only those of other short oligopeptides but also those of denatured and natively unfolded proteins.

  7. shift

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    during the course of an academic year at the University of Witwatersrand following recent reforms in training and assessment methods Method: All fifth ... Assessment of Psychiatry in medical education at the. University of Witwatersrand ... or two examiners, to assess mainly clinical competence; multiple-choice questions ...

  8. Response shift en retrospectie. / Response shift in retrospect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstraten, J.; de Meijer, E.; Sprangers, M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between response shift and the concept of "artifact" with reference to W. K. Hofstee's (1986) arguments. The use of retrospective posttests instead of retrospective pretests is rejected, and some empirical approaches for assessing the impact of social desirability and

  9. VP Anaphors and Object Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the placement of the VP anaphor det ‘it’ as a complement of verbs selecting VP complements in Danish. With verbs that only allow a VP complement, the VP anaphor must be in SpecCP regardless of its information structure properties. If SpecCP is occupied by an operator, the an...... be in situ. The article argues that a shifted pronominal in Danish must be categorially licensed by the verb and extends this analysis to shifting locatives. An Optimality Theory analysis is proposed that accounts for the observed facts....

  10. Discrepancy and Disliking Do Not Induce Negative Opinion Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Károly; Flache, Andreas; Mäs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Both classical social psychological theories and recent formal models of opinion differentiation and bi-polarization assign a prominent role to negative social influence. Negative influence is defined as shifts away from the opinion of others and hypothesized to be induced by discrepancy with or disliking of the source of influence. There is strong empirical support for the presence of positive social influence (a shift towards the opinion of others), but evidence that large opinion differences or disliking could trigger negative shifts is mixed. We examine positive and negative influence with controlled exposure to opinions of other individuals in one experiment and with opinion exchange in another study. Results confirm that similarities induce attraction, but results do not support that discrepancy or disliking entails negative influence. Instead, our findings suggest a robust positive linear relationship between opinion distance and opinion shifts.

  11. Interactions of light and a temperature shift on seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylorson, R B; Hendricks, S B

    1972-02-01

    Germination of Rumex obtusifolius L. seeds is potentiated to an observable degree in 2 minutes by a single shift in temperature from 20 to 35 C. Half-maximal potentiation requires less than 32 minutes at the higher temperature. Similar sensitivities to shifts in temperature were observed for seeds of Barbarea vulgaris, R.Br. B. verna (Mill.) Asch., and Lepidium virginicum L. A shift in temperature interacts strongly with change in form of phytochrome induced by light on germination of the four kinds of seeds. The potentiated effects for R. obtusifolius are only moderately affected by 40 mum cycloheximide. Both the temperature shift and light actions are apparently independent of processes of synthesis necessary for growth.

  12. Predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in Daphnia pulex: Uncoupling morphological defenses and life history shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.; Pihlajamaa, K.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical cues from a predator Chaoborus sp. induce morphological defense (neck spine) and life history shifts (later reproduction, decreased fecundity but larger juvenile size) in the waterflea Daphnia pulex. These shifts have been interpreted either as costs of defense or as separate adaptation. In

  13. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. To promote better sleep during the day: ... Take naps. Napping late in the day before work might help you make up your sleep debt. ...

  14. Leadership Shifts in Changing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    As groups representing local and state education players struggle to remain relevant in a policy conversation often dominated by foundations, think tanks, new advocacy groups, and political and business figures, a shift in leadership has been under way at major associations. Most of the changes have come as part of the natural churn; former…

  15. Shift register neutron coincidence module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.M.; Swansen, J.E.; East, L.V.

    1975-11-01

    A neutron coincidence module was designed using multistage shift registers to produce the coincidence gates and a crystal controlled oscillator with variable clock outputs to change the gate lengths. The advantage of this system over the conventional, thermal-neutron coincidence gates is a decrease in deadtime by more than an order of magnitude

  16. The Shift Needed for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter A. C.; Sharicz, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this action research is to begin to assess to what extent organizations have in practice begun to make the shift towards triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A definition of TBL sustainability is provided, and key elements of TBL sustainability considered necessary to success are identified…

  17. Environmental Protection: a shifting focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar

    2004-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a fundamental change in the way chemistry handles environmental issues. A shift in focus has occurred from 'end-of-pipe' to prevention and process integration. Presently an even more fundamental change is brought about by the need for sustainable development. It is

  18. Experimental investigation of zero phase shift effects for Coriolis flowmeters due to pipe imperfections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enz, Stephanie; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Neumeyer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    damping and mass, and on ambient temperature changes. Experimental observations confirm the hypothesis that asymmetry in the axial distribution of damping will induce zero shifts similar to the phase shifts due to fluid flow. Axially symmetrically distributed damping was observed to influence phase shift......, the flexural vibrations of two bent, parallel, non-fluid-conveying pipes are studied experimentally, employing an industrial CFM. Special attention has been paid on the phase shift in the case of zero mass flow, i.e. the zero shift, caused by various imperfections to the ‘‘perfect’’ CFM, i.e. non-uniform pipe...... at an order of magnitude smaller than the primary effect of mass flow, while small added mass and ambient temperature changes induced zero shifts two orders of magnitude smaller than the phase shifts due to mass flow. The order of magnitude of the induced zero shifts indicates that non-uniform damping, added...

  19. MAK33 antibody light chain amyloid fibrils are similar to oligomeric precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hora

    Full Text Available Little structural information is available so far on amyloid fibrils consisting of immunoglobulin light chains. It is not understood which features of the primary sequence of the protein result in fibril formation. We report here MAS solid-state NMR studies to identify the structured core of κ-type variable domain light chain fibrils. The core contains residues of the CDR2 and the β-strands D, E, F and G of the native immunoglobulin fold. The assigned core region of the fibril is distinct in comparison to the core identified in a previous solid-state NMR study on AL-09 by Piehl at. al, suggesting that VL fibrils can adopt different topologies. In addition, we investigated a soluble oligomeric intermediate state, previously termed the alternatively folded state (AFS, using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The NMR oligomer spectra display a high degree of similarity when compared to the fibril spectra, indicating a high structural similarity of the two aggregation states. Based on comparison to the native state NMR chemical shifts, we suggest that fibril formation via domain-swapping seems unlikely. Moreover, we used our results to test the quality of different amyloid prediction algorithms.

