WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical separation processes

  1. Laser isotope separation - a new class of chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers may soon find several applications in chemical processing. The applications that have attracted the most research funding to date involve isotope separation for the nuclear industry. These isotopes have an unusually high value (≥$1000/kg) compared to bulk chemicals (∼$1/kg) and are generally required in very large quantities. In a laser isotope separation process, light is used to convert a separation that is very difficult or even impossible by conventional chemical engineering techniques to one that is readily handled by conventional separation technology. For some isotopes this can result in substantial capital and energy savings. A uranium enrichment process developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the closest to commercialization of the large scale laser isotope separation processes. Of particular interest to the Canadian nuclear industry are the laser separation of deuterium, tritium, zirconium-90 and carbon-14. In this paper, the basic principles behind laser isotope separation are reviewed and brief dscriptions of the more developed processes are given

  2. Isotope separation by chemical exchange process: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of a chemical exchange method for the separation of the isotopes of europium was demonstrated in the system EuCl2-EuCl3. The single stage separation factor, α, in this system is 1.001 or 1.0005 per mass unit. This value of α is comparable to the separation factors reported for the U4+ - U6 and U3+ - Y4+ systems. The separation of the ionic species was done by precipitation of the Eu2+ ions or by extraction of the Eu3+ ions with HDEHP. Conceptual schemes were developed for a countercurrent reflux cascades consisting of solvent extraction contractors. A regenerative electrocel, combining simultaneous europium reduction, europium oxidation with energy generation, and europium stripping from the organic phase is described. 32 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Generalized Least Energy of Separation for Desalination and Other Chemical Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan H. Mistry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies driven by different combinations of heat, work, and chemical energy. This paper develops a consistent basis for comparing the energy consumption of such technologies using Second Law efficiency. The Second Law efficiency for a chemical separation process is defined in terms of the useful exergy output, which is the minimum least work of separation required to extract a unit of product from a feed stream of a given composition. For a desalination process, this is the minimum least work of separation for producing one kilogram of product water from feed of a given salinity. While definitions in terms of work and heat input have been proposed before, this work generalizes the Second Law efficiency to allow for systems that operate on a combination of energy inputs, including fuel. The generalized equation is then evaluated through a parametric study considering work input, heat inputs at various temperatures, and various chemical fuel inputs. Further, since most modern, large-scale desalination plants operate in cogeneration schemes, a methodology for correctly evaluating Second Law efficiency for the desalination plant based on primary energy inputs is demonstrated. It is shown that, from a strictly energetic point of view and based on currently available technology, cogeneration using electricity to power a reverse osmosis system is energetically superior to thermal systems such as multiple effect distillation and multistage flash distillation, despite the very low grade heat input normally applied in those systems.

  4. Tritium separation factors in distillation and chemical exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vapour pressures of different isotopic hydrogen, water and ammonia molecules have been calculated. These vapour pressures can be used to evaluate relative volatilities of different species for separation of tritium isotopes by distillation. The equilibrium constants for various exchange reactions involving different deuterated and tritiated species of hydrogen, water and ammonia molecules have also been calculated for different temperatures. (author)

  5. Survey of knowledge of hazards of chemicals potentially associated with the advanced isotope separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazards of chemical potentially associated with the advanced isotope separation processes are estimated based on open literature references. The tentative quantity of each chemical associated with the processes and the toxicity of the chemical are used to estimate this hazard. The chemicals thus estimated to be the most potentially hazardous to health are fluorine, nitric acid, uranium metal, uranium hexafluoride, and uranium dust. The estimated next most hazardous chemicals are bromine, hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, and hydrofluoric acid. For each of these chemicals and for a number of other process-associated chemicals the following information is presented: (1) any applicable standards, recommended standards and their basis; (2) a brief discussion to toxic effects including short exposure tolerance, atmospheric concentration immediately hazardous to life, evaluation of exposures, recommended control procedures, chemical properties, and a list of any toxicology reviews; and (3) recommendations for future research

  6. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration

  7. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  8. The development of chemical separation technology for an advanced Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future reprocessing plants will require flexible processes that minimise the environmental impact and improve cost effectiveness. This paper discusses some of the technical advances made in the Chemical Separation area of BNFL's Advanced Purex project. An integrated approach involving fundamental process chemistry, computer modelling and flow-sheeting, equipment development, and small scale confirmation trials, has been adopted. The main aims of the project are process simplification and intensification, and this has led to the development of flexible single cycle flowsheets using centrifugal contactors. In order to achieve this cost effectively, comprehensive computer models have been developed based on extraction algorithms for all the major actinide and fission product species. These models also incorporate reaction kinetics, radiolysis, TBP degradation products, and contactor data. The models have been validated by data from plant and from miniature multi-stage centrifugal contactor rigs. One rig has been used to run counter-current α-active flowsheet trials with both on-line and off-line analysis. In parallel, contactor development has concentrated on the scaling up of centrifugal contactor stages up to industrial sizes and obtaining engineering data such as mass transfer rates in single stages. Chemical development is focused on both the accumulation of data needed in computer modelling such as distribution coefficients and reaction rates, and more fundamental research in to new separation processes including chelating agent based flowsheets and new salt free reducing agents. In particular key species, such as Np, Tc, Pu and U(IV), which have a significant impact on the efficiency of single cycle flowsheets are targeted. This paper will report developments in these areas, particularly highlighting how they are integrated in the design of Advanced Purex flowsheets. (author)

  9. Evaluation Of Air Separator For Processing Particulate Chemical Industry Gas Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. W. Ntengwe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The evaluations of an air separator for processing chemical engineering particulate gas streams was carried out with a view to investigate the performance for different flow rates and other characteristics. A louver LV air separator was used as a case study. The evaluations indicated that for various set points of characteristics the prediction of operating efficiencies could be made for different variations of louver gap LVG with area ratio AR length of separator at particular angles of LV inclination and the number of LV with flow rates. It was observed that efficiencies ranging from 40 to 60 on one hand were obtained for high values of LVG and gas flow rate. On the other hand efficiencies of 61 to 99 were obtained for lower values of LVG and gas flow rate. It was noted therefore that in order to produce high efficiencies the values of LVG and flow rates have to be low and vice versa. The evaluation indicates also that plant operators can quickly predict from the results the operating efficiency for the desired dimensions and or flow rates of particulate gas streams. The methodology for the determination of operating data can be used in minimum-time frame to optimize the operations of the plant.

  10. Research on separation and extraction technology of the light element isotopes by the chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was clarified that the separation coefficient became 1.036, and succeeded in the development of the new, efficient lithium separator (Sodium Super-Ionic Conductor: NASICON) which is the elution liquid in the acid processed phosphate system for the lithium isotope separation technology. NASICON can be used in the column for the isotope separation, repeatedly if the nitric acid is used for the elution liquid and the hydroxide lithium or the acetic acid lithium solution as an adsorption solution of the lithium. Furthermore, the separation coefficient of 1.029 was obtained using the glucamine resin of the ester system for the boron isotope separation technology. (H. Katsuta)

  11. Oxygen permeation and thermo-chemical stability of oxygen separation membrane materials for the oxyfuel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellett, Anna Judith

    2009-07-01

    The reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, generally held to be one of the most significant contributors to global warming, is a major technological issue. CO{sub 2} Capture and Storage (CCS) techniques applied to large stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants could efficiently contribute to the global carbon mitigation effort. The oxyfuel process, which consists in the burning of coal in an oxygen-rich atmosphere to produce a flue gas highly concentrated in CO{sub 2}, is a technology considered for zero CO{sub 2} emission coal-fired power plants. The production of this O{sub 2}-rich combustion gas from air can be carried out using high purity oxygen separation membranes. Some of the most promising materials for this application are mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) materials with perovskite and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4} perovskite-related structures. The present work examines the selection of La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF58), La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}}, Pr{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (PSCF58) and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF50) as membrane materials for the separation of O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the framework of the oxyfuel process with flue gas recycling. Annealing experiments were carried out on pellets exposed to CO{sub 2}, water vapour, O{sub 2} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in order to determine the thermo-chemical resistance to the atmospheres and the high temperature conditions present during membrane operation in a coal-fired power plant. The degradation of their microstructure was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in combination with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) as well as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Also, the oxygen permeation fluxes of selected membranes were investigated as a function of temperature. The membrane materials selected were characterised using thermo-analytical techniques such as precision thermogravimetric

  12. Separation and sampling technique of light element isotopes by chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium and boron isotope separation technique were studied. Granulation of lithium isotope separation agent was carried out by cure covering in solution. Separation of lithium isotope was stepped up by ammonium carbonate used as elusion agent. Styrene and ester resin derived three kinds of agents such as 2-amino-1, 3-propanediol (1, 3-PD), 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (Me-1,3-PD) and tris(2-hydroxyethyl)amine (Tris) were used as absorbent.The ester resin with Tris showed larger amount of adsorption (1.4 mmol/g) than other resins. However, all resins with agent indicated more large adsorption volume of boron than the objective value (0.5 mmol/g). Large isotope shift was shown by the unsymmetrical vibration mode of lithium ion on the basis of quantum chemical calculation of isotope effect on dehydration of hydrated lithium ion. (S.Y.)

  13. Evaluation of possible physical-chemical processes that might lead to separations of actinides in ORNL waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.; Bond, W.D.; Dai, S.

    1997-09-01

    The concern that there might be some physical-chemical process which would lead to a separation of the poisoning actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U) from the fissionable ones ({sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U) in waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has led to a paper study of potential separations processes involving these elements. At the relatively high pH values (>8), the actinides are normally present as precipitated hydroxides. Mechanisms that might then selectively dissolve and reprecipitate the actinides through thermal processes or additions of reagents were addressed. Although redox reactions, pH changes, and complexation reactions were all considered, only the last type was regarded as having any significant probability. Furthermore, only carbonate accumulation, through continual unmonitored air sparging of the tank contents, could credibly account for gross transport and separation of the actinide components. From the large amount of equilibrium data in the literature, concentration differences in Th, U, and Pu due to carbonate complexation as a function of pH have been presented to demonstrate this phenomenon. While the carbonate effect does represent a potential separations process, control of long-term air sparging and solution pH, accompanied by routine determinations of soluble carbonate concentration, should ensure that this separations process does not occur.

  14. Evaluation of possible physical-chemical processes that might lead to separations of actinides in ORNL waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concern that there might be some physical-chemical process which would lead to a separation of the poisoning actinides (232Th, 238U) from the fissionable ones (239Pu, 235U) in waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has led to a paper study of potential separations processes involving these elements. At the relatively high pH values (>8), the actinides are normally present as precipitated hydroxides. Mechanisms that might then selectively dissolve and reprecipitate the actinides through thermal processes or additions of reagents were addressed. Although redox reactions, pH changes, and complexation reactions were all considered, only the last type was regarded as having any significant probability. Furthermore, only carbonate accumulation, through continual unmonitored air sparging of the tank contents, could credibly account for gross transport and separation of the actinide components. From the large amount of equilibrium data in the literature, concentration differences in Th, U, and Pu due to carbonate complexation as a function of pH have been presented to demonstrate this phenomenon. While the carbonate effect does represent a potential separations process, control of long-term air sparging and solution pH, accompanied by routine determinations of soluble carbonate concentration, should ensure that this separations process does not occur

  15. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  16. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1994-03-15

    The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

  17. Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

  18. Oxygen permeation and thermo-chemical stability of oxygen separation membrane materials for the oxyfuel process

    OpenAIRE

    Ellett, Anna Judith

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of CO2 emissions, generally held to be one of the most significant contributors to global warming, is a major technological issue. CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) techniques applied to large stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants could efficiently contribute to the global carbon mitigation effort. The oxyfuel process, which consists in the burning of coal in an oxygen-rich atmosphere to produce a flue gas highly concentrated in CO2, is a technology considered for zero ...

  19. An object-oriented systems engineering model design for integrating spent fuel treatment facility and chemical separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2003, the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) launched the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to address nuclear issues facing the United States. Amongst the major issues as identified by the AFCI were energy and waste management concerns. The interested nuclear wastes, based on their origin and toxicity, are spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and transuranic (TRU) wastes. While SNF wastes are those discharged from a nuclear reactor after being used for at least one cycle or a reactor operation, the TRU wastes are those that contain alpha-bearing radionuclides with atomic numbers greater than uranium. U.S. DOE plans to store its SNF and high-level waste (HLW) in a deep geologic disposal repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The risks that arise from long-term waste disposal come from approximately 1% of the fuels composition (transuranic group and long-lived isotopes of I and Tc). If transuranic species can be removed from the spent fuel, the toxicity of the waste drops below that of natural U within a period of several hundred years. The mission of the Transmutation Research Program (TRP) at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) is to establish a nuclear engineering test bed that carries out effective transmutation and advanced reactor research and development effort. Integrated System for Optimized PROcesses (ISOPRO) package, developed from a multi-year project, integrates a chemical separation module, Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction (AMUSE), from the Argonne National Laboratories (ANL) and commercially available system process package, such as ASPEN-Plus. Current research results focus on demonstrating the integration of the chemical separation program and system process package under the ISOPRO interfaces. Microsoft Visual Basic (MS VB) and MS Access database system has been chosen to develop the ISOPRO package. The developed user interface can directly execute and exchange parameters between the ASPEN-plus and AMUSE packages. The

  20. Isotope separation by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 enrichment by chemical exchange in the (NO/NO2) - (H2O/HNO3) system, using a laboratory-scale experimental plant and a cascade for production of two isotopes, is presented. The results obtained from the laboratory-scale plant indicate that optimal flow rate for 15N separation is 1.55 - 1.86 ml/cm2 · min at 8 - 10 M/l nitric acid and 63.4 mg at. oxygen/cm2 · min for 18O separation at 5.8 M/l nitric acid. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) of 4.11 - 4.56 cm is in good agreement with other published data for 15N separation using exchange column with Helipak packing. The HETP of 7.74 - 10.58 cm for 18O separation is greater by 20 - 30 % than those presented by Saxena and Taylor for 'Helipak' column packing, but in good agreement with the HRTP published by Borisov et al. on 'Levina' column packing. The HETP obtained for 15N separation by the production plant is in the range 11.5 - 13.8 cm at a flow rate of 2.2 ml HNO3(10M/l)/cm2 · min for the first column and 4.4 - 4.7 cm at a flow rate of 1.66 ml HNO3(10M/l)/cm2 · min for the second column. The optimal flow rate for 18O separation by the production plant is about 63 mg at. oxygen/cm2 · min (1.01 ml HNO3/cm2 · min). Enrichment of 13C and 18O by chemical exchange of carbon dioxide with its monoethanolamine carbamate in methanol and di-n-butylamine carbamate in triethylamine has also been studied, and optimum operating conditions for the separation of 13C in a packed column was determined. The HETP obtained for the 13C in a packed column was determined. The HETP obtained for the 13C separation column is 3.62 - 8.26 cm at a flow rate of 1.1 - 4.0 mmol carbamate/cm2 · min using the same column packing as for 15N and 18O separation, that is, stainless steel triangular wire springs (2.3 x 2.3 x 0.2 mm). (author)

  1. Chemical reaction and separation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.C.; Kapteijn, F.; Strous, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to process for performing a chemical reaction in a reaction mixture, which reaction produces water as by-product, wherein the reaction mixture is in contact with a hydroxy sodalite membrane, through which water produced during the reaction is removed from the reaction mixtu

  2. Lasers in chemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high cost of laser energy is the crucial issue in any potential laser-processing application. It is expensive relative to other forms of energy and to most bulk chemicals. We show those factors that have previously frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser-induced processes for the production of materials. Having identified the general criteria to be satisfied by an economically successful laser process and shown how these imply the laser-system requirements, we present a status report on the uranium laser isotope separation (LIS) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  3. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  4. 化工型空分设备内压缩流程选择%Selection of inner compression process for chemical type air separation plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋旭

    2011-01-01

    介绍化工型空分设备的3种典型内压缩流程形式:空气循环单泵流程、空气循环双泵流程、氮气循环单泵流程,结合内压缩流程空分设备的一般考核标准,比较了3种流程形式的流程设计组织、综合能耗、精馏效果、运行安全、操作维护等方面,说明用户应合理选择适合产品规格要求的内压缩空分流程。%Here, 3 typical types of inner compression process for chemical type air separation plant are introduced: Air circulation single-pump process, air circulation dual-pump process, and nitrogen circulation single-pump process, and in combination with the general examination standards of inner compression process air separation plant the process design organization, comprehensive energy consumption, distillation effect, operation safety, operation and maintenance of the 3 types of process are compared, which indicates that the user shall rationally select the inner compression air separation process which meets the product specification.

  5. Sustainable development of gree solvent separation process

    OpenAIRE

    Lisickov, Kiril; Fidancevska, Emilija; Grujic, Radoslav; Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Kuvendziev, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Solvents defi ne a major part of the environmental performance of processes in the chemical industry and impact on cost, safety and health issues. The idea of green solvents expresses the goal to minimize the environmental impact resulting from the use of solvents in chemical production. In spite of conventional separation methods, precise process green technologies are based on the application of modern processes and process equipment as well as control and management...

  6. Battery separator manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, N.I.; Sugarman, N.

    1974-12-27

    A battery with a positive plate, a negative plate, and a separator of polymeric resin having a degree of undesirable hydrophobia, solid below 180/sup 0/F, extrudable as a hot melt, and resistant to degradation by at least either acids or alkalies positioned between the plates is described. The separator comprises a nonwoven mat of fibers, the fibers being comprised of the polymeric resin and a wetting agent in an amount of 0.5 to 20 percent by weight based on the weight of the resin with the amount being incompatible with the resin below the melting point of the resin such that the wetting agent will bloom over a period of time at ambient temperatures in a battery, yet being compatible with the resin at the extrusion temperature and bringing about blooming to the surface of the fibers when the fibers are subjected to heat and pressure.

  7. Determine separations process strategy decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides a summary level comparative analysis of selected, top-level, waste treatment strategies. These strategies include No Separations, Separations (high-level/low-level separations), and Deferred Separations of the tank waste. These three strategies encompass the full range of viable processing alternatives based upon full retrieval of the tank wastes. The assumption of full retrieval of the tank wastes is a predecessor decision and will not be revisited in this study

  8. Separation process using microchannel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Perry, Steven T.; Arora, Ravi; Qiu, Dongming; Lamont, Michael Jay; Burwell, Deanna; Dritz, Terence Andrew; McDaniel, Jeffrey S.; Rogers, Jr.; William A.; Silva, Laura J.; Weidert, Daniel J.; Simmons, Wayne W.; Chadwell, G. Bradley

    2009-03-24

    The disclosed invention relates to a process and apparatus for separating a first fluid from a fluid mixture comprising the first fluid. The process comprises: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator in contact with a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the first fluid is sorbed by the sorption medium, removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing first fluid from the sorption medium and removing desorbed first fluid from the microchannel separator. The process and apparatus are suitable for separating nitrogen or methane from a fluid mixture comprising nitrogen and methane. The process and apparatus may be used for rejecting nitrogen in the upgrading of sub-quality methane.

  9. Application of chemical, biological and membrane separation processes in textile industry with recourse to zero effluent discharge--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, T; Dhodapkar, R S; Pophali, G R; Kaul, S N; Devotta, S

    2005-09-01

    Environmental concerns associated with textile processing had placed the textile sector in a Southern State of India under serious threat of survival. The textile industries were closed under the orders of the Statutory Board for reason of inadequate compliance to environmental discharge norms of the State for the protection of the drinking water source of the State capital. In compliance with the direction of the Board for zero effluent discharge, advanced treatment process have been implemented for recovery of boiler feed quality water with recourse to effluent recycling/reuse. The paper describes to a case study on the adequacy assessment of the full scale effluent treatment plant comprising chemical, biological and filtration processes in a small scale textile industry. In addition, implementation of measures for discernable improvement in the performance of the existing units through effective operation & maintenance, and application of membrane separation processes leading to zero effluent discharge is also highlighted. PMID:16196413

  10. Three phase downhole separator process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognata, Louis John

    2008-06-24

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  11. Membrane process for separation of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure driven membrane processes are controlled by size as well as physico-chemical interaction with the chemical matrix of the membrane. As the average pore-size of the membrane decreases from a few tenths of micron as in UF to a few nanometers in NF to a few angstroms in RO, the controlling mechanism changes from size exclusion to physico-chemical interactions. Consequently while the colloids, suspended matters etc. can be removed by UF, NF can separate multivalent and macromolecular species from monovalents and RO can separate water from the dissolved ionic contaminants allowing high volume reduction factors. UF as stand alone or in integration with established chemical processes is able to achieve separation of colloids, thus providing a viable solution for separation of trace water contaminants like iron, trace radiocontaminants etc. A recent bench scale study with low active waste stream of radio-contaminants generated in the department also showed promise in separation of trace amounts of 137Cs and 90Sr to achieve a DF at par with the established and practiced conventional system with much lower complexing chemical requirements. (author)

  12. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  13. Acceleration of gravity separation process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polasek, P.; Mutl, Silvestr

    Vol. I. Düsseldorf: Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Karlsruhe , 2003, s. 481-488. [FILTECH EUROPA 2003 : international conference and exhibition : filtration and separation technology. Düsseldorf (DE), 21.10.2003-23.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/03/0346 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : clarification * coagulation and flocculation * gravity separation Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  14. Thermodynamics for separation-process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    When contemplating or designing a separation process, every chemical engineer at once recognizes the thermodynamic boundary conditions that must be satisfied: when a mixture is continuously processed to yield at least partially purified products, energy and mass must be conserved and work must be done. In his daily tasks, a chemical engineer uses thermodynamic concepts as tacit, almost subconscious, knowledge. Thus, qualitative thermodynamics significantly informs process conception at its most fundamental level. However, quantitative design requires detailed knowledge of thermodynamic relations and physical chemistry. Most process engineers, concerned with flow sheets and economics, cannot easily command that detailed knowledge and therefore it is advantageous for them to maintain close contact with those specialists who do. Quantitative chemical thermodynamics provides an opportunity to evaluate possible separation processes not only because it may give support to the process engineer`s bold imagination but also because, when coupled with molecular models, it can significantly reduce the experimental effort required to determine an optimum choice of process alternatives. Six examples are presented to indicate the application of thermodynamics for conventional and possible future separation processes.

  15. A New Cryogenic Air Separation Process with Flash Separator

    OpenAIRE

    Barakat, Taj Alasfia M.; Rabah, Ali A.; Khalel, Zeinab A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A new cryogenic air separation process with flash separator is developed. A flash separator is added to the conventional double-column cryogenic air separation process. The flash separator is used to replace the turbine required to recover a portion of the energy in the double-column air separation process. The flash separator served dual purposes of throttling and separation. Both the conventional and the new processes are simulated using Aspen Plus version 11.1 the model air flow rate and c...

  16. Continuous magnetic separator and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oder, Robin R.; Jamison, Russell E.

    2008-04-22

    A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

  17. Fate of 17β-Estradiol as a model estrogen in source separated urine during integrated chemical P recovery and treatment using partial nitritation-anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Wu, Sha; Muller, James; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-10-15

    Recently, research on source separation followed by the treatment of urine and/or resource recovery from human urine has shown promise as an emerging management strategy. Despite contributing only 1% of the total volume of wastewater, human urine contributes about 80% of the nitrogen, 70% of the potassium, and up to 50% of the total phosphorus in wastewater. It is also a known fact that many of the micropollutants, especially selected estrogens, get into municipal wastewater through urine excretion. In this research, we investigated the fate of 17β-estradiol (E2) as a model estrogen during struvite precipitation from synthetic urine followed by the treatment of urine using a partial nitritation-anammox (PN/A) system. Single-stage and two-stage suspended growth PN/A configurations were used to remove the nitrogen in urine after struvite precipitation. The results showed an almost 95% phosphorous and 5% nitrogen recovery/removal from the synthetic urine due to struvite precipitation. The single and two stage PN/A processes were able to remove around 50% and 75% of ammonia and nitrogen present in the post struvite urine solution, respectively. After struvite precipitation, more than 95% of the E2 remained in solution and the transformation of E2 to E1 happened during urine storage. Most of the E2 removal that occurred during the PN/A process was due to sorption on the biomass and biodegradation (transformation of E2 to E1, and slow degradation of E1 to other metabolites). These results demonstrate that a combination of chemical and biological unit processes will be needed to recover and manage nutrients in source separated urine. PMID:27566951

  18. Chemical process hazards analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  19. Waste remediation using in situ magnetically assisted chemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation process (MACS) combines the selective and efficient separation afforded by chemical sorption with the magnetic recovery of ferromagnetic particles. This process is being developed for treating the underground storage tanks at Hanford. These waste streams contain cesium, strontium, and transuranics (TRU) that must be removed before this waste can be disposed of as grout. The separation process uses magnetic particles coated with either (1) a selective ion exchange material or an organic extractant containing solvent (for cesium and strontium removal) or (2) solvents for selective separation of TRU elements (e.g., TRUEX process). These coatings, by their chemical nature, selectively separate the contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the tank using a magnet. Once the particles are removed, the contaminants can either be left on the loaded particles and added to the glass feed slurry or stripped into a small volume of solution so that the extracting particles can be reused. The status of chemistry and separation process is discussed in this paper

  20. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, January 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-02-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for January 1961, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations, facilities engineering; research; employee relations; and special separation processing and auxiliaries operation.

  1. Continuous intensified separations for the chemicals industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, I.S.; Roelands, C.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Today, a lot of effort is going into intensifying reactions within the chemicals industry. Intensified processes are expected to delìver significant improvements in manufacturing processes, reducing equipment size and waste streams and increasing product yields and thereby delivering more sustainabl

  2. Chemical separation of disc components using RAVE

    CERN Document Server

    Wojno, Jennifer; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMillan, Paul J; Matijevič, Gal; Binney, James; Wyse, Rosemary F G; Boeche, Corrado; Just, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K; Siebert, Arnaud; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Navarro, Julio F; Parker, Quentin A; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into $\\alpha$-low (`thin disc') and $\\alpha$-high (`thick disc') components. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our thin disc stars, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity ($V_{\\mathrm{\\phi}}$) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive trend in $\\partial V_{\\mathrm{\\phi}}$/$\\partial$[Fe/H] for the thick disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the chemical thin and thick discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an $\\alpha$-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of ...

  3. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  4. Volume reduction on all particle size of the contaminated soil. Continuous processing technology of attrition, chemical wash under an ambient temperature and pressure condition and magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination was conducted in order to establish a practical purification system that could largely reduce the storage volume of radioactive waste in the Intermediate Storage Facility. The examination consists of a 3-step washing treatment of contaminated soil, which includes “Milling Washing” of removed contaminated soil, chemical extraction of fine soil fraction resulted from the “Milling Washing” under an ambient temperature and pressure condition, and magnetic separation of cesium from the extracted solution. As a result of the examination, we succeeded in development of a safe system with low initial cost and running cost. (author)

  5. Process for strontium-82 separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for selective separation of strontium-82 and strontium-85 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets comprises dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first solution containing ions selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium, rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, and yttrium; passing the solution through a first cationic resin whereby ions selected from a group consisting of zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium a portion of zirconium and a portion of rubidium are selectively absorbed by the first resin; contacting the first resin with an acid solution to strip and remove the absorbed ions from the first cationic exchange resin to form a second solution; evaporating the second solution for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the acid and water from the solution whereby a residue remains; dissolving the residue in a dilute acid to form a third solution; passing the third solution through a second cationic resin whereby the ions are absorbed by the second resin; contacting the second resin with a dilute sulfuric acid solution whereby the absorbed ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium and zirconium are selectively removed from the second resin; and contacting the second resin with a dilute acid solution whereby the absorbed strontium ions are selectively removed. 1 fig

  6. Coordination chemistry for new actinide separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of wastes and the number of chemical steps can be decreased by replacing the PUREX process extractant (TBP) by, N.N- dialkylamides (RCONR'2). Large amounts of deep underground storable wastes can be stored into sub-surface disposals if the long lived actinide isotopes are removed. Spent nuclear fuels reprocessing including the partitioning of the minor actinides Np, Am, Cm and their transmutation into short half lives fission products is appealing to the public who is not favorable to the deep underground storage of large amounts of long half lived actinide isotopes. In this paper coordination chemistry problems related to improved chemical separations by solvent extraction are presented. 2 tabs.; 4 refs

  7. Pervaporation: A Novel Process for Ethanol Separation using Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay H. Amaley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Various separation processes were used in the chemical industry along with their corresponding separating agents. The separation processes play a critical role in various chemical process industries, including the removal of impurities from raw materials, purification of products, separation of recycle streams, and removal of contaminants from air and effluents. Hence it can be intensified by integrating of existing and new unit operations, it offers a huge increase in efficiency and controllability, thereby saving a lot of raw materials and energy, reducing waste production, increasing yield and quality and improving production safety. This review, deals on the development and implementation of small scale continuous processes and processing systems helping chemical industries to get more out of their processes.

  8. Separation of radionuclides from chemical and electrochemical decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multistage process combining photocatalytic degradation of organic complexes and complexants followed by separation of the radionuclides by ion exchange was developed and tested for the treatment of aqueous waste from chemical or electrochemical decontamination of NPP primary circuit internals. In these solutions, both the oxalic and citric acids could be quantitatively degraded within 10-12 hours of irradiation by 254 nm UV radiation in the presence of TiO2 photocatalyst. For the group radionuclides separation, a standard cation exchanger was found to be preferable to any of the set of the tested inorganic-organic composite absorbers. (author)

  9. A Survey of Chemical Separation in Accreting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mckinven, Ryan; Medin, Zach; Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The heavy element ashes of rp-process hydrogen and helium burning in accreting neutron stars are compressed to high density where they freeze, forming the outer crust of the star. We calculate the chemical separation on freezing for a number of different nuclear mixtures resulting from a range of burning conditions for the rp-process. We confirm the generic result that light nuclei are preferentially retained in the liquid and heavy nuclei in the solid. This is in agreement with the previous study of a 17-component mixture of rp-process ashes by Horowitz et al. (2007), but extends that result to a much larger range of compositions. We also find an alternate phase separation regime for the lightest ash mixtures which does not demonstrate this generic behaviour. With a few exceptions, we find that chemical separation reduces the expected $Q_{\\rm imp}$ in the outer crust compared to the initial rp-process ash, where $Q_{\\rm imp}$ measures the mean-square dispersion in atomic number $Z$ of the nuclei in the mixtu...

  10. A general model for membrane-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Vipasha; Abildskov, Jens; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil;

    2009-01-01

    A separation process could be defined as a process that transforms a given mixture of chemicals into two or more compositionally distinct end-use products. One way to design these separation processes is to employ a model-based approach, where mathematical models that reliably predict the process...... behaviour will play an important role. In this paper, modelling of membrane-based processes for separation of gas and liquid mixtures are considered. Two general models, one for membrane-based liquid separation processes (with phase change) and another for membrane-based gas separation are presented. The...... modelling assumptions. Analyses of the generated models, together with their validation and application in process design/analysis are highlighted through several case studies....

  11. Separation of Fluids by Membrane Processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel

    Bratislava : Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering , 2013 - (Markoš, J.), s. 5 ISBN 978-80-89475-09-4. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /40./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 27.05.2013-31.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1194 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : pervaporation * gas separation * supported ionic liquid membranes Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  12. Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

  13. Process for separating zirconium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, P.T.; Lahoda, E.J.; Burgman, H.A.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of separating a feed stream consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of a mixture of /sup 90/Zr and /sup 91 to 96/Zr salts selected from group consisting of thiocyanate, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, perchlorate, and mixtures thereof, into two aqueous product streams, each containing both a /sup 90/Zr isotopic portion and a /sup 91 to 96/Zr isotopic portion, but in different ratios. The method consists of: (A) contacting the feed stream with methylisobutyl ketone or an organic water-immiscible solvent containing an extractant medium selected from the group consisting of quaternary ammonium salts, organic phosphonates, organic phosphinates, organic phosphates, organic sulfonates, primary amines, tertiary amines, polyethers, betadiketones, and mixtures thereof, that preferentially extracts one of the isotopic portions, leaving an aqueous raffinate depleted in that isotopic portions and enriched in the other isotopic portion; (B) stripping the organic solvent of its zirconium with an aqueous acidic strip medium to produce a first aqueous product stream; (C) recycling the stripped organic solvent to step (A); (D) evaporating water from a portion of the aqueous raffinate to produce a concentrated aqueous raffinate and a second aqueous product stream; and (E) recycling the concentrated aqueous raffinate to the feed stream.

  14. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  15. Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2009-10-01

    The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes” is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

  16. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry. PMID:27591623

  17. The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESPIP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The ESPIP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESPIP supports applied R ampersand D leading to demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Examples of current ESPIP-funded separations technologies are described here

  18. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  19. Separating, baling and processing waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The economy based on the exploitation of fossil fuels has entered the phase of disappearance, and a new one is being formed under the influence of the third industrial revolution. The third industrial revolution is developing from the process of the resolution of serious problems that have appeared in the ecosystem, and demands a new platform of interaction between the world's governments, civil society and the business world [Stigson 2008]. The consumer society that was developing until the beginning of the 21st century started from the premise that we cannot expect charity from nature. Regardless of their renewability and speed of renewal, natural resources should have been used in the measure in which humanity needed it. Needs rose uncontrollably, damaging the basic principle by which the balance of the biosphere was maintained - the parity of community members' insignificance. The man with the technosphere prevailed over the biosphere. Since nothing is provided for free and nature knows best, the beginning of the 21st century is seeing renewed attempts to establish a co-evolution of nature and society. This necessitates radical changes in people's work, lifestyle and thinking. The problem of waste requires a total break with previous practices. The existing 6.6 billion people annually produce between 2.5 and 4 billion tons of waste (The Millennium Development Goals Report 2008. Developed countries such as, e.g., the US, annually produce about 700 kilograms of waste per person, while poor countries, such as, e.g., the urban parts of India, produce only 150 kilograms per person annually. Each resident of the EU leaves behind 500 kg of waste per year. Serbia has the same civilization problems. In addition, as a transition country, it is in a position to decide the extent to which this problem will be in the hands of state companies and how much will be left to private capital owners. Moreover, Serbia is creating a development strategy that also

  20. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  1. Chemical Separation of Fixed Tissue Using Thermolysin

    OpenAIRE

    Anahita Dua; Desai, Sapan S.

    2013-01-01

    Thermolysin is a metallopeptidase used to cleave peptide bonds at specific junctions. It has previously been used to cleave specific amino acid sequences found at the junction of the sensory epithelium and underlying stroma of unfixed otolithic organs of the vestibular system. We have used thermolysin to separate sensory epithelium from the underlying stroma in fixed cristae ampullares of mouse, rat, gerbil, guinea pig, chinchilla, and tree squirrel, thus removing the saddle-shaped curvature ...

  2. Design of Uranium Isotope Separation Plant by Chemical Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology to design a solvent extraction plant for uranium isotope separation by chemical exchange is outlined. This process involves the calculator of the number of stages,the capacity of the plant,the flow rates,and reflux ration in banks of mixer settlers or pulse column used in such a plant. The feed is introduced at the middle of the plant,and the product is withdrawn at one end and the tailings at another. The redox reaction system selected is U(IV)-U(VI) and the equilibrium data of the 40% tri-n-octylamine (TOA) in benzene as the organic phase and 4 M HCI as the aqueous phase are used for the design of the real plant. The resulting analysis for the uranium isotope separation shows that more than 4000 number of stages are required and the reflux ratio is around 700 to produce only 1m3 of product containing 3% of U235 and 0,3% of U235 in the tailings. It is also known that the larger the isotope separation constant the smaller the number of stages needed. The method of design can be used for other systems where the isotope separation constants are more favorable

  3. Automated separation process for radioanalytical purposes at nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, L G; Vajda, N; Vodicska, M; Zagyvai, P; Solymosi, J

    1987-10-01

    Chemical separation processes have been developed to remove the matrix components and thus to determine fission products, especially radioiodine nuclides, in the primary coolant of WWER-type nuclear reactors. Special procedures have been elaborated to enrich long-lived nuclides in waste waters to be released and to separate and enrich caesium isotopes in the environment. All processes are based mainly on ion-exchange separations using amorphous zirconium phosphate. Automated equipment was constructed to meet the demands of the plant personnel for serial analysis. PMID:3680447

  4. Chemical Separation of Fixed Tissue Using Thermolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Dua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermolysin is a metallopeptidase used to cleave peptide bonds at specific junctions. It has previously been used to cleave specific amino acid sequences found at the junction of the sensory epithelium and underlying stroma of unfixed otolithic organs of the vestibular system. We have used thermolysin to separate sensory epithelium from the underlying stroma in fixed cristae ampullares of mouse, rat, gerbil, guinea pig, chinchilla, and tree squirrel, thus removing the saddle-shaped curvature of the sensory organ and creating a flattened sensory epithelium preparation. This permits visualization of the entire sensory organ in a single mount and facilitates proper morphometric analysis.

  5. Process intensification technologies for biodiesel production reactive separation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, A A

    2014-01-01

    This book is among the first to address the novel process intensification technologies for biodiesel production, in particular the integrated reactive separations. It provides a comprehensive overview illustrated with many industrially relevant examples of novel reactive separation processes used in the production of biodiesel (e.g. fatty acid alkyl esters): reactive distillation, reactive absorption, reactive extraction, membrane reactors, and centrifugal contact separators. Readers will also learn about the working principles, design and control of integrated processes, while also getting a

  6. Synthesis and optimization of integrated chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Paul I.; Evans, Lawrence B.

    2002-04-26

    This is the final technical report for the project titled ''Synthesis and optimization of integrated chemical processes''. Progress is reported on novel algorithms for the computation of all heteroazeotropic compositions present in complex liquid mixtures; the design of novel flexible azeotropic separation processes using middle vessel batch distillation columns; and theory and algorithms for sensitivity analysis and numerical optimization of hybrid discrete/continuous dynamic systems.

  7. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Qiu, Dongming; Dritz, Terence Andrew; Neagle, Paul; Litt, Robert Dwayne; Arora, Ravi; Lamont, Michael Jay; Pagnotto, Kristina M.

    2007-07-31

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  8. Chemical separation of carbon -14 in radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 has a long half-life of 5730 years and decays by beta emission of 156KeV to the stable nuclide, Nitrogen-14. Carbon-14 is produced mostly by the neutron activation of naturally occurring oxygen-17 in water molecules of the reactor coolant and Nitrogen-14 from nitrogen gas dissolved in the reactor coolant. Most of these carbon-14 are known to be discharged as gaseous wastes. The chemical forms of the gaseous emissions of carbon-14 from PWR stations range from 10∼26% as 14CO2 and 74∼90% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons, compared to about 95% as 14CO2 and 5% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons in BWR station gaseous emissions. Knowles reported that although the exact nature of these organic compounds was not identified, most of the carbon-14 was present as forms of organic species in a PWR primary coolant. Praudic measured the contents of the total organic and inorganic carbon-14 in waste trench leachates of New York commercial LLW disposal site and found that 74 ∼ 98% of carbon-14 was organic. In 1991, Dayal and Kirby reported that carbon-14 identified in LLW trench leachates from the Maxi Fiats site were carbonate and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon-14 and citric acid and palmitic acid as organic carbon-14. Thus concentrated Boric acid waste solutions(CB) which has generated from domestic NPP were classified into organic and inorganic carbon-14 with wet oxidation method in order to grasping a existing ratio of organic carbon-14 from total one due to affecting an environment

  9. Separation process of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About the separation different processes of zirconium-hafnium, the extraction by solvent in cross-current is the most easily the process usable on an industrial scale. It uses tributyl phosphate as solvent, diluted with white spirit to facilitate the decanting. Some exploratory tests showed that nitric environment seemed the most favorable for extraction; but a lot of other factors intervene in the separation process. We studied the influence of the acidity successively, the NO3- ions concentration, the role of the cation coming with NO3-, as well as the influence of the concentration of zirconium in the solution on the separation coefficient β = αZr / αHf. (M.B.)