  20. Human vs. Mouse Nociceptors - Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostock, Charlotte; Schrenk-Siemens, Katrin; Pohle, Jörg; Siemens, Jan

    2017-12-08

    The somatosensory system allows us to detect a diverse range of physical and chemical stimuli including noxious ones, which can initiate protective reflexes to prevent tissue damage. However, the sensation of pain can - under pathological circumstances - outlive its usefulness and perpetrate ongoing suffering. Rodent model systems have been tremendously useful to help understand basic mechanisms of pain perception. Unfortunately, the translation of this knowledge into novel therapies has been challenging. We have investigated similarities and differences of human and mouse peptidergic (TRKA expressing) nociceptors using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of dorsal root ganglia. By comparing the transcripts of a selected group of well-established nociceptive markers, we observed significant differences for some of them. We found co-expression of Trpv1, a key player for sensitization and inflammatory pain, with TrkA in a larger population in humans compared to mice. Similar results could be obtained for Na v 1.8 and Na v 1.9, two voltage gated sodium channels implicated in pathological forms of pain. Additionally, co-expression of Ret and TrkA was also found to be more abundant in human neurons. Moreover, the neurofilament heavy polypeptide was detected in all human sensory DRG neurons compared to a more selective expression pattern observed in rodents. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such detailed comparative analysis has been performed and we believe that our findings will direct future experimentation geared to understand the difficulties we face in translating findings from rodent models to humans. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS USING 'GREENER' ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical research during the last decade has witnessed a paradigm shift towards "environmentally-friendly chemistry" more popularly known as "green chemistry" due to the increasing environmental concerns and legislative requirements to curb the release of chemical waste into ...

  2. Special training of shift personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    The first step of on-the-job training is practical observation phase in an operating Nuclear Plant, where the participants are assigned to shift work. The simulator training for operating personnel, for key personnel and, to some extent, also for maintenance personnel and specialists give the practical feeling for Nuclear Power Plant behaviour during normal and abnormal conditions. During the commissioning phase of the own Nuclear Power Plant, which is the most important practical training, the participants are integrated into the commissioning staff and assisted during their process of practical learning by special instructors. The preparation for the licensing exams is vitally important for shift personnel and special courses are provided after the first non-nuclear trial operation of the plant. Personnel training also includes performance of programmes and material for retraining, training of instructors and assistance in building up special training programmes and material as well as training centers. (orig./RW)

  3. Debt Shifting and Ownership Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Schindler; Guttorm Schjelderup

    2011-01-01

    Previous theoretical studies on the debt shifting behavior of multinationals have assumed affiliates of multinationals to be wholly owned. We develop a model that allows a multinational firm to determine both the leverage and ownership structure in affiliates endogenously. A main finding is that affiliates with minority owners have less debt than wholly owned affiliates and therefore a less tax efficient financing structure. This is due to an externality that arises endogenously in our model,...

  4. Into the Era of shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencik, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Globalization and new communication technologies shape new increasingly unpredictable living conditions. Societies as individuals face a world og growing predictive impotence. Traditions loose their power as guides for maneuvering - where traditions was reflection will be. At the same time people......, life styles, experiences and sexuality. Even thougts and feelings.In the era of shifts we shall be living with ever more design in an ever less designed world....

  5. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebach, M.; Gotta, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Anagnostopoulos, D.F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ioannina (Greece); Dax, A.; Liu, Y.W.; Markushin, V.E.; Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Vienna (Austria); Indelicato, P. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Departement de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Manil, B. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); Rusi el Hassani, A.J. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Tanger (Morocco); Trassinelli, M. [Sorbonne Universites, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France); CNRS, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France)

    2014-12-01

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be ε {sub 1s} = 7.086 ± 0.007(stat) ± 0.006(sys) eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground-state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer with bent crystals. (orig.)

  6. Multicolor Holography With Phase Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype apparatus constructed to test feasibility of two-color holographic interferometric scheme in which data for reconstructing holographic wavefront obtained with help of phase-shifting technique. Provides two sets of data needed to solve equations for effects of temperature and concentration. Concept extended to holography at three or more wavelengths to measure three or more phenomena associated with significant variations in index of refraction

  7. Chemical evolution, petrogenesis, and regional chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    allows chemical correlations between the lavas of central Deccan, the Tapti dykes and the north- western outcrops. The mildly enriched high field strength element contents of the samples with. TiO2 > 1.5wt% make them products of mantle sources broadly similar to those which generated the Ambenali basalts, but their high ...

  8. Quantifying similarity of pore-geometry in nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongjin; Barthel, Senja D.; Dłotko, Paweł; Moosavi, S. Mohamad; Hess, Kathryn; Smit, Berend

    2017-05-01

    In most applications of nanoporous materials the pore structure is as important as the chemical composition as a determinant of performance. For example, one can alter performance in applications like carbon capture or methane storage by orders of magnitude by only modifying the pore structure. For these applications it is therefore important to identify the optimal pore geometry and use this information to find similar materials. However, the mathematical language and tools to identify materials with similar pore structures, but different composition, has been lacking. We develop a pore recognition approach to quantify similarity of pore structures and classify them using topological data analysis. This allows us to identify materials with similar pore geometries, and to screen for materials that are similar to given top-performing structures. Using methane storage as a case study, we also show that materials can be divided into topologically distinct classes requiring different optimization strategies.

  9. Shift Work and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to investigate the impact of shift and night work on metabolic processes and the role of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle and feeding times and environmental changes in the occurrence of metabolic disorders. The literature review was performed by searching three electronic databases for relevant studies published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of each study was assessed, and best-evidence synthesis was applied to draw conclusions. The literature has shown changes in concentrations of melatonin, cortisol, ghrelin, and leptin among shift workers. Melatonin has been implicated for its role in the synthesis and action of insulin. The action of this hormone also regulates the expression of transporter glucose type 4 or triggers phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Therefore, a reduction in melatonin can be associated with an increase in insulin resistance and a propensity for the development of diabetes. Moreover, shift work can negatively affect sleep and contribute to sedentarism, unhealthy eating habits, and stress. Recent studies on metabolic processes have increasingly revealed their complexity. Physiological changes induced in workers who invert their activity-rest cycle to fulfill work hours include disruptions in metabolic processes.

  10. Inequalities between similarities for numerical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrens, Matthijs J.

    Similarity measures are entities that can be used to quantify the similarity between two vectors with real numbers. We present inequalities between seven well known similarities. The inequalities are valid if the vectors contain non-negative real numbers.

  11. Decoding covert shifts of attention induced by ambiguous visuospatial cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eTrachel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Simple and unambiguous visual cues (e.g. an arrow can be used to trigger covert shifts of visual attention away from the center of gaze. The processing of visual stimuli is enhanced at the attended location. Covert shifts of attention modulate the power of cerebral oscillations in the alpha band over parietal and occipital regions. These modulations are sufficiently robust to be decoded on a single trial basis from electro-encephalography (EEG signals. It is often assumed that covert attention shifts are under voluntary control, and also occur in more natural and complex environments, but there is no direct evidence to support this assumption. We address this important issue by using random-dot stimuli to cue one of two opposite locations, where a visual target is presented. We contrast two conditions in which the random-dot motion is either predictive of the target location or contains ambiguous information. Behavioral results show attention shifts in anticipation of the visual target, in both conditions. In addition, these attention shifts involve similar neural sources, and the EEG can be decoded on a single trial basis. These results shed a new light on the behavioral and neural correlates of visuospatial attention, with implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI based on covert attention shifts.

  12. Protein-protein interaction based on pairwise similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Nazar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential to most biological processes. Abnormal interactions may have implications in a number of neurological syndromes. Given that the association and dissociation of protein molecules is crucial, computational tools capable of effectively identifying PPI are desirable. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method to detect PPI based on pairwise similarity and using only the primary structure of the protein. The PPI based on Pairwise Similarity (PPI-PS method consists of a representation of each protein sequence by a vector of pairwise similarities against large subsequences of amino acids created by a shifting window which passes over concatenated protein training sequences. Each coordinate of this vector is typically the E-value of the Smith-Waterman score. These vectors are then used to compute the kernel matrix which will be exploited in conjunction with support vector machines. Results To assess the ability of the proposed method to recognize the difference between "interacted" and "non-interacted" proteins pairs, we applied it on different datasets from the available yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction. The proposed method achieved reasonable improvement over the existing state-of-the-art methods for PPI prediction. Conclusion Pairwise similarity score provides a relevant measure of similarity between protein sequences. This similarity incorporates biological knowledge about proteins and it is extremely powerful when combined with support vector machine to predict PPI.

  13. Incoherent and coherent tune shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). AGS Dept.

    1995-12-31

    The longitudinal and transverse microwave instabilities are the two important limiting factors for the performance of an accelerator. Comparing with the fairly unified approach for the longitudinal microwave instabilities, different approaches have been used to define the transverse microwave instabilities. One reason of this is related to the role played by the space charge incoherent and coherent tune shifts. In this article, the transverse microwave instabilities will be discussed by defining separately the roles of the space charge incoherent and coherent tunes, which are represented by the space charge transverse impedances. Preliminary results for the AGS as proton driver are presented by using this approach.

  14. Steady State Shift Damage Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekjær, Claus; Bull, Thomas; Markvart, Morten Kusk

    2017-01-01

    The steady state shift damage localization (S3DL) method localizes structural deterioration, manifested as either a mass or stiffness perturbation, by interrogating the damage-induced change in the steady state vibration response with damage patterns cast from a theoretical model. Damage is, thus...... the required accuracy when examining complex structures, an extensive amount of degrees of freedom (DOF) must often be utilized. Since the interrogation matrix for each damage pattern depends on the size of the system matrices constituting the FE-model, the computational time quickly becomes of first...

  15. Chronotype modulates sleep duration, sleep quality, and social jet lag in shift-workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Roenneberg, Till

    2013-04-01

    This study explores chronotype-dependent tolerance to the demands of working morning, evening, and night shifts in terms of social jet lag, sleep duration, and sleep disturbance. A total of 238 shift-workers were chronotyped with the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire for shift-workers (MCTQ(Shift)), which collects information about shift-dependent sleep duration and sleep timing. Additionally, 94 shift-workers also completed those items of the Sleep Questionnaire from the Standard Shift-Work Index (SSI) that assess sleep disturbances. Although all participants worked morning, evening, and night shifts, subsamples differed in rotation direction and speed. Sleep duration, social jet lag, and sleep disturbance were all significantly modulated by the interaction of chronotype and shift (mixed-model ANOVAs). Earlier chronotypes showed shortened sleep duration during night shifts, high social jet lag, as well as higher levels of sleep disturbance. A similar pattern was observed for later chronotypes during early shifts. Age itself only influenced sleep duration and quality per se, without showing interactions with shifts. We found that workers slept longer in fast, rotating shift schedules. Since chronotype changes with age, investigations on sleep behavior and circadian misalignment in shift-workers have to consider chronotype to fully understand interindividual and intraindividual variability, especially in view of the current demographic changes. Given the impact of sleep on health, our results stress the importance of chronotype both in understanding the effects of shift-work on sleep and in devising solutions to reduce shift-work-related health problems.