  10. Production and chemical separation of 48 V radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron emitter 48 V isotope (T1/2=16 d, γ-lines: 511 keV (100%), 983.5 (100%), 1312 (97.6%)) is of interest in several fields of science. This is valid for transmitting scans in the validation process of PET-camera by positron emission. It can be used as an industrial monitoring isotope by its γ-photons having high energy and intensity. Also, it is suitable for biological study since it is the only radioisotope of the biological trace element vanadium which can be a radiotracer due to its longer half-life. The 48 V was produced by nat Ti (d,xn)48 V nuclear reaction in the U-120 cyclotron with activity of 6 mCi. The energy of irradiating beam was 13 MeV, its intensity was 5 μA and the metallic Ti target dimensions were 16 x 11 x 2 mm. For target cooling, the water circulation in the back side was used. After 3 cooling days, only 48 V, and some 46 Sc (T1/2 = 84 d), produced by the side nuclear reaction 48 Ti (d,α)46 Sc were found in the target. For the preparation of 48 V source, the Ti target was dissolved in HF and sulfuric acid. The ion exchange separation was developed for both dissolving methods. The dissolution of the chemically resistant Ti target is so violent in concentrated (3.5 % m/m) HF, that it is necessary to be carried out in polyethylene tube in order to avoid the splash of the dissolved target. An anion exchange column, Dowex 1-8 (size 100-200 mesh, length 12 cm, ID 10 mm, treated 1 day earlier, prepared fresh), was used for separation in HF media. The reduced ionic form of Ti bonds to resin, therefore the dissolved target was saturated with sulfur-dioxide produced in the Kipp-equipment by the following chemical reaction: Na2SO3 + 2 HCl → 2 NaCl + H2SO3. The treated solution was diluted to a concentration of 2 mol/l of HF and the same concentration of the HF was used as an eluent for separation. Flow rate of the elution was 1 ml/min. The eluate was cooled fractionally. The fractions were measured by γ-spectrometry, which detected only 48

  11. Radiolysis and hydrolysis of magnetically assisted chemical separation particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process is designed to separate transuranic (TRU) elements out of high-level waste (HLW) or TRU waste. Magnetic microparticles (1--25 μm) were coated with octyl (phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tested for removing TRU elements from acidic nitrate solutions. The particles were contacted with nitric acid solutions and Hanford plutonium finishing plant (PFP) simulant, irradiated with a high intensity 60Co γ-ray source, and evaluated for effectiveness in removing TRU elements from 2m HNO3 solutions. The resistance of the coatings and magnetic cores to radiolytic damage and hydrolytic degradation was investigated by irradiating samples of particles suspended in a variety of solutions with doses of up to 5 Mrad. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and physical observations of the particles and suspension solutions were used to assess physical changes to the particles. Processes that affect the surface of the particles dramatically alter the binding sites for TRU in solution. Hydrolysis played a larger role than radiolysis in the degradation of the extraction capacity of the particles

  12. Some Chemical Group Separations of Radioactive Trace Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a pretreatment for gamma spectrometric analysis methods have been developed for the chemical separation of traces of P, Sc, Ge, As, Se, Br, Zr, Nb, Ru, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Au and Hg into 9 different groups. By combining the present methods with already existing chemical group separation methods for traces of Na, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Mo, In, Fe, Cs, Ba, L.a, the rare earths, W and Ir, a complete separation scheme comprising 15 groups of elements has been worked out. The chemical 15-group separation method has been advantageously used in gamma spectrometric routine analysis of biological materials

  13. Separation process using pervaporation and dephlegmation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Leland M.; Mairal, Anurag P.; Ng, Alvin; Alvarez, Franklin R.; Baker, Richard W.

    2004-06-29

    A process for treating liquids containing organic compounds and water. The process includes a pervaporation step in conjunction with a dephlegmation step to treat at least a portion of the permeate vapor from the pervaporation step. The process yields a membrane residue stream, a stream enriched in the more volatile component (usually the organic) as the overhead stream from the dephlegmator and a condensate stream enriched in the less volatile component (usually the water) as a bottoms stream from the dephlegmator. Any of these may be the principal product of the process. The membrane separation step may also be performed in the vapor phase, or by membrane distillation.

  14. The potentialities of dry separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dry separation processes present several potential advantages with respect to the classical solvent extraction process: its compactness, the reduced transformation cycle and the mineral medium allow less investments and low capacity installations; the economically efficient isolation of long-life radioelements and the reduced volume of wastes; a good confinement and no dilution of fission gases with the possibility of quantitative trapping of gaseous effluents; its adaptability to any kind of fuel such as U-Zr, Al2O3 and MgO targets for the elimination of transuranium compounds in fast-breeder reactors etc.., its suitability for the ultimate treatment of wastes and targets irradiated in PWR- or FBR-type reactors. The paper summarizes the historical aspects of the researches concerning the dry separation processes carried out in the USA, USSR and France and the reasons that led to the rejection of these processes. Several solutions are proposed to introduce the dry separation processes as complements to the PUREX process for the isolation of long-life actinides and fission products from calcinates, irradiated oxides and fluorides. (J.S.). 5 figs

  15. Separating uranium by laser: the atomic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the countries around the world that utilizes nuclear energy, several ones are investing significantly in the development of laser techniques applied to isotope separation. In Brazil these studies are concentrated in one research institute, the IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), and aim at demonstrating the viability of this process using, as much as possible, resources available in the country. In this paper we briefly describe the laser methods for isotope separation, giving an overview of the present research and development status in this area. We also show some results obtained our laboratories. We focused this report on the atomic route for laser isotope separation, mainly in the areas of laser development and spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Foam flotation as a separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The basic principles of foam separation techniques are discussed. A review of the research concerning bubble-particle interaction and its role in the kinetics of the flotation process is given. Most of the research in this area deals with the use of theoretical models to predict the effects of bubble and particle sizes, of liquid flow, and of various forces on the aperture and retention of particles by bubbles. A discussion of fluid mechanical aspects of particle flotation is given.

  17. Design of Separation Processes with Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng-noo, Worawit; Kulajanpeng, Kusuma; Gani, Rafiqul;

    2015-01-01

    A systematic methodology for screening and designing of Ionic Liquid (IL)-based separation processes is proposed and demonstrated using several case studies of both aqueous and non-aqueous systems, for instance, ethanol + water, ethanol + hexane, benzene + hexane, and toluene + methylcyclohexane....... The best four ILs of each mixture are [mmim][dmp], [emim][bti], [emim][etso4] and [hmim][tcb], respectively. All of them were used as entrainers in the extractive distillation. A process simulation of each system was carried out and showed a lower both energy requirement and solvent usage as compared...

  18. Membrane Separation Processes at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    The primary focus of Kennedy Space Center's gas separation activities has been for carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon used in oxygen production technologies for Martian in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) projects. Recently, these studies were expanded to include oxygen for regenerative life support systems. Since commercial membrane systems have been developed for separation of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen, initially the studies focused on these membrane systems, but at lower operating temperatures and pressures. Current investigations art examining immobilized liquids and solid sorbents that have the potential for higher selectivity and lower operating temperatures. The gas separation studies reported here use hollow fiber membranes to separate carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon in the temperature range from 230 to 300 K. Four commercial membrane materials were used to obtain data at low feed and permeate pressures. These data were used with a commercial solution-diffusion modeling tool to design a system to prepare a buffer gas from the byproduct of a process to capture Martian carbon dioxide. The system was designed to operate, at 230 K with a production rate 0.1 sLpm; Feed composition 30% CO2, 44% N2, and 26% Ar; Feed pressure 104 kPa (780); and Permeate pressure 1 kPa (6 torr); Product concentration 600 ppm CO2. This new system was compared with a similar system designed to operate at ambient temperatures (298 K). The systems described above, along with data, test apparatus, and models are presented.

  19. Identification of heavy and superheavy nuclides using chemical separator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, Andreas

    1999-11-01

    With the recent synthesis of superheavy nuclides produced in the reactions 48Ca+238U and 48Ca+242,244Pu, much longer-lived nuclei than the previously known neutron-deficient isotopes of the heaviest elements have been identified. Half-lives of several hours and up to several years have been predicted for the longest-lived isotopes of these elements. Thus, the sensitivity of radiochemical separation techniques may present a viable alternative to physical separator systems for the discovery of some of the predicted longer-lived heavy and superheavy nuclides. The advantages of chemical separator systems in comparison to kinematic separators lie in the possibility of using thick targets, high beam intensities spread over larger target areas and in providing access to nuclides emitted under large angles and low velocities. Thus, chemical separator systems are ideally suited to study also transfer and (HI, αxn) reaction products. In the following, a study of (HI, αxn) reactions will be presented and prospects to chemically identify heavy and superheavy elements discussed.

  20. Magnetic separation as a plutonium residue enrichment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avens, L.R.; McFarlan, J.T.; Gallegos, U.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have subjected several plutonium contaminated residues to Open Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) on an experimental scale. Separation of graphite, bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, and bomb reduction sand, slag, and crucible, resulted in a plutonium rich fraction and a plutonium lean fraction. The lean fraction varied between about 20% to 85% of the feed bulk. The plutonium content of the lean fraction can be reduced from about 2% in the feed to the 0.1% to 0.5% range dependent on the portion of the feed rejected to this lean fraction. These values are low enough in plutonium to meet economic discard limits and be considered for direct discard. Magnetic separation of direct oxide reduction and electrorefining pyrochemical salts gave less favorable results. While a fraction very rich in plutonium could be obtained, the plutonium content of the lean fraction was to high for direct discard. This may still have chemical processing applications. OGMS experiments at low magnetic field strength on incinerator ash did give two fractions but the plutonium content of each fraction was essentially identical. Thus, no chemical processing advantage was identified for magnetic separation of this residue. The detailed results of these experiments and the implications for OGMS use in recycle plutonium processing are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Studies of separation processes using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the laboratory studies and industrial measurements, examples are given of the use of nuclear technique to check chemical processes and apparatus. The properties of radiotracers, methods of their production and application in the studies of distillation processes, rectification, electrorefining, sedimentation and liquid-liquid and solid phase extraction, are discussed. The results obtained allowed for the determination of movement parameters of the particular components inside the apparatus and for the characteristics of the latter. The usefulness of the presented isotopic methods for acquiring data to elaborate new technologies and apparatus and to modernize the applied technologies is evaluated. (author)

  2. The US Department of Energy's efficient separations and processing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESP-IP) sponsors research and development on the separation of radionuclides and toxic materials from wastes and contaminated media in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Separations research is conducted in a number of categories to address problems in five main areas of concern to DOE. Projects range from the development of novel separations processes to the adaptation of existing technologies to specific problems. The ESP-IP, initially focused on high level radioactive wastes in underground storage tanks, has diversified to address problems including mixed wastes and groundwater and soil contamination. The technical scope of the program covers the entire spectrum of physical and chemical separations, with particular interest in highly efficient reagents for removing dilute contaminants from complex mixtures. These reagents have applications beyond tank waste and testing has begun to remove contaminants from low level wastes and groundwater. The contaminants of interest include radioactive materials, toxic metals and components that degrade the performance of final waste forms. ESP-IP research is aimed at specific problems in U.S. DOE facilities, but separation methods developed by the ESP-IP are expected to have important applications both in the U.S. and abroad

  3. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde V. Ojumu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  4. Chemical recycling of municipal waste slag by using phase separation

    OpenAIRE

    Nanba, Tokuro; Kuroda, Yutaro; Sakida, Shinichi; Benino, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    A chemical recycling method by using phase separation was applied to municipal waste slags. Glasses were prepared from incineration ash and ash-melted slag, where B(2)O(3) was added to promote phase separation. The glasses were heat-treated at temperatures higher than their glass transition temperatures, and they were soaked in hydrochloric acid, leaching CaO, Fe(2)O(3), K(2)O, and S. Transparent and colorless solids containing ca. 80 mass% of SiO(2) were successfully obtained as residues. It...

  5. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  6. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond

  7. Chemical separation procedure proposed for studies of bohrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Off-line and on-line studies have been performed with radioactive tracers of various elements to develop a chemical separation procedure for bohrium (element 107). The proposed procedure is intended for use in the fast solvent extraction system SISAK. The homologs technetium and rhenium were used to model the chemical behavior of bohrium. The results show that high decontamination factors can be obtained for technetium and rhenium with respect to unwanted contaminants like trivalent actinides, polonium and the Group 5 elements. (author)

  8. Evaluation and Modification of Processes for Bioethanol Separation and Production

    OpenAIRE

    Johnner P Sitompul; W. W.; Tatang H. Soerawidjaja

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns on process evaluation and modification for bioethanol separation and production by applying pinch technology. Further, the paper is also focused on obtaining a most energy-efficient process among several processes. Three basic process configurations of bioethanol separation and production were selected for this study. The three separations and production systems are Othmer process, Barbet process and a separation process that operates under vacuum condition. Basically, eac...

  9. Cascade theory in isotopic separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three main areas are developed within the scope of this work: - the first one is devoted to fundamentals: separative power, value function, ideal cascade and square cascade. Applications to two main cases are carried out, namely: Study of binary isotopic mix, Study of processes with a small enrichment coefficient. - The second one is devoted to cascade coupling -high-flux coupling (more widely used and better known) as well as low-flux coupling are presented and compared to one another. - The third one is an outlook on problems linked to cascade transients. Those problem are somewhat intricate and their interest lies mainly into two areas: economics where the start-up time may have a large influence on the interests paid during the construction and start-up period, military productions where the start-up time has a direct bearing on the production schedule. (author). 50 figs. 3 annexes. 12 refs. 6 tabs

  10. Personal Simulator of Chemical Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴重光

    2002-01-01

    The Personal Simulator of chemical process (PS) means that fully simulationsoftware can be run on one personal computer. This paper describes the kinds of PSprograms, its features, the graphic functions and three examples. PS programs are allbased on one object-oriented and real-time simulation software environment. Authordevelops this simulation software environment. An example of the batch reaction kineticsmodel is also described. Up to now a lot of students in technical schools and universitieshave trained on PS. The training results are very successful.

  11. Magnetic separation as a plutonium residue enrichment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several plutonium contaminated residues have been subjected to Open Gradient Magnetic Separation (OGMS) on an experimental scale. OGMS experiments on graphite and bomb reduction residues resulted in a plutonium rich fraction and a plutonium lean fraction. Values for the bulk quantity rejected to the lean fraction varied between about 20% to 85% of the feed bulk. The plutonium content of the lean fraction can be reduced from about 2% in the feed to the 0.1% to 0.5% range dependent on the portion of the feed rejected to this lean fraction. These values are low enough in plutonium to meet economic discard limits and be considered for direct discard. Magnetic separation of pyrochemical salts gave less favorable results. While a fraction very rich in plutonium could be obtained, the lean fraction plutonium content was too high for direct discard. This may still have chemical processing applications. OGMS experiments at low magnetic field strength on incinerator ash did give two fractions but the plutonium content of each fraction was essentially identical. Thus, no chemical processing advantage was identified for magnetic separation of this residue. 6 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs

  12. DD3R zeolite membranes in separation and catalytic processes: Modelling and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bergh, J.

    2010-01-01

    Around 2004 the annual energy consumption of the Dutch (petro-)chemical industry was estimated to be 460 PJ of which 200 PJ could be allocated to separation processes [1]. In 2009, 15% of the global energy consumption was required for separation and purification processes to produce commodities. Mor

  13. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant safety document ICPP hazardous chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwood, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a hazardous chemical evaluation performed for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). ICPP tracks chemicals on a computerized database, Haz Track, that contains roughly 2000 individual chemicals. The database contains information about each chemical, such as its form (solid, liquid, or gas); quantity, either in weight or volume; and its location. The Haz Track database was used as the primary starting point for the chemical evaluation presented in this report. The chemical data and results presented here are not intended to provide limits, but to provide a starting point for nonradiological hazards analysis.

  14. Chemical separations schemes for partitioning and transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the initial phase of the U.S. Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program, a single-tier system was foreseen in which the transuranics and long-lived fission products (specifically, 99Tc and 129I) recovered from spent LWR oxide fuel would be sent directly to an accelerator-driven transmuter reactor [1]. Because the quantity of fuel to be processed annually was so large (almost 1,500 tons per year), an aqueous solvent extraction process was chosen for LWR fuel processing. Without the need to separate transuranics from one another for feed to the transmuter, it became appropriate to develop an advanced aqueous separations method that became known as UREX. The UREX process employs an added reagent (acetohydroxamic acid) that suppresses the extraction of plutonium and promotes the extraction of technetium together with uranium. Technetium can then be efficiently removed from the uranium; the recovered uranium, being highly decontaminated, can be disposed of as a low-level waste or stored in an unshielded facility for future use. Plutonium and the other transuranic elements, plus the remaining fission products, are directed to the liquid waste stream. This stream is calcined, converting the transuranics and fission products to their oxides. The resulting oxide powder, now representing only about four percent of the original mass of the spent fuel, is reduced to metallic form by means of a pyrometallurgical process. Subsequently, the transuranics are separated from the fission products in another pyro-metallurgical step involving molten salt electrorefining

  15. Prediction of separation process results in OGMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzov, V. L.; Dmitrievskaya, T. Yu.; Piskunov, A. N.; Fedorov, V. K.; Cheremnykh, P. A.; Yaremenko, V. N.

    1990-01-01

    The wet magnetic separation of ore fine particles containing 32-40% of iron in the form of hematite is experimentally investigated. The extraction parameter distribution W( X) of particles is obtained at the open-gradient magnetic separator, X = κD2, κ - being the relative magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic or diamagnetic particle, D, its size.

  16. Stochastic processes in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shuler, K E

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  17. Overview of the French program in chemical separations and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-range effort has begun in France that is aimed at the reduction of the volume and activity level of wastes containing long half-life radionuclides. This effort constitutes the SPIN (SeParations-INcineration) Program which investigates separations techniques that can improve current reprocessing technologies coupled with destruction of long-lived species through transmutation. Removal and destruction of specific radionuclides (e.g., neptunium, americium, technetium, iodine, cesium, and strontium) will be emphasized. Advanced solvent extraction chemistry focusing, for example, on development and implementation of diamides for actinide-lanthanide separations constitutes an important component of the SPIN program. The second component of the program focuses on inventory reductions through transmutation of such long-lived nuclides in fast reactor systems (Super Phenix). Accelerator-based systems are also being evaluated as a possible long-term option. Both of these components of the SPIN program are aimed at further reduction of the potential radiotoxicity and radiological impact of high-level wastes destined for geological storage. In this presentation, major activities of the SPIN Program will be described with emphasis on activities related to advanced chemical separations

  18. Separation of selected stable isotopes by liquid-phase thermal diffusion and by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useful applications of enriched stable nuclides are unduly restricted by high cost and limited availability. Recent research on liquid phase thermal diffusion (LTD) has resulted in practical processes for separating 34S, 35Cl, and 37Cl in significant quantities (100 to 500 g/yr) at costs much lower than those associated with the electromagnetic (Calutron) process. The separation of the isotopes of bromine by LTD is now in progress and 79Br is being produced in relatively simple equivalent at a rate on the order of 0.5 g/day. The results of recent measurements show that the isotopes of Zn can be separated by LTD of zinc alkyls. The isotopes of calcium can be separated by LTD and by chemical exchange. The LTD process is based on the use of aqueous Ca(NO3)2 as a working fluid. The chemical exchange method involves isotopically selective exchange between an aqueous phase containing a calcium salt and an organic phase containing calcium in the form of a complex with a macrocyclic ligand. The LTD method is suitable for high enrichments at low through-puts; whereas, the chemical exchange techniques is appropriate for lower enrichments at much higher production rates. Current research is directed toward reducing these concepts to practical processes

  19. High gradient magnetic separation for powder material processing

    OpenAIRE

    Idziaszek-Gonzalez, Alicja; Kozlowski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separators are widely used in both research and industry. The aim of the work is the analysis of magnetic separation for powder material processing. The paper presents the simulations of magnetic field for magnetic separators with various filter shapes. Finite Element Analysis has been used to get the magnetic field over the studied separator grid.

  20. Organic-inorganic hybrid membranes in separation processes: a 10-year review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. C. Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In relation to some inorganic membranes, polymeric membranes have relatively low separation performance. However, the processing flexibility and low cost of polymers still make them highly attractive for many industrial separation applications. Polymer-inorganic hybrid membranes constitute an emerging research field and have been recently developed to improve the separation properties of polymer membranes because they possess properties of both organic and inorganic membranes such as good hydrophilicity, selectivity, permeability, mechanical strength, and thermal and chemical stability. The structures and processing of polymer-inorganic nanocomposite hybrid membranes, as well as their use in the fields of ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, pervaporation, gas separation and separation mechanism are reviewed.

  1. PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-04-29

    A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium and the impurities associated therewith. The separation is effected by adding, to the solution containing hexavalent uranium and plutonium, acetate ions and the ions of an alkali metal and those of a divalent metal and thus forming a complex plutonium acetate salt which is carried by the corresponding complex of uranium, such as sodium magnesium uranyl acetate. The plutonium may be separated from the precipitated salt by taking the same back into solution, reducing the plutonium to a lower valent state on reprecipitating the sodium magnesium uranyl salt, removing the latter, and then carrying the plutonium from ihe solution by means of lanthanum fluoride.

  2. Experiments To Demonstrate Chemical Process Safety Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorathy, Brian D.; Mooers, Jamisue A.; Warren, Matthew M.; Mich, Jennifer L.; Murhammer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the need to educate undergraduate chemical engineering students on chemical process safety and introduces the content of a chemical process safety course offered at the University of Iowa. Presents laboratory experiments demonstrating flammability limits, flash points, electrostatic, runaway reactions, explosions, and relief design.…

  3. Sample selection and testing of separation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Phase partitioning, which has become an important tool for the separation and purification of biological materials, was studied. Instruments available for this technique were researched and a countercurrent distribution apparatus, the Biosheff MK2N, was purchased. Various proteins, polysaccharides and cells were studied as models to determine operating procedures and conditions for this piece of equipment. Results were compared with those obtained from other similar equipment, including a nonsynchronous coil planet centrifuge device. Additionally, work was done with affinity ligands attached to PEG, which can further enhance the separation capabilities of phase partitioning.

  4. Chemical reagent and process for refuse disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for treating refuse by mixing them with a reactive chemical and a puzzolana-type material. Said chemical includes a retarding agent which modifies the viscosity and an accelerating agent. (author)

  5. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  6. Modeling of Multicomponent Mixture Separation Processes Using Hollow fiber Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far, most of research activities on modeling of membrane separation processes have been focused on binary feed mixture. But, in actual separation operations, binary feed is hard to find and most separation processes involve multicomponent feed mixture. In this work models for membrane separation processes treating multicomponent feed mixture are developed. Various model types are investigated and validity of proposed models are analysed based on experimental data obtained using hollowfiber membranes. The proposed separation models show quick convergence and exhibit good tracking performance

  7. Modeling of Multicomponent Mixture Separation Processes Using Hollow fiber Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Kuk; Lee, Young Moo; Yeo, Yeong-Koo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    So far, most of research activities on modeling of membrane separation processes have been focused on binary feed mixture. But, in actual separation operations, binary feed is hard to find and most separation processes involve multicomponent feed mixture. In this work models for membrane separation processes treating multicomponent feed mixture are developed. Various model types are investigated and validity of proposed models are analysed based on experimental data obtained using hollowfiber membranes. The proposed separation models show quick convergence and exhibit good tracking performance.

  8. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WASTEWATER BY SURFACTANT SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a novel hybrid process for removing organic chemicals from contaminated water. The process uses surfactant to carry out two unit operations (1) Extraction; (2) Foam flotation. In the first step, surfactant is used to extract most of the amounts of organic contaminants in the stream. In the second step, foam flotation is used to further reduce organic contaminants and recover surfactant from the stream. The process combines the advantages of extraction and foam flotation, which allows the process not only to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, but also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in the stream and reduce it to a very low level. Surfactant regeneration can be done by conventional methods. This process is simple and low cost. The wastes are recoverable. The objective of this research is to develop an environmentally innocuous process for the wastewater or reclaimed water treatment with the ability to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in contaminated water and reduce it to a very low level, finally, provides simpler, less energy cost and economically-practical process design. Another purpose is to promote the environmental concern in minority students and encourage minority students to become more involved in environmental engineering research.

  9. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WASTEWATER BY SURFACTANT SEPARATION; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research presents a novel hybrid process for removing organic chemicals from contaminated water. The process uses surfactant to carry out two unit operations (1) Extraction; (2) Foam flotation. In the first step, surfactant is used to extract most of the amounts of organic contaminants in the stream. In the second step, foam flotation is used to further reduce organic contaminants and recover surfactant from the stream. The process combines the advantages of extraction and foam flotation, which allows the process not only to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, but also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in the stream and reduce it to a very low level. Surfactant regeneration can be done by conventional methods. This process is simple and low cost. The wastes are recoverable. The objective of this research is to develop an environmentally innocuous process for the wastewater or reclaimed water treatment with the ability to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in contaminated water and reduce it to a very low level, finally, provides simpler, less energy cost and economically-practical process design. Another purpose is to promote the environmental concern in minority students and encourage minority students to become more involved in environmental engineering research

  10. Chemical recycling of inorganic wastes by using phase separation of glass

    OpenAIRE

    Nanba, Tokuro; Mikami, Shuhei; Imaoka, Takuya; Sakida, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshinari

    2008-01-01

    A chemical recycling process using phase separation of glass was applied to a granulated blast furnace slag with high CaO content. Glasses were prepared by adding B(2)O(3) to the slag in order to promote phase separation, and the glasses were heat-treated above glass transition temperature. In the subsequent acid-treatment, however, gelation due to the elution of SiO(2) phase containing CaO occurred, not obtaining high SiO(2) solids. Then, pretreatment was introduced to reduce CaO content in ...

  11. Evaluation of the separation by pyrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report takes stock on the studies conducted by the CEA since the years 90 in the domain of the pyrochemical process, applied to the nuclear fuels reprocessing. After a presentation of the transmutation targets and fuels, the document presents the pyrochemical processes concepts and studies. In this part the author details the process developed foreign, the studies realized at the CEA, the fuel reprocessing of the molten salts reactors and the ionic liquids at ambient temperature. (A.L.B.)

  12. New strategies for the chemical separation of actinides and lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general model is proposed for the effective design of ligands for partitioning. There is no doubt that the correct design of a molecule is required for the effective separation by separation of metal ions such as lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). Heterocyclic ligands with aromatic rings systems have a rich chemistry, which is only now becoming sufficiently well understood, in relation to the partitioning process. The synthesis, characterisation and structures of some chosen molecules will be introduced in order to illustrate some important features. For example, the molecule N-butyl-2-amino-4,6-di (2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (BADPTZ), which is an effective solvent extraction reagent for actinides and lanthanides, has been synthesised, characterised and its interaction with metal ions studied. The interesting and important features of this molecule will be compared with those of other heterocyclic molecules such as 2,6-bis(5-butyl-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl) pyridine (DBTZP), which is a candidate molecule for the commercial separation of actinides and lanthanide elements. Primary Coordination Sphere. One of the most critical features concerning whether a molecule is a suitable extraction reagent is the nature of the binding and co-ordination in the primary co-ordination sphere. This effect will be considered in depth for the selected heterocylic molecules. It will be shown how the bonding of the heterocyclic and nitrate ligands changes as the complete lanthanide series is traversed from lanthanum to lutetium. For effective solvent extraction, the ligand(s) should be able completely to occupy the primary co-ordination sphere of the metal ion to be extracted. Interactions in the secondary co-ordination sphere are of less importance. Inter-complex Hydrogen Bonding Interactions. Another feature that will be considered is the intermolecular binding between ligands when bound to the metal ion. Thus the intermolecular structures between complex molecules will be considered

  13. A criterion for separating process calculi

    CERN Document Server

    Banti, Federico; Tiezzi, Francesco; 10.4204/EPTCS.41.2

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new criterion, replacement freeness, to discern the relative expressiveness of process calculi. Intuitively, a calculus is strongly replacement free if replacing, within an enclosing context, a process that cannot perform any visible action by an arbitrary process never inhibits the capability of the resulting process to perform a visible action. We prove that there exists no compositional and interaction sensitive encoding of a not strongly replacement free calculus into any strongly replacement free one. We then define a weaker version of replacement freeness, by only considering replacement of closed processes, and prove that, if we additionally require the encoding to preserve name independence, it is not even possible to encode a non replacement free calculus into a weakly replacement free one. As a consequence of our encodability results, we get that many calculi equipped with priority are not replacement free and hence are not encodable into mainstream calculi like CCS and pi-calculus, t...

  14. Separation of chemically similar elements such as trivalent actinides and lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of chemical elements has been during all times an interesting topic and references may be found from ∼ 3000 B.C., i.e. ion exchange for purification of drinking water. With increasing knowledge the separation methods have become more and more refined. There are many methods used for the separation processes, e.g. pyrometallurgy, chromatographic methods, ion exchange and solvent extraction. Of these the solvent extraction technique is widely used today due to its relative simplicity to scale up and use industrially. The solvent extraction processes have been successfully used during the last 100 years in various areas ranging from the mining industry to the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In some cases the elements that are to be separated have quite different chemical properties and a relatively simple process can be used. In the case of separation of trivalent metal ions with similar properties such as trivalent actinides and lanthanides the problem is more difficult. The separation of actinides and lanthanides is an important question when considering future alternatives to take care of waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (in for instance a transmutation process). To decrease process losses to secondary waste streams it has been decided that only extracting agents containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen are to be used, which further increases the difficulty level. Two examples of such ligands are 2,2': 6' ,2-terpyridine and 2,6-bis-(benzoxazolyl)-4-dodecyloxylpyridine. It has been shown that using such ligands, good separation of actinides and lanthanides can be achieved. This is mainly because nitrogen binds more strongly to actinides than to lanthanides due to the more covalent nature of the bond. Often synergistic extraction is used, adding the reagent to e,g. a 2-bromodecanoic acid extraction system in order to increase the extraction and the separation efficiency. In addition it is also possible to separate different

  15. Property Modelling for Applications in Chemical Product and Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    group parameter is missing, the atom connectivity based model is employed to predict the missing group interaction. In this way, a wide application range of the property modeling tool is ensured. Based on the property models, targeted computer-aided techniques have been developed for design and analysis...... of organic chemicals, polymers, mixtures as well as separation processes. The presentation will highlight the framework (ICAS software) for property modeling, the property models and issues such as prediction accuracy, flexibility, maintenance and updating of the database. Also, application issues......Physical-chemical properties of pure chemicals and their mixtures play an important role in the design of chemicals based products and the processes that manufacture them. Although, the use of experimental data in design and analysis of chemicals based products and their processes is desirable...

  16. Chemical separation and nuclear transmutation of by-product actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the most important results and conclusions of the assessment studies carried out by the Joint Research Centre-Ispra and by other organizations on the advanced waste disposal strategy based on chemical separation of By-product Actinides (BPA's) from high level liquid waste (HLLW) and their transmutation in nuclear reactors. The technological developments required for the implementation of this strategy have been identified: they concern mainly fuel reprocessing, BPA recovery from all important waste streams and fuel refabrication. After consideration of different strategies for BPA transmutation, the homogeneous recycling in FBR's appears to be most suitable due to its transmutation rate and the compatibility of BPA's with its fuel cycle. The fuel cycle with transmutation has been compared with an advanced reference fuel cycle on the basis of costs and risks. The large effort required for the development and implementation of this new fuel cycle, the increased costs operating the fuel cycle compared with the marginal benefits in the long-term risk of geological disposal, make this strategy not very attractive

  17. Technical evaluation on some chemical exchange process for uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In CEA in France, Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., in Japan and others, the industrialization of the uranium enrichment by chemical processes has been studied independently for ten years, using large amount of research expenses. In this study, technological examination was carried out on such processes and their separation characteristics, based on the published literatures. As the results, it was recognized that they have sufficient separation capability to aim at the industrialization, and the power required can be limited relatively low. However, very precise plant design and operation control system are required for them, and it is necessary to watch the future course to carry out the objective evaluation of the economic efficiency. The electric power has become a dominant factor in the production cost of enriched uranium. The separation of uranium isotopes with anion exchange resin being developed by Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., and the isotope separation by electron exchange using solvent extraction method being developed by CEA in France are introduced. Though the equilibrium separation factor is very small, they utilize reversible processes, and have the possibility of large power reduction and the cost reduction due to scaling-up. (Kako, I.)

  18. Evaluation and Modification of Processes for Bioethanol Separation and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnner P Sitompul

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns on process evaluation and modification for bioethanol separation and production by applying pinch technology. Further, the paper is also focused on obtaining a most energy-efficient process among several processes. Three basic process configurations of bioethanol separation and production were selected for this study. The three separations and production systems are Othmer process, Barbet process and a separation process that operates under vacuum condition. Basically, each process is combination of Danish Distilleries process with a separation system yielding 95% (v/v bioethanol. The production capacity of the plant is estimated about 4 x 107 litre of bioethanol 95% (v/v per year. The result of the studies shows that the most energy efficient process among the three processes evaluated is the Othmer process, followed by the Barbet process and the process involving vacuum operation. The evaluation also shows that further energy saving can be carried for Barbet and Othmer process configuration when Tmin = 10oC for heat exchange possible.

  19. Plasma-chemical processes and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct applications of plasma technology on chemistry and metallurgy are presented. The physical fundaments of chemically active non-equilibrium plasma, the reaction kinetics, and the physical chemical transformations occuring in the electrical discharges, which are applied in the industry, are analysed. Some plasma chemical systems and processes related to the energy of hydrogen, with the chemical technology and with the metallurgy are described. Emphasis is given to the optimization of the energy effectiveness of these processes to obtain reducers and artificial energetic carriers. (M.C.K.)

  20. Comparison of some physico-chemical properties of irradiated cereal starches, separated or contained in flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study some physico-chemical properties of separated wheat starch from flour type 500 and 850, rye starch from flour type 720 and triticale starch from flour type 680 were compared. All starches were irradiated with medium doses of gamma rays: 2,3 and 5 kGy directly (after their separation from flour) and in flour. The water binding capacity of starches, their solubility in water and reduction capacity were found to depend on the dose applied and the method of irradiation, individually for each starch. Additional direct irradiation of all starches caused a smaller decrease in the viscosity of starch pastes and a stronger inhibition of the retrogradation process, in comparison to the starches separated from the irradiated flours. (author)

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of Nanoporous Membrane Separation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan

    2011-03-01

    We give an analysis of desalination energy requirements in order to quantify the potential for future improvements in desalination membrane technology. Our thermodynamic analysis makes it possible to draw conclusions from the vast array of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations present in the literature as well as create a standardized comparison for measuring and reporting experimental reverse osmosis material efficiency. Commonly employed methods for estimating minimum desalination energy costs have been revised to include operations at positive input stream recovery ratios using a thermodynamic cycle analogous to the Carnot cycle. Several gaps in the statistical mechanical theory of irreversible processes have also been identified which may in the future lead to improved communication between materials engineering models and statistical mechanical simulation. Simulation results for silica surfaces and nanochannels are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Novel disk modules for membrane separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reverse osmosis (RO) system at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina has experienced fouling from trace quantities of inorganics (Al, Fe, and Si) and l.E5-l.E7/ml bacteria. The bacteria are primarily produced in an upstream Hg-removal resin bed/activated carbon bed process. The bacteria adhere to the colloidal inorganics that are in the membrane feed at their solubility limits (having been precipitated and removed upstream by a ceramic microfilter system). The resulting bacterial/inorganic foulant adheres to the membrane surface and results in high feed pressures and poor salt rejection. The feed pressure increases because the membrane system at the ETF is designed to produce a constant rate of treated water, or permeate. This is accomplished by increasing the membrane feed pressure whenever permeate flow drops. These performance losses have been attributed to bacteria present in the feed, and several potential solutions have been proposed and demonstrated here at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Advanced hybrid plate-and-frame modules have been developed that increase the applicability of membrane systems by using hydrodynamics rather than pretreatment to prevent membrane fouling

  3. Novel disk modules for membrane separation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siler, J.L.

    1993-12-06

    The reverse osmosis (RO) system at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina has experienced fouling from trace quantities of inorganics (Al, Fe, and Si) and l.E5-l.E7/ml bacteria. The bacteria are primarily produced in an upstream Hg-removal resin bed/activated carbon bed process. The bacteria adhere to the colloidal inorganics that are in the membrane feed at their solubility limits (having been precipitated and removed upstream by a ceramic microfilter system). The resulting bacterial/inorganic foulant adheres to the membrane surface and results in high feed pressures and poor salt rejection. The feed pressure increases because the membrane system at the ETF is designed to produce a constant rate of treated water, or permeate. This is accomplished by increasing the membrane feed pressure whenever permeate flow drops. These performance losses have been attributed to bacteria present in the feed, and several potential solutions have been proposed and demonstrated here at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Advanced hybrid plate-and-frame modules have been developed that increase the applicability of membrane systems by using hydrodynamics rather than pretreatment to prevent membrane fouling.

  4. Chemical production processes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Johnathan E; Muzatko, Danielle S; White, James F; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  5. Chemical production processes and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  6. Process for separation of isotopes from a gaseous mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a process for separation of isotopes from a gaseous mixture that permits the indicated isotopic separation by the combined action of photon irradiation by laser light, followed by Penning ionization of atoms, ions or molecules excited by the laser light in selective fashion

  7. Chemical separations technologies for the US accelerator transmutation of waste programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of the spent nuclear fuel generated by the operating commercial reactors in the United States is entering a new phase because it is clear that the continued rate of accumulation of spent fuel is such that the spent fuel inventory will soon exceed the legislated capacity of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. An integrated chemical separations system has been conceived for the partitioning of this fuel preparatory to transmutation of transuranic elements and long-lived fission products in an accelerator-driven transmuter reactor. A hybrid aqueous/pyrochemical separations system is being developed, with the initial separation done with an aqueous solvent extraction process called UREX. The UREX process extracts uranium, technetium and iodine and directs the transuranic elements and other fission products to the liquid waste stream. The uranium is sufficiently pure that it can be disposed as a low-level waste, while the technetium and iodine are converted into targets for transmutation to stable isotopes. The liquid waste stream containing the transuranics is converted to solid oxide form and the transuranics are separated from the fission products by electrorefining after having been converted to the metallic state. Demonstrations of the process with actual LWR spent fuel are in progress. (author)

  8. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-07-22

    This report for June 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  9. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J. F.; Johnson, W. E.; Reinker, P. H.; Warren, J. H.; McCullugh, R. W.; Harmon, M. K.; Gartin, W. J.; LaFollette, T. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Frank, W. S.; Grim, K. G.; Warren, J. H.

    1963-11-21

    This report, for October 1963 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  10. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-11-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, for October, 1962 discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; and weapons manufacturing operation.

  11. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, February 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-03-21

    This report, for February 1963 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-11-22

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: production operation; purex and redox operation; finished products operation; maintenance; financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  13. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  14. Reactive-Separator Process Unit for Lunar Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's plans for a lunar habitation outpost call out for process technologies to separate hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide gases from regolith product gas...

  15. From SRAFAP to SISAK - rapid chemical separations in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author gives an overview of rapid radiochemical separations, starting from the early experiments done by Rutherford up to the very sophisticated recoil fragment separations by fast on-line methods as an attempt to produce superheavy elements. Main emphasis is given to developments during the last decades and the extensive work performed by collaborators of the Nuclear Chemistry Institute at the University of Mainz. (RB)

  16. Process simulation of integrated biohydrogen production: hydrogen recovery by membrane separation

    OpenAIRE

    László Koók; Ákos Szabó; Péter Bakonyi; Gábor Tóth; Katalin Bélafi-Bakó; Nándor Nemestóthy

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the production of biohydrogen, as a renewable and sustainable energy source was studied. Biohydrogen was manufactured by using E. coli strain in a batch dark fermentative process integrated with membrane gas separation. Two different methods were applied: Firstly, the amount of the produced gas and component concentrations were measured, but CO2 and H2 gases were not separated. In the second experiment CO2 was removed from the gas mixture via chemical sorption (reacting with ...