  16. Has Chemical Education Reached Equilibrium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1997-06-01

    The other day I got to thinking about whether something akin to Le Chatelier's principle operates in chemical education. That is, whenever someone alters the conditions under which we interact with students, there is a shift in the system that attempts to minimize or counteract the change.

  17. On different forms of self similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswathy, R.K.; Mathew, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Fractal geometry is mainly based on the idea of self-similar forms. To be self-similar, a shape must able to be divided into parts that are smaller copies, which are more or less similar to the whole. There are different forms of self similarity in nature and mathematics. In this paper, some of the topological properties of super self similar sets are discussed. It is proved that in a complete metric space with two or more elements, the set of all non super self similar sets are dense in the set of all non-empty compact sub sets. It is also proved that the product of self similar sets are super self similar in product metric spaces and that the super self similarity is preserved under isometry. A characterization of super self similar sets using contracting sub self similarity is also presented. Some relevant counterexamples are provided. The concepts of exact super and sub self similarity are introduced and a necessary and sufficient condition for a set to be exact super self similar in terms of condensation iterated function systems (Condensation IFS’s) is obtained. A method to generate exact sub self similar sets using condensation IFS’s and the denseness of exact super self similar sets are also discussed.

  18. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S; Fletcher, Paul C; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-03-04

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability.

  19. Term Structure Models with Parallel and Proportional Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armerin, Frederik; Björk, Tomas; Astrup Jensen, Bjarne

    We investigate the possibility of an arbitrage free model for the term structure of interest rates where the yield curve only changes through a parallel shift. We consider HJM type forward rate models driven by a multidimensionalWiener process as well as by a general marked point process. Within...... this general framework we show that there does indeed exist a large variety of nontrivial parallel shift term structure models, and we also describe these in detail. We also show that there exists no nontrivial flat term structure model. The same analysis is repeated for the similar case, where the yield curve...... only changes through proportional shifts.Key words: bond market, term structure of interest rates, flat term structures....

  20. Dental auxiliaries versus community health workers: similarities and contrasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone De Melo Costa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The dental auxiliaries and the community health workers (CHWs are practitioners that represent an important part in the Family Health Policy in Brazil and have several tasks. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the attributes of the dental auxiliaries and of the CHWs, regarding the application of their services and their education/training, to identify the similarities and contrasts between these health care practitioners. METHODOLOGY: Quantitative and census method data collection performed on the context of the Education Program for Health Workers - PET‑Saúde, 2010‑2012. The data collection method was a semi-structured questionnaire. The analysis has a level of significance of p0.05. CONCLUSION: Similarities and contrasts were identified between these health care workers. The dental auxiliaries, despite being mostly issued to specific assignments on a clinical environment, are able to shift their praxis by taking actions on a family and community context once integrated to a family health team.

  1. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  2. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  3. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  4. Individual differences in shift work tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers-van der Holst, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a key feature of our contemporary 24/7 society, employing several successive work teams to sustain around-the-clock operations. However, numerous studies imply that frequently shifting the periods of sleep and wakefulness poses a serious threat to the shift worker’s physical, mental

  5. Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development Options in the Eastern Himalayas. Shifting ... pressure and market forces. The idea is to share good policies and practices related to shifting cultivation and alternative options through regional exchange. ... Les chaînes de valeur comme leviers stratégiques.

  6. Similarity analysis, synthesis, and bioassay of antibacterial cyclic peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Workalemahu M. Berhanu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical similarity of antibacterial cyclic peptides and peptidomimetics was studied in order to identify new promising cyclic scaffolds. A large descriptor space coupled with cluster analysis was employed to digitize known antibacterial structures and to gauge the potential of new peptidomimetic macrocycles, which were conveniently synthesized by acylbenzotriazole methodology. Some of the synthesized compounds were tested against an array of microorganisms and showed antibacterial activity against Bordetella bronchistepica, Micrococcus luteus, and Salmonella typhimurium.

  7. Tilt shift determinations with spatial-carrier phase-shift method in temporal phase-shift interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Yang; He, Jianguo; Ji, Fang; Wang, Baorui

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed to deal with tilt-shift errors in temporal phase-shift interferometry (PSI). In the algorithm, the tilt shifts are detected with the spatial-carrier phase-shift (SCPS) method and then the tilt shifts are applied as priori information to the least-squares fittings of phase retrieval. The algorithm combines the best features of the SCPS and the temporal PSI. The algorithm could be applied to interferograms of arbitrary aperture without data extrapolation for the Fourier transform is not involved. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. The statistics of simulation results show a satisfied accuracy in detecting tilt-shift errors. Comparisons of the measurements with and without environmental vibration show that the proposed algorithm could compensate tilt-shift errors and retrieve wavefront phase accurately. The algorithm provides an approach to retrieve wavefront phase for the temporal PSI in vibrating environment. (paper)

  8. Transient human auditory cortex activation during volitional attention shifting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Harm Uhlig

    Full Text Available While strong activation of auditory cortex is generally found for exogenous orienting of attention, endogenous, intra-modal shifting of auditory attention has not yet been demonstrated to evoke transient activation of the auditory cortex. Here, we used fMRI to test if endogenous shifting of attention is also associated with transient activation of the auditory cortex. In contrast to previous studies, attention shifts were completely self-initiated and not cued by transient auditory or visual stimuli. Stimuli were two dichotic, continuous streams of tones, whose perceptual grouping was not ambiguous. Participants were instructed to continuously focus on one of the streams and switch between the two after a while, indicating the time and direction of each attentional shift by pressing one of two response buttons. The BOLD response around the time of the button presses revealed robust activation of the auditory cortex, along with activation of a distributed task network. To test if the transient auditory cortex activation was specifically related to auditory orienting, a self-paced motor task was added, where participants were instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation while they pressed the response buttons in alternation and at a similar pace. Results showed that attentional orienting produced stronger activity in auditory cortex, but auditory cortex activation was also observed for button presses without focused attention to the auditory stimulus. The response related to attention shifting was stronger contralateral to the side where attention was shifted to. Contralateral-dominant activation was also observed in dorsal parietal cortex areas, confirming previous observations for auditory attention shifting in studies that used auditory cues.