  17. Study of Aging ion exchange membranes used in separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently, the most important application of ion exchange membranes (IEM) is the electrodialysis. This technique consists of a membrane separation using a series of anion exchange membranes alternately and cations, often used for the desalination of brackish water. These membranes are confronted with problems of aging. Indeed, the more they are used more physical and chemical properties will change. A comparative study of the behavior of both EMI and new but the same treatment is carried out by measuring a magnitude transfer characteristic: ion permeability. Ionic permeability is a physical quantity can have an idea about the selectivity of the membrane towards the charged species and the porosityof the membrane. It is a transport of ions (cations + anions) through the membrane. Thus, determining the ion permeability is to determine the diffusion flux of a strong electrolyte through a membrane separating two compartments (one containing electrolytes and other water initially ultrapure who will gradually electrolyte through the membrane). The measurement technique used is that by conductimetric detection because of the ease of its implementation and its accuracy. Thus, the variation of the concentration of the electrolyte is continuously monitored by measuring the conductivity of the solution diluted with time. The curves s = f (t) MEA and MEC new and used varying concentration of the electrolyte membranes show that let in less waste of strong electrolyte (NaCl and HCl) than new ones. This can be explained by: - The functional sites are combined with polyvalent ions present even in trace amounts in the solution process and become inactive. The membrane loses its hydrophilic character and turns into a film almost hydrophobic. - The chemical attacks and electrodialysis operations have degraded and eliminated much of the fixed sites leading to the same effects on the hydrophilic membrane. - These two assumptions have been reinforced by the extent of exchange capacities

  18. Computer Aided Methods & Tools for Separation & Purification of Fine Chemical & Pharmaceutical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afonso, Maria B.C.; Soni, Vipasha; Mitkowski, Piotr Tomasz;

    2006-01-01

    An integrated approach that is particularly suitable for solving problems related to product-process design from the fine chemicals, agrochemicals, food and pharmaceutical industries is presented together with the corresponding methods and tools, which forms the basis for an integrated computer...... aided system. The methods and tools are linked through the problems they are able to solve and the associated data-flow. The integrated computer aided system has been used to solve a number of industrial problems and summarized results from a selection, involving separation and purification issues, are...

  19. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-21

    The November 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed was the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operations. (MB)

  20. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-20

    The May, 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operations. (MB)

  1. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, July 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-08-22

    The July, 1958 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  2. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-21

    The May, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.(MB)

  3. Radiation Chemical and Plasma Chemical Processes for Hydrogen Production from Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is considered to be the fuel of the future. The simplest way to produce hydrogen is by water decomposition. The usual, non-electrical method of producing this reaction is either by direct thermal water splitting or by making use of some catalytic process in a batch or flow reactor. The aim of the present work, which is part of the DEMO studies, is to investigate two further, little used methods for hydrogen production. I. Radiation Chemical Process Both fission and fusion reactors produce radioactive material, the radiation energy of which is wasted. By examining the water decomposition yields observed under different conditions we conclude that the radiolysis of high temperature water vapour in contact with oxide catalysts can produce sizable amounts of hydrogen. II. Plasma Chemical Process One of the most serious problems with thermal water decomposition lies with the high reaction temperature which, apart from other associated problems, demands highly corrosion resistant materials. Plasma chemical splitting removes this obstacle, but a mixture of O2 and H2 is formed and the separation of these products is quite difficult. Having investigated a number of high temperature processes where product separation might be easier, we conclude that the thermodynamic conditions of the reaction N2 + H2O = N2O + H2 appear attractive, additionally, N2O is easy to separate from H2. More detailed thermodynamic studies and relating kinetic investigations of this and analogous processes must follow in order to assess the practical use of plasma chemical methods. Energy carriers other than hydrogen, e.g. methane, methanol, formic acid, will also be considered, as these can also be synthesised in chemical plasmas by making use of fusion energy. The paper will report the results of the studies on both these processes for the production of hydrogen from fusion energy. (author)

  4. Evaluation of separation and purification processes in the antibiotic industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Lee, D.D.; Byers, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    The different separation and purification processes for three major types of antibiotics, Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Tetracyclines will be discussed. All antibiotic, processing plants contain two majors sections, a relatively small and highly specialized fermentation section and a very large (60-80% of the plant) separation and purification section. The fermentation sections for the different antibiotics are essentially identical, except for differences in growth media and operating variables, but there are vast differences in the separation and purification sections. Several different separation methods are used including filtration, ultrafiltration, centrifugation, precipitation, extraction, chromatography and various membrane methods. Variables affecting the specific separation and purification configurations include final fermentation broth concentration, by-product formed during fermentation, the physical properties and molecular structure of the various antibiotics and special purification requirements. Necessary reductions in the separation and purification processes required for rebuilding the antibiotic industry after a national emergency are discussed along with several relatively new separation/purification methods that hold great promise for effecting these reductions, chromatography, supercritical fluid extraction (SCF), and membranes. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Treatment Process Requirements for Waters Containing Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, W. T.; Camarillo, M. K.; Domen, J. K.; Sandelin, W.; Varadharajan, C.; Cooley, H.; Jordan, P. D.; Heberger, M. G.; Reagan, M. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of chemical additives are used as part of the hydraulic fracturing (HyF) process. There is concern that HyF chemicals will be released into the environment and contaminate drinking water, agricultural water, or other water used for beneficial purposes. There is also interest in using produced water (water extracted from the subsurface during oil and gas production) for irrigation and other beneficial purposes, especially in the arid Southwest US. Reuse of produced water is not speculative: produced water can be low in salts and is being used in California for irrigation after minimal treatment. In this study, we identified chemicals that are used for hydraulic fracturing in California and conducted an analysis to determine if those chemicals would be removed by a variety of technically available treatment processes, including oil/water separation, air stripping, a variety of sorption media, advanced oxidation, biological treatment, and a variety of membrane treatment systems. The approach taken was to establish major physiochemical properties for individual chemicals (log Koc, Henry's constant, biodegradability, etc.), group chemicals by function (e.g corrosion inhibition, biocides), and use those properties to predict the fate of chemical additives in a treatment process. Results from this analysis is interpreted in the context of what is known about existing systems for the treatment of produced water before beneficial reuse, which includes a range of treatment systems from oil/water separators (the most common treatment) to sophisticated treatment trains used for purifying produced water for groundwater recharge. The results show that most HyF chemical additives will not be removed in existing treatment systems, but that more sophisticated treatment trains can be designed to remove additives before beneficial reuse.

  6. Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

  7. Chemicals Industry New Process Chemistry Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-08-01

    The Materials Technology I workshop was held in November 1998 to address future research needs for materials technology that will support the chemical industry. Areas covered included disassembly, recovery, reuse and renewable technology; new materials; and materials measurement and characterization. The Materials Technology II workshop was held in September 1999 and covered additives, modeling and prediction and an additional segment on new materials. Materials Technology Institute (MTI) for the Chemical Process Industries, Inc. and Air Products & Chemicals lead the workshops. The Materials Technology Roadmap presents the results from both workshops.

  8. Performance of biofuel processes utilising separate lignin and carbohydrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Kristian; Kohl, Thomas; Koskinen, Jukka; Hurme, Markku

    2015-09-01

    Novel biofuel pathways with increased product yields are evaluated against conventional lignocellulosic biofuel production processes: methanol or methane production via gasification and ethanol production via steam-explosion pre-treatment. The novel processes studied are ethanol production combined with methanol production by gasification, hydrocarbon fuel production with additional hydrogen produced from lignin residue gasification, methanol or methane synthesis using synthesis gas from lignin residue gasification and additional hydrogen obtained by aqueous phase reforming in synthesis gas production. The material and energy balances of the processes were calculated by Aspen flow sheet models and add on excel calculations applicable at the conceptual design stage to evaluate the pre-feasibility of the alternatives. The processes were compared using the following criteria: energy efficiency from biomass to products, primary energy efficiency, GHG reduction potential and economy (expressed as net present value: NPV). Several novel biorefinery concepts gave higher energy yields, GHG reduction potential and NPV. PMID:26056782

  9. Process for separating cesium ions from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A precipitation agent is added to the aqueous solution and the resulting precipitate containing Cs+ ions is separated from the solution. By this process, caesium is to be separated selectively compared with other alkaline metal ions with great efficiency from aqueous solutions, particularly aqueous MAW (medium activity waste). This is achieved by using a sodium tetraphenyl borate attracting electrons to the phenyl rings and having substitutes. (orig./PW)

  10. Extraction process for separating Tc and Pd from waste solutions of nuclear fuel reprocessing. 3. Studies on the chemical stability and radiation resistance of tri-n-octylamine/tetrachloromethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruendig, M.; Langguth, H.; Richter, M.

    1985-11-01

    The chemical stability and the radiation resistance of the extraction agents and the direct influence of the radiation on the extraction of technetium and palladium with TOA in CCl/sub 4/ has been investigated.

  11. Membrane separation processes for argon plasma gas recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Harlacher, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of argon and hydrogen is used as plasma gas in a thermal plasma synthesis for the production of silicon carbide. Next to argon and hydrogen, the exhaust gas of the ceramic synthesis contains carbon monoxide. Since argon is an expensive gas, the plasma gas needs to be recycled. For this purpose, the carbon monoxide has to be removed from the exhaust gas. The applicability of a membrane based gas separation process for this separation task was investigated in this study. A process rou...

  12. Recent achievements in facilitated transport membranes for separation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Ferraz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane separation processes have been extensively used for some important industrial separations, substituting traditional methods. However, some applications require the development of new membranes. In this work, we discuss recent progress achieved in this field, focusing on gas and liquid separation using facilitated transport membranes. The advantages of using a carrier species either in a liquid membrane or fixed in a polymer matrix to enhance both the flux and the selectivity of the transport are summarized. The most probable transport mechanisms in these membranes are presented and the improvements needed to spread this technology are also discussed. As examples, we discuss our very successful experiences in air fractioning, olefin/paraffin separation and sugar recovery using liquid and fixed carrier membranes.

  13. Present status of advanced aqueous separation process technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 'the Feasibility study on commercialized fast reactor cycle systems' begun in 1999, the commercialized candidate concept of the process as the advanced aqueous reprocessing system has been examined. This process, named NEXT, includes such advanced process elements as high efficiency dissolution, crystallization, U/Pu/Np co-recovery, and MA recovery. Small scale hot tests of these process elements have been conducted with irradiated fuel of the experimental Fast Reactor 'JOYO' in Chemical Processing Facility (CPF). The prospect of the technical feasibility of the NEXT process is being obtained as a promising candidate concept. (author)

  14. Separation process design for isolation and purification of natural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malwade, Chandrakant R.

    for initial selection of separation techniques and operating conditions. The key factor in designing separation processes with multiple unit operations is to determine the synergy between them which in turn demands molecular level understanding of process streams. Therefore, the methodology is...... streams at molecular level, thereby providing process information crucial for determining synergistic effects between different unit operations. In this work, the formulated methodology has been used to isolate and purify artemisinin, an antimalarial drug, from dried leaves of the plant Artemisia annua. A...... process flow sheet is generated consisting of maceration, flash column chromatography and crystallization unit operations for extraction, partial purification and final purification of artemisinin, respectively. PAT framework is used extensively to characterize the process streams at molecular level and...

  15. Chemical Processes in Astrophysical Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of stimulated photon emission on chemical processes in a radiation field are considered and their influence on the chemistry of the early universe and other astrophysical environments is investigated. Spontaneous and stimulated radiative attachment rate coefficients for H(-), Li(-) and C(-) are presented

  16. Safety Considerations in the Chemical Process Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Stanley M.

    There is an increased emphasis on chemical process safety as a result of highly publicized accidents. Public awareness of these accidents has provided a driving force for industry to improve its safety record. There has been an increasing amount of government regulation.

  17. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  18. Desulphurization of exhaust gases in chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur content of exhaust gases can be reduced by: desulphurization of fuels; modification of processes; or treatment of resultant gases. In this paper a few selected examples from the chemical industry in the German Democratic Republic are presented. Using modified processes and treating the resultant gases, the sulphuric content of exhaust gases is effectively reduced. Methods to reduce the sulfur content of exhaust gases are described in the field of production of: sulphuric acid; viscose; fertilizers; and paraffin.

  19. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SFLn/Am obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as a Zr

  20. Innovative SANEX process for trivalent actinides separation from PUREX raffinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sypula, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Recycling of nuclear spent fuel and reduction of its radiotoxicity by separation of long-lived radionuclides would definitely help to close the nuclear fuel cycle ensuring sustainability of the nuclear energy. Partitioning of the main radiotoxicity contributors followed by their conversion into short-lived radioisotopes is known as partitioning and transmutation strategy. To ensure efficient transmutation of the separated elements (minor actinides) the content of lanthanides in the irradiation targets has to be minimised. This objective can be attained by solvent extraction using highly selective ligands that are able to separate these two groups of elements from each other. The objective of this study was to develop a novel process allowing co-separation of minor actinides and lanthanides from a high active acidic feed solution with subsequent actinide recovery using just one cycle, so-called innovative SANEX process. The conditions of each step of the process were optimised to ensure high actinide separation efficiency. Additionally, screening tests of several novel lipophilic and hydrophilic ligands provided by University of Twente were performed. These tests were aiming in better understanding the influence of the extractant structural modifications onto An(III)/Ln(III) selectivity and complexation properties. Optimal conditions for minor actinides separation were found and a flow-sheet of a new innovative SANEX process was proposed. Tests using a single centrifugal contactor confirmed high Eu(III)/Am(III) separation factor of 15 while the lowest SF{sub Ln/Am} obtained was 6,5 (for neodymium). In addition, a new masking agent for zirconium was found as a substitution for oxalic acid. This new masking agent (CDTA) was also able to mask palladium without any negative influence on An(III)/Ln(III). Additional tests showed no influence of CDTA on plutonium present in the feed solution unlike oxalic acid which causes Pu precipitation. Therefore, CDTA was proposed as

  1. Examination of lignocellulosic fibers for chemical, thermal, and separations properties: Addressing thermo-chemical stability issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carter David

    Natural fiber-plastic composites incorporate thermoplastic resins with fibrous plant-based materials, sometimes referred to as biomass. Pine wood mill waste has been the traditional source of natural fibrous feedstock. In anticipation of a waste wood shortage other fibrous biomass materials are being investigated as potential supplements or replacements. Perennial grasses, agricultural wastes, and woody biomass are among the potential source materials. As these feedstocks share the basic chemical building blocks; cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, they are collectively called lignocellulosics. Initial investigation of a number of lignocellulosic materials, applied to fiber-plastic composite processing and material testing, resulted in varied results, particularly response to processing conditions. Less thermally stable lignocellulosic filler materials were physically changed in observable ways: darkened color and odor. The effect of biomass materials' chemical composition on thermal stability was investigated an experiment involving determination of the chemical composition of seven lignocellulosics: corn hull, corn stover, fescue, pine, soy hull, soy stover, and switchgrass. These materials were also evaluated for thermal stability by thermogravimetric analysis. The results of these determinations indicated that both chemical composition and pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials can have an effect on their thermal stability. A second study was performed to investigate what effect different pretreatment systems have on hybrid poplar, pine, and switchgrass. These materials were treated with hot water, ethanol, and a 2:1 benzene/ethanol mixture for extraction times of: 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. This factorial experiment demonstrated that both extraction time and medium have an effect on the weight percent of extractives removed from all three material types. The extracted materials generated in the above study were then subjected to an evaluation of thermal

  2. Process/Equipment Co-Simulation on Syngas Chemical Looping Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Liang; Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2012-09-30

    The chemical looping strategy for fossil energy applications promises to achieve an efficient energy conversion system for electricity, liquid fuels, hydrogen and/or chemicals generation, while economically separate CO{sub 2} by looping reaction design in the process. Chemical looping particle performance, looping reactor engineering, and process design and applications are the key drivers to the success of chemical looping process development. In order to better understand and further scale up the chemical looping process, issues such as cost, time, measurement, safety, and other uncertainties need to be examined. To address these uncertainties, advanced reaction/reactor modeling and process simulation are highly desired and the modeling efforts can accelerate the chemical looping technology development, reduce the pilot-scale facility design time and operating campaigns, as well as reduce the cost and technical risks. The purpose of this work is thus to conduct multiscale modeling and simulations on the key aspects of chemical looping technology, including particle reaction kinetics, reactor design and operation, and process synthesis and optimization.

  3. Chemical Interactions and Their Role in the Microphase Separation of Block Copolymer Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Farrell

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamics of self-assembling systems are discussed in terms of the chemical interactions and the intermolecular forces between species. It is clear that there are both theoretical and practical limitations on the dimensions and the structural regularity of these systems. These considerations are made with reference to the microphase separation that occurs in block copolymer (BCP systems. BCP systems self-assemble via a thermodynamic driven process where chemical dis-affinity between the blocks driving them part is balanced by a restorative force deriving from the chemical bond between the blocks. These systems are attracting much interest because of their possible role in nanoelectronic fabrication. This form of self-assembly can obtain highly regular nanopatterns in certain circumstances where the orientation and alignment of chemically distinct blocks can be guided through molecular interactions between the polymer and the surrounding interfaces. However, for this to be possible, great care must be taken to properly engineer the interactions between the surfaces and the polymer blocks. The optimum methods of structure directing are chemical pre-patterning (defining regions on the substrate of different chemistry and graphoepitaxy (topographical alignment but both centre on generating alignment through favourable chemical interactions. As in all self-assembling systems, the problems of defect formation must be considered and the origin of defects in these systems is explored. It is argued that in these nanostructures equilibrium defects are relatively few and largely originate from kinetic effects arising during film growth. Many defects also arise from the confinement of the systems when they are ‘directed’ by topography. The potential applications of these materials in electronics are discussed.

  4. Chemical Interactions and Their Role in the Microphase Separation of Block Copolymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Richard A.; Fitzgerald, Thomas G.; Borah, Dipu; Holmes, Justin D.; Morris, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of self-assembling systems are discussed in terms of the chemical interactions and the intermolecular forces between species. It is clear that there are both theoretical and practical limitations on the dimensions and the structural regularity of these systems. These considerations are made with reference to the microphase separation that occurs in block copolymer (BCP) systems. BCP systems self-assemble via a thermodynamic driven process where chemical dis-affinity between the blocks driving them part is balanced by a restorative force deriving from the chemical bond between the blocks. These systems are attracting much interest because of their possible role in nanoelectronic fabrication. This form of self-assembly can obtain highly regular nanopatterns in certain circumstances where the orientation and alignment of chemically distinct blocks can be guided through molecular interactions between the polymer and the surrounding interfaces. However, for this to be possible, great care must be taken to properly engineer the interactions between the surfaces and the polymer blocks. The optimum methods of structure directing are chemical pre-patterning (defining regions on the substrate of different chemistry) and graphoepitaxy (topographical alignment) but both centre on generating alignment through favourable chemical interactions. As in all self-assembling systems, the problems of defect formation must be considered and the origin of defects in these systems is explored. It is argued that in these nanostructures equilibrium defects are relatively few and largely originate from kinetic effects arising during film growth. Many defects also arise from the confinement of the systems when they are ‘directed’ by topography. The potential applications of these materials in electronics are discussed. PMID:19865513

  5. Analysis of fundamental processes in laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Isotope Separation based on atomic beam is achieved by selective excitation of neutral atoms with laser beam whose line width is as narrow as might discriminate isotope shift of specified atoms, and by recovering those excited atoms with appropriate method. This separation scheme thus involves fundamental processes of atomic beam generation, selective excitation, photoionization and recover. Enriching model, in which atoms excited with exciter is recovered by applying static electric field after ionized with ionizer, is presented to evaluate each fundamental processes and separation mechanism. That is, energy model having two kinds of 3-level system for specified atoms and nonspecified atoms respectively, which includes energy and charge transfer between two system, is calculated for parameter studies. Hearth temperature, exciter power, ionizer power, electrode length in the direction of both laser and atomic beam, and electrode gap are selected as the parameters. (author)

  6. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's , Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The TheragenicsTM PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. TheragenicsTM also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, TheragenicsTM has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, TheragenicsTM is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes

  7. Chemical computing with reaction-diffusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, J; Gizynski, K; Guzowski, J; Gorecka, J N; Garstecki, P; Gruenert, G; Dittrich, P

    2015-07-28

    Chemical reactions are responsible for information processing in living organisms. It is believed that the basic features of biological computing activity are reflected by a reaction-diffusion medium. We illustrate the ideas of chemical information processing considering the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction and its photosensitive variant. The computational universality of information processing is demonstrated. For different methods of information coding constructions of the simplest signal processing devices are described. The function performed by a particular device is determined by the geometrical structure of oscillatory (or of excitable) and non-excitable regions of the medium. In a living organism, the brain is created as a self-grown structure of interacting nonlinear elements and reaches its functionality as the result of learning. We discuss whether such a strategy can be adopted for generation of chemical information processing devices. Recent studies have shown that lipid-covered droplets containing solution of reagents of BZ reaction can be transported by a flowing oil. Therefore, structures of droplets can be spontaneously formed at specific non-equilibrium conditions, for example forced by flows in a microfluidic reactor. We describe how to introduce information to a droplet structure, track the information flow inside it and optimize medium evolution to achieve the maximum reliability. Applications of droplet structures for classification tasks are discussed. PMID:26078345

  8. Process of treating cellulosic membrane and alkaline with membrane separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    The improvement of water-soluble cellulose ether membranes for use as separators in concentrated alkaline battery cells is discussed. The process of contacting membranes with an aqueous alkali solution of concentration less than that of the alkali solution to be used in the battery but above that at which the membrane is soluble is described.

  9. The influence of chemicals on water quality in a high pressure separation rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, Einar E.; Hemmingsen, Paal V.; Mediaas, Heidi; Svarstad, May Britt E.; Westvik, Arild

    2006-03-15

    In the research laboratory of Statoil at Rotvoll, Trondheim, a high pressure experimental rig used for separation and foaming studies has been developed. There have been several studies to ensure that the high pressure separation rig produces reliable and consistent results with regard to the water-in-oil and oil-in-water contents. The results are consistent with available field data and, just as important, consistent when changing variables like temperature, pressure drop and water cut. The results are also consistent when changing hydrodynamic variables like flow velocity and mixing point (using different choke valves) and when using oil with and without gas saturation. At equal experimental conditions, the high pressure separation rig is able to differentiate between separation characteristics of oil and water from different fields and from different wells at the same field. The high pressure separation and foam rig can be used from -10 deg C to 175 deg C and at pressures up to 200 bar. Crude oil and water are studied under relevant process conditions with respect to temperature, pressure, shear, water cut and separation time. In the present work the influence of chemicals on the oil and water quality has been studied. Chemicals have been mixed into the oil and/or water beforehand or added in situ (on-stream; simulated well stream). The amount of oil in the water after a given residence time in the separation cell has been measured. The results from the high pressure rig show that some demulsifiers, with their primary purpose of giving less water in oil, also have influence on the water quality. Improvement of water quality has been observed as well as no effect or aggravation. The experimental results have been compared to results from bottle tests at the field. The results from the bottle tests and from the laboratory are not corresponding, and only a full-scale field test can tell which of them are the correct results, if any. (Experience from corresponding

  10. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant product denitrator upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium product denitrator at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has had serious operating problems since 1970, including inadequate contamintion control, fluidized bed caking, frequent bed heater failure, product overflow plugging, and poor feed control. These problems were minimized through selective redesign and upgrade of the process equipment as part of a process upgrade program completed in March 1981. Following startup and testing of the rebuilt product denitrator, 1044 kg of enriched uranium was processed in three weeks while demonstrating greater reliability, ease of operation, and improved contamination control. To maximize personnel safety in the future, the denitrator vessel should be made critically safe by geometry and process instrumentation isolated from the process for semi-remote operation

  11. Supporting chemical process design under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wechsung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in chemical process design is to make design decisions based on partly incomplete or imperfect design input data. Still, process engineers are expected to design safe, dependable and cost-efficient processes under these conditions. The complexity of typical process models limits intuitive engineering estimates to judge the impact of uncertain parameters on the proposed design. In this work, an approach to quantify the effect of uncertainty on a process design in order to enhance comparisons among different designs is presented. To facilitate automation, a novel relaxation-based heuristic to differentiate between numerical and physical infeasibility when simulations do not converge is introduced. It is shown how this methodology yields more details about limitations of a studied process design.

  12. Chemical precipitation processes for the treatment of aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation has been commonly used for many years to treat liquid (aqueous) radioactive waste. This method allows the volume of waste to be substantially reduced for further treatment or conditioning and the bulk of the waste to de discharged. Chemical precipitation is usually applied in combination with other methods as part of a comprehensive waste management scheme. As with any other technology, chemical precipitation is constantly being improved to reduce cost to increase the effectiveness and safety on the entire waste management system. The purpose of this report is to review and update the information provided in Technical Reports Series No. 89, Chemical Treatment of Radioactive Wastes, published in 1968. In this report the chemical methods currently in use for the treatment of low and intermediate level aqueous radioactive wastes are described and illustrated. Comparisons are given of the advantages and limitations of the processes, and it is noted that good decontamination and volume reduction are not the only criteria according to which a particular process should be selected. Emphasis has been placed on the need to carefully characterize each waste stream, to examine fully the effect of segregation and the importance of looking at the entire operation and not just the treatment process when planning a liquid waste treatment facility. This general approach includes local requirements and possibilities, discharge authorization, management of the concentrates, ICRP recommendations and economics. It appears that chemical precipitation process and solid-liquid separation techniques will continue to be widely used in liquid radioactive waste treatment. Current research and development is showing that combining different processes in one treatment plant can provide higher decontamination factors and smaller secondary waste arisings. Some of these processes are already being incorporated into new and

  13. Promising pyrochemical actinide/lanthanide separation processes using aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic calculations have shown that aluminum is the most promising metallic solvent or support for the separation of actinides (An)from lanthanides (Ln). In molten fluoride salt, the technique of reductive extraction is under development in which the separation is based on different distributions of An and Ln between the salt and metallic Al phases. In this process molten aluminum alloy acts as both a reductant and a solvent into which the actinides are selectively extracted. It was demonstrated that a one-stage reductive extraction process, using a concentrated solution, allows a recovery of more than 99.3% of Pu and Am. In addition excellent separation factors between Pu and Ln well above 103 were obtained. In molten chloride media similar separations are developed by constant current electrorefining between a metallic alloy fuel (U60Pu20-Zr10Am2Nd3.5Y0.5Ce0.5Gd0.5) and an Al solid cathode. In a series of demonstration experiments, almost 25 g of metallic fuel was reprocessed and actinides collected as An-Al alloys on the cathode. Analysis of the An-Al deposits confirmed that an excellent An/Ln separation (An/Ln mass ratio = 2400) had been obtained. These results show that Al is a very promising material to be used in pyrochemical reprocessing of actinides. (authors)

  14. Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. The ESP funds several multi-year tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R and D) leading to demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within DOE-EM. Treating essentially all DOE defense wastes requires separation methods that concentrate the contaminants and/or purify waste streams for release to the environment or for downgrading to a waste form less difficult and expensive to dispose of. Initially, ESP R and D efforts focused on treatment of high-level waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks (USTs) because of the potential for large reductions in disposal costs and hazards. As further separations needs emerge and as waste management and environmental restoration priorities change, the program has evolved to encompass the breadth of waste management and environmental remediation problems

  15. Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program. Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. The ESP funds several multi-year tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R and D) leading to demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within DOE-EM. Treating essentially all DOE defense wastes requires separation methods that concentrate the contaminants and/or purify waste streams for release to the environment or for downgrading to a waste form less difficult and expensive to dispose of. Initially, ESP R and D efforts focused on treatment of high-level waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks (USTs) because of the potential for large reductions in disposal costs and hazards. As further separations needs emerge and as waste management and environmental restoration priorities change, the program has evolved to encompass the breadth of waste management and environmental remediation problems.

  16. Energy conversion technology by chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, I.W.; Yoon, K.S.; Cho, B.W. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The sharp increase in energy usage according to the industry development has resulted in deficiency of energy resources and severe pollution problems. Therefore, development of the effective way of energy usage and energy resources of low pollution is needed. Development of the energy conversion technology by chemical processes is also indispensable, which will replace the pollutant-producing and inefficient mechanical energy conversion technologies. Energy conversion technology by chemical processes directly converts chemical energy to electrical one, or converts heat energy to chemical one followed by heat storage. The technology includes batteries, fuel cells, and energy storage system. The are still many problems on performance, safety, and manufacturing of the secondary battery which is highly demanded in electronics, communication, and computer industries. To overcome these problems, key components such as carbon electrode, metal oxide electrode, and solid polymer electrolyte are developed in this study, followed by the fabrication of the lithium secondary battery. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell, as an advanced power generating apparatus with high efficiency, no pollution, and no noise, has many applications such as zero-emission vehicles, on-site power plants, and military purposes. After fabricating the cell components and operating the single cells, the fundamental technologies in polymer electrolyte fuel cell are established in this study. Energy storage technology provides the safe and regular heat energy, irrespective of the change of the heat energy sources, adjusts time gap between consumption and supply, and upgrades and concentrates low grade heat energy. In this study, useful chemical reactions for efficient storage and transport are investigated and the chemical heat storage technology are developed. (author) 41 refs., 90 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. The preparation and characterisation of hydrophobic polymeric membranes for use in the separation of liquid mixtures using pervaporation separation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    Pervaporation is a membrane separation process used to separate liquid mixtures Separation is achieved by establishing a concentration vapour-pressure gradient across the membrane. Polyurethane (PU) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes were prepared from their prepolymers by solution casting Dilute aqueous solutions of ethyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl ethyl ketone and aniline were separated using these polyurethane and polydimethylsiloxane polymeric membranes at temperat...

  18. Chemical cleaning processes - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion products and impurities can accumulate in the secondary side of steam generators causing accelerated corrosion, steam flow disruption and heat transfer loss. Traditionally, chemical cleaning processes have been performed using multi-step processes that employ relatively concentrated reagents (e.g. EPRI-SGOG, 10-20 wt.%), that are applied at elevated temperatures. The use of such reagents dictates the use of large and relatively complex reagent handling systems for both reagent preparation and disposal. The significant duration and cost of each chemical clean has dictated that these cleaning processes are only applied on a remedial basis. An assessment of existing technology was carried out and improvements to the EPRI-SGOG processes are being developed. Results of these assessments are reported. Advanced processes are being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited that use lower concentrations of reagents, require shorter application times and generate lower amounts of waste. This technology can be used on a preventive basis to keep steam generators clean. Included are: A dilute regenerative process that is applied during shutdown. The dilute reagent is continuously recirculated and regenerated during the cleaning process, resulting in shorter application times using modular and portable equipment. The low reagent concentration results in a significantly reduced waste volume. For deposits containing both magnetite and copper a pseudo one-step process (using the same base electrolyte and pH) is used with alternate addition of oxidizing or reducing agents; A dilute on-line process that can be used while the reactor is operating. Such a process would be used on a periodic basis and dislodged oxides removed by blowdown or by mechanical means; Additives that can be used to keep steam generators clean. A demonstration of this technology is currently being planned. Details of these technologies will be described. (author)

  19. Utilization of chemical looping strategy in coal gasification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangshih Fan; Fanxing Li; Shwetha Ramkumar

    2008-01-01

    Three chemical looping gasification processes, i. e. Syngas Chemical Looping (SCL) process, Coal Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) process, and Calcium Looping process (CLP), are being developed at the Ohio State University (OSU). These processes utilize simple reaction schemes to convert carbonaceous fuels into products such as hydrogen, electricity, and synthetic fuels through the transformation of a highly reactive, highly recyclable chemical intermediate. In this paper, these novel chemical looping gasification processes are described and their advantages and potential challenges for commercialization are discussed.

  20. Analysis of hydrogen separation methods in low pressure industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present strategies for removing part of the hydrogen contained in a tank of 500 1 at a total pressure of 95 kPa. Hydrogen is mixed with other gases in a relation 95:5. The gas is generated as an end product during the production of radioisotopes. Main impurities are N2, humidity and activated gases. Two separation methods are proposed: one of them based on the use of a commercial Pd/Cu membrane, while the other involves the use of materials capable of forming metal hydrides (HFM). Characterization of hydrogen separation properties using a Pd/Cu membrane from pure H2 and H2/Ar mixture were performed in the laboratory. We present simulations of a device containing HFM of the LaNi5-xSnx (0.x.0,5), using the properties of reaction with hydrogen measured in our laboratory. The performance of the different options was evaluated. Results were compared using as evaluation criteria the value of the pressure in the tank after 3 h of separation process and the time needed to separate the same amount of hydrogen generated during a batch of the process (author)

  1. Process for hastening the separation rate of an emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process for hastening the separation rate of an oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsion, which consists in determining the HLB (hydrophobiboc-lipophobic balance) index of this emulsion and adding to it a surfactant having an opposite HLB index. Hence, in order to recuperate the uranium from phosphoric acid, pyrophosphoric acid can be used as extraction agent associated with kerosene, thereby enabling a significantly greater amount to be recuperated economically

  2. Silica membranes for hydrogen separation in coal gas processing. Final report, January 1993

    OpenAIRE

    Gavalas, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The general objective of this project was to synthesize permselective membranes suitable for hydrogen separation from coal gas. The specific objectives were: (i) to synthesize membranes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiO(sub 2) or other oxides on porous support tubes, (ii) characterize the membranes by permeation measurements of various gases and by electron microscopy, and (iii) obtain information about the mechanism and kinetics Of SiO(sub 2) deposition, and model the process of memb...

  3. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  4. Process for Separation of Petroleum Acids from Crude Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new technique for separation of petroleum acids from crude oil was proposed. The method relates to processes for treating acidic oils or fractions thereof to reduce or eliminate their acidity by addition of effective amounts of crosslinked polymeric amines such as polypropylene amine and anionic exchange resins having amino-groups. Petroleum acids contained in the mixture can be extracted by a complex solvent. The results indicate that more than 80 % of the petroleum acids are removed and the process does not cause environmental pollution because all the solvents are recovered and reused in the test.

  5. Catalysis questions in chemical processing of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paal, Z.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the literature in the field of catalytic problems related to the chemical processing of coal. As is known, these processes have become especially significant due to the energy crisis. Existing problems can be divided into two groups: one group is connected with catalytic processing of liquid products of coal destructive hydrogenation (for example, by hydrogenation of coal at high pressures, or by extraction); the other groups is connected with catalytic reactions occurring during the destructive hydrogenation or gasification of coal. Extensive basic research is required in both fields, since certain basic properties of the systems examined are still unknown. The article also gives a brief review of certain new results obtained when studying Fisher-Tropsh reactions and MeOH synthesis.

  6. Characterization of Physically and Chemically Separated Athabasca Asphaltenes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundaraín Hurtado, Jesús Leonardo; Chodakowski, Martin; Long, Bingwen; Shaw, John M. (Alberta)

    2012-02-07

    Athabasca asphaltenes were characterized using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Two methods were used to separate asphaltenes from the Athabasca bitumen: namely, chemical separation by precipitation with n-pentane and physical separation by nanofiltration using a zirconia membrane with a 20 nm average pore size. The permeate and chemically separated samples were diluted in 1-methylnaphtalene and n-dodecane prior to SAXS measurements. The temperature and asphaltene concentration ranges were 50-310 C and 1-10.4 wt %, respectively. Model-independent analysis of SAXS data provided the radius of gyration and the scattering coefficients. Model-dependent fits provided size distributions for asphaltenes assuming that they are dense and spherical. Model-independent analysis for physically and chemically separated asphaltenes showed significant differences in nominal size and structure, and the temperature dependence of structural properties. The results challenge the merits of using chemically separated asphaltene properties as a basis for asphaltene property prediction in hydrocarbon resources. While the residuals for model-dependent fits are small, the results are inconsistent with the structural parameters obtained from model-independent analysis.

  7. Separation processes for high-level radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During World War II, production of nuclear materials in the United States for national defense, high-level waste (HLW) was generated as a byproduct. Since that time, further quantities of HLW radionuclides have been generated by continued nuclear materials production, research, and the commercial nuclear power program. In this paper HLW is defined as the highly radioactive material resulting from the processing of spent nuclear fuel. The HLW is the liquid waste generated during the recovery of uranium and plutonium in a fuel processing plant that generally contains more than 99% of the nonvolatile fission products produced during reactor operation. Since this paper deals with waste separation processes, spent reactor fuel elements that have not been dissolved and further processed are excluded

  8. Chemical separation of Mo and W from terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples via anion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuichiro; Yokoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-05-20

    A new two-stage chemical separation method was established using an anion exchange resin, Eichrom 1 × 8, to separate Mo and W from four natural rock samples. First, the distribution coefficients of nine elements (Ti, Fe, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta, and W) under various chemical conditions were determined using HCl, HNO3, and HF. On the basis of the obtained distribution coefficients, a new technique for the two-stage chemical separation of Mo and W, along with the group separation of Ti-Zr-Hf, was developed as follows: 0.4 M HCl-0.5 M HF (major elements), 9 M HCl-0.05 M HF (Ti-Zr-Hf), 9 M HCl-1 M HF (W), and 6 M HNO3-3 M HF (Mo). After the chemical procedure, Nb remaining in the W fraction was separated using 9 M HCl-3 M HF. On the other hand, Nb and Zn remaining in the Mo fraction were removed using 2 M HF and 6 M HCl-0.1 M HF. The performance of this technique was evaluated by separating these elements from two terrestrial and two extraterrestrial samples. The recovery yields for Mo, W, Zr, and Hf were nearly 100% for all of the examined samples. The total contents of the Zr, Hf, W, and Mo in the blanks used for the chemical separation procedure were 582, 9, 29, and 396 pg, respectively. Therefore, our new separation technique can be widely used in various fields of geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and environmental sciences and particularly for multi-isotope analysis of these elements from a single sample with significant internal isotope heterogeneities. PMID:24801276

  9. Carbon Dioxide Separation Technology: R&D Needs for the Chemical and Petrochemical Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2007-11-01

    This report, the second in a series, is designed to summarize and present recommendations for improved CO2 separation technology for industrial processes. This report provides an overview of 1) the principal CO2 producing processes, 2) the current commercial separation technologies and 3) emerging adsorption and membrane technologies for CO2 separation, and makes recommendations for future research.

  10. Intelligent Controller Design for a Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Glan Devadhas G

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on*line non*linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. Ziegler – Nichols tuned PI and PID controllers are found to provide poor performances for higher*order and non–linear systems. This paper presents an application of one*step*ahead fuzzy as well as ANFIS (adaptive*network*based fuzzy inference system tuning scheme for an Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor CSTR process. The controller is designed based on a Mamdani type and Sugeno type fuzzy system constructed to model the dynamics of the process. The fuzzy system model can take advantage of both a priori linguistic human knowledge through parameter initialization, and process measurements through on* line parameter adjustment. The ANFIS, which is a fuzzy inference system, is implemented in the framework of adaptive networks. The proposed ANFIS can construct an input*output mapping based on both human knowledge (in the form of fuzzy if*then rules and stipulated input*output data pairs. In this method, a novel approach based on tuning of fuzzy logic control as well as ANFIS for a CSTR process, capable of providing an optimal performance over the entire operating range of process are given. Here Fuzzy logic control as well as ANFIS for obtaining the optimal design of the CSTR process is explained. In this approach, the development of rule based and the formation of the membership function are evolved simultaneously. The performance of the algorithm in obtaining the optimal tuning values has been analyzed in CSTR process through computer simulation.

  11. Chemical evolution of the Earth: Equilibrium or disequilibrium process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.

    1985-01-01

    To explain the apparent chemical incompatibility of the Earth's core and mantle or the disequilibrium process, various core forming mechanisms have been proposed, i.e., rapid disequilibrium sinking of molten iron, an oxidized core or protocore materials, and meteorite contamination of the upper mantle after separation from the core. Adopting concepts used in steady state thermodynamics, a method is devised for evaluating how elements should distribute stable in the Earth's interior for the present gradients of temperature, pressure, and gravitational acceleration. Thermochemical modeling gives useful insights into the nature of chemical evolution of the Earth without overly speculative assumptions. Further work must be done to reconcile siderophile elements, rare gases, and possible light elements in the outer core.