  9. FACILITATED CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS UNDER ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical research in the late 1990's witnessed a paradigm shift towards "environmentally-friendly chemistry" more popularly known as "green chemistry" due to the increasing environmental concerns and legislative requirements to curb the release of chemical waste into the atmo...

  10. Enhancing Thai Students' Learning of Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairam, Sanoe; Somsook, Ekasith; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical kinetics is an extremely important concept for introductory chemistry courses. The literature suggests that instruction in chemical kinetics is often teacher-dominated at both the secondary school and tertiary levels, and this is the case in Thailand--the educational context for this inquiry. The work reported here seeks to shift students…

  11. Chemical and thermal unfolding of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K.; Larsen, N.; Tran, T. A. T.

    2013-01-01

    assay, we have investigated the chemical and thermal stability of calreticulin. When the chemical stability of calreticulin was assessed, a midpoint for calreticulin unfolding was calculated to 3.0M urea using CD data at 222 nm. Using the fluorescent dye binding thermal shift assay, calreticulin...

  12. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because asthma ...

  13. Precise Doppler shift compensation in the hipposiderid bat, Hipposideros armiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppler, Diana; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette

    2018-03-15

    Bats of the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae families, and Pteronotus parnellii, compensate for Doppler shifts generated by their own flight movement. They adjust their call frequency such that the frequency of echoes coming from ahead fall in a specialized frequency range of the hearing system, the auditory fovea, to evaluate amplitude and frequency modulations in echoes from fluttering prey. Some studies in hipposiderids have suggested a less sophisticated or incomplete Doppler shift compensation. To investigate the precision of Doppler shift compensation in Hipposideros armiger, we recorded the echolocation and flight behaviour of bats flying to a grid, reconstructed the flight path, measured the flight speed, calculated the echo frequency, and compared it with the resting frequency prior to each flight. Within each flight, the average echo frequency was kept constant with a standard deviation of 110 Hz, independent of the flight speed. The resting and reference frequency were coupled with an offset of 80 Hz; however, they varied slightly from flight to flight. The precision of Doppler shift compensation and the offset were similar to that seen in Rhinolophidae and P. parnellii. The described frequency variations may explain why it has been assumed that Doppler shift compensation in hipposiderids is incomplete.

  14. Anomalous center of mass shift: gravitational dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eue Jin

    1997-02-01

    The anomalous, energy dependent shift of the center of mass of an idealized, perfectly rigid, uniformly rotating hemispherical shell which is caused by the relativistic mass increase effect is investigated in detail. It is shown that a classical object on impact which has the harmonic binding force between the adjacent constituent particles has the similar effect of the energy dependent, anomalous shift of the center of mass. From these observations, the general mode of the linear acceleration is suggested to be caused by the anomalous center of mass shift whether it's due to classical or relativistic origin. The effect of the energy dependent center of mass shift perpendicular to the plane of rotation of a rotating hemisphere appears as the non zero gravitational dipole moment in general relativity. Controlled experiment for the measurement of the gravitational dipole field and its possible links to the cylindrical type line formation of a worm hole in the extreme case are suggested. The jets from the black hole accretion disc and the observed anomalous red shift from far away galaxies are considered to be the consequences of the two different aspects of the dipole gravity.

  15. Magnetic phase shift reconstruction for uniformly magnetized nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtari-Zavareh, Azadeh [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kavanagh, Karen L. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    A new analytical model is developed for the magnetic phase shift of uniformly magnetized nanowires with ideal cylindrical geometry. The model is applied to experimental data from off-axis electron holography measurements of the phase shift of CoFeB nanowires, and the saturation induction of a selected wire, as well as its radius, aspect ratio, position and orientation, is determined by fitting the model parameters. The saturation induction value of 1.7 T of the CoFeB nanowire is found to be similar, to be within the measurement error, to values reported in the literature. - Highlights: • We describe a mathematical model for the magnetic phase shift of a cylindrical nanowire. • We discuss electron holography experiments on magnetic nanowires. • We obtain an accurate fit of the measured magnetic phase shift profile. • We extract the magnetic induction of the nanowire from the phase shift model. • The magnetic induction of 1.7 T agrees well with literature results.

  16. Ring current shifts in {sup 19}F-NMR of membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dongsheng, E-mail: liudsh@shanghaitech.edu.cn; Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: kwuthrich@shanghaitech.edu.cn [ShanghaiTech University, iHuman Institute (China)

    2016-05-15

    Fluorine-19 NMR markers are attractive reporter groups for use in studies of complex biomacromolecular systems, in particular also for studies of function-related conformational equilibria and rate processes in membrane proteins. Advantages of {sup 19}F-NMR probes include high sensitivity of the {sup 19}F chemical shifts to variations in the non-covalent environment. Nonetheless, in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) we encountered situations where {sup 19}F chemical shifts were not responsive to conformational changes that had been implicated by other methods. This prompted us to examine possible effects of aromatic ring current fields on the chemical shifts of {sup 19}F-NMR probes used in GPCRs. Analysis of previously reported {sup 19}F-NMR data on the β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor and mammalian rhodopsin showed that all {sup 19}F-labeling sites which manifested conformational changes are located near aromatic residues. Although ring current effects are small when compared to other known non-covalent effects on {sup 19}F chemical shifts, there is thus an indication that their contributions are significant when studying activation processes in GPCRs, since the observed activation-related {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts are comparable in size to the calculated ring current shifts. Considering the impact of ring current shifts may thus be helpful in identifying promising indigenous or engineered labeling sites for future {sup 19}F-NMR studies of GPCR activation, and novel information may be obtained on the nature of conformational rearrangements near the {sup 19}F-labels. It will then also be interesting to see if the presently indicated role of ring current shifts in membrane protein studies with {sup 19}F-NMR markers can be substantiated by a more extensive data base resulting from future studies.