  12. Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants inthe Hanford Vadose Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee,Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2007-04-10

    Water and chemical transport from a point source withinvadose zone sediments at Hanford were examined with a leak testconsisting of five 3800-liter aliquots of water released at 4.5 m depthevery week over a 4-week period. The third aliquot contained bromide, D2Oand 87Sr. Movement of the tracers was monitored for 9 months by measuringpore water compositions of samples from boreholes drilled 2-8 m from theinjection point. Graded sedimentary layers acting as natural capillarybarriers caused significant lateral spreading of the leak water. D2Oconcentrations>50 percent of the concentration in the tracer aliquotwere detected at 9-11 m depth. However, increased water contents, lowerd18O values, and geophysical monitoring of moisture changes at otherdepths signified high concentrations of leak fluids were added where D2Oconcentrations were<3 percent above background, suggesting limitedmixing between different aliquots of the leak fluids. Initially highbromide concentrations decreased more rapidly over time than D2O,suggesting enhanced transport of bromide due to anion exclusion. Nosignificant increase in 87Sr was detected in the sampled pore water,indicating strong retardation of Sr by the sediments. These resultshighlight some of the processes strongly affecting chemical transport inthe vadose zone and demonstrate the significant separation of contaminantplumes that can occur.

  13. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) mission is to receive and store spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes for disposition for Department of Energy (DOE) in a cost-effective manner that protects the safety of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) employees, the public, and the environment by: Developing advanced technologies to process spent nuclear fuel for permanent offsite disposition and to achieve waste minimization. Receiving and storing Navy and other DOE assigned spent nuclear fuels. Managing all wastes in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Identifying and conducting site remediation consistent with facility transition activities. Seeking out and implementing private sector technology transfer and cooperative development agreements. Prior to April 1992, the ICPP mission included fuel reprocessing. With the recent phaseout of fuel reprocessing, some parts of the ICPP mission have changed. Others have remained the same or increased in scope

  14. A chemical cleaning process with Cerium (IV)-sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical cleaning process with a high decontamination factor (DF) is requested for decommissioning. Usually, the process should be qualified with the features, such as the feasibility of treating large or complicated form waste, the minimization of secondary waste. Therefore, a powerful technique of redox decontamination process with Ce+4/Ce+3 has been studied at INER. First, the redox of cerium ion with electrolytic method was developed. Two kinds of home-made electrolyzer were used. One is with an ion-exchange membrane, and the other one is with a ceramic separator. Second, factors influencing the decontamination efficiency, such as the concentration of Ce+4, regeneration current density, temperature, acidity of solution were all studied experimentally, and the optimum conditions were specified too. Third, the liquid waste recycling and treatment were developed with electrodialysis and ion-exchange absorption methods. Finally, the hot test was proceeded with the contaminated metals from DCR of nuclear facility. (author)

  15. Chemical precipitation processes for the treatment of low and medium level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical precipitation processes for the treatment of various radioactive low and medium level liquid waste are described. Application to waste from reprocessing plants, removal of the main gamma emitters, actinide separation, utility liquid wastes generated during pwr operation, and combination of ultrafiltration with chemical precipitation, are all discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Development of a fully automated open-column chemical-separation system—COLUMNSPIDER—and its application to Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses of igneous rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Vaglarov, Bogdan Stefanov; Takei, Masakazu; Suzuki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Ohsawa, Kouzou; Chang, Qing; Takahashi, Toshiro; Hirahara, Yuka; Hanyu, Takeshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    A fully automated open-column resin-bed chemical-separation system, named COLUMNSPIDER, has been developed. The system consists of a programmable micropipetting robot that dispenses chemical reagents and sample solutions into an open-column resin bed for elemental separation. After the initial set up of resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers for the separated chemical components, all separation procedures are automated. As many as ten samples can be eluted in parallel in a single automated run. Many separation procedures, such as radiogenic isotope ratio analyses for Sr and Nd, involve the use of multiple column separations with different resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers of various volumes. COLUMNSPIDER completes these separations using multiple runs. Programmable functions, including the positioning of the micropipetter, reagent volume, and elution time, enable flexible operation. Optimized movements for solution take-up and high-efficiency column flushing allow the system to perform as precisely as when carried out manually by a skilled operator. Procedural blanks, examined for COLUMNSPIDER separations of Sr, Nd, and Pb, are low and negligible. The measured Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for JB-2 and Nd isotope ratios for JB-3 and BCR-2 rock standards all fall within the ranges reported previously in high-accuracy analyses. COLUMNSPIDER is a versatile tool for the efficient elemental separation of igneous rock samples, a process that is both labor intensive and time consuming.

  17. A theoretical consideration on uranium isotope effects observed in chemical uranium-235 enrichment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical consideration on the uranium isotope effects in chemical chromatographic uranium isotope enrichment processes are presented, making use of up-to-date spectroscopic, solution chemical and separation factor data. It is shown that hydration of the uranyl (UO22+) and uranous (U4+) ions has a profound effect on the reduced partition function ratios (RPFR's) of these ions and that, in accordance with experiment, the RPFR of the uranous ion is larger than that of the uranyl ion. Future prospects concerning the separation factors in chemical processes are mentioned. (orig.)

  18. An improvement in APOR process I-uranium/plutonium separation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖松涛; 李丽; 叶国安; 罗方祥; 刘协春; 杨贺; 兰天

    2015-01-01

    The reduction stripping behavior of Pu(IV) from 30%TBP/OK with hydroxysemicarbazide (HSC) was inves-tigated, and the separation efficiency of HSC and DMHAN-MMH for U/Pu partitioning in Purex process was compared. The results show that HSC can effectively realize the separation of Pu from U;using mixer-settlers to simulate U/Pu separation in 1B bank of PUREX, from 16-stage counter current extraction experiment (in which 6 stages for supplemental extraction, 10 stages for stripping) with flow rate ratio (1BF:1BX:1BS)=4:1:1 in 1B contactor, good result was achieved that the yields are both more than 99.99%for uranium and Pu, the separation factor of plutonium from uranium (SFPu/U) is 2.8 × 104, and separation factor of uranium from plu-tonium (SFU/Pu) is 5.9 × 104. As a stripping reductant, HSC can effectively achieve the separation of Pu from U and the separation effect is nearly the same with DMHAN-MMH, which contributed to replace enough the latter with HSC in the U/Pu separation in Advanced Purex Process Based on Organic Reagent (APOR) process.

  19. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Separation of Pb and Zn from Fe and Cu in ash-melting of municipal solid waste. ► Molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in fly ash affected the metal-separation efficiency. ► The low molar ratio and a non-oxidative atmosphere were better for the separation. - Abstract: In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu

  20. Studies on hydrogen separation membrane for IS process. Membrane preparation with porous α-alumina tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was investigated the preparation technique of hydrogen separation membrane to enhance the decomposition ratio of hydrogen iodide in the thermochemical IS process. Hydrogen separation membranes based on porous α-alumina tubes having pore size of 100 nm and 10 nm were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source. In the hydrogen separation membrane, its pore was closed by the deposited silica and then the permeation of gas was affected by the hindrance diffusion. At 600degC, the selectivity ratios (H2/N2) were 5.2 and 160 for the membranes based on porous α-alumina tube having pore size of 100 nm and 10 nm, respectively. (author)

  1. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  2. Simultaneous Design of Ionic Liquids and Azeotropic Separation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roughton, Brock C.; White, John; Camarda, Kyle V.; Gani, Rafiqul

    A methodology for the design of azeotrope separation processes using ionic liquids as entrainers is outlined. A Hildebrand solubility parameter group contribution model has been developed to screen for or design an ionic liquid entrainer that is soluble with the azeotropic components. Using the...... best candidate, vapor-liquid equilibria data is predicted using a new ionic liquid UNIFAC model that has been developed. The UNIFAC model is used to confirm the breaking of the azeotrope. The methanol-acetone azeotrope at 1 atm is used as an example. The azeotrope was predicted to break with 10 mol...... % [BMPy][BF4] added. The driving force concept is used to design an extractive distillation process that minimizes energy inputs. The methodology given can be expanded to the use of ionic liquids as entrainers in any azeotropic system of interest....

  3. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant failure rate database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents the first major upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Failure Rate Database. This upgrade incorporates additional site-specific and generic data while improving on the previous data reduction techniques. In addition, due to a change in mission at the ICPP, the status of certain equipment items has changed from operating to standby or off-line. A discussion of how this mission change influenced the relevance of failure data also has been included. This report contains two data sources: the ICPP Failure Rate Database and a generic failure rate database. A discussion is presented on the approaches and assumptions used to develop the data in the ICPP Failure Rate Database. The generic database is included along with a short discussion of its application. A brief discussion of future projects recommended to strengthen and lend credibility to the ICPP Failure Rate Database also is included

  4. Thermodynamics principles characterizing physical and chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Honig, Jurgen M

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise overview of thermodynamics, and is written in a manner which makes the difficult subject matter understandable. Thermodynamics is systematic in its presentation and covers many subjects that are generally not dealt with in competing books such as: Carathéodory''s approach to the Second Law, the general theory of phase transitions, the origin of phase diagrams, the treatment of matter subjected to a variety of external fields, and the subject of irreversible thermodynamics.The book provides a first-principles, postulational, self-contained description of physical and chemical processes. Designed both as a textbook and as a monograph, the book stresses the fundamental principles, the logical development of the subject matter, and the applications in a variety of disciplines. This revised edition is based on teaching experience in the classroom, and incorporates many exercises in varying degrees of sophistication. The stress laid on a didactic, logical presentation, and on the relat...

  5. Process study on the separation of 99Mo from irradiated natural uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical process for the separation and purification of fission product 99Mo by the irradiation of natural UO2 targets has been developed. The major separation steps include: (1) Extraction of 99Mo with 5% D2EHPA (Di-2-Ethylhexyl Phosphoric Acid)/kerosene from a nitric acid solution. (2) Removal of H2O2 in a dilute acid medium with a platinum catalyst. (3) Initial purification of 99Mo by alumina adsorption, and (4) final purification of 99Mo by calcium phosphate hydroxide adsorption. Variables affecting on the chemical yield and purity of 99Mo in each process step were examined in batch studies. A full-scale synthetic solution experiment with the established optimum process conditions was carried out in a hot cell. It is estimated that 20 to 70 curies of 99Mo can be obtained by irradiating about 400 grams of natural UO2 target at TRR (Taiwan Research Reactor) with a neutron flux of 5x1013 n/cm2/sec. The calculated activity of the 99Mo product solution is 6x102 to 3x103 Ci/g and its estimated radionuclide purity and other quality assay were extremely satisfactory. The experimental results indicated that this separated high specific activity of 99Mo is suitable for the preparation of 99mTc generator for nuclear medical applications. (orig.)

  6. 21 CFR 570.19 - Pesticide chemicals in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pesticide chemicals in processed foods. 570.19... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES General Provisions § 570.19 Pesticide chemicals in processed foods. When pesticide chemical residues occur in processed foods due to the use...

  7. 21 CFR 170.19 - Pesticide chemicals in processed foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pesticide chemicals in processed foods. 170.19... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES General Provisions § 170.19 Pesticide chemicals in processed foods. When pesticide chemical residues occur in processed foods due to the use...

  8. Chemical ordering suppresses large-scale electronic phase separation in doped manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinyan; Du, Kai; Niu, Jiebin; Lin, Lingfang; Wei, Wengang; Liu, Hao; Lin, Hanxuan; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Tieying; Kou, Yunfang; Shao, Jian; Gao, Xingyu; Xu, Xiaoshan; Wu, Xiaoshan; Dong, Shuai; Yin, Lifeng; Shen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    For strongly correlated oxides, it has been a long-standing issue regarding the role of the chemical ordering of the dopants on the physical properties. Here, using unit cell by unit cell superlattice growth technique, we determine the role of chemical ordering of the Pr dopant in a colossal magnetoresistant (La1-yPry)1-xCaxMnO3 (LPCMO) system, which has been well known for its large length-scale electronic phase separation phenomena. Our experimental results show that the chemical ordering of Pr leads to marked reduction of the length scale of electronic phase separations. Moreover, compared with the conventional Pr-disordered LPCMO system, the Pr-ordered LPCMO system has a metal-insulator transition that is ~100 K higher because the ferromagnetic metallic phase is more dominant at all temperatures below the Curie temperature.

  9. Microwave transmission systems for the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plasma Separation Process now employs a 28 GHz cw gyrotron (VGA-8000) for electron cyclotron heating. Frequency increases to 56 GHz in FY 84 and approx. 140 GHz in FY '87 are planned. The tripple miter bend waveguide system in use with the VGA-8000 will be upgraded to provide mode control. The mode output of the tube is being measured; cippled wall converters will transform the tube output (TE01, TE02, TE03) to a single mode. Transmission will proceed through reduced diameter corrugated waveguide bends or bends will be eliminated by use of a horizontally mounted tube. Directional couplers will measure forward power in the dominant mode and multi-mode reflected power

  10. Martian Air Separation for In-Situ Resource Utilization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, J. R.; Way, J. D.; Baldwin, R. M.; Mason, L. W.

    2002-01-01

    We will introduce the concept of using synthetic organic and inorganic membranes for the separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The class of applications targeted in this project are known as In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). ISRU involves the use of resources present on Mars, such as atmospheric gases, a concept that will dramatically reduce the amount of material that must be transferred from Earth to support a mission. ISRU technologies will provide many of the consumables required for a manned mission, such as rocket propellant, water, oxygen and buffer gases. The Martian atmosphere is primarily CO2, and also contains a few percent nitrogen and argon. Martian CO2 is a principal component of several ISRU processes that may be used in a manned Mars mission. For example, the Sabatier/Electrolysis (SE) process reacts atmospheric CO2 with hydrogen to produce methane (fuel), water, and oxygen. Pure gas and mixed gas permeation tests with CO2, Ar, N2, and O2 were performed over the temperature range 243 K to 295 K with a several candidate membrane materials including rubbery polymers (silicone rubber and PEBAX) and supported faujasite zeolite membranes. In experiments with commercially available silicone rubber membranes, the pure gas CO2 permeance (flux/driving force) increases from 460 GPUs to 655 GPUs as the temperature decreases from 295 K to 243 K. A GPU is a commonly used unit of permeance and is defined as 10-6 cm3(STP)/cm2-s-cm Hg. The ideal carbon dioxide/nitrogen separation factor (ratio of pure gas permeances) increases from 7.5 to 17.5 over the same temperature range. However, in mixed gas experiments, the CO2/N2 separation factor was much lower, increasing from 4.5 to 6 as the temperature decreased from 295 K to 243 K. This difference was attributed to plasticization of the rubbery polymer membrane by CO2.

  11. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  12. Studying chemical vapor deposition processes with theoretical chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Henrik; Elliott, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    In a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process, a thin film of some material is deposited onto a surface via the chemical reactions of gaseous molecules that contain the atoms needed for the film material. These chemical reactions take place on the surface and in many cases also in the gas phase. To fully understand the chemistry in the process and thereby also have the best starting point for optimizing the process, theoretical chemical modeling is an invaluable tool for providing atomic-scale...

  13. Membrane separation processes for the treatment of uranium bearing effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane processes are gaining acceptance over conventional methods such as chemical precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption etc. in the field of radioactive waste treatment, owing to their simplicity of operation. Moreover, the amount of secondary wastes generated are much less. The present paper deals with the treatment of uranium bearing effluents using ultrafiltration(UF) and reverse osmosis(RO). A RO/UF unit based on plate module configuration utilizing cellulose acetate membranes has been used for the experiments. The studies indicated that not only uranium but also its β-emitting daughter products can be contained, producing a permeate stream, safe enough for discharging into the environment. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  14. Statistical process control support during Defense Waste Processing Facility chemical runs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) has been developed to ensure that the wasteforms produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will satisfy the regulatory and processing criteria that will be imposed. The PCCS provides rigorous, statistically-defensible management of a noisy, multivariate system subject to multiple constraints. The system has been successfully tested and has been used to control the production of the first two melter feed batches during DWPF Chemical Runs. These operations will demonstrate the viability of the DWPF process. This paper provides a brief discussion of the technical foundation for the statistical process control algorithms incorporated into PCCS, and describes the results obtained and lessons learned from DWPF Cold Chemical Run operations. The DWPF will immobilize approximately 130 million liters of high-level nuclear waste currently stored at the Site in 51 carbon steel tanks. Waste handling operations separate this waste into highly radioactive sludge and precipitate streams and less radioactive water soluble salts. (In a separate facility, soluble salts are disposed of as low-level waste in a mixture of cement slag, and flyash.) In DWPF, the precipitate steam (Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous or PHA) is blended with the insoluble sludge and ground glass frit to produce melter feed slurry which is continuously fed to the DWPF melter. The melter produces a molten borosilicate glass which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository

  15. Noninvasive Temperature Mapping With MRI Using Chemical Shift Water-Fat Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Soher, Brian J.; Wyatt, Cory; Reeder, Scott B.; MacFall, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Tissues containing both water and lipids, e.g., breast, confound standard MR proton reference frequency-shift methods for mapping temperatures due to the lack of temperature-induced frequency shift in lipid protons. Generalized Dixon chemical shift–based water-fat separation methods, such as GE’s iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation method, can result in complex water and fat images. Once separated, the phase change over time of the water s...

  16. Ultrasonically treated liquid interfaces for progress in cleaning and separation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound and acoustic cavitation enable ergonomic and eco-friendly treatment of complex liquids with outstanding performance in cleaning, separation and recycling of resources. A key element of ultrasonic-based technology is the high speed of mixing by streams, flows and jets (or shock waves), which is accompanied by sonochemical reactions. Mass transfer across the phase boundary with a great variety of catalytic processes is substantially enhanced through acoustic emulsification. Encapsulation, separation and recovery of liquids are fast with high production yield if applied by ultrasound. Here we discuss the state of knowledge of these processes by ultrasound and acoustic cavitation from a perspective of a physico-chemical model in order to predict and control the outcome. We focus on the physical interpretation and quantification of ultrasonic parameters and properties of liquids to understand the chemistry of liquid/liquid interfaces in acoustic fields. The roles of thermodynamic enthalpy and entropy (incl. Laplace and osmotic pressure) in the context of sonochemical reactions (separation, catalysis, degradation, cross-linking, ion exchange and phase transfer) are outlined. The synergy of ultrasound and electric fields or continuous flow chemistry for cleaning and separation via emulsification is highlighted by specific strategies involving polymers and ultrasonic membranes. PMID:26435267

  17. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. PMID:25216897

  18. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medin, Zach [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cumming, Andrew, E-mail: zmedin@lanl.gov, E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of phase separation in fluids with chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Raishma; Puri, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    We present results from the first d =3 molecular dynamics (MD) study of phase-separating fluid mixtures (AB) with simple chemical reactions (A ⇌B ). We focus on the case where the rates of forward and backward reactions are equal. The chemical reactions compete with segregation, and the coarsening system settles into a steady-state mesoscale morphology. However, hydrodynamic effects destroy the lamellar morphology which characterizes the diffusive case. This has important consequences for the phase-separating structure, which we study in detail. In particular, the equilibrium length scale (ℓeq) in the steady state suggests a power-law dependence on the reaction rate ɛ :ℓeq˜ɛ-θ with θ ≃1.0 .

  20. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma

  1. A signature of chemical separation in the cooling curves of transiently accreting neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach

    2013-01-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  2. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOP'S FOR THE TREATMENT OF CCL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on treatment of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) chemicals is being conducted. Specific groups of contaminants on the CCL will be evaluated using numerous advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Initially, these CCL contaminants will be evaluated in groups based on chemical...

  3. Process and device for separating hydrogen from a gas mixture by diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the invention, a process and a device are introduced, by which hydrogen can be effectively separated from gas mixtures, even if the hydrogen is only present in very small amounts and may be present in the form of a chemical compound. This is achieved by the hydrogen present in molecular and/or chemically bound form in the gas space of a chamber which can be closed on all sides, which is separated from a second chamber, which can also be closed on all sides, by a wall which is selectively permeable to hydrogen, being converted by contact dissociation, luminous current discharge, high frequency discharge, ionising radiation or in an arc into atomic hydrogen, and where the hydrogen is collected in the second chamber after permeation through the permeable wall restoring it to molecular hydrogen. By means of this procedure, the hydrogen diffusion is vastly improved (by several orders of magnitude) and becomes practically independent of any hydrogen pressure differences on both sides of the membrane, so that, without any mechanical moving parts, which would introduce (oil) contamination and sealing problems, a considerable compression of the separated hydrogen is achieved compared to its partial pressure in the initial mixture, where, for example pressures of up to 20 bar can be achieved in the separated gaseous hydrogen isotope mixture, and even if the partial pressure of the hydrogen in the gas mixture is only about 10-1 millibar. Diffusion separation is carried on for such a pressure increase until the required pressure is reached behind the wall permeable to hydrogen. (orig./MM)

  4. Process for the recovery and separation of plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Pomykala Jr., Joseph A.

    2003-07-29

    A method of separating a portion of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) from a mixture containing ABS and for separating a portion of ABS and polycarbonate (PC) from a mixture of plastics containing ABS and PC is disclosed. The method includes shredding and/or granulating the mixture of plastics containing ABS and PC to provide a selected particle size; sequentially dispersing the shredded mixture of plastics in a series aqueous solutions having different specific gravities and separating the floating fraction until the desired separation is obtained. Surface tension and pH are also variable to be controlled.

  5. Chemical separation and AES determination of rare earths in thorium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical separation method has been developed for the separation of rare earths like, Ce, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu and La, Y from ThO2 matrix and their determination by emission spectrographic method. Cyanex-272 ie. [bis(2,4,4-trimethyl pentyl) phosphinic acid] /xylene/ HNO3 extraction system has been used for separation of thorium. The recovery of rare earths as determined by emission spectrographic method was found to be quantitative within experimental error. The estimation range for the analytes lie between 0.02μg-4μg based on 100 mg ThO2. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab

  6. Physico-Chemical Study of the Separation of Calcium Isotopes by Chemical Exchange Between Amalgam and Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a preliminary study of the isotopic exchange between Ca amalgam and aqueous or organic solutions of Ca salts, the main parameters governing the feasibility of a separation process based on these systems such as separation factor, exchange kinetics, rate of decomposition of the amalgam were investigated. The separation factor between 40Ca and 46Ca was found to be of the order of 1.02. The rate of the exchange reaction is rather low for aqueous solutions, extremely low for organic solutions. The amalgam seems not to be attacked by dimethyl-formamide solutions; but it is rapidly decomposed by aqueous solutions of Ca halides. This decomposition is slow in the case of aqueous solutions of calcium formate and still slower for Ca(OH)2; however, except in particular conditions, the observed rate is often much higher, owing to interfering reactions between amalgam and water vapor contained in H2 bubbles. (authors)

  7. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program: Develop and test sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, L.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed during FY 1995 under the task {open_quotes}Develop and Test Sorbents,{close_quotes} the purpose of which is to develop high-capacity, selective solid extractants to recover cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. This work is being done for the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP), operated by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management`s Office of Technology Development. The task is under the direction of staff at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with key participation from industrial and university staff at 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota; IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Forks, Utah; AlliedSignal, Inc., Des Plaines, Illinois, and Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. 3M and IBC are responsible for ligand and membrane technology development; AlliedSignal and Texas A&M are developing sodium titanate powders; and PNL is testing the materials developed by the industry/university team members. Major accomplishments for FY 1995 are summarized in this report.

  8. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program: Develop and test sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed during FY 1995 under the task open-quotes Develop and Test Sorbents,close quotes the purpose of which is to develop high-capacity, selective solid extractants to recover cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. This work is being done for the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP), operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's Office of Technology Development. The task is under the direction of staff at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with key participation from industrial and university staff at 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota; IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Forks, Utah; AlliedSignal, Inc., Des Plaines, Illinois, and Texas A ampersand M University, College Station, Texas. 3M and IBC are responsible for ligand and membrane technology development; AlliedSignal and Texas A ampersand M are developing sodium titanate powders; and PNL is testing the materials developed by the industry/university team members. Major accomplishments for FY 1995 are summarized in this report

  9. Plasma separation process: Magnet move to Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report on the series of operations which culminated with the delivery of the Plasma Separation Process prototype magnet system (PMS) to Building K1432 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This procedure included real time monitoring of the cold mass support strut strain gauges and an in-cab rider to monitor the instrumentation and direct the driver. The primary technical consideration for these precautions was the possibility of low frequency resonant vibration of the cold mass when excited by symmetrical rough road conditions at specific speeds causing excess stress levels in the support struts and consequent strut failure. A secondary consideration was the possibility of high acceleration loads due to sudden stops, severe road conditions, of impacts. The procedure for moving and transportation to ORNL included requirements for real time continuous monitoring of the eight strut stain gauges and three external accelerometers. Because the strain gauges had not been used since the original magnet cooldown, it was planned to verify their integrity during magnet warmup. The measurements made from the strut strain gauges resulted in stress values that were physically impossible. It was concluded that further evaluation was necessary to verify the usefulness of these gauges and whether they might be faulty. This was accomplished during the removal of the magnet from the building. 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Mechanical separation process for decladding of LWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of known methods of decladding led to cavitation erosion being used as a decladding mechanism. This process attacks not the jacket of the fuel rod but the fuel itself. Cavitation erosion is the consequence of imploding vapour bubbles entailing dynamic stress of a high frequency and high amplitude. The separation effect is due to the different material properties. Ductile materials as a rule are much more resistant to dynamic stress than brittle materials. Systematic experiments at varying pressures, volume flow, nozzle geometries and distances between nozzle and sample led to optimized parameters. There was a conspicuous rise in the relations pressure to depth of erosion and volume flow to depth of erosion. This considered, p=700 bar and d=1.6 mm were found to be useful parameters. The relation of the distance from nozzle to sample and the erosion obtained also has an optimum at s=50 mm. This distance can be shortened in the course of the operation. A great entrance angle combined with a nozzle outlet channel of the length l=1/2 D improves the erosion result considerably. The attack of the cavitating water jet on the jacket of the fuel rod causes a weight loss of <=2per mille. (orig./HP)

  11. Enrichment of U-235 by the separation nozzle process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most favorable results for practical application of the separation nozzle method have so far been obtained with a separating system in which a band-shaped gaseous jet consisting of a UF6/H2-mixture is deflected by a curved wall. Different methods have been developed to produce tubular separation elements based on this principle. Presently, separation capacities of up to 50 SWU/year can be achieved with tubular separation elements 15 cm in diameter and 2 m in length. These separation nozzles need a specific compression work of 2,700 kWh/SWU. Taking into account all energy losses of the enrichment facility this results in a specific energy consumption of about 4,000 kWh/SWU for an industrial-scale plant. Stages equipped with tubular separation elements have performed successfully since 1972 and 1974, respectively. The efficiency of UF6-recycling on the top of the cascades has been demonstrated. The tests of these prototypes provided the knowledge necessary for planning and engineering of industrial-scale enrichment plants. The operating characteristics of such separation nozzle plants can be predicted with high reliability using appropriate digital computer simulation showing that smooth and inherent stable cascade operation can be expected. On the basis of these results a technology program was initiated to provide the prototypes for enrichment plants with capacities of the order of 2.5 to 5 million SWU/year and more. (orig.)

  12. Designing learning curves for carbon capture based on chemical absorption according to the minimum work of separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This work defines the minimum work of separation (MWS) for a capture process. • Findings of the analysis indicated a MWS of 0.158 GJ/t for post-combustion. • A review of commercially available processes based on chemical absorption was made. • A review of learning models was conducted, with the addition on a novel model. • A learning curve for post-combustion carbon capture was successfully designed. - Abstract: Carbon capture is one of the most important alternatives for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions in energy facilities. The post-combustion route based on chemical absorption with amine solvents is the most feasible alternative for the short term. However, this route implies in huge energy penalties, mainly related to the solvent regeneration. By defining the minimum work of separation (MWS), this study estimated the minimum energy required to capture the CO2 emitted by coal-fired thermal power plants. Then, by evaluating solvents and processes and comparing it to the MWS, it proposes the learning model with the best fit for the post-combustion chemical absorption of CO2. Learning models are based on earnings from experience, which can include the intensity of research and development. In this study, three models are tested: Wright, DeJong and D and L. Findings of the thermochemical analysis indicated a MWS of 0.158 GJ/t for post-combustion. Conventional solvents currently present an energy penalty eight times the MWS. By using the MWS as a constraint, this study found that the D and L provided the best fit to the available data of chemical solvents and absorption plants. The learning rate determined through this model is very similar to the ones found in the literature

  13. Mound Laboratory activities in chemical and physical research: July--December 1976. [Isotope separation; metal hydride research, separation chemistry and separation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-04

    The status of the following programs is reported: isotope separation of carbon, argon, helium, krypton, neon, xenon, oxygen, and sulfur; metal hydride research; separation chemistry; and separation research. (LK)

  14. The use of a hot cyclone for separation of heavy metals during combustion, evaluation by chemical equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This degree-project is a part of a project financed by the European Communities non Nuclear energy program. The aim of the project is to reach a sustainable use of biofuels as energy source. A requirement for sustainable use of biomass fuel in combustion and gasification plants is that the ash produced can be recycled back to the forest and farmlands in a safe and controlled way. Recycling is important because most of the nutrients (Ca, Mg, P, Na and K) are ending up in the ash. However, the ashes also contain heavy metals and organic pollutants that should not be recycled. To solve this problem, a new technique for separation of the heavy metals during combustion is under development. This technique builds on evaporation of heavy metals and particle separation with a hot cyclone. The idea is that the heavy metal will pass the cyclone as gas species while the nutrients will be separated in the cyclone from the flue gas. The heavy metals are then collected in the more efficient cleaning device downstream in the process. In the present study, the technique has been evaluated by chemical equilibrium calculations and the results were compared with some previously performed full-scale experiments. The results show that by this technique a separation of Cd and Pb will be possible. Concerning the elements As, Cu and Cr, it may be possible to separate them to some extent while the element Ni and V will not be separated. At least 60-70% of Na and K and 90% of Ca, Mg and P will be separated in the cyclone 21 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Comparison between conventional chemical processes and bioprocesses in cotton fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsov, Kiro

    2015-01-01

    Textile processing is a growing industry that traditionally has used a lot of water, energy and harsh chemicals. They are also not easily biodegradable. Biotechnology in textiles is one of the revolutionary ways to promote the textile field. Bio-processing were accompanied by a significant lower demand of energy, water, chemicals, time and costs. Due to the ever growing costs for water and energy worldwide investigations are carried out to substitute conventional chemical textile processes by...

  16. Computer-controlled, chemical separation system for use with neutron-activated samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a sensitive technique for the quantitative determination of metals in the parts-per-billion range. While sodium and potassium salt concentrations in sea water and biological materials are on the order of 10,000 ppm, the levels of trace metals range from 1 ppm to 0.1 ppb. The high concentrations and high activities of the salts in these matrices greatly reduce the ability to measure short half-life isotopes such as 2.3 min. 28Al, 3.8 min. 52V and 5.1 min. 66Cu. Post-irradiation separation is often the method of choice for such samples. However, when performed manually this technique is awkward, slow and unsafe. The Basic Automated Separation System (BASS) is a computer-controlled, chemical separation system for use in post-irradiation separations of neutron activated samples. It allows irradiation and separation of high-activated samples without user-intervention

  17. Total chemical management in photographic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luden, Charles; Schultz, Ronald

    1985-01-01

    The mission of the U. S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center is to produce high-quality photographs of the earth taken from aircraft and Landsat satellite. In order to meet the criteria of producing research-quality photographs, while at the same time meeting strict environmental restrictions, a total photographic chemical management system was installed. This involved a three-part operation consisting of the design of a modern chemical analysis laboratory, the implementation of a chemical regeneration system, and the installation of a waste treatment system, including in-plant pretreatment and outside secondary waste treatment. Over the last ten years the result of this program has yielded high-quality photographs while saving approximately 30,000 per year and meeting all Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) restrictions.

  18. Micro-fluidic partitioning between polymeric sheets for chemical amplification and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian L.

    2015-05-26

    A system for fluid partitioning for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations of a sample, comprising a first dispenser of a first polymeric sheet, wherein the first polymeric sheet contains chambers; a second dispenser of a second polymeric sheet wherein the first dispenser and the second dispenser are positioned so that the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet become parallel; a dispenser of the fluid positioned to dispense the fluid between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet; and a seal unit that seals the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet together thereby sealing the sample between the first polymeric sheet and the second polymeric sheet and partitioning the fluid for chemical amplification or other chemical processing or separations.

  19. Applications of Process Synthesis: Moving from Conventional Chemical Processes towards Biorefinery Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Chen, Bingzhen; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    , biorefinery processes for converting biomass-derived carbohydrates into transportation fuels and chemicals are now gaining more and more attention from both academia and industry. Process synthesis, which has played a vital role for the development, design and operation of (petro) chemical processes, can be......Concerns about diminishing petroleum reserves, enhanced worldwide demand for fuels and fluctuations in the global oil market, together with climate change and national security have promoted many initiatives for exploring alternative, non-petroleum based processes. Among these initiatives...

  20. Nonlinear fluctuations, separation of procedures, and linearization of processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of separation of procedures is introduced to study cooperative phenomena theoretically. Some typical important examples of this concept are presented to clarify its usefulness: Kubo's stochastic Liouville equation, some generalized diffusionlike equations, van Kampen's expansion, Kubo's extensitivity. Prigogine's entropy production, the scaling theory of transient phenomena based on the Lie algebra, and Suzuki's CAM theory of cooperative phenomena are discussed from the new viewpoint of separation of procedures

  1. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered. PMID:26497761

  2. LACAN Code for global simulation of SILVA laser isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functions used for the definition of a SILVA separator require quite a lot of dimensional and operating parameters. Sizing a laser isotope separation plant needs the determination of these parameters for optimization. In the LACAN simulation code, each elementary physical process is described by simplified models. An example is given for a uranium isotope separation plant whose separation power is optimized with 6 parameters

  3. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

    2002-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate

  4. Membrane Separation Processes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture: State of the Art and Critical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Belaissaoui Bouchra; Favre Eric

    2014-01-01

    Membrane processes have been initially seldom considered within a post-combustion carbon dioxide capture framework. More traditional processes, particularly gas-liquid absorption in chemical solvents, are often considered as the most appropriate solution for the first generation of technologies. In this paper, a critical state of the art of gas separation membranes for CO2 capture is proposed. In a first step, the key performances (selectivity, permeability) of different membrane materials su...

  5. Separation of stable isotopes of alkali and alkaline earth metals in chemical exchange systems with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical isotope exchange in two-phase water - organic systems Men+ (water) - MeLn+ (org), where Me = Li, Ca, K, Mg; L = crown ethers with 5 to 6 oxygen atoms in macrocyclic ring; org = CHCl3, CH2Cl2 has been studied. The process of isotope separation has been realized by extraction chromatography. The chromatographic column contained a fixed aqueous phase. The organic solution of metal complex with crown ether was eluted through the column. On contact with the fixed aqueous phase in the course of chromatography, metal salt reextraction occurred and interphase isotope exchange between aqueous and organic phases resulted. Isotope separation factors in these systems were in the range of: 1.0032 - 1.020 (6Li/7Li), 1.0016 - 1.0038 (40Ca/44Ca), 1.0007 - 1.0011 (39K/41K), 1.0014 - 1.0044 (24Mg/26Mg). The theoretical model has been proposed to interpret the high separation factors in crown ether extraction systems. According to this model, the potential in such systems has a very flat bottom. This type of potential results in weakening the force field and decreasing of β-factor (i.e., (s/s')f) in spite of comparatively high energy of complexation. This model can interpret both high separation factors and their strong dependence on the type of crown ether. (author)

  6. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  7. Overview of the long-lived radionuclide separation processes developed in connection with the CEA`s spin programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madic, C.; Bourges, J.; Dozol, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    One possible strategy for eliminating the long-term potential hazards associated with the storage of vitrified high level waste produced by the processing of irradiated nuclear fuels, is the transmutation of the long-life radionuclides in these wastes into short-life radionuclides by nuclear means, which requires the prior chemical separation of these long-life radionuclides from the nuclear waste mixture. To do this, the French CEA (Atomic Energy Commissionership) launched the SPIN (Separation-Incineration) research programme in 1991, under the law passed by the parliament on december 30, 1991. Research currently under way to develop separation processes for some long-life radionuclides concerns modifications of the Purex process, and the development of new solvent extraction processes. The research directions are briefly summarized here. (authors). 17 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Overview of the long-lived radionuclide separation processes developed in connection with the CEA's spin programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One possible strategy for eliminating the long-term potential hazards associated with the storage of vitrified high level waste produced by the processing of irradiated nuclear fuels, is the transmutation of the long-life radionuclides in these wastes into short-life radionuclides by nuclear means, which requires the prior chemical separation of these long-life radionuclides from the nuclear waste mixture. To do this, the French CEA (Atomic Energy Commissionership) launched the SPIN (Separation-Incineration) research programme in 1991, under the law passed by the parliament on december 30, 1991. Research currently under way to develop separation processes for some long-life radionuclides concerns modifications of the Purex process, and the development of new solvent extraction processes. The research directions are briefly summarized here. (authors). 17 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Ionic Liquids: Green Solvents for Chemical Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Antonia Pérez de los Ríos; Angel Irabien; Frank Hollmann; Francisco José Hernández Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are organic salts, usually consisting of an organic cation and a polyatomic inorganic anion, which are liquid under 100∘ C. The most relevant properties of ionic liquids are their almost negligible vapour pressure. Furthermore, their physical and chemical properties can be fine-tuned by the adequate selection of the cation and anion constituents. Ionic liquids have been recognized as environmental benign alternative to volatile organic solvents. Applicati...

  10. FAHP ranking and selection of pretreatment module for membrane separation processes in textile cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manekar, Pravin; Nandy, Tapas; Sargaonkar, Abha; Rathi, Barkha; Karthik, Manikavasagam

    2011-01-01

    Recent development in membrane manufacturing and extensive application of membranes in effluent treatment has opened up a new water resource. The effluent pretreatment module plays a critical role in membrane performance. Appropriate selection of conventional and advanced pretreatment modules in membrane separation processes (MSP) is significant to the success of zero effluent discharge (ZED). This study addresses performance assessment of eight conventional and advanced pretreatment modules implemented for wastewater management in a textile cluster in South India. The comparative pollutant reduction, capital, operation and maintenance (OM) cost of pretreatment modules are discussed. The ranking and interdependence of the pretreatment modules were analyzed through fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) with MATLAB software. The pretreatment module IV ranked third with a composite weight of 15.46%. The integrated study of performance assessment and FAHP resulted in an optimum pretreatment module IV comprising the sequence of chemical precipitation, bio-oxidation processes (activated sludge processes) followed by chemical precipitation, to achieve the ZED. This study provides a techno-economically feasible solution for selection of an effective pretreatment module for MSP in the textile cluster. PMID:20728348

  11. Evolutionary multi-objective optimization based comparison of multi-column chromatographic separation processes for a ternary separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Jari; Kukkonen, Saku; Sainio, Tuomo

    2014-09-01

    Performance characteristics of two advanced multi-column chromatographic separation processes with discontinuous feed, Multi-Column Recycling Chromatogrphy (MCRC) and Japan Organo (JO), were investigated for a ternary separation using multi-objective optimization with an evolutionary algorithm. Conventional batch process was used as a reference. Fractionation of a concentrated acid hydrolysate of wood biomass into sulfuric acid, monosaccharide, and acetic acid fractions was used as a model system. Comparison of the separation processes was based on selected performance parameters in their optimized states. Flow rates and step durations were taken as decision variables whereas the column configuration and dimensions were fixed. The MCRC process was found to be considerably more efficient than the other processes with respect to eluent consumption. The batch process gave the highest productivity and the JO process the lowest. Both of the multi-column processes gave significantly higher monosaccharide yield than the batch process. When eluent consumption and monosaccharide yield are taken into account together with productivity, the MCRC process was found to be the most efficient in the studied case. PMID:25060000

  12. 9 CFR 318.24 - Product prepared using advanced meat/bone separation machinery; process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .../bone separation machinery; process control. 318.24 Section 318.24 Animals and Animal Products FOOD.../bone separation machinery; process control. (a) General. Meat, as defined in § 301.2 of this subchapter... this subchapter, using advances in mechanical meat/bone separation machinery (i.e., AMR systems)...