  17. Set shifting and visuospatial organization deficits in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L; Weingarden, Hilary; Reuman, Lillian; Abrams, Dylan; Mothi, Suraj S; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-11-24

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) over-attend to perceived defect(s) in their physical appearance, often becoming "stuck" obsessing about perceived flaws and engaging in rituals to hide flaws. These symptoms suggest that individuals with BDD may experience deficits in underlying neurocognitive functions, such as set-shifting and visuospatial organization. These deficits have been implicated as risk and maintenance factors in disorders with similarities to BDD but have been minimally investigated in BDD. The present study examined differences in neurocognitive functions among BDD participants (n = 20) compared to healthy controls (HCs; n = 20). Participants completed neuropsychological assessments measuring set-shifting (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery Intra-Extra Dimensional Set Shift [IED] task) and visuospatial organization and memory (Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test [ROCF]). Results revealed a set-shifting deficit among BDD participants compared to HCs on the IED. On the ROCF, BDD participants exhibited deficits in visuospatial organization compared to HCs, but they did not differ in visuospatial memory compared to HCs. Results did not change when accounting for depression severity. Findings highlight neurocognitive deficits as potential endophenotype markers of clinical features (i.e., delusionality). Understanding neuropsychological deficits may clarify similarities and differences between BDD and related disorders and may guide targets for BDD treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Similarity based approximate reasoning: fuzzy control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raha, S.; Hossain, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to similarity based approximate reasoning that elucidates the connection between similarity and existing approaches to inference in approximate reasoning methodology. A set of axioms is proposed to get a reasonable measure of similarity between two fuzzy sets. The

  19. Molecular similarity-based predictions of the Tox21 screening outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Natalia Drwal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the toxicity of new chemicals and drugs, regulatory agencies require in vivo testing for many toxic endpoints, resulting in millions of animal experiments conducted each year. However, following the Replace, Reduce, Refine (3R principle, the development and optimization of alternative methods, in particular in silico methods, has been put into focus in the recent years. It is generally acknowledged that the more complex a toxic endpoint, the more difficult it is to model. Therefore, computational toxicology is shifting from modelling general and complex endpoints to the investigation and modelling of pathways of toxicity and the underlying molecular effects.The U.S. Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 initiative has screened a large library of compounds, including approximately 10K environmental chemicals and drugs, for different mechanisms responsible for eliciting toxic effects, and made the results publicly available. Through the Tox21 Data Challenge, the consortium has established a platform for computational toxicologists to develop and validate their predictive models.Here, we present a fast and successful method for the prediction of different outcomes of the nuclear receptor and stress response pathway screening from the Tox21 Data Challenge 2014. The method is based on the combination of molecular similarity calculations and a naïve Bayes machine learning algorithm and has been implemented as a KNIME pipeline. Molecules are represented as binary vectors consisting of a concatenation of common two-dimensional molecular fingerprint types with topological compound properties. The prediction method has been optimized individually for each modelled target and evaluated in a cross-validation as well as with the independent Tox21 validation set. Our results show that the method can achieve good prediction accuracies and rank among the top algorithms submitted to the prediction challenge, indicating its broad applicability in

  20. REPRODUCIBLE DRUG REPURPOSING: WHEN SIMILARITY DOES NOT SUFFICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Emre

    2017-01-01

    Repurposing existing drugs for new uses has attracted considerable attention over the past years. To identify potential candidates that could be repositioned for a new indication, many studies make use of chemical, target, and side effect similarity between drugs to train classifiers. Despite promising prediction accuracies of these supervised computational models, their use in practice, such as for rare diseases, is hindered by the assumption that there are already known and similar drugs for a given condition of interest. In this study, using publicly available data sets, we question the prediction accuracies of supervised approaches based on drug similarity when the drugs in the training and the test set are completely disjoint. We first build a Python platform to generate reproducible similarity-based drug repurposing models. Next, we show that, while a simple chemical, target, and side effect similarity based machine learning method can achieve good performance on the benchmark data set, the prediction performance drops sharply when the drugs in the folds of the cross validation are not overlapping and the similarity information within the training and test sets are used independently. These intriguing results suggest revisiting the assumptions underlying the validation scenarios of similarity-based methods and underline the need for unsupervised approaches to identify novel drug uses inside the unexplored pharmacological space. We make the digital notebook containing the Python code to replicate our analysis that involves the drug repurposing platform based on machine learning models and the proposed disjoint cross fold generation method freely available at github.com/emreg00/repurpose.

  1. Integrated trend assessment of ecosystem changes in the Limfjord (Denmark): evidence of a recent regime shift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomczak, Maciej Tomasz; Dinesen, Grete E.; Hoffmann, Erik

    2012-01-01

    and main outflow to the Kattegat in the east. We showed that from 1990 to 1995, the ecosystem structure shifted from dominance by demersal fish species (eel pout, whiting, flounder, plaice) to that of pelagic fish species (sprat, herring, sticklebacks), smallbodied fish species (black goby, pipefish......), jellyfish, common shore crab, starfish and blue mussels. We interpret this change as a regime shift that showed a similar temporal pattern to regime shifts identified in adjacent seas. The observed changes in trophic interactions and food web reorganisation suggested a non-linear regime shift. The analyses...

  2. Similarity Structure of Wave-Collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, Kristoffer; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Similarity transformations of the cubic Schrödinger equation (CSE) are investigated. The transformations are used to remove the explicit time variation in the CSE and reduce it to differential equations in the spatial variables only. Two different methods for similarity reduction are employed...... and the significance of similarity in the evolution of a collapsing wave packet is investigated. Numerical solutions in radial symmetry demonstrate that the similarity behaviour is local in space and time, and that some similarity solutions must be classified as improper solutions. The nature of the collapsing...