  13. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Che, Dock-Chil [Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, King-Chuen [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Roma (Italy); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  14. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed

  15. Photochemical separation of actinides in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photo-redox reactions of MO22+ and M4+ (where M is plutonium or uranium) in aqueous acid solutions containing hydrazine, ethanol, or formic acid reductants are briefly reviewed. These reactions suggest that Pu4+ can be separated from UO22+ and NpO22+ by a photoreductive reaction using hydrazine as the reductant. Hydrazine by itself is too slow a reductant, but illumination with 1 W of 300 nm UV radiation increases the hydrazine rate of reduction at least six-fold and produces an 18-fold increase in the Pu-O separation factor in a non-optimized laboratory-scale system

  16. Chemical process safety management within the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Department of Energy (DOE) is not well known for its chemical processing activities, the DOE does have a variety of chemical processes covered under OSHA's Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (the PSM Standard). DOE, like industry, is obligated to comply with the PSM Standard. The shift in the mission of DOE away from defense programs toward environmental restoration and waste management has affected these newly forming process safety management programs within DOE. This paper describes the progress made in implementing effective process safety management programs required by the PSM Standard and discusses some of the trends that have supported efforts to reduce chemical process risks within the DOE. In June of 1994, a survey of chemicals exceeding OSHA PSM or EPA Risk Management Program threshold quantities (TQs) at DOE sites found that there were 22 processes that utilized toxic or reactive chemicals over TQs; there were 13 processes involving flammable gases and liquids over TQs; and explosives manufacturing occurred at 4 sites. Examination of the survey results showed that 12 of the 22 processes involving toxic chemicals involved the use of chlorine for water treatment systems. The processes involving flammable gases and liquids were located at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Naval petroleum Reserve sites

  17. Spectroscopic methods of process monitoring for safeguards of used nuclear fuel separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Jamie Lee

    UV-Visible spectra gathered in real time, the objective is to detect the conversion from the UREX process, which does not separate Pu, to the PUREX process, which yields a purified Pu product. The change in process chemistry can be detected in the feed solution, aqueous product or in the raffinate stream by identifying the acid concentration, metal distribution and the presence or absence of AHA. A fiber optic dip probe for UV-Visible spectroscopy was integrated into a bank of three counter-current centrifugal contactors to demonstrate the online process monitoring concept. Nd, Fe and Zr were added to the uranyl nitrate system to explore spectroscopic interferences and identify additional species as candidates for online monitoring. This milestone is a demonstration of the potential of this technique, which lies in the ability to simultaneously and directly monitor the chemical process conditions in a reprocessing plant, providing inspectors with another tool to detect nuclear material diversion attempts. Lastly, dry processing of used nuclear fuel is often used as a head-end step before solvent extraction-based separations such as UREX or TRUEX. A non-aqueous process, used fuel treatment by dry processing generally includes chopping of used fuel rods followed by repeated oxidation-reduction cycles and physical separation of the used fuel from the cladding. Thus, dry processing techniques are investigated and opportunities for online monitoring are proposed for continuation of this work in future studies.

  18. Deposition of air-borne 238Pu near a chemical separation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods were compared to measure deposition of 238Pu released from a chemical separation facility at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC. The following methods were used: adhesive paper; a collector of rain and dryfall; and soil samples. Excellent agreement among the three methods was found. The measured deposition for the particular source term and meteorological conditions at the Savannah River Plant is described by y proportional to x/sup -1.36/ where y is the pCi of 238Pu deposited per square meter per mC: 238Pu released, and x is distance in meters from the source

  19. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  20. A Mechanistic Study of Chemically Modified Inorganic Membranes for Gas and Liquid Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, J Douglas

    2011-01-21

    This final report will summarize the progress made during the period August 1, 1993 - October 31, 2010 with support from DOE grant number DE-FG03-93ER14363. The objectives of the research have been to investigate the transport mechanisms in micro- and mesoporous, metal oxide membranes and to examine the relationship between the microstructure of the membrane, the membrane surface chemistry, and the separation performance of the membrane. Examples of the membrane materials under investigation are the microporous silica hollow fiber membrane manufactured by PPG Industries, chemically modified mesoporous oxide membranes, and polymer membranes containing microporous oxides (mixed matrix membranes). Analytical techniques such as NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption were used to investigate membrane microstructure and to probe the chemical interactions occurring at the gas-membrane interface.

  1. Fluid flow for chemical and process engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, F

    1995-01-01

    This major new edition of a popular undergraduate text covers topics of interest to chemical engineers taking courses on fluid flow. These topics include non-Newtonian flow, gas-liquid two-phase flow, pumping and mixing. It expands on the explanations of principles given in the first edition and is more self-contained. Two strong features of the first edition were the extensive derivation of equations and worked examples to illustrate calculation procedures. These have been retained. A new extended introductory chapter has been provided to give the student a thorough basis to understand the methods covered in subsequent chapters.

  2. Separation of Process Water using Hydroxy Sodalite Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khajavi, S.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of Hydroxy Sodalite (H-SOD) membranes in selective separation of water from aqueous solutions and reaction media. The emphasis has been put on the development of a tight membrane film that could be primarily used for water separa

  3. Separation: An Integral Aspect of the Staffing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Valerie Martin

    2001-01-01

    The model of staffing in higher education proposed by Winston and Creamer (1997) includes essential components of recruitment and selection, orientation, supervision, staff development, and performance appraisal. Proposes that the model has a significant oversight-when staff leave their position. Separation is proposed as a necessary component of…

  4. Separation of Molybdenum From Spent Fuel Solution in Burnup Measurements Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish a kind of automatic radiochemistry separation procedure of nuclide 100Mo from spent fuel solution in burnup measurements process, a method of separating Mo quickly and effectively from the feed solution is needed. In the studies,

  5. Experimental Validation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Energy Efficient Ethanol-Water Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step,...

  6. Study of the actinide-lanthanide separation from nuclear waste by a new pyrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical extraction and separation of platinoids, actinides and lanthanides is allowed by thermodynamic using two adapted reducing agents: zinc and magnesium. Thereby, a pyrochemical method for the nuclear waste processing has been devised. The high temperature handling of the elements in fluoride forms and their processing by a reactive metallic phase required special precautions. The study of the behavior of matter in exploratory systems allowed the development of an experimental technology for the treatment and contacting of phases. The thermodynamical analysis of the experimental results shows the feasibility of the process. A model was developed to predict the distribution coefficients of zirconium, uranium and lanthanum as a function of the system composition. An estimation method was proposed in order to evaluate the distribution coefficients in diluted solution of all the actinides and lanthanides existing in the fission products between LiF CaF2 and Zn-Mg at 720 deg C. Coupled with the experimental results, the estimates results may be extrapolated to concentrated solutions allowing predictions of the separation of all actinides and lanthanides. The rapidity of element transfer is induced by a thermal effect caused by the high exothermicity of the reduction by magnesium. The kinetic coefficients have been linked with the reduction enthalpy of each element. Moreover, the kinetics seem limited by chemical reaction and not by mass transfer. (author)

  7. Process and device for operating a separating cascade for separating gaseous mixtures, particularly mixtures of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixture to be separated is divided into two controllable part flows. One part flow is fed into the basic stage and the other into an enrichment or impoverishment stage adjacent to this, according to the concentration required of the fraction occurring at the heavy cascade output. The whole flow to be fed in is set according to the concentration of the light fraction required at the light cascade output. Three parallel feed pipes provided with flow control valves are provided for supplying the mixture, one of which leads to the basic stage of the cascade and the other two to an enrichment and an impoverishment stage respectively. (orig./HP)

  8. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, July 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-08-21

    Pu production from separation plants was only 65% of the monthly commitment owing to Purex difficulties. UO{sub 3} production and shipments both met schedules. Although unfabricated Pu metal production was reduced, all shipping commitments were met on schedule. Purex equipment responded satisfactorily to decontamination. 860,000 Ci of Ce{sup 144} were recovered from Purex Conc. IWW. The all-Ti L-3 concentrator loop was installed in the Redox Pu Concentrator. The safety of the slag and crucible dissolver in Finished Products Operation was improved by adding cadmium to each batch. Engineering studies of Palmolive facilities are reported. An emergency water supply for the Purex 241-A waste storage tank farm will be installed. A study was made on casks for NPR fuel shipment. (DLC)

  9. Chemical Sensing for Buried Landmines - Fundamental Processes Influencing Trace Chemical Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-05-01

    Mine detection dogs have a demonstrated capability to locate hidden objects by trace chemical detection. Because of this capability, demining activities frequently employ mine detection dogs to locate individual buried landmines or for area reduction. The conditions appropriate for use of mine detection dogs are only beginning to emerge through diligent research that combines dog selection/training, the environmental conditions that impact landmine signature chemical vapors, and vapor sensing performance capability and reliability. This report seeks to address the fundamental soil-chemical interactions, driven by local weather history, that influence the availability of chemical for trace chemical detection. The processes evaluated include: landmine chemical emissions to the soil, chemical distribution in soils, chemical degradation in soils, and weather and chemical transport in soils. Simulation modeling is presented as a method to evaluate the complex interdependencies among these various processes and to establish conditions appropriate for trace chemical detection. Results from chemical analyses on soil samples obtained adjacent to landmines are presented and demonstrate the ultra-trace nature of these residues. Lastly, initial measurements of the vapor sensing performance of mine detection dogs demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of dogs in sensing landmine signature chemicals; however, reliability at these ultra-trace vapor concentrations still needs to be determined. Through this compilation, additional work is suggested that will fill in data gaps to improve the utility of trace chemical detection.

  10. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  11. Radionuclide separation and processing for recycle or disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is sponsoring research and development on advanced radiochemical separations, at a modest level, with the long-term goals of reducing the volume of deep geologic repository-disposed waste and the toxicity of low-level waste disposed as cement grout in a near-surface vault. This will help reduce overall environmental risks and the cost of waste management. (author)

  12. BEHAVIOR OF MERCURY DURING DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Koopman, D.

    2012-04-09

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility has experienced significant issues with the stripping and recovery of mercury in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The stripping rate has been inconsistent, often resulting in extended processing times to remove mercury to the required endpoint concentration. The recovery of mercury in the Mercury Water Wash Tank has never been high, and has decreased significantly since the Mercury Water Wash Tank was replaced after the seventh batch of Sludge Batch 5. Since this time, essentially no recovery of mercury has been seen. Pertinent literature was reviewed, previous lab-scale data on mercury stripping and recovery was examined, and new lab-scale CPC Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were conducted. For previous lab-scale data, many of the runs with sufficient mercury recovery data were examined to determine what factors affect the stripping and recovery of mercury and to improve closure of the mercury material balance. Ten new lab-scale SRAT runs (HG runs) were performed to examine the effects of acid stoichiometry, sludge solids concentration, antifoam concentration, form of mercury added to simulant, presence of a SRAT heel, operation of the SRAT condenser at higher than prototypic temperature, varying noble metals from none to very high concentrations, and higher agitation rate. Data from simulant runs from SB6, SB7a, glycolic/formic, and the HG tests showed that a significant amount of Hg metal was found on the vessel bottom at the end of tests. Material balance closure improved from 12-71% to 48-93% when this segregated Hg was considered. The amount of Hg segregated as elemental Hg on the vessel bottom was 4-77% of the amount added. The highest recovery of mercury in the offgas system generally correlated with the highest retention of Hg in the slurry. Low retention in the slurry (high segregation on the vessel bottom) resulted in low recovery in the offgas system. High agitation rates appear to result in lower

  13. Evaluation Of Alternative Stronium And Transuranic Separation Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  14. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMALLEY CS

    2011-04-25

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  15. ACSEPT-a successful story in actinide separation process development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of publication follows: Over the last four years, the FP7 EURATOM Collaborative Project ACSEPT (Actinide recycling by Separation and Transmutation) has co-ordinated the European research on aqueous and pyro-actinide chemical separation processes. A clear structuration of the work and an enthusiastic collaboration between partners has allowed significant progress in actinide separation process development. In the field of aqueous reprocessing, four hot-test demonstrations have been carried out based on chemical systems developed in former European projects (NEWPART, PARTNEW, EUROPART) or directly in ACSEPT. Process flowsheets are now available for the regular SANEX, the innovative SANEX, the 1 cycle SANEX and the GANEX concepts (some of them being more elaborate alternatives to reference existing processes), paving the way for further optimisation. This progress was made possible thanks to a well-driven organic synthesis work. It allowed the testing of more than 150 new molecules and the selection of about 5 of them for further process development. In addition, specific issues related to advanced fuel cycles involving materials with high Pu loading or minor actinides were addressed such as MOX dissolution or co-conversion into solid forms suitable for fuel fabrication. In the field of pyrochemical process development, two reference processes were selected within EUROPART (the electrorefining on solid aluminium cathode in molten chloride and the liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride/liquid aluminium). In ACSEPT, the work has been continued with a focus on key process steps such as exhaustive electrolysis allowing a quantitative recovery of the transuranics after the electrorefining or the actinide back extraction from an aluminium alloy, a crucial step for the two reference processes. In addition, a specific effort has been allocated to the head-end step (oxide pre-reduction, thermal treatment), the

  16. Efficient Nonlinear Programming Algorithms for Chemical Process Control and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegler, Lorenz T.

    Optimization is applied in numerous areas of chemical engineering including the development of process models from experimental data, design of process flowsheets and equipment, planning and scheduling of chemical process operations, and the analysis of chemical processes under uncertainty and adverse conditions. These off-line tasks require the solution of nonlinear programs (NLPs) with detailed, large-scale process models. Recently, these tasks have been complemented by time-critical, on-line optimization problems with differential-algebraic equation (DAE) process models that describe process behavior over a wide range of operating conditions, and must be solved sufficiently quickly. This paper describes recent advances in this area especially with dynamic models. We outline large-scale NLP formulations and algorithms as well as NLP sensitivity for on-line applications, and illustrate these advances on a commercial-scale low density polyethylene (LDPE) process.

  17. Process simulation of integrated biohydrogen production: hydrogen recovery by membrane separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Koók

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this project, the production of biohydrogen, as a renewable and sustainable energy source was studied. Biohydrogen was manufactured by using E. coli strain in a batch dark fermentative process integrated with membrane gas separation. Two different methods were applied: Firstly, the amount of the produced gas and component concentrations were measured, but CO2 and H2 gases were not separated. In the second experiment CO2 was removed from the gas mixture via chemical sorption (reacting with NaOH. Both methods use continuous product removal in order to enhance the biohydrogen formation. In addition, process modeling was carried out with a simulation software (SuperPro Designer, Intelligen Inc. so that experimental and computational results could be compared. CO2 and H2 flow rates and fluxes were calculated on the basis of the membrane permeation data obtained by using pure gases and silicone (PDMS hollow-fiber membrane module (PermSelect – MedArray Inc..

  18. COLUMN, 1-D Migration for Various Physical Chemical Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: COLUMN2 is designed for studies of the effects various physicochemical processes on migration in one dimension. It solves the transport equation and can take into account dispersion, sorption, ion exchange, first and second order homogeneous chemical reactions. Spatial variations of input pulses and retention factors are possible. 2 - Method of solution: The Method of solution is based on a finite difference discretion followed by the application of the method of characteristics and two separate grid systems. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: For computational reasons the number of components has been limited to 5 and the maximum number of second order reactions is 10. However, a re-dimensioning of all relevant arrays will allow for any number of components and reactions desired. Arrays should never be dimensioned larger than needed in order to save computation time. Five components and 10 second order reactions may seem a small number. However, larger simulations are often divided into smaller sub-problems for clarification purposes. The maximum number of grid points, default value 801, may be enlarged to re-dimensioning all relevant arrays

  19. Chemical reactions during the thermal processing of borazene polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A class of borazene polymers was developed which consists of a two-dimensional array of six-membered borazene rings with the borons of adjacent borazene rings separated by -NH- groups. Pyrolysis of these polymers above ∼1000 degrees C leads to crystalline graphite-like boron nitride (h-BN). The thermal chemistry of thin films of one polymer deposited on KOH-etched aluminum was examined by thermal decomposition mass spectroscopy (TDMS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and the gas evolution chemistry was found to be essentially complete at temperatures less than 400 degrees C. All products desorb with the same temperature profile and the major desorbing species are NH3 and N2, consistent with a loss of excess nitrogen and hydrogen in the polymer, and HCI from decomposition of byproducts of the synthesis step. Since the formation of ordered crystalline h-BN films requires heating to temperatures of the order of 1000 degrees C, whereas the gas evolution chemistry is complete by roughly 400 degrees C, it is concluded that gas evolution chemical processes are not rate limiting in BN ceramic production

  20. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of (1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, (2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  1. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  2. Effect of temperature and active biogas process on passive separation of digested manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    outside mechanical or chemical action was used, within the reactor was studied in three vertical settling columns (100 cm deep). Variations in solids and microbial distribution at top, middle and bottom layers of column were assessed over a 15 day settling period. Results showed that best solids...... solids separation was noticed 24 h after settling in column incubated at 55 degrees C, with active biogas process. Microbiological analyses revealed that proportion of Archaea and Bacteria, absent in the autoclaved material, varied with incubation temperature, time and sampling depth. Short rod shaped...... reactor can be used effectively as an operating strategy to optimize biogas production by increasing the solids and biomass retention times. A minimum of 1-2 h "non-stirring" period appears to be optimal time before effluent removal in plants where extraction is batch-wise 2-4 times a day....

  3. Separation and purification of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by combined process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Jiang, Jungang; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua; Wang, Zhaojiang

    2015-11-01

    Prehydrolysis of wood biomass prior to kraft cooking provides a stream containing hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDSs) but also undesired non-saccharide compounds (NSCs) that were resulted from lignin depolymerization and carbohydrate degradation. In this study, a combined process consisting of lime treatment, resin adsorption, and gel filtration was developed to separate HDSs from NSCs. The macro-lignin impurities that accounted for 32.2% of NSCs were removed by lime treatment at 1.2% dosage with negligible HDSs loss. The majority of NSCs, lignin-derived phenolics, were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange resin, elevating NSCs removal to 94.0%. The remaining NSCs, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural, were excluded from HDSs by gel filtration. Chemical composition analysis showed that xylooligosaccharides (XOS) with the degree of depolymerization from 2 to 6 accounted for 28% of the total purified HDSs. PMID:26275826

  4. Imaging wet gas separation process by capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Nguyen, Van T.; Betting, Marco; Chondronasios, Athanasios; Nattras, Steve; Okimoto, Fred; McCann, Hugh

    2002-03-01

    Natural gas from a well contains water and hydrocarbons. It is necessary to separate the liquid components from such gas streams before use. An innovative type of separation facility, called Twister, has been developed for this purpose, and CFD models have been developed to assist in the design of Twister. However, it is difficult to verify the mathematical models directly and experimentally. To investigate the behavior of Twister and to verify the CFD models, a simulator using air and water vapor was set up in the laboratory. This simulator was instrumented with a highly sensitive electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system based on an HP LCR meter and a purpose-designed multiplexer. Two ECT sensors, each with 8 measurement electrodes, were built taking into consideration the demanding operational conditions, such as sensitivity, temperature, pressure, geometry and location. This paper presents the first experimental results, showing that water droplets distributions in a flowing gas can be visualized using ECT, and the tomography system developed is robust and offers the possibility for further development to field operations.

  5. Thorium-uranium processing with gravity, magnetic and electrical separation in zarigan ore deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of low grade of thorium and uranium in the Zarigan mineral deposit, the pre-concentration operation prior to leaching is necessary. From X-ray diffraction analysis results, it was clear that this ore has large amount of other minerals such as Feldespat, Quartz, Hematite, Titanomagnetite, and rare earths. In this paper the thorium enhancement grade in Zarigan deposit by using gravity, magnetic and electrical separations methods is reported. The output of a Jaw crusher was ground to 85 micron by using ball mill. Then about 95% of SiO2 was separated by using shaking table separation. The heavy concentrate of shaking table was processed by a high intensity magnetic separator and then the magnetic concentrate separated by a low intensity magnetic separator. Finally, the non magnetic concentrate of low magnetic separator was processed with the electrical separation. The grades of thorium and uranium in the non magnetic concentrate of low magnetic separator were increased to 4000 and 5000 ppm, respectively where only 15% of the initial feed (ore) was transferred to this concentrate. Therefore, this resulted in a decrease of acid consumption in the leaching processes and the efficiency enhancement of the process. The pre-treatment circuit of this ore was designed as Jaw crusher/ball mill/shaking table/high-magnetic separator/low-magnetic separator/electrical separator, respectively.

  6. Sustainability Indicators for Chemical Processes: III. Biodiesel Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical industry is one of the most important business sectors, not only economically, but also societally; as it allows humanity to attain higher standards and quality of life. Simultaneously, chemical products and processes can be the origin of potential human health and ...

  7. Chemical interaction matrix between reagents in a Purex based process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is the responsible entity for the disposal of the United States excess weapons grade plutonium. DOE selected a PUREX-based process to convert plutonium to low-enriched mixed oxide fuel for use in commercial nuclear power plants. To initiate this process in the United States, a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is under construction and will be operated by Shaw AREVA MOX Services at the Savannah River Site. This facility will be licensed and regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A PUREX process, similar to the one used at La Hague, France, will purify plutonium feedstock through solvent extraction. MFFF employs two major process operations to manufacture MOX fuel assemblies: (1) the Aqueous Polishing (AP) process to remove gallium and other impurities from plutonium feedstock and (2) the MOX fuel fabrication process (MP), which processes the oxides into pellets and manufactures the MOX fuel assemblies. The AP process consists of three major steps, dissolution, purification, and conversion, and is the center of the primary chemical processing. A study of process hazards controls has been initiated that will provide knowledge and protection against the chemical risks associated from mixing of reagents over the life time of the process. This paper presents a comprehensive chemical interaction matrix evaluation for the reagents used in the PUREX-based process. Chemical interaction matrix supplements the process conditions by providing a checklist of any potential inadvertent chemical reactions that may take place. It also identifies the chemical compatibility/incompatibility of the reagents if mixed by failure of operations or equipment within the process itself or mixed inadvertently by a technician in the laboratories. (authors)

  8. System and process for efficient separation of biocrudes and water in a hydrothermal liquefaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Oyler, James R.; Rotness, Jr, Leslie J.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-02

    A system and process are described for clean separation of biocrudes and water by-products from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) product mixtures of organic and biomass-containing feedstocks at elevated temperatures and pressures. Inorganic compound solids are removed prior to separation of biocrude and water by-product fractions to minimize formation of emulsions that impede separation. Separation may be performed at higher temperatures that reduce heat loss and need to cool product mixtures to ambient. The present invention thus achieves separation efficiencies not achieved in conventional HTL processing.

  9. Chemical kinetics, stochastic processes, and irreversible thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Santillán, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    This book brings theories in nonlinear dynamics, stochastic processes, irreversible thermodynamics, physical chemistry, and biochemistry together in an introductory but formal and comprehensive manner.  Coupled with examples, the theories are developed stepwise, starting with the simplest concepts and building upon them into a more general framework.  Furthermore, each new mathematical derivation is immediately applied to one or more biological systems.  The last chapters focus on applying mathematical and physical techniques to study systems such as: gene regulatory networks and ion channels. The target audience of this book are mainly final year undergraduate and graduate students with a solid mathematical background (physicists, mathematicians, and engineers), as well as with basic notions of biochemistry and cellular biology.  This book can also be useful to students with a biological background who are interested in mathematical modeling, and have a working knowledge of calculus, differential equatio...

  10. Microfluidic separation process by the Soret effect in biological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alain; Bou-Ali, M. Mounir; Barrutia, Haritz; Alonso de Mezquia, David

    2011-05-01

    In this article the thermophysical and transport properties of mixtures composed of glucose and sucrose in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) are determined. The studied mass concentrations are 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% of glucose or sucrose in DMSO at an average temperature of 25 °C. The properties studied experimentally are the dynamic viscosity, density, mass and thermal expansion coefficient and thermodiffusion coefficient. The thermogravitational technique in flat configuration is used in order to obtain the thermodiffusion coefficients. Once these properties are known, the work is focused on the numerical study of applying a temperature gradient in microdevices in order to optimize the extraction of DMSO using the CFD Ansys Fluent software. The results show an improvement even of 35% on microfluidic separation techniques that are based on a purely diffusive regime.

  11. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for August 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-09-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for August 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-09-22

    This report, for August 1958 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operation; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  13. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-03-21

    This report from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation, purex operation, redox operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance operation, financial operation, facilities engineering operation, research and engineering operation, and employee relations operation.

  14. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-03-20

    This report for February 1959, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  15. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for July 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F. K.; Johnson, W. E.; MacCready, W. K.; Warren, J. H.; Schroeder, O. C.; Groswith, C. T.; Mobley, W. N.; LaFollette, T. G.; Grim, K. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Richards, R. B.; Roberts, D. S.

    1957-08-22

    This report, for July 1957 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following; Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  16. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-10-23

    This report, for September 1962 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following; Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  17. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for September 1963, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations, facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and power and crafts operation.

  18. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for July 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-08-21

    This report, for July 1964 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Separating disk chemical substructures with cluster models. Evidence of a separate evolution in the metal-poor thin disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Schultheis, M.; Guiglion, G.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Kordopatis, G.; Hill, V.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Koposov, S. E.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Chiappini, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Recent spectroscopic surveys have begun to explore the Galactic disk system on the basis of large data samples, with spatial distributions sampling regions well outside the solar neighborhood. In this way, they provide valuable information for testing spatial and temporal variations of disk structure kinematics and chemical evolution. Aims: The main purposes of this study are to demonstrate the usefulness of a rigorous mathematical approach to separate substructures of a stellar sample in the abundance-metallicity plane, and provide new evidence with which to characterize the nature of the metal-poor end of the thin disk sequence. Methods: We used a Gaussian mixture model algorithm to separate in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane a clean disk star subsample (essentially at RGC -0.25 dex) highlight a change in the slope at solar metallicity. This holds true at different radial regions of the Milky Way. The distribution of Galactocentric radial distances of the metal-poor part of the thin disk ([Fe/H] levels might be due to their origin from gas pre-enriched by outflows from the thick disk or the inner halo. The smooth trends of their properties (their spatial distribution with respect to the plane, in particular) with [Fe/H] and [Mg/Fe] suggested by the data indicates a quiet dynamical evolution, with no relevant merger events. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 188.B-3002. These data products have been processed by the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU) at the Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, and by the FLAMES/UVES reduction team at INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. These data have been obtained from the Gaia-ESO Survey Data Archive, prepared and hosted by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, which is funded by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council.

  20. Birth order effects on the separation process in young adults: an evolutionary and dynamic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Ido; Hermel, Orly

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyzes the differential contribution of a familial or social focus in imaginative ideation (the personal fable and imagined audience mental constructs) to the separation-individuation process of firstborn, middleborn, and lastborn children. A total of 160 young adults were divided into 3 groups by birth order. Participants' separation-individuation process was evaluated by the Psychological Separation Inventory, and results were cross-validated by the Pathology of Separation-Individuation Inventory. The Imaginative Ideation Inventory tested the relative dominance of the familial and social environments in participants' mental constructs. The findings showed that middleborn children had attained more advanced separation and were lower in family-focused ideation and higher in nonfamilial social ideation. However, the familial and not the social ideation explained the variance in the separation process in all the groups. The findings offer new insights into the effects of birth order on separation and individuation in adolescents and young adults. PMID:21977689

  1. HYPER-­TVT: Development and Implementation of an Interactive Learning Environment for Students of Chemical and Process Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Marina; Mazzotti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Hyper-TVT is a computer-aided education system that has been developed at the Institute of Process Engineering at the ETH Zurich. The aim was to create an interactive learning environment for chemical and process engineering students. The topics covered are the most important multistage separation processes, i.e. fundamentals of separation…

  2. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  3. Chemical grouting process for tight soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, E.H.; Kauffman, D.; Herce, J.A.

    1975-07-15

    A process is described for strengthening a soil in which the pores are too small to be penetrated by a slurry of cement. A means for injecting fluid is arranged for flowing fluid into a selected zone within such a soil formation at a rate such that the fluid velocity in the pores in that zone is at least 0.3 cm per min. A determination is made of the extent of time-temperature exposure to which a fluid is subjected when it flows at the selected rate from a fluid-compounding location to the selected zone within the soil formation. A basic aqueous solution of an amphoteric metal oxide and a pH-reducing reactant that begins precipitating a hydrated metal oxide after being subjected to the determined extent of time-temperature exposure is prepared at the fluid-compounding location. The prepared solution is flowed into the selected zone at the selected rate while the time and the temperature conditions of the compounding and storing of the fluid are adjusted so that substantially all portions of the solution are subjected to the determined extent of time-temperature exposure. (9 claims)

  4. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, March 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-04-20

    Production of Pu, UO{sub 3}, and Pu metal exceeded forecasts. The 2nd attempt at Purex to recover Zr-Nb resulted in about 1/3 recovery, contaminated with about 1% of the Ce. Palm losses to Purex U product were eliminated, and the Pu content was reduced 5 to 10{times}. Routing the dissolver rinses into 3WB concentrator resulted into improved rinsing efficiency. Unclarified feed was processed through Purex HA column. In a test for using B in Redox, the B was routed completely to the waste; it was not detectable in product streams beyond the first cycle. Almost 1000 g Palm was purified and converted to oxide. Ferrous ion catalyzed the reduction of Palm VI by hydrazine or semicarbazide. Coordination of E-metal and NPR reprocessing at Redox in multipurpose dissolver was studied. An interim fission product recovery program at Purex will be directed toward low-efficiency collection of Pm {sup 147}. Locations for critical incident alarms were selected. (DLC)

  5. Chemical investigations of isotope separation on line target units for carbon and nitrogen beams

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, H; Gäggeler, H W; Köster, U

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) are of significant interest in a number of applications. Isotope separation on line (ISOL) facilities provide RIB with high beam intensities and good beam quality. An atom that is produced within the ISOL target will first diffuse out from the target material. During the effusion towards the transfer line and into the ion source the many contacts with the surrounding surfaces may cause unacceptable delays in the transport and, hence, losses of the shorter-lived isotopes. We performed systematic chemical investigations of adsorption in a temperature and concentration regime relevant for ISOL targets and ion source units, with regard to CO/sub x/ and NOmaterials are potential construction materials for the above-mentioned areas. Off-line and on-line tests have been performed using a gas thermochromatography setup with radioactive tracers. The experiments were performed at the production of tracers for atmospheric chemistry (PROTRAC) facility at the Paul Schener Institute in Villigen...

  6. Stabilization and separation of heavy metals in incineration fly ash during the hydrothermal treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuyan; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Jianping; Chen, Dezhen

    2015-12-15

    In the paper, hydrothermal treatment (HT) of MSWI fly ashes was performed to stabilize and separate heavy metals. Influences of pre-treatment, types of ferric and/or ferrous additives, and subsequent heavy metal stabilization procedure by adding phosphate were investigated. The chemical stability of hydrothermal products was examined by solid waste extraction procedure with acetic acid buffer solution. Mineralogical investigation of selected hydrothermal product was carried out by XRD. FEGE SEM- -EDX was used to study the morphology and surface compositions of the ash particles. Experimental results revealed that HT process facilitated heavy metal exposure to leaching solution. FEGE SEM-EDX images revealed that fly ash particles were re-organized during hydrothermal process and that the minerals with special shapes and containing high levels of heavy metals were formed. A mild acid washing treatment with final pH around 6.20 could remove soluble heavy metals. Therefore, it may be a proper pre- or post-treatment method for fly ash particles for the purpose of reducing heavy metal contents. For the purpose of stabilizing heavy metals, the addition of ferric/ferrous salts in the HT process or phosphate stabilization after HT is recommended. The HT process may be applied to realize the environmentally sound management of MSWI fly ash or to recover and utilize MSWI fly ash. PMID:26100935

  7. Separation of lignocelluloses from spent liquor of NSSC pulping process via adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Gilbert, Allan; Fatehi, Pedram

    2014-04-01

    Hemicelluloses and lignin present in the spent liquor (SL) of neutral sulfite semichemical (NSSC) pulping process can potentially be converted into value-added products such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, levulinic acid, phenols and adhesives. However, the direct conversion of hemicelluloses and lignin of SL into value-added products is uneconomical due to the dilute nature of the SL. To have a feasible downstream process for utilizing lignocelluloses of SL, the lignocelluloses should initially be separated from the SL. In this study, an adsorption process (via applying activated carbon) was considered for isolating the dissolved lignin and hemicelluloses from the SL of an NSSC pulping process. Under the optimal conditions of pH, SL/AC weight ratio, time and temperature of 5.7, 30, 360 min and 30 °C, the maximum lignin and hemicellulose adsorptions were 0.33 and 0.25 g/g on AC. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity of the SL were decreased by 11% and 39%, respectively, as a result of lignocellulose adsorption on AC. Also, the incineration behavior of the SL-treated AC was studied with a thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). PMID:24565877

  8. Analysis of chemical coal cleaning processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Six chemical coal cleaning processes were examined. Conceptual designs and costs were prepared for these processes and coal preparation facilities, including physical cleaning and size reduction. Transportation of fine coal in agglomerated and unagglomerated forms was also discussed. Chemical cleaning processes were: Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Ledgemont, Ames Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (two versions), and Guth Process (KVB). Three of the chemical cleaning processes are similar in concept: PETC, Ledgemont, and Ames. Each of these is based on the reaction of sulfur with pressurized oxygen, with the controlling factor being the partial pressure of oxygen in the reactor. All of the processes appear technically feasible. Economic feasibility is less certain. The recovery of process chemicals is vital to the JPL and Guth processes. All of the processes consume significant amounts of energy in the form of electric power and coal. Energy recovery and increased efficiency are potential areas for study in future more detailed designs. The Guth process (formally designed KVB) appears to be the simplest of the systems evaluated. All of the processes require future engineering to better determine methods for scaling laboratory designs/results to commercial-scale operations. A major area for future engineering is to resolve problems related to handling, feeding, and flow control of the fine and often hot coal.

  9. Gas separation performance of 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Wulin

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the gas separation performance of several 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures, to correlate chemical structure with gas transport properties with a special focus on CO2 and CH 4 transport and plasticization stability of the polyimides membranes relevant to natural gas purification. The consideration of the other gases (He, O2 and N2) provided additional insights regarding effects of backbone structure on detailed penetrant properties. The polyimides studied include 6FDA-DAM, 6FDA-mPDA, 6FDA-DABA, 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2), 6FDA-DAM:mPDA (3:2) and 6FDA-mPDA:DABA (3:2). Both pure and binary gas permeation were investigated. The packing density, which is tunable by adjusting monomer type and composition of the various samples, correlated with transport permeability and selectivity. The separation performance of the polyimides for various gas pairs were also plotted for comparison to the upper bound curves, and it was found that this family of materials shows attractive performance. The CO 2 plasticization responses for the un-cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance to CO2/CH4 mixed gas with 10% CO2; however, only the cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance under aggressive gas feed conditions (CO 2/CH4 mixed gas with 50% CO2 or pure CO 2). For future work, asymmetric hollow fibers and carbon molecular sieve membranes based on the most attractive members of the family will be considered. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemicals in the process chain from raw material to product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As described in this presentation, chemicals are added at various points along the physical flow from oil/gas well to sold products. They have several functions and are added in different amounts. The chemicals may have a negative impact on the environment by emission to sea. But they can also reduce the regularity of the processing equipment and the prices of the products. Therefore, Statoil has begun a research project that aims to develop improved methods and tools for the prediction of the distribution of chemicals in the process chain and the unwanted effects they might have on the environment, on downstream installations and on the products. 4 refs., 11 figs

  11. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Separating disk chemical substructures with cluster models

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas-Arriagada, A; de Laverny, P; Schultheis, M; Guiglion, G; Mikolaitis, Š; Kordopatis, G; Hill, V; Gilmore, G; Randich, S; Alfaro, E J; Bensby, T; Koposov, S E; Costado, M T; Franciosini, E; Hourihane, A; Jofré, P; Lardo, C; Lewis, J; Lind, K; Magrini, L; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sacco, G G; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S; Chiappini, C

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Recent spectroscopic surveys have begun to explore the Galactic disk system outside the solar neighborhood on the basis of large data samples. In this way, they provide valuable information for testing spatial and temporal variations of disk structure kinematics and chemical evolution. We used a Gaussian mixture model algorithm, as a rigurous mathematical approach, to separate in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane a clean disk star subsample from the Gaia-ESO survey internal data release 2. We find that the sample is separated into five groups associated with major Galactic components; the metal-rich end of the halo, the thick disk, and three subgroups for the thin disk sequence. This is confirmed with a sample of red clump stars from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. The two metal-intermediate and metal-rich groups of the thin disk decomposition ([Fe/H]>-0.25 dex) highlight a change in the slope at solar metallicity. This holds true at different radial regions. ...

  12. Separation and recovery of molybdenum values from uranium process waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described of recovering molybdenum and uranium values from a process waste generated from the production of nuclear-grade uranium hexafluoride which consists of: (a) hydrolysing the process waste which contains UF6, MoF6 and MoOF4 in an aqueous solution containing ammonium carbonate and ammonium hydroxide thereby forming ammonium uranyl carbonate; (b) digesting while maintaining a pH > 9, the resulting mother liquor at a temperature of about 600-800C. to evolve CO2 and convert the ammonium uranyl carbonate to solid ammonium diuranate; (c) filtering, washing and drying the solid ammonium diuranate

  13. Contribution of the industrial chemical processing of pitchblende in Jachymov to the first isolation of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium ore chemical processing plant in Jachymov (St. Joachimstal) started the industrial production of uranium yellow (sodium diuranate) in 1853. This technology was developed by a talented metallurgical chemist Adolf Patera. The insoluble residue from uranium leaching was enriched by radium 226Ra. During more than forty years before discovery of radioactivity, a worthless waste was accumulated in this uranium plant. This waste as radium preconcentrate was present in a suitable chemical form for the subsequent separation of radium. The occurrence of this material significantly facilitated the separation and isolation of the first pure weighable amount of radium, necessary to prove the existence of a new chemical element, discovered in 1898 by M. and P. Curie and G. Bemont. (author)

  14. Perfection of organization of educational process in the special medical separation of higher educational establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A.S.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of health of modern youth is considered. The use of modern technologies is offered in perfection of process of physical education. Directions organization of an educate process are rotined on physical education in the special medical separation. The electronic base of these students of the special medical separation and project of web-site of separation is presented. Resulted recommendation on organization of independent employments of students. Methods and facilities of physical recreation are offered.