  3. Dynamics and computation in functional shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a new type of shift dynamics as an extended model of symbolic dynamics, and investigate the characteristics of shift spaces from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation. This shift dynamics is called a functional shift, which is defined by a set of bi-infinite sequences of some functions on a set of symbols. To analyse the complexity of functional shifts, we measure them in terms of topological entropy, and locate their languages in the Chomsky hierarchy. Through this study, we argue that considering functional shifts from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation gives us opposite results about the complexity of systems. We also describe a new class of shift spaces whose languages are not recursively enumerable.

  4. Does workplace health promotion reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: One reason for health disparities between shift and day workers may be that workplace health promotion does not reach shift workers to the same extent as it reaches day workers. This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and the availability of and participatio...... could not confirm that shift workers in general report a lower availability of and participation in workplace health promotion.......OBJECTIVES: One reason for health disparities between shift and day workers may be that workplace health promotion does not reach shift workers to the same extent as it reaches day workers. This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and the availability of and participation...... in workplace health promotion. METHODS: We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from a large representative sample of all employed people in Denmark. We obtained information on the availability of and participation in six types of workplace health promotion. We also obtained information on working hours, ie...

  5. COMPUTATION OF IMAGE SIMILARITY WITH TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Balamurugan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Searching for similar sequence in large database is an important task in temporal data mining. Similarity search is concerned with efficiently locating subsequences or whole sequences in large archives of sequences. It is useful in typical data mining applications and it can be easily extended to image retrieval. In this work, time series similarity analysis that involves dimensionality reduction and clustering is adapted on digital images to find similarity between them. The dimensionality reduced time series is represented as clusters by the use of K-Means clustering and the similarity distance between two images is found by finding the distance between the signatures of their clusters. To quantify the extent of similarity between two sequences, Earth Mover’s Distance (EMD is used. From the experiments on different sets of images, it is found that this technique is well suited for measuring the subjective similarity between two images.

  6. Testing Self-Similarity Through Lamperti Transformations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Myoungji

    2016-07-14

    Self-similar processes have been widely used in modeling real-world phenomena occurring in environmetrics, network traffic, image processing, and stock pricing, to name but a few. The estimation of the degree of self-similarity has been studied extensively, while statistical tests for self-similarity are scarce and limited to processes indexed in one dimension. This paper proposes a statistical hypothesis test procedure for self-similarity of a stochastic process indexed in one dimension and multi-self-similarity for a random field indexed in higher dimensions. If self-similarity is not rejected, our test provides a set of estimated self-similarity indexes. The key is to test stationarity of the inverse Lamperti transformations of the process. The inverse Lamperti transformation of a self-similar process is a strongly stationary process, revealing a theoretical connection between the two processes. To demonstrate the capability of our test, we test self-similarity of fractional Brownian motions and sheets, their time deformations and mixtures with Gaussian white noise, and the generalized Cauchy family. We also apply the self-similarity test to real data: annual minimum water levels of the Nile River, network traffic records, and surface heights of food wrappings. © 2016, International Biometric Society.

  7. Proposed definition of crystal substructure and substructural similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lusann; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2014-08-01

    There is a clear need for a practical and mathematically rigorous description of local structure in inorganic compounds so that structures and chemistries can be easily compared across large data sets. Here a method for decomposing crystal structures into substructures is given, and a similarity function between those substructures is defined. The similarity function is based on both geometric and chemical similarity. This construction allows for large-scale data mining of substructural properties, and the analysis of substructures and void spaces within crystal structures. The method is validated via the prediction of Li-ion intercalation sites for the oxides. Tested on databases of known Li-ion-containing oxides, the method reproduces all Li-ion sites in an oxide with a maximum of 4 incorrect guesses 80% of the time.

  8. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  9. Shift work-related health problems in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khavaji

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsShift work is a major feature of working life that affects diverse aspects of human life. The main purposes of this study were to investigate shift work-related health problems and their risk factors among workers of "12-hour shift" schedule.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was carried out at 8 petrochemical industries in Asalooyeh area. Study population consisted of 1203 workers including 549 shift worker (46% and 654 day worker (54%. Data on personal details, shift schedule and adverse effects of shift work werecollected by anonymous questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 11.5. The level of significance was set at 5%.ResultsAlthough, the results showed that health problems among shift workers was more prevalent than day workers, but the differences were just significant in gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal disorders (p<0.05. Multiple linear regressions indicated that in addition to shift working, other variants such as long work hours, type of employment, second job, number of children and job title were associated with health problems.ConclusionPrevalence rates of gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal problems among shift workers were significantly higher than that of day workers. Although, working in shift system was the main significant factor associated with the reported problems, but other demographic andwork variables were also found to have association.

  10. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  11. Core shift effect in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  12. Bridging Database Applications and Declarative Similarity Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade Ribeiro, Leonardo; Schneider, Natália Cristina; de Souza Inácio, Andrei; Wagner, Harley Michel; von Wangenheim, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Effective manipulation of string data is of fundamental importance to modern database applications. Very often, textual inconsistencies render equality comparisons meaningless and strings have to be matched in terms of their similarity. Previous work has proposed techniques to express similarity operations using declarative SQL statements. However, the non-trivial issue of embedding similarity support into object-oriented applications has received little attention. Particularly, declarative s...

  13. Similar speaker recognition using nonlinear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.P.; Kim, M.S.; Baek, I.C.; Kwon, Y.H.; Lee, K.S.; Chang, S.W.; Yang, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    Speech features of the conventional speaker identification system, are usually obtained by linear methods in spectral space. However, these methods have the drawback that speakers with similar voices cannot be distinguished, because the characteristics of their voices are also similar in spectral space. To overcome the difficulty in linear methods, we propose to use the correlation exponent in the nonlinear space as a new feature vector for speaker identification among persons with similar voices. We show that our proposed method surprisingly reduces the error rate of speaker identification system to speakers with similar voices

  14. Chemical oceanography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millero, F.J

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Oceanography presents a comprehensive examination of the chemistry of oceans through discussions of such topics as descriptive physical oceanography, the composition of seawater and the major...