  15. Plasma separation process: Disposal of PSP radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes, in the form of natural uranium contaminated scrap hardware and residual materials from decontamination operations, were generated in the PSP facilities in buildings R1 and 106. Based on evaluation of the characteristics of these wastes and the applicable regulations, the various options for the processing and disposal of PSP radioactive wastes were investigated and recommended procedures were developed. The essential features of waste processing included: (1) the solidification of all liquid wastes prior to shipment; (2) cutting of scrap hardware to fit 55-gallon drums and use of inerting agents (diatomaceous earth) to eliminate pyrophoric hazards; and (3) compaction of soft wastes. All PSP radioactive wastes were shipped to the Hanford Site for disposal. As part of the waste disposal process, a detailed plan was formulated for handling and tracking of PSP radioactive wastes, from the point of generation through shipping. In addition, a waste minimization program was implemented to reduce the waste volume or quantity. Included in this document are discussions of the applicable regulations, the types of PSP wastes, the selection of the preferred waste disposal approach and disposal site, the analysis and classification of PSP wastes, the processing and ultimate disposition of PSP wastes, the handling and tracking of PSP wastes, and the implementation of the PSP waste minimization program. 9 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  16. A Systematic Computer-Aided Framework for Integrated Design and Control of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted;

    -defined operational conditions whereas controllability is considered to maintain desired operating points of the process at any kind of imposed disturbance under normal operating conditions. In this work, a systematic hierarchical computer-aided framework for integrated process design and control of chemical......-separator-recycle (RSR) system. Next, it will be shown that the RSR system can be replaced by an intensified unit operation, a reactive distillation column (RDC) which optimal design-control solution is also presented. The operation and control of the RSR and RDC at the optimal designs is compared with other candidate......Chemical processes are conventionally designed through a sequential approach. In this sequential approach, first, a steady-state process design is obtained and then, control structure synthesis that, in most of the cases, is based on heuristics is performed. Therefore, process design and process...

  17. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  18. A behavioral method for separation of house fly (Diptera: Muscidae) larvae from processed pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicková, Helena; Kozánek, Milan; Morávek, Ivan; Takác, Peter

    2012-02-01

    A behavioral method applicable in biodegradation facilities for separation of house fly (Musca domestica L.) larvae from processed pig manure is presented. The method is based on placing a cover over the larval rearing tray, while escaping larvae are collected in collection trays. Separation units must be placed in a dark room to avoid negative phototactic responses of the larvae. After 24 h of separation, over 70% of the larvae escaped from processed manure and were collected in collection trays. Most of the larvae pupated within 48 h after separation. Mean weight of pupae recovered from manure residue was not significantly different from mean weight of pupae of separated individuals. Eclosion rate of pupae recovered from manure residue was significantly lower than eclosion of separated individuals, and was strongly related to separation success. Factors responsible for escape behavior of larvae are discussed. PMID:22420256

  19. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    Some bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer, thereby enabling them to use electron acceptors and donors without direct cell contact 1, 2, 3, 4 . Beyond the micrometre scale, however, no firm evidence has previously existed that spatially segregated biogeochemical processes can be...... coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...... in the sediment was driven by electrons conducted from the anoxic zone. A distinct pH peak in the oxic zone could be explained by electrochemical oxygen reduction, but not by any conventional sets of aerobic sediment processes. We suggest that the electric current was conducted by bacterial nanowires...

  20. Development of integrated separation processes with green solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Ricardo Miguel Tomás do

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the fractionation of mixtures with unconventional solvents, like supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), and develops new integrated processes which couple these solvents with membranes. It was explored the feasibility of using reverse osmosis membranes for fractionations in scCO2 with a model mixture of oleic acid and squalene, and it was found that all membranes tested were selective towards oleic acid. The effect of coupling ...

  1. Separation of isoflavones form okara : process mechanisms & synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jankowiak, L

    2014-01-01

    By-product utilisation, more efficient use of resources, and more sustainable processing have become of the utmost importance for society and the food industry. During soymilk production, a by-product called okara is produced in great quantities. Despite being a by-product, okara contains many nutrients, which could be utilised for human consumption. Isoflavones are one example of the components present in soy, which are also found in okara. Isoflavones are a subclass of flavonoids, a group o...

  2. A Model of Multiple Magnetic Separation in the Continuous Process

    OpenAIRE

    Brożek, M.

    1999-01-01

    In continuous enrichment processes, in industrial conditions and due to the generally required high efficiency of machines, a relatively high concentration of feed is applied. Since it is necessary to liberate the useful minerals, the feed has to be ground thoroughly and this fact results in the percentage growth of the fraction of particles measuring a few tens or several micrometers. When the particles are so fine and the feed is so much concentrated, the magnetic particles interactions pla...

  3. Insects associated with the composting process of solid urban waste separated at the source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladis Estela Morales

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcosaprophagous macroinvertebrates (earthworms, termites and a number of Diptera larvae enhance changes in the physical and chemical properties of organic matter during degradation and stabilization processes in composting, causing a decrease in the molecular weights of compounds. This activity makes these organisms excellent recyclers of organic matter. This article evaluates the succession of insects associated with the decomposition of solid urban waste separated at the source. The study was carried out in the city of Medellin, Colombia. A total of 11,732 individuals were determined, belonging to the classes Insecta and Arachnida. Species of three orders of Insecta were identified, Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. Diptera corresponding to 98.5% of the total, was the most abundant and diverse group, with 16 families (Calliphoridae, Drosophilidae, Psychodidae, Fanniidae, Muscidae, Milichiidae, Ulidiidae, Scatopsidae, Sepsidae, Sphaeroceridae, Heleomyzidae, Stratiomyidae, Syrphidae, Phoridae, Tephritidae and Curtonotidae followed by Coleoptera with five families (Carabidae, Staphylinidae, Ptiliidae, Hydrophilidae and Phalacaridae. Three stages were observed during the composting process, allowing species associated with each stage to be identified. Other species were also present throughout the whole process. In terms of number of species, Diptera was the most important group observed, particularly Ornidia obesa, considered a highly invasive species, and Hermetia illuscens, both reported as beneficial for decomposition of organic matter.

  4. Dust as interstellar catalyst. I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.; Cazaux, S.; Hocuk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV- and cosmic-ray-induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included in astrochemical models. Methods: We present a collection of experimental results of more than ten reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice were used. We derived a formula for reproducing the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process that considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II of this study we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results: The equipartition of energy correctly describes the chemical desorption process on bare surfaces. On icy surfaces, the chemical desorption process is much less efficient, and a better description of the interaction with the surface is still needed. Conclusions: We show that the mechanism that directly transforms solid species into gas phase species is efficient for many reactions.

  5. A novel double loop control model design for chemical unstable processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Er-Ding; Hu, Ming-Hui; Tu, Shan-Tung; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Shao, Hui-He

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, based on Smith predictor control scheme for unstable process in industry, an improved double loop control model is proposed for chemical unstable processes. Inner loop is to stabilize integrating the unstable process and transform the original process to first-order plus pure dead-time dynamic stable process. Outer loop is to enhance the performance of set point response. Disturbance controller is designed to enhance the performance of disturbance response. The improved control system is simple with exact physical meaning. The characteristic equation is easy to realize stabilization. Three controllers are separately design in the improved scheme. It is easy to design each controller and good control performance for the respective closed-loop transfer function separately. The robust stability of the proposed control scheme is analyzed. Finally, case studies illustrate that the improved method can give better system performance than existing design methods. PMID:24309506

  6. Centrifugal separation of carbon isotopes using n-octane as processing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using n-octane as processing gas and single centrifuge as separator, a series of experiments were conducted to study the separation performance. Samples of each experiment were sent to mass spectrometer for analysis, and the overall separation factor and flow cut at different feed flow and holdup were obtained. The overall separation factor were all close to or more than 1.10, and the maximum valum can reach to 1.13. Based on the experimental data, parameters of cascade for separating 13C were estimated using the MARC model. The calculation results indicated that 13C can be enriched to about 11% by centrifuge cascade. (authors)

  7. Tritium and zirconium separation from PUREX-process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel of LWR-reactors contains among others tritium and zirkonium. Under PUREX-process conditions about 50 % of the total tritium enters the process with the aqueous solution after dissolution. While the major amount of the dissolved tritium and zirkonium follows the aqueous waste stream, a small part is extracted in or entrained by the organic phase which is loaded with uranium and plutonium. In order to prevent spreading of this tritium beyond the extended head end area, a special second scrub section has been added to the first high active scrub. According to the flowsheet for a reprocessing plant, a tritium decontamination factor of 40 should be obtained. A special tritium scrubber with a 0.8 molar nitric acid as the srub-solution is integrated therefore in the first extraction cycle of the German industrial reprocessing plant (WAK). In function of the low acidity this tritium scrubber works as a zirkoniumtrap as well, even when an external phase ratio of o:a = 20 - 40 was chosen. A five stage mixer settler with internal recycling of the scrub phase and a pulsed-nozzle plate column, both in a 1 :1 scale have been tested alternately

  8. Optimal separation of jojoba protein using membrane processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabetani, Hiroshi; Abbott, T.P.; Kleiman, R. [National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Peoria, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The efficiency of a pilot-scale membrane system for purifying and concentrating jojoba protein was estimated. In this system, a jojoba extract was first clarified with a microfiltration membrane. The clarified extract was diafiltrated and the protein was purified with an ultrafiltration membrane. Then the protein solution was concentrated with the ultrafiltration membrane. Permeate flux during microfiltration was essentially independent of solids concentration in the feed, in contrast with the permeate flux during ultrafiltration which was a function of protein concentration. Based on these results, a mathematical model which describes the batchwise concentration process with ultrafiltration membranes was developed. Using this model, the combination of batchwise concentration with diafiltration was optimized, and an industrial-scale process was designed. The effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the performance of the membrane system was also investigated. The addition of EDTA increased the concentration of protein in the extract and improved the recovery of protein in the final products. The quality of the final product (color and solubility) was also improved. However, EDTA decreased permeate flux during ultrafiltration.

  9. An Extended Algorithm of Flexibility Analysis in Chemical Engineering Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An extended algorithm of flexibility analysis with a local adjusting method for flexibility region of chemical processes, which is based on the active constraint strategy, is proposed, which fully exploits the flexibility region of the process system operation. The hyperrectangular flexibility region determined by the extended algorithm is larger than that calculated by the previous algorithms. The limitation of the proposed algorithm due to imperfect convexity and its corresponding verification measure are also discussed. Both numerical and actual chemical process examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm.

  10. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for October 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    The October, 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  11. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-10-22

    The September, 1958 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  12. Diffusion mechanisms for chemical-thermal metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe volumetric diffusion in metals, some possible mechanisms are offered: exchange, cyclic (circular), interstitial idle time and interstitial with cumulative and vacancy replacement. It is revealed that at chemical-thermal processing the diffusion process is complex where there is multidimensional movement of atoms and displacement of crystal lattices

  13. MICROSTRUCTURE DEVICES FOR APPLICATIONS IN THERMAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING

    OpenAIRE

    Brandner, Juergen; Anurjew, E.; Henning, T.; Schygulla, U.; Schubert, K.

    2006-01-01

    In this publication, an overview of the work dealing with thermal and chemical micro process engineering performed at the Institute for Micro Process Engineering (IMVT) of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be given. The focus will be set on manufacturing of metallic microstructure devices and on microstructure heat exchangers. A brief outlook will describe possible future application fields.

  14. A Course in Project Evaluation in the Chemical Process Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Riestra, J. Frank

    1983-01-01

    Describes a course designed to expose neophytes to methodology used in chemical process industries to evaluate commercial feasibility of proposed projects. Previously acquired disciplines are integrated to facilitate process synthesis, gain appreciation of nature of industrial projects and industrial viewpoint in managing them, and to become adept…

  15. Dust as interstellar catalyst I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, M; Cazaux, S; Hocuk, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV and CR induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims. The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included into astrochemical models. Methods. We present a collection of experimental results of more than 10 reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice are used. We derive a formula to reproduce the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process, which considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II we extend these resul...

  16. The National Toxicology Program chemical nomination selection and testing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, J J

    1988-01-01

    The NTP is an interagency program of the Federal Government which coordinates toxicological programs at the NIH (NIEHS), FDA (NCTR), and CDC (NIOSH) with input from NCI, NIH, OSHA, CPSC, EPA, and ATSDR. The NTP has the capability to completely characterize the toxicologic profile of a chemical, including studies of chemical disposition, genetic toxicity, immunotoxicity, teratology, reproductive toxicity, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, and specific organ toxicity. The NTP encourages nominations of chemicals of human health concern from all sectors of the public, including industry, labor, and the general public. The specific process of nomination, evaluation, and selection of chemicals for testing by the NTP is described. It is a multicomponent system with several evaluations and a public peer review step to assure adequate consideration of all nominated chemicals. The results of NTP studies are all peer reviewed and available to the general public as well as to the scientific community. PMID:2980357

  17. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program 1996 technical exchange meeting. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1996 Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program Technical Exchange Meeting. This meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users and other interested parties within the EM community. During this meeting the following many separation processes technologies were discussed such as ion exchange, membrane separation, vacuum distillation, selective sorption, and solvent extraction. Other topics discussed include: waste forms; testing or inorganic sorbents for radionuclide and heavy metal removal; selective crystallization; and electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes. This is the leading abstract, individual papers have been indexed separately for the databases

  18. Efficient separations and processing crosscutting program 1996 technical exchange meeting. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This document contains summaries of technology development presented at the 1996 Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program Technical Exchange Meeting. This meeting is held annually to promote a free exchange of ideas among technology developers, potential users and other interested parties within the EM community. During this meeting the following many separation processes technologies were discussed such as ion exchange, membrane separation, vacuum distillation, selective sorption, and solvent extraction. Other topics discussed include: waste forms; testing or inorganic sorbents for radionuclide and heavy metal removal; selective crystallization; and electrochemical treatment of liquid wastes. This is the leading abstract, individual papers have been indexed separately for the databases.

  19. The top 50 commodity chemicals: Impact of catalytic process limitations on energy, environment, and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkovich, A.L.Y.; Gerber, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The production processes for the top 50 U.S. commodity chemicals waste energy, generate unwanted byproducts, and require more than a stoichiometric amount of feedstocks. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has quantified this impact on energy, environment, and economics for the catalytically produced commodity chemicals. An excess of 0.83 quads of energy per year in combined process and feedstock energy is required. The major component, approximately 54%, results from low per-pass yields and the subsequent separation and recycle of unreacted feedstocks. Furthermore, the production processes, either directly or through downstream waste treatment steps, release more than 20 billion pounds of carbon dioxide per year to the environment. The cost of the wasted feedstock exceeds 2 billion dollars per year. Process limitations resulting from unselective catalysis and unfavorable reaction thermodynamic constraints are the major contributors to this waste. Advanced process concepts that address these problems in an integrated manner are needed to improve process efficiency, which would reduce energy and raw material consumption, and the generation of unwanted byproducts. Many commodity chemicals are used to produce large volume polymer products. Of the energy and feedstock wasted during the production of the commodity chemicals, nearly one-third and one-half, respectively, represents chemicals used as polymer precursors. Approximately 38% of the carbon dioxide emissions are generated producing polymer feedstocks.

  20. In-situ examination of diffusion and precipitation processes during the evolution of chemical garden systems

    OpenAIRE

    Glaab, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    “Chemical” or “silicate gardens” are a well known example for the spontaneous formation of a complex and structured system from ordinary educts. Simply by addition of soluble metal salt crystals to alkaline silica sols, dissolution of the metal salt and subsequent solidification initiate a self-organization process, which not only produces two separated compartments with drastically different chemical conditions by precipitation of a closed and tubular membrane but also produces a variety of ...

  1. Chemical sensors and gas sensors for process control in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned with the possibilities for chemical measurement of the progress of biotechnological processes which are offered by devices already developed for other demanding applications. It considers the potential use of ultrasonic instrumentation originally developed for the nuclear industry, gas measurement methods from the fields of environmental monitoring and combustion control, nuclear instruments developed for the oil, mining and chemical industries, robotic systems and advanced control techniques. (author)

  2. A chemical process of asphaltenes dispersion : anticor DSA 700

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with asphalts dispersion chemical process. Asphaltenes are constituents of petroleum which under chemical, physical or mechanical variations effect precipitate and create deposits. In order to cope with this problem, a product : Anticor DSA 700 has been adjusted and allow to stabilize asphaltenes. This method has already been used in France and in Algeria and will be extended to others west countries. (O.L.). 2 figs

  3. Separation Process of Polydisperse Particles in the Plasma of Radio-frequency Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. Batryshev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Method of separation of polydisperse particles in the plasma of radio-frequency (RF discharge is considered. Investigation of plasma equipotential field gave conditions for separation. The purpose of this work was an obtaining of monodisperse particles in the plasma of RF discharge. Samples of monodisperse microparticles of silica and alumina were obtained. The size and chemical composition of samples were studied on a scanning electron microscope Quanta 3D 200i (SEM, USA FEI company. Average size of separated silica nanoparticles is 600 nm, silica and alumina microparticles is 5 mkm.

  4. Process Design and Evaluation for Chemicals Based on Renewable Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Wenjing

    One of the key steps in process design is choosing between alternative technologies, especially for processes producing bulk and commodity chemicals. Recently, driven by the increasing oil prices and diminishing reserves, the production of bulk and commodity chemicals from renewable feedstocks has...... well as to match different catalyst conditions. These kinds of problems are crucial, especially at the early stages of process development, when information is limited. This thesis describes a methodological framework for dealing with the challenges and giving direction to research in the process...... process design of the synthesis 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDA) from glucose. By using the selected case study, the complexity and challenges for the process engineer to choose between different alternative routes and technologies as well as to combine two different kinds of catalysis (enzymatic...

  5. Physical–chemical characteristics of lignins separated from biomasses for second-generation ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignin was extracted by two extraction methods from two biomasses for energy (Mischantus and Giant Reed) and a lignocellulosic material resulting from a microbial treatment of giant reed. One method of extraction involved the use of H2SO4 (SA), providing a highly aromatic water-insoluble material, while a second method employed H2O2 at alkaline pH (Ox), resulting in a water-soluble lignin. Extraction yields were related to the total Klason lignin measured for the three materials. We compared the physical–chemical features of the isolated lignins, by employing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-CPMAS spectra and derived T1ρH relaxation times), thermogravimetric analyses, infrared spectrometry and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). We found that lignin separated by the Ox method owned a more mobile molecular conformation, and was largely more water-soluble and fragmented than the lignin obtained by the SA treatment. In line with T1ρH-NMR and thermogravimetric results, the HPSEC of Ox lignins showed nominal molecular weights less than 3 kDa, indicating well depolymerized materials. Such low-molecular weight and fragmented lignin obtained from biomasses for energy may become useful for application of recycled products in agriculture and in green chemistry reactions, thereby promoting an increase in the economic sustainability of biorefineries. - Highlights: • Lignin extracted from energy crops by either acidic or alkaline treatment. • Lignin chemical features were assessed by analytical and spectroscopic techniques. • Acidic extraction gave poorly water-soluble and conformationally rigid lignins. • Alkaline oxidation produced depolymerized and water-soluble lignins. • Water-soluble lignins may be environmentally and industrially useful

  6. Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESP-IP): Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESPIP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. These wastes and environmental problems, located at more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories, are the result of half a century of nuclear processing activities by DOE and its predecessor organizations. The cost of cleaning up this legacy has been estimated to be of the order of hundreds of billions of dollars, and ESPIP's origin came with the realization that if new separations and processes can produce even a marginal reduction in cost then billions of dollars will be saved. The ultimate mission for ESPIP, as outlined in the ESPIP Strategic Plan, is: to provide Separations Technologies and Processes (STPS) to process and immobilize a wide spectrum of radioactive and hazardous defense wastes; to coordinate STP research and development efforts within DOE; to explore the potential uses of separated radionuclides; to transfer demonstrated separations and processing technologies developed by DOE to the US industrial sector, and to facilitate competitiveness of US technology and industry in the world market. Technology research and development currently under investigation by ESPIP can be divided into four broad areas: cesium and strontium removal; TRU and other HLW separations; sludge technology, and other technologies

  7. Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESP-IP): Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Efficient Separations and Processing Integrated Program (ESPIP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop and perfect separations technologies and processes to treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE Complex. These wastes and environmental problems, located at more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories, are the result of half a century of nuclear processing activities by DOE and its predecessor organizations. The cost of cleaning up this legacy has been estimated to be of the order of hundreds of billions of dollars, and ESPIP`s origin came with the realization that if new separations and processes can produce even a marginal reduction in cost then billions of dollars will be saved. The ultimate mission for ESPIP, as outlined in the ESPIP Strategic Plan, is: to provide Separations Technologies and Processes (STPS) to process and immobilize a wide spectrum of radioactive and hazardous defense wastes; to coordinate STP research and development efforts within DOE; to explore the potential uses of separated radionuclides; to transfer demonstrated separations and processing technologies developed by DOE to the US industrial sector, and to facilitate competitiveness of US technology and industry in the world market. Technology research and development currently under investigation by ESPIP can be divided into four broad areas: cesium and strontium removal; TRU and other HLW separations; sludge technology, and other technologies.

  8. Iron-based syngas chemical looping process and coal-direct chemical looping process development at Ohio State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Moving bed reducer maximizes solids conversion and maintains full fuel conversion. • 850+ Operating hours completed in 25-kWth sub-pilot chemical looping units. • Full solid and gaseous fuel conversion achieved in sub-pilot chemical looping units. • Fully integrated, pressurized 250-kWth pilot SCL unit construction initiated. • Extensive techno-economic analysis performed on CDCL and SCL process configurations. - Abstract: The increasing demands for energy and concern of global warming are intertwined issues of critical importance. With the pressing need for clean, efficient, and cost-effective energy conversion processes, the chemical looping strategy has evolved as a promising alternative to the traditional carbonaceous fuel conversion processes. Chemical looping processes utilize oxygen carrier particles to indirectly convert carbonaceous fuels while capturing CO2 for sequestration and/or utilization. Throughout its development, multiple oxygen carrier compositions and reactor configurations have been studied and demonstrated. The Ohio State University (OSU) chemical looping technologies have received significant attention over the recent years. OSU’s unique moving-bed chemical looping technologies coupled with iron-based oxygen carrier particles capable of sustaining hundreds of redox cycles have the advantage of converting a variety of carbonaceous fuels, such as natural gas, coal and biomass, to electricity, H2, liquid fuels, or any combination thereof with zero to negative net CO2 emissions. Specifically, two chemical looping processes are being developed and studied, the syngas chemical looping (SCL) and the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) technologies. Over the past 14 years, these processes have developed from a novel concept to successful sub-pilot (25 kWth) demonstrations. With the support of the Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) of the US Department of Energy (USDOE), a 250 kWth high pressure SCL pilot

  9. Organic-inorganic hybrid membranes in separation processes: a 10-year review

    OpenAIRE

    V. C. Souza; M. G. N. Quadri

    2013-01-01

    In relation to some inorganic membranes, polymeric membranes have relatively low separation performance. However, the processing flexibility and low cost of polymers still make them highly attractive for many industrial separation applications. Polymer-inorganic hybrid membranes constitute an emerging research field and have been recently developed to improve the separation properties of polymer membranes because they possess properties of both organic and inorganic membranes such as good hyd...

  10. Removal of Zn(II) from dilute aqueous solutions and radioactive process wastewater by foam separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, precipitate and adsorbing colloid flotations of zinc(II) from dilute aqueous solutions have been investigated over a wide pH range using the anionic surfactant Aerosol OT or the cationic collector cetyl pyridinium chloride. In case of adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF) iron oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxide were used, either separately or together, as coprecipitants. The precipitate flotation curves were compared with the corresponding theoretical one calculated from the data published for Zn(II) hydrolysis. In addition to the effect of pH on the percent removal the effects of collector concentration, ionic strength, bubbling time and metal ion concentration were investigated and the optimum conditions were established. High removals could be achieved especially with ACF. The results obtained are discussed with respect to the chemical state of zinc, the ionization behaviour of the collectors and properties of the coprecipitants. The developed ACF process was applied to the removal of 65Zn from radioactive process wastewater. (author). 45 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Chemical characteristics and methane potentials of source-separated and pre-treated organic municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine Lund; Svärd, Å; Angelidaki, Irini;

    2003-01-01

    A research project has investigated the biogas potential of pre-screened source-separated organic waste. Wastes from five Danish cities have been pre-treated by three methods: screw press; disc screen; and shredder and magnet. This paper outlines the sampling procedure used, the chemical composit......A research project has investigated the biogas potential of pre-screened source-separated organic waste. Wastes from five Danish cities have been pre-treated by three methods: screw press; disc screen; and shredder and magnet. This paper outlines the sampling procedure used, the chemical...... composition of the wastes and the estimated methane potentials....

  12. Investigation of a Gas-Solid Separation Process for Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarup, Claus; Hjuler, Klaus; Clement, Karsten;

    2015-01-01

    The gas/solid heat exchanger (2D-HX), developed to replace the cyclone preheaters in cement plants is presented. This design aims at reducing construction height and operation costs. The separation process in the 2D-HX is experimentally investigated, and the results show that separation...... efficiencies up to 90% can be achieved in the gravitationally driven process. Based on the data, a model of the separation process is developed, utilizing relations from pneumatic transport and cyclone theory. The model fit is acceptable, especially in the area of interest. Based on experimental data, further...

  13. A study of liberation and separation process of metals from printed circuit boards (PCBs) scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the metallic elements are covered with or encapsulated by various plastic or ceramic materials on printed circuit boards, a mechanical pre-treatment process allowing their liberation and separation is first needed in order to facilitate their efficient extraction with hydrometallurgy route. Even though many studies have been performed on the mechanical pre-treatment processing for the liberation and separation of the metallic components of printed circuit boards scrap, further studies are required to pave the way for efficient recycling of waste printed circuit boards through a combination of mechanical pre-treatment and hydrometallurgical technology. In this work, a fundamental study has been carried out on the mechanical pre-treatment that is necessary to recover metallic concentrates from printed circuit boards scraps. The most important problem is to separate or release particles from the associated gangue minerals at the possible liberation particle size. The distribution of metallic elements has been also investigated in relation to the particle size of the milled printed circuit boards. The samples of printed circuit boards were separated into the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions by Rare-earth Roll Magnetic separator. Thereafter, the magnetic and non-magnetic fractions were separated to heavy fraction (metallic elements) and light fraction (plastic) by Mozley Laboratory Table Separator. The recovery ratios and the evaluation of the metallic concentrates recovered by each separation process were also investigated. This study is expected to provide useful data for the efficient mechanical separation of metallic components from printed circuit boards scraps. (author)

  14. Electrochemistry and green chemical processes: electrochemical ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo M. da Silva

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available After an introductory discussion emphasising the importance of electrochemistry for the so-called Green Chemical Processes, the article presents a short discussion of the classical ozone generation technologies. Next a revision of the electrochemical ozone production technology focusing on such aspects as: fundamentals, latest advances, advantages and limitations of this technology is presented. Recent results about fundamentals of electrochemical ozone production obtained in our laboratory, using different electrode materials (e.g. boron doped diamond electrodes, lead dioxide and DSAÒ-based electrodes also are presented. Different chemical processes of interest to the solution of environmental problems involving ozone are discussed.

  15. Studies on the remediation of environment contaminated with radioactive pollutants using the chemical separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of soil and drinking water contaminated with radioactive nuclides is important for the mitigation of radiation exposure. Then we attempted to construct the remediation system including the dose estimation system using the chemical separation technique to remove pollutants from the environment. The information on air dose rate is important for assessment of risk from the radiation exposure. Then we measured the air dose rate and analysed the relationship between air dose rate and the contamination of soil at the area in Russia (Bryansk district) contaminated by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. Moreover, we analysed the soil of Bryansk district on the concentration of rare earth elements, thorium and uranium and on the isotope ratio of strontium. On the other hand, we tried to develop the rapid measurement method of radioactivity of Sr-90 which is one of the dangerous radionuclides, because the method of radioactivity measurement in the literature is too time-consuming. It was reported recently that the molecules containing SH group form the covalent bond with gold atoms at the surface of gold plate and that crown ether compounds have strong affinity to strontium. Then we attempted to synthesize the crown ether containing SH group. In addition, we search the inorganic elements accumulated to special organisms of fishes and other animals in sea in order to find out new reagent for trace elements. Transition metal such as Co, Fe, Ni, Ti, V and Zn were detected from the intracellular granules in the bronchial heart of octopus. (author)

  16. Innovative processes for uranium separation from secondary sources for eco-friendly industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary sources of uranium include materials from which it is uneconomical to extract it as the main product using currently available technologies. Such sources are generated as co-product or by-product of processing feed materials for products other than uranium. The secondary sources can include industrial solid or liquid streams in which uranium concentration may be low, but in view of large amounts of feed-stock, the quantity of uranium recoverable could be significant. Examples include sedimentary phosphates (as well as products derived therefrom), coal ash, niobium-tantalum slag and even sea water. Monazite is a phosphatic secondary source where uranium is obtainable as a by-product of production of rare earths and thorium. The term secondary source also includes solid residues, slag, scraps etc generated as a waste product of fuel fabrication facilities. It also includes contaminated sites and equipment from conventional uranium mills that need to be decontaminated and decommissioned. In some of the secondary sources, it is possible that the concentration of uranium can be fairly high, but the processing is constrained by the complexity of the host matrix or the chemical form of uranium or presence of other elements. Recovery of uranium from secondary sources is an eco-friendly process as it serves to isolate the uranium from the environment and the future generations are thereby spared the burden of caring for such materials. It is possible that for many of the secondary sources, the concentration of uranium is below the safe limit set by currently applicable regulations. However the collective societal dose integrated over the long exposure times associated with the long half-life of uranium can be significant. In accordance with the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle of radiation protection, uranium separation is desirable as a 'green' activity, This has been acknowledged in IAEA documents on the long term uranium supplies, which also

  17. The Application of High–Gradient Magnetic Separation to Water Treatment by Means of Chemically Precipitated Magnetite

    OpenAIRE

    Hencl, V.; Mucha, P.

    1994-01-01

    Conditions of high–gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) of chemically precipitated magnetite, prepared from a waste material of the titanium white production were studied. The magnetite was used as a sorption material for the treatment of water from the Vltava River. Detailed experimental research resulted in a proposal for a technology of water treatment, schematic description of which is presented. The results of HGMS of chemically precipitated magnetite together with those of water treatmen...

  18. Application of gas hydrate formation in separation processes: A review of experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Review of gas hydrate technology applied to separation processes. ► Gas hydrates have potential to be a future sustainable separation technology. ► More theoretical, simulation, and economic studies needed. - Abstract: There has been a dramatic increase in gas hydrate research over the last decade. Interestingly, the research has not focussed on only the inhibition of gas hydrate formation, which is of particular relevance to the petroleum industry, but has evolved into investigations on the promotion of hydrate formation as a potential novel separation technology. Gas hydrate formation as a separation technology shows tremendous potential, both from a physical feasibility (in terms of effecting difficult separations) as well as an envisaged lower energy utilization criterion. It is therefore a technology that should be considered as a future sustainable technology and will find wide application, possibly replacing a number of current commercial separation processes. In this article, we focus on presenting a brief description of the positive applications of clathrate hydrates and a comprehensive survey of experimental studies performed on separation processes using gas hydrate formation technology. Although many investigations have been undertaken on the positive application of gas hydrates to date, there is a need to perform more theoretical, experimental, and economic studies to clarify various aspects of separation processes using clathrate/semi-clathrate hydrate formation phenomena, and to conclusively prove its sustainability.

  19. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis. II. Detailed analytical schema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed ion-exchange procedure for the separation of chemical elements in eight groups suitable for subsequent gamma spectrometric analysis is described. The method has been in use for gamma spectrometry of some inorganic - but mostly organic - samples for one year. The separation time for inorganic samples, is usually about 1.5 hours and for organic samples as least 2 hours. One man can separate and count three samples per day. In comparative measurements of short-lived isotopes in biological material 10-12 elements can be analysed thus making possible 30 - 35 determinations per day for one man

  20. Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  1. 2,4-Difluoro anisole. A promising complexing agent for boron isotopes separation by chemical exchange reaction and distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although methods of boron isotopes separation were intensively pursued about 60 years, the chemical exchange distillation is the only method that has been applied in industrial scale production of 10B. The present anisole BF3 system suffers from the drawbacks like high melting point, relatively low separation coefficient and instability under reaction conditions, which demand a continuous search for more effective and efficient donors for boron isotope separation. A series of fluoro-substituted anisole derivatives were screened in this paper, among which 2,4-difluoro anisole exhibited good properties compared with anisole. Studies on the boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is reported. The results showed that 2,4-difluoro anisole is better than anisole in separation coefficient, freezing point and stability under pyrolysis conditions, which suggest a further detailed investigations on boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct. (author)

  2. Eutectic(LiCl-KCl) Waste Salt Treatment by Sequential Separation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sequential separation process, composed of an oxygen sparging process for separating lanthanides and a zone freezing process for separating Group I and II fission products, was evaluated and tested with a surrogate eutectic waste salt generated from pyroprocessing of used metal nuclear fuel. During the oxygen sparging process, the used lanthanide chlorides (Y, Ce, Pr and Nd) were converted into their sat-insoluble precipitates, over 99.5% at 800 .deg. C; however, Group I (Cs) and II (Sr) chlorides were not converted but remained within the eutectic salt bed. In the next process, zone freezing, both precipitation of lanthanide precipitates and concentration of Group I/II elements were preformed. The separation efficiency of Cs and Sr increased with a decrease in the crucible moving speed, and there was little effect of crucible moving speed on the separation efficiency of Cs and Sr in the range of a 3.7 - 4.8 mm/hr. When assuming a 60% eutectic salt reuse rate, over 90% separation efficiency of Cs and Sr is possible, but when increasing the eutectic salt reuse rate to 80%, a separation efficiency of about 82 - 86 % for Cs and Sr was estimated

  3. Eutectic(LiCl-KCl) Waste Salt Treatment by Sequential Separation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yungzun; Lee, Taekyo; Choi, Junghun; Eun, Heechul; Park, Hwanseo; Park, Geunil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The sequential separation process, composed of an oxygen sparging process for separating lanthanides and a zone freezing process for separating Group I and II fission products, was evaluated and tested with a surrogate eutectic waste salt generated from pyroprocessing of used metal nuclear fuel. During the oxygen sparging process, the used lanthanide chlorides (Y, Ce, Pr and Nd) were converted into their sat-insoluble precipitates, over 99.5% at 800 .deg. C; however, Group I (Cs) and II (Sr) chlorides were not converted but remained within the eutectic salt bed. In the next process, zone freezing, both precipitation of lanthanide precipitates and concentration of Group I/II elements were preformed. The separation efficiency of Cs and Sr increased with a decrease in the crucible moving speed, and there was little effect of crucible moving speed on the separation efficiency of Cs and Sr in the range of a 3.7 - 4.8 mm/hr. When assuming a 60% eutectic salt reuse rate, over 90% separation efficiency of Cs and Sr is possible, but when increasing the eutectic salt reuse rate to 80%, a separation efficiency of about 82 - 86 % for Cs and Sr was estimated.

  4. A new sampler for collecting separate dry and wet atmospheric depositions of trace organic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Don T.; Cessna, Allan J.; Gurprasad, Narine P.; Banner, James

    Studies conducted in Saskatchewan and elsewhere have demonstrated the atmospheric transport of agricultural pesticides and other organic contaminants and their deposition into aquatic ecosystems. To date these studies have focused on ambient concentrations in the atmosphere and in wet precipitation. To measure the dry deposition of organic chemicals, a new sampler was designed which uses a moving sheet of water to passively trap dry particles and gasses. The moving sheet of water drains into a reservoir and, during recirculation through the sampler, is passed through an XAD-2 resin column which adsorbs the trapped organic contaminants. All surfaces which contact the process water are stainless steel or Teflon. Chemicals collected can be related to airborne materials depositing into aquatic ecosystems. The sampler has received a United States patent (number 5,413,003 - 9 May 1996) with the Canadian patent pending. XAD-2 resin adsorption efficiencies for 10 or 50 μg fortifications of ten pesticides ranged from 76% for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino- S-triazine) to 110% for triallate [ S-(2,3,3-trichloro-2-phenyl)bis(1-methylethyl)carbamothioate], dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) and toxaphene (chlorinated camphene mixture). Field testing using duplicate samplers showed good reproducibility and amounts trapped were consistent with those from high volume and bulk pan samplers located on the same site. Average atmospheric dry deposition rates of three chemicals, collected for 5 weeks in May and June, were: dicamba, 69 ng m -2 da -1; 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), 276 ng m -2 da -1: and, γ-HCH ( γ-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-hexachlorocyclohexane), 327 ng m -2 da -1.

  5. Integrating chemical engineering fundamentals in the capstone process design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Solms, Nicolas; Woodley, John; Johnsson, Jan Erik;

    2010-01-01

    All B.Eng. courses offered at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) must now follow CDIO standards. The final “capstone” course in the B.Eng. education is Process Design, which for many years has been typical of chemical engineering curricula worldwide. The course at DTU typically has about 30...... receive. The education is designed to provide students with the necessary tools to become productive in a company in a short time – so there is a strong industrial focus. Some students choose to continue with their studies and can then complete an M.Sc. after a further two years of study. The demands of...... chemical plants will incorporate one or more chemical reactors. In the initial stages of a process design, it is sufficient to express simply the reactor inputs and outputs. However in later stages, details about the reactor need to be specified. This is only possible using tools learned in the course...

  6. Systematic screening methodology and energy efficient design of ionic liquid-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulajanpeng, Kusuma; Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    based on a combination of criteria such as stability, toxicity, and their environmental impacts. All best ILs were used as entrainers, and an extractive distillation column (EDC) and ionic liquid recovery column were designed and simulated with a process simulator to determine the overall energy...... consumption of the ILs-based separation processes. Among all candidates, the best IL was selected based on the minimum energy requirement obtained from the simulation. Finally, the modification of the separation process to obtain design flexibility for other azeotropic series with respect to the change in...... size of the target solute was investigated using the same separation process and IL entrainer to obtain the same product purity. The proposed methodology has been evaluated through a case study of binary alcoholic aqueous azeotropic separation: water+ethanol and water+isopropanol....

  7. A study on triple-membrane-separator (TMS) process to treat aqueous effluents containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective process incorporated with the novel membrane separation technology was developed to recover uranium from the filtrate effluent of uranium dioxide conversion processes. The prominent feature of the process is that it utilizes separation characteristics of three different types of membranes as follow: separation of uranium species from effluent of high fluoride content by ultrafiltration membrane, separation of uranium species from effluent of low fluoride content by reverse osmosis membrane, precipitation of uranium species with hydrogen peroxide, and filtration of uranium bearing precipitates by microfiltration membrane. The process is simple and feasible for treatment of liquid waste containing both soluble and suspended uranium species. The recovery of uranium can be as high as 95% and the treated effluents meet the current environmental standards. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. Chemical and physicochemical characteristics changes during passion fruit juice processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gurgel Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Passion fruit is widely consumed due to its pleasant flavour and aroma acidity, and it is considered very important a source of minerals and vitamins. It is used in many products such as ice-cream, mousses and, especially, juices. However, the processing of passion fruit juice may modify the composition and biodisponibility of the bioactive compounds. Investigations of the effects of processing on nutritional components in tropical juices are scarce. Frequently, only losses of vitamin C are evaluated. The objective of this paper is to investigate how some operations of passion fruit juice processing (formulation/homogeneization/thermal treatment affect this product's chemical and physicochemical characteristics. The results showed that the chemical and physicochemical characteristics are little affected by the processing although a reduction in vitamin C contents and anthocyanin, large quantities of carotenoids was verified even after the pasteurization stage.

  9. Fundamental study on separation and recovery technique of uranium from chemical trap fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various kinds of chemical traps are used for the removal of gaseous radionuclides, fluorine, etc in the process-off gas of uranium conversion facility or similar facilities. The spent fillers such as sodium fluoride (NaF), magnesium fluoride (CaF2), or activated alumina (Al2O3) from the chemical traps should be reused as useful materials, or converted into general industrial wastes so as to reduce the amount of radioactive waste, wherever possible. Molten salt technique can be considered as a feasible technique to be applied for the removal of radionuclides from the spent fillers. The mixed salt, NaF with sodium chloride (NaCl) was used in this experiment. The uranium concentration in the molten salt, pre-treatment condition, electrolytic temperature, current density, etc was used as parameters. Several fundamental experiments were carried out, and the obtained results were analyzed and evaluated. They indicate that the application of the molten salt technique is one of the potential methods for the removal of uranium from spent fillers. (author)

  10. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation and...

  11. Portfolio Assessment on Chemical Reactor Analysis and Process Design Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alha, Katariina

    2004-01-01

    Assessment determines what students regard as important: if a teacher wants to change students' learning, he/she should change the methods of assessment. This article describes the use of portfolio assessment on five courses dealing with chemical reactor and process design during the years 1999-2001. Although the use of portfolio was a new…

  12. Fabrication of agglomerate-free nanopowders by hydrothermal chemical processing

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Helmut K.; Nass, Rüdiger; Burgard, Detlef; Nonninger, Ralph

    1998-01-01

    A chemical processing technique for the fabrication of nanopowders has been developed. The route is based on precipitation processes in solutions, either within aqueous droplets in microemulsions in the presence of surface modifiers like surfactants or by direct precipitation in solutions in the presence of theses surface modifiers or small organic molecules directly bonded to the particle surface. In order to obtain well crystallized or densified particles, a continuous flow hydrothermal pro...

  13. Data reconciliation and gross error detection: application in chemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    EGHBAL AHMADİ, Mohammad Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Measured data are normally corrupted by different kinds of errors in many chemical processes. In this work, a brief overview in data reconciliation and gross error detection believed as the most efficient technique in reducing the measurement errors and obtaining accurate information about the process is presented. In addition to defining the basic problem and a survey of recent developments in this area that is categorized in “Real Time Optimization” field, we will describe about a...

  14. A method to separate process contributions in impedance spectra by variation of test conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Hauch, Anne; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Jacobsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    Many processes contribute to the overall impedance of an electrochemical cell, and these may be difficult to separate in the impedance spectrum. Here, we present an investigation of a solid oxide fuel cell based on differences in impedance spectra due to a change of operating parameters and present...... the result as the derivative of the impedance with respect to ln(f). The method is used to separate the anode and cathode contributions and to identify various types of processes....

  15. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Separator Feed Stocks in Titanium Minerals Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanough, G.; Holtham, P. N.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic separation is widely used in the processing of titanium minerals. The expected mineral recoveries are assessed by performing laboratory magnetic separations of representative samples to determine the distribution of magnetic components. This is an inherently slow process performed on relatively small samples. This paper describes the development of an inductance based device to rapidly determine the mass distribution of the magnetic properties of a titanium mineral sample. The system...

  16. Iron - rare earths separation through double salt, oxalate precipitation - a combined process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium diuranate (SDU) obtained at Heavy Water Board (HWB) during uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by D2EHPA-TBP process contains significant amount of iron and valuable rare earths particularly heavier rare earths such as Y, Er, Yb, Dy etc. Separation of valuable rare earths and iron from SDU is essential to get nuclear grade pure uranium. In the present work efforts have been made to devise a solvent extraction cum precipitation process to separate uranium from rare earths and iron followed by selective separation of rare earths from iron by precipitation route

  17. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  18. Carbon stripping - a critical process step in chemical looping combustion of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramp, M.; Thon, A.; Hartge, E.U.; Heinrich, S.; Werther, J. [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Solids Process Engineering and Particle Technology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    In chemical looping combustion of solid fuels the well-mixed solids flow from the fuel reactor consisting of char, ash, and oxygen carrier particles cannot be completely separated into its constituents before it enters the air reactor. The slip of carbon will thus lead to char oxidation in the wrong reactor. Process simulation was applied to investigate the carbon stripping process in chemical looping combustion of solid fuels. Depending on the fuel choice, without carbon stripping CO{sub 2} capture rates below 50 % are calculated for 4 min of solids residence time in the fuel reactor. In a process with carbon stripper, however, CO{sub 2} capture rates exceeding 90 % can be achieved for both fuels investigated in this work. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Computer Aided Design and Analysis of Separation Processes with Electrolyte Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takano, Kiyoteru; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, P.; Ishikawa, T.

    A methodology for computer aided design and analysis of separation processes involving electrolyte systems is presented. The methodology consists of three main parts. The thermodynamic part 'creates' the problem specific property model package, which is a collection of pure component and mixture...... process alternatives. For the simulation part, a general multi-purpose, multi-phase separation model has been developed and integrated to an existing computer aided system. Application of the design and analysis methodology is highlighted through two illustrative case studies, (C) 2000 Elsevier Science...... property models. The design and analysis part generates process (flowsheet) alternatives, evaluates/analyses feasibility of separation and provides a visual operation path for the desired separation. The simulation part consists of a simulation/calculation engine that allows the screening and validation of...

  20. Computer Aided Design and Analysis of Separation Processes with Electrolyte Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A methodology for computer aided design and analysis of separation processes involving electrolyte systems is presented. The methodology consists of three main parts. The thermodynamic part "creates" the problem specific property model package, which is a collection of pure component and mixture...... property models. The design and analysis part generates process (flowsheet) alternatives, evaluates/analyses feasibility of separation and provides a visual operation path for the desired separation. The simulation part consists of a simulation/calculation engine that allows the screening and validation of...... process alternatives. For the simulation part, a general multi-purpose, multi-phase separation model has been developed and integrated to an existing computer aided system. Application of the design and analysis methodology is highlighted through two illustrative case studies....

  1. Computer Aided Design and Analysis of Separation Processes with Electrolyte Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takano, Kiyoteru; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, P.;

    2000-01-01

    A methodology for computer aided design and analysis of separation processes involving electrolyte systems is presented. The methodology consists of three main parts. The thermodynamic part 'creates' the problem specific property model package, which is a collection of pure component and mixture...... property models. The design and analysis part generates process (flowsheet) alternatives, evaluates/analyses feasibility of separation and provides a visual operation path for the desired separation. The simulation part consists of a simulation/calculation engine that allows the screening and validation of...... process alternatives. For the simulation part, a general multi-purpose, multi-phase separation model has been developed and integrated to an existing computer aided system. Application of the design and analysis methodology is highlighted through two illustrative case studies, (C) 2000 Elsevier Science...

  2. A Framework to Design and Optimize Chemical Flooding Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2006-08-31

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  3. Development of method to chemical separation of gallium-67 by thermal diffusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes of gallium have been studied and evaluated for medical applications since 1949. Over the past 50 years 67Ga has been widely used in the diagnosis of various diseases, including acute and chronic inflammatory lesions, bacterial or sterile and several types of tumors. In Brazil 30% of clinics that provide services for Nuclear Medicine use 67Ga citrate and the demand for 67Ga at IPEN-CNEN/SP is 37 GBq (1 Ci)/week. The 67Ga presents physical half-life of 3.26 days (78 hours) and decays 100% by electron capture to stable 67Zn. Its decay includes the emission of γ rays with energies of 93.3 keV (37%), 184.6 keV (20.4%), 300.2 keV (16.6%) and 888 keV (26%). In the past 67Ga was produced by the reaction 68Zn (p, 2n) 67Ga at IPEN-CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the target was dissolved in concentrated HCl and the solution percolated through a cationic resin DOWEX 50W-X8, 200-400 mesh, conditioned with 10 mol L-1 HCl. Zinc, nickel and copper were eluted in 10 mol L-1 HCl and 67Ga 3.5 mol L-1 HCl. The final product was obtained as 67Ga citrate. This work presents a new, fast, direct and efficient method for the chemical separation of 67Ga by thermal diffusion (heating of the target) combined with concentrated acetic acid extraction. Purification was performed by ion exchange chromatography. Natural zinc electrodeposition was performed on nickel/copper plates as substrate and the zinc deposits were adherent to the substrate, slightly shiny and uniform. The targets were irradiated with 26 MeV protons and integrated current of 10 μA.h. After irradiation, the targets were heated at 300 deg C for 2 hours and placed in contact with concentrated acetic acid for 1 hour. The average yield of extraction of 67Ga was (72 ± 10)%. This solution was evaporated and the residue was taken up in 0.5 mol L-1 NH4OH. The 67Ga was purified on cationic resin Dowex 50WX8 in NH4OH medium. The 67Ga recovery was (98 ± 2)%. This solution was evaporated and taken up in 0.1 mol L-1 HCl. The

  4. Burst and Principal Components Analyses of MEA Data Separates Chemicals by Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) detect drug and chemical induced changes in action potential "spikes" in neuronal networks and can be used to screen chemicals for neurotoxicity. Analytical "fingerprinting," using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) on spike trains recorded from prim...

  5. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements thro...

  6. Separation of boron isotopes at chemical isotopic exchange between, boron trifluoride and its complex with anisole in multitube mass-exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are given on continuous counterflow two-phase process of boron isotopes 10B and 11B separation at chemical isotopic exchange between gaseous BF3 and its liquid complex with anisole, the process is realized in the module of three packed columns with parallel operation; each of the columns in its bottom part is connected with the others by the common unit of flow reversal (desorber), has the diameter of 78 mm, height of 46.5 m, and is filled with wire spiral-prismatic pack with 3.5·3.5·0.2 mm element

  7. Overview of the French R&D program for the development of minor actinides separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the scientific and technical feasibility demonstration on 15kg of spent fuel of the Am+Cm separation by DIAMEX-SANEX process, CEA has launched in the framework of the law 2006 R&D program aimed to improve and optimize the minor actinides separation processes for the different recycling modes: • GANEX process for recycling the MA (Np, Am et Cm) with plutonium in the fast reactor core in an homogeneous recycling route; • SANEX-TODGA process for the separation of americium and curium for the heterogeneous transmutation route in the fast reactor blankets; • EXAm process for the separation of the sole americium for the transmutation in heterogeneous concept in dilution on uranium support (UAmO2). Furthermore, additional studies were performed to enlarge the results towards the by-process for the management of the effluents and the development of piloting tool. The demonstration on the genuine solutions of the feasibility of these various separation processes were carried out in the Atalante CBP hot cell between 2008 and 2010 and the main results will be presented. (author)

  8. Review of Life Cycle Assessment in Agro-Chemical Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Gillani, Sayed Tamizuddin; Belaud, Jean-Pierre; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Vignoles, Mireille; Le Lann, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a method used to evaluate the potential impacts on the environment of a product, process, or activity throughout its life cycle. Today’s LCA users are a mixture of individuals with skills in different disciplines who want to evaluate their products, processes, or activities in a life cycle context. This study attempts to present some of the LCA studies on agro-chemical processes, recent advances in LCA and their application on food products and non-food products...

  9. Transuranium element production. II. Chemical processing of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical processing described concerns small experimental targets irradiated in OSIRIS or EL-III and industrial targets irradiated in the CELESTIN reactors. In view of the difficulties encountered when processing highly irradiated targets (760MWd.kg-1) by liquid-liquid extraction (interface sludges leading to stable emulsion) the new processes developed are based on inverse phase chromatography. This technique applied to targets of americium 241, plutonium 239 and a plutonium mixture rich in isotope 242 has given tens of milligrams of curium 242, grams of americium 243 and curium 244 and micrograms of californium 252

  10. A chemical decontamination process for decontaminating and decommissioning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five chemical decontamination processes have been developed for nuclear reactor applications. One of these processes is the cerium decontamination process (CDP). This method uses a cerium acid reagent to rapidly decontaminate surfaces, obtaining decontamination factors in excess of 300 in 6 h on pressurized water reactor specimens. Sound volume reduction and waste management techniques have been demonstrated, and solidified waste volume fractions as low as 9% experimentally obtained. The CDP method represents the hybrid decontamination technique often sought for component replacement and decommissioning operations: high effectiveness, rapid kinetics, simple waste treatment, and a low solidified waste volume

  11. Application of enzymes in leather processing: a comparison between chemical and coenzymatic processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. de Souza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of biotechnology by tanneries has increased in recent years. Enzymes can be applied during different steps of the leather production process: soaking, dehairing, bating, dyeing, degreasing or in effluent and solid waste treatment. This study evaluated the performance of five commercial enzymes in soaking and unhairing/liming by comparing the chemical and coenzymatic processes. Tests were conducted in bench drums to evaluate the action of enzymes during each stage. Concentration, processing time and type of enzyme were varied. Total organic carbon and soluble protein were used to measure the efficiency of the processes. Enzymatic activity assays on collagen, keratin and lipid and scanning electron microscopic (SEM analyses of hides were used to complement the study. Coenzymatic processes generally showed better results in comparison to chemical processes. The enzymes showed activity on all substrates, and the SEM analyses of the hides showed a clear difference between the chemical and coenzymatic processes.

  12. Study on microwave assisted process in chemical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave assisted process is a revolutionary method of extraction that reduces the extraction time to as little as a few seconds, with up to a ten-fold decrease in the use of solvents. The target material is immersed in solvent that is transparent to microwaves, so only the target material is heated, and because of the microwaves tend to heat the inside of the material quickly, the target chemical are expelled in a few seconds. benefits from this process include significant reductions in the amount of energy required and substantial reductions in the cost and dispose of hazardous solvents. A thorough review has been displayed on: using the microwave in extraction, applications of microwave in industry, process flow diagram, mechanism of the process and comparison between microwave process and other extraction techniques (soxhlet, steam distillation and supercritical fluid). This review attempts to summarize the studies about microwave assisted process as a very promising technique. (Author)

  13. Computer-Aided Multiscale Modelling for Chemical Process Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Gani, Rafiqul

    2007-01-01

    Chemical processes are generally modeled through monoscale approaches, which, while not adequate, satisfy a useful role in product-process design. In this case, use of a multi-dimensional and multi-scale model-based approach has importance in product-process development. A computer-aided framework...... for model generation, analysis, solution and implementation is necessary for the development and application of the desired model-based approach for product-centric process design/analysis. This goal is achieved through the combination of a system for model development (ModDev), and a modelling tool...... (MoT) for model translation, analysis and solution. The integration of ModDev, MoT and ICAS or any other external software or process simulator (using COM-Objects) permits the generation of different models and/or process configurations for purposes of simulation, design and analysis. Consequently, it...

  14. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAYAS Pérez Teresa; GEISSLER Gunther; HERNANDEZ Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculatio and advanced oxidation processes(AOP)had been studied.The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H202,UVO3 and UV/H-H202/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions.For each of these processes,different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater.Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand(COD)and low total suspended solids.The outcomes of coffee wastewater reeatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD,color,and turbidity.It was found that a reductiOn in COD of 67%could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculatlon witll lime and coagulant T-1.When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H202,a COD reduction of 86%was achieved,although only after prolonged UV irradiation.Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered,UV/H202,uv/03 and UV/H202/03,we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective,with an efficiency of color,turbidity and further COD removal of 87%,when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  15. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater. PMID:17918591

  16. A process for treatment of mixed waste containing chemical plating wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Treatment and Minimization Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed and will be constructing a transportable treatment system to treat low-level radioactive mixed waste generated during plating operations. The chemical and plating waste treatment system is composed of two modules with six submodules, which can be trucked to user sites to treat a wide variety of aqueous waste solutions. The process is designed to remove the hazardous components from the waste stream, generating chemically benign, disposable liquids and solids with low level radioactivity. The chemical and plating waste treatment system is designed as a multifunctional process capable of treating several different types of wastes. At this time, the unit has been the designated treatment process for these wastes: Destruction of free cyanide and metal-cyanide complexes from spent plating solutions; destruction of ammonia in solution from spent plating solutions; reduction of CrVI to CrIII from spent plating solutions, precipitation, solids separation, and immobilization; heavy metal precipitation from spent plating solutions, solids separation, and immobilization, and acid or base neutralization from unspecified solutions

  17. ROBUST TEMPERATURE CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR A CHEMICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Glan Devadhas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to tuning out a new PID control strategy to provide Robust Control for a Chemical process. Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on-line non-linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. The proposed method has the advantage that it takes into account all the parameters variations associated with the process. The variations in the process parameters are modeled as a gaussian noise and an adaptive gaussian filter is placed in the feedback path. The adaptivegaussian filter in the feedback path adapts its filter coefficients based on a kalman estimation algorithm. This adaptive filter adapts so as to maintain the mean square error a minimum. The LQG (Linear Quadratic Gaussian in Robust Control is used in designing of the proposed strategy. The analysis of a PID tuning [7] strategy and the necessity of such an adaptive strategy is also explored in this paper. The proposed strategy of Robust Control has been designed for a First Order Lag Plus Delay (FOLPD process. The proposed strategy ofRobust Control has been simulated for an FOLPD process in SIMULINK.

  18. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for April 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J.H.

    1958-05-21

    The separations plants operated on schedule, and Pu production exceeded commitment. UO{sub 3} production and shipments were also ahead of schedule. Purex operation under pseudo two-cycle conditions (elimination of HS and 1A columns, co-decontamination cycle concentrator HCP) was successful. Final U stream was 3{times} lower in Pu than ever before; {gamma} activity in recovered HNO{sub 3} was also low. Four of 6 special E metal batches were processed through Redox and analyzed. Boric acid is removed from solvent extraction process via aq waste. The filter in Task II hydrofluorinator was changed from carbon to Poroloy. Various modifications to equipment were made.

  19. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Deguillaume

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  20. Modified Purex process for the separation and recovery of plutonium--uranium residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, J.D.; Leebl, R.G.

    1978-07-08

    A modified (one-cycle) Purex process has been developed for the separation and recovery of plutonium and uranium from mixed actinide residues. The process utilizes 30 vol % tributyl phosphate--dodecane to extract uranium from a 5M nitric acid-plutonium (III)-uranium(VI) feed. After uranium extraction, plutonium in the aqueous feed solution is purified by anion exchange technology. Uranium in the organic is scrubbed and stripped to effectively purify the uranium so that it contains <5,000 ppM plutonium. The process has been used successfully to separate residues consisting of plutonium and uranium oxide.

  1. CO2 separation by calcium looping from full and partial fuel oxidation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sivalingam, Senthoorselvan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis work deals with the research and development of Calcium Looping(CaL) process for CO2 separation from full and partial fuel oxidation based power generation systems. CaL process involves separation of CO2 at high temperatures (600-700°C) by calcium sorbents (CaO). CO2 reacts with CaO in a carbonation process and produces CaCO3. In a subsequent thermal regeneration (>850°C) called calcination, the CO2 is released from CaCO3. Moreover, the CaL is realised in industrial scale with dua...

  2. Development and technical implementation of the separation nozzle process for enrichment of uranium 235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation nozzle process for the enrichment of uranium-235 has been developed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center as an alternative to the gaseous diffusion and centrifuge process. The separation of uranium isotopes is achieved by the deflection of a jet of uranium hexafluoride mixed with hydrogen. Since 1970, the German company of STEAG, has been involved in the technological development and commercial implementation of the nozzle process. In 1975, the Brazilian company of NUCLEBRAS, and the German company of Interatom, joined the effort. The primary objective of the common activity is the construction of a separation nozzle demonstration plant with an annual capacity of about 200 000 SWU and the development of components of a commercial plant. The paper covers the most important steps in the development and the technical implementation of the process. (orig.)

  3. Preparation of 99Mo from the 100Mo(γ,n) reaction and chemical separation of 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclide 99Mo has been prepared by 100Mo(γ, n) reaction using two types of natural molybdenum compound (molybdenum trioxide and zirconium molybdate gel) with the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 10 and 15 MeV. After the equilibrium, 99mTc was separated as NaTcO4 from the irradiated samples using two different chemical procedures to examine the chemical yield. The separated Na[99mTc]TcO4 from the ZrMo gel has the 99Mo breakthrough of <10-4 %, radiochemical purity >99 % as well as chemical impurities of Al, Mo and Zr < 10 ppm. The estimation of 99Mo and 99mTc was done by using off-line c-ray spectrometric technique. The chemical yield of the separated 99mTc from the dissolved molybdenum trioxide is 70.7-75.2 %, whereas in the undissolved zirconium molybdate gel, it is 19.1-43 %. The second method is preferable because it is user friendly in hospital radiopharmacy throughout the shelf-life. (author)

  4. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  5. Processing bias in children with separation anxiety disorder, social phobia and generalised anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kindt; S.M. Bögels; M. Morren

    2003-01-01

    The present study examined processing bias in children suffering from anxiety disorders. Processing bias was assessed using of the emotional Stroop task in clinically referred children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SP), and/or generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and normal co

  6. On the design of experimental separation processes for maximum accuracy in the estimation of their parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal design of experimental separation processes for maximum accuracy in the estimation of process parameters is discussed. The sensitivity factor correlates the inaccuracy of the analytical methods with the inaccuracy of the estimation of the enrichment ratio. It is minimized according to the design parameters of the experiment and the characteristics of the analytical method

  7. Separating business process from user interaction in web-based information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aberer, Karl; Datta, Anwitaman; Despotovic, Zoran; Wombacher, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    In Web-based information commerce it is diffcult to disentangle presentation from process logic, and sometimes even data is not separate from the presentation. Consequently, it becomes crucial to define an abstract model for business processes and their mapping into an active user interface presenta

  8. A method for separating water soluble organics from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J.; Mego, William A.

    1997-12-01

    The present invention relates to a method for separating water-miscible organic species from a process stream by aqueous biphasic extraction. In particular, the method includes extracting the organic species into a polymer-rich phase of an aqueous biphase system in which the process stream comprises the salt-rich phase, and, next, separating the polymer from the extracted organic species by contacting the loaded, polymer-rich phase with a water-immiscible organic phase. Alternatively, the polymer can be separated from the extracted organic species by raising the temperature of the loaded, polymer-rich phase above the cloud point, such that the polymer and the water-soluble organic species separate into two distinct aqueous phases. In either case, a substantially salt-free, concentrated aqueous solution containing the organic species is recovered.

  9. Revised Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities At The Separations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York - DCN 0496-SR-06-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  10. New Vistas in Chemical Product and Process Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Babi, Deenesh K; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-06-01

    Design of chemicals-based products is broadly classified into those that are process centered and those that are product centered. In this article, the designs of both classes of products are reviewed from a process systems point of view; developments related to the design of the chemical product, its corresponding process, and its integration are highlighted. Although significant advances have been made in the development of systematic model-based techniques for process design (also for optimization, operation, and control), much work is needed to reach the same level for product design. Timeline diagrams illustrating key contributions in product design, process design, and integrated product-process design are presented. The search for novel, innovative, and sustainable solutions must be matched by consideration of issues related to the multidisciplinary nature of problems, the lack of data needed for model development, solution strategies that incorporate multiscale options, and reliability versus predictive power. The need for an integrated model-experiment-based design approach is discussed together with benefits of employing a systematic computer-aided framework with built-in design templates. PMID:27088667

  11. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  12. Conventional and chemical processing of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional and chemical processing of the superconducting YBa2Cu3Ox ceramic powders are reviewed. Conditions for calcination, sintering and microstructural development are shown to be important considerations for the superconducting properties of YBa2Cu3Ox ceramics. The authors examine different forming techniques, e.g. dry pressing, hot pressing, tape casting and screen printing, to prepare superconducting components with different sizes, shapes and configurations

  13. Quality costs and robustness criteria in chemical process design optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo, Fernando P.; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N; Pedro M. Saraiva

    2001-01-01

    The identification and incorporation of quality costs and robustness criteria is becoming a critical issue while addressing chemical process design problems under uncertainty. This article presents a systematic design framework that includes Taguchi loss functions and other robustness criteria within a single-level stochastic optimization formulation, with expected values in the presence of uncertainty being estimated by an efficient cubature technique. The solution obtained defines an optima...

  14. Vibration and Stability of 3000-hp, Titanium Chemical Process Blower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Gutzwiller

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This 74-in-diameter blower had an overhung rotor design of titanium construction, operating at 50 pounds per square inch gauge in a critical chemical plant process. The shaft was supported by oil-film bearings and was directdriven by a 3000-hp electric motor through a metal disk type of coupling. The operating speed was 1780 rpm. The blower shaft and motor shaft motion was monitored by Bently Nevada proximity probes and a Model 3100 monitoring system.

  15. Early Attachment-Figure Separation and Increased Risk for Later Depression: Potential Mediation by Proinflammatory Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy, Michael B.; Deak, Terrence; Schiml-Webb, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Early maternal separation and other disruptions of attachment relations are known to increase risk for the later onset of depressive illness in vulnerable individuals. It is suggested here that sensitization involving proinflammatory processes may contribute to this effect. This argument is based on: (1) current notions of the role of proinflammatory cytokines in depressive illness; (2) evidence that proinflammatory cytokines mediate depressive-like behavior during separation in a rodent mode...

  16. Simulation of Magnetophoretic Separation Processes in Dispersions of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles in the Noncooperative Regime

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Faraudo; Pablo Barbero; Andreu, Jordi S.; Juan Camacho

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic separation has gained much attention due to its implications in different fields, becoming feasible as an alternative to existent technologies at the industrial and lab scale. Substantial efforts are focused to improve the magnetic particles used in these applications. Here we show how a relatively simple and low-cost simulation strategy (tracer simulations) can be employed to predict the effect of various key factors in magnetic separation processes, namely, particle properties and ...

  17. Application of Permanent Dry High Intensity Magnetic Separation for the Processing of Spent FCC Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Leaper, M. C.; Kingman, S. W.; Seville, J. P. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of permanent dry high intensity magnetic separation to improve the efficiency of Fluidised Catalytic Cracking (FCC) systems used in oil refining, causing preferential removal of deactivated (spent) catalyst from the process. It was shown that this technique can provide efficient separation of spent catalyst from fresh, despite some loss of fine particles. The effects of particle segregation were also investigated, with both magnetic and nonmagnetic particl...

  18. Chemical Vapor Deposition of MoS2: Insight Into the Growth Mechanism by Separated Gas Flow Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Takashi; Watanabe, Sho; Weng, Mengting; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-04-01

    We report detailed experiments on chemical vapor deposition of an atomic' layer semiconductor MoS2. We developed a new type of CVD system in which MoO3 and S sources are separately supplied to the substrates. It has become possible to precisely control the supply of the materials separately in the order of seconds. Raman and XPS analysis of the films grown under various conditions revealed that the initially obtained films are S-deficient and complete stoichiometry is reached after several minutes under S vapor flow. PMID:27451608

  19. Development of separation process for transuranium elements and some fission products using new extractants and adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation process for transuranium elements (TRU = Am, Cm, Np and Pu) and some fission products (Sr, Cs and Mo) has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency using new innovative extractants and adsorbents to improve the partitioning process from the viewpoints of the economy and the reduction of secondary wastes. Phosphorus-free compounds consisting of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen (CHON principle) were applied to the separation steps for TRU, Cs and Sr by using solvent extraction or extraction chromatography. At the first step, TRU and rare-earth elements (RE) are recovered from high-level liquid waste by solvent extraction with N,N,N',N'-tetra-dodecyl-diglycolamide (TDdDGA). Trivalent actinides Am and Cm, are separated from RE at the next step by extraction chromatography using N,N'-dioctyl-N,N'- diphenyl-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxy-amide (Oct-PDA). Heat-generating fission products Cs and Sr are separated from the raffinate of the TDdDGA extraction step by extraction chromatography using calix-crown derivatives for Cs and crown ether derivatives for Sr, sequentially. Finally, Mo is separated by adsorption with an iron oxide adsorbent. This paper presents research and development results concerning the separation process. (authors)

  20. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Jian-Ming; Guo Wei; Wang Long; Shao Fu-Qiu

    2004-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas at low altitude (high pressure) and at high altitude (low pressure). The plasma lifetime and the temporal evolution of the main charged species are presented.The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a long period. The heavy charged species are dominant at low altitude in comparison with the light species at high altitude. Some species of small amount in natural air play an important role in the processes.

  1. Chemical Assessment of White Wine during Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Coldea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There were investigated chemical properties of indigenous white wine varieties (Fetească albă, Fetească regală and Galbenă de Odobeşti during fermentation. The white wine making process took place at Wine Pilot Station of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca. We aimed to monitorize the evolution of fermentation process parameters (temperature, alcohol content, and real extract and the quality of the bottled white wine (total acidity, alcohol content, total sulfur dioxide, total dry extract. The results obtained were in accordance to Romanian Legislation.

  2. Supercritical Water Process for the Chemical Recycling of Waste Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Motonobu

    2010-11-01

    The development of chemical recycling of waste plastics by decomposition reactions in sub- and supercritical water is reviewed. Decomposition reactions proceed rapidly and selectively using supercritical fluids compared to conventional processes. Condensation polymerization plastics such as PET, nylon, and polyurethane, are relatively easily depolymerized to their monomers in supercritical water. The monomer components are recovered in high yield. Addition polymerization plastics such as phenol resin, epoxy resin, and polyethylene, are also decomposed to monomer components with or without catalysts. Recycling process of fiber reinforced plastics has been studied. Pilot scale or commercial scale plants have been developed and are operating with sub- and supercritical fluids.

  3. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  4. Mechanical and chemical cleaning of the tubes bundles of the moisture separator reheaters (GSS) of Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cleaning operation concerns the 'GSS' system (GSS stands for moisture separator reheaters, MSR) which are classified as 'watch quality guarantee', not classified as safety facility and subjected to Pressure Equipment regulations. The follow-up of the operational GSS (steel carbon) of EDF nuclear power plants CP0 group reveals a clog rate due to a relevant magnetite deposits that could result in equipment damage, loss of availability and loss of plant productivity. The pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the heating steam is close to maximum design criterion. The service consisted in designing, developing, qualifying and carrying out a process which removes clog from the inside of GSS U-tubes bundle located in the vapor circuit and which respects the equipment integrity and ensures the process harmlessness. This cleaning has to enable the complete removal of deposits and oxides (magnetite) in order to recover a passage diameter and a surface finish equivalent to the origin, thus avoiding the replacement of the GSS and obtaining a considerable reduction of costs. To do so, LAINSA and SOLARCA designed, developed, qualified and operated on 14 GSS bundles, by carrying out the following operations: - Cartography of the GSS tubes bundles clogging state; - Pre-Mechanical cleaning to un-block the sealed tubes and release the inside tubes passing; - Isolation of the bundle and check of leaks of the system; - Chemical cleaning with the efficiency and harmlessness parameters follow-up: - Acid Phase by means of weak organic acids to eliminate all the deposits; - Passivation phase; - Final Rinsing respecting the customer criteria; - Drying; - Waste management and waste treatment. The implementation of this operation enables the elimination of the whole deposits (magnetite) and oxides located inside the GSS tube bundle and thus to recover a passage diameter inside the tubes, and a pressure drop close to a new system and therefore to enables the

  5. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  6. Application of repetitive pulsed power technology to chemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerous sites of soil and water contaminated with organic chemicals present an urgent environmental concern that continues to grow. Electron and x-ray irradiation have been shown to be effective methods to destroy a wide spectrum of organic chemicals, nitrates, nitrites, and cyanide in water by breaking molecules to non-toxic products or entirely mineralizing the by-products to gas, water, and salts. Sandia National Laboratories is developing Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) technology capable of producing high average power, broad area electron or x-ray beams. The 300 kW RHEPP-II facility accelerates electrons to 2.5 MeV at 25 kA over 1,000 cm2 in 60 ns pulses at repetition rates of over 100 Hz. Linking this modular treatment capability with the rapid optical-sensing diagnostics and neutral network characterization software algorithms will provide a Smart Waste Treatment (SWaT) system. Such a system would also be applicable for chemical manufacture and processing of industrial waste for reuse or disposal. This talk describes both the HREPP treatment capability and sensing technologies. Measurements of the propagated RHEPP-II beam and dose profiles are presented. Sensors and rapid detection software are discussed with application toward chemical treatment

  7. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Minissale

    2014-01-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O$_2$) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80 $\\%$ at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-...

  8. Fatty acid methyl esters production: chemical process variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Narváez Rincón

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of fatty acid methyl esters as basic oleochemicals over fatty acids, the seventies world energy crisis and the use of those oleochemicals as fuels, have increased research interest on fats and oils trans-esterification. In this document, a review about basic aspects, uses, process variables and problems associated to the production process of fatty acid methyl esters is presented. A global view of recent researches, most of them focused in finding a new catalyst with same activity as the alcohol-soluble hydroxides (NaOH, KOH, and suitable to be used in transforming fats and oils with high levels of free fatty acids and water avoiding separation problems and reducing process costs, is also discussed.

  9. Characterization of nuclear decontamination solutions at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from 1982-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents possibly the single largest collection of operational decontamination data from a nuclear reprocessing facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and perhaps anywhere in the world. The uniqueness of this data is due to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant's (ICPP's) ability to process different types of highly enriched nuclear fuel. The report covers an 8-year period, during which six campaigns were conducted to dissolve nuclear fuel clad in stainless steel, aluminum, graphite, and zirconium. Each fuel type had a separate head-end process with unique dissolution chemistry, but shared the same extraction process equipment. This report presents data about decontamination activities of the ICPP's First Cycle extraction vessels, columns, piping, and aluminum dissolution vessels. Operating data from 1982 through 1990 has been collected, analyzed, and characterized. Chemicals used in the decontamination processes are documented along with quantities used. The chemical solutions are analyzed to compare effectiveness. Radioisotopic analysis is recorded, showing and quantifying what nuclides were removed by the various solutions. The original data is also provided to make it possible for researchers to address questions and test other hypotheses not discussed in this report

  10. Characterization of nuclear decontamination solutions at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from 1982-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    This report represents possibly the single largest collection of operational decontamination data from a nuclear reprocessing facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and perhaps anywhere in the world. The uniqueness of this data is due to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant`s (ICPP`s) ability to process different types of highly enriched nuclear fuel. The report covers an 8-year period, during which six campaigns were conducted to dissolve nuclear fuel clad in stainless steel, aluminum, graphite, and zirconium. Each fuel type had a separate head-end process with unique dissolution chemistry, but shared the same extraction process equipment. This report presents data about decontamination activities of the ICPP`s First Cycle extraction vessels, columns, piping, and aluminum dissolution vessels. Operating data from 1982 through 1990 has been collected, analyzed, and characterized. Chemicals used in the decontamination processes are documented along with quantities used. The chemical solutions are analyzed to compare effectiveness. Radioisotopic analysis is recorded, showing and quantifying what nuclides were removed by the various solutions. The original data is also provided to make it possible for researchers to address questions and test other hypotheses not discussed in this report.

  11. The state of the art on nuclides separation in high level liquid wastes by Truex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the advancement of the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle, novel CMPO RUEX process was studied for separating minor actinides from fission products in high level liquid waste using real radioactive solutions from PUREX experiments, so as to support PNC's actinides recycling program using fast reactor. The present PUREX process was also studied to improve the separation of 237Np, 106Ru and 99Tc, the most interfering-natured nuclides in both PUREX and TRUEX processes, by utilizing electrochemistry-based salt-free methods which can eliminate the secondary radioactive waste. The state of the art of separation technologies are described by summarizing the extraction behaviors of nuclides in recent hot counter-current runs using CMPO RUEX process with mild salt-free stripping reagents. The degradation and regeneration characteristics of CMPO/TBP/n-dodecane mixture solvent were also simulated by semi-hot experiments. Several experiments to separate minor actinides and lanthanides from the TRUEX mixture product using aqueous amino-poly-carboxylate complexant, DTPA, resulted in reasonable MA/Ln separation profiles in multiple mixer-settler stages and allowed a unique separation flowsheet adaptable to the TRUEX process to be proposed. Application of electrochemistry to assist both solvent extraction processes, e.g., 'anodic oxidation' to destroy PUREX and TRUEX solvent waste in the presence of electron transfer mediator Age2+ or 'cathodic reduction' for electrolytic extraction of Pd2+, RuNO3+ and 99TcO4- from 3 M nitric acid medium is under study. (authors)

  12. Process for the selective separation of uranium from other metals and for obtaining uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This addition to main patent 2817029 includes the separation and obtaining of uranium from an aquaeous sulphuric acid solution instead of a nitric acid solution. The uranium forms complex sulphate anions, which cannot be foamed with cation tenside in a flotation cell. The relatively high stability of complex uranyl sulphates makes it possible to separate the uranium from nearly all metals found with it in nature. The process is more economic and has fewer waste problems. The process and associated device are described in detail. (UWI)

  13. Achieving nanoscale horizontal separations in the standard 2 μm PolyMUMPS process

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2013-01-25

    This paper shares with the research community how to achieve, effectively and easily, lateral submicron separations in the standard 2 lm PolyMUMPS process without any fabrication intervention or post-processing, based on the oxide sidewall spacer technique. Thousands of nanoseparations were created and successfully tested by visual inspection and by a simple capacitance measurement. The lateral separations attained were less than 440 nm and reached as low as 280 nm. To corroborate the findings, measurements were performed on different capacitors fabricated in different fabrication runs with consistent results. This is the first time that submicron lateral distances are reported in PolyMUMPS using the oxide spacer technique.

  14. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout mos...

  15. Optimisation of the Fischer-Tropsch process using zeolites for tail gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Carbajo, J; Gómez-Álvarez, P; Bueno-Perez, R; Merkling, P J; Calero, S

    2014-03-28

    This work is aimed at optimizing a Fischer-Tropsch Gas To Liquid (GTL) process by recycling compounds of the expelled gas mixture using zeolites for the separation. To that end, we have performed a computational study on four structures widely used in industry. A range of Si/Al ratios have been explored and the effects of their distribution assessed. The ability of the considered force fields and molecular models to reproduce experimental results has been widely proved in previously reported studies. Since this tail gas is formed by a five-component mixture, namely carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and hydrogen, molecular simulations present clear advantages over experiments. In addition, the viability of the Ideal Adsorption Solution Theory (IAST) has been evaluated to easily handle further separation steps. On the basis of the obtained results, we provide a separation scheme to perform sequentially the separation of CO2, CH4, CO, N2 and H2. PMID:24522290

  16. Liquid separation behavior of Cu-Co alloy during isothermal process at high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙占波; 胡柱东; 宋晓平; 刘剑; 杨森; 李晓园; 祝要民

    2001-01-01

    Liquid separation of Cu75Co25 and Cu85Co15 alloys at various supercoolings was investigated employing glass flux technology. The results reveal that during the course of isothermal processes, liquid separation develops more fully than in the continuous cooling, which results in more and larger particles. Further thermodynamic analyses indicate that primary dendrites from liquid separation are inclined to remelt in Cu liquid and finally the dendrites shrink locally, or even break into fragments. The fragments clash each other and grow into larger Co-rich particles due to electromagnetic force. It is also showed that at constant temperature whether Co-rich particles solidify depends on the develop level of the liquid separations. Co-rich liquid droplets begin to solidify when the component of Co-rich liquid reaches the solidus.

  17. An integrated computer aided system for integrated design of chemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Hytoft, Glen; Jaksland, Cecilia;

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, an Integrated Computer Aided System (ICAS), which is particularly suitable for solving problems related to integrated design of chemical processes; is presented. ICAS features include a model generator (generation of problem specific models including model simplification and model......, design, control form the basis for the toolboxes. The available features of ICAS are highlighted through a case study involving the separation of binary azeotropic mixtures. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....... reduction), a simulator (use of problem specific simulation strategies for steady state and dynamic simulation), toolboxes (thermodynamic toolbox, synthesis toolbox, control toolbox, design toolbox and analysis toolbox), and an interface for problem defintion. Each toolbox solves aspecific set of problems...