  15. Chemical allergy in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable interest in the immunobiological processes through which the development of allergic sensitization to chemicals is initiated and orchestrated. One of the most intriguing issues is the basis for the elicitation by chemical sensitizers of different forms of allergic...... reaction; that is, allergic contact dermatitis or sensitization of the respiratory tract associated with occupational asthma. Studies in rodents have revealed that differential forms of allergic sensitization to chemicals are, in large part at least, a function of the selective development of discrete...... functional sub-populations of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes. Evidence for a similar association of chemical allergy in humans with discrete T-lymphocyte populations is, however, limited. It is of some interest, therefore, that two recent articles from different teams of investigators have shed new light...

  16. The influence of light at night exposure on melatonin levels among Canadian rotating shift nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Anne; Tranmer, Joan; Richardson, Harriet; Graham, Charles H; Aronson, Kristan J

    2011-11-01

    Shift work has been identified as a risk factor for several cancer sites in recent years, with melatonin as a potential intermediate on the proposed causal pathway. This study examined the influence of nighttime light exposure on melatonin levels among 123 rotating shift nurses. Nurses working a rotating shift schedule (two 12-hour days, two 12-hour nights, and five days off) were recruited and participated on a day and night shift in both the summer and winter seasons. Over each 48-hour study period, nurses wore a light data logger and provided two urine and four saliva samples. Saliva measurements showed that the pattern of melatonin production did not differ between day and night shifts. Mean light exposure was significantly higher (P night, although peak melatonin levels (P = 0.65) and the daily change in melatonin levels (P = 0.80) were similar across day/night shifts. Multivariate analysis did not show an association between light exposure and melatonin levels when data from both shifts was combined; however, when data from the night shift was considered alone, a statistically significant inverse relationship between light and change in melatonin was observed (P = 0.04). These results show that light exposure does not seem to be strongly related to reduced melatonin production among nurses on this rapidly rotating shift schedule. Future research considering more extreme shift patterns or brighter lighting conditions could further clarify the relationship between light exposure and melatonin production in observational settings. © 2011 AACR.

  17. Model-based phase-shifting interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A model-based phase-shifting interferometer (MPI) is developed, in which a novel calculation technique is proposed instead of the traditional complicated system structure, to achieve versatile, high precision and quantitative surface tests. In the MPI, the partial null lens (PNL) is employed to implement the non-null test. With some alternative PNLs, similar as the transmission spheres in ZYGO interferometers, the MPI provides a flexible test for general spherical and aspherical surfaces. Based on modern computer modeling technique, a reverse iterative optimizing construction (ROR) method is employed for the retrace error correction of non-null test, as well as figure error reconstruction. A self-compiled ray-tracing program is set up for the accurate system modeling and reverse ray tracing. The surface figure error then can be easily extracted from the wavefront data in forms of Zernike polynomials by the ROR method. Experiments of the spherical and aspherical tests are presented to validate the flexibility and accuracy. The test results are compared with those of Zygo interferometer (null tests), which demonstrates the high accuracy of the MPI. With such accuracy and flexibility, the MPI would possess large potential in modern optical shop testing.

  18. Pneumatic, PLC Controlled, Automotive Gear Shifting Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Muntaser Momani

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a gear shifting mechanism was designed and applied to make the shifting process faster and less destructible for the driver. The new device must be reliable, has a small dimensions, low construction and maintenance cost. This paper aims to improve gear shifting process using devices as: a manual four speed gear box, four pneumatic double acting cylinders, four pneumatic two position five ways directional control valves, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) LOGO unit, an electric...

  19. Gas transmission : a paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelson, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of energy markets in North America was discussed. The investment opportunities that are possible in a deregulated energy market, be it in production or in the generation of energy commodities, in the development of midstream infrastructure, or in the provision of energy services, were outlined. Deregulation of crude oil, natural gas and electricity has resulted in significant changes in the structure of energy markets and the way in which customers are served. One of the advantages of competition regarding power generation is that it has turned energy into a commodity which has resulted in greater customer choice and efficiency. As one example of midstream infrastructure development, the Alliance Pipeline project was described. This project was conceived as a means to enhance the value of western Canadian natural gas. The 1,900 mile pipeline will run from British Columbia, through Alberta into Chicago where it will interconnect with the North American gas transmission grid. The pipeline is an efficient means of transporting energy from Western Canada to North American markets, and Alliance, as a lowest cost transporter, will continue to put pressure on the traditional infrastructure to become even more competitive at the margin. As such, Alliance represents a paradigm shift in energy transportation, and serves as an excellent example of the type of investment opportunity that a deregulated market can provide. It was suggested that innovation and competition in a deregulated North American energy market will continue to increase. As electricity is deregulated, the energy market will respond more quickly to changes in supply and demand than it did in the past, in an effort to satisfy the needs of investors and customers. This will provide increased opportunities for restructuring and further competition

  20. Similarity indices I: what do they measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.W.

    1976-11-01

    A method for estimating the effects of environmental effusions on ecosystems is described. The characteristics of 25 similarity indices used in studies of ecological communities were investigated. The type of data structure, to which these indices are frequently applied, was described as consisting of vectors of measurements on attributes (species) observed in a set of samples. A general similarity index was characterized as the result of a two-step process defined on a pair of vectors. In the first step an attribute similarity score is obtained for each attribute by comparing the attribute values observed in the pair of vectors. The result is a vector of attribute similarity scores. These are combined in the second step to arrive at the similarity index. The operation in the first step was characterized as a function, g, defined on pairs of attribute values. The second operation was characterized as a function, F, defined on the vector of attribute similarity scores from the first step. Usually, F was a simple sum or weighted sum of the attribute similarity scores. It is concluded that similarity indices should not be used as the test statistic to discriminate between two ecological communities