  18. Incorporation of chemical kinetic models into process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important consideration in chemical process control is to determine the precise rationing of reactant streams, particularly when a large time delay exists between the mixing of the reactants and the measurement of the product. In this paper, a method is described for incorporating chemical kinetic models into the control strategy in order to achieve optimum operating conditions. The system is first characterized by determining a reaction rate surface as a function of all input reactant concentrations over a feasible range. A nonlinear constrained optimization program is then used to determine the combination of reactants which produces the specified yield at minimum cost. This operating condition is then used to establish the nominal concentrations of the reactants. The actual operation is determined through a feedback control system employing a Smith predictor. The method is demonstrated on a laboratory bench scale enzyme reactor

  19. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  20. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford's 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications

  1. Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

  2. Use of Separator with Regular Granular Filling in Extraction Processes - 12209

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separator with a regular granular filling has been developed to be used for the operations of the removal of carbon-black impurities from the aqueous flow; the intra-cycle regeneration of back-extractants; and the concentrating back-extraction of plutonium in the extraction SNF reprocessing technology. The process conditions for those operations have been experimentally tested using this separator. Thus, the separator for operations of concentrating reextraction of plutonium and regeneration recycling extractant allows to: - derive plutonium from the organic stream into an extremely concentrated form, reducing the amount of liquid radioactive waste (raffinate, decantate) plutonium branches to a minimum; - controlling the processes of concentration of uranium and plutonium, get uranium-plutonium product with required concentration and the amount of metal with required ratio; - eliminate contamination of the emulsion flows; - simplify the purification of uranium from the extract plutonium; - test results showed that when working on a solution 'hydrazine-DTPA' in the separator it is achieved the extraction of plutonium re-extract - 82% TC - at 56-65%. With the transition to the reextraction by solution 'U (IV)-hydrazine', of plutonium into re-extract increases to 95%, technetium - up to 83%; - regenerate the extractant recycling minimizing the amount of liquid radioactive waste generated as a technology used as well as alternative 'salt-free' systems; - it is found that the regeneration of the extractant solution of soda and EDA in the separator at a load of 3.2 m3 / (m2.h) it can be achieved almost complete phase separation. Residual carryover of 0,005-0,006% emulsion is on the verge of analytical detection. - It is shown that in the depth of separation phase a separation of the extractant regeneration of quality superior is more than 5-7 times to the extraction. (authors)

  3. Development for a process for the adsorptive separation of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the final process step of dissolver waste gas purification in a reprocessing facility, the radioactive noble gas Kr-85 is separated by physical separation processes. The experiments showed that the available mixture of air/Kr/Xe can be appropriately separated by chromatography. In principle, the adsorption column is laded with the waste gas and subsequently regenerated by puring with a carrier gas. A complete separation of the waste gas components can thus be achieved. He suggests itself as a purge gas. Fine-grained activated charcoals are to be preferred as adsorbing agents. Among the adsorptive process alternatives studied, one variant in which the adsorber was split into two halves and loaded at -1300C or -1600C proved to be particularly suitable. It can be seen that a total of only 0.2 m3 of activated charcoal would be required for a commerical facility with a waste gas throughput of 100 nm3/h. The helium flux required only amounts to 4% of the waste gas flow to be purified. If valuable xenon is also to be recovered then this value increases to 7%. In this case the quantity of activated charcoal necessary would be 0.28 m3. A comparison with alternative process principles indicated that the adsorptive concept has advantages with respect to process engineering and regarding high safety standards in nuclear engineering facilities. (orig./HP)

  4. Semi-industrial experimental study on bauxite separation using a cell-column integration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning-ning; Zhou, Chang-chun; Cong, Long-fei; Cao, Wen-long; Zhou, You

    2016-01-01

    The cyclonic-static micro-bubble flotation column (FCSMC) is a highly efficient mineral processing equipment. In this study, a cell-column (FCSMC) integration process was investigated for the separation of bauxite and its feasibility was analyzed on a theoretical basis. The properties of low-grade bauxite ore from Henan Province, China were analyzed. Parameters such as reagent dosage, scraping bubble time, and pressure of the circulating pump during the sorting process were investigated and optimized to improve the flotation efficiency. On the basis of these parameters, continuous separation experiments were conducted. Bauxite concentrate with an aluminum-to-silicon (A/S) mass ratio of 6.37 and a 77.63wt% recovery rate were achieved via a flow sheet consisting of "fast flotation using a flotation cell, one roughing flotation and one cleaning flotation using flotation columns". Compared with the full-flotation-cells process, the cell-column integration process resulted in an increase of the A/S ratio by 0.41 and the recovery rate by 17.58wt%. Cell-column integration separation technology represents a new approach for the separation of middle-to-low-grade bauxite ore.

  5. Semi-industrial experimental study on bauxite separation using a cellcolumn integration process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-ning Zhang; Chang-chun Zhou; Long-fei Cong; Wen-long Cao; You Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The cyclonic-static micro-bubble flotation column (FCSMC) is a highly efficient mineral processing equipment. In this study, a cell-column (FCSMC) integration process was investigated for the separation of bauxite and its feasibility was analyzed on a theoretical basis. The properties of low-grade bauxite ore from Henan Province, China were analyzed. Parameters such as reagent dosage, scraping bubble time, and pressure of the circulating pump during the sorting process were investigated and optimized to improve the flotation efficiency. On the basis of these parameters, continuous separation experiments were conducted. Bauxite concentrate with an aluminum-to-silicon (A/S) mass ratio of 6.37 and a 77.63wt% recovery rate were achieved via a flow sheet consisting of “fast flotation using a flotation cell, one roughing flotation and one cleaning flotation using flotation columns”. Compared with the full-flotation-cells process, the cell-column integration process resulted in an increase of the A/S ratio by 0.41 and the recovery rate by 17.58wt%. Cell-column integration separation technology represents a new approach for the separation of middle-to-low-grade bauxite ore.

  6. Chemical separation for the burnup determination of the U3Si/Al spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of U, Pu, and Nd for the burnup determination of the U3Si/Al spent fuel samples has been studied. The preliminary experiments were carried out with the simulated spent fuel solution. The solutions were prepared by adding of fission product elements to unirradiated U3Si/Al fuel samples. The fuel samples were dissolved in 6 M HNO3, 6 M HNO3 using mercury catalyst, or applying a mixture of HCl and HNO3 without any catalyst. All dissolved fuel solutions contained a small amount of a residue(silica). The trace silica reprecipitated from the fuel solutions taken for the separation was dissolved in HF and removed by subsequent evaporating to dryness. The separation of U and fission product elements from the various sample solutions was achieved by two sequential anion exchange resin separation procedures. The U, Pu and Nd can be purely isolated from the sample solutions with a large excess of Al by this chromatographic procedures. The dissolution and separation procedure used in this experiment were applied for burnup determination of real U3Si/Al spent fuels from HANARO reactor

  7. Phase separation and crystallization process of amorphous Fe78B12Si9Ni1 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the melt heat treatment on the structure and crystallization process of the rapidly quenched amorphous Fe78B12Si9Ni1 alloys have been investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, DSC and TEM. Amorphous phase separation has been observed in the alloys quenched after the preliminary high temperature heat treatment of the liquid alloy (heating above 1400°C). Comparative analysis of the pair distribution functions demonstrates that this phase separation accompanied by a changes in the local atomic arrangement. It has been found that crystallization process at heating is strongly dependent on the initial amorphous phase structure - homogeneous or phase separated. In the last case crystallization goes through the formation of a new metastable hexagonal phase [a=12.2849(9) Ǻ, c=7.6657(8) Ǻ]. At the same time the activation energy for crystallization (Ea) reduces from 555 to 475 kJ mole−1

  8. Development of New Generation of Ceramics for Environmentally Focused Chemical Separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Girish

    This dissertation focuses on the use of composite materials for environmental applications. For the first time, applications of both fresh and aged concrete as inexpensive adsorbents for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) removal is demonstrated. Concrete is the most widely used composite material of the modern era. Cement manufacturing (a major component of concrete) is considered to be one of the leading contributors to air pollution, resulting in 7% of the global carbon dioxide emissions along with a number of other harmful pollutants such as oxides, mercury and particulates. These emissions aide in the formation of acid rain, smog, and toxic ground level ozone, causing detrimental effects such as respiratory illnesses, visibility reduction, eutrification and global warming. This thesis offers a novel and sustainable solution in mitigating NOX emissions, by introducing the significant adsorption potential of recycled concrete. The work is based on both commercially available cement paste and already aged concrete samples, providing truly scalable solutions. The concrete samples aged for different periods of time were exposed to NO2 to measure their adsorption capacity. The results show that all of the concrete samples (fresh and aged) exhibited excellent NO2 adsorption capacity, with the fresh concrete samples removing almost 100% of the NO2. Furthermore, to compare the effects of long term aging, 12 year-old recently demolished concrete samples were obtained and its NOX removal was shown to be almost 60%. The experimental results provide evidence of nitrate and nitrite species formation from chemical reactions occurring between NO2 and surface alkaline species. This important discovery can be utilized for NO2 removal and subsequent NOX sequestered demolished concrete (NSDC) recycling in new concrete, either as a set accelerating admixture or as a corrosion inhibitor, a big leap towards better sustainability and longevity of the new reinforced concrete structures. The rest

  9. 'Exalting Understanding without Depressing Imagination': Depicting Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Knight

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Alchemists' illustrations indicated through symbols the processes being attempted; but with Lavoisier's Elements (1789, the place of imagination and symbolic language in chemistry was much reduced. He sought to make chemistry akin to algebra and its illustrations merely careful depictions of apparatus. Although younger contemporaries sought, and found in electrochemistry, a dynamical approach based upon forces rather than weights, they found this very difficult to picture. Nevertheless, by looking at chemical illustrations in the eighty years after Lavoisier's revolutionary book, we can learn about how reactions were carried out, and interpreted, and see that there was scope for aesthetic judgement and imagination.

  10. Fundamental studies of chemical vapor deposition diamond growth processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing laser spectroscopic techniques to foster a fundamental understanding of diamond film growth by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several spectroscopic techniques are under investigation to identify intermediate species present in the bulk reactor volume, the thin active volume immediately above the growing film, and the actual growing surface. Such a comprehensive examination of the overall deposition process is necessary because a combination of gas phase and surface chemistry is probably operating. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques have been emphasized. A growth rector that permits through-the-substrate gas sampling for REMPI/time-of-flight mass spectroscopy has been developed. 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. Optimization of radiation-chemical process of trichloroethylene oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) oxidation under the effect of gamma-irradiation is investigated. It is shown that the reaction of TCE oxidation proceeds according to the chain mechanism. At the temperature of 60 deg C in the dose rate range from 1.1015 to 1.5x1016 eV(cm3xs) radiation-chemical yield changes from 1.5x104 to 5x103 molecules/100 eV. It is found that the reaction rate practically does not depend upon oxygen concentration and is directly proportional to the TCE concentration and the dose rate. The process optimization is studied

  12. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  13. Vibration and Stability of 3000-hp, Titanium Chemical Process Blower

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This 74-in-diameter blower had an overhung rotor design of titanium construction, operating at 50 pounds per square inch gauge in a critical chemical plant process. The shaft was supported by oil-film bearings and was directdriven by a 3000-hp electric motor through a metal disk type of coupling. The operating speed was 1780 rpm. The blower shaft and motor shaft motion was monitored by Bently Nevada proximity probes and a Model 3100 monitoring system.Although the blowers showed very satisfact...

  14. Chemical elements dynamic in the fermentation process of ethanol producing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides useful information about the dynamics of chemical elements analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and, found in the various segments of the fermentation process of producing ethanol from sugar cane. For this, a mass balance of Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Sm, and Th, terrigenous elements, as well as Br, K, Rb, and Zn, sugar cane plant elements, has been demonstrated for the fermentation vats in industrial conditions of ethanol production. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. Large deviations for two scale chemical kinetic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    We formulate the large deviations for a class of two scale chemical kinetic processes motivated from biological applications. The result is successfully applied to treat a genetic switching model with positive feedbacks. The corresponding Hamiltonian is convex with respect to the momentum variable as a by-product of the large deviation theory. This property ensures its superiority in the rare event simulations compared with the result obtained by formal WKB asymptotics. The result is of general interest to understand the large deviations for multiscale problems.

  16. Integrating chemical engineering fundamentals in the capstone process design project

    OpenAIRE

    von Solms, Nicolas; Woodley, John; Johnsson, Jan Erik; Abildskov, Jens

    2010-01-01

    All B.Eng. courses offered at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) must now follow CDIO standards. The final “capstone” course in the B.Eng. education is Process Design, which for many years has been typical of chemical engineering curricula worldwide. The course at DTU typically has about 30 students. The B.Eng. education lasts for 3½ years (seven semesters), of which the 5th semester consists of practical training with a company and the final (7th) semester consists of a research proje...

  17. Relationship between snow microstructure and physical and chemical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bartels-Rausch

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice and snow in the environment are important because they not only act as a host to rich chemistry but also provide a matrix for physical exchanges of contaminants within the ecosystem. This review discusses how the structure of snow influences both chemical reactivity and physical processes, which thereby makes snow a unique medium for study. The focus is placed on impacts of the presence of liquid and surface disorder using many experimental studies, simulations, and field observations from the molecular to the micro-scale.

  18. Hazard Identification of the Offshore Three-phase Separation Process Based on Multilevel Flow Modeling and HAZOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Lind, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    HAZOP studies are widely accepted in chemical and petroleum industries as the method for conducting process hazard analysis related to design, maintenance and operation of the systems. Different tools have been developed to automate HAZOP studies. In this paper, a HAZOP reasoning method based on...... in traditional HAZOP analysis. As a case study, the extended MFM based HAZOP methodology is applied to an offshore three-phase separation process. The results show that the cause-consequence analysis in MFM can infer the cause and effect of a deviation used in HAZOP and used to fill HAZOP worksheet....... This paper is the first paper discussing and demonstrate the potential of the roles concept in MFM to supplement the integrity of HAZOP analysis....

  19. Separation of uranium from process wastewaters using microbial cells as sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated for separating U from process wastewaters. The mixed culture was obtained as films on coal particles in an operating fluidized-bed bioreactor system. Biosorption of U by the mixed culture was rapid, reaching a saturation of approx. 0.14 g U per gram of dry cells. Two contacting devices were also evaluated. 4 figures

  20. Principles of Stagewise Separation Process Calculations: A Simple Algebraic Approach Using Solvent Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    A simple liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) system involving a constant partition coefficient based on solute ratios is used to develop an algebraic understanding of multistage contacting in a first-year separation processes course. This algebraic approach to the LLE system is shown to be operable for the introduction of graphical techniques…

  1. Chemical processes in the turbine and exhaust nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukachko, S.P.; Waitz, I.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aero-Environmental Lab.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Dawes, W.N. [University Engineering Dept., Cambridge (United Kingdom). Whittle Lab.

    1997-12-31

    The objective is to establish an understanding of primary pollutant, trace species, and aerosol chemical evolution as engine exhaust travels through the nonuniform, unsteady flow fields of the turbine and exhaust nozzle. An understanding of such processes is necessary to provide accurate inputs for plume-wake modeling efforts and is therefore a critical element in an assessment of the atmospheric effects of both current and future aircraft. To perform these studies, a numerical tool was developed combining the calculation of chemical kinetics and one-, two-, or three-dimensional (1-D, 2-D, 3-D) Reynolds-averaged flow equations. Using a chemistry model that includes HO{sub x}, NO{sub y}, SO{sub x}, and CO{sub x} reactions, several 1-D parametric analyses were conducted for the entire turbine and exhaust nozzle flow path of a typical advanced subsonic engine to understand the effects of various flow and chemistry uncertainties on a baseline 1-D result. These calculations were also used to determine parametric criteria for judging 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D modeling requirements as well as to provide information about chemical speciation at the nozzle exit plane. (author) 9 refs.

  2. Discrimination and chemical characterization of different Paeonia lactifloras (Radix Paeoniae Alba and Radix Paeoniae Rubra) by infrared macro-fingerprint analysis-through-separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ping; Xu, Changhua; Sun, Suqin; Zhou, Qun; Shi, Zhe; Li, Jin; Chen, Tao; Li, Zheng; Cui, Weili

    2015-11-01

    Paeonia lactiflora, a commonly used herbal medicine (HM) in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), mainly has two species, Radix Paeoniae Alba (RPA) and Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR), for different clinical applications in TCM. For expounding the chemical profile of RPA and RPR and ensuring the clinical efficacy and safety, an infrared macro-fingerprint analysis-through-separation method integrated with statistical pattern recognition was developed to analyze and discriminate the two Paeonia lactifloras. In IR spectra, the major difference between the two was in the range of 1200-900 cm-1: the strongest peak of RPA was at 1024 cm-1, while that of RPR was 1049 cm-1. The difference was magnified in second derivative spectra. The findings were further verified by investigating the separation process of total glucosides, stepwisely monitored by both of IR and UPLC-MS/MS. Simultaneously, the aqueous extracts of RPA and RPR had been separated continuously to acquire the comprehensively hierarchical chemical characteristics for undoubtedly identification and subsequently discrimination of the two herbs. Moreover, 60 batches of the two HMs (30 for each) were objectively classified by principal component regression (PCR) model based on IR macro-fingerprints.

  3. Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

  4. The use of safeguards data for process monitoring in the Advanced Test Line for Actinide Separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos is constructing an integrated process monitoring/materials control and accounting (PM/MC and A) system in the Advanced Testing Line for Actinide Separations (ATLAS) at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The ATLAS will test and demonstrate new methods for aqueous processing of plutonium. The ATLAS will also develop, test, and demonstrate the concepts for integrated process monitoring/materials control and accounting. We describe how this integrated PM/MC and A system will function and provide benefits to both process research and materials accounting personnel

  5. Proceedings of the 23. International Symposium on Physico-Chemical Methods of Separation - Ars Separatoria 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual symposia '' Ars Separatoria '' offer the scientists and engineers information on the latest achievements in the separation sciences. In 2008 participants presented 6 lectures, 16 short lectures and 74 posters. Of special interest were results obtained using solvent extraction and ion exchange methods

  6. Separation of 15N by chemical exchange in NO, NO2 - HNO3 system under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic isotopic exchange reaction is responsible for the separation of 15N in the Nitrox system that between gaseous nitrogen oxides and aqueous nitric acid with a single stage separation factor α = 1.055 for 10M nitric acid, at 25 deg C and atmospheric pressure takes place. In order to know what happens in 15N separation at higher pressure, when the isotopic transport between two phases is improved, a stainless steel laboratory experimental plant with a 1000 mm long x 18 mm i.d. column, packed with triangular wire springs 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm2, was utilised. At 1.5 atm (absolute), and 2.36 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate HETP was 7% smaller than at atmospheric pressure and 1.5 times smaller flow rate. HETP at 3.14 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate and 1.8 atm is practically equal with that obtained at atmospheric pressure and 2 times smaller flow rate. The operation of the 15N separation plant at 1.8 atm (absolute), instead of atmospheric pressure, will permit doubling of the 10M nitric acid flow rate and of 15N production of the given column. (author)

  7. Polyaniline/polybenzimidazole blends: characterisation of its physico-chemical properties and gas separation behaviour

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giel, Verena; Kredatusová, Jana; Trchová, Miroslava; Brus, Jiří; Žitka, Jan; Peter, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 77, April (2016), s. 98-113. ISSN 0014-3057 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP106/12/P643 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : gas separation * gas sorption * gas permeation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.005, year: 2014

  8. A differential viscosity detector for use in miniaturized chemical separation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Marko T.; Chmela, Emil; Heyden, van der Frank H.J.; Oosterbroek, R. Edwin; Tijssen, Robert; Elwenspoek, Miko; Berg, van den Albert

    2005-01-01

    We present a micromachined differential viscosity detector suitable for integration into an on-chip hydrodynamic chromatography system. The general design, however, is applicable to any liquid chromatography system that is used for separation of polymers. The micromachined part of the detector consi

  9. Proceedings of the 22. International Symposium on Physico-Chemical Methods of Separation - Ars Separatoria 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual symposia '' Ars Separatoria '' offer the scientists and engineers information on the latest achievements in the separation sciences. In 2007 participants presented 9 plenary lectures, 15 communications and 45 posters. Of special interest were results obtained using solvent extraction and ion exchange methods

  10. Proceedings of the 24. International Symposium on Physico-Chemical Methods of Separation - Ars Separatoria 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual symposia '' Ars Separatoria '' offer the scientists and engineers information on the latest achievements in the separation sciences. In 2009 participants presented 9 lectures, 16 short lectures and 63 posters. Of special interest were results obtained using solvent extraction and ion exchange methods

  11. Tribo-charging properties of waste plastic granules in process of tribo-electrostatic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Guiqing; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    Plastic products can be found everywhere in people's daily life. With the consistent growth of plastic consumption, more and more plastic waste is generated. Considering the stable chemical and physics characteristics of plastic, regular waste management methods are not suitable for recycling economic strategy of each government, which has become a serious environmental problem. Recycling plastic waste is considered to be the best way to treat it, because it cannot only deduce the waste but also save the energy to produce new virgin plastic. Tribo-electrostatic separation is strongly recommended for plastic separation as it can preserve the original properties of plastic and has little additional pollution. In this study, plastic granules are generated by crushing plastic waste in waste electric and electronic equipment. The tribo-charging properties of plastic waste were studied by vibrating tribo-charging and cyclone tribo-charging. The triboelectric series obtained by vibrating was: (-)-PE-PS-PC-PVC-ABS-PP-(+), while the triboelectric series obtained by cyclone was (-)-PE-PS-PC-PVC-ABS-PP-(+). Further, the cyclone charging was more effective and stable than vibrating charging. The impact factors experiments showed that small particle size was better changed than large ones and were more suitable recycled by tribo-electrostatic separation. High relative humidity was identified as impede charging effect. The results of this study will help defining the operating parameters of subsequent separator. PMID:25453321

  12. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-level waste grout stabilization development program FY-96 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general purpose of the Grout Stabilization Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-level wastes (LLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LLW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste; (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines; (3) facility decontamination processes; and (4) process equipment waste. The main tasks completed this fiscal year as part of the program were chromium stabilization study for sodium-bearing waste and stabilization and solidification of LLW from aluminum and zirconium calcines. The projected LLW will be highly acidic and contain high amounts of nitrates. Both of these are detrimental to Portland cement chemistry; thus, methods to precondition the LLW and to cure the grout were explored. A thermal calcination process, called denitration, was developed to solidify the waste and destroy the nitrates. A three-way blend of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested. Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For the sodium LLW, a 25% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.5 and a compressive strength of 2,500 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For the aluminum LLW, a 15% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4,350 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 30% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3,570 pounds per square inch

  13. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Kilpinen, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  14. Separation and Purification of Mineral Salts from Spacecraft Wastewater Processing via Electrostatic Beneficiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, John D., II; Lunn, Griffin

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic separation is a class of material processing technologies commonly used for the sorting of coarse mixtures by means of electrical forces acting on charged or polarized particles. Most if not all of the existing tribo-electrostatic separators had been initially developed for mineral ores beneficiation. It is a well-known process that has been successfully used to separate coal from minerals. Potash (potassium) enrichment where underground salt mines containing large amounts of sodium is another use of this techno logy. Through modification this technology can be used for spacecraft wastewater brine beneficiation. This will add in closing the gap beeen traveling around Earth's Gravity well and long-term space explorations. Food has been brought on all man missions, which is why plant growth for food crops continues to be of interest to NASA. For long-term mission considerations food productions is one of the top priorities. Nutrient recovery is essential for surviving in or past low earth orbit. In our advance bio-regenerative process instead of nitrogen gas produced; soluble nitrate salts that can be recovered for plant fertilizer would be produced instead. The only part missing is the beneficiation of brine to separate the potassium from the sodium. The use of electrostatic beneficiation in this experiment utilizes the electrical charge differences between aluminum and dried brine by surface contact. The helixes within the aluminum tribocharger allows for more surface contact when being agitated. When two materials are in contact, the material with the highest affinity for electrons becomes negatively charged, while the other becomes positively charged. This contact exchange of charge may cause the particles to agglomerate depending on their residence time within the tribocharger, compromising the efficiency of separation. The aim of this experiment is to further the development in electrostatic beneficiation by optimizing the separation of ersatz and

  15. Development of microforming process combined with selective chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microforming has been received much attention in the recent decades due to the wide use of microparts in electronics and medical purpose. For the further functionalization of these micro devices, high functional surface with noble metals and nanomaterials are strongly required in bio- and medical fields, such as bio-sensors. To realize the efficient manufacturing process, which can deform the submillimeter scale bulk structure and can construct the micro to nanometer scale structures in one process, the present study proposes a combined process of microforming for metal foils with a selective chemical vapor deposition (SCVD on the active surface of work materials. To clarify the availability of this proposed process, the feasibility of SCVD of functional materials to active surface of titanium (Ti was investigated. CVD of iron (Fe and carbon nanotubes (CNTs which construct CNTs on the patterned surface of active Ti and non-active oxidation layer were conducted. Ti thin films on silicon substrate and Fe were used as work materials and functional materials, respectively. CNTs were grown on only Ti surface. Consequently, the selectivity of the active surface of Ti to the synthesis of Fe particles in CVD process was confirmed.

  16. Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for 99Mo production - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented here are recent experimental results of our continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product 99Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified 99Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration for production of 99Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU. (author)

  17. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate’s application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein.

  18. Optimization of chemical etching process in niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T. (Tsuyoshi); Trabia, M.; Culbreth, W.; Subramanian, S.

    2004-01-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities are important components of linear accelerators. Buffered chemical polishing (BCP) on the inner surface of the cavity is a standard procedure to improve its performance. The quality of BCP, however, has not been optimized well in terms of the uniformity of surface smoothness. A finite element computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the chemical etching process inside the cavity. The analysis confirmed the observation of other researchers that the iris section of the cavity received more etching than the equator regions due to higher flow rate. The baffle, which directs flow towards the walls of the cavity, was redesigned using optimization techniques. The redesigned baffle significantly improves the performance of the etching process. To verify these results an experimental setup for flow visualization was created. The setup consists of a high speed, high resolution CCD camera. The camera is positioned by a computer-controlled traversing mechanism. A dye injecting arrangement is used for tracking the fluid path. Experimental results are in general agreement with CFD and optimization results.

  19. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. V.; Hamid, S. B. A.; Zain, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein. PMID:25247208

  20. In-line formation of chemically cross-linked P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes for H2/CO2 separation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Seung Hak

    2010-12-13

    In this study, chemically cross-linked asymmetric P84® co-polyimide hollow fibre membranes with enhanced separation performance were fabricated, using a dry-wet spinning process with an innovative in-line cross-linking step. The chemical modification was conducted by controlled immersion of the coagulated fibre in an aqueous 1,5-diamino-2-methylpentane (DAMP) cross-linker solution before the take-up. The effect of the cross-linker concentration on the thermal, mechanical, chemical and gas transport properties of the membranes was investigated. FT-IR/ATR analysis was used to identify the chemical changes in the polymer, while DSC analysis confirmed the changes in the Tg and the specific heat of the polymer upon cross-linking. Chemical cross-linking with a 10 wt.% aqueous DAMP solution strongly enhanced the H2/CO2 ideal selectivity from 5.3 to 16.1, while the H2 permeance of the membranes decreased from 7.06 × 10−3 to 1.01 × 10−3 m3(STP) m−2 h−1 bar−1 for a feed pressure of 1 bar at 25 °C. The increase of selectivity with decreasing permeance is somewhat higher than the slope in the Robeson upper bound, evidencing the positive effect of the cross-linking on the separation performance of the fibres. Simultaneously, the cross-linking leads to improved mechanical resistance of the membranes, which could be further enhanced by an additional thermal treatment. The produced membranes are therefore more suitable for use under harsh conditions and have a better overall performance than the uncross-linked ones.

  1. Survey of the concepts of value function and power consumption of separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concepts of value function and of power consumption of a separative element have been developed by P.A.M. Dirac (1941) and L. Onsager (1939) by different approaches. The emphasis will be set here on the less-known derivation of the power consumption by a non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach. The general calculations valid for both steady and unsteady flows of isotopic mixtures are recalled. Practical uses and applications of these concepts that have been performed will be discussed here. Then the attempts to extend these concepts to strong separative effects and/or multicomponent mixtures, including the cases of non-statistical processes, are reviewed. (author)

  2. EFFECT OF XYLANASE PRETREATMENT OF WOOD CHIPS ON FIBER SEPARATION IN THE CTMP REFINING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Lei

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of xylanase treatment of eucalyptus wood chips on chip refining and fiber properties was investigated. The fiber separation region and fiber surface structure were observed with SEM, TEM, and AFM. The fiber length and fines were analyzed with a Bauer-McNett classifier and optical image analysis of flowing suspensions (FQA. The results showed that xylanase degraded and hydrolyzed some xylan in the fiber wall, thus loosening the fiber wall structure. Therefore, in the subsequent refining process, fiber separation occurred in the secondary wall. This resulted in fibers with less lignin and extractives on the surface, which will benefit the interfiber bonding.

  3. Blind Separation of Mixtures of Piecewise AR(1) Processes and Model Mismatch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichavský, Petr; Šembera, Ondřej; Koldovský, Zbyněk

    Heidelberg : Springer, 2015 - (Vincent, E.; Yeredor, A.; Koldovský, Z.; Tichavský, P.), s. 304-311 ISBN 978-3-319-22482-4. ISSN 0302-9743. - (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). [Latent Variable Analysis and Signal Separation 12th International Conference, LVA/ICA 2015. Liberec (CZ), 25.08.2015-28.08.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-13713S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Autoregressive processes * Cramer-Rao bound * Blind source separation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/SI/tichavsky-0447196.pdf

  4. Effect of Separation Method on Chemical Composition and Insecticidal Activity of Lamiaceae Isolates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena; Karban, Jindřich; Rochová, Kristina; Pavela, R.; Barnet, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, MAY (2013), s. 69-77. ISSN 0926-6690 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06049; GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * iInsecticidal activity * lamiaceae Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.208, year: 2013

  5. EXPLORING ENGINEERING CONTROL THROUGH PROCESS MANIPULATION OF RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TANK CHEMICAL CLEANING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.

    2014-04-27

    One method of remediating legacy liquid radioactive waste produced during the cold war, is aggressive in-tank chemical cleaning. Chemical cleaning has successfully reduced the curie content of residual waste heels in large underground storage tanks; however this process generates significant chemical hazards. Mercury is often the bounding hazard due to its extensive use in the separations process that produced the waste. This paper explores how variations in controllable process factors, tank level and temperature, may be manipulated to reduce the hazard potential related to mercury vapor generation. When compared using a multivariate regression analysis, findings indicated that there was a significant relationship between both tank level (p value of 1.65x10{sup -23}) and temperature (p value of 6.39x10{sup -6}) to the mercury vapor concentration in the tank ventilation system. Tank temperature showed the most promise as a controllable parameter for future tank cleaning endeavors. Despite statistically significant relationships, there may not be confidence in the ability to control accident scenarios to below mercury’s IDLH or PAC-III levels for future cleaning initiatives.

  6. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes & cellulosics. Final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Okos, M.; Burgos, N. [and others

    1997-06-15

    High strength food wastes of about 15-20 billion pounds solids are produced annually by US food producers. Low strength food wastes of 5-10 billion pounds/yr. are produced. Estimates of the various components of these waste streams are shown in Table 1. Waste paper/lignocellulosic crops could produce 2 to 5 billion gallons of ethanol per year or other valuable chemicals. Current oil imports cost the US about $60 billion dollars/yr. in out-going balance of trade costs. Many organic chemicals that are currently derived from petroleum can be produced through fermentation processes. Petroleum based processes have been preferred over biotechnology processes because they were typically cheaper, easier, and more efficient. The technologies developed during the course of this project are designed to allow fermentation based chemicals and fuels to compete favorably with petroleum based chemicals. Our goals in this project have been to: (1) develop continuous fermentation processes as compared to batch operations; (2) combine separation of the product with the fermentation, thus accomplishing the twin goals of achieving a purified product from a fermentation broth and speeding the conversion of substrate to product in the fermentation broth; (3) utilize food or cellulosic waste streams which pose a current cost or disposal problem as compared to high cost grains or sugar substrates; (4) develop low energy recovery methods for fermentation products; and finally (5) demonstrate successful lab scale technologies on a pilot/production scale and try to commercialize the processes. The scale of the wastes force consideration of {open_quotes}bulk commodity{close_quotes} type products if a high fraction of the wastes are to be utilized.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety

  8. Separation of technetium and rare earth metals for co-decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine; Martin, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Poster. In the US there are several technologies under consideration for the separation of the useful components in used nuclear fuel. One such process is the co-decontamination process to separate U, Np and Pu in a single step and produce a Np/ Pu and a U product stream. Although the behavior of the actinide elements is reasonably well defined in this system, the same is not true for the fission products, mainly Zr, Mo, Ru and Tc. As these elements are cationic and anionic they may interact with each other to extract in a manner not predicted by empirical models such as AMUSE. This poster presentation will discuss the initial results of batch contact testing under flowsheet conditions and as a function of varying acidity and flowsheet conditions to optimize recovery of Tc and minimize extraction of Mo, Zr and Ru with the goal of developing a better understanding of the behavior of these elements in the co-decontamination process.

  9. Optimization of an improved single-column chromatographic process for the separation of enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Monzure-Khoda; Medi, Bijan; Amanullah, Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    This work addresses optimization of an improved single-column chromatographic (ISCC) process for the separation of guaifenesin enantiomers. Conventional feed injection and fraction collection systems have been replaced with customized components facilitating simultaneous separation and online monitoring with the ultimate objective of application of an optimizing controller. Injection volume, cycle time, desorbent flow rate, feed concentration, and three cut intervals are considered as decision variables. A multi-objective optimization technique based on genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to achieve maximum productivity and minimum desorbent requirement in the region constrained by product specifications and hardware limitations. The optimization results along with the contribution of decision variables are discussed using Pareto fronts that identify non-dominated solutions. Optimization results of a similar simulated moving bed process have also been included to facilitate comparison with a continuous chromatographic process. PMID:22364669

  10. Phase separation coupled with damage processes analysis of phase field models in elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Heinemann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The authors explore a unifying model which couples phase separation and damage processes in a system of partial differential equations. The model has technological applications to solder materials where interactions of both phenomena have been observed and cannot be neglected for a realistic description. The equations are derived in a thermodynamically consistent framework and suitable weak formulations for various types of this coupled system are presented. In the main part, existence of weak solutions is proven and degenerate limits are investigated. Contents Modeling of Phase Separation and Damage Processes Notion of Weak Solutions Existence of Weak Solutions Degenerate Limit Target Groups Researchers, academics and scholars in the field of (applied) mathematics Material scientists in the field of modeling damaging processes The Authors Christian Heinemann earned his doctoral degree at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Jürgen Sprekels and Dr. Christiane Kraus. He is a ...

  11. A differential viscosity detector for use in miniaturized chemical separation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Marko T.; Chmela, Emil; Heyden; Oosterbroek, R. Edwin; Tijssen, Robert; Elwenspoek, Miko; Berg, van den, W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a micromachined differential viscosity detector suitable for integration into an on-chip hydrodynamic chromatography system. The general design, however, is applicable to any liquid chromatography system that is used for separation of polymers. The micromachined part of the detector consists of a fluidic Wheatstone bridge and a low hydraulic capacitance pressure sensor of which the pressure sensing is based on optical detection of a membrane deflection. The stand-alone sensor shows...

  12. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  13. Controlling Solution Self-assembly and Non-Solvent Induced Microphase Separation of Triblock Terpolymers to Generate Nanofiltration Membranes with Chemically-Tailored Pore Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouris, Bryan; Mulvenna, Ryan; Weidman, Jacob; Phillip, William

    2014-03-01

    Block polymer-based templates have been utilized in a number of membrane applications; however, there has yet to be a demonstration of a nanoporous block polymer thin film that can achieve high flux and high selectivity simultaneously while also allowing for the facile tuning of the pore wall chemistry. Here, we demonstrate that by synthesizing and controlling the solution self-assembly of a triblock terpolymer, polyisoprene- b-polystyrene- b-poly(N, N-dimethylacrylamide) (PI-PS-PDMA), and precisely inducing non-solvent induced phase separation during the self-assembly process allows for the creation of an asymmetric nanoporous membrane with PDMA-lined pore walls. This PDMA functionality is then converted to any number of side chain functionalities through simple chemistry in the solid state. In this way, we are able to show a highly selectivity membrane that can separate analytes of interest based both on size and chemical composition at a high solution flux. In fact, this high fidelity structure has a very narrow distribution of pore sizes (500 cm2) . This has allowed for the separation of particles with hydrodynamic radii as low as 0.8 nm, which is the smallest separation achieved using a block polymer-based membrane to date.

  14. Structural Formation Process of Microphase Separated Films with Liquid Crystalline Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Motonori; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2008-03-01

    Ordered nanostructures arising from the microphase separation of block copolymers have driven one to fabricate nanofunctional materials as fundamental technology of the coming electronic and photonic materials. Thin films of a series of newly designed amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of hydrophilic polyethylene oxide (PEO) and hydrophobic polymethacrylate with azobenzene-mesogen in side-chain (PMA(Az)) show highly ordered microphase separation with PEO cylinders perpendicularly oriented to the film surface. In the present report, we investigated a structural formation process of the microphase separated films by temperature controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These measurements revealed that homeotropic alignments of Az liquid crystalline layers predominated the cylinder orientation, which corresponded to a direction of body centered cubic structure under annealing condition, in disagreement with cylinder orientation of order-order transition of traditional block copolymers.

  15. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for May 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-06-20

    Production of Pu nitrate from separations plants during May was below forecast. A Np recovery campaign in Purex yielded 1.5 kg. Production and shipments of UO{sub 3} met schedules. Unfabricated Pu metal production was below forecast, but all shipments were on schedule. Decontamination efficiency was low in Purex solvent extraction around the time of the Np recovery. The damaged Redox B-2 dissolver is being restored; processing of enriched metal in A and C dissolvers was continued. A spectrograph for inclusions in Pu metal was installed. 4 kg Pu oxide was produced in a continuous direct calciner. Scope design on Purex Np recovery and purification facilities was completed. Other design and contracts are discussed.

  16. Separation of high purity gadolinium for reactor applications by solvent extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two cycle solvent extraction process employing 2-ethyl hexyl, 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid (EHEHPA) has been developed for the separation of high purity gadolinium. Intermediate rare earth concentrate obtained during samarium purification process, comprised of 70% gadolinium along with lighter rare earths (Sm, Nd) as well as heavier rare earths (Tb, Dy, Y) have been processed for obtaining >99.5 % gadolinium oxide. The oxide was subsequently converted to its nitrate form for use as a secondary shut down device in PHWR system. The experimental conditions were optimized using computer simulation and validated by bench scale counter-current operations. (author)

  17. Three-dimensional numerical investigation of the separation process inside vortex tube using different operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Seyed Ehsan; Sadeghiazad, M. M.

    2016-04-01

    Air separators provide safe, clean, and appropriate air flow to engines and are widely used in vehicles with large engines such as ships and submarines. In this operational study, the separation process inside a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube cleaning (cooling) system is investigated to analyze the impact of the operating gas type on the vortex tube performance; the operating gases used are air, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. The computational fluid dynamic model used is equipped with a three-dimensional structure, and the steady-state condition is applied during computations. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model is employed to resolve nonlinear flow equations, and various key parameters, such as hot and cold exhaust thermal drops, and power separation rates, are described numerically. The results show that nitrogen dioxide creates the greatest separation power out of all gases tested, and the numerical results are validated by good agreement with available experimental data. In addition, a comparison is made between the use of two different boundary conditions, the pressure-far-field and the pressure-outlet, when analyzing complex turbulent flows inside the air separators. Results present a comprehensive and practical solution for use in future numerical studies.

  18. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    Full Text Available A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  19. Spreadsheets in chemical engineering education : a tool in process design and process integration

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, E. C.; Lima, Ricardo; Salcedo, Romualdo

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in embedding numerical optimization procedures with linear and nonlinear solvers within a spreadsheet environment have greatly enhanced the use of these tools for teaching chemical process design and process integration. Student skills with respect to these topics are usually gained by complex and expensive modular simulators, e.g. ASPEN Plus® or algebraic tools such as GAMS® or AMPL®. However, modular simulators have a significant learning curve, and algebraic modeling la...

  20. Designing separation process of radioactive Iodine produced from irradiation of natural uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarie, K

    1999-01-01

    Tehran Research Reactor , one can produce approximately 7 Ci of sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I for medical purposes. By attention to the sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I consumption rate in Iran, it is found this amount of sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I will be enough for our country's demands. On the other hand, by installation of this new method we can produce other very useful radionuclides such as sup 9 sup 9 Mo and sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Xe in one bath irradiation in the unique production line. sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I is one of most widely used radionuclide in medical diagnosis and therapy especially for thyroid gland. This is mainly because of its unique nuclear, physical and chemical properties comparing with other radionuclides. In this thesis carrier free sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I has been separated from natural uranium fission products in the bench scale (mu Ci) and then, sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I separation and purification systems designed for large scale. Radionuclide, radiochemical and chemical purity of product are compatible with international phar...